Science.gov

Sample records for vector wind change

  1. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    Multivariate analysis was used to determine the joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from 15 years of twice-daily rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, that the joint distribution of wind component change with respect to time is univariate normal, that the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and that the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh are tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from 1 to 5 hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented. Extension of the theoretical prediction (based on rawinsonde data) of wind component change standard deviation to time periods of 1 to 5 hours falls (with a few exceptions) within the 95 percentile confidence band of the population estimate obtained from the Jimsphere sample data. The joint distributions of wind change components, conditional wind components, and 1 km vector wind shear change components are illustrated by probability ellipses at the 95 percentile level.

  2. Vector wind gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a vector wind gust model through statistical analysis is described. Wind perturbation statistics which include location, altitude, season, and wavelength range are used in the synthesis of detailed wing profiles. These profiles provide the basis for the establishment of improved discrete gust design criteria guidelines for ascending launch vehicles.

  3. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.; Smith, O. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a vector wind gust model that is suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies was studied. Verification of the hypothesis that gust component variables are gamma distributed, gust modulus is approximately Weibull distributed, and zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed is emphasized. A method of testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables, and two distributions for gust modulus are described. The results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented, and the validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  4. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Work towards establishing a vector wind profile gust model for the Space Transportation System flight operations and trade studies is reported. To date, all the statistical and computational techniques required were established and partially implemented. An analysis of wind profile gust at Cape Kennedy within the theoretical framework is presented. The variability of theoretical and observed gust magnitude with filter type, altitude, and season is described. Various examples are presented which illustrate agreement between theoretical and observed gust percentiles. The preliminary analysis of the gust data indicates a strong variability with altitude, season, and wavelength regime. An extension of the analyses to include conditional distributions of gust magnitude given gust length, distributions of gust modulus, and phase differences between gust components has begun.

  5. Thermal Wind The thermal wind is defined as the vector difference between the geostrophic winds at

    E-print Network

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    ATMS 310 Thermal Wind The thermal wind is defined as the vector difference between the geostrophic winds at two levels. It is not really a wind at all, just a measure of the shear of the geostrophic wind. But there are good reasons for considering the geostrophic wind; mainly, it provides a convenient way of connecting

  6. Probabilistic Wind Vector Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-print Network

    Raftery, Adrian

    Probabilistic Wind Vector Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging J. MCLEAN 2011, in final form 26 May 2012) ABSTRACT Probabilistic forecasts of wind vectors are becoming critical as interest grows in wind as a clean and re- newable source of energy, in addition to a wide range of other

  7. Rapid Temporal Changes of Boundary Layer Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    2005-01-01

    The statistical distribution of the magnitude of the vector wind change over 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2-h periods based on data from November 1999 through August 2001 is presented. The distributions of the 2-h u and v component wind changes are also presented for comparison. The wind changes at altitudes from 500 to 3000 m were measured using the Eastern Range network of five 915 MHz Doppler radar wind profilers. Quality controlled profiles were produced every 15 minutes for up to sixty gates, each representing 101 m in altitude over the range from 130 m to 6089 m. Five levels, each constituting three consecutive gates, were selected for analysis because of their significance to aerodynamic loads during the Space Shuttle ascent roll maneuver. The distribution of the magnitude of the vector wind change is found to be lognormal consistent with earlier work in the mid-troposphere. The parameters of the distribution vary with time lag, season and altitude. The component wind changes are symmetrically distributed with near-zero means, but the kurtosis coefficient is larger than that of a Gaussian distribution.

  8. The winds of change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind-based power generation has been growing steadily in the United States and around the world, and this growth will continue—and accelerate—in the future, as the following background statistics demonstrate. The U.S. wind industry installed 8,358 megawatts (MW) of new wind generating capacity in 20...

  9. Rapid Temporal Changes of Midtropospheric Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    1997-01-01

    The statistical distribution of the magnitude of the vector wind change over 0.25-, 1-, 2-. and 4-h periods based on data from October 1995 through March 1996 over central Florida is presented. The wind changes at altitudes from 6 to 17 km were measured using the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler radar wind profiler. Quality controlled profiles were produced every 5 min for 112 gates, each representing 150 m in altitude. Gates 28 through 100 were selected for analysis because of their significance to ascending space launch vehicles. The distribution was found to be lognormal. The parameters of the lognormal distribution depend systematically on the time interval. This dependence is consistent with the behavior of structure functions in the f(exp 5/3) spectral regime. There is a small difference between the 1995 data and the 1996 data, which may represent a weak seasonal effect.

  10. Building a Climate Data Record for Ocean Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardulli, L.; Meissner, T.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Scatterometers such as QuikSCAT and ASCAT are in principle well suited for providing climate-quality wind observations. They are very stable sensors, usually unaffected by satellite drifts or other issues that might affect the temporal stability of the wind time series. However, combining data from multiple scatterometers with the accuracy required for climate studies is a major challenge. Here we will review the challenges and progress made towards producing high-quality and consistent time series of ocean vector winds from past, current, and future scatterometer missions. We will describe the development of consistent Geophysical Model Functions (GMF) at the Ku-, C, and L-band frequencies, and the efforts in understanding and removing sources of bias among different scatterometer winds (i.e., atmospheric/ocean surface effects, rain impact, imperfect calibration of the GMF, etc..) . An additional and important source of inter-satellite bias at a regional level is due to the diurnal variability in the ocean surface winds. We will present an analysis aimed at estimating the amplitude and phase of wind diurnal variability. We will show how global time series of ocean winds from different scatterometer missions do overlap within the accuracy required for climate studies, when processed in a consistent manner and with proper quality control,.

  11. Vector wind, horizontal divergence, wind stress and wind stress curl from SEASAT-SASS at one degree resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Sylvester, W. B.; Salfi, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional data obtained in 1983 are contrasted with SEASAT-A scatterometer and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data to show how observations at a single station can be extended to an area of about 150,000 square km by means of remotely sensed data obtained in nine minutes. Superobservations at a one degree resolution for the vector winds were estimated along with their standard deviations. From these superobservations, the horizontal divergence, vector wind stress, and the curl of the wind stress can be found. Weather forecasting theory is discussed and meteorological charts of the North Pacific Ocean are presented. Synoptic meteorology as a technique is examined.

  12. Using Daily Ocean Wind Vector and Speed Measurements to Estimate the Diurnal Cycle Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, F. J.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Haddad, Z. S.

    2014-12-01

    Over many oceanic regions, the surface wind varies widely throughout the day, owing to various meteorological forcings, such as land/sea temperature differences near coasts, or variations associated with tropical precipitation processes. Over the tropical oceans, several coarsely spaced buoy networks (TAO/TRITON in the Pacific, PIRATA in the Atlantic, RAMA in the Indian Ocean) are maintained as part of the Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array. For finer global scale analysis, further improvements to the modeling and understanding of physical processes within the coupled atmosphere ocean is based upon analysis of a disparate collection of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellite based ocean surface wind data records. Since LEO satellite observations represent intermittently spaced, instantaneous snapshots, sampling against the backdrop of continuously changing physical processes, its is important to carefully merge and analyze the multiple satellite datasets in order to extract meaningful information on diurnal and semi-diurnal wind cycles. Early analysis of an investigation are described whereby multi-year collections of global sun-synchronous and asynchronous orbiting satellite ocean wind data are used to investigate the diurnal and semi-diurnal ocean wind vector variability over certain regions. A unique feature of the effort is the utilization of all capable sensors, including both wind speed and wind vector capable sensors, using overlapping asynchronous satellite observations to establish self-consistency, including inter-sensor bias correction to a common reference platform.

  13. Triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting wind energy and as self-powered wind vector sensor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Zhu, Guang; Zhang, Hulin; Chen, Jun; Zhong, Xiandai; Lin, Zong-Hong; Su, Yuanjie; Bai, Peng; Wen, Xiaonan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-10-22

    We report a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that plays dual roles as a sustainable power source by harvesting wind energy and as a self-powered wind vector sensor system for wind speed and direction detection. By utilizing the wind-induced resonance vibration of a fluorinated ethylene-propylene film between two aluminum foils, the integrated TENGs with dimensions of 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm × 22 cm deliver an output voltage up to 100 V, an output current of 1.6 ?A, and a corresponding output power of 0.16 mW under an external load of 100 M?, which can be used to directly light up tens of commercial light-emitting diodes. Furthermore, a self-powered wind vector sensor system has been developed based on the rationally designed TENGs, which is capable of detecting the wind direction and speed with a sensitivity of 0.09 ?A/(m/s). This work greatly expands the applicability of TENGs as power sources for self-sustained electronics and also self-powered sensor systems for ambient wind detection. PMID:24044652

  14. A simplified wind vector algorithm for satellite scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified algorithm is derived for retrieving wind vectors from microwave scatterometer observations. The azimuthal dependence of the sea-surface radar cross section is modeled by a double-cosine function, rather than the traditional second-order cosine expansion. The algorithm is tested using the aircraft scatterometer observations obtained during the AAFE-RADSCAT Experiment in 1975 and 1976. There is little difference between the performance of the simplified algorithm and the more involved least-squares searching algorithm. The AAFE-RADSCAT aircraft observations are sampled so as to simulate the three-look satellite scatterometer NSCAT that will be launched on the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite. The results of the retrievals indicate that it is probably not possible to uniquely determine the wind direction using just NSCAT observations because of a 180 degree ambiguity. However, if forecast models can predict the wind direction to an accuracy of +/- 90 deg, thereby eliminating the ambiguity, then the results indicate that NSCAT can determine the wind direction to an accuracy of about +/- 20 deg. Better performance is obtained when the three observations are the same polarization (either v-pol or h-pol), as compared to using a mix of v-pol and h-pol observations.

  15. Two-component horizontal wind vectors from the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Two-component horizontal wind vectors were calculated by applying a cross-correlation algorithm to square image blocks extracted from consecutive pairs of elastic backscatter lidar scans. The resulting vector components were compared with corresponding horizontal wind components from tower-mounted sonic anemometers located at the center of the image blocks at a range of 1.61 km. 180245 pairs of vectors derived from 75 days of field data collected between 19 March and 11 June 2007 were used in the analysis. Examples of time series comparisons from 4-h periods during light, strong, and changing wind conditions will be presented. The correlation between lidar-derived components and sonic anemometer components changes as a function of the mean backscatter signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the block area, maxima of the cross-correlation function (CCF), observed wind speed, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The correlation between the lidar-derived velocity components and sonic anemometer wind components tends to be highest during light wind conditions with low TKE. Although the correlation of high frequency perturbations tends to be poor during windy and turbulent conditions, the technique is capable of sensing the mean flow. Examples of 2-dimensional, 2-component, flow fields will be presented. The NSF/NCAR REAL at California State University Chico. Streamlined flow field from 2-component vectors derived from 2 scans of the REAL and application of the cross-correlation technique. The area of the image spans 4 km by 4 km.

  16. Ocean Surface Vector Wind: Research Challenges and Operational Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere and ocean are joined together over seventy percent of Earth, with ocean surface vector wind (OSVW) stress one of the linkages. Satellite OSVW measurements provide estimates of wind divergence at the bottom of the atmosphere and wind stress curl at the top of the ocean; both variables are critical for weather and climate applications. As is common with satellite measurements, a multitude of OSVW data products exist for each currently operating satellite instrument. In 2012 the Joint Technical Commission on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) launched an initiative to coordinate production of OSVW data products to maximize the impact and benefit of existing and future OSVW measurements in atmospheric and oceanic applications. This paper describes meteorological and oceanographic requirements for OSVW data products; provides an inventory of unique data products to illustrate that the challenge is not the production of individual data products, but the generation of harmonized datasets for analysis and synthesis of the ensemble of data products; and outlines a vision for JCOMM, in partnership with other international groups, to assemble an international network to share ideas, data, tools, strategies, and deliverables to improve utilization of satellite OSVW data products for research and operational applications.

  17. Two-component vector wind fields by scanning aerosol lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, S. D.; Derian, P.; Hamada, M.; Mauzey, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of two or more wind components that resolve turbulent perturbations over large areas remain a challenge in the atmospheric boundary layer community. One successful approach to multi-component flow measurement in the engineering community is particle image velocimetry (PIV). This presentation will report on recent progress in the development and validation of two motion estimation algorithms that can be applied to aerosol backscatter imagery to provide two-component horizontal wind fields. The algorithms being developed and tested are a traditional cross-correlation method (i.e., Schols & Eloranta, JGR, 1992) and a new wavelet-based optical flow method (Dérian et al., NMTMA, 2013). These algorithms have been applied to imagery from the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) collected in Dixon, California, in 2007 (as part of CHATS) and in Chico, California in 2013. The resulting 2-component winds were compared against the same from sonic anemometers and a Doppler lidar. Our results include new insights on the performance of the cross-correaltion algorithm and new experiences with wavelet-based optical flow. Animations of turbulent flow in the atmospheric surface layer over approximately 10-square km areas with 15 s frame update rates will be presented. (Vectors may be spaced as closely as every 10 m, but the spatial resolution is larger and dynamic and related to the availability of small scale aerosol features in the imagery.) In addition to flow visualizations, time-series and space-series comparisons of the wind components with those from sonic anemometer and Doppler lidar data will be presented.

  18. Evaluation of two January - June 1992 ERS-1 AMI wind vector data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Freilich, M. H.; Dunbar, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    A Jan. - Jun. 1992 10 m height wind vector field was computed with the CMOD2 model function. Freilich and Dunbar used ESA measurements of AMI (Active Microwave Instrument) sigma-naught to derive a refined model function and to produce an alternate Jan. - Jun. 1992 10 m height wind vector field, named FD data. The ESA and FD model functions and algorithms were substantially different. The FD wind vectors were in better agreement with the climatological mean wind field and with moored buoy wind measurements. The average correlation coefficients between monthly mean and daily averaged FD and moored buoy matchups of the Cartesian wind components were 0.84 and 0.74, respectively. The average root mean square differences between the monthly mean and daily averaged FD and moored buoy matchups of the Cartesian wind components were 1.25 and 3.0 m/s, respectively.

  19. Single-Vector Calibration of Wind-Tunnel Force Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibrating a wind-tunnel force balance involves the use of a unique load application system integrated with formal experimental design methodology. The Single-Vector Force Balance Calibration System (SVS) overcomes the productivity and accuracy limitations of prior calibration methods. A force balance is a complex structural spring element instrumented with strain gauges for measuring three orthogonal components of aerodynamic force (normal, axial, and side force) and three orthogonal components of aerodynamic torque (rolling, pitching, and yawing moments). Force balances remain as the state-of-the-art instrument that provide these measurements on a scale model of an aircraft during wind tunnel testing. Ideally, each electrical channel of the balance would respond only to its respective component of load, and it would have no response to other components of load. This is not entirely possible even though balance designs are optimized to minimize these undesirable interaction effects. Ultimately, a calibration experiment is performed to obtain the necessary data to generate a mathematical model and determine the force measurement accuracy. In order to set the independent variables of applied load for the calibration 24 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 experiment, a high-precision mechanical system is required. Manual deadweight systems have been in use at Langley Research Center (LaRC) since the 1940s. These simple methodologies produce high confidence results, but the process is mechanically complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four weeks to complete. Over the past decade, automated balance calibration systems have been developed. In general, these systems were designed to automate the tedious manual calibration process resulting in an even more complex system which deteriorates load application quality. The current calibration approach relies on a one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) methodology, where each independent variable is incremented individually throughout its full-scale range, while all other variables are held at a constant magnitude. This OFAT approach has been widely accepted because of its inherent simplicity and intuitive appeal to the balance engineer. LaRC has been conducting research in a "modern design of experiments" (MDOE) approach to force balance calibration. Formal experimental design techniques provide an integrated view to the entire calibration process covering all three major aspects of an experiment; the design of the experiment, the execution of the experiment, and the statistical analyses of the data. In order to overcome the weaknesses in the available mechanical systems and to apply formal experimental techniques, a new mechanical system was required. The SVS enables the complete calibration of a six-component force balance with a series of single force vectors.

  20. Climate Change: Potential Affect on Pesticide Application for Vector Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change has and will in the future contribute to the global burden of vector-borne disease by affecting the spatial and tempral distribution of disease. These changes in disease distributions are a direct result of altering the ecology of immature and adult habitats of insect vectors....

  1. A Novel Empirical Mode Decomposition With Support Vector Regression for Wind Speed Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ye; Suganthan, Ponnuthurai Nagaratnam; Srikanth, Narasimalu

    2014-09-11

    Wind energy is a clean and an abundant renewable energy source. Accurate wind speed forecasting is essential for power dispatch planning, unit commitment decision, maintenance scheduling, and regulation. However, wind is intermittent and wind speed is difficult to predict. This brief proposes a novel wind speed forecasting method by integrating empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and support vector regression (SVR) methods. The EMD is used to decompose the wind speed time series into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residue. Subsequently, a vector combining one historical data from each IMF and the residue is generated to train the SVR. The proposed EMD-SVR model is evaluated with a wind speed data set. The proposed EMD-SVR model outperforms several recently reported methods with respect to accuracy or computational complexity. PMID:25222957

  2. The relationship between wind vector and normalized radar cross section used to derive Seasat-A Satellite Scatterometer winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Jones, W. L.; Boggs, D. H.; Halberstam, I. M.; Dome, G.; Pierson, W. J.; Wentz, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Seasat-A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS) ocean normalized radar cross section (NRCS) dependence on the 19.5-m neutral stability wind vector may be specified as a function of radar incidence angle, the angle between wind direction and radar azimuth, and the neutral stability wind speed expressed in m/sec at a height of 19.5 m. An account is given of the development of models both expressing this relationship and providing the basis of inversion of NRCS to SASS winds, from initially aircraft scatterometer measurement-based forms to three Seasat field-validation experiments which furnish model NRCS versus surface windspeed data for comparison with SASS data.

  3. Effectiveness of Changing Wind Turbine Cut-in Speed to Reduce Bat Fatalities at Wind Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Huso, Manuela M. P.; Hayes, John P.

    2009-04-01

    This report details an experiment on the effectiveness of changing wind turbine cut-in speed on reducing bat fatality from wind turbines at the Casselman Wind Project in Somerset County, Pennsylvania.

  4. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  5. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Fisher, Mark; Muth, Allan

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  6. Global Change and Human Vulnerability to Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sutherst, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Global change includes climate change and climate variability, land use, water storage and irrigation, human population growth and urbanization, trade and travel, and chemical pollution. Impacts on vector-borne diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, infections by other arboviruses, schistosomiasis, trypanosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and leishmaniasis are reviewed. While climate change is global in nature and poses unknown future risks to humans and natural ecosystems, other local changes are occurring more rapidly on a global scale and are having significant effects on vector-borne diseases. History is invaluable as a pointer to future risks, but direct extrapolation is no longer possible because the climate is changing. Researchers are therefore embracing computer simulation models and global change scenarios to explore the risks. Credible ranking of the extent to which different vector-borne diseases will be affected awaits a rigorous analysis. Adaptation to the changes is threatened by the ongoing loss of drugs and pesticides due to the selection of resistant strains of pathogens and vectors. The vulnerability of communities to the changes in impacts depends on their adaptive capacity, which requires both appropriate technology and responsive public health systems. The availability of resources in turn depends on social stability, economic wealth, and priority allocation of resources to public health. PMID:14726459

  7. Common themes in changing vector-borne disease scenarios.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, David H

    2003-01-01

    The impact of climate change on disease patterns is controversial. However, global burden of disease studies suggest that infectious diseases will contribute a proportionately smaller burden of disease over the next 2 decades as non-communicable diseases emerge as public health problems. However, infectious diseases contribute proportionately more in the poorest quintile of the population. Notwithstanding the different views of the impact of global warming on vector-borne infections this paper reviews the conditions which drive the changing epidemiology of these infections and suggests that such change is linked by common themes including interactions of generalist vectors and reservoir hosts at interfaces with humans, reduced biodiversity associated with anthropogenic environmental changes, increases in Plasmodium falciparum: P. vivax ratios and well-described land use changes such as hydrological, urbanization, agricultural, mining and forest-associated impacts (extractive activities, road building, deforestation and migration) which are seen on a global scale. PMID:14584362

  8. Multispectral change vector analysis for monitoring coastal marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Michalek, J.L.; Wagner, T.W.; Luczkovich, J.J.; Stoffle, R.W. Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor )

    1993-03-01

    This paper investigates the utility of multispectral Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite data for documenting changes to a Caribbean coastal zone using the change vector analysis processing technique. The area of study was the coastal region near the village of Buen Hombre on the north coast of the Dominican Republic. The change vector analysis techniques uses any number of spectral bands from multidate satellite data to produce change images that yield information about both the magnitude and direction of differences in pixel values (which are proportional to radiance). The final products were created by appending color-coded change pixels onto a black-and-white base map. The advantages and limitations of the technique for coastal inventories are discussed. 9 refs.

  9. [Vector transmitted diseases and climate changes in Europe].

    PubMed

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2014-09-01

    The increase in temperatures recorded since the mid-nineteenth century is unprecedented in the history of mankind. The consequences of climate changes are numerous and can affect human health through direct (extreme events, natural disasters) or indirect (alteration of the ecosystem) mechanisms. Climate changes have repercussions on ecosystems, agriculture, social conditions, migration, conflicts and the transmission mode of infectious diseases. Vector-borne diseases are infections transmitted by the bite of infected arthropods such as mosquitoes, ticks, triatomines, sand flies and flies. Epidemiological cornerstones of vector-borne diseases are: the ecology and behaviour of the host, the ecology and behaviour of the vector, and the population's degree of immunity. Mosquito vectors related to human diseases mainly belong to the genus Culex, Aedes and Mansonia. Climate changes in Europe have increased the spread of new vectors, such as Aedes albopictus, and in some situations have made it possible to sustain the autochthonous transmission of some diseases (outbreak of Chukungunya virus in northern Italy in 2007, cases of dengue in the South of France and in Croatia). Despite the eradication of malaria from Europe, anopheline carriers are still present, and they may allow the transmission of the disease if the climatic conditions favour the development of the vectors and their contacts with plasmodium carriers. The tick Ixodes ricinus is a vector whose expansion has been documented both in latitude and in altitude in relation to the temperature increase; at the same time the related main viral and bacterial infections have increased. In northern Italy and Germany, the appearance of Leishmaniasis has been associated to climatic conditions that favour the development of the vector Phlebotomus papatasi and the maturation of the parasite within the vector, although the increase of cases of visceral leishmaniasis is also related to host immune factors, particularly immunodepression caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Despite the importance of global warming in facilitating the transmission of certain infectious diseases, due consideration must be taken of the role played by other variables, such as the increase in international travel, migration and trade, with the risk of importing parasites and vectors with the goods. In addition, the control of certain infections was possible in the past through improvements in socio-economic conditions of affected populations. However, the reduction in resources allocated to health care has recently led to the re-emergence of diseases that were considered eradicated. PMID:25269959

  10. Using Objective Analyses (H*Wind) in Tropical Cyclone Wind Vector Verification Christopher C. Hennon

    E-print Network

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    of a database and user-controlled client. Figure 1 shows the components of H*Wind. Data are automatically retrieved from all available sources and stored in the database. The user then chooses a time frame products, including QuikSCAT Level 2B, Q-wind, Ultra High Resolution QuikSCAT (Long 2001), and WindSat data

  11. Global climate change and vector-borne diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Global warming will have different effects on different diseases because of the complex and idiosynchratic interactions between vectors, hosts, and pathogens that influence transmission dynamics of each pathogen. Human activities, including urbanization, rapid global travel, and vector management, have profound effects on disease transmission that can operate on more rapid time scales than does global climate change. The general concern about global warming encouraging the spread of tropical diseases is legitimate, but the effects vary among diseases, and the ecological implications are difficult to predict.

  12. A Vector Control for Grid-connected Wind Power Generation with Doubly Fed Induction Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yuji; Kaneda, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Daichi; Tanaka, Akio

    Recently, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) and synchronous generator are mostly applied for wind power generation due to high efficiently for wind energy capture. An inverter system is required to control wind turbine speed and power factor in those generators. The inverter rating of the synchronous generator equals to generator rating. However, DFIG has the advantage that the inverter rating is about 25% to the generator rating. The paper describes a vector control of DFIG inter-connected to power line. The performance of proposed vector control is examined using power system simulation software PSCAD/EMTDC for the DFIG inter-connected to 6.6kv distribution line. The results show good dynamic responses and high accuracy to the stator active power control and the stator reactive power control.

  13. Integrating the ASCAT Observations into a Climate Data Record of Ocean Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardulli, Lucrezia; Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Ocean surface vector winds have been continuously observed from space since 1991, starting with the ERS scatterometer, followed later by a series of other scatterometers. These measurements have been proved extremely useful for improving the skill of numerical weather forecasts. With a timeseries extending now to more than 20 years, these measurements can provide great insight into the climate variability of surface wind patterns. Integrating all the measurements from different sensors into a continuous and accurate timeseries suitable for climate analysis is however a challenging task. An essential requirement for this purpose is the consistency among wind retrievals from different sensors at all wind speed ranges. Here we present our methodology for creating a Climate Data Record of ocean vector winds. We first started with reprocessing the QuikSCAT wind measurements for the whole mission (1999-2009) by using a new Geophysical Model Function (GMF) specifically redeveloped for improving retrievals at high wind speeds. The new GMF Ku-2011 (Ricciardulli and Wentz, 2011) was developed using wind retrievals from the WindSat radiometer as calibration for the scatterometer backscatter ratio. WindSat wind speeds are believed to be accurate for winds up to at least 35 m/s (Meissner and Wentz, 2009). In order to continue the timeseries after the end of the QuikSCAT mission, we focused on developing a new GMF for the European scatterometer ASCAT, which started in 2007 and is planned to continue for several years. The motivation behind redeveloping the GMF, rather than using the operational one, is based on the necessity of a consistent methodology to reduce biases when combining QuikSCAT with ASCAT in a Climate Data Record. The new ASCAT GMF was developed calibrating the backscatter ratio to the wind speeds from the SSM/I and WindSat radiometers. A preliminary version of the RSS ASCAT winds has been recently produced. Here we will discuss the validation of these retrievals versus in situ observations and winds from other satellite missions. Particular emphasis will be on the comparison with the QuikSCAT retrievals during the overlapping period (2007-2009), in terms of overall consistency at all wind speed ranges and careful analysis of any regional bias. One important feature to keep in mind is the temporal gap in the local observing time of the two scatterometers (about 3-4 hours). This temporal gap can give raise to regional biases and diurnal aliasing in the merged timeseries if the diurnal cycle of ocean winds is not properly accounted for. An additional check for consistency and any potential temporal drift in the QuikSCAT and ASCAT timeseries is done by comparing them with the wind speed timeseries from the SSM/I and SSMIS radiometers. Once we ascertain the feasibility of merging QuikSCAT and ASCAT measurements with the required climate-quality accuracy, the Climate Data Record can be extended back in time to 1991 by using the same methodology for the European scatterometers ERS-1 and 2. This intercalibrated data set would then provide two decades of global ocean vector winds, suitable for climate research.

  14. Surface Wind Vector and Rain Rate Observation Capability of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; El-Nimri, Salem; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is the next-generation Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), and it will offer the capability of simultaneous wide-swath observations of both extreme ocean surface wind vector and strong precipitation from either aircraft (including UAS) or satellite platforms. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce valid wind observations under hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered by precipitation. The SFMR i s a proven aircraft remote sensing system for simultaneously observing extreme ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. The first version of the instrument will be a single polarization system for wind speed and rain rate, with a dual-polarization system to follow for wind vector capability. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by NASA s Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard (laboratory) version of the instrument has been completed and successfully tested in a test chamber. Development of the aircraft instrument is underway, with flight testing planned for the fall of 2009. Preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on surface wind analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor. New off-nadir data collected in 2008 by SFMR that affirms the ability of this measurement technique to obtain wind speed data at non-zero incidence angle will be presented, as well as data from the brassboard instrument chamber tests.

  15. Climate change and vector-borne diseases: a regional analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Githeko, A. K.; Lindsay, S. W.; Confalonieri, U. E.; Patz, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that inter-annual and inter-decadal climate variability have a direct influence on the epidemiology of vector-borne diseases. This evidence has been assessed at the continental level in order to determine the possible consequences of the expected future climate change. By 2100 it is estimated that average global temperatures will have risen by 1.0-3.5 degrees C, increasing the likelihood of many vector-borne diseases in new areas. The greatest effect of climate change on transmission is likely to be observed at the extremes of the range of temperatures at which transmission occurs. For many diseases these lie in the range 14-18 degrees C at the lower end and about 35-40 degrees C at the upper end. Malaria and dengue fever are among the most important vector-borne diseases in the tropics and subtropics; Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the USA and Europe. Encephalitis is also becoming a public health concern. Health risks due to climatic changes will differ between countries that have developed health infrastructures and those that do not. Human settlement patterns in the different regions will influence disease trends. While 70% of the population in South America is urbanized, the proportion in sub-Saharan Africa is less than 45%. Climatic anomalies associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon and resulting in drought and floods are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. They have been linked to outbreaks of malaria in Africa, Asia and South America. Climate change has far-reaching consequences and touches on all life-support systems. It is therefore a factor that should be placed high among those that affect human health and survival. PMID:11019462

  16. Noise model based ?-support vector regression with its application to short-term wind speed forecasting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghua; Zhang, Shiguang; Xie, Zongxia; Mi, Jusheng; Wan, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Support vector regression (SVR) techniques are aimed at discovering a linear or nonlinear structure hidden in sample data. Most existing regression techniques take the assumption that the error distribution is Gaussian. However, it was observed that the noise in some real-world applications, such as wind power forecasting and direction of the arrival estimation problem, does not satisfy Gaussian distribution, but a beta distribution, Laplacian distribution, or other models. In these cases the current regression techniques are not optimal. According to the Bayesian approach, we derive a general loss function and develop a technique of the uniform model of ?-support vector regression for the general noise model (N-SVR). The Augmented Lagrange Multiplier method is introduced to solve N-SVR. Numerical experiments on artificial data sets, UCI data and short-term wind speed prediction are conducted. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed technique. PMID:24874183

  17. Sensitivity of Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes: Role of relative wind stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, D. R.; Zhai, X.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of different wind stress bulk formulae on the response of the Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes is investigated using an idealised channel model. Surface/mixed layer properties are found to be sensitive to the use of the relative wind stress formulation, where the wind stress depends on the difference between the ocean and atmosphere velocities. Previous work has highlighted the surface eddy damping effect of this formulation, which we find leads to increased circumpolar transport. Nevertheless the transport due to thermal wind shear does lose sensitivity to wind stress changes at sufficiently high wind stress. In contrast, the sensitivity of the meridional overturning circulation is broadly the same regardless of the bulk formula used due to the adiabatic nature of the relative wind stress damping. This is a consequence of the steepening of isopycnals offsetting the reduction in eddy diffusivity in their contribution to the eddy bolus overturning, as predicted using a residual mean framework.

  18. A vector auto-regressive model for onshore and offshore wind synthesis incorporating meteorological model information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D.; Bell, K. R. W.; McMillan, D.; Infield, D.

    2014-05-01

    The growth of wind power production in the electricity portfolio is striving to meet ambitious targets set, for example by the EU, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020. Huge investments are now being made in new offshore wind farms around UK coastal waters that will have a major impact on the GB electrical supply. Representations of the UK wind field in syntheses which capture the inherent structure and correlations between different locations including offshore sites are required. Here, Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) models are presented and extended in a novel way to incorporate offshore time series from a pan-European meteorological model called COSMO, with onshore wind speeds from the MIDAS dataset provided by the British Atmospheric Data Centre. Forecasting ability onshore is shown to be improved with the inclusion of the offshore sites with improvements of up to 25% in RMS error at 6 h ahead. In addition, the VAR model is used to synthesise time series of wind at each offshore site, which are then used to estimate wind farm capacity factors at the sites in question. These are then compared with estimates of capacity factors derived from the work of Hawkins et al. (2011). A good degree of agreement is established indicating that this synthesis tool should be useful in power system impact studies.

  19. Using support vector machines for anomalous change detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Steinwart, Ingo; Llamocca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We cast anomalous change detection as a binary classification problem, and use a support vector machine (SVM) to build a detector that does not depend on assumptions about the underlying data distribution. To speed up the computation, our SVM is implemented, in part, on a graphical processing unit. Results on real and simulated anomalous changes are used to compare performance to algorithms which effectively assume a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we investigate the use of support vector machines (SVMs) with radial basis kernels for finding anomalous changes. Compared to typical applications of SVMs, we are operating in a regime of very low false alarm rate. This means that even for relatively large training sets, the data are quite meager in the regime of operational interest. This drives us to use larger training sets, which in turn places more of a computational burden on the SVM. We initially considered three different approaches to to address the need to work in the very low false alarm rate regime. The first is a standard SVM which is trained at one threshold (where more reliable estimates of false alarm rates are possible) and then re-thresholded for the low false alarm rate regime. The second uses the same thresholding approach, but employs a so-called least squares SVM; here a quadratic (instead of a hinge-based) loss function is employed, and for this model, there are good theoretical arguments in favor of adjusting the threshold in a straightforward manner. The third approach employs a weighted support vector machine, where the weights for the two types of errors (false alarm and missed detection) are automatically adjusted to achieve the desired false alarm rate. We have found in previous experiments (not shown here) that the first two types can in some cases work well, while in other cases they do not. This renders both approaches unreliable for automated change detection. By contrast, the third approach reliably produces good results, but at the cost of larger computational requirements caused by the need to estimate very small false alarm rates. To address these computational requirements, we employ a recently developed in-house solver for SVMs that is significantly faster than freely available standard solvers. But these computational issues are secondary to the larger question: do kernelized solutions provide better performance, in terms of detection rates and false alarm rates, than more traditional methods for change detection that effectively assume Gaussian data distributions? To this end, we will compare ROC curves obtained from the SVM with those from chronochrome, covariance equalization, and hyperbolic anomalous change detection.

  20. Can antibodies against flies alter malaria transmission in birds by changing vector behavior?

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Can antibodies against flies alter malaria transmission in birds by changing vector behavior? Suma-fly antibodies Avian malaria Vector movement a b s t r a c t Transmission of insect-borne diseases is shaped

  1. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  2. Aspects of the determination of winds by means of scatterometry and of the utilization of vector wind data for meteorological forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Sylvester, W. B.; Donelan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper provides a description of four aspects of scatterometer winds and their uses. The theory of wave generation by the wind is considered along with an analysis of the properties of superobservations, and studies of intermittent versus continuous data assimilation methods for numerical weather predictions which use remotely sensed data. A comparison of the sum of squares versus the maximum likelihood method for recovering the vector winds is also conducted. Questions regarding wind speed, friction velocity, or normal stress are discussed and synoptic scale fields from Seasat-SASS data are examined.

  3. Evaluation and Validation of Operational RapidScat Ocean Surface Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul; Jelenak, Zorana; Soisuvarn, Seubson; Said, Faozi; Sienkiewicz, Joseph; Brennan, Michael

    2015-04-01

    NASA launched RapidScat to the International Space Station (ISS) on September 21, 2014 on a two-year mission to support global monitoring of ocean winds for improved weather forecasting and climate studies. The JPL-developed space-based scatterometer is conically scanning and operates at ku-band (13.4 GHz) similar to QuikSCAT. The ISS-RapidScat's measurement swath is approximately 900 kilometers and covers the majority of the ocean between 51.6 degrees north and south latitude (approximately from north of Vancouver, Canada, to the southern tip of Patagonia) in 48 hours. RapidScat data are currently being posted at a spacing of 25 kilometers, but a version to be released in the near future will improve the postings to 12.5 kilometers. RapidScat ocean surface wind vector data are being provided in near real-time to NOAA, and other operational users such as the U.S. Navy, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI). The quality of the RapidScat OSVW data are assessed by collocating the data in space and time with "truth" data. Typically "truth" data will include, but are not limited to, the NWS global forecast model analysis (GDAS) fields, buoys, ASCAT, WindSat, AMSR-2, and aircraft measurements during hurricane and winter storm experiment flights. The standard statistical analysis used for satellite microwave wind sensors will be utilized to characterize the RapidScat wind vector retrievals. The global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are a convenient source of "truth" data because they are available 4 times/day globally which results in the accumulation of a large number of collocations over a relatively short amount of time. The NWP model fields are not "truth" in the same way an actual observation would be, however, as long as there are no systematic errors in the NWP model output the collocations will converge in the mean for winds between approximately 3-20 m/s. The NWP models typically do not properly resolve the very low and high wind speeds in part due to limitations of the spatial scales they can account for. Buoy measurements, aircraft-based measurements and other satellite retrievals can be more directly compared on a point-by-point basis. The RapidScat OSVW validation results will be presented and discussed. Utilization examples of these data in support of NOAA's marine weather forecasting and warning mission will also be presented and discussed.

  4. The effect of the arbitrary level assignment of satellite cloud motion wind vectors on wind analyses in the pre-thunderstorm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived cloud motion vectors on SESAME rawinsonde wind fields was studied in two separate cases. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of the satellite data is assessed to coordinate surfaces in a severe storm environment marked by strong vertical wind shear. Objective analyses of SESAME rawinsonde winds and combined winds are produced and differences between these two analyzed fields are used to make an assessment of coordinate level choice. It is shown that the standard method of arbitrarily assigning wind vectors to a low level coordinate surface yields systematic differences between the rawinsonde and combined wind analyses. Arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to the 0.9 sigma surface produces smaller differences than assignment to the 825 mb pressure surface. Systematic differences occur near moisture discontinuities and in regions of horizontal and vertical wind shears. The differences between the combined and SESAME wind fields are made smallest by vertically interpolating cloud motions to either a pressure or sigma surface.

  5. The effect of the arbitrary level assignment of satellite cloud motion wind vectors on wind analyses in the pre-thunderstorm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived cloud motion vectors on SESAME rawinsonde wind fields was studied in two separate cases. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of the satellite data is assessed to coordinate surfaces in a severe storm environment marked by strong vertical wind shear. Objective analyses of SESAME rawinsonde winds and combined winds are produced and differences between these two analyzed fields are used to make an assessment of coordinate level choice. It is shown that the standard method of arbitrarily assigning wind vectors to a low level coordinate surface yields systematic differences between the rawinsonde and combined wind analyses. Arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to the 0.9 sigma surface produces smaller differences than assignment to the 825 mb pressure surface. Systematic differences occur near moisture discontinuities and in regions of horizontal and vertical wind shears. The differences between the combined and SESAME wind fields are made smallest by vertically interpolating cloud motions to either a pressure or sigma surface.

  6. Methods of reducing wind power changes from large turbine arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.; Dorsey, J.; Lotfalian, M.; Park, G.; Shayanfar, M.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses methods of reducing the WECS generation change through selection of the wind turbine model for each site, selection of an appropriate siting configuration, and wind array controls. An analysis of wind generation change from an echelon and a farm for passage of a thunderstorm is presented to establish the factors concerning the wind turbine model and siting configuration that contribute to these variations. Detailed simulation results indicate more precisely how these factors can be exploited to minimize the WECS generation changes observed. Reduction of the wind generation change over ten minutes is shown to reduce the increase in spinning reserve, unloadable generation and load following requirements on unit commitment when significant WECS generation is present and the farm penetration constraint is satisfied. Controls on the blade pitch angle of all wind turbines in an array or a battery control are shown to reduce both the wind generation change out of an array and the effective farm penetration in anticipation of a storm so that the farm penetration constraint may be satisfied.

  7. Solar Wind Change Exchange from the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a long (approximately 100 ks) XMM-Newton observation designed to observe solar wind charge exchange emission (SWCX) from Earth's magnetosheath. By luck, the observation took place during a period of minimal solar wind flux so the SWCX emission was also minimal. Never-the-less, there is a significant if not stunning correlation between the observed O VIII count rate and our model for magnetosheath emission. We also report on the observed O VII and O VII emission.

  8. Impact of Short Interval SMS Digital Data on Wind Vector Determination for a Severe Local Storms Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of 5 minute interval SMS-2 visible digital image data in analyzing severe local storms is examined using wind vectors derived from cloud tracking on time lapsed sequence of geosynchronous satellite images. The cloud tracking areas are located in the Central Plains, where on 6 May 1975, hail-producing thunderstorms occurred ahead of a well defined dry line. The results demonstrate that satellite-derived wind vectors and their associated divergence fields complement conventional meteorological analyses in describing the conditions preceding severe local storm development.

  9. World Wind Tools Reveal Environmental Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Originally developed under NASA's Learning Technologies program as a tool to engage and inspire students, World Wind software was released under the NASA Open Source Agreement license. Honolulu, Hawaii based Intelesense Technologies is one of the companies currently making use of the technology for environmental, public health, and other monitoring applications for nonprofit organizations and Government agencies. The company saved about $1 million in development costs by using the NASA software.

  10. Calibration Performance and Capabilities of the New Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.; Focardi, P.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Montes, O.; Padmanabhan, S.; Redick, R.; Russell, D.; Wincentsen, J.

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes performance and capabilities of a new satellite conically imaging microwave radiometer system, the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COWVR), being built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for an Air Force demonstration mission. COWVR is an 18-34 GHz fully polarimetric radiometer designed to provide measurements of ocean vector winds with an accuracy that meets or exceeds that provided by WindSat, but using a simpler design which has both calibration and cost advantages. Heritage conical radiometer systems, such as WindSat, AMSR, GMI or SSMI(S), all have a similar overall architecture and have exhibited significant intra-channel and inter-sensor calibration biases, due in part to the relative independence of the radiometers between the different polarizations and frequencies in the system. The COWVR system uses a broadband compact hybrid combining architecture and Electronic Polarization Basis Rotation to minimize the number of free calibration parameters between polarization and frequencies, as well as providing a definitive calibration reference from the modulation of the mean polarized signal from the Earth. This second calibration advantage arises because the sensor modulates the incoming polarized signal at the input antenna aperture in a known way based only on the instrument geometry which forces relative calibration consistency between the polarimetric channels of the sensor and provides a gain and offset calibration independent of a model or other ancillary data source, which has typically been a weakness in the calibration and inter-calibration of heritage microwave sensors. This paper will give a description of the COWVR instrument and an overview of the technology demonstration mission. We will discuss the overall calibration approach for this system, its advantages over existing systems and how many of the calibration issues that impact existing satellite radiometers can be eliminated in future operational systems based on this design. COWVR is currently in flight fabrication at JPL, having successfully passed its Critical Design Review in June 2014, and will be flight ready in September 2015 with launch no earlier than 2016.

  11. Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    REVIEW Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind- pollinated plants. At least 10 % of angiosperms are wind pollinated, and this mode of pollination has evolved. Here, the evolution and functional ecology of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants

  12. Climate change. Climate change and wind intensification in coastal upwelling ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sydeman, W J; García-Reyes, M; Schoeman, D S; Rykaczewski, R R; Thompson, S A; Black, B A; Bograd, S J

    2014-07-01

    In 1990, Andrew Bakun proposed that increasing greenhouse gas concentrations would force intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in eastern boundary current systems that contribute substantial services to society. Because there is considerable disagreement about whether contemporary wind trends support Bakun's hypothesis, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature on upwelling-favorable wind intensification. The preponderance of published analyses suggests that winds have intensified in the California, Benguela, and Humboldt upwelling systems and weakened in the Iberian system over time scales ranging up to 60 years; wind change is equivocal in the Canary system. Stronger intensification signals are observed at higher latitudes, consistent with the warming pattern associated with climate change. Overall, reported changes in coastal winds, although subtle and spatially variable, support Bakun's hypothesis of upwelling intensification in eastern boundary current systems. PMID:24994651

  13. Water Vapor Winds and Their Application to Climate Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lerner, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The retrieval of satellite-derived winds and moisture from geostationary water vapor imagery has matured to the point where it may be applied to better understanding longer term climate changes that were previously not possible using conventional measurements or model analysis in data-sparse regions. In this paper, upper-tropospheric circulation features and moisture transport covering ENSO periods are presented and discussed. Precursors and other detectable interannual climate change signals are analyzed and compared to model diagnosed features. Estimates of winds and humidity over data-rich regions are used to show the robustness of the data and its value over regions that have previously eluded measurement.

  14. Effects of Local Anthropogenic Changes on Potential Malaria Vector Anopheles hyrcanus and West Nile Virus Vector Culex modestus, Camargue, France

    PubMed Central

    Ponçon, Nicolas; Balenghien, Thomas; Toty, Céline; Ferré, Jean Baptiste; Thomas, Cyrille; Dervieux, Alain; L’Ambert, Grégory; Schaffner, Francis; Bardin, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Using historical data, we highlight the consequences of anthropogenic ecosystem modifications on the abundance of mosquitoes implicated as the current most important potential malaria vector, Anopheles hyrcanus, and the most important West Nile virus (WNV) vector, Culex modestus, in the Camargue region, France. From World War II to 1971, populations of these species increased as rice cultivation expanded in the region in a political context that supported agriculture. They then fell, likely because of decreased cultivation and increased pesticide use to control a rice pest. The species increased again after 2000 with the advent of more targeted pest-management strategies, mainly the results of European regulations decisions. An intertwined influence of political context, environmental constraints, technical improvements, and social factors led to changes in mosquito abundance that had potential consequences on malaria and WNV transmission. These findings suggest that anthropogenic changes should not be underestimated in vectorborne disease recrudescence. PMID:18258028

  15. Predicting the effect of climate change on African trypanosomiasis: integrating epidemiology with parasite and vector biology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean; Shrestha, Sourya; Tomlinson, Kyle W; Vuong, Holly

    2012-05-01

    Climate warming over the next century is expected to have a large impact on the interactions between pathogens and their animal and human hosts. Vector-borne diseases are particularly sensitive to warming because temperature changes can alter vector development rates, shift their geographical distribution and alter transmission dynamics. For this reason, African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), a vector-borne disease of humans and animals, was recently identified as one of the 12 infectious diseases likely to spread owing to climate change. We combine a variety of direct effects of temperature on vector ecology, vector biology and vector-parasite interactions via a disease transmission model and extrapolate the potential compounding effects of projected warming on the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. The model predicts that epidemics can occur when mean temperatures are between 20.7°C and 26.1°C. Our model does not predict a large-range expansion, but rather a large shift of up to 60 per cent in the geographical extent of the range. The model also predicts that 46-77 million additional people may be at risk of exposure by 2090. Future research could expand our analysis to include other environmental factors that influence tsetse populations and disease transmission such as humidity, as well as changes to human, livestock and wildlife distributions. The modelling approach presented here provides a framework for using the climate-sensitive aspects of vector and pathogen biology to predict changes in disease prevalence and risk owing to climate change. PMID:22072451

  16. Wind farms and weather: the predictability of wind farm-induced changes in the downstream atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, D.; Kirk-Davidoff, D.

    2007-12-01

    The installed wind power capacity worldwide has now exceeded 80 Gigawatts, 12 Gigawatts of which is located in the United States. The size of this capacity is growing at an accelerating rate due to an increasingly reasonable delivery price compared to other energy sources, and improvements in turbine technologies. In light of this growth, we have studied the potential impact that deliberate management of a large wind farm has on both regional climatology and the ability to modify a particular storm's strength and track. We illuminate the extent to which any such changes can be made predictably within a reasonable forecast timeframe. We also distinguish remote anomalies arising from spectral wave generation within the model during the first few time steps from significant anomalies caused by gravity wave propagation away from the wind farm site. Management of a wind farm would be performed in the field by altering the farm's effective roughness length through adjustment of the attitude of the turbine blades with respect to the wind direction. We will also present results that elucidate the dependence of a storm's downstream strength upon both the timing and magnitude of the surface roughness change. This project follows work by Kirk- Davidoff and Keith (2007) that demonstrated a significant extended regional effect on climatology through an alteration of surface roughness over a large area.

  17. Retrieval and Evaluation of Wind Vectors and Advective Surface Velocities from Synthetic Aperture Radar and Infrared Radiometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Gisela; Eriksson, Leif E. B.

    Analysis of ocean surface dynamics has been proven to be of vital importance in many areas (e.g. shipping, fishing). Two important parameters to describe the ocean dynamics are the wind velocity (speed and direction) and advective surface velocities (ocean current velocity). These parameters are currently provided operationally by forecast models, surface sensors (e.g. buoys, coastal radar) and satellite sensors. However, coverage limitations, low resolution and limited temporal availability impose a need for implementation and evaluation of new data sources and techniques for estimation of these parameters. In this paper we implement and evaluate known techniques for determination of wind and ocean current velocity from satellite data. Wind is determined from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data by applying two algo-rithms. First, the Local Gradient method is implemented to extract wind direction from the SAR data, and then the CMOD-5 Geophysical Model Function of the backscatter is inverted to obtain the wind speed as a function of the wind direction and the incidence angle. Current propagation is estimated by analyzing the Sea Surface Temperature propagation in two consec-utive infrared images of the same area from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The evaluation shows a good agreement between estimated wind vectors from SAR and scat-terometer data. Comparison with merged ocean current estimates is addressed. The methods will be implemented in the maritime security service provided by the SECTRONIC project funded by the EU 7th framework program.

  18. Climate Change Influences on Global Distributions of Dengue and Chikungunya Virus Vectors

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Lindsay P.; Luther, Caylor; Moo-Llanes, David; Ramsey, Janine M.; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-01-01

    This packet presents raster data files that accompany a manuscript submitted for publication to Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, titled “Climate Change Influences on Global Vector Distributions for Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses...

  19. SECULAR CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE'S WIND 1998-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Martin, John C.; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Walter, Frederick M.

    2012-05-20

    Stellar wind-emission features in the spectrum of eta Carinae have decreased by factors of 1.5-3 relative to the continuum within the last 10 years. We investigate a large data set from several instruments (STIS, GMOS, UVES) obtained between 1998 and 2011 and analyze the progression of spectral changes in direct view of the star, in the reflected polar-on spectra at FOS4, and at the Weigelt knots. We find that the spectral changes occurred gradually on a timescale of about 10 years and that they are dependent on the viewing angle. The line strengths declined most in our direct view of the star. About a decade ago, broad stellar wind-emission features were much stronger in our line-of-sight view of the star than at FOS4. After the 2009 event, the wind-emission line strengths are now very similar at both locations. High-excitation He I and N II absorption lines in direct view of the star strengthened gradually. The terminal velocity of Balmer P Cyg absorption lines now appears to be less latitude dependent, and the absorption strength may have weakened at FOS4. Latitude-dependent alterations in the mass-loss rate and the ionization structure of eta Carinae's wind are likely explanations for the observed spectral changes.

  20. Simulating Population Genetics of Pathogen Vectors in Changing Landscapes: Guidelines and Application with Triatoma brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Rebaudo, Francois; Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos E.; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Harry, Myriam; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms that influence the population dynamics and spatial genetic structure of the vectors of pathogens infecting humans is a central issue in tropical epidemiology. In view of the rapid changes in the features of landscape pathogen vectors live in, this issue requires new methods that consider both natural and human systems and their interactions. In this context, individual-based model (IBM) simulations represent powerful yet poorly developed approaches to explore the response of pathogen vectors in heterogeneous social-ecological systems, especially when field experiments cannot be performed. Methodology/Principal Findings We first present guidelines for the use of a spatially explicit IBM, to simulate population genetics of pathogen vectors in changing landscapes. We then applied our model with Triatoma brasiliensis, originally restricted to sylvatic habitats and now found in peridomestic and domestic habitats, posing as the most important Trypanosoma cruzi vector in Northeastern Brazil. We focused on the effects of vector migration rate, maximum dispersal distance and attraction by domestic habitat on T. brasiliensis population dynamics and spatial genetic structure. Optimized for T. brasiliensis using field data pairwise fixation index (FST) from microsatellite loci, our simulations confirmed the importance of these three variables to understand vector genetic structure at the landscape level. We then ran prospective scenarios accounting for land-use change (deforestation and urbanization), which revealed that human-induced land-use change favored higher genetic diversity among sampling points. Conclusions/Significance Our work shows that mechanistic models may be useful tools to link observed patterns with processes involved in the population genetics of tropical pathogen vectors in heterogeneous social-ecological landscapes. Our hope is that our study may provide a testable and applicable modeling framework to a broad community of epidemiologists for formulating scenarios of landscape change consequences on vector dynamics, with potential implications for their surveillance and control. PMID:25102068

  1. Effect of climate change on vector-borne disease risk in the UK.

    PubMed

    Medlock, Jolyon M; Leach, Steve A

    2015-06-01

    During the early part of the 21st century, an unprecedented change in the status of vector-borne disease in Europe has occurred. Invasive mosquitoes have become widely established across Europe, with subsequent transmission and outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya virus. Malaria has re-emerged in Greece, and West Nile virus has emerged throughout parts of eastern Europe. Tick-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease, continue to increase, or, in the case of tick-borne encephalitis and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever viruses, have changed their geographical distribution. From a veterinary perspective, the emergence of Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses show that northern Europe is equally susceptible to transmission of vector-borne disease. These changes are in part due to increased globalisation, with intercontinental air travel and global shipping transport creating new opportunities for invasive vectors and pathogens. However, changes in vector distributions are being driven by climatic changes and changes in land use, infrastructure, and the environment. In this Review, we summarise the risks posed by vector-borne diseases in the present and the future from a UK perspective, and assess the likely effects of climate change and, where appropriate, climate-change adaptation strategies on vector-borne disease risk in the UK. Lessons from the outbreaks of West Nile virus in North America and chikungunya in the Caribbean emphasise the need to assess future vector-borne disease risks and prepare contingencies for future outbreaks. Ensuring that adaptation strategies for climate change do not inadvertently exacerbate risks should be a primary focus for decision makers. PMID:25808458

  2. Effect of wind turbine generator model and siting on wind power changes out of large WECS arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleuter, R. A.; Park, G. L.; Lotfalian, M.; Dorsey, J.; Shayanfar, H.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of reducing the WECS generation change through selection of the wind turbine model for each site, selection of an appropriate siting configuration, and wind array controls are discussed. An analysis of wind generation change from an echelon and a farm for passage of a thunderstorm is presented. Reduction of the wind generation change over ten minutes is shown to reduce the increase in spinning reserve, unloadable generation and load following requirements on unit commitment when significant WECS generation is present and the farm penetration constraint is satisfied. Controls on the blade pitch angle of all wind turbines in an array or a battery control are shown to reduce both the wind generation change out of an array and the effective farm penetration in anticipation of a storm so that the farm penetration constraint may be satisfied.

  3. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  4. Solar cycle changes in the polar solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Rumsey, V. H.; Kaufman, J. J.; Turley, D. G.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Armstrong, J. W.; Harmons, J. K.; Scott, S. L.; Sime, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that although the 11 year solar cycle was first recognized in 1843, it is still only poorly understood. Further, while there are satisfactory models for the magnetic variations, the underlying physics is still obscure. New observations on the changing three-dimensional form of the solar wind are presented which help relate some of the modulations observed in geomagnetic activity, the ionosphere, and the flux of galactic cosmic rays.

  5. Climate change effects on Chikungunya transmission in Europe: geospatial analysis of vector’s climatic suitability and virus’ temperature requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya was, from the European perspective, considered to be a travel-related tropical mosquito-borne disease prior to the first European outbreak in Northern Italy in 2007. This was followed by cases of autochthonous transmission reported in South-eastern France in 2010. Both events occurred after the introduction, establishment and expansion of the Chikungunya-competent and highly invasive disease vector Aedes albopictus (Asian tiger mosquito) in Europe. In order to assess whether these outbreaks are indicative of the beginning of a trend or one-off events, there is a need to further examine the factors driving the potential transmission of Chikungunya in Europe. The climatic suitability, both now and in the future, is an essential starting point for such an analysis. Methods The climatic suitability for Chikungunya outbreaks was determined by using bioclimatic factors that influence, both vector and, pathogen. Climatic suitability for the European distribution of the vector Aedes albopictus was based upon previous correlative environmental niche models. Climatic risk classes were derived by combining climatic suitability for the vector with known temperature requirements for pathogen transmission, obtained from outbreak regions. In addition, the longest potential intra-annual season for Chikungunya transmission was estimated for regions with expected vector occurrences. In order to analyse spatio-temporal trends for risk exposure and season of transmission in Europe, climate change impacts are projected for three time-frames (2011–2040, 2041–2070 and 2071–2100) and two climate scenarios (A1B and B1) from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). These climatic projections are based on regional climate model COSMO-CLM, which builds on the global model ECHAM5. Results European areas with current and future climatic suitability of Chikungunya transmission are identified. An increase in risk is projected for Western Europe (e.g. France and Benelux-States) in the first half of the 21st century and from mid-century onwards for central parts of Europe (e.g. Germany). Interestingly, the southernmost parts of Europe do not generally provide suitable conditions in these projections. Nevertheless, many Mediterranean regions will persist to be climatically suitable for transmission. Overall, the highest risk of transmission by the end of the 21st century was projected for France, Northern Italy and the Pannonian Basin (East-Central Europe). This general tendency is depicted in both, the A1B and B1 climate change scenarios. Conclusion In order to guide preparedness for further outbreaks, it is crucial to anticipate risk as to identify areas where specific public health measures, such as surveillance and vector control, can be implemented. However, public health practitioners need to be aware that climate is only one factor driving the transmission of vector-borne disease. PMID:24219507

  6. Large-scale winds in the KNMI'14 1 climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterl, Andreas; Bakker, Alexander; van den Brink, Henk; Haarsma, Rein; Stepek, Andrew; Wijnant, Ine; de Winer, Renske

    2015-04-01

    The wind climate and its possible change in a warming world are important topics for many applications, among which marine and coastal safety and wind energy generation. Therefore, wind is an important variable to investigate for climate change scenarios. In developing the wind part of the KNMI'14 climate change scenarios, output from several model categories have been analysed, ranging from global GCMs via RCMs to suitably resampled RCM output. The main conclusion is that global warming will not change the wind climate over the Netherlands and the North Sea beyond the large range of natural climate variability that has been experienced in the past.

  7. A Delay Vector Variance based Marker for an Output-Only Assessment of Structural Changes in Tension Leg Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksic, V.; Wright, C.; Mandic, D. P.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    Although aspects of power generation of many offshore renewable devices are well understood, their dynamic responses under high wind and wave conditions are still to be investigated to a great detail. Output only statistical markers are important for these offshore devices, since access to the device is limited and information about the exposure conditions and the true behaviour of the devices are generally partial, limited, and vague or even absent. The markers can summarise and characterise the behaviour of these devices from their dynamic response available as time series data. The behaviour may be linear or nonlinear and consequently a marker that can track the changes in structural situations can be quite important. These markers can then be helpful in assessing the current condition of the structure and can indicate possible intervention, monitoring or assessment. This paper considers a Delay Vector Variance based marker for changes in a tension leg platform tested in an ocean wave basin for structural changes brought about by single column dampers. The approach is based on dynamic outputs of the device alone and is based on the estimation of the nonlinearity of the output signal. The advantages of the selected marker and its response with changing structural properties are discussed. The marker is observed to be important for monitoring the as- deployed structural condition and is sensitive to changes in such conditions. Influence of exposure conditions of wave loading is also discussed in this study based only on experimental data.

  8. Characteristics of Wind Velocity and Temperature Change Near an Escarpment-Shaped Road Embankment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small. PMID:25136681

  9. Polarimetric Ku-Band Scatterometer for High Accuracy, Large Swath Global Wind Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Wu-Yang; Nghiem, Son V.; Huddleston, James; Spencer, Michael; Stiles, Bryan; West, Richard

    2000-01-01

    In the past, wind measurements from space using fan-beam antennas, such as Seasat Scatterometer (SASS-1), ERS-1 &2, and NASA scatterometer (NSCAT), required up to six large stick-like antennas and suffered a nadir gap of up to 400 km. In the near future, a spinning pencil-beam scatterometer system is to be used for the SeaWinds scatterometer on QuikSCAT (QSCAT) and on ADEOS-2 (SeaWinds). This scatterometer, though offering wind measurements in the nadir region, still suffers from degraded performance in the nadir and outer swath. The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced polarimetric spinning pencil-beam scatterometer system, which can significantly improve the wind performance across the entire swath. The polarimetric scatterometer simultaneously measures co-polarized backscatter and the polarimetric correlation of co- and cross-polarized radar returns from the ocean surface. The advantage over the conventional scatterometer system is that, while the co-polarization radar returns are even function of the wind direction, the polarimetric correlation is an odd function of wind direction due to the reflection symmetry of the wind roughened surface. Therefore, this polarimetric scatterometer system can provide additional, equivalent measurements at azimuth angle 45degree away from the corresponding co-polarization measurements. The combined co-polarization and correlation measurements enable good wind performance across the whole swath to be obtained. In this paper, we will first present the theoretical formulation of all of the key components required for designing a polarimetric scatterometer. Then, we show that good wind performance can be achieved by a slight improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the current QSCAT/SeaWinds design. We then present the predicated wind performance using computer simulation based on a model function for the co-polarized backscatter obtained from actual spaceborne scatterometer data and an estimated model function for the polarimetric correlation based on the asymmetry observed in backscatter data. Finally, we will show that, aside from ocean applications, this polarimetric scatterometer can also be used for ice and land applications.

  10. Climate Change and Vector Borne Diseases on NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Shepanek, Marc A.; Kamel, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Increasing global temperature, weather patterns with above average storm intensities, and higher sea levels have been identified as phenomena associated with global climate change. As a causal system, climate change could contribute to vector borne diseases in humans. Vectors of concern originate from the vicinity of Langley Research Center include mosquitos and ticks that transmit disease that originate regionally, nationwide, or from outside the US. Recognizing changing conditions, vector borne diseases propagate under climate change conditions, and understanding the conditions in which they may exist or propagate, presents opportunities for monitoring their progress and mitigating their potential impacts through communication, continued monitoring, and adaptation. Personnel comprise a direct and fundamental support to NASA mission success, continuous and improved understanding of climatic conditions, and the resulting consequence of disease from these conditions, helps to reduce risk in terrestrial space technologies, ground operations, and space research. This research addresses conditions which are attributed to climatic conditions which promote environmental conditions conducive to the increase of disease vectors. This investigation includes evaluation of local mosquito population count and rainfall data for statistical correlation and identification of planning recommendations unique to LaRC, other NASA Centers to assess adaptation approaches, Center-level planning strategies.

  11. Changes of the prevailing trade winds over the islands of Hawaii and the North Pacific

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Changes of the prevailing trade winds over the islands of Hawaii and the North Pacific Jessica A of the prevailing northeast and east trade winds from 1973-2009 are analyzed from four land stations in the Hawaiian Islands. A nonparametric robust trend analysis indicates a downward trend in northeast trade wind

  12. 7. NESDIS Ocean Winds and Rain Experiment Principal Investigator: Paul Chang (NESDIS)

    E-print Network

    54 ! 7. NESDIS Ocean Winds and Rain Experiment ! Principal Investigator: Paul Chang (NESDIS understanding of microwave scatterometer retrievals of the ocean surface wind field and to evaluate new remote during hurricane season for the past several years. The Ocean Winds experiment is part of an ongoing

  13. Energy Policy 36 (2008) 2333 Change in public attitudes towards a Cornish wind farm

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    Energy Policy 36 (2008) 23­33 Viewpoint Change in public attitudes towards a Cornish wind farm independently conducted polls suggest significant public support for wind energy, there are often objections, this has seen the development of onshore wind energy to meet these targets (Strachan and Lal, 2004

  14. Evidence that implicit assumptions of 'no evolution' of disease vectors in changing environments can be violated on a rapid timescale.

    PubMed

    Egizi, Andrea; Fefferman, Nina H; Fonseca, Dina M

    2015-04-01

    Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be fixed over relevant time-scales, when they may actually be capable of rapid evolutionary change and even adaptation. We examine the genetic signature of a spatial expansion by an invasive vector into locations with novel temperature conditions compared to its native range as a proxy for how existing vector populations may respond to temporally changing habitat. Specifically, we compare invasions into different climate ranges and characterize the importance of selection from the invaded habitat. We demonstrate that vector species can exhibit evolutionary responses (altered allelic frequencies) to a temperature gradient in as little as 7-10 years even in the presence of high gene flow, and further, that this response varies depending on the strength of selection. We interpret these findings in the context of climate change predictions for vector populations and emphasize the importance of incorporating vector evolution into models of future vector-borne disease dynamics. PMID:25688024

  15. Assessment of changes of vector borne diseases with wetland characteristics using multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheela, A M; Sarun, S; Justus, J; Vineetha, P; Sheeja, R V

    2015-04-01

    Vector borne diseases are a threat to human health. Little attention has been paid to the prevention of these diseases. We attempted to identify the significant wetland characteristics associated with the spread of chikungunya, dengue fever and malaria in Kerala, a tropical region of South West India using multivariate analyses (hierarchical cluster analysis, factor analysis and multiple regression). High/medium turbid coastal lagoons and inland water-logged wetlands with aquatic vegetation have significant effect on the incidence of chikungunya while dengue influenced by high turbid coastal beaches and malaria by medium turbid coastal beaches. The high turbidity in water is due to the urban waste discharge namely sewage, sullage and garbage from the densely populated cities and towns. The large extent of wetland is low land area favours the occurrence of vector borne diseases. Hence the provision of pollution control measures at source including soil erosion control measures is vital. The identification of vulnerable zones favouring the vector borne diseases will help the authorities to control pollution especially from urban areas and prevent these vector borne diseases. Future research should cover land use cover changes, climatic factors, seasonal variations in weather and pollution factors favouring the occurrence of vector borne diseases. PMID:25412801

  16. Determination of the Wind-Velocity Vector Above the Ocean Surface Using the Image Spectrum of a Polarimetric Radar with Synthesized Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilova, M. A.; Kanevsky, M. B.; Balandina, G. N.; Karaev, V. Yu.; Stoffelen, A.; Verkhoev, A.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new method for determining the wind-velocity vector above the ocean surface using the data of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar. The preliminary calculations show that for wind waves, the location of the maximum in the radar image is unambiguously related to the wind velocity, whereas the wind direction is retrieved with an uncertainty of 180°, which is related to the central symmetry of the image spectrum. To eliminate the ambiguity when determining the wind direction, a criterion based on the information on the sign of the coefficient of correlation among the complex signals on the co- and cross polarizations is used. It is shown that using the polarimetric radar, it is theoretically possible to obtain information on both the wind velocity and direction without exact radar calibration.

  17. Full vector (3-D) inflow simulation in natural and wind farm environments using an expanded version of the SNLWIND (Veers) turbulence code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1992-11-01

    We have recently expanded the numerical turbulence simulation (SNLWIND) developed by Veers to include all three components of the turbulent wind vector. We have also configured the code to simulate the characteristics of turbulent wind fields upwind and downwind of a large wind farm, as well as over uniform, flat terrain. Veers's original method only simulates the longitudinal component of the wind in neutral flow. This paper overviews the development of spectral distribution, spatial coherence, and cross correlation models used to expired the SNLWIND code to include the three components of the turbulent wind over a range of atmospheric stabilities. These models are based on extensive measurements of the turbulence characteristics immediately upwind and downwind of a large wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass, California.

  18. Retinal degeneration progression changes lentiviral vector cell targeting in the retina.

    PubMed

    Calame, Maritza; Cachafeiro, Maité; Philippe, Stéphanie; Schouwey, Karine; Tekaya, Meriem; Wanner, Dana; Sarkis, Chamsy; Kostic, Corinne; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2011-01-01

    In normal mice, the lentiviral vector (LV) is very efficient to target the RPE cells, but transduces retinal neurons well only during development. In the present study, the tropism of LV has been investigated in the degenerating retina of mice, knowing that the retina structure changes during degeneration. We postulated that the viral transduction would be increased by the alteration of the outer limiting membrane (OLM). Two different LV pseudotypes were tested using the VSVG and the Mokola envelopes, as well as two animal models of retinal degeneration: light-damaged Balb-C and Rhodopsin knockout (Rho-/-) mice. After light damage, the OLM is altered and no significant increase of the number of transduced photoreceptors can be obtained with a LV-VSVG-Rhop-GFP vector. In the Rho-/- mice, an alteration of the OLM was also observed, but the possibility of transducing photoreceptors was decreased, probably by ongoing gliosis. The use of a ubiquitous promoter allows better photoreceptor transduction, suggesting that photoreceptor-specific promoter activity changes during late stages of photoreceptor degeneration. However, the number of targeted photoreceptors remains low. In contrast, LV pseudotyped with the Mokola envelope allows a wide dispersion of the vector into the retina (corresponding to the injection bleb) with preferential targeting of Müller cells, a situation which does not occur in the wild-type retina. Mokola-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors may serve to engineer these glial cells to deliver secreted therapeutic factors to a diseased area of the retina. PMID:21901134

  19. Projected Future Distributions of Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in North America under Climate Change Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Miroslava; Feria Arroyo, Teresa Patricia; Casillas, Edgar A.; Sanchez-Cordero, Victor; Rivaldi, Chissa-Louise; Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease kills approximately 45 thousand people annually and affects 10 million people in Latin America and the southern United States. The parasite that causes the disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, can be transmitted by insects of the family Reduviidae, subfamily Triatominae. Any study that attempts to evaluate risk for Chagas disease must focus on the ecology and biogeography of these vectors. Expected distributional shifts of vector species due to climate change are likely to alter spatial patterns of risk of Chagas disease, presumably through northward expansion of high risk areas in North America. Methodology/Principal Findings We forecast the future (2050) distributions in North America of Triatoma gerstaeckeri and T. sanguisuga, two of the most common triatomine species and important vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern United States. Our aim was to analyze how climate change might affect the future shift of Chagas disease in North America using a maximum entropy algorithm to predict changes in suitable habitat based on vector occurrence points and predictive environmental variables. Projections based on three different general circulation models (CCCMA, CSIRO, and HADCM3) and two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2) were analyzed. Twenty models were developed for each case and evaluated via cross-validation. The final model averages result from all twenty of these models. All models had AUC >0.90, which indicates that the models are robust. Our results predict a potential northern shift in the distribution of T. gerstaeckeri and a northern and southern distributional shift of T. sanguisuga from its current range due to climate change. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study provide baseline information for monitoring the northward shift of potential risk from Chagas disease in the face of climate change. PMID:24831117

  20. Modified vector control algorithm for increasing partial-load efficiency of fractional-slot concentrated-winding surface PM machines

    SciTech Connect

    El-Refaie, Ayman M; Jahns, Thomas M; Reddy, Patel; McKeever, John W

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a modified vector control algorithm for a fractional-slot concentrated-winding surface PM machine that has been developed to maximize the machine's partial-load efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. By increasing the amplitude of the negative d-axis current, the resulting increase in the stator copper losses can be more than offset by the reduction in the iron core losses achieved by lowering the stator d-axis flux amplitude. The effectiveness of this technique has been demonstrated using both analytical models and finite element analysis (FEA) for a 55 kW (peak) surface PM machine design developed for a demanding set of traction drive performance requirements. For this example, the modified control strategy increases the partial-load efficiency at 20% of rated torque by >6% at 2000 rpm compared to the maximum torque/amp algorithm, making the machine much more attractive for its intended application

  1. Modified vector control algorithm for increasing partial-load efficiency of fractional-slot concentrated-winding surface PM machines

    SciTech Connect

    El-Refaie, Ayman M; Jahns, Thomas M; Reddy, Patel; McKeever, John W

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a modified vector control algorithm for a fractional-slot concentrated-winding surface permanent magnet (SPM) machine that has been developed to maximize the machine's partial-load efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. By increasing the amplitude of the negative d-axis current, the resulting increase in the stator copper losses can be more than offset by the reduction in the iron core losses achieved by lowering the stator d-axis flux amplitude. The effectiveness of this technique has been demonstrated using both analytical models and finite element analysis for a 55-kW (peak) SPM machine design developed for a demanding set of traction drive performance requirements. For this example, the modified control strategy increases the partial-load efficiency at 20% of rated torque by > 6% at 2000 r/min compared to the maximum torque/ampere algorithm, making the machine much more attractive for its intended application.

  2. Support Vector Machines for Multitemporal and Multisensor Change Detection in a Mining Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecheltjen, Antje; Waske, Bjorn; Thonfeld, Frank; Braun, Matthias; Menz, Gunter

    2010-12-01

    Long-term change detection often implies the challenge of incorporating multitemporal data from different sensors. Most of the conventional change detection algorithms are designed for bi-temporal datasets from the same sensors detecting only the existence of changes. The labeling of change areas remains a difficult task. To overcome such drawbacks, much attention has been given lately to algorithms arising from machine learning, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs). While SVMs have been applied successfully for land cover classifications, the exploitation of this approach for change detection is still in its infancy. Few studies have already proven the applicability of SVMs for bi- and multitemporal change detection using data from one sensor only. In this paper we demonstrate the application of SVM for multitemporal and -sensor change detection. Our study site covers lignite open pit mining areas in the German state North Rhine-Westphalia. The dataset consists of bi-temporal Landsat data and multi-temporal ERS SAR data covering two time slots (2001 and 2009). The SVM is conducted using the IDL program imageSVM. Change is deduced from one time slot to the next resulting in two change maps. In contrast to change detection, which is based on post-classification comparison, change detection is seen here as a specific classification problem. Thus, changes are directly classified from a layer-stack of the two years. To reduce the number of change classes, we created a change mask using the magnitude of Change Vector Analysis (CVA). Training data were selected for different change classes (e.g. forest to mining or mining to agriculture) as well as for the no-change classes (e.g. agriculture). Subsequently, they were divided in two independent sets for training the SVMs and accuracy assessment, respectively. Our study shows the applicability of SVMs to classify changes via SVMs. The proposed method yielded a change map of reclaimed and active mines. The use of ERS SAR data, however, did not add to the accuracy compared to Landsat data only. A great advantage compared to other change detection approaches are the labeled change maps, which are a direct output of the methodology. Our approach also overcomes the drawback of post-classification comparison, namely the propagation of classification inaccuracies.

  3. Monte Carlo studies of ocean wind vector measurements by SCATT: Objective criteria and maximum likelihood estimates for removal of aliases, and effects of cell size on accuracy of vector winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The scatterometer on the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS) is studied by means of Monte Carlo techniques so as to determine the effect of two additional antennas for alias (or ambiguity) removal by means of an objective criteria technique and a normalized maximum likelihood estimator. Cells nominally 10 km by 10 km, 10 km by 50 km, and 50 km by 50 km are simulated for winds of 4, 8, 12 and 24 m/s and incidence angles of 29, 39, 47, and 53.5 deg for 15 deg changes in direction. The normalized maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) is correct a large part of the time, but the objective criterion technique is recommended as a reserve, and more quickly computed, procedure. Both methods for alias removal depend on the differences in the present model function at upwind and downwind. For 10 km by 10 km cells, it is found that the MLE method introduces a correlation between wind speed errors and aspect angle (wind direction) errors that can be as high as 0.8 or 0.9 and that the wind direction errors are unacceptably large, compared to those obtained for the SASS for similar assumptions.

  4. Global climatology of the wind vector rotation - implications for the orographic gravity waves propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisoft, Petr; Sacha, Petr; Kuchar, Ales

    2015-04-01

    The gravity waves spectrum is shaped not only by different sources but it also reflects tropospheric background conditions contributing to filtering of various gravity waves. This could be most easily illustrated for the propagation of the orographic gravity waves that are critically filtered when the wind speed is zero. This condition is ensured in case of the directional shear exceeding 180°. Above regions where it is fulfilled, one can rule out the possibility of orographic GW modes contributing to the observed GW activity and vice versa regions of small wind rotation in the lower levels are often precursors of enhanced GW activity higher. In this study, we have performed a global analysis of the background conditions with a focus on the rotation of the ground level winds. We have analyzed MERRA and JRA-55 time series. The results provided climatology of atmospheric regions with the conditions favorable for the upward propagation of the orographic gravity waves from the troposphere into the stratosphere. The regions are detected mainly over areas where tropospheric and stratospheric jets coincide. The study is supplemented by a global analysis of the fields of potential energy of disturbances as a proxy for gravity waves activity using COSMIC GPS RO data.

  5. Impact of climate change in the epidemiology of vector-borne diseases in domestic carnivores.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, F; Chalvet-Monfray, K

    2013-12-01

    Vector-borne diseases are medically important in humans and animals but were long considered tropical and known to first affect production animals. This is no longer true and we can see today that they are common in domestic animals and that they are also present in temperate countries, especially in Europe. In recent years, an increase in the diagnosis of vector borne diseases among humans and animals has been observed, which may partly due to the development of diagnostic tools. Their study requires exchanges and collaborations between the many actors involved, especially since the epidemiology seems to be constantly evolving. The veterinary practitioner is the first one to notice the emergence of cases and to implement prevention measures. He also acts as a sentinel to alert epidemiologists. Many factors can explain the epidemiological changes, i.e. all human factors, such as the increase in commercial transportation, but also owners traveling with their pet during the holidays, the development of "outdoor" activities, the increase of individual housings with gardens; to these human factors must be added the ignorance of the risks, linked to animals in general and to wildlife in particular; then the environmental changes: forest fragmentation, establishment of parks; the increase of wild mammal populations (deer, carnivores, rodents, etc.); finally, climate changes. Climate change is a reality which may explain the increase of density of arthropod vectors, but also of their hosts, changes in periods of activity and variations in geographical distribution. The authors show the proof of the climate modifications and then explain how it has an impact in Europe on ticks, mosquitoes, sandflies and even fleas. They conclude on the practical consequences for veterinary practitioners, especially with the diagnosis of parasitic diseases or diseases in areas where they usually do not occur. However, not any epidemiological modification should be linked to climate change, since many other factors are involved and often even overriding. PMID:23953958

  6. Climate Change, Public Health, and Decision Support: The New Threat of Vector-borne Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, F.; Kumar, S.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change and vector-borne diseases constitute a massive threat to human development. It will not be enough to cut emissions of greenhouse gases-the tide of the future has already been established. Climate change and vector-borne diseases are already undermining the world's efforts to reduce extreme poverty. It is in the best interests of the world leaders to think in terms of concerted global actions, but adaptation and mitigation must be accomplished within the context of local community conditions, resources, and needs. Failure to act will continue to consign developed countries to completely avoidable health risks and significant expense. Failure to act will also reduce poorest of the world's population-some 2.6 billion people-to a future of diminished opportunity. Northrop Grumman has taken significant steps forward to develop the tools needed to assess climate change impacts on public health, collect relevant data for decision making, model projections at regional and local levels; and, deliver information and knowledge to local and regional stakeholders. Supporting these tools is an advanced enterprise architecture consisting of high performance computing, GIS visualization, and standards-based architecture. To address current deficiencies in local planning and decision making with respect to regional climate change and its effect on human health, our research is focused on performing a dynamical downscaling with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to develop decision aids that translate the regional climate data into actionable information for users. For the present climate WRF was forced with the Max Planck Institute European Center/Hamburg Model version 5 (ECHAM5) General Circulation Model 20th century simulation. For the 21th century climate, we used an ECHAM5 simulation with the Special Report on Emissions (SRES) A1B emissions scenario. WRF was run in nested mode at spatial resolution of 108 km, 36 km and 12 km and 28 vertical levels. This model was examined relative to two mosquito vectors, both competent carriers of dengue fever, a viral, vector-borne disease. Models which incorporate public health considerations can enable decision makers to take proactive steps to mitigate the impacts and adapt to the changing environmental conditions. In this paper we provide a snapshot of our climate initiative and some examples relative to our public health practice work in vector-borne diseases to illustrate how integrated decision support could be of assistance to regional and local communities worldwide.

  7. Quantifying changes in the bone microarchitecture using Minkowski-functionals and scaling vectors: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Link, Thomas M.; Boehm, Holger; Monetti, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease leading to de-mineralization and increased risk of fracture. The two major factors that determine the biomechanical competence of bone are the degree of mineralization and the micro-architectural integrity. Today, modern imaging modalities exist that allow to depict structural details of trabecular bone tissue. Recently, non-linear techniques in 2D and 3D based on the scaling vector method (SVM) and the Minkowski functionals (MF) have been introduced, which show excellent performance in predicting bone strength and fracture risk. However, little is known about the performance of the various parameters with respect to monitoring structural changes due to progression of osteoporosis or as a result of medical treatment. We test and compare the two methodologies using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameter of the system, become discernible by applying both the MF and the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results obtained with SVM are superior to those obtained with the Minkowski functionals. An additive combination of both measures drastically increases the sensitivity to slight changes in bone structures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  8. Recent tax law changes create new opportunities for leasing wind energy property

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer, George J.

    2010-01-15

    Recent changes in tax law make leveraged lease transactions far more attractive on paper than they were before the changes. However, changes in the economy and the financial industry and other changes in law counterbalance the favorable tax law changes and make it uncertain whether lease transactions will be used to finance new wind facilities. (author)

  9. The impact of climate change on the U.S. wind energy resource

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Kirk-Davidoff; Daniel Barrie

    2013-03-19

    The growing need for low-carbon emitting electricity sources has resulted in rapid growth in the wind power industry. The size and steadiness of the offshore wind resource has attracted growing investment in the planning of offshore wind turbine installations. Decisions about the location and character of wind farms should be made with an eye not only to present but also future wind resource, which may change as increasing carbon dioxide forces reductions in the poleward temperature gradient, and thus potentially in the mean tropospheric westerly winds. I propose to use the new North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program climate projections to estimate the change of the wind power resource under various carbon dioxide loading scenarios and for a range of climate models. We will compare our assessment with both our assessment based on the IPCC AR4 model runs, to explore the extent to which improved model resolution changes the prediction for the wind power resource, and with present day estimates from reanalysis and scatterometer winds.

  10. Potential Influence of Climate Change on Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases: A Review and Proposed Research Plan

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James N.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Khan, Ali S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of complex interactions of climate variables at the levels of the pathogen, vector, and host, the potential influence of climate change on vector-borne and zoonotic diseases (VBZDs) is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Climate effects on the nonvector-borne zoonotic diseases are especially obscure and have received scant treatment. Objective We described known and potential effects of climate change on VBZDs and proposed specific studies to increase our understanding of these effects. The nonvector-borne zoonotic diseases have received scant treatment and are emphasized in this paper. Data sources and synthesis We used a review of the existing literature and extrapolations from observations of short-term climate variation to suggest potential impacts of climate change on VBZDs. Using public health priorities on climate change, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we developed six specific goals for increasing understanding of the interaction between climate and VBZDs and for improving capacity for predicting climate change effects on incidence and distribution of VBZDs. Conclusions Climate change may affect the incidence of VBZDs through its effect on four principal characteristics of host and vector populations that relate to pathogen transmission to humans: geographic distribution, population density, prevalence of infection by zoonotic pathogens, and the pathogen load in individual hosts and vectors. These mechanisms may interact with each other and with other factors such as anthropogenic disturbance to produce varying effects on pathogen transmission within host and vector populations and to humans. Because climate change effects on most VBZDs act through wildlife hosts and vectors, understanding these effects will require multidisciplinary teams to conduct and interpret ecosystem-based studies of VBZD pathogens in host and vector populations and to identify the hosts, vectors, and pathogens with the greatest potential to affect human populations under climate change scenarios. PMID:20576580

  11. Solar cycle changes in the high latitude solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickett, B. J.; Coles, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the solar wind velocity during the period 1971-79 using the technique of interplanetary scintillation are discussed. The average wind speed was faster than 500 km/s at latitudes above 30 deg for most of 1973-77. The fast polar stream, observed to become much narrower in 1978-79 is examined. The narrowing of the polar streams coincided with the emergence of sunspots at midlatitudes, with the start of the new solar cycle, and with a corresponding contraction of the polar coronal holes. The theory that the solar magnetic field controls the large scale structure of the solar wind is discussed in relation to the results.

  12. Southern Hemisphere westerly wind changes during the Last Glacial Maximum: paleo-data synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeld, K. E.; Graham, R. M.; de Boer, A. M.; Sime, L. C.; Wolff, E. W.; Le Quéré, C.; Bopp, L.

    2013-05-01

    Changes in the strength and position of Southern Hemisphere westerly winds during the Last Glacial cycle have been invoked to explain both millennial and glacial-interglacial climate fluctuations. However, neither paleo models nor paleodata agree on the magnitude, or even the sign, of the change in wind strength and latitude during the most studied glacial period, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), compared to the recent past. This paper synthesizes paleo-environmental data that have been used to infer changes in LGM winds. Data compilations are provided for changes in terrestrial moisture, dust deposition, sea surface temperatures and ocean fronts, and ocean productivity, and existing data on Southern Hemisphere ocean circulation changes during the LGM are summarized. We find that any hypothesis of LGM wind and climate change needs to provide a plausible explanation for increased moisture on the west coast of continents, cooler temperatures and higher productivity in the Subantarctic Zone, and reductions in Agulhas leakage around southern Africa. Our comparison suggests that an overall strengthening, an equatorward displacement, or no change at all in winds could all be interpreted as consistent with observations. If a single cause related to the southern westerlies is sought for all the evidence presented, then an equatorward displacement or strengthening of the winds would be consistent with the largest proportion of the observations. However, other processes, such as weakening or poleward shifts in winds, a weakened hydrological cycle, extended sea-ice cover, and changed buoyancy fluxes, cannot be ruled out as potential explanations of observed changes in moisture, surface temperature, and productivity. We contend that resolving the position and strength of westerly winds during the LGM remains elusive based on data reconstructions alone. However, we believe that these data reconstructions of environmental conditions can be used in conjunction with model simulations to identify which processes best represent westerly wind conditions during the LGM.

  13. Mosquitoes and Culicoides biting midges: vector range and the influence of climate change.

    PubMed

    Elbers, A R W; Koenraadt, C J M; Meiswinkel, R

    2015-04-01

    Vector-borne animal diseases pose a continuous and substantial threat to livestock economies around the globe. Increasing international travel, the globalisation of trade, and climate change are likely to play a progressively more important role in the introduction, establishment and spread of arthropod-borne pathogens worldwide. A review of the literature reveals that many climatic variables, functioning singly or in combination, exert varying effects on the distribution and range of Culicoides vector midges and mosquitoes. For example, higher temperatures may be associated with increased insect abundance--thereby amplifying the risk of disease transmission--but there are no indications yet of dramatic shifts occurring in the geographic range of Culicoides midges. However, the same cannot be said for mosquitoes: over the last few decades, multiple Asian species have established themselves in Europe, spread and are unlikely to ever be eradicated. Research on how insects respond to changes in climate is still in its infancy. The authors argue that we need to grasp how other annectant changes, such as extremes in precipitation (drought and flooding), may affect the dispersal capability of mosquitoes. Models are useful for assessing the interplay between mosquito vectors expanding their range and the native flora and fauna; however, ecological studies employing classical mark-release-recapture techniques remain essential for addressing fundamental questions about the survival and dispersal of mosquito species, with the resulting parameters fed directly into new-generation disease transmission models. Studies on the eventual impact of mosquitoes on animal and human health should be tackled through large-scale integrated research programmes. Such an approach calls for more collaborative efforts, along the lines of the One Health Initiative. PMID:26470453

  14. Dynamics of Sylvatic Chagas Disease Vectors in Coastal Ecuador Is Driven by Changes in Land Cover

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Mario J.; Terán, David; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a serious public health problem in Latin America where about ten million individuals show Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite significant success in controlling domiciliated triatomines, sylvatic populations frequently infest houses after insecticide treatment which hampers long term control prospects in vast geographical areas where vectorial transmission is endemic. As a key issue, the spatio-temporal dynamics of sylvatic populations is likely influenced by landscape yet evidence showing this effect is rare. The aim of this work is to examine the role of land cover changes in sylvatic triatomine ecology, based on an exhaustive field survey of pathogens, vectors, hosts, and microhabitat characteristics' dynamics. Methodology and Principal Findings The study was performed in agricultural landscapes of coastal Ecuador as a study model. Over one year, a spatially-randomized sampling design (490 collection points) allowed quantifying triatomine densities in natural, cultivated and domestic habitats. We also assessed infection of the bugs with trypanosomes, documented their microhabitats and potential hosts, and recorded changes in landscape characteristics. In total we collected 886 individuals, mainly represented by nymphal stages of one triatomine species Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. As main results, we found that 1) sylvatic triatomines had very high T. cruzi infection rates (71%) and 2) densities of T. cruzi-infected sylvatic triatomines varied predictably over time due to changes in land cover and occurrence of associated rodent hosts. Conclusion We propose a framework for identifying the factors affecting the yearly distribution of sylvatic T. cruzi vectors. Beyond providing key basic information for the control of human habitat colonization by sylvatic vector populations, our framework highlights the importance of both environmental and sociological factors in shaping the spatio-temporal population dynamics of triatomines. A better understanding of the dynamics of such socio-ecological systems is a crucial, yet poorly considered, issue for the long-term control of Chagas disease. PMID:24968118

  15. Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

  16. North Sea wind climate in changing weather regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Ivonne; Rockel, Burkhardt

    2015-04-01

    Results from regional climate models (RCMs) are getting more and more important in future wind climate assessment. From RCMs often only the daily wind speed is available, but no information on prevailing wind direction of each day. Weather regime classification can close this gap and models ability of simulating surface wind speed can be analysed in detail. Several objective regime classifications have been investigated to be a sufficient diagnostic tool to evaluate the present wind climate at the German and Dutch coastal area of the North Sea. The classification by Jenkinson and Collison (1977) uses values for mean sea level pressure at 16 locations centered over the North Sea. Beside the predefined 8 prevailed wind directions and the two possibilities on cyclonic or anticyclonic turbulence, 2x8 hybrid weather types can be defined. In this way 27 different regimes can be distinguished including a class of non-classifiable cases. The 27 regimes could be reduced to a number of 11 by allotting the hybrid types to the directional or the centered types. As the classification is carried out for the North Sea based on ERA40 mean sea level pressure the different regimes clearly reflect the mean wind characteristics at the stations. Comparing the wind roses for the individual observations leads to the assumption that the regime classification described before fits the requirements to carry out the regime dependent evaluation of the RCMs with a focus on the German and Dutch coast. Trends in the occurrence of the regimes in the winter period of 1961 to 2000 show an increase of the regimes with Western and Southwestern wind directions and a decrease of wind events from Eastern directions in the North Sea. The trend is dominated by the strong positive phase of the NAO especially in the months January to March starting in the beginning of the 1980s. Due to the applied method ERA40 and the RCMs do not necessarily show the same regime at each day. The agreement among the RCM simulations carried out in the ENSEMBLES framework and ERA40 has been analysed in a last step. References: Jenkinson A, Collison F (1977) An initial climatology of gales over the north sea. Synoptic Climatology Branch Memorandum 62:18pp, UK Met Office

  17. Environmental change and water-related, vector borne diseases in eastern Africa: the HEALTHY FUTURES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David; Kienberger, Stefan; Tompkins, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Pathogens that spend time outside the human body, and any organisms involved in their transmission, have particular ecological requirements; as environment, including climate, conditions change, then the transmission characteristics of associated pathogens - and the diseases caused - are also likely to vary. Relationships between environment and health in many parts of the world remain poorly studied and are often overlooked, however. This is particularly the case in developing countries, because of budgetary and available expertise constraints. Moreover the relationship is often confounded by other factors. These other factors contribute to human vulnerability, and thus to the overall disease risk due to environmental change. This presentation will highlight the importance of environmental, including climate, change information to a better understanding of the risks to health of projected future environmental changes, and to the more efficient and effective use of scarce health resources in the developing world. The paper will focus on eastern Africa, and in particular the health effects of future projected environmental change impacts on water-related, vector borne diseases in the East African Community region. Moreover the paper will highlight how the EU FP7-funded project HEALTHY FUTURES is, through a broadly-based, integrative approach that distinguishes environmental change-induced health hazard from health risk aims to support the health decisions making process, thereby attempting to help mitigate negative health impacts.

  18. Climate, Environmental, and Socioeconomic Change Weighing up the Balance in Vector-Borne Disease Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, Paul; Waldock, Johanna; Christophides, George; Hemming, Deborah; Agusto, Folashade; Evans, Katherine J; Fefferman, Nina; Gaff, Holly; Gumel, Abba; LaDeau, Shannon; Lenhart, Suzanne; Mickens, Ronald; Naumova, Elena; Ostfeld, Richard; Ready, Paul; Thomas, Matthew; Velasco-Hernandez, Jorge; Edwin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Arguably one of the most important effects of climate change is the potential impact on human health. While this is likely to take many forms, the implications for future transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs), given their ongoing contribution to global disease burden, are both extremely important and highly uncertain. In part, this is due not only to data limitations and methodological challenges when integrating climate-driven VBD models and climate change projections, but, perhaps most crucially, the multitude of epidemiological, ecological, and socioeconomic factors that drive VBD transmission, and this complexity has generated considerable debate over the last 10-15 years. In this article, and Theme Issue, we seek to elucidate current knowledge around this topic, identify key themes and uncertainties, evaluate ongoing challenges and open research questions, and, crucially, offer some solutions for the field moving forwards. Although many of these challenges are ubiquitous across multiple VBDs, more specific issues also arise in different vector-pathogen systems. This Theme Issue seeks to cover both, reflected in the breadth and depth of the topics and VBD-systems considered, itself strongly indicative of the challenging, but necessary, multidisciplinary nature of this research field.

  19. Operation of a Wind Turbine-Flywheel Energy Storage System under Conditions of Stochastic Change of Wind Energy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author's opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical parameters of a wind turbine-energy storage system and its geographical location one can determine the boundary capacity of the storage, which helps prevent power cuts to the grid at the assumed probability. Flywheel energy storage was selected due to its characteristics and technical parameters. The storage capacity was determined based on an empirical relationship using the results of the proposed statistical and energetic analysis of the measured wind velocity courses. A detailed algorithm of the WT-FESS with the power grid system was developed, eliminating short-term breaks in the turbine operation and periods when the wind turbine power was below the assumed level. PMID:25215326

  20. Operation of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system under conditions of stochastic change of wind energy.

    PubMed

    Tomczewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author's opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical parameters of a wind turbine-energy storage system and its geographical location one can determine the boundary capacity of the storage, which helps prevent power cuts to the grid at the assumed probability. Flywheel energy storage was selected due to its characteristics and technical parameters. The storage capacity was determined based on an empirical relationship using the results of the proposed statistical and energetic analysis of the measured wind velocity courses. A detailed algorithm of the WT-FESS with the power grid system was developed, eliminating short-term breaks in the turbine operation and periods when the wind turbine power was below the assumed level. PMID:25215326

  1. Prediction of compound potency changes in matched molecular pairs using support vector regression.

    PubMed

    de la Vega de León, Antonio; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-10-27

    Matched molecular pairs (MMPs) consist of pairs of compounds that are transformed into each other by a substructure exchange. If MMPs are formed by compounds sharing the same biological activity, they encode a potency change. If the potency difference between MMP compounds is very small, the substructure exchange (chemical transformation) encodes a bioisosteric replacement; if the difference is very large, the transformation encodes an activity cliff. For a given compound activity class, MMPs comprehensively capture existing structural relationships and represent a spectrum of potency changes for structurally analogous compounds. We have aimed to predict potency changes encoded by MMPs. This prediction task principally differs from conventional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. For the prediction of MMP-associated potency changes, we introduce direction-dependent MMPs and combine MMP analysis with support vector regression (SVR) modeling. Combinations of newly designed kernel functions and fingerprint descriptors are explored. The resulting SVR models yield accurate predictions of MMP-encoded potency changes for many different data sets. Shared key structure context is found to contribute critically to prediction accuracy. SVR models reach higher performance than random forest (RF) and MMP-based averaging calculations carried out as controls. A comparison of SVR with kernel ridge regression indicates that prediction accuracy has largely been a consequence of kernel characteristics rather than SVR optimization details. PMID:25191787

  2. A spatially interactive simulation of climate change, harvesting, wind, and tree species migration and

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    A spatially interactive simulation of climate change, harvesting, wind, and tree species migration to climate change. Our objective was to estimate the combined effects of climate change, common disturbances circulation models, the Hadley Climate Centre (version 2) and the Canadian Climate Center (version 1

  3. Learning curves and changing product attributes: the case of wind turbines

    E-print Network

    Coulomb, Louis; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14

    . Significant changes of attributes of a technology must be corrected when assessing the impact of learning-by-doing. We use an engineering-based model to capture the cost changes of wind turbines that can be attributed to changes in turbine size. We estimate...

  4. 20% Wind Energy - Diversifying Our Energy Portfolio and Addressing Climate Change (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-05-01

    This brochure describes the R&D efforts needed for wind energy to meet 20% of the U.S. electrical demand by 2030. In May 2008, DOE published its report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, which presents an in-depth analysis of the potential for wind energy in the United States and outlines a potential scenario to boost wind electric generation from its current production of 16.8 gigawatts (GW) to 304 GW by 2030. According to the report, achieving 20% wind energy by 2030 could help address climate change by reducing electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 825 million metric tons (20% of the electric utility sector CO2 emissions if no new wind is installed by 2030), and it will enhance our nation's energy security by diversifying our electricity portfolio as wind energy is an indigenous energy source with stable prices not subject to fuel volatility. According to the report, increasing our nation's wind generation could also boost local rural economies and contribute to significant growth in manufacturing and the industry supply chain. Rural economies will benefit from a substantial increase in land use payments, tax benefits and the number of well-paying jobs created by the wind energy manufacturing, construction, and maintenance industries. Although the initial capital costs of implementing the 20% wind scenario would be higher than other generation sources, according to the report, wind energy offers lower ongoing energy costs than conventional generation power plants for operations, maintenance, and fuel. The 20% scenario could require an incremental investment of as little as $43 billion (net present value) more than a base-case no new wind scenario. This would represent less than 0.06 cent (6 one-hundredths of 1 cent) per kilowatt-hour of total generation by 2030, or roughly 50 cents per month per household. The report concludes that while achieving the 20% wind scenario is technically achievable, it will require enhanced transmission infrastructure, streamlined siting and permitting regimes, improved reliability and operability of wind systems, and increased U.S. wind manufacturing capacity. To meet these challenges, the DOE Wind Energy Program will continue to work with industry partners to increase wind energy system reliability and operability and improve manufacturing processes. The program also conducts research to address transmission and grid integration issues, to better understand wind resources, to mitigate siting and environmental issues, to provide information to industry stakeholders and policy makers, and to educate the future generations.

  5. Effect of sudden solar wind dynamic pressure changes at subauroral latitudes: Change in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Le, G.; Russell, C.T.; Petrinec, S.M.; Ginskey, M. )

    1993-03-01

    The observations obtained during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) from the magnetometers of the IGS network extending from Cambridge, England, to Tromso, Norway, are used to study the response of subauroral current systems to sudden changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. Observations show that the response is very strong at subauroral latitudes. The preliminary response in the H component is a brief, small increase in the dayside moring sector and a decrease in the afternoon and night sectors. The main response in the horizontal field (the H and D components) is toward the pole except in the dayside morning sector. The inferred ionospheric current is mainly a circulatory system flowing counterclockwise when viewed form the north pole everywhere at subauroral latitudes except the dayside morning sector. 29 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Changes in wind speed and extremes in Beijing during 1960-2008 based on homogenized observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yan, Zhongwei; Tu, Kai; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Yingchun

    2011-03-01

    Daily observations of wind speed at 12 stations in the Greater Beijing Area during 1960-2008 were homogenized using the Multiple Analysis of Series for Homogenization method. The linear trends in the regional mean annual and seasonal (winter, spring, summer and autumn) wind speed series were -0.26, -0.39, -0.30, -0.12 and -0.22 m s-1 (10 yr)-1, respectively. Winter showed the greatest magnitude in declining wind speed, followed by spring, autumn and summer. The annual and seasonal frequencies of wind speed extremes (days) also decreased, more prominently for winter than for the other seasons. The declining trends in wind speed and extremes were formed mainly by some rapid declines during the 1970s and 1980s. The maximum declining trend in wind speed occurred at Chaoyang (CY), a station within the central business district (CBD) of Beijing with the highest level of urbanization. The declining trends were in general smaller in magnitude away from the city center, except for the winter case in which the maximum declining trend shifted northeastward to rural Miyun (MY). The influence of urbanization on the annual wind speed was estimated to be about -0.05 m s-1 (10 yr)-1 during 1960-2008, accounting for around one fifth of the regional mean declining trend. The annual and seasonal geostrophic wind speeds around Beijing, based on daily mean sea level pressure (MSLP) from the ERA-40 reanalysis dataset, also exhibited decreasing trends, coincident with the results from site observations. A comparative analysis of the MSLP fields between 1966-1975 and 1992-2001 suggested that the influences of both the winter and summer monsoons on Beijing were weaker in the more recent of the two decades. It is suggested that the bulk of wind in Beijing is influenced considerably by urbanization, while changes in strong winds or wind speed extremes are prone to large-scale climate change in the region.

  7. Metabolic changes in rat urine after acute paraquat poisoning and discriminated by support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wen, Congcong; Wang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Meiling; Wang, Shuanghu; Geng, Peiwu; Sun, Fa; Chen, Mengchun; Lin, Guanyang; Hu, Lufeng; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat is quick-acting and non-selective, killing green plant tissue on contact; it is also toxic to human beings and animals. In this study, we developed a urine metabonomic method by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate the effect of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both partial least squares discriminate analysis and principal component analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the levels of benzeneacetic acid and hexadecanoic acid of the acute paraquat poisoning group (intragastric administration 36?mg/kg) increased, while the levels of butanedioic acid, pentanedioic acid, altronic acid decreased. Based on these urinary metabolomics data, support vector machine was applied to discriminate the metabolomic change of paraquat groups from the control group, which achieved 100% classification accuracy. In conclusion, metabonomic method combined with support vector machine can be used as a useful diagnostic tool in paraquat-poisoned rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26419410

  8. Simulation comparison of a decoupled longitudinal control system and a velocity vector control wheel steering system during landings in wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simulator comparison of the velocity vector control wheel steering (VCWS) system and a decoupled longitudinal control system is presented. The piloting task was to use the electronic attitude direction indicator (EADI) to capture and maintain a 3 degree glide slope in the presence of wind shear and to complete the landing using the perspective runway included on the EADI. The decoupled control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The decoupled control system improved the pilots' ability to control airspeed and flight path angle during the final stages of an approach made in severe wind shear. The system also improved their ability to complete safe landings. The pilots preferred the decoupled control system in severe winds and, on a pilot rating scale, rated the approach and landing task with the decoupled control system as much as 3 to 4 increments better than use of the VCWS system.

  9. Estimated Effects of Projected Climate Change on the Basic Reproductive Number of the Lyme Disease Vector Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Radojevic´, Milka; Wu, Xiaotian; Duvvuri, Venkata R.; Leighton, Patrick A.; Wu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    Background: The extent to which climate change may affect human health by increasing risk from vector-borne diseases has been under considerable debate. Objectives: We quantified potential effects of future climate change on the basic reproduction number (R0) of the tick vector of Lyme disease, Ixodes scapularis, and explored their importance for Lyme disease risk, and for vector-borne diseases in general. Methods: We applied observed temperature data for North America and projected temperatures using regional climate models to drive an I. scapularis population model to hindcast recent, and project future, effects of climate warming on R0. Modeled R0 increases were compared with R0 ranges for pathogens and parasites associated with variations in key ecological and epidemiological factors (obtained by literature review) to assess their epidemiological importance. Results: R0 for I. scapularis in North America increased during the years 1971–2010 in spatio-temporal patterns consistent with observations. Increased temperatures due to projected climate change increased R0 by factors (2–5 times in Canada and 1.5–2 times in the United States), comparable to observed ranges of R0 for pathogens and parasites due to variations in strains, geographic locations, epidemics, host and vector densities, and control efforts. Conclusions: Climate warming may have co-driven the emergence of Lyme disease in northeastern North America, and in the future may drive substantial disease spread into new geographic regions and increase tick-borne disease risk where climate is currently suitable. Our findings highlight the potential for climate change to have profound effects on vectors and vector-borne diseases, and the need to refocus efforts to understand these effects. Citation: Ogden NH, Radojevi? M, Wu X, Duvvuri VR, Leighton PA, Wu J. 2014. Estimated effects of projected climate change on the basic reproductive number of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis. Environ Health Perspect 122:631–638;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307799 PMID:24627295

  10. Climate change influences on global distributions of dengue and chikungunya virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lindsay P; Luther, Caylor; Moo-Llanes, David; Ramsey, Janine M; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Peterson, A Townsend

    2015-04-01

    Numerous recent studies have illuminated global distributions of human cases of dengue and other mosquito-transmitted diseases, yet the potential distributions of key vector species have not been incorporated integrally into those mapping efforts. Projections onto future conditions to illuminate potential distributional shifts in coming decades are similarly lacking, at least outside Europe. This study examined the global potential distributions of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in relation to climatic variation worldwide to develop ecological niche models that, in turn, allowed anticipation of possible changes in distributional patterns into the future. Results indicated complex global rearrangements of potential distributional areas, which--given the impressive dispersal abilities of these two species--are likely to translate into actual distributional shifts. This exercise also signalled a crucial priority: digitization and sharing of existing distributional data so that models of this sort can be developed more rigorously, as present availability of such data is fragmentary and woefully incomplete. PMID:25688023

  11. Modelling potential changes in marine biogeochemistry due to large-scale offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan; Rees, Jon; Limpenny, Sian

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale renewable energy generation by offshore wind farms may lead to changes in marine ecosystem processes through the following mechanism: 1) wind-energy extraction leads to a reduction in local surface wind speeds; 2) these lead to a reduction in the local wind wave height; 3) as a consequence there's a reduction in SPM resuspension and concentrations; 4) this results in an improvement in under-water light regime, which 5) may lead to increased primary production, which subsequently 6) cascades through the ecosystem. A three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamics-biogeochemistry model (GETM_ERSEM) was used to investigate this process for a hypothetical wind farm in the central North Sea, by running a reference scenario and a scenario with a 10% reduction (as was found in a case study of a small farm in Danish waters) in surface wind velocities in the area of the wind farm. The ERSEM model included both pelagic and benthic processes. The results showed that, within the farm area, the physical mechanisms were as expected, but with variations in the magnitude of the response depending on the ecosystem variable or exchange rate between two ecosystem variables (3-28%, depending on variable/rate). Benthic variables tended to be more sensitive to the changes than pelagic variables. Reduced, but noticeable changes also occurred for some variables in a region of up to two farm diameters surrounding the wind farm. An additional model run in which the 10% reduction in surface wind speed was applied only for wind speeds below the generally used threshold of 25 m/s for operational shut-down showed only minor differences from the run in which all wind speeds were reduced. These first results indicate that there is potential for measurable effects of large-scale offshore wind farms on the marine ecosystem, mainly within the farm but for some variables up to two farm diameters away. However, the wave and SPM parameterisations currently used in the model are crude and need to be further tested and refined. Also, potential counter-acting processes such as possible increases in SPM concentrations due to turbulence generated by the wind-turbine foundations may need to be included for more accurate simulations. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these results would be valid for areas where different hydrodynamic characteristics may predominate, e.g. with summer stratification or strong tidal currents. Finally, an assessment would need to be carried out of how beneficial or detrimental these potential changes might be from various social-economic and ecosystem-management points of view.

  12. Southern Hemisphere westerly wind changes during the Last Glacial Maximum: model-data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Louise C.; Kohfeld, Karen E.; Le Quéré, Corinne; Wolff, Eric W.; de Boer, Agatha M.; Graham, Robert M.; Bopp, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    The Southern Hemisphere (SH) westerly winds are thought to be critical to global ocean circulation, productivity, and carbon storage. For example, an equatorward shift in the winds, though its affect on the Southern Ocean circulation, has been suggested as the leading cause for the reduction in atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial period. Despite the importance of the winds, it is currently not clear, from observations or model results, how they behave during the Last Glacial. Here, an atmospheric modelling study is performed to help determine likely changes in the SH westerly winds during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Using LGM boundary conditions, the maximum in SH westerlies is strengthened by ˜+1 m s-1 and moved southward by ˜2° at the 850 hPa pressure level. Boundary layer stabilisation effects over equatorward extended LGM sea-ice can lead to a small apparent equatorward shift in the wind band at the surface. Further sensitivity analysis with individual boundary condition changes indicate that changes in sea surface temperatures are the strongest factor behind the wind change. The HadAM3 atmospheric simulations, along with published PMIP2 coupled climate model simulations, are then assessed against the newly synthesised database of moisture observations for the LGM. Although the moisture data is the most commonly cited evidence in support of a large equatorward shift in the SH winds during the LGM, none of the models that produce realistic LGM precipitation changes show such a large equatorward shift. In fact, the model which best simulates the moisture proxy data is the HadAM3 LGM simulation which shows a small poleward wind shift. While we cannot prove here that a large equatorward shift would not be able to reproduce the moisture data as well, we show that the moisture proxies do not provide an observational evidence base for it.

  13. Cytoplasmic pH dynamics in maize pulvinal cells induced by gravity vector changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannes, E.; Collings, D. A.; Rink, J. C.; Allen, N. S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, changes in orientation of stems are perceived by pulvinal tissue, which responds to the stimulus by differential growth resulting in upward bending of the stem. The amyloplast-containing bundle sheath cells are the sites of gravity perception, although the initial steps of gravity perception and transmission remain unclear. In columella cells of Arabidopsis roots, we previously found that cytoplasmic pH (pH(c)) is a mediator in early gravitropic signaling (A.C. Scott, N.S. Allen [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1291-1298). The question arises whether pH(c) has a more general role in signaling gravity vector changes. Using confocal ratiometric imaging and the fluorescent pH indicator carboxy seminaphtorhodafluor acetoxymethyl ester acetate, we measured pH(c) in the cells composing the maize pulvinus. When stem slices were gravistimulated and imaged on a horizontally mounted confocal microscope, pH(c) changes were only apparent within the bundle sheath cells, and not in the parenchyma cells. After turning, cytoplasmic acidification was observed at the sides of the cells, whereas the cytoplasm at the base of the cells where plastids slowly accumulated became more basic. These changes were most apparent in cells exhibiting net amyloplast sedimentation. Parenchyma cells and isolated bundle sheath cells did not show any gravity-induced pH(c) changes although all cell types responded to external stimuli in the predicted way: Propionic acid and auxin treatments induced acidification, whereas raising the external pH caused alkalinization. The results suggest that pH(c) has an important role in the early signaling pathways of maize stem gravitropism.

  14. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Cameron; Capps, Scott

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  15. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site: Evidence for a Change in Wind Regime from Lander and Orbiter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael D.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2000-01-01

    Surface features related to the wind are observed in the vicinity of the Mars Pathfinder (MPR landing site data from the lander and in data from orbit by the Viking Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor missions. Features seen from the surface include wind tails associated with small rocks, barchanoid duneforms, ripplelike patterns, and ventifact flutes cut into some rocks. Features seen from orbit include wind tails associated with impact craters, ridges inferred to be duneforms, and modified crater rims interpreted to have been eroded and mantled by windblown material. The orientations of these features show two prevailing directions. One is inferred to represent winds from the northeast, which is consistent with strongest winds predicted by a general circulation model to occur during the Martian northern winter under current conditions. A second wind blowing from the ESE was responsible for modifying the crater rims and cutting some of the ventifacts. The two wind regimes could reflect a change in climate related to Mars' obliquity or some other, unknown factor. Regardless of the cause, the MPF area has been subjected to a complex pattern of winds and supply of small particles, and the original surface formed by sedimentary processes from Tiu and Ares Vallis flooding events has been modified by repeated burial and exhumation.

  16. Changes in wind pattern alter albatross distribution and life-history traits.

    PubMed

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Louzao, Maite; de Grissac, Sophie; Delord, Karine

    2012-01-13

    Westerly winds in the Southern Ocean have increased in intensity and moved poleward. Using long-term demographic and foraging records, we show that foraging range in wandering albatrosses has shifted poleward in conjunction with these changes in wind pattern, while their rates of travel and flight speeds have increased. Consequently, the duration of foraging trips has decreased, breeding success has improved, and birds have increased in mass by more than 1 kilogram. These positive consequences of climate change may be temporary if patterns of wind in the southern westerlies follow predicted climate change scenarios. This study stresses the importance of foraging performance as the key link between environmental changes and population processes. PMID:22246774

  17. Limited change in dune mobility in response to a large decrease in wind power in semi-arid northern China since the 1970s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, J.A.; Swinehart, J.B.; Lu, H.; Miao, X.; Cha, P.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The climatic controls on dune mobility, especially the relative importance of wind strength, remain incompletely understood. This is a key research problem in semi-arid northern China, both for interpreting past dune activity as evidence of paleoclimate and for predicting future environmental change. Potential eolian sand transport, which is approximately proportional to wind power above the threshold for sand entrainment, has decreased across much of northern China since the 1970s. Over the same period, effective moisture (ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration) has not changed significantly. This "natural experiment" provides insight on the relative importance of wind power as a control on dune mobility in three dunefields of northern China (Mu Us, Otindag, and Horqin), although poorly understood and potentially large effects of human land use complicate interpretation. Dune forms in these three regions are consistent with sand transport vectors inferred from weather station data, suggesting that wind directions have remained stable and the stations adequately represent winds that shaped the dunes. The predicted effect of weaker winds since the 1970s would be dune stabilization, with lower sand transport rates allowing vegetation cover to expand. Large portions of all three dunefields remained stabilized by vegetation in the 1970s despite high wind power. Since the 1970s, trends in remotely sensed vegetation greenness and change in mobile dune area inferred from sequential Landsat images do indicate widespread dune stabilization in the eastern Mu Us region. On the other hand, expansion of active dunes took place farther west in the Mu Us dunefield and especially in the central Otindag dunefield, with little overall change in two parts of the Horqin dunes. Better ground truth is needed to validate the remote sensing analyses, but results presented here place limits on the relative importance of wind strength as a control on dune mobility in the study areas. High wind power alone does not completely destabilize these dunes. A large decrease in wind power either has little short-term effect on the dunes, or more likely its effect is sufficiently small that it is obscured by human impacts on dune stability in many parts of the study areas. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seasonal changes in the apparent position of the Sun as elementary applications of vector operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Many introductory courses in physics face an unpleasant chicken-and-egg problem. One might choose to introduce students to physical quantities such as velocity, acceleration, and momentum in over-simplified one-dimensional applications before introducing vectors and their manipulation; or one might first introduce vectors as mathematical objects and defer demonstration of their physical utility. This paper offers a solution to this pedagogical problem: elementary vector operations can be used without mechanics concepts to understand variations in the solar latitude, duration of daylight, and orientation of the rising and setting Sun. I show how sunrise and sunset phenomena lend themselves to exercises with scalar products, vector products, unit vectors, and vector projections that can be useful for introducing vector analysis in the context of physics.

  19. Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Changes during the Last Glacial Maximum: Model-Data Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Louise; Kohfeld, Karen; Le Quere, Corinne; Wolff, Eric; de Boer, Agatha; Graham, Robert; Bopp, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The Southern Hemisphere (SH) westerly winds are thought to be critical to both past and future global ocean circulation, productivity, and carbon storage. For example, an equatorward shift in the winds has been suggested as the leading cause for the reduction in atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), through its affect on the Southern Ocean circulation. Despite the importance of the SH westerlies, paleo-records and modelling studies still disagree on how they behaved during the LGM. Here, a joint model-data evaluation study is performed to determine likely changes in the SH westerly winds during the LGM. HadAM3 atmospheric simulations, along with published PMIP2 coupled climate model simulations, are assessed against our newly synthesised database of moisture records for the LGM (Kohfeld et al., accepted, QSR). While moisture data are the most commonly cited evidence in support of a large equatorward shift in the SH winds during the LGM, none of the models that produce realistic LGM precipitation patterns show a large equatorward shift. In fact, the model which best simulates the moisture proxy data, our HadAM3 LGM simulation, shows a small poleward wind shift. Thus, moisture proxies do not provide a robust observational evidence base for equatorward shifted winds during the LGM (Sime et al, in press, QSR). Sensitivity simulations, featuring individual boundary condition changes, suggest that changes in sea surface temperatures are the strongest factor behind LGM wind changes, compared with sea ice and land ice effects. If the SH westerly winds were not shifted equatorward at the LGM, this raises intriguing questions regarding past and future carbon storage in the Southern Ocean.

  20. Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Changes during the Last Glacial Maximum: Paleo-data Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeld, Karen; Graham, Robert; De Boer, Agatha; Sime, Louise; Wolff, Eric; Le Quéré, Corinne; Bopp, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Changes in the strength and position of Southern Hemisphere westerly winds during the last glacial cycle have been invoked to explain glacial-interglacial climate fluctuations. However, neither paleo models nor paleodata agree on the magnitude, or even the sign, of the change in wind strength and latitude during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), compared to the recent past. This study synthesizes paleo-environmental data that have been used to infer changes in winds during the LGM compared with the late Holocene. These compilations include changes in terrestrial moisture, dust deposition, and ocean productivity, along with summaries of previously published information on sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and ocean dynamics in the Southern Hemisphere. Our compilations of terrestrial moisture from 94 sites and dust deposition from 87 sites show generally drier conditions for the LGM between 0 and 40°S, with wetter conditions along the west coasts and drying along the east coasts of continents. LGM dust deposition rates ranged from 2 to 4.5 times higher over the Southern Ocean and about 13 times higher over the Antarctic continent. For the oceans, reconstructed changes in SSTs show maximum cooling (>4°C) in the modern-day Subantarctic Zone, coincident with a region of enhanced export production during the LGM compared with today. We find that any hypothesis of LGM wind and climate change needs to provide a plausible explanation for increased moisture on the west coast of continents, cooler temperatures and higher productivity in the Subantarctic Zone, and reductions in Agulhas leakage around southern Africa. Our comparison suggests that an overall strengthening, an equatorward displacement, or no change at all in winds could all be interpreted as consistent with observations. If a single cause related to the southern westerlies is sought for all the evidence presented, then an equatorward displacement or strengthening of the winds would be consistent with the largest proportion of the data evidence. However, other processes, such as weakening or poleward shifts in winds, a weakened hydrological cycle, extended sea-ice cover, and changed buoyancy fluxes, cannot be ruled out as potential explanations of observed changes in moisture, surface temperature, and productivity. We contend that resolving the position and strength of westerly winds during the LGM remains elusive based on data reconstructions alone. However, we believe that these data reconstructions of environmental conditions can be used in conjunction with model simulations to identify which processes best represent westerly wind conditions during the LGM.

  1. Calcium mobilizations in response to changes in the gravity vector in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Toyota, Masatsugu; Furuichi, Takuya; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Gravity influences the growth direction of higher plants. Changes in the gravity vector (gravistimulation) immediately promote the increase in the cytoplasmic free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]c) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. When the seedlings are gravistimulated by reorientation at 180°, a transient two peaked (biphasic) [Ca2+]c-increase arises in their hypocotyl and petioles. Parabolic flights (PFs) can generate a variety of gravity-stimuli, and enables us to measure gravity-induced [Ca2+]c-increases without specimen rotation, which demonstrate that Arabidopsis seedlings possess a rapid gravity-sensing mechanism linearly transducing a wide range of gravitational changes into Ca2+ signals on a sub-second timescale. Hypergravity by centrifugation (20 g or 300 g) also induces similar transient [Ca2+]c-increases. In this review, we propose models for possible cellular processes of the garavi-stimulus-induced [Ca2+]c-increase, and evaluate those by examining whether the model fits well with the kinetic parameters derived from the [Ca2+]c-increases obtained by applying gravistimulus with different amplitudes and time sequences. PMID:25763612

  2. Climate Change and Spatiotemporal Distributions of Vector-Borne Diseases in Nepal – A Systematic Synthesis of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dhimal, Meghnath; Ahrens, Bodo; Kuch, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its largely mountainous terrain for which this Himalayan country is a popular tourist destination, Nepal is now endemic for five major vector-borne diseases (VBDs), namely malaria, lymphatic filariasis, Japanese encephalitis, visceral leishmaniasis and dengue fever. There is increasing evidence about the impacts of climate change on VBDs especially in tropical highlands and temperate regions. Our aim is to explore whether the observed spatiotemporal distributions of VBDs in Nepal can be related to climate change. Methodology A systematic literature search was performed and summarized information on climate change and the spatiotemporal distribution of VBDs in Nepal from the published literature until December2014 following providing items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Principal Findings We found 12 studies that analysed the trend of climatic data and are relevant for the study of VBDs, 38 studies that dealt with the spatial and temporal distribution of disease vectors and disease transmission. Among 38 studies, only eight studies assessed the association of VBDs with climatic variables. Our review highlights a pronounced warming in the mountains and an expansion of autochthonous cases of VBDs to non-endemic areas including mountain regions (i.e., at least 2,000 m above sea level). Furthermore, significant relationships between climatic variables and VBDs and their vectors are found in short-term studies. Conclusion Taking into account the weak health care systems and difficult geographic terrain of Nepal, increasing trade and movements of people, a lack of vector control interventions, observed relationships between climatic variables and VBDs and their vectors and the establishment of relevant disease vectors already at least 2,000 m above sea level, we conclude that climate change can intensify the risk of VBD epidemics in the mountain regions of Nepal if other non-climatic drivers of VBDs remain constant. PMID:26086887

  3. Winds of Change: How Black Holes May Shape Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    New observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provide evidence for powerful winds blowing away from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy. This discovery indicates that "average" supermassive black holes may play an important role in the evolution of the galaxies in which they reside. For years, astronomers have known that a supermassive black hole grows in parallel with its host galaxy. And, it has long been suspected that material blown away from a black hole - as opposed to the fraction of material that falls into it -- alters the evolution of its host galaxy. A key question is whether such "black hole blowback" typically delivers enough power to have a significant impact. Powerful relativistic jets shot away from the biggest supermassive black holes in large, central galaxies in clusters like Perseus are seen to shape their host galaxies, but these are rare. What about less powerful, less focused galaxy-scale winds that should be much more common? "We're more interested here in seeing what an "average"-sized supermassive black hole can do to its galaxy, not the few, really big ones in the biggest galaxies," said Dan Evans of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who presented these results at the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Kona, Hawaii. Evans and his colleagues used Chandra for five days to observe NGC 1068, one of the nearest and brightest galaxies containing a rapidly growing supermassive black hole. This black hole is only about twice as massive as the one in the center of our Galaxy, which is considered to be a rather ordinary size. The X-ray images and spectra obtained using Chandra's High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) showed that a strong wind is being driven away from the center of NGC 1068 at a rate of about a million miles per hour. This wind is likely generated as surrounding gas is accelerated and heated as it swirls toward the black hole. A portion of the gas is pulled into the black hole, but some of it is blown away. High energy X-rays produced by the gas near the black hole heat the ouflowing gas, causing it to glow at lower X-ray energies. This Chandra study by Evans and his colleagues is much deeper than previous X-ray observations. It allowed them to make a high-definition map of the cone-shaped volume lit up by the black hole and its winds. By combining measurement of the velocity of the clouds with estimates of the density of the gas, Evans and his colleagues showed that each year several times the mass of the Sun is being deposited out to large distances, about 3,000 light years from the black hole. The wind may carry enough energy to heat the surrounding gas and suppress extra star formation. "We have shown that even these middle-of-the-road black holes can pack a punch," said Evans. "I think the upshot is that these black holes are anything but ordinary." Further Chandra HETGS studies of other nearby galaxies will examine the impact of other AGN outflows, leading to improvements in our understanding of the evolution of both galaxies and black holes. "In the future, our own Galaxy's black hole may undergo similar activity, helping to shut down the growth of new stars in the central region of the Milky Way," said Evans. These new results provide a key comparison to previous work performed at Georgia State University and the Catholic University of America with the Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. More information, including images and other multimedia, can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  4. Downscaling of precipitation for climate change scenarios: A support vector machine approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shivam; Srinivas, V. V.; Nanjundiah, Ravi S.

    2006-11-01

    SummaryThe Climate impact studies in hydrology often rely on climate change information at fine spatial resolution. However, general circulation models (GCMs), which are among the most advanced tools for estimating future climate change scenarios, operate on a coarse scale. Therefore the output from a GCM has to be downscaled to obtain the information relevant to hydrologic studies. In this paper, a support vector machine (SVM) approach is proposed for statistical downscaling of precipitation at monthly time scale. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated through its application to meteorological sub-divisions (MSDs) in India. First, climate variables affecting spatio-temporal variation of precipitation at each MSD in India are identified. Following this, the data pertaining to the identified climate variables (predictors) at each MSD are classified using cluster analysis to form two groups, representing wet and dry seasons. For each MSD, SVM- based downscaling model (DM) is developed for season(s) with significant rainfall using principal components extracted from the predictors as input and the contemporaneous precipitation observed at the MSD as an output. The proposed DM is shown to be superior to conventional downscaling using multi-layer back-propagation artificial neural networks. Subsequently, the SVM-based DM is applied to future climate predictions from the second generation Coupled Global Climate Model (CGCM2) to obtain future projections of precipitation for the MSDs. The results are then analyzed to assess the impact of climate change on precipitation over India. It is shown that SVMs provide a promising alternative to conventional artificial neural networks for statistical downscaling, and are suitable for conducting climate impact studies.

  5. Evaluation of wind vectors observed by HY-2A scatterometer using ocean buoy observations, ASCAT measurements, and numerical model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dawei; Shen, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The first Chinese microwave ocean environment satellite HY-2A was launched successfully in August, 2011. This study presents a quality assessment of HY-2A scatterometer (HYSCAT) data based on comparison with ocean buoy data, the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) data, and numerical model data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The in-situ observations include those from buoy arrays operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) project. Only buoys located offshore and in deep water were analyzed. The temporal and spatial collocation windows between HYSCAT data and buoy observations were 30 min and 25 km, respectively. The comparisons showed that the wind speeds and directions observed by HYSCAT agree well with the buoy data. The root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs) of wind speed and direction for the HYSCAT standard wind products are 1.90 m/s and 22.80°, respectively. For the HYSCAT-ASCAT comparison, the temporal and spatial differences were limited to 1 h and 25 km, respectively. This comparison yielded RMSEs of 1.68 m/s for wind speed and 19.1° for wind direction. We also compared HYSCAT winds with reanalysis data from NCEP. The results show that the RMSEs of wind speed and direction are 2.6 m/s and 26°, respectively. The global distribution of wind speed residuals (HYSCAT-NCEP) is also presented here for evaluation of the HYSCAT-retrieved wind field globally. Considering the large temporal and spatial differences of the collocated data, it is concluded that the HYSCAT-retrieved wind speed and direction met the mission requirements, which were 2 m/s and 20° for wind speeds in the range 2-24 m/s. These encouraging assessment results show that the wind data obtained from HYSCAT will be useful for the scientific community.

  6. Wind-tunnel investigation of the powered low-speed longitudinal aerodynamics of the Vectored-Engine-Over (VEO) wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W.; Whitten, P. D.; Stumpfl, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation incorporating both static and wind-on testing was conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the effects of vectored thrust along with spanwise blowing on the low-speed aerodynamics of an advanced fighter configuration. Data were obtained over a large range of thrust coefficients corresponding to takeoff and landing thrust settings for many nozzle configurations. The complete set of static thrust data and the complete set of longitudinal aerodynamic data obtained in the investigation are presented. These data are intended for reference purposes and, therefore, are presented without analysis or comment. The analysis of the thrust-induced effects found in the investigation are not discussed.

  7. Support vector machines for detecting age-related changes in running kinematics.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Reginaldo K; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Duarte, Marcos; Ferber, Reed

    2011-02-01

    Age-related changes in running kinematics have been reported in the literature using classical inferential statistics. However, this approach has been hampered by the increased number of biomechanical gait variables reported and subsequently the lack of differences presented in these studies. Data mining techniques have been applied in recent biomedical studies to solve this problem using a more general approach. In the present work, we re-analyzed lower extremity running kinematic data of 17 young and 17 elderly male runners using the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification approach. In total, 31 kinematic variables were extracted to train the classification algorithm and test the generalized performance. The results revealed different accuracy rates across three different kernel methods adopted in the classifier, with the linear kernel performing the best. A subsequent forward feature selection algorithm demonstrated that with only six features, the linear kernel SVM achieved 100% classification performance rate, showing that these features provided powerful combined information to distinguish age groups. The results of the present work demonstrate potential in applying this approach to improve knowledge about the age-related differences in running gait biomechanics and encourages the use of the SVM in other clinical contexts. PMID:20980005

  8. An Ill Wind? Climate Change, Migration, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Background: Climate change is projected to cause substantial increases in population movement in coming decades. Previous research has considered the likely causal influences and magnitude of such movements and the risks to national and international security. There has been little research on the consequences of climate-related migration and the health of people who move. Objectives: In this review, we explore the role that health impacts of climate change may play in population movements and then examine the health implications of three types of movements likely to be induced by climate change: forcible displacement by climate impacts, resettlement schemes, and migration as an adaptive response. Methods: This risk assessment draws on research into the health of refugees, migrants, and people in resettlement schemes as analogs of the likely health consequences of climate-related migration. Some account is taken of the possible modulation of those health risks by climate change. Discussion: Climate-change–related migration is likely to result in adverse health outcomes, both for displaced and for host populations, particularly in situations of forced migration. However, where migration and other mobility are used as adaptive strategies, health risks are likely to be minimized, and in some cases there will be health gains. Conclusions: Purposeful and timely policy interventions can facilitate the mobility of people, enhance well-being, and maximize social and economic development in both places of origin and places of destination. Nevertheless, the anticipated occurrence of substantial relocation of groups and communities will underscore the fundamental seriousness of human-induced climate change. PMID:22266739

  9. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-01-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  10. ERS-1 scatterometer calibration and validation activities at ECMWF. B: From radar backscatter characteristics to wind vector solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffelen, AD; Anderson, David L. T.; Woiceshyn, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    Calibration and validation activities for the ERS-1 scatterometer were carried out at ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast) complementary to the 'Haltenbanken' field campaign off the coast of Norway. At a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) center a wealth of verifying data is available both in time and space. This data is used to redefine the wind retrieval procedure given the instrumental characteristics. It was found that a maximum likelihood estimation procedure to obtain the coefficients of a reformulated sigma deg to wind relationship should use radar measurements in logarithmic rather than physical space, and use winds as the wind components rather than wind speed and direction. Doing this, a much more accurate transfer function than the one currently operated by ESA was derived. Sigma deg measurement space shows no signature of a separation in an upwind solution cone and a downwind solution cone. As such signature was anticipated in ESA's wind direction ambiguity removal algorithm, reconsideration of the procedure is necessary. Despite the fact that revisions have to be made in the process of wind retrieval; a grid potential is shown for scatterometry in meteorology and climatology.

  11. Implications of climate change on wind erosion of agricultural lands in the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change may impact soil health and productivity as a result of accelerated or decelerated rates of erosion. Previous studies suggest a greater risk of wind erosion on arid and semi-arid lands due to loss of biomass under a future warmer climate. There have been no studies conducted to assess ...

  12. Winds of Change: Charting the Course for IT in the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Brian L.

    2007-01-01

    In the spring of 2005, the author, the retiring president of EDUCAUSE, was asked to be the keynote speaker at the EDUCAUSE Western Regional Conference. The conference theme was "Winds of Change: Charting the Course for Technology in Challenging Times." What that brought to his mind was the era of the great sailing ships of the eighteenth and…

  13. Short Term Wind Forecasting for Sites with Abrupt Roughness and Thermal Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Taylor, P. A.; Weng, W.; Salmon, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    With the increasing penetration of wind power to the electrical grid, the importance of short-term wind energy forecasting from hours to 2-3 days ahead has been recognized. Typically, the outputs of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models are used to drive the forecasting system with forecast horizons of a few hours. We are studying the coupling of the local-scale models with North America regional NWP models such as GEM and NAM and nested meso-scale models for site specific wind and wind energy forecasting for wind farms near abrupt roughness and thermal changes. The goal is for real-time wind forecasts from 1 hour to 48 hours and comparison with field measurements at one or more sites in southern Ontario. Local, site specific, winds are affected on a local scale by a variety of factors. These include topography, on a range of scales, surface roughness and its spatial variation, surface temperatures or thermal properties and wakes behind surface mounted obstacles. On the meso-scale, effects such as sea or lake breezes and channelling effects are important factors. These local effects are generally not properly represented in meso-scale models, with a resolution of order 2-10 km. We will use various methods to simulate these local effects in our forecasting system. These include numerical vertical and horizontal interpolations and the use of models of flow in complex terrain. The results will be examined using the Mean Absolute Error and Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE). A decomposition of RMSE into amplitude and phase error will assist in identifying the forecasting errors and selecting MOS procedures for improving the forecasting. A comparison between the forecasted and measured wind speed at 80-m, the typical turbine hub height, shows encouraging results.

  14. SeaWinds Scatterometer Wind Vector Retrievals Within Hurricanes Using AMSR and NEXRAD to Perform Corrections for Precipitation Effects: Comparison of AMSR and NEXRAD Retrievals of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla; Callahan, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The opportunity provided by satellite scatterometers to measure ocean surface winds in strong storms and hurricanes is diminished by the errors in the received backscatter (SIGMA-0) caused by the attenuation, scattering and surface roughening produced by heavy rain. Providing a good rain correction is a very challenging problem, particularly at Ku band (13.4 GHz) where rain effects are strong. Corrections to the scatterometer measurements of ocean surface winds can be pursued with either of two different methods: empirical or physical modeling. The latter method is employed in this study because of the availability of near simultaneous and collocated measurements provided by the MIDORI-II suite of instruments. The AMSR was designed to measure atmospheric water-related parameters on a spatial scale comparable to the SeaWinds scatterometer. These quantities can be converted into volumetric attenuation and scattering at the Ku-band frequency of SeaWinds. Optimal estimates of the volume backscatter and attenuation require a knowledge of the three dimensional distribution of reflectivity on a scale comparable to that of the precipitation. Studies selected near the US coastline enable the much higher resolution NEXRAD reflectivity measurements evaluate the AMSR estimates. We are also conducting research into the effects of different beam geometries and nonuniform beamfilling of precipitation within the field-of-view of the AMSR and the scatterometer. Furthermore, both AMSR and NEXRAD estimates of atmospheric correction can be used to produce corrected SIGMA-0s, which are then input to the JPL wind retrieval algorithm.

  15. Titan's rotation reveals an internal ocean and changing zonal winds.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ralph D; Stiles, Bryan W; Kirk, Randolph L; Allison, Michael D; Del Marmo, Paolo Persi; Iess, Luciano; Lunine, Jonathan I; Ostro, Steven J; Hensley, Scott

    2008-03-21

    Cassini radar observations of Saturn's moon Titan over several years show that its rotational period is changing and is different from its orbital period. The present-day rotation period difference from synchronous spin leads to a shift of approximately 0.36 degrees per year in apparent longitude and is consistent with seasonal exchange of angular momentum between the surface and Titan's dense superrotating atmosphere, but only if Titan's crust is decoupled from the core by an internal water ocean like that on Europa. PMID:18356521

  16. Spatial Orientation and Balance Control Changes Induced by Altered Gravito-Inertial Force Vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Galen D.; Wood, Scott J.; Gianna, Claire C.; Black, F. Owen; Paloski, William H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Seventeen healthy and eight vestibular deficient subjects were exposed to an interaural centripetal acceleration of 1 G (resultant 45 deg roll tilt of 1.4 G) on a 0.8 meter radius centrifuge for a period of 90 minutes in the dark. The subjects sat with head fixed upright, except every 4 of 10 minutes when instructed to rotate their head so that their nose and eyes pointed towards a visual point switched on every 3 to 5 seconds at random places (within +/- 30 deg) in the Earth horizontal plane. Motion sickness caused some subjects to limit their head movements during significant portions of the 90 minute period, and led three normal subjects to stop the test earlier. Eye movements, including directed saccades for subjective Earth- and head-referenced planes, were recorded before, during, and immediately after centrifugation using electro-oculography. Postural stability measurements were made before and within ten minutes after centrifugation. In normal subjects, postural sway and multisegment body kinematics were gathered during an eyes-closed head movement cadence (sway-referenced support platform), and in response to translational/rotational platform perturbations. A significant increase in postural sway, segmental motion amplitude and hip frequency was observed after centrifugation. This effect was short-lived, with a recovery time of several postural test trials. There were also asymmetries in the direction of post-centrifugation center of sway and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). To delineate the effect of the magnitude of the gravito-inertial vector versus its direction during the adaptive centrifugation period, we tilted eight normal subjects in the roll axis at a 45 deg angle in the dark for 90 minutes without rotational motion. Their postural responses did not change following the period of tilt. Based on verbal reports, normal subjects overestimated roll-tilt during 90 minutes of both tilt and centrifugation stimuli. Subjective estimates of head-horizontal, provided by directed saccades, revealed significant errors after approximately 30 minutes that tended to increase only in the group who underwent centrifugation. Immediately after centrifugation, subjects reported feeling tilted on average 10 degrees in the opposite direction, which was in agreement with the direction of their earth-directed saccades. In vestibular deficient (VD) subjects, postural sway was measured using a sway-referenced or earth-fixed support surface, and with or without a head movement sequence. 'Me protocol was selected for each patient during baseline testing, and corresponded to the most challenging condition in which the patient was able to maintain balance with eyes closed. Bilaterally VD subjects showed no postural decrement after centrifugation, while unilateral VD subjects had varying degrees of decrement. Unilateral VD subjects were tested twice; they underwent centrifugation both with right ear out and left ear out. Their post-centrifuation center of sway shifted at right angles depending on the centrifuge GIF orientation. Bilateral VD subjects bad shifts as well, but no consistent directional trend. VD subjects underestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation, These results suggest that orientation of the gravito-inertial vector and its magnitude arc both used by the central nervous system for calibration of multiple orientation systems. A change in the background gravito-inertial force (otolith input) can rapidly initiate postural and perceptual adaptation in several sensorimotor systems, independent of a structured visual surround.

  17. Changing patterns of West Nile virus transmission: altered vector competence and host susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Aaron C.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a flavivirus (Flaviviridae) transmitted between Culex spp. mosquitoes and avian hosts. The virus has dramatically expanded its geographic range in the past ten years. Increases in global commerce, climate change, ecological factors and the emergence of novel viral genotypes likely play significant roles in the emergence of this virus; however, the exact mechanism and relative importance of each is uncertain. Previously WNV was primarily associated with febrile illness of children in endemic areas, but it was identified as a cause of neurological disease in humans in 1994. This modulation in disease presentation could be the result of the emergence of a more virulent genotype as well as the progression of the virus into areas in which the age structure of immunologically naïve individuals makes them more susceptible to severe neurological disease. Since its introduction to North America in 1999, a novel WNV genotype has been identified that has been demonstrated to disseminate more rapidly and with greater efficiency at elevated temperatures than the originally introduced strain, indicating the potential importance of temperature as a selective criteria for the emergence of WNV genotypes with increased vectorial capacity. Even prior to the North American introduction, a mutation associated with increased replication in avian hosts, identified to be under adaptive evolutionary pressure, has been identified, indicating that adaptation for increased replication within vertebrate hosts could play a role in increased transmission efficiency. Although stable in its evolutionary structure, WNV has demonstrated the capacity for rapidly adapting to both vertebrate hosts and invertebrate vectors and will likely continue to exploit novel ecological niches as it adapts to novel transmission foci. PMID:19406093

  18. Will people change their vector-control practices in the presence of an imperfect dengue vaccine?

    PubMed

    Boccia, T M Q R; Burattini, M N; Coutinho, F A B; Massad, E

    2014-03-01

    Human behaviours, which are influenced by social, cultural, economic and political factors, can increase or decrease the risk of dengue infection, depending on the relationship with the insect vector. Because no vaccine is currently available, the spread of dengue can only be curtailed by controlling vector populations (Aedes aegypti and others) and by protecting individuals. This study tested the hypothesis that dengue-affected populations are likely to relax their vector-control habits if a potentially protective vaccine becomes available. The hypothesis was tested using two approaches: a mathematical model designed to describe dengue transmission and an empirical field test in which the local population of an endemic area was interviewed about their vector-control habits given the presence of a theoretical vaccine. The model demonstrated that depending on the level of vector-control reduction, there is a threshold in vaccine efficacy below which it is better not to introduce the vaccine. The interview showed that people who were informed that a very effective vaccine is available would reduce their vector-control habits significantly compared to a group that was informed that the vaccine is not very effective. PMID:23735007

  19. Histomorphometric analysis of the temporal bone after change of direction of force vector of mandible: an experimental study in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    PURICELLI, Edela; PONZONI, Deise; MUNARETTO, Jéssica Cerioli; CORSETTI, Adriana; LEITE, Mauro Gomes Trein

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The present study aimed at performing a histological evaluation of the response of temporal bone tissue to a change of direction of the force vector of the mandible in relation to the base of the skull. Material and methods Adult rabbits were assigned into four groups with two control and four experimental animals in each group. Experimental animals underwent surgery, which resulted in a change of direction of the force vector on the right temporomandibular joint. Samples were collected after 15, 30, 60 and 90 days for histological analysis. Results In the two-way analysis of variance, the effect of group and time was statistically significant (p<0.001). Additionally, a statistically significant interaction between group and time was observed (p<0.001). Control animals showed normal growth and development of the temporal region. In the experimental group, the change in direction of the force vector of the mandible induced significant changes in the temporal bone, with a bone modeling process, which suggests growth of this cranial structure. Conclusions The methodology used in this experiment allows us to conclude that the change in direction of the force vector of the mandible in relation to the skull base induces remodeling and modeling processes in the temporal bone. The resumption of normal oral functions after bone healing of the mandibular fracture appears to increase cell activation in the remodeling and modeling of the temporal bone structure. The observation of areas of temporal bone modeling shows the relevance of further investigation on the correlation between the joint structures and craniofacial growth and development. PMID:23138738

  20. Catastrophic wind damage to North American forests and the potential impact of climate change.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C J

    2000-11-15

    Catastrophic winds from tornadoes and downbursts are a major cause of natural disturbance in forests of eastern North America, accounting for thousands of hectares of disturbed area annually. Wind disturbance shows substantial regional variation, decreasing from the mid-west to the east and from the south-east to New England. In terms of the relative importance among these types of storms, more forest damage results from tornadoes in the south-east and mid-west, while downbursts are the most important type of wind disturbance in the Great Lakes area. Downbursts vary widely in size, but large ones can damage thousands of hectares, while tornadoes are much smaller, seldom affecting more than several hundred hectares. Tornadoes cause the most severe wind disturbances. Site characteristics such as physiography, soil moisture, and soil depth; stand characteristics like density and canopy roughness; and tree characteristics such as size, species, rooting depth, and wood strength, are the factors most recognized as influencing damage patterns. The consequences of wind damage to forests, such as change in environmental conditions, density, size structure, species composition, and successional status, occur on both immediate (hours-to-days) and long-term (months-to-decades) time scales. Most wind disturbances result in the post-disturbance vegetation being comprised of surviving canopy trees, and varying amounts of sprouts, released understory stems, and new seedlings. Stand size structure is usually reduced, and successional status of a forest is often advanced. Diversity can be either increased or decreased, depending on the measure of abundance used to calculate diversity. Because tornadoes and downbursts are in part products of thermodynamic climatic circumstances, they may be affected by anticipated changes in climatic conditions as the 21st century progresses. However, the current understanding of tornado and downburst formation from supercell storms is very incomplete, and climate-change model predictions sufficiently coarse, that predictions of changes in frequency, size, intensity, or timing of these extreme events must be regarded as highly uncertain. Moreover, retrospective approaches that employ tree demography and dendrochronology require prohibitively large sample sizes to resolve details of the relationship between climate fluctuations and characteristics of these storms. To improve predictions of changes in the climatology of these storms, we need improved understanding of the genesis of tornadoes and downbursts within thunderstorms, and greater resolution in global climate models. To improve coping strategies, forest scientists can contribute by giving more attention to how various silvicultural actions influence stand and tree vulnerability. Finally, increased focus on the dynamics of forest recovery and regrowth may suggest management actions that can facilitate desired objectives after one of these unpredictable wind disturbances. PMID:11087033

  1. Large warming trends associated with blocked winds over the Antarctic Peninsula and changes in zonal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, A.; Hunt, J.; Light, M.; Cresswell, D.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of surface temperature (ST) anomalies of the Antarctic for the period 1982-1998 has shown that the largest warming trend in the world occurs on the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula (by approximately 1.0{o}C over the past 20 years). This is associated with related warming of the peripheral seas and decrease of the sea-ice extent (Kwok and Comiso, 2002). This can be studied by considering how zonal winds interact with the mountains (2km high) of the peninsula. Since westerly winds are turned southwards through Coriolis forces, warmer air over the southern ocean is transported to the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. On its eastern side (warming of approximately 0.5{o}C over the past 20 years), strong southerly katabatic winds overcome the weak northerly synoptically driven flows and flow along the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. However for easterly winds passing over the Weddell Sea, Coriolis forces cause winds which add to the cold katabatic southerly winds from the Antarctic plateau. Both these types of wind cool the east and west sides of the peninsula. Therefore the observed increase in the frequency of westerly winds should cause a net warming, particularly on the western side, as recent synoptic data from the NCEP/ECMWF reanalysis project has shown for the past 20 years (Kwok and Comiso, 2002). This concept has been tested using detailed modelling of the stably stratified atmospheric flows over the peninsula. The idealised 2-layer model of Hunt et al. (2002) for typical mesoscale atmospheric flows with sharp variations in surface roughness and mountainous elevation verifies the above flow behaviour for easterly and westerly winds perpendicular to a `cape' such as the Antarctic Peninsula. Numerical modelling using the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM) at 12km resolution showed a flow response which agrees with observational weather station data on the eastern side. But it is less satisfactory on the western side where the katabatic winds are not (at present) accurately represented. \\vspace{0.1cm} References: \\vspace{0.1cm} Kwok, R. and Comiso, J. C., `Spatial patterns of variability in Antarctic surface temperature: Connections to the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode and the Southern Oscillation', Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, No. 10, 2002. \\vspace{0.1cm} Hunt, J. C. R., Orr, A., Rottman, J. and Capon, R., `Coriolis effects in mesoscale flows with sharp changes in surface conditions', Submitted to Q. J. Roy. Met. Soc, 2002.

  2. The role of Southern Ocean winds and CO2 in glacial abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, R.; Alvarez-Solas, J.; Montoya, M.

    2011-12-01

    The last glacial period (ca. 110-10 kyr before present, hereafter kyr BP) is characterized by substantial climate instability, manifested as climatic variability on millennial timescales. Two types of events dominate this variability: Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, which involve decadal-scale warming by more than 10K, and Heinrich events, massive iceberg discharges from the Laurentide Ice Sheet at intervals of ca. 10 kyr during peak glacial conditions. Both DO and Heinrich events are associated with widespread centennial to millennial scale climatic changes, including a synchronous temperature response over the North Atlantic and an anti-phase temperature relationship over Antarctica and most of the Southern Ocean, as revealed by a wealth of deep sea sediments and terrestrial record. Recent studies indicate CO2 changes during deglaciation and, possibly, during glacial abrupt climate changes were preceded by significant increases of Southern Ocean upwelling caused by an enhancement and/or a shift of surface winds over that region. The proposed hypothesis is that periods of halted or reduced North Atlantic deep water (NADW) formation resulted in warming of the Southern Ocean through the bipolar see-saw effect leading to a reorganization of Southern Hemisphere (SH) surface winds, and thereby enhanced upwelling and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, the role of SH surface wind and CO2 changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is analyzed in a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. We investigate whether changes in the former could eventually trigger an intensification of the Atlantic overturning circulation and a northward shift of NADW formation, which would allow to explain glacial abrupt climate changes as the result of an oscillation which involves the MOC, CO2 and the winds.

  3. Determination of statistics for any rotation of axes of a bivariate normal elliptical distribution. [of wind vector components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falls, L. W.; Crutcher, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    Transformation of statistics from a dimensional set to another dimensional set involves linear functions of the original set of statistics. Similarly, linear functions will transform statistics within a dimensional set such that the new statistics are relevant to a new set of coordinate axes. A restricted case of the latter is the rotation of axes in a coordinate system involving any two correlated random variables. A special case is the transformation for horizontal wind distributions. Wind statistics are usually provided in terms of wind speed and direction (measured clockwise from north) or in east-west and north-south components. A direct application of this technique allows the determination of appropriate wind statistics parallel and normal to any preselected flight path of a space vehicle. Among the constraints for launching space vehicles are critical values selected from the distribution of the expected winds parallel to and normal to the flight path. These procedures are applied to space vehicle launches at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

  4. ASCAT wind quality under high subcell wind variability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenming; Portabella, Marcos; Stoffelen, Ad; Vogelzang, Jur; Verhoef, Anton

    2015-08-01

    The assessment and validation of the quality of satellite scatterometer vector winds is challenging under increased subcell wind variability conditions, since reference wind sources such as buoy winds or model output represent very different spatial scales from those resolved by scatterometers (i.e., increased representativeness error). In this paper, moored buoy wind time series are used to assess the correlation between subcell wind variability and several Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT)-derived parameters, such as the wind-inversion residual, the backscatter measurement variability factor, and the singularity exponents derived from an image processing technique, called singularity analysis. It is proven that all three ASCAT parameters are sensitive to the subcell wind variability and complementary in flagging the most variable winds, which is useful for further application. A triple collocation (TC) analysis of ASCAT, buoy, and the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) model output is then performed to assess the quality of each wind data source under different variability conditions. A novel approach is used to compute the representativeness errors, a key ingredient for the TC analysis. The experimental results show that the estimated errors of each wind source increase as the subcell wind variability increases. When temporally averaged buoy winds are used instead of 10 min buoy winds, the TC analysis results in smaller buoy wind errors (notably at increased wind variability conditions) while ASCAT and ECMWF errors do not significantly change, further validating the proposed TC approach. It is concluded that at 25 km resolution, ASCAT provides the best quality winds in general.

  5. Impacts of Climate Change on Vector Borne Diseases in the Mediterranean Basin — Implications for Preparedness and Adaptation Policy

    PubMed Central

    Negev, Maya; Paz, Shlomit; Clermont, Alexandra; Pri-Or, Noemie Groag; Shalom, Uri; Yeger, Tamar; Green, Manfred S.

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is vulnerable to climatic changes. A warming trend exists in the basin with changes in rainfall patterns. It is expected that vector-borne diseases (VBD) in the region will be influenced by climate change since weather conditions influence their emergence. For some diseases (i.e., West Nile virus) the linkage between emergence andclimate change was recently proved; for others (such as dengue) the risk for local transmission is real. Consequently, adaptation and preparation for changing patterns of VBD distribution is crucial in the Mediterranean basin. We analyzed six representative Mediterranean countries and found that they have started to prepare for this threat, but the preparation levels among them differ, and policy mechanisms are limited and basic. Furthermore, cross-border cooperation is not stable and depends on international frameworks. The Mediterranean countries should improve their adaptation plans, and develop more cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary and participatory approaches. In addition, based on experience from existing local networks in advancing national legislation and trans-border cooperation, we outline recommendations for a regional cooperation framework. We suggest that a stable and neutral framework is required, and that it should address the characteristics and needs of African, Asian and European countries around the Mediterranean in order to ensure participation. Such a regional framework is essential to reduce the risk of VBD transmission, since the vectors of infectious diseases know no political borders. PMID:26084000

  6. Detection and Monitoring of Spatio-temporal Change in the Distribution of Mosquito Vector Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosquitoes transmit blood-borne disease agents that cause morbidity and mortality in human and animal populations. Preemption of epidemics/epizootics of mosquito-borne disease is predicated on the timely and effective application of vector control. Such timing is decided on the basis of adult mosq...

  7. Spatial orientation and balance control changes induced by altered gravitoinertial force vectors.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, G D; Wood, S J; Gianna, C C; Black, F O; Paloski, W H

    2001-04-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of human adaptation to rotating environments, we exposed 19 healthy subjects and 8 vestibular-deficient subjects ("abnormal"; four bilateral and four unilateral lesions) to an interaural centripetal acceleration of 1 g (resultant 45 degrees roll-tilt of 1.4 g) on a 0.8-m-radius centrifuge for periods of 90 min. The subjects sat upright (body z-axis parallel to centrifuge rotation axis) in the dark with head stationary, except during 4 min of every 10 min, when they performed head saccades toward visual targets switched on at 3- to 5-s intervals at random locations (within +/- 30 degrees) in the earth-horizontal plane. Eight of the normal subjects also performed the head saccade protocol in a stationary chair adjusted to a static roll-tilt angle of 45 degrees for 90 min (reproducing the change in orientation but not the magnitude of the gravitoinertial force on the centrifuge). Eye movements, including voluntary saccades directed along perceived earth- and head-referenced planes, were recorded before, during, and immediately after centrifugation. Postural center of pressure (COP) and multisegment body kinematics were also gathered before and within 10 min after centrifugation. Normal subjects overestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation and revealed errors in perception of head-vertical provided by directed saccades. Errors in this perceptual response tended to increase with time and became significant after approximately 30 min. Motion-sickness symptoms caused approximately 25% of normal subjects to limit their head movements during centrifugation and led three normal subjects to stop the test early. Immediately after centrifugation, subjects reported feeling tilted 10 degrees in the opposite direction, which was in agreement with the direction of their earth-referenced directed saccades. Postural COP, segmental body motion amplitude, and hip-sway frequency increased significantly after centrifugation. These postural effects were short-lived, however, with a recovery time of several postural test trials (minutes). There were also asymmetries in the direction of postcentrifugation COP and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). The amount of total head movements during centrifugation correlated poorly or inversely with postcentrifugation postural stability, and the most unstable subject made no head movements. There was no decrease in postural stability after static tilt, although these subjects also reported a perceived tilt briefly after return to upright, and they also had COP asymmetries. Abnormal subjects underestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation, and their directed saccades revealed permanent spatial distortions. Bilateral abnormal subjects started out with poor postural control, but showed no postural decrements after centrifugation, while unilateral abnormal subjects had varying degrees of postural decrement, both in their everyday function and as a result of experiencing the centrifugation. In addition, three unilateral, abnormal subjects, who rode twice in opposite orientations, revealed a consistent orthogonal pattern of COP offsets after centrifugation. These results suggest that both orientation and magnitude of the gravitoinertial vector are used by the central nervous system for calibration of multiple orientation systems. A change in the background gravitoinertial force (otolith input) can rapidly initiate postural and perceptual adaptation in several sensorimotor systems, independent of a structured visual surround. PMID:11355385

  8. Spatial orientation and balance control changes induced by altered gravitoinertial force vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Wood, S. J.; Gianna, C. C.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of human adaptation to rotating environments, we exposed 19 healthy subjects and 8 vestibular-deficient subjects ("abnormal"; four bilateral and four unilateral lesions) to an interaural centripetal acceleration of 1 g (resultant 45 degrees roll-tilt of 1.4 g) on a 0.8-m-radius centrifuge for periods of 90 min. The subjects sat upright (body z-axis parallel to centrifuge rotation axis) in the dark with head stationary, except during 4 min of every 10 min, when they performed head saccades toward visual targets switched on at 3- to 5-s intervals at random locations (within +/- 30 degrees) in the earth-horizontal plane. Eight of the normal subjects also performed the head saccade protocol in a stationary chair adjusted to a static roll-tilt angle of 45 degrees for 90 min (reproducing the change in orientation but not the magnitude of the gravitoinertial force on the centrifuge). Eye movements, including voluntary saccades directed along perceived earth- and head-referenced planes, were recorded before, during, and immediately after centrifugation. Postural center of pressure (COP) and multisegment body kinematics were also gathered before and within 10 min after centrifugation. Normal subjects overestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation and revealed errors in perception of head-vertical provided by directed saccades. Errors in this perceptual response tended to increase with time and became significant after approximately 30 min. Motion-sickness symptoms caused approximately 25% of normal subjects to limit their head movements during centrifugation and led three normal subjects to stop the test early. Immediately after centrifugation, subjects reported feeling tilted 10 degrees in the opposite direction, which was in agreement with the direction of their earth-referenced directed saccades. Postural COP, segmental body motion amplitude, and hip-sway frequency increased significantly after centrifugation. These postural effects were short-lived, however, with a recovery time of several postural test trials (minutes). There were also asymmetries in the direction of postcentrifugation COP and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). The amount of total head movements during centrifugation correlated poorly or inversely with postcentrifugation postural stability, and the most unstable subject made no head movements. There was no decrease in postural stability after static tilt, although these subjects also reported a perceived tilt briefly after return to upright, and they also had COP asymmetries. Abnormal subjects underestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation, and their directed saccades revealed permanent spatial distortions. Bilateral abnormal subjects started out with poor postural control, but showed no postural decrements after centrifugation, while unilateral abnormal subjects had varying degrees of postural decrement, both in their everyday function and as a result of experiencing the centrifugation. In addition, three unilateral, abnormal subjects, who rode twice in opposite orientations, revealed a consistent orthogonal pattern of COP offsets after centrifugation. These results suggest that both orientation and magnitude of the gravitoinertial vector are used by the central nervous system for calibration of multiple orientation systems. A change in the background gravitoinertial force (otolith input) can rapidly initiate postural and perceptual adaptation in several sensorimotor systems, independent of a structured visual surround.

  9. Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons

    E-print Network

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    1 Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons Pet Laupattarakasem and W This paper presents a new hurricane ocean vector wind (OVW) product known as Q-Winds produced from the SeaWinds for tropical cyclones. SeaWinds OVW retrievals are presented for ten hurricane passes with near

  10. An assessment of wind energy potential in Iberia under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Santos, João A.; Rochinha, Carlos; Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2015-04-01

    Wind energy potential in Iberia is assessed for recent-past (1961-2000) and future (2041-2070) climates. For recent-past, a COSMO-CLM simulation driven by ERA-40 is used. COSMO-CLM simulations driven by ECHAM5 following the A1B scenario are used for future projections. A 2 MW rated power wind turbine is selected. Mean potentials, inter-annual variability and irregularity are discussed on annual/seasonal scales and on a grid resolution of 20 km. For detailed regional assessments eight target sites are considered. For recent-past conditions, the highest daily mean potentials are found in winter over northern and eastern Iberia, particularly on high-elevation or coastal regions. In northwestern Iberia, daily potentials frequently reach maximum wind energy output (50 MWh day-1), particularly in winter. Southern Andalucía reveals high potentials throughout the year, whereas the Ebro valley and central-western coast show high potentials in summer. The irregularity in annual potentials is moderate (<15% of mean output), but exacerbated in winter (40%). Climate change projections show significant decreases over most of Iberia (<2 MWh day-1). The strong enhancement of autumn potentials in Southern Andalucía is noteworthy (>2 MWh day-1). The northward displacement of North Atlantic westerly winds (autumn-spring) and the strengthening of easterly flows (summer) are key drivers of future projections. Santos, J.A.; Rochinha, C.; Liberato, M.L.R.; Reyers, M.; Pinto, J.G. (2015) Projected changes in wind energy potentials over Iberia. Renewable Energy, 75, 1: 68-80. doi: 10.1016/j.renene.2014.09.026 Acknowledgements: This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  11. Response of the Martian environment to solar wind dynamic pressure change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modolo, R.; Leblanc, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Curry, S.; Leclercq, L.; Chanteur, G. M.; Savoini, P.

    2014-12-01

    The main structures of the solar wind plasma interaction with the upper atmosphere can be usually described using a steady state picture, however time-dependent effects play important roles. In the last couple of years sophisticated 3D simulation try to address the response of the induced magnetosphere and its escape to different time-dependent drivers. Modolo et al (2012) discussed about timescales required for the induced magnetosphere to recover from an IMF rotation. Ma et al (2013) used time-varying solar wind conditions (density and velocity enhancement) and concluded that the ionospheric/atmospheric system reach a new equilibrium in few hours. We use a 3D parallel multi-species hybrid simulation model to study the response of the induced magnetosphere to a time-varying solar wind dynamic pressure. The hybrid model (Modolo et al, 2014, in prep) includes crustal fields, a ionospheric chemistry scheme and uses a 3D description of the Martian thermosphere (Chaufray et al, 2014) and exosphere (Yagi et al, 2012). The impact of a solar wind dynamic pressure change on plasma boundaries is discussed. A special attention is focused on the time-varying energy deposition in the upper atmosphere by O+ ions precipitation as well as the escape flux of planetary ions.

  12. Long-term changes in solar wind elemental and isotopic ratios - A comparison of two lunar ilmenites of different antiquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind components in two lunar ilmenites are examined. The noble gas and nitrogen elemental and isotopic abundances of lunar regolith breccia sample 79035, assumed to have been exposed to solar winds more than 2 Ga ago, are analyzed using stepwise oxidation and pyrolysis. This sample is compared with the data of Frick et al. (1988) for soil sample 71501, recently exposed to solar winds. It is observed that the two elements differ in terms of xenon abundance, helium and neon isotopic rates, and He/Ar elemental ratios. It is concluded that there have been isotopic and elemental abundance changes in solar wind composition over time.

  13. Global climate change and its potential impact on disease transmission by salinity-tolerant mosquito vectors in coastal zones.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Surendran, Sinnathamby Noble

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change can potentially increase the transmission of mosquito vector-borne diseases such as malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue in many parts of the world. These predictions are based on the effects of changing temperature, rainfall, and humidity on mosquito breeding and survival, the more rapid development of ingested pathogens in mosquitoes and the more frequent blood feeds at moderately higher ambient temperatures. An expansion of saline and brackish water bodies (water with <0.5?ppt or parts per thousand, 0.5-30?ppt and >30?ppt salt are termed fresh, brackish, and saline respectively) will also take place as a result of global warming causing a rise in sea levels in coastal zones. Its possible impact on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases has, however, not been adequately appreciated. The relevant impacts of global climate change on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones are discussed with reference to the Ross-McDonald equation and modeling studies. Evidence is presented to show that an expansion of brackish water bodies in coastal zones can increase the densities of salinity-tolerant mosquitoes like Anopheles sundaicus and Culex sitiens, and lead to the adaptation of fresh water mosquito vectors like Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes albopictus to salinity. Rising sea levels may therefore act synergistically with global climate change to increase the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones. Greater attention therefore needs to be devoted to monitoring disease incidence and preimaginal development of vector mosquitoes in artificial and natural coastal brackish/saline habitats. It is important that national and international health agencies are aware of the increased risk of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones and develop preventive and mitigating strategies. Application of appropriate counter measures can greatly reduce the potential for increased coastal transmission of mosquito-borne diseases consequent to climate change and a rise in sea levels. It is proposed that the Jaffna peninsula in Sri Lanka may be a useful case study for the impact of rising sea levels on mosquito vectors in tropical coasts. PMID:22723781

  14. Global Climate Change and Its Potential Impact on Disease Transmission by Salinity-Tolerant Mosquito Vectors in Coastal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Surendran, Sinnathamby Noble

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change can potentially increase the transmission of mosquito vector-borne diseases such as malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue in many parts of the world. These predictions are based on the effects of changing temperature, rainfall, and humidity on mosquito breeding and survival, the more rapid development of ingested pathogens in mosquitoes and the more frequent blood feeds at moderately higher ambient temperatures. An expansion of saline and brackish water bodies (water with <0.5?ppt or parts per thousand, 0.5–30?ppt and >30?ppt salt are termed fresh, brackish, and saline respectively) will also take place as a result of global warming causing a rise in sea levels in coastal zones. Its possible impact on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases has, however, not been adequately appreciated. The relevant impacts of global climate change on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones are discussed with reference to the Ross–McDonald equation and modeling studies. Evidence is presented to show that an expansion of brackish water bodies in coastal zones can increase the densities of salinity-tolerant mosquitoes like Anopheles sundaicus and Culex sitiens, and lead to the adaptation of fresh water mosquito vectors like Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes albopictus to salinity. Rising sea levels may therefore act synergistically with global climate change to increase the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones. Greater attention therefore needs to be devoted to monitoring disease incidence and preimaginal development of vector mosquitoes in artificial and natural coastal brackish/saline habitats. It is important that national and international health agencies are aware of the increased risk of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones and develop preventive and mitigating strategies. Application of appropriate counter measures can greatly reduce the potential for increased coastal transmission of mosquito-borne diseases consequent to climate change and a rise in sea levels. It is proposed that the Jaffna peninsula in Sri Lanka may be a useful case study for the impact of rising sea levels on mosquito vectors in tropical coasts. PMID:22723781

  15. Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind turbine is discussed in this

    E-print Network

    Kusiak, Andrew

    1 Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind prediction, power ramp rate, data mining, wind turbine operation strategy, generator torque, blade pitch to variations in wind speed, wind farms exhibit different characteristics from conventional power plants. Two

  16. Do changes in the size of mud flocs affect the acoustic backscatter values recorded by a Vector ADV?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, Mohamad; Keyvani, Ali; Strom, Kyle

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of mud floc growth on the acoustic back-scatter signal recorded by a Nortek Vector acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Several studies have shown that calibration equations can be developed to link the backscatter strength with average suspended sediment concentration (SSC) when the sediment particle size distribution remains constant. However, when mud is present, the process of flocculation can alter the suspended particle size distribution. Past studies have shown that it is still unclear as to the degree of dependence of the calibration equation on changes in floc size. Part of the ambiguity lies in the fact that flocs can be porous and rather loosely packed and therefore will not scatter sound waves as a solid particle would. In addition, direct, detailed measurements of floc size have not accompanied experiments examining the dependence of ADV backscatter and suspended sediment concentration. In this set of experiments, direct measurement of the floc size distribution is made with time in a mixing chamber using a floc camera system. A Vector ADV and an OBS are also placed within the tank to measure acoustic backscatter and SSC as the flocs change size with time; concentration in the experiments ranges from 15 to 90 mg/l. Results showed that the growth of mud flocs did influence the SNR recorded by the Vector ADV, and that the sensitivity of the SNR signal to changes in floc size was higher for flocs with diameters less than ?80 ?m (it kr=1 at a diameter of 80 ?m). The response of SNR to changes in floc size and SSC was modeled with a modified sonar equation. If properly calibrated, the model was able to capture the functional behavior of SNR with changes in floc size and concentration. Values of the calibration coefficients showed that while changes in floc diameter up to about 80 ?m did alter the SNR, the change was less than what would be expected from a similar change in the size of solid scatterers.

  17. Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Belnap, Jayne; Okin, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 y of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces.

  18. Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau.

    PubMed

    Munson, Seth M; Belnap, Jayne; Okin, Gregory S

    2011-03-01

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 y of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces. PMID:21368143

  19. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-print Network

    Lauderdale, Jonathan

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  20. Modelling the influence of predicted future climate change on the risk of wind damage within New Zealand's planted forests.

    PubMed

    Moore, John R; Watt, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    Wind is the major abiotic disturbance in New Zealand's planted forests, but little is known about how the risk of wind damage may be affected by future climate change. We linked a mechanistic wind damage model (ForestGALES) to an empirical growth model for radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) and a process-based growth model (cenw) to predict the risk of wind damage under different future emissions scenarios and assumptions about the future wind climate. The cenw model was used to estimate site productivity for constant CO2 concentration at 1990 values and for assumed increases in CO2 concentration from current values to those expected during 2040 and 2090 under the B1 (low), A1B (mid-range) and A2 (high) emission scenarios. Stand development was modelled for different levels of site productivity, contrasting silvicultural regimes and sites across New Zealand. The risk of wind damage was predicted for each regime and emission scenario combination using the ForestGALES model. The sensitivity to changes in the intensity of the future wind climate was also examined. Results showed that increased tree growth rates under the different emissions scenarios had the greatest impact on the risk of wind damage. The increase in risk was greatest for stands growing at high stand density under the A2 emissions scenario with increased CO2 concentration. The increased productivity under this scenario resulted in increased tree height, without a corresponding increase in diameter, leading to more slender trees that were predicted to be at greater risk from wind damage. The risk of wind damage was further increased by the modest increases in the extreme wind climate that are predicted to occur. These results have implications for the development of silvicultural regimes that are resilient to climate change and also indicate that future productivity gains may be offset by greater losses from disturbances. PMID:25703827

  1. Centennial changes in North Pacific anoxia linked to tropical trade winds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deutsch, Curtis; Berelson, William; Thunell, Robert; Weber, Thomas; Tems, Caitlin; McManus, James; Crusius, John; Ito, Taka; Baumgartner, Timothy; Ferreira, Vicente; Mey, Jacob; van Geen, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming is expected to reduce oxygen (O2) supply to the ocean and expand its oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). We reconstructed variations in the extent of North Pacific anoxia since 1850 using a geochemical proxy for denitrification (?15N) from multiple sediment cores. Increasing ?15N since ~1990 records an expansion of anoxia, consistent with observed O2 trends. However, this was preceded by a longer declining ?15N trend that implies that the anoxic zone was shrinking for most of the 20th century. Both periods can be explained by changes in winds over the tropical Pacific that drive upwelling, biological productivity, and O2 demand within the OMZ. If equatorial Pacific winds resume their predicted weakening trend, the ocean’s largest anoxic zone will contract despite a global O2 decline.

  2. Topological Winding Number Change and Broken Inversion Symmetry in a Hofstadter's Butterfly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Cheng, Bin; Martynov, Oleg; Miao, Tengfei; Jing, Lei; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Aji, Vivek; Lau, Chun Ning; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-10-14

    Graphene's quantum Hall features are associated with a ? Berry's phase due to its odd topological pseudospin winding number. In nearly aligned graphene-hexagonal BN heterostructures, the lattice and orientation mismatch produce a superlattice potential, yielding secondary Dirac points in graphene's electronic spectrum, and under a magnetic field, a Hofstadter butterfly-like energy spectrum. Here we report an additional ? Berry's phase shift when tuning the Fermi level past the secondary Dirac points, originating from a change in topological winding number from odd to even when the Fermi-surface electron orbit begins to enclose the secondary Dirac points. At large hole doping inversion symmetry breaking generates a distinct hexagonal pattern in the longitudinal resistivity versus magnetic field and charge density. Major Hofstadter butterfly features persist up to ?100 K, demonstrating the robustness of the fractal energy spectrum in these systems. PMID:26401645

  3. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    As the world's most rapidly growing source of energy, wind power has vast potential for mitigating climate change and advancing global environmental sustainability. Yet, the challenges facing wind energy remain both complex and substantial. Two such challenges are: 1) wildlife impacts; and 2) perceived negative effects on tourism. This dissertation examines these challenges in a multi-paper format, and also investigates the role that climate change perceptions play in garnering public support for wind power. The first paper assesses optimal approaches for addressing wind power's wildlife impacts. Comparative analysis reveals that avian mortality from turbines ranks far behind avian mortality from a number of other anthropogenic sources. Additionally, although bats have recently emerged as more vulnerable to wind turbines than birds, they are generally less federally protected. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects over 800 bird species, regardless of their threatened or endangered status. Moreover, it criminalizes the incidental take of birds without a permit and simultaneously grants no permits for such incidental take, thereby creating a legal conundrum for the wind industry. An examination of the legislative and case history of the MBTA, however, reveals that wind operators are not likely to be prosecuted for incidental take if they cooperate with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and take reasonable steps to reduce siting and operational impacts. Furthermore, this study's analysis reveals modest wildlife impacts from wind power, in comparison with numerous other energy sources. Scientific-research, legal, and policy recommendations are provided to update the present legal and regulatory regime under the MBTA and to minimize avian and bat impacts. For instance, FWS should: establish comprehensive federal guidelines for wind facility siting, permitting, monitoring, and mitigation; and promulgate regulations under the MBTA for the issuance of incidental take permits at wind facilities. Equal protections for bats are also recommended. In examining the potential effect of offshore wind power on coastal tourism, the second paper reports the findings of a summer 2007 survey of over 1,000 out-of-state tourists at Delaware beaches. Randomly sampled beachgoers were shown photo-simulations of wind turbines at increasing distances from shore and asked how each simulation would affect visitation. With wind turbines located six miles offshore, approximately one-quarter would switch to a different beach. This stated avoidance, however, diminishes with increasing wind project distance from shore. Additionally, stated avoidance of a beach with turbines six miles offshore is exceeded by: avoidance of a beach with an equidistant, inland, fossil fuel power plant; attraction to a beach in order to see turbines six miles offshore; and the likelihood of paying for an offshore wind boat tour. Further, logistic regression modeling reveals that neither trip cost nor income significantly influences the likelihood of visiting a beach with offshore wind. These findings suggest that to limit beach avoidance, offshore wind developers could site wind facilities further from shore, particularly in areas with high recreational use. Moreover, with wind turbines six miles offshore serving more as an attraction than as a deterrent, offshore wind development may, in fact, bolster local tourism revenues. The third study examines public perceptions of climate change and the link between those perceptions and support for wind power, both in general and with respect to specific offshore sites. Analyzing data from five surveys, this research uncovers low climate awareness and concern levels overall. Respondents demonstrate a poor understanding of climate change impacts and of how to effectively address climate change. In accordance with the New Ecological Paradigm, still fewer are concerned about climate change. The issue ranks 6th in Delaware and 8th in Cape Cod as a reason for local project support, behind such issues as energy independence

  4. Evolution of dengue in Sri Lanka-changes in the virus, vector, and climate.

    PubMed

    Sirisena, P D N N; Noordeen, F

    2014-02-01

    Despite the presence of dengue in Sri Lanka since the early 1960s, dengue has become a major public health issue, with a high morbidity and mortality. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are the vectors responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). The four DENV serotypes (1, 2, 3, and 4) have been co-circulating in Sri Lanka for more than 30 years. The new genotype of DENV-1 has replaced an old genotype, and new clades of DENV-3 genotype III have replaced older clades. The emergence of new clades of DENV-3 in the recent past coincided with an abrupt increase in the number of dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases, implicating this serotype in severe epidemics. Climatic factors play a pivotal role in the epidemiological pattern of DF/DHF in terms of the number of cases, severity of illness, shifts in affected age groups, and the expansion of spread from urban to rural areas. There is a regular incidence of DF/DHF throughout the year, with the highest incidence during the rainy months. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with DF/DHF, it is important to implement effective vector control programs in the country. The economic impact of DF/DHF results from the expenditure on DF/DHF critical care units in several hospitals and the cost of case management. PMID:24334026

  5. Incidence of Vector-borne Disease and Climate Change: A Study in Semi-arid Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakey, T.; Bounoua, L.

    2012-12-01

    Leishmaniases are among the most important emerging and resurging vector-borne diseases, second only to malaria in terms of the number of affected people. Leishmaniases are endemic in 88 countries worldwide and threaten about 350 million people (WHO, 2007). Since the first reported case of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in Saida, Algeria in 1991, 1,275 cases have been recorded (Makhlouf & Houti, 2010) with the vast majority of study-area cases (99%) reported between the years of 2000 and 2009. An investigation of potential climatic indicators for the apparent shift in disease prevalence was conducted by comparing anomalies in the climate data specific to the local pathogen cycle. It was determined that long term climate trends have resulted in conditions that promote the prevalence of ZCL. Increased precipitation have resulted in greater vegetation and promoted host and vector population growth through a trophic cascade. Increased minimum temperatures have lengthened the annual duration of sandfly activity. Short term variations in maximum temperatures, however show a correlation with disease suppression in the subsequent years. These findings indicate a potential to forecast the risk of ZCL infection through models of the trophic cascade and sandfly population growth.

  6. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site: Evidence for a Change in Wind Regime and Climate from Lander and Orbiter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Kraft, M. D.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Bridges, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    Surface features related to the wind are observed in data from the Mars Pathfinder lander and from orbit by the Viking Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor missions. Features seen from the surface include wind tails associated with small rocks, barchanoid duneforms, ripplelike patterns, and ventifact flutes cut into some rocks. Features seen from orbit include wind tails associated with impact craters, ridges inferred to be duneforms, and modified crater rims interpreted to have been eroded and mantled by windblown material. The orientations of these features show two prevailing directions, one inferred to represent winds from the northeast which is consistent with strongest winds predicted by a general circulation model to occur during the Martian northern winter under current conditions, and a second wind pattern oriented approx. 90 degrees to the first. This latter wind could be from the W-NW or from the E-SE and was responsible for cutting the ventifacts and modifying the crater rims. The two wind regimes could reflect a change in climate related to Mars' obliquity or some other, unknown factor. Regardless of the cause, the MPF area has been subjected to a complex pattern of winds and supply of small particles, in which the original surface formed by sedimentary processes from Tiu and Ares Vallis events has been modified by repeated burial and exhumation.

  7. Climate, environmental and socio-economic change: weighing up the balance in vector-borne disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Parham, Paul E; Waldock, Joanna; Christophides, George K; Hemming, Deborah; Agusto, Folashade; Evans, Katherine J; Fefferman, Nina; Gaff, Holly; Gumel, Abba; LaDeau, Shannon; Lenhart, Suzanne; Mickens, Ronald E; Naumova, Elena N; Ostfeld, Richard S; Ready, Paul D; Thomas, Matthew B; Velasco-Hernandez, Jorge; Michael, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Arguably one of the most important effects of climate change is the potential impact on human health. While this is likely to take many forms, the implications for future transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs), given their ongoing contribution to global disease burden, are both extremely important and highly uncertain. In part, this is owing not only to data limitations and methodological challenges when integrating climate-driven VBD models and climate change projections, but also, perhaps most crucially, to the multitude of epidemiological, ecological and socio-economic factors that drive VBD transmission, and this complexity has generated considerable debate over the past 10-15 years. In this review, we seek to elucidate current knowledge around this topic, identify key themes and uncertainties, evaluate ongoing challenges and open research questions and, crucially, offer some solutions for the field. Although many of these challenges are ubiquitous across multiple VBDs, more specific issues also arise in different vector-pathogen systems. PMID:25688012

  8. Structural changes in the currents and fields of the equatorial electrojet due to zonal and meridional winds

    SciTech Connect

    Anandarao, B.G.; Raghavarao, R. )

    1987-03-01

    The authors describe calculations of the effects of zonal and meridional winds on the equatorial electrojet vis-a-vis the observed features by solving the electrodynamic equations. Vertical shears in the zonal winds can cause significant changes in the electrojet beyond about 2{degree} latitude. At the magnetic equator these changes are less than about 10%. The width (latitudinal) and the thickness (altitudinal) of the jet are changed by as much as 100% by these shears. When the width is decreased, the intensity of the current densities in meridional plane is increased. Steady (not varying with altitude) zonal winds are ineffective. These results are discussed in comparison with those of earlier authors. Meridional winds cause substantial cross-equatorial currents leading to considerable asymmetry in the distribution of the electrojet current density as inferred by the ground-base and rocket-borne magnetometers. The electrojet center is shifted to about 0.5{degree} south of the equator by a steady northward wind of speed 100 m/s. The deviations in the magnitude of the electrojet current produced by the meridional winds are significant only beyond {plus minus}2{degree} off the equator. Structures in the vertical profiles of the eastward current density observed by rocket-borne magnetometers a few degrees off the equator can be accounted for by the zonal wind shears.

  9. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  10. The National Assessment of Shoreline Change: A GIS Compilation of Vector Shorelines and Associated Shoreline Change Data for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Tara L.; Morton, Robert A.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Moore, Laura J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and shoreline change rates for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. These data, which are presented herein, were compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project. Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information including rates and trends of shoreline migration. There is also a critical need for shoreline change data that is consistent from one coastal region to another. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. This data compilation for open-ocean, sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico is the first in a series that will eventually include the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. Short- and long-term shoreline change evaluations are based on merging three historical shorelines with a modern shoreline derived from lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys. Historical shorelines generally represent the following time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1970s. The most recent shoreline is derived from data collected over the period of 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated by linear regression using all four shorelines. Short-term rates of change are simple end-point rate calculations using the two most recent shorelines. Please refer to our full report on shoreline change in the Gulf of Mexico, National Assessment of Shoreline Change: Part 1, Historical Shoreline Changes and Associated Coastal Land Loss Along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (USGS Open File Report 2004-1043) for additional information regarding methods and results. Data in this report are organized into data layers by state and are provided as single-point vector datasets with metadata. Vector shorelines may represent a compilation of data from one or more sources and these sources are attributed in the dataset. All data are intended to be GIS-ready inasmuch as the data should not require any additional cleanup, formatting, or renaming of fields in order to use the data in a Geographic Information System (GIS). This project employs the Environmental Systems Research Institute's (ESRI) ArcView as its GIS mapping tool and contains several data layers (or themes) that are used to create a geographic view of the margin off the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. These vector data form a basemap comprised of polygon and line themes that include a U.S. coastline (1:80,000), U.S. cities, and state boundaries.

  11. THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  12. Wind Tunnel Test of an RPV with Shape-Change Control Effector and Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Sloan, Adam R.; Barnwell, William G.; Lion, S. Todd; Hautamaki, Bret A.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of novel control effector concepts have recently emerged that may enable new approaches to flight control. In particular, the potential exists to shift the composition of the typical aircraft control effector suite from a small number of high authority, specialized devices (rudder, aileron, elevator, flaps), toward larger numbers of smaller, less specialized, distributed device arrays. The concept envisions effector and sensor networks composed of relatively small high-bandwidth devices able to simultaneously perform a variety of control functions using feedback from disparate data sources. To investigate this concept, a remotely piloted flight vehicle has been equipped with an array of 24 trailing edge shape-change effectors and associated pressure measurements. The vehicle, called the Multifunctional Effector and Sensor Array (MESA) testbed, was recently tested in NASA Langley's 12-ft Low Speed wind tunnel to characterize its stability properties, control authorities, and distributed pressure sensitivities for use in a dynamic simulation prior to flight testing. Another objective was to implement and evaluate a scheme for actively controlling the spanwise pressure distribution using the shape-change array. This report describes the MESA testbed, design of the pressure distribution controller, and results of the wind tunnel test.

  13. Typical and Atypical Magnetospheric Response to Sudden Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Alexeev, I. I.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Welling, D. T.; Cai, X.

    2014-12-01

    A sudden increase in solar wind dynamic pressure will cause a compression of the magnetosphere that is observed as a sudden jump in the low latitude surface geomagnetic field. We show here that this reaction may depend on conditions in the IMF and in the magnetosphere/ionosphere system. The typical response of the low-latitude northward magnetic field is a simultaneous global increase, generally call a SI (sudden impulse) or SSC (storm sudden commencement) if a geomagnetic storm follows. We have found several atypical cases, however, for which the largest positive disturbances are observed on the night side and little or no field increase is registered near local noon. For some of these cases the solar wind pressure change is simultaneous with a northward turning of the IMF from near zero Bz . Another case is shown where the pressure change follows a period of increasing negative IMF Bz. We propose that the magnetic response for the atypical cases can be accounted for by a transition current system where the ionospheric closure of the current system depends upon the auroral conductivity established by previous activity.

  14. Last century changes in ocean wind wave height from global visual wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulev, Sergey K.; Grigorieva, Vika

    2004-12-01

    Centennial time series of visually observed wave height were derived from the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set along the major ship routes in the World Ocean and homogenized. They demonstrate positive trends in significant wave height over the North Pacific with a maximum of 8-10 cm/decade in the northeast Pacific. In the North Atlantic and other basins significant upward changes (up to 14 cm/decade) are observed only for the last 50 years and not for centennial records. Long-term changes in wind wave height are closely associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation in the Atlantic and with North Pacific Oscillation and El-Niño-Southern Oscillation in the Pacific.

  15. Assessing Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Changes during the Last Glacial Maximum using Paleo-data Synthesis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeld, K. E.; Graham, R. M.; De Boer, A. M.; Wolff, E. W.; Sime, L. C.; Le Quere, C.; Bopp, L.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the strength and position of Southern Hemisphere westerly winds during the last glacial cycle have been invoked to explain glacial-interglacial climate fluctuations. However, neither paleo models nor paleodata agree on the magnitude, or even the sign, of the change in wind strength and latitude during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), compared to the recent past. This study synthesizes paleo-environmental data that have been used to infer changes in winds during the LGM compared with the late Holocene. These compilations include changes in terrestrial moisture, dust deposition, and ocean productivity, along with summaries of previously published information on sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and ocean dynamics in the Southern Hemisphere. Our compilations of terrestrial moisture from 94 sites and dust deposition from 87 sites show generally drier conditions for the LGM between 0 and 40S, with wetter conditions along the west coasts and drying along the east coasts of continents. LGM dust deposition rates ranged from 2 to 4.5 times higher over the Southern Ocean and about 13 times higher over the Antarctic continent. For the oceans, reconstructed changes in SSTs show maximum cooling (>4 °C) in the modern-day Subantarctic Zone, coincident with a region of enhanced export production during the LGM compared with today. We find that any hypothesis of LGM wind and climate change needs to provide a plausible explanation for increased moisture on the west coast of continents, cooler temperatures and higher productivity in the Subantarctic Zone, and reductions in Agulhas leakage around southern Africa. Our comparison suggests that an overall strengthening, an equatorward displacement, or no change at all in winds could all be interpreted as consistent with observations. If a single cause related to the southern westerlies is sought for all the evidence presented, then an equatorward displacement or strengthening of the winds would be consistent with the largest proportion of the data evidence. However, other processes, such as weakening or poleward shifts in winds, a weakened hydrological cycle, extended sea-ice cover, and changed buoyancy fluxes, cannot be ruled out as potential explanations of observed changes in moisture, surface temperature, and productivity. We contend that resolving the position and strength of westerly winds during the LGM remains elusive based on data reconstructions alone. However, we believe that these data reconstructions of environmental conditions can be used in conjunction with model simulations to identify which processes best represent westerly wind conditions during the LGM.

  16. Ecological Niche Modelling Predicts Southward Expansion of Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) flaviscutellata (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), Vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis in South America, under Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Bruno M.; Ready, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Vector borne diseases are susceptible to climate change because distributions and densities of many vectors are climate driven. The Amazon region is endemic for cutaneous leishmaniasis and is predicted to be severely impacted by climate change. Recent records suggest that the distributions of Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) flaviscutellata and the parasite it transmits, Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, are expanding southward, possibly due to climate change, and sometimes associated with new human infection cases. We define the vector’s climatic niche and explore future projections under climate change scenarios. Vector occurrence records were compiled from the literature, museum collections and Brazilian Health Departments. Six bioclimatic variables were used as predictors in six ecological niche model algorithms (BIOCLIM, DOMAIN, MaxEnt, GARP, logistic regression and Random Forest). Projections for 2050 used 17 general circulation models in two greenhouse gas representative concentration pathways: “stabilization” and “high increase”. Ensemble models and consensus maps were produced by overlapping binary predictions. Final model outputs showed good performance and significance. The use of species absence data substantially improved model performance. Currently, L. flaviscutellata is widely distributed in the Amazon region, with records in the Atlantic Forest and savannah regions of Central Brazil. Future projections indicate expansion of the climatically suitable area for the vector in both scenarios, towards higher latitudes and elevations. L. flaviscutellata is likely to find increasingly suitable conditions for its expansion into areas where human population size and density are much larger than they are in its current locations. If environmental conditions change as predicted, the range of the vector is likely to expand to southeastern and central-southern Brazil, eastern Paraguay and further into the Amazonian areas of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela. These areas will only become endemic for L. amazonensis, however, if they have competent reservoir hosts and transmission dynamics matching those in the Amazon region. PMID:26619186

  17. Atmospheric changes through 2012 as shown by iteratively homogenized radiosonde temperature and wind data (IUKv2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Steven C.; Nishant, Nidhi

    2015-05-01

    We present an updated version of the radiosonde dataset homogenized by Iterative Universal Kriging (IUKv2), now extended through February 2013, following the method used in the original version (Sherwood et al 2008 Robust tropospheric warming revealed by iteratively homogenized radiosonde data J. Clim. 21 5336-52). This method, in effect, performs a multiple linear regression of the data onto a structural model that includes both natural variability, trends, and time-changing instrument biases, thereby avoiding estimation biases inherent in traditional homogenization methods. One modification now enables homogenized winds to be provided for the first time. This, and several other small modifications made to the original method sometimes affect results at individual stations, but do not strongly affect broad-scale temperature trends. Temperature trends in the updated data show three noteworthy features. First, tropical warming is equally strong over both the 1959-2012 and 1979-2012 periods, increasing smoothly and almost moist-adiabatically from the surface (where it is roughly 0.14 K/decade) to 300 hPa (where it is about 0.25 K/decade over both periods), a pattern very close to that in climate model predictions. This contradicts suggestions that atmospheric warming has slowed in recent decades or that it has not kept up with that at the surface. Second, as shown in previous studies, tropospheric warming does not reach quite as high in the tropics and subtropics as predicted in typical models. Third, cooling has slackened in the stratosphere such that linear trends since 1979 are about half as strong as reported earlier for shorter periods. Wind trends over the period 1979-2012 confirm a strengthening, lifting and poleward shift of both subtropical westerly jets; the Northern one shows more displacement and the southern more intensification, but these details appear sensitive to the time period analysed. There is also a trend toward more easterly winds in the middle and upper troposphere of the deep tropics.

  18. Agents of change on Mars' northern dunes: CO2 ice and wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Diniega, S.; Bridges, N.; Byrne, S.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Portyankina, G.

    2015-05-01

    Both wind and seasonal CO2 ice sculpt the dunes of Mars in today's climate. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has returned extensive temporal coverage of changes on the north polar dunes for nearly four Mars years. The processes driving dune morphology changes such as the formation of new alcoves have been investigated. Considerable interannual variability has been observed. Most changes occur in the period of time when HiRISE cannot image: late summer and fall when light levels are too low to see subtle changes on the dunes and the polar hood obscures the surface, and winter when the cap is in polar night. This is consistent with seasonal control but does not allow us to directly differentiate between eolian processes vs. CO2 ice as the driving agent for alcove formation. Circumstantial evidence and observations of analog processes in the southern mid-latitudes however implicates processes associated with frost emplacement and removal.

  19. Climate and Population Health Vulnerabilities to Vector-Borne Diseases: Increasing Resilience Under Climate Change Conditions in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, P.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; De La Torre Juarez, M.; Kruczkiewicz, A.; Lessel, J.; Jensen, K.; Thomson, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the City University of New York (CUNY) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in collaboration with NASA SERVIR are developing tools to monitor climate variables (precipitation, temperature, vegetation, water bodies, inundation) that help projects in Africa to increase resilience to climate change for vector-borne diseases (i.e. malaria, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis). Through the development of new products to monitor precipitation, water bodies and inundation, IRI, CUNY and JPL provide tools and capacity building to research communities, ministries of health and World Health Organization in Africa to: 1) Develop research teams' ability to appropriately use climate data as part of their research 2) Enable research teams and ministries to integrate climate information into social and economic drivers of vulnerability and opportunities for adaptation to climate change 3) Inform better policies and programs for climate change adaptation. This oral presentation will demonstrate how IRI, CUNY, and JPL developed new products, tools and capacity building to achieve the three objectives mentioned above.

  20. Solar-wind-driven changes to the ionospheric electric potential lead to changes in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Mai Mai; Chisham, Gareth; Freeman, Mervyn P.

    2015-04-01

    There are a large number of responses, on the day-to-day timescale, of the dynamics of the troposphere to regional changes in the downward current of the global atmospheric electric circuit (GEC). They provide compelling evidence that, via the GEC, the solar wind plays a role in influencing surface weather and climate. We use reanalysis data to estimate the altitude and time lag dependence of one such response - the Mansurov effect. This effect was first observed as a correlation between the duskward component By of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and surface pressure anomalies in Antarctica. Additionally, we have more recently shown that the polar Mansurov effect can affect mid-latitude atmospheric planetary waves, the amplitude of the effect being comparable to typical initial analysis uncertainties in ensemble numerical weather prediction. Here we shed light on the origins of the polar surface effect by examining the correlation between IMF By and geopotential height anomalies throughout the Antarctic troposphere and lower stratosphere. We find that the correlation is highly statistically significant within the troposphere, and not so in the stratosphere. The peak in the correlation occurs at greater time lags at the tropopause (~ 6 - 8 days) and in the mid troposphere (~ 4 days) than in the lower troposphere (~ 1 day). This supports a mechanism involving the action on lower tropospheric clouds of the GEC, modified by variations in the solar wind (through modulations of the spatial variation in ionospheric potential). The increase in time lag with increasing altitude is consistent with the upward propagation by conventional atmospheric processes of the solar wind-induced variability in the lower troposphere. This is in contrast to the downward propagation of atmospheric effects to the lower troposphere from the stratosphere due to solar variability-driven mechanisms involving ultraviolet radiation or energetic particle precipitation. We also find a correlation between IMF By and the tropospheric air temperature anomaly, which is of lower statistical significance than the geopotential height effect described above. Up to altitudes of 3 km, the anomalies in air temperature are related to the geopotential height by the environmental lapse rate, and therefore considered to be real and to be part of the Mansurov effect. The mean air temperature anomaly across Antarctica associated with the Mansurov effect is up to 0.8 K.

  1. Could a change in magnetic field geometry cause the break in the wind-activity relation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Jardine, M.; See, V.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; Boro Saikia, S.; Hébrard, E.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.

    2016-01-01

    Wood et al. suggested that mass-loss rate is a function of X-ray flux (dot{M}? F_x^{1.34}) for dwarf stars with Fx ? Fx,6 ? 106 erg cm-2 s-1. However, more active stars do not obey this relation. These authors suggested that the break at Fx,6 could be caused by significant changes in magnetic field topology that would inhibit stellar wind generation. Here, we investigate this hypothesis by analysing the stars in Wood et al. sample that had their surface magnetic fields reconstructed through Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI). Although the solar-like outliers in the dot{M} - Fx relation have higher fractional toroidal magnetic energy, we do not find evidence of a sharp transition in magnetic topology at Fx,6. To confirm this, further wind measurements and ZDI observations at both sides of the break are required. As active stars can jump between states with highly toroidal to highly poloidal fields, we expect significant scatter in magnetic field topology to exist for stars with Fx ? Fx,6. This strengthens the importance of multi-epoch ZDI observations. Finally, we show that there is a correlation between Fx and magnetic energy, which implies that dot{M} - magnetic energy relation has the same qualitative behaviour as the original dot{M} - Fx relation. No break is seen in any of the Fx - magnetic energy relations.

  2. The Structural Changes of Tropical Cyclones Upon Interaction with Vertical Wind Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    The Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4) provided a unique opportunity to observe the distributions and document the roles of important atmospheric factors that impact the development of the core asymmetries and core structural changes of tropical cyclones embedded in vertical wind shear. The state-of-the-art instruments flown on the NASA DC-8 and ER-2, in addition to those on the NOAA aircraft, provided a unique set of observations that documented the core structure throughout the depth of the tropical cyclone. These data have been used to conduct a combined observational and modeling study using a state-of-the-art, high- resolution mesoscale model to examine the role of the environmental vertical wind shear in producing tropical cyclone core asymmetries, and the effects on the structure and intensity of tropical cyclones.The scientific objectives of this study were to obtain in situ measurements that would allow documentation of the physical mechanisms that influence the development of the asymmetric convection and its effect on the core structure of the tropical cyclone.

  3. Could a change in magnetic field geometry cause the break in the wind-activity relation?

    E-print Network

    Vidotto, A A; Jardine, M; See, V; Petit, P; Boisse, I; Saikia, S Boro; Hebrard, E; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Morin, J

    2015-01-01

    Wood et al suggested that mass-loss rate is a function of X-ray flux ($\\dot{M} \\propto F_x^{1.34}$) for dwarf stars with $F_x \\lesssim F_{x,6} \\equiv 10^6$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. However, more active stars do not obey this relation. These authors suggested that the break at $F_{x,6}$ could be caused by significant changes in magnetic field topology that would inhibit stellar wind generation. Here, we investigate this hypothesis by analysing the stars in Wood et al's sample that had their surface magnetic fields reconstructed through Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI). Although the solar-like outliers in the $\\dot{M}$ -- $F_x$ relation have higher fractional toroidal magnetic energy, we do not find evidence of a sharp transition in magnetic topology at $F_{x,6}$. To confirm this, further wind measurements and ZDI observations at both sides of the break are required. As active stars can jump between states with highly toroidal to highly poloidal fields, we expect significant scatter in magnetic field topology to exi...

  4. Modeling flow over roughness changes and applications to wind energy for sites on the Great Lakes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. A.; Salmon, J.; Weng, W.

    2010-12-01

    The wind energy resource offshore is not well understood in the Great Lakes area. This is unfortunate as potential offshore wind farm sites are attracting great interest. In an effort to improve our knowledge of the offshore resource, data are now being collected in specific locations. Preferred Great Lakes wind farm sites are in relatively shallow water reasonably close to shore. Airflow over these sites will often be within a transition zone as air flows from a rough land surface to a smoother lake surface. There will also often be changes in the thermal stratification of the air column within this Internal Boundary Layer (IBL). For long fetches and heights of order 100m we can formulate and solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. We make boundary-layer approximations for pressure and assume that along-wind diffusion is minimal. Effects of gentle terrain can be added separately. Results suggest that relatively long fetches of order 100 km are required before winds at 100m fully adjust to the smoother lake surface. Over Lakes Erie and Ontario winds are frequently from the 180-270 degree quadrant and this suggests that the wind resource should be better in the northern (Canadian) half of these lakes. We illustrate this with energy density plots for locations near lakes Erie and Ontario.

  5. Wind Characterization for the Assessment of Collision Risk During Flight Level Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor; Chartrand, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A model of vertical wind gradient is presented based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) wind data. The objective is to have an accurate representation of wind to be used in Collision Risk Models (CRM) of aircraft procedures. Depending on how an aircraft procedure is defined, wind and the different characteristics of the wind will have a more severe or less severe impact on distances between aircraft. For the In-Trail Procedure, the non-linearity of the vertical wind gradient has the greatest impact on longitudinal distance. The analysis in this paper extracts standard deviation, mean, maximum, and linearity characteristics from the NOAA data.

  6. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  7. A Change of Inertia-Supporting the Thrust Vector Control of the Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziubanek, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is America's next launch vehicle. To utilize the vehicle more economically, heritage hardware from the Space Transportation System (STS) will be used when possible. The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) actuators could possibly be used in the core stage of the SLS. The dynamic characteristics of the SRB actuator will need to be tested on an Inertia Load Stand (ILS) that has been converted to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The inertia on the pendulum of the ILS will need to be changed to match the SSME inertia. In this testing environment an SRB actuator can be tested with the equivalent resistence of an SSME.

  8. Impact of WRF Physics and Grid Resolution on Low-level Wind Prediction: Towards the Assessment of Climate Change Impact on Future Wind Power

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H S; Glascoe, L; Lundquist, J; Wharton, S

    2010-02-24

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used in short-range simulations to explore the sensitivity of model physics and horizontal grid resolution. We choose five events with the clear-sky conditions to study the impact of different planetary boundary layer (PBL), surface and soil-layer physics on low-level wind forecast for two wind farms; one in California (CA) and the other in Texas (TX). Short-range simulations are validated with field measurements. Results indicate that the forecast error of the CA case decreases with increasing grid resolution due to the improved representation of valley winds. Besides, the model physics configuration has a significant impact on the forecast error at this location. In contrast, the forecast error of the TX case exhibits little dependence on grid resolution and is relatively independent of physics configuration. Therefore, the occurrence frequency of lowest root mean square errors (RMSEs) at this location is used to determine an optimal model configuration for subsequent decade-scale regional climate model (RCM) simulations. In this study, we perform two sets of 20-year RCM simulations using the data from the NCAR Global Climate Model (GCM) simulations; one set models the present climate and the other simulates the future climate. These RCM simulations will be used to assess the impact of climate change on future wind energy.

  9. The Impacts of Land Use Change on Malaria Vector Abundance in a Water-Limited Highland Region of Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, J.; Bomblies, A.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in land use and climate are expected to alter risk of malaria transmission in areas where rainfall limits vector abundance. We use a coupled hydrology-entomology model to investigate the effects of land use change on hydrological processes impacting mosquito abundance in a highland village of Ethiopia. Land use affects partitioning of rainfall into infiltration and runoff that reaches small-scale topographic depressions, which constitute the primary breeding habitat of Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes. A physically-based hydrology model isolates hydrological mechanisms by which land use impacts pool formation and persistence, and an agent-based entomology model evaluates the response of mosquito populations. This approach reproduced observed interannual variability in mosquito abundance between the 2009 and 2010 wet seasons. Several scenarios of land cover were then evaluated using the calibrated, field-validated model. Model results show variation in pool persistence and depth, as well as in mosquito abundance, due to land use changes alone. The model showed particular sensitivity to surface roughness, but also to root zone uptake. Scenarios in which land use was modified from agriculture to forest generally resulted in lowest mosquito abundance predictions; classification of the entire domain as rainforest produced a 34% decrease in abundance compared to 2010 results. This study also showed that in addition to vegetation type, spatial proximity of land use change to habitat locations has an impact on mosquito abundance. This modeling approach can be applied to assess impacts of climate and land use conditions that fall outside of the range of previously observed variability.

  10. Wind extremes in the North Sea basin under climate change: an ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winter, R.; Ruessink, G.; Sterl, A.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal safety may be influenced by climate change, as changes in extreme surge levels and wave extremes may increase the vulnerability of dunes and other coastal defenses. In the North Sea, an area already prone to severe flooding, these high surge levels and waves are generated by severe wind speeds during storm events. As a result of the geometry of the North Sea, not only the maximum wind speed is relevant, but also wind direction. Analyzing changes in a changing climate implies that several uncertainties need to be taken into account. First, there is the uncertainty in climate experiments, which represents the possible development of the emission of greenhouse gases. Second, there is uncertainty between the climate models that are used to analyze the effect of different climate experiments. The third uncertainty is the natural variability of the climate. When this system variability is large, small trends will be difficult to detect. The natural variability results in statistical uncertainty, especially for events with high return values. We addressed the first two types of uncertainties for extreme wind conditions in the North Sea using 12 CMIP5 GCMs. To evaluate the differences between the climate experiments, two climate experiments (rcp4.5 and rcp8.5) from 2050-2100 are compared with historical runs, running from 1950-2000. Rcp4.5 is considered to be a middle climate experiment and rcp8.5 represents high-end climate scenarios. The projections of the 12 GCMs for a given scenario illustrate model uncertainty. We focus on the North Sea basin, because changes in wind conditions could have a large impact on safety of the densely populated North Sea coast, an area that has already a high exposure to flooding. Our results show that, consistent with ERA-Interim results, the annual maximum wind speed in the historical run demonstrates large interannual variability. For the North Sea, the annual maximum wind speed is not projected to change in either rcp4.5 or rcp8.5. In fact, the differences in the 12 GCMs are larger than the difference between the three experiments. Furthermore, our results show that, the variation in direction of annual maximum wind speed is large and this precludes a firm statement on climate-change induced changes in these directions. Nonetheless, most models indicate a decrease in annual maximum wind speed from south-eastern directions and an increase from south-western and western directions. This might be caused by a poleward shift of the storm track. The amount of wind from north-west and north-north-west, wind directions that are responsible for the development of extreme storm surges in the southern part of the North Sea, are not projected to change. However, North Sea coasts that have the longest fetch for western direction, e.g. the German Bight, may encounter more often high storm surge levels and extreme waves when the annual maximum wind will indeed be more often from western direction.

  11. Feline Leukemia Virus Integrase And Capsid Packaging Functions Do Not Change The Insertion Profile Of Standard Moloney Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Métais, Jean-Yves; Topp, Shana; Doty, Raymond T.; Borate, Bhavesh; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2010-01-01

    Adverse events linked to perturbations of cellular genes by vector insertion reported in gene therapy trials and animal models have prompted attempts to better understand the mechanisms directing viral vector integration. The integration profiles of vectors based on MLV, ASLV, SIV, and HIV have all been shown to be non-random, and novel vectors with a safer integration pattern have been sought. Recently we developed a producer cell line called CatPac that packages standard MoMLV vectors with FeLV gag, pol and env gene products. We now report the integration profile of this vector, asking if the FeLV integrase and capsid proteins could modify the MoMLV integration profile, potentially resulting in a less genotoxic pattern. We transduced rhesus macaque CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with CatPac or standard MoMLV vectors, and determined their integration profile by LAM-PCR. We obtained 184 and 175 unique integration sites (IS) respectively for CatPac and standard MoMLV vectors, and these were compared to 10 000 in silico-generated random IS. The integration profile for CatPac vector was similar to MoMLV and equally non-random, with a propensity for integration near transcription start sites and in highly dense gene regions. We found an IS for CatPac vector localized 715 nucleotides upstream of LMO-2, the gene involved in the ALL developed by X-SCID patients treated via gene therapy using MoMLV vectors. In conclusion, we found that replacement of MoMLV env, gag, and pol gene products with FeLV did not alter the basic integration profile. Thus there appears to be no safety advantage for this packaging system. However, considering the stability and efficacy of CatPac vectors, further development is warranted, utilizing potentially safer vector backbones, for instance those with a SIN configuration. PMID:20237508

  12. Changes in fluxes of heat, H2O, CO2 caused by a large wind farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX) provides a platform to investigate the effect of wind turbines and large wind farms on surface fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and carbon dioxide (CO2). In 2010 and 2011, eddy covariance flux stations were installed between two lines of turbines at the south...

  13. Pharmacological analysis of calcium transients in response to gravity vector change in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and petioles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, M.; Furuichi, T.; Tatsumi, H.; Sokabe, M.

    Plants regulate their growth and morphology in response to gravity field known as gravitropism in general In the process of gravitropism gravity sensing will form the critical earliest event which is supposed to take place in specialized cells statocytes such as columella cells and shoot endodermal cells Although gravistimulation is assumed to be converted into certain intracellular signals the underlying transduction mechanisms have hardly been explored One of the potential candidates for the intracellular signals is an increase in the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration Ca 2 c Here we measured Ca 2 c changes induced by gravistimulation in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing aequorin as a calcium reporter When a plate of seedlings was turned through 180 r Ca 2 c transiently increased within 50 s and decayed exponentially with a time constant of ca 60 s The amplitude of the Ca 2 c increase was independent of the angular velocity of the rotation The Ca 2 c increase was reversibly blocked by extracellularly applied potential mechanosensitive channel blockers La 3 Gd 3 or a Ca 2 chelator BAPTA indicating that it arose from Ca 2 -influx via Ca 2 -permeable channel s on the plasma membrane Furthermore the Ca 2 c increase was attenuated by actin-disrupting drugs latrunculin B cytochalasin B but not by microtuble-disrupting drugs oryzalin nocodazole indicating that the activation of

  14. Changing Malaria Prevalence on the Kenyan Coast since 1974: Climate, Drugs and Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Robert W.; Kibuchi, Eliud; Karuri, Stella W.; Sang, Gilbert; Gitonga, Caroline W.; Mwandawiro, Charles; Bejon, Philip; Noor, Abdisalan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Progress toward reducing the malaria burden in Africa has been measured, or modeled, using datasets with relatively short time-windows. These restricted temporal analyses may miss the wider context of longer-term cycles of malaria risk and hence may lead to incorrect inferences regarding the impact of intervention. Methods 1147 age-corrected Plasmodium falciparum parasite prevalence (PfPR2-10) surveys among rural communities along the Kenyan coast were assembled from 1974 to 2014. A Bayesian conditional autoregressive generalized linear mixed model was used to interpolate to 279 small areas for each of the 41 years since 1974. Best-fit polynomial splined curves of changing PfPR2-10 were compared to a sequence of plausible explanatory variables related to rainfall, drug resistance and insecticide-treated bed net (ITN) use. Results P. falciparum parasite prevalence initially rose from 1974 to 1987, dipped in 1991–92 but remained high until 1998. From 1998 onwards prevalence began to decline until 2011, then began to rise through to 2014. This major decline occurred before ITNs were widely distributed and variation in rainfall coincided with some, but not all, short-term transmission cycles. Emerging resistance to chloroquine and introduction of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine provided plausible explanations for the rise and fall of malaria transmission along the Kenyan coast. Conclusions Progress towards elimination might not be as predictable as we would like, where natural and extrinsic cycles of transmission confound evaluations of the effect of interventions. Deciding where a country lies on an elimination pathway requires careful empiric observation of the long-term epidemiology of malaria transmission. PMID:26107772

  15. A century of glacier change in the Wind River Range, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVisser, Mark H.; Fountain, Andrew G.

    2015-03-01

    The Wind River Range spans roughly 200 km along the continental divide in western Wyoming and encompasses at least 269 glaciers and perennial snowfields totaling 34.34 ± 0.13 km2 (2006), including Gannett Glacier, the largest glacier (2.81 km2) in the continental U.S. outside of Washington State. To track changing glacier and perennial snow surface area over the past century we used historic maps, aerial photography, and geologic evidence evident in said imagery. Since the end of the Little Ice Age (~ 1900), when the glaciers retreated from their moraines, to 2006 the ice-covered area shrank by ~ 47%. The main driver of surface area change was air temperature, with glaciers at lower elevations shrinking faster than those at higher elevations. The total contribution of ice wastage to late summer stream flow ranged from 0.4 to 1.5%, 0.9 to 2.8%, 1.7 to 5.4%, and 3.4 to 10.9% in four different watersheds, none of which exceeded 7% glacier cover. Results from previous studies were difficult to include because of differences in interpretation of glacier boundaries, because of poor imagery, or to extensive seasonal snow. These difficulties highlight potential problems in combining data sets from different studies and underscores the importance of reexamining past observations to ensure consistent interpretation.

  16. Separating the influence of projected changes in air temperature and wind on patterns of sea level change and ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.; Yang, Duo; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Spence, Paul; Myers, Paul G.

    2015-08-01

    We present ocean model sensitivity experiments aimed at separating the influence of the projected changes in the "thermal" (near-surface air temperature) and "wind" (near-surface winds) forcing on the patterns of sea level and ocean heat content. In the North Atlantic, the distribution of sea level change is more due to the "thermal" forcing, whereas it is more due to the "wind" forcing in the North Pacific; in the Southern Ocean, the "thermal" and "wind" forcing have a comparable influence. In the ocean adjacent to Antarctica the "thermal" forcing leads to an inflow of warmer waters on the continental shelves, which is somewhat attenuated by the "wind" forcing. The structure of the vertically integrated heat uptake is set by different processes at low and high latitudes: at low latitudes it is dominated by the heat transport convergence, whereas at high latitudes it represents a small residual of changes in the surface flux and advection of heat. The structure of the horizontally integrated heat content tendency is set by the increase of downward heat flux by the mean circulation and comparable decrease of upward heat flux by the subgrid-scale processes; the upward eddy heat flux decreases and increases by almost the same magnitude in response to, respectively, the "thermal" and "wind" forcing. Regionally, the surface heat loss and deep convection weaken in the Labrador Sea, but intensify in the Greenland Sea in the region of sea ice retreat. The enhanced heat flux anomaly in the subpolar Atlantic is mainly caused by the "thermal" forcing.

  17. Potential impacts of topography and prevailing wind direction on future precipitation changes in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunematsu, N.; Dairaku, K.; Hirano, J.

    2013-12-01

    To investigate future changes in summertime precipitation amounts over the Japanese islands and their relations to the topographical heights, this study analyzed 20 km horizontal grid-spacing regional climate model downscalings of MIROC3.2-hires 20C3M and SRES-A1B scenario data for the periods of 1981-2000 and 2081-2100. Results indicate the remarkable increases in June-July-August mean daily precipitation in the west and south sides (windward sides) of the mountainous regions, especially in western Japan where heavy rainfall is frequently observed in the recent climate. The remarkable increases in summertime precipitation are likely to occur not only in high altitude areas but also at low altitudes. The occurrence frequencies of precipitation greater than 100 mm/day would also increase in such areas. The intensification of southwesterly moist air flows in the lower troposphere is considered to be one of the main causes of those precipitation changes because the intensified southwesterly moist air flows impinging on the western and southern slopes of the mountains can generate stronger upslope flows and well-developed clouds, leading to increased precipitation. Also, the results show that future precipitation changes in the lee sides of the mountainous regions (e.g., the Tokyo metropolitan area) would be comparatively small. These results indicate large influences of topography and prevailing wind direction on future precipitation changes. Acknowledgments: This study was conducted as part of the research subject "Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change in Water Hazard Assessed Using Regional Climate Scenarios in the Tokyo Region' (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; PI: Koji Dairaku) of Research Program on Climate Change Adaptation (RECCA) and was supported by the SOUSEI Program, funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Government of Japan. We thank the regional climate modeling groups (MRI/NIED/Univ. Tsukuba) for producing and making available their model output. Their work was supported by the Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (S5-3) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

  18. Overwinter Changes in Wind Erodibility of Clay Loam Soils in Southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, M S.; Larney, F. J.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C. ); Feng, Y

    2001-03-21

    Soil dry aggregate size distribution (DASD) and surface roughness are important factors affecting wind erodibility. This study monitored overwinter changes in DASD and surface roughness and identified relationships with climatic variables in the chinook-dominated region of southern Alberta. A different site was monitored in each of three winters (18 Sept. 1992 to 12 May 1993; 26 Oct. 1993 to 29 Apr. 1994; 30 Aug. 1994 to 24 May 1995) on Dark Brown Chernozemic clay loams (fine-loamy, mixed, Typic Haploborolls). The DASD was expressed as geometric mean diameter (GMD) and wind erodible fraction (EF). The GMD ranged from 1.88 to 0.08 mm in 1992-1993, from 9.05 to 1.17 mm in 1993-1994, and from 4.71 to 0.80 mm in 1994-1995. The EF range from 38.9 to 74.0% in 1992-1993, from 12.6 to 43.7% in 1993-1994, and 31.3 to 55.% in 1994-1995. Surface roughness was measured parallel (Cpar) to tillage direction on two of the sites. Using the chain method, Cper ranged from 15.1 to 3.7% in 1993-199 4 and from 14.4 to 3.3% in 1994-1995. Regression analysis with time revealed significant exponential decay for GMD (R2= 0.57 in 1992-1993, 0.97 in 1993-1994, and 0.78 in 1994-1995) and Cpar (R2= 0.98 in 1993-1994, 0.91 in 1994-1995) and a positive linear fit for EF (R2= 0.57 in 1992-1993, 0.91 in 1993-1994, and 0.62 in 1994-1995). Three overwinter periods, differentiated by the timing and form of precipitation and designated as''fall rain/snow'',''winter snow'', and''spring snow/rain'', were used to assess the changes in EF using cumulative freeze-thaw cycles, precipitation, and snow cover

  19. Land-Based Wind Potential Changes in the Southeastern United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J. O.

    2013-09-01

    Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

  20. Reconstructing Holocene changes in the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds: Integrating modern processes and paleoclimate data from New Zealand's southern fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, J.; Moy, C. M.; Wilson, G. S.; Stirling, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere westerly winds are an important component of the global carbon cycle due to their influence on Southern Ocean CO2 flux. In addition, the winds influence mid-latitude storm tracks, thereby controlling moisture balance over much of New Zealand's South Island and other Southern Hemisphere regions. Fiordland, New Zealand is an ideal locale to investigate Holocene changes in westerly wind behavior: It sits at the northern margin of the wind field maximum, is sensitive to latitudinal and strength fluctuations of the winds, and is the location of numerous fjord sub-basins with high sedimentation rates (up to 3 mm/yr). Due to the strong positive relationship between wind speed and regional rainfall, reconstructions of past precipitation and fjord circulation can inform us of past westerly wind behavior. These processes can be observed through changes in the rate of organic carbon delivery from land: When precipitation is high, more terrestrial organic carbon is delivered to the fjords, while low precipitation shifts the balance toward accumulation of marine organic carbon. An important first step towards reconstructing past westerly wind variability is to characterize the distribution and cycling of carbon throughout different depositional settings in the fjords to determine the optimal location for the development of paleoclimate records. Here, we present a geochemical characterization of surface sediments and the water column throughout the region and apply this understanding to sediment cores. During three field seasons in 2012 and 2013, we collected surface sediments, particulate organic matter, and piston cores from 10 different fjords spanning 44-46° S. Our results suggest that organic carbon in the fjord basins largely follows a two-end-member mixing model, drawing from marine and terrestrial end-member sources. We see consistent down-fjord trends in carbon and nitrogen concentrations and isotopes measured from surface sediments and particulate organic matter. Terrestrial organic carbon dominates toward the head of each fjord and marine organic content increases moving toward the mouth, and the consistency of this relationship allows us to compare downcore results from different basins. We will apply our modern-process framework to several cores that span the last 4,000 years and discuss the implications for late Holocene westerly wind variability in this understudied but important region.

  1. Spatially-Explicit Simulation Modeling of Ecological Response to Climate Change: Methodological Considerations in Predicting Shifting Population Dynamics of Infectious Disease Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Radhika; Jimenez, Violeta; Chang, Howard H.; Gambhir, Manoj; Fu, Joshua S.; Liu, Yang; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-01-01

    Poikilothermic disease vectors can respond to altered climates through spatial changes in both population size and phenology. Quantitative descriptors to characterize, analyze and visualize these dynamic responses are lacking, particularly across large spatial domains. In order to demonstrate the value of a spatially explicit, dynamic modeling approach, we assessed spatial changes in the population dynamics of Ixodes scapularis, the Lyme disease vector, using a temperature-forced population model simulated across a grid of 4 × 4 km cells covering the eastern United States, using both modeled (Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) 3.2.1) baseline/current (2001–2004) and projected (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and RCP 8.5; 2057–2059) climate data. Ten dynamic population features (DPFs) were derived from simulated populations and analyzed spatially to characterize the regional population response to current and future climate across the domain. Each DPF under the current climate was assessed for its ability to discriminate observed Lyme disease risk and known vector presence/absence, using data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Peak vector population and month of peak vector population were the DPFs that performed best as predictors of current Lyme disease risk. When examined under baseline and projected climate scenarios, the spatial and temporal distributions of DPFs shift and the seasonal cycle of key questing life stages is compressed under some scenarios. Our results demonstrate the utility of spatial characterization, analysis and visualization of dynamic population responses—including altered phenology—of disease vectors to altered climate. PMID:24772388

  2. Spatially-Explicit Simulation Modeling of Ecological Response to Climate Change: Methodological Considerations in Predicting Shifting Population Dynamics of Infectious Disease Vectors.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Radhika; Jimenez, Violeta; Chang, Howard H; Gambhir, Manoj; Fu, Joshua S; Liu, Yang; Remais, Justin V

    2013-09-01

    Poikilothermic disease vectors can respond to altered climates through spatial changes in both population size and phenology. Quantitative descriptors to characterize, analyze and visualize these dynamic responses are lacking, particularly across large spatial domains. In order to demonstrate the value of a spatially explicit, dynamic modeling approach, we assessed spatial changes in the population dynamics of Ixodes scapularis, the Lyme disease vector, using a temperature-forced population model simulated across a grid of 4 × 4 km cells covering the eastern United States, using both modeled (Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) 3.2.1) baseline/current (2001-2004) and projected (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and RCP 8.5; 2057-2059) climate data. Ten dynamic population features (DPFs) were derived from simulated populations and analyzed spatially to characterize the regional population response to current and future climate across the domain. Each DPF under the current climate was assessed for its ability to discriminate observed Lyme disease risk and known vector presence/absence, using data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Peak vector population and month of peak vector population were the DPFs that performed best as predictors of current Lyme disease risk. When examined under baseline and projected climate scenarios, the spatial and temporal distributions of DPFs shift and the seasonal cycle of key questing life stages is compressed under some scenarios. Our results demonstrate the utility of spatial characterization, analysis and visualization of dynamic population responses-including altered phenology-of disease vectors to altered climate. PMID:24772388

  3. Statistical-dynamical downscaling for wind energy potentials: Evaluation and applications to decadal hindcasts and climate change projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Joaquim G.; Reyers, Mark; Mömken, Julia

    2014-05-01

    A statistical-dynamical downscaling (SDD) approach for the regionalisation of wind energy output (Eout) over Europe with special focus on Germany is proposed. SDD uses an extended circulation weather type (CWT) analysis on global daily MSLP fields with the central point being located over Germany. 77 weather classes based on the associated circulation weather type and the intensity of the geostrophic flow are identified. Representatives of these classes are dynamical downscaled with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. By using weather class frequencies of different datasets the simulated representatives are recombined to probability density functions (PDFs) of near-surface wind speed and finally to Eout of a sample wind turbine for present and future climate. This is performed for reanalysis, decadal hindcasts and long-term future projections. For evaluation purposes results of SDD are compared to wind observations and to simulated Eout of purely dynamical downscaling (DD) methods. For the present climate SDD is able to simulate realistic PDFs of 10m-wind speed for most stations in Germany. The resulting spatial Eout patterns are similar to DD simulated Eout. In terms of decadal hindcasts results of SDD are similar to DD simulated Eout over Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, and Benelux, for which high correlations between annual Eout timeseries of SDD and DD are detected for selected hindcasts. Lower correlation is found for other European countries. It is demonstrated that SDD can be used to downscale the full ensemble of the MPI-ESM decadal prediction system. Long-term climate change projections in SRES scenarios of ECHAM5/MPI-OM as obtained by SDD agree well to results of other studies using DD methods, with increasing Eout over Northern Europe and a negative trend over Southern Europe. Despite some biases it is concluded that SDD is an adequate tool to assess regional wind energy changes in large model ensembles.

  4. Statistical-dynamical downscaling for wind energy potentials: Evaluation and applications to decadal hindcasts and climate change projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Moemken, Julia

    2015-04-01

    A statistical-dynamical downscaling (SDD) approach for the regionalisation of wind energy output (Eout) over Europe with special focus on Germany is proposed. SDD uses an extended circulation weather type (CWT) analysis on global daily MSLP fields with the central point being located over Germany. 77 weather classes based on the associated circulation weather type and the intensity of the geostrophic flow are identified. Representatives of these classes are dynamical downscaled with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. By using weather class frequencies of different datasets the simulated representatives are recombined to probability density functions (PDFs) of near-surface wind speed and finally to Eout of a sample wind turbine for present and future climate. This is performed for reanalysis, decadal hindcasts and long-term future projections. For evaluation purposes results of SDD are compared to wind observations and to simulated Eout of purely dynamical downscaling (DD) methods. For the present climate SDD is able to simulate realistic PDFs of 10m-wind speed for most stations in Germany. The resulting spatial Eout patterns are similar to DD simulated Eout. In terms of decadal hindcasts results of SDD are similar to DD simulated Eout over Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, and Benelux, for which high correlations between annual Eout timeseries of SDD and DD are detected for selected hindcasts. Lower correlation is found for other European countries. It is demonstrated that SDD can be used to downscale the full ensemble of the MPI-ESM decadal prediction system. Long-term climate change projections in SRES scenarios of ECHAM5/MPI-OM as obtained by SDD agree well to results of other studies using DD methods, with increasing Eout over Northern Europe and a negative trend over Southern Europe. Despite some biases it is concluded that SDD is an adequate tool to assess regional wind energy changes in large model ensembles.

  5. Responding to a Changing Energy Industry : 2007 Wind Energy Business Plan

    E-print Network

    Jacobson, Ryan J.

    2007-12-14

    with fossil power plants, or instead of them. For much of the U.S., the most mature and cost effective renewable energy technology is wind power. Due to this market need, the wind energy industry in the U.S. is growing tremendously (over 20 percent in 2006... for wind turbines, which they procure directly) and construction (EPC) services in a combined package under a single contract. This approach is in line with the manner Midwest Engineering builds fossil power plants, substations, and transmission lines...

  6. Changing Snow Cover and Stream Discharge in the Western United States - Wind River Range, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Barton, Jonathan S.; Riggs, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier onset of springtime weather has been documented in the western United States over at least the last 50 years. Because the majority (>70%) of the water supply in the western U.S. comes from snowmelt, analysis of the declining spring snowpack has important implications for the management of water resources. We studied ten years of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover products, 40 years of stream discharge and meteorological station data and 30 years of snow-water equivalent (SWE) SNOw Telemetry (SNOTEL) data in the Wind River Range (WRR), Wyoming. Results show increasing air temperatures for.the 40-year study period. Discharge from streams in WRR drainage basins show lower annual discharge and earlier snowmelt in the decade of the 2000s than in the previous three decades. Changes in streamflow may be related to increasing air temperatures which are probably contributing to a reduction in snow cover, although no trend of either increasingly lower streamflow or earlier snowmelt was observed within the decade of the 2000s. And SWE on 1 April does not show an expected downward trend from 1980 to 2009. The extent of snow cover derived from the lowest-elevation zone of the WRR study area is strongly correlated (r=0.91) with stream discharge on 1 May during the decade of the 2000s. The strong relationship between snow cover and streamflow indicates that MODIS snow-cover maps can be used to improve management of water resources in the drought-prone western U.S.

  7. Rapid changes in mixed layer stratification driven by submesoscale instabilities and winds

    E-print Network

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Submesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instability of upper ocean fronts lead to rapid restratification of the mixed layer on a time scale of days. This restratification can be opposed by a down-front wind stress ...

  8. Future changes of wind energy potentials over Europe in a large CMIP5 multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, Mark; Moemken, Julia; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2015-04-01

    A statistical-dynamical downscaling method is used to estimate future changes of wind energy output (Eout) of an idealized wind turbine across Europe at the regional scale. With this aim, 22 GCMs of the CMIP5 ensemble are considered. The downscaling method uses circulation weather types and regional climate modelling with the COSMO-CLM model. Future projections are computed for two time periods (2021-2060 and 2061-2100) following two scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). The CMIP5 ensemble mean response reveal a more likely than not increase of mean annual Eout over Northern and Central Europe and a likely decrease over Southern Europe. There is some uncertainty with respect to the magnitude and the sign of the changes. Higher robustness in future changes is observed for specific seasons. Except from the Mediterranean area, an ensemble mean increase of Eout is simulated for winter and a decreasing for the summer season, resulting in a strong increase of the intra-annual variability for most of Europe. The latter is in particular likely during the 2nd half of the 21st century under the RCP8.5 scenario. In general, signals are stronger for 2061-2100 compared to 2021-2060 and for RCP8.5 compared to RCP4.5. Regarding changes of the inter-annual variability of Eout for Central Europe, the future projections strongly vary between individual models and also between future periods and scenarios within single models. This study showed for an ensemble of 22 CMIP5 models that changes in the wind energy potentials over Europe may take place in future decades. However, due to the uncertainties detected in this research, further investigations with multi-model ensembles are needed to provide a better quantification and understanding of the future changes.

  9. Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Liming

    interpreting our results. First, the land surface temperature measures the temperature of the Earth's surface1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature

  10. The impact of climate change on the geographical distribution of two vectors of Chagas disease: implications for the force of infection.

    PubMed

    Medone, Paula; Ceccarelli, Soledad; Parham, Paul E; Figuera, Andreína; Rabinovich, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is the most important vector-borne disease in Latin America. The vectors are insects belonging to the Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), and are widely distributed in the Americas. Here, we assess the implications of climatic projections for 2050 on the geographical footprint of two of the main Chagas disease vectors: Rhodnius prolixus (tropical species) and Triatoma infestans (temperate species). We estimated the epidemiological implications of current to future transitions in the climatic niche in terms of changes in the force of infection (FOI) on the rural population of two countries: Venezuela (tropical) and Argentina (temperate). The climatic projections for 2050 showed heterogeneous impact on the climatic niches of both vector species, with a decreasing trend of suitability of areas that are currently at high-to-moderate transmission risk. Consequently, climatic projections affected differently the FOI for Chagas disease in Venezuela and Argentina. Despite the heterogeneous results, our main conclusions point out a decreasing trend in the number of new cases of Tr. cruzi human infections per year between current and future conditions using a climatic niche approach. PMID:25688019

  11. Changing vessel routes could significantly reduce the cost of future offshore wind projects.

    PubMed

    Samoteskul, Kateryna; Firestone, Jeremy; Corbett, James; Callahan, John

    2014-08-01

    With the recent emphasis on offshore wind energy Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) has become one of the main frameworks used to plan and manage the increasingly complex web of ocean and coastal uses. As wind development becomes more prevalent, existing users of the ocean space, such as commercial shippers, will be compelled to share their historically open-access waters with these projects. Here, we demonstrate the utility of using cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to support siting decisions within a CMSP framework. In this study, we assume that large-scale offshore wind development will take place in the US Mid-Atlantic within the next decades. We then evaluate whether building projects nearshore or far from shore would be more cost-effective. Building projects nearshore is assumed to require rerouting of the commercial vessel traffic traveling between the US Mid-Atlantic ports by an average of 18.5 km per trip. We focus on less than 1500 transits by large deep-draft vessels. We estimate that over 29 years of the study, commercial shippers would incur an additional $0.2 billion (in 2012$) in direct and indirect costs. Building wind projects closer to shore where vessels used to transit would generate approximately $13.4 billion (in 2012$) in savings. Considering the large cost savings, modifying areas where vessels transit needs to be included in the portfolio of policies used to support the growth of the offshore wind industry in the US. PMID:24794388

  12. Virus-Mediated Chemical Changes in Rice Plants Impact the Relationship between Non-Vector Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and Its Egg Parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

  13. Virus-mediated chemical changes in rice plants impact the relationship between non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and its egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaochan; Xu, Hongxing; Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

  14. Abrupt changes of density in sporadic solar wind and their effect on Earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomov, V. A.; Borodkova, N. L.; Eselevich, V. G.; Eselevich, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In a magnetic cloud, which is part of a sporadic solar wind on the Earth orbit, against the background of a constant solar wind velocity, abrupt jumps in the solar wind density and antiphase, highly correlated (correlation coefficient R˜-0.9) variations of the magnitude of the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field were detected. Analysis has shown that these jumps, which represent fibers or eruptive protuberances, result, when interacting with the Earth magnetosphere, in the development of a high-latitude magnetic disturbance, starting on the dayside and propagating into the morning and evening sides of the magnetosphere. The processes, developing in the auroral region during this disturbance, are similar to processes occurring during the substorm, but they are characterized by a shorter duration and lower value of released energy.

  15. Climate change projected fire weather sensitivity: CaliforniaSanta Ana wind occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.; Schlegel, Nicole J.

    2006-01-01

    A new methodbased on global climate model pressuregradients was developed for identifying coastal high-wind fire weatherconditions, such as the Santa Ana Occurrence (SAO). Application of thismethod for determining southern California Santa Ana wind occurrenceresulted in a good correlation between derived large-scale SAOs andobserved offshore winds during periods of low humidity. The projectedchange in the number of SAOs was analyzed using two global climatemodels, one a low temperature sensitivity and the other amiddle-temperature sensitivity, both forced with low and high emissionscenarios, for three future time periods. This initial analysis showsconsistent shifts in SAO events from earlier (September-October) to later(November-December) in the season, suggesting that SAOs may significantlyincrease the extent of California coastal areas burned by wildfires, lossof life, and property.

  16. Statistical properties of solar wind discontinuities, intermittent turbulence, and rapid emergence of

    E-print Network

    Oughton, Sean

    and locally from nonlinear dynamics that can be understood in the framework of nonlinear MHD theory of the observed solar wind discontinuities may be locally generated, representing boundaries between interacting changes in the magnetic field vector. These changes are mainly directional, not in magnitude

  17. Updated Measurements of Saturn’s Zonal Wind between 2004 - 2014 from Cassini ISS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.

    2015-11-01

    We present updated zonal wind measurements of Saturn using Cassini ISS images taken between 2004 and 2014. We previously reported that there may be small seasonal changes in Saturn’s zonal wind profile but measurement uncertainties prevented us from making definite statements. In our previous report, we used the zonal standard deviation of the wind vectors as a proxy for the measurement uncertainty. However, zonal standard deviation contains contributions from both real spatial variations in the wind speed as well as uncertainties in the measurements. This raised a difficulty in distinguishing small, real changes in the wind field from the uncertainties in the measurement. We have developed a technique which isolates real spatial variations from measurement uncertainties by analyzing the correlation fields produced in the two-dimensional Correlation Imaging Velocimetry (CIV) cloud-tracking wind measurement method. The CIV algorithm computes a wind vector by calculating the two-dimensional correlation between the pair of maps; a peak in the correlation is judged to be a match. We determine the size, shape, and orientation of the peak by fitting an ellipse to the peak and calculating the area, eccentricity, and orientation angle of the ellipse. Combining these metrics provides a measure of the uncertainty associated with individual wind vectors. Vectors with smaller, sharper, more circular peaks will have a smaller uncertainty than vectors with larger, flatter, more elliptical peaks. Using this new technique, our new measurements reveal small temporal changes in the zonal wind profiles. Our work has been supported by NASA PATM NNX14AK07G and NSF AAG 1212216.

  18. Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2012-01-01

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

  19. Sensitivity of the Overturning Circulation in the Southern Ocean to Decadal Changes in Wind Forcing

    E-print Network

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    cir- culation and the associated fluxes and air­sea exchanges of heat, freshwater, and climatically important tracers such as CO2 (Le Que´re´ et al. 2007; Solomon et al. 2007). The strong westerly winds decades, due at least partly to anthropogenic processes (Thompson and Solomon 2002; Marshall 2003

  20. Vector Inflation

    E-print Network

    Golovnev, Alexey; Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scenario where inflation is driven by non-minimally coupled massive vector fields. In an isotropic homogeneous universe these fields behave in presicely the same way as a massive minimally coupled scalar field. Therefore our model is very similar to the model of chaotic inflation with scalar field. For vector fields the isotropy of expansion is achived either by considering a triplet of orthogonal vector fields or for the expense of $N$ randomly oriented vector fields. In this last case the substantial anisotropy of the expansion of order $1/\\sqrt{N}$ survives after inflation. The lightest vector fields might also force the late time acceleration of the Universe.

  1. More Variable and Stronger Winds during the Last Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Stephan; Werner, Martin; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Changes of wind systems and thus of atmospheric circulation patterns are an essential feature of fast climate changes that explain hemispheric wide teleconnections. Here, we present the synoptic interpretation of prevailing paleo wind systems for Central Europe during glacial times and compare the results with a proxy record of changes from easterly to westerly wind directions from maar lake sediments (Germany). This record indicates a high amount of east wind and a high variability on a millennial time scale of wind direction changes for the last glacial period. The basic observations, made on the proxy record, are also shown in the 10 m-wind vectors in ECHAM3 and ECHAM4 model experiments under glacial conditions with different prescribed sea surface temperature patterns. However, all glacial experiments show a lower frequency of east wind in comparison to the present-day control runs. But all glacial runs show a high variability of wind direction changes and stronger winds in comparison to the present-day control runs. Furthermore, the analysis of long-persisting east wind conditions (so-called LEWIC events) in the AGCM data shows a stronger seasonality during glacial conditions: all different experiments are characterized by an increase of the relative importance during spring and summer. Synoptic analysis of the air flows with prevailing east wind over Central Europe are given for the spring which is the most important season for dust emission. Under present-day conditions easterly wind directions are mainly forced by a strong high over the Baltic Sea realm. The different glacial experiments show in good agreement a shift from a long-lasting high from the Baltic Sea towards NW, directly above the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, together with the contemporary occurrence of enhanced westerly circulation at the North Atlantic.

  2. The influence of changes in wind patterns on the areal extension of surface cyanobacterial blooms in a large shallow lake in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingfeng; Qin, Boqiang; Brookes, Justin D; Shi, Kun; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhu, Mengyuan; Yan, Wenming; Wang, Zhen

    2015-06-15

    It has been hypothesized that climate change will induce the areal extension of cyanobacterial blooms. However, this hypothesis lacks field-based observation. In the present study both long-term historical data and short-term field measurement were used to identify the importance of changes in wind patterns on the cyanobacterial bloom in Lake Taihu (China), a large, shallow, eutrophic lake located in a subtropical zone. The cyanobacterial bloom mainly composed of Microcystis spp. recurred frequently throughout the year. The regression analysis of multi-year satellite image data extracted by the Floating Algae Index revealed that both the annual mean monthly maximum cyanobacterial bloom area (MMCBA) increased year by year from 2000 to 2011, while the contemporaneous cyanobacterial biomass showed no significant change. However, the correlation analysis shows that MMCBA was negatively correlated with wind speed. Our short-term field measurements indicated that the influence of wind on surface cyanobacterial blooms is that the Chlorophyll-a (Chla) concentration is fully mixing throughout the water column when the wind speed exceed 7 m s(-1). At lower wind speeds, there was vertical stratification of Chla with high surface concentrations and an increase in bloom area. The regression analysis of wind speed indicates that the climate has changed over the last decade. Lake Taihu has become increasingly calm, with the decrease of strong wind frequency between 2000 and 2011, corresponding to the increase in the MMCBA over time. Therefore, we conclude that changes in wind patterns related to climate change have favored the increase of cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu. PMID:25747360

  3. Rice stripe virus affects the viability of its vector offspring by changing developmental gene expression in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Shijuan; Wang, Xi; Li, Xiaoli; Zi, Jinyan; Ge, Shangshu; Cheng, Zhaobang; Zhou, Tong; Ji, Yinghua; Deng, Jinhua; Wong, Sek-Man; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses may affect the viability and development process of their herbivore vectors. Small brown planthopper (SBPH) is main vector of Rice stripe virus (RSV), which causes serious rice stripe disease. Here, we reported the effects of RSV on SBPH offspring by crossing experiments between viruliferous and non-viruliferous strains. The life parameters of offspring from different cross combinations were compared. The hatchability of F1 progeny from viruliferous parents decreased significantly, and viruliferous rate was completely controlled by viruliferous maternal parent. To better elucidate the underlying biological mechanisms, the morphology of eggs, viral propagation and distribution in the eggs and expression profile of embryonic development genes were investigated. The results indicated that RSV replicated and accumulated in SBPH eggs resulting in developmental stunt or delay of partial eggs; in addition, RSV was only able to infect ovum but not sperm. According to the expression profile, expression of 13 developmental genes was regulated in the eggs from viruliferous parents, in which two important regulatory genes (Ls-Dorsal and Ls-CPO) were most significantly down-regulated. In general, RSV exerts an adverse effect on SBPH, which is unfavourable for the expansion of viruliferous populations. The viewpoint is also supported by systematic monitoring of SBPH viruliferous rate. PMID:25601039

  4. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  5. Analysis of Age-Related Changes in Asian Facial Skeletons Using 3D Vector Mathematics on Picture Archiving and Communication System Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, So Jung; Park, Jee Soo; Byun, Sung Wan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There are marked differences in facial skeletal characteristics between Asian and Caucasian. However, ethnic differences in age-related facial skeletal changes have not yet been fully established. The aims of this study were to evaluate age-related changes in Asian midfacial skeletons and to explore ethnic differences in facial skeletal structures with aging between Caucasian and Asian. Materials and Methods The study included 108 men (aged 20-79 years) and 115 women (aged 20-81 years). Axial CT images with a gantry tilt angle of 0 were analyzed. We measured three-dimensional (3D) coordinates at each point with a pixel lens cursor in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS), and angles and widths between the points were calculated using 3D vector mathematics. We analyzed angular changes in 4 bony regions, including the glabellar, orbital, maxillary, and pyriform aperture regions, and changes in the orbital aperture width (distance from the posterior lacrimal crest to the frontozygomatic suture) and the pyriform width (between both upper margins of the pyriform aperture). Results All 4 midfacial angles in females and glabellar and maxillary angles in males showed statistically significant decreases with aging. On the other hand, the orbital and pyriform widths did not show statistically significant changes with aging. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that Asian midfacial skeletons may change continuously throughout life, and that there may be significant differences in the midfacial skeleton between both sexes and between ethnic groups. PMID:26256986

  6. The Response of Trade-wind Clouds to a Changing Environment: Why Climate Model Cloud Feedbacks Might Differ from Nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuijens, L.; Medeiros, B.; Sandu, I.; Ahlgrimm, M.

    2014-12-01

    The vertical distribution of clouds in the trades, and how this distribution is linked to the thermodynamic structure of the lower troposphere, is emerging as a key factor in the assessment of modeled cloud feedbacks. The spread in cloud feedbacks and climate sensitivity may be attributed to how efficiently models dry the lower troposphere as climate warms. This relates to how models mix moisture vertically, and thus to how their clouds are distributed. A three year record of cloudiness and boundary layer structure from a ground-based remote sensing station at Barbados, situated in a typical trade-wind region, is used to gain insight into the major components of the cloud distribution, and how these vary with changes in atmospheric structure. These insights are then used to evaluate modeled cloud behavior in single time step (half-hourly) output of the ECMWF IFS and CMIP5 models, at a grid point nearby Barbados. Cloudiness is found to be regulated by two components with a different sensitivity to the large-scale flow. Cloud near cloud base is on average the largest contributor to cloudiness, but is relatively constant on time scales much longer than a day. This is because turbulence and cumulus convection adjust fast to perturbations, and self-regulate the cumulus mass flux and cloudiness near cloud base. A secondary component consists mainly of stratiform outflow layers near the detrainment level of cumulus tops, which carry most of the variability on longer time scales. The organization of convection into larger and deeper clusters, which can vertically transport large amounts of moisture, appear key in regulating such outflow layers. Several models fail at reproducing these smaller scale processes that control trade-wind cloudiness in the current climate. The stratiform component in modeled distributions of trade-wind cloudiness is seldom pronounced, and their distributions tend to be bottom-heavy. Whereas observations suggest that changes in clouds are more likely manifested in the component of cloud aloft, models show large variances in their cloud base component instead. Hence, changes in cloudiness into a warmer climate predicted by models may be largely carried by changes that are unlike nature.

  7. Vector Inflation

    E-print Network

    Alexey Golovnev; Viatcheslav Mukhanov; Vitaly Vanchurin

    2008-06-10

    We propose a scenario where inflation is driven by non-minimally coupled massive vector fields. In an isotropic homogeneous universe these fields behave in presicely the same way as a massive minimally coupled scalar field. Therefore our model is very similar to the model of chaotic inflation with scalar field. For vector fields the isotropy of expansion is achived either by considering a triplet of orthogonal vector fields or for the expense of $N$ randomly oriented vector fields. In the last case the substantial anisotropy of the expansion of order $1/\\sqrt{N}$ survives until the end of inflation. The lightest vector fields might also force the late time acceleration of the Universe.

  8. Decades-long changes of the interstellar wind through our solar system.

    PubMed

    Frisch, P C; Bzowski, M; Livadiotis, G; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Mueller, H-R; Pryor, W R; Schwadron, N A; Sokó?, J M; Vallerga, J V; Ajello, J M

    2013-09-01

    The journey of the Sun through the dynamically active local interstellar medium creates an evolving heliosphere environment. This motion drives a wind of interstellar material through the heliosphere that has been measured with Earth-orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft for 40 years. Recent results obtained by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer mission during 2009-2010 suggest that neutral interstellar atoms flow into the solar system from a different direction than found previously. These prior measurements represent data collected from Ulysses and other spacecraft during 1992-2002 and a variety of older measurements acquired during 1972-1978. Consideration of all data types and their published results and uncertainties, over the three epochs of observations, indicates that the trend for the interstellar flow ecliptic longitude to increase linearly with time is statistically significant. PMID:24009386

  9. Fractional Factorial Experiment Designs to Minimize Configuration Changes in Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard; Cler, Daniel L.; Graham, Albert B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper serves as a tutorial to introduce the wind tunnel research community to configuration experiment designs that can satisfy resource constraints in a configuration study involving several variables, without arbitrarily eliminating any of them from the experiment initially. The special case of a configuration study featuring variables at two levels is examined in detail. This is the type of study in which each configuration variable has two natural states - 'on or off', 'deployed or not deployed', 'low or high', and so forth. The basic principles are illustrated by results obtained in configuration studies conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility and in the ViGYAN Low Speed Tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. The crucial role of interactions among configuration variables is highlighted with an illustration of difficulties that can be encountered when they are not properly taken into account.

  10. Medical Education in the Anatomical Sciences: The Winds of Change Continue to Blow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Richard L.; McBride, Jennifer M.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    At most institutions, education in the anatomical sciences has undergone several changes over the last decade. To identify the changes that have occurred in gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses, directors of these courses were asked to respond to a survey with questions pertaining to total course…

  11. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A. (Madison, WI); Smith, Lloyd M. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  12. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  13. Potential Effects of Climate Change on Ecological Interaction Outcomes Between Two Disease-Vector Mosquitoes: A Mesocosm Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Leonel, B F; Koroiva, R; Hamada, N; Ferreira-Keppler, R L; Roque, F O

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to experimentally assess the effects of different climate change scenarios on the outcomes of interactions between Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae. The experimental design maintained a constant density of specimens while the proportion of the species in different experimental climate change scenarios varied. Our results indicate that survival of the two species was not affected, but larval development and pupation times decreased under elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration and high air temperature. In climate change scenarios with both species together, the survival of Ae. aegypti increased and its larval development time decreased with increasing density of Cx. quinquefasciatus. This may be attributed to the effects of intraspecific competition being more significant than interspecific competition in Ae. aegypti. Our study also reveals that climatic changes may affect the patterns of interactions between Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti. Alterations in climatic conditions changed the response of context-dependent competition, indicating the importance of studies on how ecological interactions will be affected by projected future climatic change. PMID:26336208

  14. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  15. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  16. Holocene changes in a park-forest vegetation mosaic in the Wind River Range, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, E.A. )

    1994-06-01

    The modern mod-elevation vegetation of the Rocky Mountains is a mosaic of conifer forests and open parks dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), grasses, and other herbs. It is not known how this pattern originated or how sensitive the balance between forest and park is to disturbance. Using pollen from sediments of five small ponds in Fish Creek Park, WY (elev. 2700 m), I reconstructed the last 8000 yrs of changes in the park-forest mosaic in an are about 16 km[sup 2]. Surface samples collected from 52 ponds in the Fish Creek Park area and from forest and park sites in Wyoming and Colorado indicate that park and forest pollen assemblages can be distinguished using multivariate statistical methods and conifer:herb pollen ratios. Fossil pollen from the five sediment cores shows that the distribution of the two vegetation types on the landscape has changed through the Holocene, and that the changes in vegetation are gradual. Past changes from park to forest have apparently occurred much more slowly than changes from forest to park, suggesting that areas subjected to recent clearcutting may remain unforested for centuries.

  17. Dissipation in Pulsar Winds

    E-print Network

    J. G. Kirk

    2005-04-19

    I review the constraints placed on relativistic pulsar winds by comparing optical and X-ray images of the inner Crab Nebula on the one hand with two-dimensional MHD simulations on the other. The various proposals in the literature for achieving the low magnetisation required at the inner edge of the Nebula, are then discussed, emphasising that of dissipation in the striped-wind picture. The possibility of direct observation of the wind is examined. Based on the predicted orientation of the polarisation vector, I outline a new argument suggesting that the off-pulse component of the optical emission of the Crab pulsar originates in the wind.

  18. Vectors, Change of Basis and Matrix Representation: Onto-Semiotic Approach in the Analysis of Creating Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montiel, Mariana; Wilhelmi, Miguel R.; Vidakovic, Draga; Elstak, Iwan

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, the onto-semiotic approach was employed to analyse the mathematical notion of different coordinate systems, as well as some situations and university students' actions related to these coordinate systems in the context of multivariate calculus. This study approaches different coordinate systems through the process of change of…

  19. Changes in the High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles in Response to Solar-Wind Perturbations During Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Arbacher, Becca

    2011-01-01

    The latest results from an investigation to establish links between solar-wind and topside-ionospheric parameters will be presented including a case where high-latitude topside electron-density Ne(h) profiles indicated dramatic rapid changes in the scale height during the main phase of a large magnetic storm (Dst < -200 nT). These scale-height changes suggest a large heat input to the topside ionosphere at this time. The topside profiles were derived from ISIS-1 digital ionograms obtained from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDA Web). Solar-wind data obtained from the NASA OMNIWeb database indicated that the magnetic storm was due to a magnetic cloud. This event is one of several large magnetic storms being investigated during the interval from 1965 to 1984 when both solar-wind and digital topside ionograms, from either Alouette-2, ISIS-1, or ISIS-2, are potentially available.

  20. Winds of Change in the English Language--Air of Peril for Native Speakers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradowski, Michal B.

    2008-01-01

    English today is one of the most hybrid and rapidly changing languages in the world. New users of the language are not just passively absorbing, but actively shaping it, breeding a variety of regional Englishes, as well as pidgins and English-lexified creoles. Also, as in an increasing number of countries English is becoming an element of core…

  1. Winds of Change: Latinos in the Heartland and the Nation. JSRI Statistical Brief No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aponte, Robert; Siles, Marcelo E.

    This statistical brief provides a follow-up assessment of the changing demographic and economic landscape of the Midwest between 1980 and 1990. Latino population growth in the Midwest during the 1980s was modest, but since the region's other groups experienced minimal or negative growth, Latino growth accounted for over half the Midwest's total…

  2. The Winds of Change in Russian Higher Education: Is the East Moving West?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timoshenko, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    In the last 30 years, major changes have taken place in the public sector worldwide under the rubric of New Public Management [NPM]. The education sector is perhaps one of the key areas drawing an intense interest and discussion in the wake of NPM. The Russian State seems to be no longer an exception to this global trend. In line with this, the…

  3. Hot gas ingestion test results of a two-poster vectored thrust concept with flow visualization in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Neiner, George; Bencic, Timothy J.; Flood, Joseph D.; Amuedo, Kurt C.

    1990-01-01

    A 9.2 percent scale STOVL hot gas ingestion model was tested in the NASA Lewis 9 x 15-foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Flow visualization from the Phase 1 test program, which evaluated the hot ingestion phenomena and control techniques, is covered. The Phase 2 test program evaluated the hot gas ingestion phenomena at higher temperatures and used a laser sheet to investigate the flow field. Hot gas ingestion levels were measured for the several forward nozzle splay configurations and with flow control/life improvement devices (LIDs) which reduced the hot gas ingestion. The test was conducted at full scale nozzle pressure ratios and inlet Mach numbers. Results are presented over a range of nozzle pressure ratios at a 10 kn headwind velocity. The Phase 2 program was conducted at exhaust nozzle temperatures up to 1460 R and utilized a sheet laser system for flow visualization of the model flow field in and out of ground effects. The results reported are for nozzle exhaust temperatures up to 1160 R and contain the compressor face pressure and temperature distortions, the total pressure recovery, the inlet temperature rise, and the environmental effects of the hot gas. The environmental effects include the ground plane contours, the model airframe heating, and the location of the ground flow separation.

  4. Simulation of Variable Speed Wind Generation System Using Boost Converter of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyama, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Arinaga, Shinji; Yamashita, Yukio

    This paper proposes variable-speed wind generation system using the boost converter. The proposed system has three speed control modes for the wind velocity. The control mode of low wind velocity regulates the armature current of the generator with the boost converter to control the speed of wind turbine. The control mode of middle wind velocity regulates the DC link voltage with the vector controlled inverter to control the speed of wind turbine. The control mode of high wind velocity regulates the pitch angle of the wind turbine with the pitch angle control system to control the speed of wind turbine. The hybrid of three control modes extends the variable-speed range. The proposed system simplifies the maintenance and improves the reliability and reduces the cost in compare with the variable-speed wind generation system using PWM converter. This paper describes the control strategy and modeling for simulation using Matlab Simulink of the proposed system. Also this paper describes the control strategy and modeling of variable-speed wind generation system using PWM converter. The steady state and transient responses for wind velocity changes are simulated using the Matlab Simulink. This paper verifies the fundamental performance of the system using boost converter by discussing the simulation results of the both systems.

  5. The impact of Climate Change on the Iberian Low-Level Wind Jet: EURO-CORDEX regional climate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Lima, Daniela; Semedo, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    A sharp temperature contrast, observed mostly in summer, between high temperatures over land and lower temperatures over the ocean and the typical summer synoptic scale configuration (high pressure system over the ocean and thermal low inland) are responsible for the development of a coastal low-level jet (CLLJ). The low level horizontal pressure gradient induces, through geostrophic adjustment, a strong alongshore flow, which is also influenced by local orography and the high pressure subsidence over the maritime boundary layer. In this study, the EURO-CORDEX hindcast forced by ERA-Interim (1989-2009), the historic reference (1960-2006) and the future (2006-2100; RCP8.5) simulations, forced by EC-Earth global model, are used to determine the climate change signal on the CLLJ off the Iberian Peninsula's western coast. Although the boundary conditions of the hindcast and historic reference simulations have different resolutions, both have similar distributions and features of CLLJ. In the summer, a clear rise in the occurrence of CLLJ is expected throughout the 21st century, with the highest increase off the northwest coast of Iberia (~14%). The CLLJ prevailing height is confined between 300 and 400m and the most frequent maximum wind speed is 15ms-1 both in present and future climate, nevertheless a shift to higher values is expected. The predominant wind direction at jet height is north-northeast in all simulations. The temporal evolution of CLLJ occurrence during the 21st century shows that there is no significant trend in spring and autumn, although some decadal variability is observed.

  6. PULSED ALFVEN WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J. T.; Tian, H.; Phan, T. D.

    2011-08-20

    Using 3 s plasma and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft located in the solar wind well upstream from Earth, we report observations of isolated, pulse-like Alfvenic disturbances in the solar wind. These isolated events are characterized by roughly plane-polarized rotations in the solar wind magnetic field and velocity vectors away from the directions of the underlying field and velocity and then back again. They pass over Wind on timescales ranging from seconds to several minutes. These isolated, pulsed Alfven waves are pervasive; we have identified 175 such events over the full range of solar wind speeds (320-550 km s{sup -1}) observed in a randomly chosen 10 day interval. The large majority of these events are propagating away from the Sun in the solar wind rest frame. Maximum field rotations in the interval studied ranged from 6 Degree-Sign to 109 Degree-Sign . Similar to most Alfvenic fluctuations in the solar wind at 1 AU, the observed changes in velocity are typically less than that predicted for pure Alfven waves (Alfvenicity ranged from 0.28 to 0.93). Most of the events are associated with small enhancements or depressions in magnetic field strength and small changes in proton number density and/or temperature. The pulse-like and roughly symmetric nature of the magnetic field and velocity rotations in these events suggests that these Alfvenic disturbances are not evolving when observed. They thus appear to be, and probably are, solitary waves. It is presently uncertain how these waves originate, although they may evolve out of Alfvenic turbulence.

  7. How do cosmic rays change their energy in the solar wind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion-convection (modulation) equation is derived directly from the Boltzmann equation on the basis of a minimum number of assumptions concerning the scattering process, among which are: (1) that the scattered particles undergo no energy change, and (2) that isotropy is an equilibrium state. It is noted that, in the event that the background plasma contains a magnetic field and the flow speeds of the plasma and scattering centers are different, additional terms arise that will modify the equations. If, moreover, the scatterers have individual motions relative to their average flow, the second-order Fermi acceleration term will appear.

  8. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  9. Stochastic Dynamics of Sea Surface Winds Adam Hugh Monahan

    E-print Network

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    Stochastic Dynamics of Sea Surface Winds Adam Hugh Monahan School of Earth and Ocean Sciences The probability distribution of sea surface winds (both vector winds and wind speed) is considered. The observed moment fields, estimated from SeaWinds scatterometer data, are shown to be characterised by non

  10. Hot gas ingestion test results of a two-poster vectored thrust concept with flow visualization in the NASA Lewis 9- x 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Neiner, George; Bencic, Timothy J.; Flood, Joseph D.; Amuedo, Kurt C.; Strock, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    A 9.2 percent scale Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) hot gas ingestion model was designed and built by McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MCAIR) and tested in the Lewis Research Center 9 x 15 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Hot gas ingestion, the entrainment of heated engine exhaust into the inlet flow field, is a key development issure for advanced short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft. Flow visualization from the Phase 1 test program, which evaluated the hot ingestion phenomena and control techniques, is covered. The Phase 2 test program evaluated the hot gas ingestion phenomena at higher temperatures and used a laser sheet to investigate the flow field. Hot gas ingestion levels were measured for the several forward nozzle splay configurations and with flow control/life improvement devices (LIDs) which reduced the hot gas ingestion. The model support system had four degrees of freedom - pitch, roll, yaw, and vertical height variation. The model support system also provided heated high-pressure air for nozzle flow and a suction system exhaust for inlet flow. The test was conducted at full scale nozzle pressure ratios and inlet Mach numbers. Test and data analysis results from Phase 2 and flow visualization from both Phase 1 and 2 are documented. A description of the model and facility modifications is also provided. Headwind velocity was varied from 10 to 23 kn. Results are presented over a range of nozzle pressure ratios at a 10 kn headwind velocity. The Phase 2 program was conducted at exhaust nozzle temperatures up to 1460 R and utilized a sheet laser system for flow visualization of the model flow field in and out of ground effects. The results reported are for nozzle exhaust temperatures up to 1160 R. These results will contain the compressor face pressure and temperature distortions, the total pressure recovery, the inlet temperature rise, and the environmental effects of the hot gas. The environmental effects include the ground plane contours, the model airframe heating, and the location of the ground flow separation.

  11. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  12. Pollen, wind and fire: how to investigate genetic effects of disturbance-induced change in forest trees.

    PubMed

    Bacles, Cecile F E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of habitat disturbance on mating patterns although pollen and seed dispersal in forest trees has been a long-standing theme of forest and conservation genetics. Forest ecosystems face global environmental pressures from timber exploitation to genetic pollution and climate change, and it is therefore essential to comprehend how disturbances may alter the dispersal of genes and their establishment in tree populations in order to formulate relevant recommendations for sustainable resource management practices and realistic predictions of potential adaptation to climate change by means of range shift or expansion (Kremer et al. 2012). However, obtaining reliable evidence of disturbance-induced effects on gene dispersal processes from empirical evaluation of forest tree populations is difficult. Indeed, tree species share characteristics such as high longevity, long generation time and large reproductive population size, which may impede the experimenter's ability to assess parameters at the spatial and time scales at which any change may occur (Petit and Hampe 2006). It has been suggested that appropriate study designs should encompass comparison of populations before and after disturbance as well as account for demonstrated variation in conspecific density, that is, the spatial distribution of mates, and forest density, including all species and relating to alteration in landscape openness (Bacles & Jump 2011). However, more often than not, empirical studies aiming to assess the consequences of habitat disturbance on genetic processes in tree populations assume rather than quantify a change in tree densities in forests under disturbance and generally fail to account for population history, which may lead to inappropriate interpretation of a causal relationship between population genetic structure and habitat disturbance due to effects of unmonitored confounding variables (Gauzere et al. 2013). In this issue, Shohami and Nathan (2014) take advantage of the distinctive features of the fire-adapted wind-pollinated Aleppo pine Pinus halepensis (Fig. 1) to provide an elegant example of best practice. Thanks to long-term monitoring of the study site, a natural stand in Israel, Shohami and Nathan witnessed the direct impact of habitat disturbance, here taking the shape of fire, on conspecific and forest densities and compared pre- and postdisturbance mating patterns estimated from cones of different ages sampled on the same surviving maternal individuals (Fig. 2). This excellent study design is all the more strong that Shohami and Nathan took further analytical steps to account for confounding variables, such as historical population genetic structure and possible interannual variation in wind conditions, thus giving high credibility to their findings of unequivocal fire-induced alteration of mating patterns in P. halepensis. Most notably, the authors found, at the pollen pool level, a disruption of local genetic structure which, furthermore, they were able to attribute explicitly to enhanced pollen-mediated gene immigration into the low-density fire-disturbed stand. This cleverly designed research provides a model approach to be followed if we are to advance our understanding of disturbance-induced dispersal and genetic change in forest trees. PMID:24372751

  13. Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy resource over the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, S. C.; Barthelmie, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The energy sector comprises approximately two-thirds of global total greenhouse gas emissions. For this and other reasons, renewable energy resources including wind power are being increasingly harnessed to provide electricity generation potential with negligible emissions of carbon dioxide. The wind energy resource is naturally a function of the climate system because the “fuel” is the incident wind speed and thus is determined by the atmospheric circulation. Some recent articles have reported historical declines in measured near-surface wind speeds, leading some to question the continued viability of the wind energy industry. Here we briefly articulate the challenges inherent in accurately quantifying and attributing historical tendencies and making robust projections of likely future wind resources. We then analyze simulations from the current generation of regional climate models and show, at least for the next 50 years, the wind resource in the regions of greatest wind energy penetration will not move beyond the historical envelope of variability. Thus this work suggests that the wind energy industry can, and will, continue to make a contribution to electricity provision in these regions for at least the next several decades. PMID:21536905

  14. Wind farm and solar park effects on plant-soil carbon cycling: uncertain impacts of changes in ground-level microclimate.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alona; Waldron, Susan; Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas J

    2014-06-01

    Global energy demand is increasing as greenhouse gas driven climate change progresses, making renewable energy sources critical to future sustainable power provision. Land-based wind and solar electricity generation technologies are rapidly expanding, yet our understanding of their operational effects on biological carbon cycling in hosting ecosystems is limited. Wind turbines and photovoltaic panels can significantly change local ground-level climate by a magnitude that could affect the fundamental plant-soil processes that govern carbon dynamics. We believe that understanding the possible effects of changes in ground-level microclimates on these phenomena is crucial to reducing uncertainty of the true renewable energy carbon cost and to maximize beneficial effects. In this Opinions article, we examine the potential for the microclimatic effects of these land-based renewable energy sources to alter plant-soil carbon cycling, hypothesize likely effects and identify critical knowledge gaps for future carbon research. PMID:24132939

  15. Wind farm and solar park effects on plant–soil carbon cycling: uncertain impacts of changes in ground-level microclimate

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alona; Waldron, Susan; Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Global energy demand is increasing as greenhouse gas driven climate change progresses, making renewable energy sources critical to future sustainable power provision. Land-based wind and solar electricity generation technologies are rapidly expanding, yet our understanding of their operational effects on biological carbon cycling in hosting ecosystems is limited. Wind turbines and photovoltaic panels can significantly change local ground-level climate by a magnitude that could affect the fundamental plant–soil processes that govern carbon dynamics. We believe that understanding the possible effects of changes in ground-level microclimates on these phenomena is crucial to reducing uncertainty of the true renewable energy carbon cost and to maximize beneficial effects. In this Opinions article, we examine the potential for the microclimatic effects of these land-based renewable energy sources to alter plant–soil carbon cycling, hypothesize likely effects and identify critical knowledge gaps for future carbon research. PMID:24132939

  16. The effect of changing solar wind conditions on the inner magnetosphere and ring current: A model data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Spencer, E.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the rate at which the open drift paths in the near-Earth magnetosphere convert to closed paths during events with a sudden northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) after the peak of a geomagnetic storm. The geomagnetic storm on 17 August 2001 with an abrupt turning of the IMF Bz after the peak in SYM-H index is chosen in this study. The Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme model along with the Fok Ring Current (FRC) model available at Community Coordinated Modeling Center is used to model this event. The unique movie maps of the worldwide magnetometer stations are used to compare with the numerical results. The results indicate that ground magnetic disturbance remains asymmetric for some time after the start of the recovery phase even for a storm with abrupt northward turning of the IMF Bz. FRC simulation results suggest that the flow-out losses decrease under weakened magnetospheric convection but at a rate slower than the change in IMF Bz. These results indicate that the flow-out losses rapidly become smaller as the IMF Bz turns northward during the early recovery phase of a storm and the contribution of the tail current to the SYM-H index is important.

  17. Optimization of satellite coverage in observing cause and effect changes in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and solar wind. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Loveless, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    Disturbances in the ionosphere sometimes cause adverse effects to communications systems, power grids, etc. on the earth. Currently, very little, if any, lead time is given to warn of an impending problem. If a forecast could be made of ionospheric occurrences, some lead time may be given to appropriate agencies and equipment may be saved. Most changes that occur in the ionosphere are a result of interaction of energy, currents, etc. between the magnetosphere and/or solar wind. Before a forecast can be made, however, improvement of ionospheric models currently in use need to be made. The models currently depict features in various regions of the ionosphere but not always where these features are actually observed. So an improvement to the model is needed to create an accurate baseline condition, or in other words an accurate depiction of the current ionosphere. Models could be improved by inputting real-time data from the ionosphere into the model. This data would come from satellites and/or ground-based stations.

  18. Determination of the effect of wind velocity and direction changes on turbidity removal in rectangular sedimentation tanks.

    PubMed

    Khezri, Seyed Mostafa; Biati, Aida; Erfani, Zeynab

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a pilot-scale sedimentation tank was used to determine the effect of wind velocity and direction on the removal efficiency of particles. For this purpose, a 1:20 scale pilot simulated according to Frude law. First, the actual efficiency of total suspended solids (TSS) removal was calculated in no wind condition. Then, the wind was blown in the same and the opposite directions of water flow. At each direction TSS removal was calculated at three different velocities from 2.5 to 7 m/s. Results showed that when the wind was in the opposite direction of water flow, TSS removal efficiency initially increased with the increase of wind velocity from 0 to 2.5 m/s, then it decreased with the increase of velocity to 5 m/s. This mainly might happen because the opposite direction of wind can increase particles' retention time in the sedimentation tank. However, higher wind velocities (i.e. 3.5 and 5.5 m/s) could not increase TSS removal efficiency. Thus, if sedimentation tanks are appropriately exposed to the wind, TSS removal efficiency increases by approximately 6%. Therefore, energy consumption will be reduced by a proper site selection for sedimentation tank unit in water and waste water treatment plants. PMID:23109603

  19. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  20. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  1. Cross-border transfer of climate change mitigation technologies : the case of wind energy from Denmark and Germany to India

    E-print Network

    Mizuno, Emi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the causal factors and processes of international development and diffusion of wind energy technology by examining private sector cross-border technology transfer from Denmark and Germany to India ...

  2. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  3. An oilspill trajectory analysis model with a variable wind deflection angle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Huang, N.E.; Amstutz, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The oilspill trajectory movement algorithm consists of a vector sum of the surface drift component due to wind and the surface current component. In the U.S. Geological Survey oilspill trajectory analysis model, the surface drift component is assumed to be 3.5% of the wind speed and is rotated 20 degrees clockwise to account for Coriolis effects in the Northern Hemisphere. Field and laboratory data suggest, however, that the deflection angle of the surface drift current can be highly variable. An empirical formula, based on field observations and theoretical arguments relating wind speed to deflection angle, was used to calculate a new deflection angle at each time step in the model. Comparisons of oilspill contact probabilities to coastal areas calculated for constant and variable deflection angles showed that the model is insensitive to this changing angle at low wind speeds. At high wind speeds, some statistically significant differences in contact probabilities did appear. ?? 1982.

  4. The interacting winds of Eta Carinae: Observed forbidden line changes and the Forbidden Blue(-Shifted) Crab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Corcoran, Michael F.; Teodoro, Mairan; Richardson, Noel; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Groh, Jose H.; Hillier, Desmond John; Damineli, Augusto; Weigelt, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The massive binary, Eta Carinae (EC), produces such massive winds that strong forbidden line emission of singly- and doubly-ionized iron traces wind-wind interactions from the current cycle plus fossil interactions from one, two and three 5.54-year cycles ago.With an eccentricity of >0.9, the >90 solar mass primary (EC-A) and >30 solar mass secondary (EC-B) approach to within 1.5 AU during periastron and recede to nearly 30 AU across apastron. The wind-wind structures move outward driven by the 420 km/s primary wind interacting with the ~3000 km/s secondary wind yielding partially-accelerated compressed primary wind shells that are excited by mid-UV from EC-A and in limited lines of sight, FUV from EC-B.These structures are spectroscopically and spatially resolved by HST's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. At critical binary phases, we have mapped the central 2'x2' region in the light of [Fe III] and [Fe II] with spatial resolution of 0.12' and velocity resolution of 40 km/s.1) The bulk of forbidden emission originates from the large cavity northwest of EC and is due to ionization of massive ejecta from the 1840s and 1890s eruptions. The brightest clumps are the Weigelt Blobs C and D, but there are additionally multiple, fainter emission clumps. Weigelt B appears to have faded.2) Three concentric, red-shifted [FeII] arcs expand at ~470 km/s excited by mid-UV of EC-A.3) The structure of primarily blue-shifted [Fe III] emission resembles a Maryland Blue Crab. The claws appear at the early stages of the high-excitation recovery from the periastron passage, expand at radial velocities exceeding the primary wind terminal velocity, 420 km/s and fade as the binary system approaches periastron with the primary wind enveloping the FUV radiation from EC-B.4) All [Fe III] emission faded by late June 2014 and disappeared by August 2, 2014, the beginning of periastron passage.Comparisons to HST/STIS observations between 1998 to 2004.3 indicate long-term fading of [Fe II]. Likewise, Na D emission has faded. 3D hydro/radiative models suggest a small decrease (< factor of 2) in primary mass loss rate to be the cause.

  5. Reproductive allocation in plants as affected by elevated carbon dioxide and other environmental changes: a synthesis using meta-analysis and graphical vector analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianzhong; Taub, Daniel R; Jablonski, Leanne M

    2015-04-01

    Reproduction is an important life history trait that strongly affects dynamics of plant populations. Although it has been well documented that elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere greatly enhances biomass production in plants, the overall effect of elevated CO2 on reproductive allocation (RA), i.e., the proportion of biomass allocated to reproductive structures, is little understood. We combined meta-analysis with graphical vector analysis to examine the overall effect of elevated CO2 on RA and how other environmental factors, such as low nutrients, drought and elevated atmospheric ozone (O3), interacted with elevated CO2 in affecting RA in herbaceous plants. Averaged across all species of different functional groups and environmental conditions, elevated CO2 had little effect on RA (-0.9%). RA in plants of different reproductive strategies and functional groups, however, differed in response to elevated CO2. For example, RA in iteroparous wild species decreased by 8%, while RA in iteroparous crops increased significantly (+14%) at elevated CO2. RA was unaffected by CO2 in plants grown with no stress or in low-nutrient soils. RA decreased at elevated CO2 and elevated O3, but increased in response to elevated CO2 in drought-stressed plants, suggesting that elevated CO2 could ameliorate the adverse effect of drought on crop production to some extent. Our results demonstrate that elevated CO2 and other global environmental changes have the potential to greatly alter plant community composition through differential effects on RA of different plant species and thus affect the dynamics of natural and agricultural ecosystems in the future. PMID:25537120

  6. THE WAVENUMBER SPECTRA OF SCATTEROMETER-DERIVED WINDS

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    THE WAVENUMBER SPECTRA OF SCATTEROMETER-DERIVED WINDS D. G . Long and D. D. Luke Electrical Spaceborne scatterometers are the only proven method for global all-weather measurement of vector winds/seainteraction where the time variability of the surface wind field and the wind stress curl drive the ocean; hence

  7. DSCOVR High Time Resolution Solar Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), previously known as Triana, spacecraft is expected to be launched in late 2014. It will carry a fluxgate magnetometer, Faraday Cup solar wind detector and a top-hat electron electrostatic analyzer. The Faraday Cup will provide an unprecedented 10 vectors/sec time resolution measurement of the solar wind proton and alpha reduced distribution functions. Coupled with the 40 vector/sec vector magnetometer measurements, the identification of specific wave modes in the solar wind will be possible for the first time. The science objectives and data products of the mission will be discussed.

  8. Strokes for Representing Univariate Vector David Fowler and Colin Ware

    E-print Network

    Ware, Colin

    of the use of line segments to represent vector field data is a 17th century map by Edmond Halley (discussed in Tufte, 1983) which shows trade winds over the Atlantic Ocean (see Figure 1). Halley's elegant pen

  9. Inertial response from wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ian F.

    Wind power is an essential part of the strategy to address challenges facing the energy sector. Operation of the electricity network in 2020 will require higher levels of response and reserve from generation. The provision of inertial response from wind turbines was investigated. A model was developed for the simulation of frequency on the mainland UK system, including a simplified model for a synchronous generator to represent Full Power Converter turbines. Two different methods of inertia response, the step method and the inertia coupling method, were modelled and introduced into the turbine torque speed control. Simulations illustrated the effects on primary frequency control for a high penetration of wind turbines. Results are shown for different demand levels with generation losses of 1320GW and 1800GW. A comparison of the inertia functions is included and the effect of wind speed and the constant speed region of the maximum power extraction curve. For the scenarios modelled only a small change in turbine output was required for inertia response (0.02p.u). Without inertia response a large increase in synchronous plant response was needed. A test rig was constructed consisting of a Full Power Converter bridge and a synchronous generator driven by a dc machine. Power converters were designed and constructed by the candidate. Vector control of both the generator converter and grid converter was implemented on a dedicated control platform. The inertia coupling function was implemented and a test frequency deviation injected to represent a load generation imbalance. Results compared closely to those from the model and demonstrated the capability to closely couple turbine speed to system frequency with adjustment of the response via a filter if desired. The experimental work confirmed the adequacy of the simplified generator model and further confirmed the possibility of using inertia response. The inertia coupling function was considered suitable for use for the UK system.

  10. Changes in sea-level pressure over South Korea associated with high-speed solar wind events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Hyun; Kwak, Young-Sil; Marubashi, Katsuhide; Kim, Yeon-Han; Park, Young-Deuk; Chang, Heon-Young

    2012-09-01

    We explore a possibility that the daily sea-level pressure (SLP) over South Korea responds to the high-speed solar wind event. This is of interest in two aspects: first, if there is a statistical association this can be another piece of evidence showing that various meteorological observables indeed respond to variations in the interplanetary environment. Second, this can be a very crucial observational constraint since most models proposed so far are expected to preferentially work in higher latitude regions than the low latitude region studied here. We have examined daily solar wind speed V, daily SLP difference ?SLP, and daily log(BV2) using the superposed epoch analysis in which the key date is set such that the daily solar wind speed exceeds 800 km s-1. We find that the daily ?SLP averaged out of 12 events reaches its peak at day +1 and gradually decreases back to its normal level. The amount of positive deviation of ?SLP is +2.5 hPa. The duration of deviation is a few days. We also find that ?SLP is well correlated with both the speed of solar wind and log(BV2). The obtained linear correlation coefficients and chance probabilities with one-day lag for two cases are r ? 0.81 with P > 99.9%, and r ? 0.84 with P > 99.9%, respectively. We conclude by briefly discussing future direction to pursue.

  11. Wind-Tunnel Investigations on a Changed Mustang Profile with Nose Flap Force and Pressure-Distribution Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, W.

    1947-01-01

    Measurements are described which were taken in the large wind tunnel of the AVA on a rectangular wing "Mustang 2" with nose flap of a chord of 10 percent. Besides force measurements the results of pressure-distribution measurements are given and compared with those on the same profile "without" nose flap.

  12. Patchiness in wind erosion-deposition patterns in response to a recent state change reversal in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shifts from shrub-dominated states to grasslands are believed to be irreversible as a result of positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil properties. In the Chihuahuan Desert, mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) expansion into black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) grasslands is maintained by wind redis...

  13. Chikungunya virus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Lark L; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C

    2014-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  14. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  15. Bottom-current and wind-pattern changes as indicated by Late Glacial and Holocene sediments from western Lake Geneva (Switzerland)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Girardclos, S.; Baster, I.; Wildi, W.; Pugin, A.; Rachoud-Schneider, A. -M.

    2003-01-01

    The Late-Glacial and Holocene sedimentary history of the Hauts-Monts area (western Lake Geneva, Switzerland) is reconstructed combining high resolution seismic stratigraphy and well-dated sedimentary cores. Six reflections and seismic units are defined and represented by individual isopach maps, which are further combined to obtain a three-dimensional age-depth model. Slumps, blank areas and various geometries are identified using these seismic data. The sediment depositional areas have substantially changed throughout the lake during the end of the Late-Glacial and the Holocene. These changes are interpreted as the result of variations in the intensity of deep lake currents and the frequency of strong winds determining the distribution of sediment input from the Versoix River and from reworking of previously deposited sediments within the lacustrine basin. The identified changes in sediment distribution allowed us to reconstruct the lake's deep-current history and the evolution of dominant strong wind regimes from the Preboreal to present times.

  16. CMIP5 Projections of 21st Century Westerly Wind Changes over the Amundsen Sea, West Antarctica: Long-Term Predictability and the Role of Tropical Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracegirdle, T.; Turner, J.; Hosking, J. S.; Phillips, T.

    2014-12-01

    Winds over the Amundsen Sea, West Antarctica, are a key driver of variability and change in regional ocean-ice interactions and therefore an important consideration in assessing past and future ice loss from glaciers over West Antarctica, which is an important component of global sea level change. The predictability of 21stcentury climate change in this region is affected significantly by the large atmospheric internal variability, driven in part by external tropical influences. In this talk an assessment of 21st century projections of westerly winds over the Amundsen Sea (UAS) will be presented, based on output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model ensemble. The focus will be on quantifying the importance of model uncertainty and internal climate variability in RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenario projections and identifying potential sources of model uncertainty. In general the CMIP5 ensemble-mean response exhibits increases in UAS over the 21st century, with the Amundsen Sea being positioned on the poleward flank of large-scale westerly wind increases across mid-to-low latitudes. In terms of the annual mean, increases of 0.3 and 0.7 m s-1are simulated following the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios respectively. However, as a consequence of large internal climate variability over the Amundsen Sea, it takes until approximately 2030 (2065) for the RCP8.5 response to exceed one (two) standard deviation(s) of decadal internal variability. In all scenarios and seasons the model uncertainty is large. However the present-day climatological zonal wind bias over the whole South Pacific, which is important for tropical teleconnections, is strongly related to inter-model differences in projected change in UAS (more skilful models show larger UAS increases). This relationship is significant in winter (r = -0.56) and spring (r = -0.65), when the influence of the tropics on the Amundsen Sea region is known to be important. Horizontal grid spacing and present day sea ice extent were not found to be significant sources of inter-model spread. Possible physical/dynamical explanations for the above correlations will be discussed, in particular considering the role of tropical-Antarctic teleconnections and including current work extending the analysis to the Atlantic and Indian sectors.

  17. Wind direction variability in Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Mahrt, Larry

    2014-05-01

    Understanding wind direction (WD) variability better is important for several reasons. Air pollution models need information about how variable wind direction is in different conditions (Davies and Thomson 1999). Accurate predictions of dispersion are important for human health and safety and allow for adaptation planning (Nagle et al. 2011). Other applications include horizontal diffusion, efficiency and fatigue of wind machines and air-sea interaction (Mahrt 2011). Most studies of wind direction variability have focused on nocturnal conditions because of greater variability in light winds. Modelling WD variability in transition periods when both mean wind speed and variance of the wind components are in a state of change can, however, also be very challenging and has not been the focus of earlier studies. The evening transitioning to the nocturnal boundary layer can play an important role in the diffusion process of pollutants and scalars emitted at surface and transported within the atmosphere. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign that took place in southern France in June and July 2011 focused on the decaying turbulence of the late afternoon boundary layer and related issues (Lothon et al. 2012). We analyse field measurements from BLLAST to investigate WD variability in the evening transition period. Standard deviations of horizontal wind direction fluctuations in the lowest 60 m of the boundary layer have been examined for dependence on mean wind speed, higher order moments and averaging time. Measurement results are interpreted using measured and idealized probability density functions of horizontal wind vectors. These are also used to develop analytical functions describing how WD variability depends on wind speed, variance and other controlling factors in the atmospheric boundary layer. References: Davies B.M., Thomson D.J., 1999. Comparison of some parameterizations of wind direction variability with observations, Atmospheric Enviroment 33, 4909-4917. Lothon M. et al., 2012. The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment, Proc. of the 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and Turbulence, 7-13 July, Boston, MA, USA. Mahrt L., 2011. Surface Wind Direction Variability, Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 50. 144-152. Nagle J.C., 2011. Adapting to Pollution, Research Roundtable on Climate Change, Adaptation, and Enviromental Law, Northwestern Law Searle Center, Legal and Regulatory Studies 7-18 April, IL, USA.

  18. Southern Ocean Winds and Precipitation at the LGM: The Influence of State Dependency and Sea Surface Changes on CMIP5-PMIP3 Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Louise; Hodgson, Dominic; Bracegirdle, Tom; Allen, Claire; Stephen, Roberts; Perren, Bianca

    2015-04-01

    One hypothesis to explain the apparent tight coupling of deglacial atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperature is latitudinal shifts in the Southern Ocean westerly wind belt: shifts could drive changes in the ocean CO2 inventory. PMIP2 and PMIP3 models show considerable disagreement in their simulation of deglacial, 21 ky to 0 ky, Southern Ocean wind changes. This is despite nearly all CMIP5 models exhibiting a poleward shift and all models a strengthening of the surface jet following from 1900 to 2100, following the RCP8.5 scenario. Understanding what drives modelled wind changes, and the reasons for inter-model inconsistencies, should help our understanding of large changes in past CO2 and climate. We find that that jet position is strongly related to the sea ice edge latitude in PMIP3-CMIP5 simulations. An equatorwards shift in the sea ice edge correlates with a poleward shift in the jet latitude (r ~ -0.9). The relationship is strongest for 850 hPa winds, however similar results are obtained using 1000 hPa and ?U. A 1° difference in the sea ice edge suggests a -0.8° shift in the 850 hPa jet. However this applies only to models which have jets which are at a realistic latitude at 0 ky; if the 0 ky modelled jet sits equatorward of 47°S this relationship does not apply. If we look at the relationship between Southern Ocean sea surface temperature changes and jet shifts, a cooling of -1 K between 0 to 21 ky over the Gersonde et al. (2005) Southern Ocean compilation locations results in a 3.0° poleward shift in the 850 hPa jet (r = 0.83; n=5). The ensemble of present day CMIP5 model run data show an equatorward bias of 3.3° in the ensemble mean position of the surface zonal mean jet. We thus also calculate the impact of initial jet position, or state, dependency for Southern Ocean jet shifts and intensity changes across the various oceanic sectors. We find that state dependency explains up to 56% of the 0 to 21 ky jet shifts in the Atlantic (r=-0.75, N=9, for ?U), and 41% in the Indian Ocean (r = -0.64, N = 9, for ?U). State dependency is much weaker in the Pacific; here any influence is negligible. We generally find state dependence stronger for ?U than for the 850 hPa winds. For the whole of the Southern Ocean, the variance explained by state dependency is 38% (r = -0.62, N = 9, for ?U). Finally we also find that state dependency has a large influence on the simulation of past observed moisture changes. In the majority of cases model-data agreements at 21 ky are highly dependent on the jet position at 0 ky, indicating that state dependence is also critical in determining model-data moisture agreements. This finding also has implications for the calculation of Southern Ocean buoyancy forcing during the deglacial.

  19. Seasonal changes in estuarine dissolved organic matter due to variable flushing time and wind-driven mixing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Osburn, Christopher L.; Paerl, Hans W.; Peierls, Benjamin L.

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the seasonality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and transformations within the Neuse River estuary (NRE) in eastern North Carolina between March 2010 and February 2011. During this time, monthly surface and bottom water samples were collected along the longitudinal axis of the NRE, ranging from freshwater to mesohaline segments. The monthly mean of all surface and bottom measurements made on collected samples was used to clarify larger physical mixing controls in the estuary as a whole. By comparing monthly mean trends in DOM and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) properties in surface and bottom waters during varying hydrological conditions, we found that DOM and CDOM quality in the NRE is controlled by a combination of discharge, wind speed, and wind direction. The quality of DOM was assessed using C:N ratios, specific ultraviolet absorption at 254 nm (SUVA254), the absorption spectral slope ratio (SR), and the humification (HIX) and biological (BIX) indices from fluorescence. The NRE reflects allochthonous sources when discharge and flushing time are elevated at which times SUVA254 and HIX increased relative to base flow. During periods of reduced discharge and long flushing times in the estuary, extensive autochthonous production modifies the quality of the DOM pool in the NRE. This was evidenced by falling C:N values, and higher BIX and SR values. Lastly, a combination of increased wind speed and shifts in wind direction resulted in benthic resuspension events of degraded, planktonic OM. Thus, the mean DOM characteristics in this shallow micro-tidal estuary can be rapidly altered during episodic mixing events on timescales of a few weeks.

  20. Emotional tone of ontario newspaper articles on the health effects of industrial wind turbines before and after policy change.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Benjamin; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Newspapers are often a primary source of health information for the public about emerging technologies. Information in newspapers can amplify or attenuate readers' perceptions of health risk depending on how it is presented. Five geographically distinct wind energy installations in Ontario, Canada were identified, and newspapers published in their surrounding communities were systematically searched for articles on health effects from industrial wind turbines from May 2007 to April 2011. The authors retrieved 421 articles from 13 community, 2 provincial, and 2 national newspapers. To measure the emotional tone of the articles, the authors used a list of negative and positive words, informed from previous studies as well as from a random sample of newspaper articles included in this study. The majority of newspaper articles (64.6%, n = 272) emphasized negative rather than positive/neutral tone, with community newspapers publishing a higher proportion of negative articles than provincial or national newspapers, ?(2)(2) = 15.1, p < .001. Articles were more likely to be negative when published 2 years after compared with 2 years before provincial legislation to reduce dependence on fossil fuels (the Green Energy Act), ?(2)(3) = 9.7, p < .05. Repeated public exposure to negative newspaper content may heighten readers' health risk perceptions about wind energy. PMID:25806896

  1. Intermittency Of Solar Wind Ion Flux And Magnetic Field Fluctuations In The Wide Frequency Region From 10{sup -5} Up To 1 Hz And The Influence Of Sudden Changes Of Ion Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Riazantseva, Maria O.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2010-03-25

    Intermittency is one of the main features of the solar wind turbulence. We investigate the intermittency of ion flux and magnetic field scalar fluctuations under large statistics of the high time resolution measurements onboard Interball-1 spacecraft. A large degree of intermittency is observed in the solar wind, and it grows significantly from a large (more than 10000 s) to a small (less than 100 s) scales. We give a special attention to a comparison of intermittency for the solar wind observation intervals containing SCIF (Sudden Changes of Ion Flux) to ones for intervals without SCIF. Such a comparison allows us to reveal the fundamental turbulent properties of the solar wind regions in which SCIF is observed more frequently. Especially it is important that the intermittency of the high frequency (up to 1 Hz) plasma variations is investigated for the first time. So we significantly extend the range of intermittency observations for solar wind plasma.

  2. SEERISK concept: Dealing with climate change related hazards in southeast Europe: A common methodology for risk assessment and mapping focusing on floods, drought, winds, heat wave and wildfire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathoma-Koehle, Maria; Promper, Catrin; Glade, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Southeast Europe is a region that suffers often from natural hazards and has experienced significant losses in the recent past due to extreme weather conditions and their side-effects (cold and heat waves, extreme precipitation leading to floods / flash floods, thunderstorms, extreme winds, drought and wildfires). SEERISK ("Joint Disaster Management Risk Assessment and Preparedness in the Danube macro-region") is a European funded SEE (Southeast Europe) project that aims at the harmonisation and consistency among risk assessment practices undertaken by the partner countries at various levels regarding climate change related disasters. A common methodology for risk assessment has been developed that offers alternatives in order to tackle the problem of limited data. The methodology proposes alternative steps for hazard and vulnerability assessment that, according to the data availability, range from detailed modelling to expert judgement. In the present study the common methodology has been adapted for five hazard types (floods, drought, winds, heat wave and wildfire) that are expected to be affected by climate change in the future and are relevant for the specific study areas. The last step will be the application of the methodology in six different case studies in Hungary, Romania, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Slovakia and Serbia followed by field exercises.

  3. Heat transfer phase change paint test (OH-42) of a Rockwell International SSV orbiter in the NASA/LRC Mach 8 variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Creel, T. R., Jr.; Lawing, P.; Quan, M.; Dye, W.; Cummings, J.; Gorowitz, H.; Craig, C.; Rich, G.

    1973-01-01

    Phase change paint tests of a Rockwell International .00593-scale space shuttle orbiter were conducted in the Langley Research Center's Variable Density Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to determine the effects of various wing/underbody configurations on the aerodynamic heating rates and boundary layer transition during simulated entry conditions. Several models were constructed. Each varied from the other in either wing cuff radius, airfoil thickness, or wing-fuselage underbody blending. Two ventral fins were glued to the fuselage underside of one model to test the interference heating effects. Simulated Mach 8 entry data were obtained for each configuration at angles of attack ranging from 25 to 40 deg, and a Reynolds number variation of one million to eight million. Elevon, bodyflap, and rudder flare deflections were tested. Oil flow visualization and Schlieren photographs were obtained to aid in reducing the phase change paint data as well as to observe the flow patterns peculiar to each configuration.

  4. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases – Incidence through Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Savi?, Sara; Vidi?, Branka; Grgi?, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests – ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples brought to the laboratory to analysis for different infectious diseases are analyzed for vector-borne diseases. In the region of Vojvodina (northern part of Serbia), the following vector-borne infectious diseases have been found in dogs so far borreliosis, babesiosis, dirofilariosis, leishmaniasis, and anaplasmosis. PMID:25520951

  5. Wind Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  6. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  7. Validation Campaigns for Sea Surface Wind and Wind Profile by Ground-Based Doppler Wind Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhishen; Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Li, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    According to the research frame of ESA-MOST DRAGON Cooperation Program (ID5291), Chinese partners from Ocean Remote Sensing Institute of Ocean University of China have carried out a serial of campaigns for ground-based lidar validations and atmospheric observations. ORSI/OUC Doppler wind lidar has been developed and deployed to accurately measure wind speed and direction over large areas in real time -- an application useful for ADM-Aeolus VAL/CAL, aviation safety, weather forecasting and sports. The sea surface wind campaigns were successfully accomplished at the Qingdao sailing competitions during the 29th Olympic Games. The lidar located at the seashore near the sailing field, and made a horizontal scan over the sea surface, making the wind measurement in real time and then uploading the data to the local meteorological station every 10 minutes. In addition to the sea surface wind campaigns, ORSI/OUC Doppler wind lidar was deployed on the wind profile observations for the China's Shenzhou 7 spacecraft landing zone weather campaigns in September 2008 in Inner Mongolia steppe. Wind profile was tracked by the mobile Doppler lidar system to help to predict the module's landing site. During above ground tests, validation lidar is tested to be able to provide an independent and credible measurement of radial wind speed, wind profile, 3D wind vector, aerosol- backscattering ratio, aerosol extinction coefficient, extinction-to-backscatter ratio in the atmospheric boundary layer and troposphere, sea surface wind vectors, which will be an independent and very effective validation tool for upcoming ADM-Aeolus project.

  8. SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS

    E-print Network

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS--Scatterometer measurements of ocean vector winds (OVW) are significantly degraded in the presence of the precipitation, especially in tropical cyclones. This paper presents a new ocean hurricane/typhoon wind vector retrieval

  9. Developing and Testing Wind Velocity Retrieval Algorithms for Doppler Wind Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, A.; Capaldo, N.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    A 3-dimensional wind lidar is being evaluated at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) for its applications in wind energy. The focus of the work described here is to develop algorithms that can increase data availability and accuracy in estimating wind velocity from the line of sight (los) velocity (Vlos) from Plan Position Indicator (PPI) scans. The common algorithm (AL0) starts by removing Vlos estimates that have low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Then, assuming a horizontally homogeneous wind field and zero vertical wind speed (w), the wind velocity is estimated by application of ordinary least square (OLS) fitting, and the results are averaged to produce the 10-minute mean wind velocity (scalar averaging) at each range-gate position. This approach has uncertainties because: (1) SNR is robust but conservative for quality control and use of any SNR threshold may result in exclusion of valid Vlos values causing low data availability. (2) While 10-minute mean w = 0 is typically valid, assuming zero w for each individual Vlos field may introduce biases. (3) The variance of Vlos changes with azimuth angle as it is the projection of the variance of the wind vector on the los. This violates the equal variance assumption in OLS fitting. The two new algorithms are developed to increase data availability and the accuracy of 10-minute mean wind velocities. Both algorithms assume that the wind velocity is normally distributed and use the maximum likelihood estimator for which the variance of Vlos changes with azimuth angle. The first algorithm (AL1) uses the 10-minute mean Vlos to estimate the 10-minute mean wind velocity. In comparison to scalar averaging, AL1 can reduce the variation in Vlos and the assumption of w = 0 is more likely to be valid. To increase data availability, Vlos with low SNR is retained if its difference from the mean is smaller than three times the standard deviation of Vlos. The second algorithm (AL2) uses the median of Vlos over 10 minutes (as opposed to the mean value as in AL1). For a normal distribution, the sample median is a robust estimate of the mean and is insensitive to outliers (e.g. incorrect measurements associated with low SNR). Thus, using the sample median allows for the use of Vlos with very low SNR and eventually increase data availability for AL2. A preliminary analysis of lidar data collected during February 15 to 26, 2013 shows that AL2 out-performs AL0 and AL1 when the resulting wind speed estimates are compared with independent data from a sonic anemometer (Table 1). Work is underway to test the performance of the three algorithms using a dataset of several months collected during spring/summer 2013 at NWTC, and the errors/uncertainties of each approach will be quantified in terms of their relationships with atmospheric conditions, such as wind shear and atmospheric stability, using the data from instrumentation deployed on the NWTC meteorological towers.Table 1 Summary of performance of the three lidar wind retrieval algorithms

  10. Winds of Change: Expanding the Frontiers of Flight. Langley Research Center's 75 Years of Accomplishment, 1917-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, James

    1992-01-01

    This commemorative volume highlights in pictures and text seventy five years of accomplishments of the Langley Research Center. The introductory matter features wind tunnels and their contribution to the development of aeronautics. A chronological survey details four different periods in Langley's history. The first period, 1917-1939, is subtitled 'Perfecting the Plane' which details Langley's contribution to early aeronautics with examples from specific aircraft. The second period, 1940-1957, focuses on the development of military aircraft during and after World War II. The third period, 1958-1969, tells the story of Langley's involvement with NASA and the satellite and Apollo era. The fourth period, entitled 'Charting New Courses: 1970-1992 and Beyond', treats various new topics from aerospace planes to Mars landing, as well as older topics such as the Space Shuttle and research spinoffs.

  11. Orbital period changes and possible stellar wind mass loss in the algol-type binary system AT Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Magdy A.

    2012-12-01

    An analysis of the measurements of mid-eclipse times of AT Peg has been presented. It indicates a period decrease rate of dP/dt = -4.2 × 10-7 d/yr, which can be interpreted in terms of mass loss from the system via stellar wind with a rate between (1 and 2) × 10-8 M?/yr. The O-C diagram shows a growing sine wave covering two different cycles of 13 yr and 31.9 yr with amplitudes equal to 0.026 and 0.032 day, respectively. These unequal durations of the cycles may be explained by magnetic activity cycling variations due to star spots. The obtained characteristics of the second cycle are consistent with similar systems when applying Applegate’s mechanism.

  12. Changes in abundance and behaviour of vector mosquitoes induced by land use during the development of an oil palm plantation in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Chang, M S; Hii, J; Buttner, P; Mansoor, F

    1997-01-01

    Surveys were conducted of adult and immature mosquitoes in an area undergoing oil palm development in north Sarawak. Point prevalence data from 2 sites were collected annually, coinciding with annual phases of forest clearing, burning/cultivation, and maintenance. Major habitat perturbation during the forest/clearing transition shifted the major mosquito faunal equilibrium in terms of species composition, relative density and occurrence. Analyses of variance showed that the mean numbers of 4 species of Anopheles decreased significantly after forest clearing. Relative densities of immature stages decreased after forest clearing, but A. letifer and Culex tritaeniorhynchus remained relatively unchanged after the second year. Comparisons with the pre-development forest stage showed that the reductions in person-biting rates, adult survival and combined entomological inoculation rates (EIR) of A. donaldi and A. letifer decreased the risk of malaria transmission by 90% over the 4 years period. Concomitant reductions in EIR and annual malaria incidence were also correlated. This study highlighted the 'law of unintended consequences', since 2 contrasting effects were observed: reduction of malaria vectors but concomitant increase of dengue vectors. PMID:9373626

  13. Saturn’s Zonal Winds at Cloud Level between 2004-2013 from Cassini ISS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Ingersoll , Andrew P.

    2014-11-01

    We examine images of Saturn returned by Cassini orbiter’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) camera between 2004 to 2013 to analyze the temporal evolution of the zonal mean wind speed as a function of latitude. Our study primarily examines the images captured in the 752-nm continuum band using the CB2 filter. Images captured using the CB2 filter sense the upper troposphere of Saturn between 350 mbar and 500 mbar (Pérez-Hoyos and Sánchez-Lavega, 2006; Sánchez-Lavega et al, 2006; García-Melendo et al, 2009). We measure the wind speed using a two-dimensional Correlation Imaging Velocimetry (CIV) technique. The wind vectors are computed using pairs of images separated in time by up to two planetary rotations, and binned in latitude to determine the zonal mean wind profile, which typically covers a limited range of latitude. To achieve pole-to-pole coverage, we systematically merge all the wind measurements during each of the calendar years in order to compile a yearly, near-global record of Saturn's zonal wind structure. Using our wind measurements, we analyze the temporal evolution of the zonal wind. We specifically focus on changes in the wind profile after the 2009 equinox; we predict that changes in the insolation pattern caused by the shifting ring shadows affect the horizontal temperature gradient, and change the zonal mean wind through the thermal wind relationship. Furthermore, we also extend the zonal wind analysis by Sayanagi et al (2013), who detected changes in the zonal wind related to the Great Storm of 2010-2011, to study the subsequent evolution of the region affected by the storm. We compare our results with previously published zonal wind profiles obtained from Voyager 1 and 2 (Sánchez-Lavega et al, 2000) and Cassini (García-Melendo et al, 2011). Out study is supported by the Cassini Project, and our investigation is funded by NASA Outer Planets Research Program grant NNX12AR38G and NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics grant 1212216 to KMS.

  14. Erosion: Wind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion refers to the detachment, transport and deposition of sediment by wind. It is a dynamic, physical process where loose, dry, bare soils are transported by strong winds. Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that affects over 500 million ha of land worldwide and creates between 500 an...

  15. Comparison of Satellite-Derived Wind Measurements with Other Wind Measurement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, Michael; Herman, Leroy

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the good data from the Jimsphere launches with the data from the satellite system. By comparing the wind speeds from the Fixed Pedestal System 16 (FPS-16) Radar/Jimsphere Wind System and NASA's 50-MHz Radar Wind Profiler, the validation of winds from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 7 (GOES-7) is performed. This study provides an in situ data quality check for the GOES-7 satellite winds. Comparison was made of the flowfields in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere of case studies of pairs of Jimsphere balloon releases and Radar Wind Profiler winds during Space Shuttle launches. The mean and standard deviation of the zonal component statistics, the meridional component statistics, and the power spectral density curves show good agreement between the two wind sensors. The standard deviation of the u and v components for the STS-37 launch (consisting of five Jimsphere/Radar Wind Profiler data sets) was 1.92 and 1.67 m/s, respectively; for the STS-43 launch (there were six Jimsphere/Wind Profiler data sets) it was 1.39 and 1.44 m/s, respectively. The overall standard deviation was 1.66 m/s for the u component and 1.55 m/s tor the v component, and a standard deviation of 2.27 m/s tor the vector wind difference. The global comparison of satellite with Jimsphere balloon vector winds shows a standard deviation of 3.15 m/s for STS-43 and 4.37 m/s for STS-37. The overall standard deviation of the vector wind was 3.76 m/s, with a root-mean-square vector difference of 4.43 m/s. These data have demonstrated that this unique comparison of the Jimsphere and satellite winds provides excellent ground truth and a frame of reference during testing and validation of satellite data

  16. Generation of Large-Scale Winds in Horizontally Anisotropic Convection.

    PubMed

    von Hardenberg, J; Goluskin, D; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

    2015-09-25

    We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-Bénard convection, confined between free-slip horizontal plates and rotating about a distant horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind. PMID:26451558

  17. Adiabatic and nonadiabatic responses of the radiation belt relativistic electrons to the external changes in solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    By removing the influences of 'magnetopause shadowing' (r0>6.6RE) and geomagnetic activities, we investigated statistically the responses of magnetic field and relativistic (>0.5MeV) electrons at geosynchronous orbit to 201 interplanetary perturbations during 6 years from 2003 (solar maximum) to 2008 (solar minimum). The statistical results indicate that during geomagnetically quiet times (HSYM ?-30nT, and AE<200nT), ~47.3% changes in the geosynchronous magnetic field and relativistic electron fluxes are caused by the combined actions of the enhancement of solar wind dynamic pressure (Pd) and the southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (?Pd>0.4 nPa, and IMF Bz<0 nT), and only ~18.4% changes are due to single dynamic pressure increase (?Pd >0.4 nPa, but IMF Bz>0 nT), and ~34.3% changes are due to single southward turning of IMF (IMF Bz<0 nT, but |?Pd|<0.4 nPa). Although the responses of magnetic field and relativistic electrons to the southward turning of IMF are weaker than their responses to the dynamic pressure increase, the southward turning of IMF can cause the dawn-dusk asymmetric perturbations that the magnetic field and the relativistic electrons tend to increase on the dawnside (LT~00:00-12:00) but decrease on the duskside (LT~13:00-23:00). Furthermore, the variation of relativistic electron fluxes is adiabatically controlled by the magnitude and elevation angle changes of magnetic field during the single IMF southward turnings. However, the variation of relativistic electron fluxes is independent of the change in magnetic field in some compression regions during the enhancement of solar wind dynamic pressure (including the single pressure increases and the combined external perturbations), indicating that nonadiabatic dynamic processes of relativistic electrons occur there. Acknowledgments. This work is supported by NSFC (grants 41074119 and 40604018). Liuyuan Li is grateful to the staffs working for the data from GOES 8-12 satellites and OMNI database in CDAWeb.

  18. Ensemble Dynamics and Bred Vectors

    E-print Network

    Nusret Balci; Anna L. Mazzucato; Juan M. Restrepo; George R. Sell

    2011-08-24

    We introduce the new concept of an EBV to assess the sensitivity of model outputs to changes in initial conditions for weather forecasting. The new algorithm, which we call the "Ensemble Bred Vector" or EBV, is based on collective dynamics in essential ways. By construction, the EBV algorithm produces one or more dominant vectors. We investigate the performance of EBV, comparing it to the BV algorithm as well as the finite-time Lyapunov Vectors. We give a theoretical justification to the observed fact that the vectors produced by BV, EBV, and the finite-time Lyapunov vectors are similar for small amplitudes. Numerical comparisons of BV and EBV for the 3-equation Lorenz model and for a forced, dissipative partial differential equation of Cahn-Hilliard type that arises in modeling the thermohaline circulation, demonstrate that the EBV yields a size-ordered description of the perturbation field, and is more robust than the BV in the higher nonlinear regime. The EBV yields insight into the fractal structure of the Lorenz attractor, and of the inertial manifold for the Cahn-Hilliard-type partial differential equation.

  19. Ensemble Dynamics and Bred Vectors

    E-print Network

    Balci, Nusret; Restrepo, Juan M; Sell, George R

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the new concept of an EBV to assess the sensitivity of model outputs to changes in initial conditions for weather forecasting. The new algorithm, which we call the "Ensemble Bred Vector" or EBV, is based on collective dynamics in essential ways. By construction, the EBV algorithm produces one or more dominant vectors. We investigate the performance of EBV, comparing it to the BV algorithm as well as the finite-time Lyapunov Vectors. We give a theoretical justification to the observed fact that the vectors produced by BV, EBV, and the finite-time Lyapunov vectors are similar for small amplitudes. Numerical comparisons of BV and EBV for the 3-equation Lorenz model and for a forced, dissipative partial differential equation of Cahn-Hilliard type that arises in modeling the thermohaline circulation, demonstrate that the EBV yields a size-ordered description of the perturbation field, and is more robust than the BV in the higher nonlinear regime. The EBV yields insight into the fractal structure of th...

  20. Forecasting Caspian Sea level changes using satellite altimetry data (June 1992-December 2013) based on evolutionary support vector regression algorithms and gene expression programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Moslem; You, Rey-Jer; Kuo, Chung-Yen

    2014-10-01

    Sea level forecasting at various time intervals is of great importance in water supply management. Evolutionary artificial intelligence (AI) approaches have been accepted as an appropriate tool for modeling complex nonlinear phenomena in water bodies. In the study, we investigated the ability of two AI techniques: support vector machine (SVM), which is mathematically well-founded and provides new insights into function approximation, and gene expression programming (GEP), which is used to forecast Caspian Sea level anomalies using satellite altimetry observations from June 1992 to December 2013. SVM demonstrates the best performance in predicting Caspian Sea level anomalies, given the minimum root mean square error (RMSE = 0.035) and maximum coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.96) during the prediction periods. A comparison between the proposed AI approaches and the cascade correlation neural network (CCNN) model also shows the superiority of the GEP and SVM models over the CCNN.

  1. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  2. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  3. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  4. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  5. Spatio-Temporal Variability in Coastal Upwelling/Downwelling from Scatterometer Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The decade-plus near-continuous record from satellite scatterometers provides indirect measurements of vector winds over the global ocean with sampling largely determined by the satellite orbits. This allows investigation of wind-driven ocean processes even at remote locations that are poorly sampled by in situ measurements. Global satellite wind products are used to produce a database of time series of upwelling indices, similar to those typically produced using data from coastal ocean observing systems, at all coastal locations over the Earth. This database is analyzed to study spatial and temporal variability of coastal upwelling and downwelling throughout the world ocean. The upwelling index is typically a proxy for upwelling/downwelling across the slope assuming a simple local mass balance to the offshore surface Ekman transport. However, along-shore variations in winds and shelf geometry perturb this simple local balance via shelf wave dynamics. In particular, cross-slope velocities downcoast (in a shelf wave propagation sense) of changes in the topographic gradient orientation may respond preferentially to a wind direction not oriented along local isobaths. Data from numerical models are analyzed to illustrate this point and to clarify the relation between upwelling/downwelling and local wind direction throughout the global coastal ocean that may allow improvement in wind-derived upwelling indices.

  6. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. The effect of sensor sheltering and averaging techniques on wind measurements at the Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents results of a field study of the effect of sheltering of wind sensors by nearby foliage on the validity of wind measurements at the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). Standard measurements are made at one second intervals from 30-feet (9.1-m) towers located 500 feet (152 m) from the SLF centerline. The centerline winds are not exactly the same as those measured by the towers. A companion study, Merceret (1995), quantifies the differences as a function of statistics of the observed winds and distance between the measurements and points of interest. This work examines the effect of nearby foliage on the accuracy of the measurements made by any one sensor, and the effects of averaging on interpretation of the measurements. The field program used logarithmically spaced portable wind towers to measure wind speed and direction over a range of conditions as a function of distance from the obstructing foliage. Appropriate statistics were computed. The results suggest that accurate measurements require foliage be cut back to OFCM standards. Analysis of averaging techniques showed that there is no significant difference between vector and scalar averages. Longer averaging periods reduce measurement error but do not otherwise change the measurement in reasonably steady flow regimes. In rapidly changing conditions, shorter averaging periods may be required to capture trends.

  8. Support vector machine and fuzzy C-mean clustering-based comparative evaluation of changes in motor cortex electroencephalogram under chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surendra; Ghosh, Subhojit; Tetarway, Suhash; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the magnitude and spatial distribution of frequency spectrum in the resting electroencephalogram (EEG) were examined to address the problem of detecting alcoholism in the cerebral motor cortex. The EEG signals were recorded from chronic alcoholic conditions (n = 20) and the control group (n = 20). Data were taken from motor cortex region and divided into five sub-bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta-1 and beta-2). Three methodologies were adopted for feature extraction: (1) absolute power, (2) relative power and (3) peak power frequency. The dimension of the extracted features is reduced by linear discrimination analysis and classified by support vector machine (SVM) and fuzzy C-mean clustering. The maximum classification accuracy (88 %) with SVM clustering was achieved with the EEG spectral features with absolute power frequency on F4 channel. Among the bands, relatively higher classification accuracy was found over theta band and beta-2 band in most of the channels when computed with the EEG features of relative power. Electrodes wise CZ, C3 and P4 were having more alteration. Considering the good classification accuracy obtained by SVM with relative band power features in most of the EEG channels of motor cortex, it can be suggested that the noninvasive automated online diagnostic system for the chronic alcoholic condition can be developed with the help of EEG signals. PMID:25773367

  9. The Analysis of Wind Seismic Noise and Algorithms of its Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, K. V.; Gravirov, V. V.; Labuncov, M.

    2010-12-01

    Main barrier on a way of increase quality of seismic observations is the noise oscillations of a ground owing to influence of parameters variations of an environment, which is exhibited in the broad band record. For a reduction of noise influences changes any of an environment parameter, its variations are noted. It serves for hardware or program compensation of the noise. Nowadays the numerous ways are developed for a noise level reduction made by changes of temperature, magnetic field and atmospheric pressure. It is not so difficult to conduct record-keeping of influence of ground waters level and snow coverage on long and super long periods also. Wind is high-power factor for noise producing. It was multiply noted in the scientific literature. The wind is connected to pressure, but it is not the same. The apart from of a gradient of pressure, on a field of a wind in a surface layer renders influence of the Coriolis force and friction about a surface of ground. Any obstacle, from small-scale (building, trees, wood bands and so on) up to large-scale (range of mountains), standing on a way of air flow, distorts a field of a wind. Therefore, there are zones of a wind strengthening, zone of wind shadow. It forms exposed to the wind and lee-side vortexes. The speed and the direction of the wind are influenced also by non-irregularity of vertical distribution temperature, which makes horizontal flows of an air influencing to underlying layers known as the phenomenon of turbulent viscosity. The wind has a character of a laminar flow only at low speeds. The vortexes formed by strengthening of the wind act quasi-periodic on an underlying surface, the force and period of these effects, including wind impacts in obstacles, grow with strengthening of a wind. It is size the same order, as acceleration created in atmosphere by barometric gradients. A very complex picture of seismic noise for each seismic station is created by outcome of air friction about the earth surface and impacts into obstacles. The influence of a wind direction to seismic noise is not proved. The attempts of searching of this influence came across absence of qualitative data and absence of techniques of determination of a wind operation on oscillations of a ground. It is marked the increase of a noise level with strengthening of a wind only. Any compensation of noise is not made. In the task is illuminated the state of a problem, it is discussed the applicability the existing data and techniques for research and are considered the possible approaches to the solution of a problem and requirement to experimental data. The examples of sharing of the seismic noise data, atmospheric pressure, force and direction of a wind are shown. The methodology of researches consists of two directions: it is offered to represent a wind as a vector (direction, force of a wind) and to compare it to appropriate vector of the noise, chosen from a the seismic data on direction; other method - to decompose the wind on ranges (on a direction and on a force) and separately to investigate seismic noise appropriate to each wind range.

  10. Wind driven air pump

    SciTech Connect

    Beisel, V.A.

    1983-05-31

    An improved pump for lifting water from an underground source utilizes a wind motor for driving an oil-less air compressor eliminating oil contamination of ground water which is forced to the surface. The wind motor is movable to face the wind by means of a novel swivel assembly which also eliminates the formation and freezing of condensate within the airline from the compressor. The propeller blades of the wind motor and the tail section are formed from a pair of opposed convex air foil shaped surfaces which provide the propeller blades and the tail section with fast sensitivity to slight changes in wind direction and speed. A novel well tower for supporting the wind motor and compressor and for lifting the water from the underground source is an optional modification which requires no welding and eliminates the problem of condensate freezing in the airline going to the well. The wind driven air pump disclosed is lightweight, can be easily installed, is relatively inexpensive to produce and is virtually maintenance-free and capable of operating in winds exceeding 100 miles per hour.

  11. Covariantised Vector Galileons

    E-print Network

    Hull, Matthew; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2015-01-01

    Vector galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an ADM approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a `beyond Horndeski' theory involving vector degrees of freedom, that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyse a Higgs mechanism for generating vector galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantisation.

  12. A recursive technique for adaptive vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Vector Quantization (VQ) is fast becoming an accepted, if not preferred method for image compression. The VQ performs well when compressing all types of imagery including Video, Electro-Optical (EO), Infrared (IR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Multi-Spectral (MS), and digital map data. The only requirement is to change the codebook to switch the compressor from one image sensor to another. There are several approaches for designing codebooks for a vector quantizer. Adaptive Vector Quantization is a procedure that simultaneously designs codebooks as the data is being encoded or quantized. This is done by computing the centroid as a recursive moving average where the centroids move after every vector is encoded. When computing the centroid of a fixed set of vectors the resultant centroid is identical to the previous centroid calculation. This method of centroid calculation can be easily combined with VQ encoding techniques. The defined quantizer changes after every encoded vector by recursively updating the centroid of minimum distance which is the selected by the encoder. Since the quantizer is changing definition or states after every encoded vector, the decoder must now receive updates to the codebook. This is done as side information by multiplexing bits into the compressed source data.

  13. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ?, ? and ? mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  14. Wind Turbine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The species of bats that are most susceptible to wind turbines all roost in trees throughout the year, leading some scientists to speculate that they may be visually mistaking wind turbines for trees in which to roost....

  15. Flow distortion by a solent sonic anemometer: Wind tunnel calibration and its assessment for flux measurements over forest and field

    SciTech Connect

    Grelle, A.; Lindroth, A.

    1994-12-01

    Main flow distortion effects caused by the sonic probe (i.e., deflection and attenuation/amplification of the wind vector) as a function of the azimuth angle of the incoming flow were examined by means of wind tunnel measurements at four different wind speeds and 11 different elevation angles of the flow with respect to the probe. The dependence of the distortion on wind speed and elevation angle turned out to be small compared with the dependence on the azimuth angle. Based on wind tunnel data, a set of calibration coefficients for each azimuth was evaluated. Application of this calibration on wind tunnel data shows an average compensation of the flow distortion of about 61%. A comparative application of the calibration supplied by the manufacturer leads to an increase of the flow distortion effects, especially at higher wind speeds. Application of the obtained calibration on field data leads to a change of about 20% in momentum flux over forest and grass field. The flux of sensible heat changes by about 4% over forest, whereas it is hardly altered over grass.

  16. Ultrasonic Dynamic Vector Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Froggatt, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Stress inferred from measurements in specimens rather than in bonded gauges. Ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS) measures changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in material or structure at location touched by device when material or structure put under cyclic load. Includes phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe. Useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and evaluation of designs.

  17. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the measurements need to be done in a time short compared to the time scale for changes of the solar features being observed. Were it possible, one would want to record all the needed data simultaneously, since temporal variation of atmospheric seeing degrades both the image and the polarization sensitivity. Since the measurements must span four dimensions, two spatial plus polarization and wavelength, we had some freedom to design the instrument to favor some dimensions over others in terms of simultaneity. Our earlier instrument, the Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter, records a range of wavelengths spanning two spectral lines in each reading, but requires two seconds to determine the polarization state and obtains spatial information only by assembling a long sequence of measurements at single locations on the sun. The new instrument sacrifices spectral detail and accuracy in favor of greatly improved imaging characteristics. The scientific goals for this instrument were to measure surface magnetic fields with enough accuracy to permit calculations of photospheric currents, but with a field of view covering an entire typical active region, high spatial resolution, and a fast enough temporal cadence for detecting flare-associated changes in magnetic structures.

  18. Gene expression from transcriptionally disabled retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, J K; Moores, J C; Jolly, D J; Wolff, J A; Respess, J G; Friedmann, T

    1987-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are used for the efficient transfer of foreign genes into mammalian cells. We report here the construction of murine retrovirus-based vectors carrying the full-length cDNA for human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; EC 2.4.2.8) and from which the enhancer sequences, the "CAAT box," and the "TATA box" in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) have been deleted. After infection of HPRT-deficient rat cells by the vectors, transcriptional activity from the 5' LTR was undetectable and expression of the HPRT cDNA was dependent on an internal promoter. Removal of the LTR regulatory elements increased HPRT gene expression from an internal promoter, indicating interference between the two sets of transcriptional signals. Such disabled vectors may reduce the likelihood of undesirable genetic changes through insertional mutagenesis in cells infected with retroviral vectors. Images PMID:3474647

  19. Rosetta observations of solar wind interaction with the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broiles, T. W.; Burch, J. L.; Clark, G.; Koenders, C.; Behar, E.; Goldstein, R.; Fuselier, S. A.; Mandt, K. E.; Mokashi, P.; Samara, M.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The Rosetta spacecraft arrived at the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on August 6, 2014, which has made it possible to perform the first study of the solar wind interacting with the coma of a weakly outgassing comet. Aims: It is shown that the solar wind experiences large deflections (>45°) in the weak coma. The average ion velocity slows from the mass loading of newborn cometary ions, which also slows the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) relative to the solar wind ions and subsequently creates a Lorentz force in the frame of the solar wind. The Lorentz force in the solar wind frame accelerates ions in the opposite direction of cometary pickup ion flow, and is necessary to conserve momentum. Methods: Data from the Ion and Electron Sensor are studied over several intervals of interest when significant solar wind deflection was observed. The deflections for protons and for He++ were compared with the flow of cometary pickup ions using the instrument's frame of reference. We then fit the data with a three-dimensional Maxwellian, and rotated the flow vectors into the Comet Sun Equatorial coordinate system, and compared the flow to the spacecraft's position and to the local IMF conditions. Results: Our observations show that the solar wind may be deflected in excess of 45° from the anti-sunward direction. Furthermore, the deflections change direction on a variable timescale. Solar wind protons are consistently more deflected than the He++. The deflections are not ordered by the spacecraft's position relative to the comet, but large changes in deflection are related to changes in the orthogonal IMF components.

  20. Winds of change - a molecular outflow in NGC 1377?. The anatomy of an extreme FIR-excess galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, S.; Muller, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Gallagher, J. S.; Martín, S.; Costagliola, F.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: Our goal was to investigate the molecular gas distribution and kinematics in the extreme far-infrared (FIR) excess galaxy NGC 1377 and to address the nature and evolutionary status of the buried source. Methods: We used high- (0''65 × 0''52, (65 × 52 pc)) and low- (4''88 × 2''93) resolution SubMillimeter Array (SMA) observations to image the 12CO and 13CO 2-1 line emission. Results: We find bright, complex 12CO 2-1 line emission in the inner 400 pc of NGC 1377. The 12CO 2-1 line has wings that are tracing a kinematical component that appears to be perpendicular to the component traced by the line core. Together with an intriguing X-shape of the integrated intensity and dispersion maps, this suggests that the molecular emission of NGC 1377 consists of a disk-outflow system. Lower limits to the molecular mass and outflow rate are Mout(H2) > 1 × 107 M? and ? > 8 M? yr-1. The age of the proposed outflow is estimated to be 1.4 Myr, the extent to be 200 pc and the outflow speed to be Vout = 140 km s-1. The total molecular mass in the SMA map is estimated to Mtot(H2) = 1.5 × 108 M? (on a scale of 400 pc) while in the inner r = 29 pc the molecular mass is Mcore(H2) = 1.7 × 107 M? with a corresponding H2 column density of N(H2) = 3.4 × 1023 cm-2 and an average 12CO 2-1 brightness temperature of 19 K. 13CO 2-1 emission is found at a factor 10 fainter than 12CO in the low-resolution map while C18O 2-1 remains undetected. We find weak 1 mm continuum emission of 2.4 mJy with spatial extent less than 400 pc. Conclusions: Observing the molecular properties of the FIR-excess galaxy NGC 1377 allows us to probe the early stages of nuclear activity and the onset of feedback in active galaxies. The age of the outflow supports the notion that the current nuclear activity is young - a few Myr. The outflow may be powered by radiation pressure from a compact, dust enshrouded nucleus, but other driving mechanisms are possible. The buried source may be an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or an extremely young (1 Myr) compact starburst. Limitations on size and mass lead us to favor the AGN scenario, but additional studies are required to settle this question. In either case, the wind with its implied mass outflow rate will quench the nuclear power source within the very short time of 5-25 Myr. It is possible, however, that the gas is unable to escape the galaxy and may eventually fall back onto NGC 1377 again.

  1. Implications of climate change on the distribution of the tick vector Ixodes scapularis and risk for Lyme disease in the Texas-Mexico transboundary region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease risk maps are important tools that help ascertain the likelihood of exposure to specific infectious agents. Understanding how climate change may affect the suitability of habitats for ticks will improve the accuracy of risk maps of tick-borne pathogen transmission in humans and domestic anim...

  2. File: NormOvrv Tutorial Overview of Vector and Matrix Norms Version dated January 30, 2013 11:18 am Prof. W. Kahan SUBJECT TO CHANGE: Do you have the latest version? Page 1 / 79

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    File: NormOvrv Tutorial Overview of Vector and Matrix Norms Version dated January 30, 2013 11:18 am of Vector and Matrix Norms Prepared for the Numerical Analysis Seminar at U.C. Berkeley, 2010.eecs.berkeley.edu/~wkahan/MathH110/NormOvrv.pdf> #12;File: NormOvrv Tutorial Overview of Vector and Matrix Norms Version dated

  3. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  4. The ocean-atmosphere response to wind-induced thermocline changes in the tropical South Western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, F. M.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.; Hazeleger, W.

    2015-08-01

    In the Indian Ocean basin the sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are most sensitive to changes in the oceanic depth of the thermocline in the region of the Seychelles Dome. Observational studies have suggested that the strong SST variations in this region influence the atmospheric evolution around the basin, while its impact could extend far into the Pacific and the extra-tropics. Here we study the adjustments of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system to a winter shallow doming event using dedicated ensemble simulations with the state-of-the-art EC-Earth climate model. The doming creates an equatorial Kelvin wave and a pair of westward moving Rossby waves, leading to higher SST 1-2 months later in the Western equatorial Indian Ocean. Atmospheric convection is strengthened and the Walker circulation responds with reduced convection over Indonesia and cooling of the SST in that region. The Pacific warm pool convection shifts eastward and an oceanic Kelvin wave is triggered at thermocline depth. The wave leads to an SST warming in the East Equatorial Pacific 5-6 months after the initiation of the Seychelles Dome event. The atmosphere responds to this warming with weak anomalous atmospheric convection. The changes in the upper tropospheric divergence in this sequence of events create large-scale Rossby waves that propagate away from the tropics along the atmospheric waveguides. We suggest to repeat these types of experiments with other models to test the robustness of the results. We also suggest to create the doming event in June so that the East-Pacific warming occurs in November when the atmosphere is most sensitive to SST anomalies and El Niño could possibly be triggered by the doming event under suitable conditions.

  5. Automated mesoscale winds determined from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A new automated technique for extracting mesoscale fields from GOES visible/infrared satellite imagery was developed. Quality control parameters were defined to allow objective editing of the wind fields. The system can produce equivalent or superior cloud wind estimates compared to the time consuming manual methods used on various interactive meteorological processing systems. Analysis of automated mesoscale cloud wind for a test case yields an estimated random error value one meter per second and produces both regional and mesoscale vector wind field structure and divergence patterns that are consistent in time and highly correlated with subsequent severe thunderstorm development.

  6. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar including combined RF-acoustic antenna installed coaxially with the gondola of the wind power turbine. The work of the technique is synchronized with rotation of blades to eliminate their shielding action. Dangerous in terms of dynamic strength is the wind load pulse, the rise time which is comparable with the period of the natural frequency of the wind turbine elements (blade, tower, rotor, etc.). The amplitude decay of resonant vibrations at critical values of the speed of rotation can be realized through the use of mechanical elastic supports with nonlinear artificial dampers. They have a high coefficient of resistance, but may cause self-excited oscillations. We propose the way to deal with raised vibration of wind turbine elements at the expense of short-term increase of damping in the range of critical rotary axis speeds or during impulsive effects of wind loadings (wind gusts). This is possible through the use of non-linear electromagnetic dampers or active magnetic bearings. Their feature is the possibility of varying the mechanical stiffness and damping properties by changing the electrical parameters of electromagnets. The controlling of these parameters is carried out by the control system (CS) with the information feedback on the spatial-temporal structure of the wind field obtained from IRASS. In the composition of the CS can also be included the rotational speed sensor of the WPT rotor. This approach to the adaptation of wind turbines will allow to reduce vibration and to perform early compensation of the load on their components, which arise under the wind gusts. In addition, corrections about the wind field obtained with IRASS, would increase the mean power of WPT.

  7. Electric car with solar and wind energy may change the environment and economy: A tool for utilizing the renewable energy resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanhua

    2014-01-01

    Energy and environmental issues are among the most important problems of public concern. Wind and solar energy may be one of the alternative solutions to overcome energy shortage and to reduce greenhouse gaseous emission. Using electric cars in cities can significantly improve the air quality there. Through our analyses and modeling on the basis of the National Centers for Environment Prediction data we confirm that the amount of usable solar and wind energy far exceeds the world's total energy demand, considering the feasibility of the technology being used. Storing the surplus solar and wind energy and then releasing this surplus on demand is an important approach to maintaining uninterrupted solar- and wind-generated electricity. This approach requires us to be aware of the available solar and wind energy in advance in order to manage their storage. Solar and wind energy depends on weather conditions and we know weather forecasting. This implies that solar and wind energy is predictable. In this article, we demonstrate how solar and wind energy can be forecasted. We provide a web tool that can be used by all to arrive at solar and wind energy amount at any location in the world. The tool is available at http://www.renewableenergyst.org. The website also provides additional information on renewable energy, which is useful to a wide range of audiences, including students, educators, and the general public.

  8. Impact of Anthropogenic Environmental Alterations on Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The spread of infectious vector-borne diseases involves at least 3 organisms: a parasite, a vector, and a host. Alterations to the natural environment may change the context within which these entities interact, thus potentially affecting vector-borne disease epidemiology. In this review, examples are presented in which human-driven ecological changes may be contributing to the spread of vector-borne diseases. Such changes include deforestation, agriculture and animal husbandry, water control projects, urbanization, loss of biodiversity, introduction of alien species, and climate change. The global environment is currently being degraded at an alarming pace, potentially placing human populations at increasing risk for unnecessary and preventable outbreaks of vector-borne diseases. Further research is needed to improve our ability to predict and prevent emergence and reemergence of vector-borne diseases from environmental alterations. PMID:19099032

  9. Impact of anthropogenic environmental alterations on vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Vora, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The spread of infectious vector-borne diseases involves at least 3 organisms: a parasite, a vector, and a host. Alterations to the natural environment may change the context within which these entities interact, thus potentially affecting vector-borne disease epidemiology. In this review, examples are presented in which human-driven ecological changes may be contributing to the spread of vector-borne diseases. Such changes include deforestation, agriculture and animal husbandry, water control projects, urbanization, loss of biodiversity, introduction of alien species, and climate change. The global environment is currently being degraded at an alarming pace, potentially placing human populations at increasing risk for unnecessary and preventable outbreaks of vector-borne diseases. Further research is needed to improve our ability to predict and prevent emergence and reemergence of vector-borne diseases from environmental alterations. PMID:19099032

  10. Solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsch, E.; Axford, W. I.; McKenzie, J. F.

    There are three major types of solar wind - the steady fast wind, the unsteady slow wind, and the variable transient wind. The fast streams are the normal modes of the solar wind. Their basic properties can be reproduced by multi-fluid models involving waves. After briefly reviewing the history of the subject and describing some of the modern theories of the fast wind, the boundary conditions and in-situ constraints are discussed which are imposed on the models, in particular by Ulysses at high latitudes. Some of the results are then presented from SOHO observations that have brought a wealth of new information on the state of the wind in the inner corona as well as the plasma source conditions prevailing in the transition region and solar chromosphere. Finally, problem areas are identified and future research perspectives are outlined.

  11. Seasonal Changes in Estuarine Dissolved Organic Matter Due to Variations in Discharge, Flushing Times and Wind-driven Mixing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Jennifer Louise

    Estuaries are highly productive habitats that transport and transform organic matter (OM), experience large changes in ionic composition and act as a transition zone between terrestrial and marine environments (Paerl et al. 1998; Markager et al. 2011; Osburn et al. 2012). OM source and matrix effects (such as salinity and pH) influence the chemical structure of DOM in estuaries and therefore affect its bioavailability, photo-reactivity, and its overall fate in these systems (Jaffe et al. 2004; Boyd et al. 2010; Pace et al. 2012; Osburn et al. 2012; Cawley et al. 2013). Within estuaries, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a heterogeneous mixture of aromatic and aliphatic compounds, and its composition in aquatic systems varies spatially and temporally with source (Bauer and Bianchi 2011). However, the main source of DOM in estuaries, rivers and other aquatic systems, originates from vascular plant detritus, soil humus, older fossil (i.e., petrogenic) organic carbon, black carbon, marine OM and in situ production (Hedges 2002; Houghton 2007; Bauer and Bianchi 2011). Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), the light absorbing fraction of DOM, can be characterized using optical methods such as absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy (e.g. Coble, 1996; Stedmon and Markager, 2003). By analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of DOM and CDOM within estuaries, information pertaining to OM source and fate across the freshwater-marine continuum can be obtained. These methods offer an inexpensive, non-destructive means for obtaining sensitive measurements of a diverse group of organic compounds. By using this technology to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of CDOM within estuaries, information pertaining to OM source and fate across the freshwater-marine continuum can be obtained (Fellman et al. 2011; Osburn et al. 2012; Murphy et al. 2014). Chemical biomarkers are also routinely used to identify DOM sources in coastal waters. Examples are carbon stable isotopes (Bauer, 2002) and lignin (e.g., Benner and Opsahl, 2001; Harvey and Mannino, 2001). Marine DOM derived from phytoplankton typically has carbon stable isotope (delta13C) values that range from --20 to --22‰, while terrestrial DOM derived from C3 land plants typically have delta13C values that range from --26 to --28‰ (Bauer, 2002). Lignin is an important component of vascular plants, thus making it a unique geochemical biomarker, which can be used to trace the fate of terrestrial DOM in coastal seawater (e.g., Hernes and Benner, 2003; Walker et al. 2009; Osburn and Stedmon, 2011). Further, the ratios of the different phenolic compounds derived from the oxidation of lignin can be used to distinguish between plant sources (e.g. angiosperm vs. gymnosperm, or woody vs. non-woody tissue) and the extent of exposure to degradation (Hedges et al. 1988). The highly productive, eutrophic waters of the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), in eastern North Carolina, USA, serve as a transition zone for terrigenous DOM between the head of the Neuse River and Pamlico Sound. Previous studies have determined that the NRE is dominated by inputs from riverine discharge, yet very clear shifts in DOM quality are apparent as discharge varied (Paerl et al. 1998; Osburn et al. 2012). Furthermore, flushing times within the NRE will aid in determining whether DOM is primarily autochthonous or allochthonous and if it is processed internally or transported downstream to the Pamlico Sound (Paerl et al. 1998; Mari et al. 2007, Peierls et al. 2012). Therefore, the main sources of DOM and its composition can change throughout an estuary depending on the hydrodynamic conditions. For example, increases in flushing time may allow for the accumulation of autochthonous DOM because of (1) planktonic communities within the water column having more time to utilize nutrients within the system, resulting in phytoplankton blooms and (2) lower inputs of allochthonous OM from the NRE's watershed (Dixon et al. accepted). Therefore, the main sources of DOM and its composition can change throughout an est

  12. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  13. Analysis of extreme wind speed and wind gust for Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peline Nemeth, Csilla; Bartholy, Judit; Pongrácz, Rita; Radics, Kornélia

    2015-04-01

    Homogenized wind speed (1975-2012) and wind gust data sets (1975-2013) were analysed in order to assess Hungarian wind climate trends, variability, frequency and intensity of extreme wind events reliably. Decreases in the annual mean wind speed were found in our former studies when using homogenised observed wind data. These results are consistent with reduced Pole to Equator temperature gradient in a warmer world. Question arises how a changing global climate affects regional and local wind extremes in Hungary. First, 10-metre wind speed from the ERA Interim reanalysis was compared to the station observations. The comparison is quite difficult due to the fact that the observed 10-metre wind speed is a point measurement, where variables of the ERA Interim reanalysis represent larger areas, at least the size of the grid box (0.5°×0.5°) and are subject to the effects of a smoothly varying surface topography. Then, 0.1° horizontal resolution gridded wind speed data sets (CARPATCLIM) based on homogenized measured data series were used to estimate spatial and temporal distribution of extreme wind parameters for Hungary. The extreme values calculated from the observed and CARPATCLIM wind data sets are presented in this study. The annual daily maxima of wind speed and wind gust were fitted to the Generalized Extreme Value distribution at every station, which were used to estimate 50- and 100-year return values. Additionally, the threshold crossing technique was applied to evaluate the frequency occurrence and the trend of moderate and strong wind days at the stations for the recent past.

  14. Vector Quantization With Emergent Codebook Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahalt, Stanley C.; Krishnamurthy, Ashok

    1993-01-01

    Proposed scheme under development for transmission of vector-quantized digital video images, vector quantizer codebook updated to adapt quantizer to changing signal statistics. Intended to be realized with electronic neural network. Codebook, which consists of patterns constituting video images, will undergo training during operation and scheme will develop codebooks ordered during training. System enables coding more compact, more immune to noise, and supports variable rate compression.

  15. Bluetongue vector species of Culicoides in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Cagienard, A; Griot, C; Mellor, P S; Denison, E; Stärk, K D C

    2006-06-01

    Switzerland is historically recognized by the Office Internationale des Epizooties as free from bluetongue disease (BT) because of its latitude and climate. With bluetongue virus (BTV) moving north from the Mediterranean, an entomological survey was conducted in Switzerland in 2003 to assess the potential of the BTV vectors present. A total of 39 cattle farms located in three geographical regions, the Ticino region, the Western region and the region of the Grisons, were monitored during the vector season. Farms were located in areas at high risk of vector introduction and establishment based on the following characteristics: annual average temperature > 12.5 degrees C, average annual humidity >or= 60%, cattle farm. Onderstepoort black light traps were operated at the cattle farms generally for one night in July and one night in September. A total of 56 collections of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were identified morphologically. Only one single individual of Culicoides (Avaritia) imicola, the major Old World vector of BTV, was found in July 2003 in the Ticino region, one of the southernmost regions of Switzerland. In the absence of further specimens of C. imicola from Switzerland it is suggested that this individual may be a vagrant transported by wind from regions to the south of the country where populations of this species are known to occur. Alternative potential BTV vectors of the Culicoides (Culicoides) pulicaris and Culicoides (Avaritia) obsoletus complexes were abundant in all sampled regions with individual catches exceeding 70 000 midges per trap night. PMID:16874919

  16. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  17. Wind-Direction Effects on Urban-Type Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Jean; Coceal, O.; Thomas, T. Glyn; Branford, S.; Belcher, S. E.; Castro, Ian P.

    2012-02-01

    Practically all extant work on flows over obstacle arrays, whether laboratory experiments or numerical modelling, is for cases where the oncoming wind is normal to salient faces of the obstacles. In the field, however, this is rarely the case. Here, simulations of flows at various directions over arrays of cubes representing typical urban canopy regions are presented and discussed. The computations are of both direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation type. Attention is concentrated on the differences in the mean flow within the canopy region arising from the different wind directions and the consequent effects on global properties such as the total surface drag, which can change very significantly—by up to a factor of three in some circumstances. It is shown that for a given Reynolds number the typical viscous forces are generally a rather larger fraction of the pressure forces (principally the drag) for non-normal than for normal wind directions and that, dependent on the surface morphology, the average flow direction deep within the canopy can be largely independent of the oncoming wind direction. Even for regular arrays of regular obstacles, a wind direction not normal to the obstacle faces can in general generate a lateral lift force (in the direction normal to the oncoming flow). The results demonstrate this and it is shown how computations in a finite domain with the oncoming flow generated by an appropriate forcing term (e.g. a pressure gradient) then lead inevitably to an oncoming wind direction aloft that is not aligned with the forcing term vector.

  18. Stellar Winds Geoffrey V. Bicknell Stellar Winds

    E-print Network

    Bicknell, Geoff

    Stellar Winds © Geoffrey V. Bicknell Stellar Winds vw Star #12;Astrophysical Gas Dynamics: Stellar Winds 2/66 1 Characteristics of stellar winds Solar wind Velocity at earth's orbit: (1) Density: (2: Stellar Winds 3/66 Mass flux (spherically symmetric wind): (5) Other stars Red giants: O&B type stars

  19. Vector Relations Michael Kaneshige

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    Vector Relations Michael Kaneshige January 14, 1995 1 Vector Calculus in Cartesian Coordinates ~ r = â?? i @ @x + â?? j @ @y + â?? k @ @z Gradient : ~ r\\Phi = @ \\Phi @x â?? i + @ \\Phi @y â?? j + @ \\Phi @z â?? k Divergence : ~ r \\Delta ~ A = @A 1 @x + @A 2 @y + @A 3 @z Curl : ~ r \\Theta ~ A = ( @A 3 @y \\Gamma @A 2 @z

  20. Hunting the Vector Hybrid

    E-print Network

    A Donnachie; Yu S Kalashnikova

    1999-02-01

    The current state of analysis of e+e- annihilation below 2.0 GeV and of the vector component of tau decay is reviewed. The evidence for and against the presence of hybrid vectors is discussed. It is concluded that the data strongly favour their inclusion, and the consequences of this are outlined.

  1. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M. (Livermore, CA); Leighton, James F. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  2. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  3. Viral Vector Production: Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Morshed, Ramin A; Kane, J Robert; Auffinger, Brenda; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have proven to be valuable resources in the development of novel therapies aimed at targeting pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease and neoplastic brain lesions. Not only can some genetically engineered adenoviral vectors achieve remarkably efficient and specific gene delivery to target cells, but they also may act as anticancer agents by selectively replicating within cancer cells.Due to the great interest in using adenoviral vectors for various purposes, the need for a comprehensive protocol for viral vector production is especially apparent. Here, we describe the process of generating an adenoviral vector in its entirety, including the more complex process of adenoviral fiber modification to restrict viral tropism in order to achieve more efficient and specific gene delivery. PMID:26611583

  4. Time Domain Buffeting Analysis of Suspension Bridges Subjected to Turbulent Wind with Effective Attack Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DING, Q.; LEE, P. K. K.; LO, S. H.

    2000-06-01

    Suspension bridges are long-span flexible structures susceptible to various types of wind-induced vibrations such as buffeting actions. In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element model formulated to deal with suspension bridges under turbulent wind with effective attack angle is presented. In this model, all sources of geometric non-linearity such as cable sag, force-bending moment interaction in the bridge deck and towers as well as changes in bridge geometry due to large displacements are fully considered. The wind loads which include buffeting loads and self-excited loads are converted into the time domain by using a computer simulation technique to form aerodynamic damping and stiffness matrices as well as element loading vectors. Furthermore, a more refined model of wind loads is constructed in order to investigate the effect of an instantaneous change in effective attack angle of turbulent wind on bridge buffeting response. By comparing the results with those obtained by classic buffeting theory through an example bridge, the validity of the presented method is verified.

  5. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  6. Implications of climate change on the distribution of the tick vector Ixodes scapularis and risk for Lyme disease in the Texas-Mexico transboundary region

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Disease risk maps are important tools that help ascertain the likelihood of exposure to specific infectious agents. Understanding how climate change may affect the suitability of habitats for ticks will improve the accuracy of risk maps of tick-borne pathogen transmission in humans and domestic animal populations. Lyme disease (LD) is the most prevalent arthropod borne disease in the US and Europe. The bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi causes LD and it is transmitted to humans and other mammalian hosts through the bite of infected Ixodes ticks. LD risk maps in the transboundary region between the U.S. and Mexico are lacking. Moreover, none of the published studies that evaluated the effect of climate change in the spatial and temporal distribution of I. scapularis have focused on this region. Methods The area of study included Texas and a portion of northeast Mexico. This area is referred herein as the Texas-Mexico transboundary region. Tick samples were obtained from various vertebrate hosts in the region under study. Ticks identified as I. scapularis were processed to obtain DNA and to determine if they were infected with B. burgdorferi using PCR. A maximum entropy approach (MAXENT) was used to forecast the present and future (2050) distribution of B. burgdorferi-infected I. scapularis in the Texas-Mexico transboundary region by correlating geographic data with climatic variables. Results Of the 1235 tick samples collected, 109 were identified as I. scapularis. Infection with B. burgdorferi was detected in 45% of the I. scapularis ticks collected. The model presented here indicates a wide distribution for I. scapularis, with higher probability of occurrence along the Gulf of Mexico coast. Results of the modeling approach applied predict that habitat suitable for the distribution of I. scapularis in the Texas-Mexico transboundary region will remain relatively stable until 2050. Conclusions The Texas-Mexico transboundary region appears to be part of a continuum in the pathogenic landscape of LD. Forecasting based on climate trends provides a tool to adapt strategies in the near future to mitigate the impact of LD related to its distribution and risk for transmission to human populations in the Mexico-US transboundary region. PMID:24766735

  7. Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads

    DOEpatents

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2007-02-13

    A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

  8. Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines

    E-print Network

    Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

    2005-01-01

    Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

  9. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  10. Heat transfer phase change paint tests of 0.0175-scale models (nos. 21-0 and 46-0) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the AEDC tunnel B hypersonic wind tunnel (test OH25A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a hypersonic wind tunnel using various truncated space shuttle orbiter configurations in an attempt to establish the optimum model size for other tests examining body shock-wing leading edge interference effects. The tests were conducted at Mach number 8 using the phase change paint technique. A test description, tabulated data, and tracings of isotherms made from photographs taken during the test are presented.

  11. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor modifications. The improvement in winds through use of these new quality and control parameters is measured without the use of rawinsonde or modeled wind field data and compared with other approaches.

  12. Moist wind relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, William H.

    1990-01-01

    The equations describing the temporal and spatial behavior of the kinematic moisture and heat flux are described. In these nonlinear equations, the contribution by diabatic processes to the large-scale flux is composed of two parts. One part is associated with a Rayleigh damping term while the other arises from temporal and spatial changes in the pressure gradient term. It was found that the influence of diabatic processes on large-scale moisture fluxes depends greatly on the degree of balance between forcing and damping terms in the governing kinematic flux equations. The existence of a near balance requires a reduction in the large-scale horizontal geostrophic wind speed. Based on an examination of the moisture flux equations, it is argued that reductions in the large-scale horizontal wind speed observed within major cumulus cloud systems help conserve large-scale moisture fluxes. The deviation of the wind from geostrophic conditions is easily estimated for a near balanced state. This wind modification induces secondary vertical circulations that contribute to convergence, creating or supporting long-lived mesoscale flows. We believe this process to be a major supporter of the mesoscale circulations observed in severe storms and squall lines. In the tropics the wind modification has an antitriptic relationship. These diagnostic findings suggest possible modifications to the wind field in the application of a cumulus parameterization, and may be important in diabatic initialization of numerical weather prediction models.

  13. Generalized Stokes vector for three photon process

    E-print Network

    Shaji, Chitra; Satyanarayana, SVM; Sharan, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Stokes Muller formalism is important to understand the optical properties of materials by measuring the change in the polarization state of light upon scattering. The formalism can be extended to nonlinear scattering processes involving two and three photon processes. In this work, we derive a triple Stokes vector analytically using operator approach used in quantum theory of light. A three photon polarization state can be described by Stokes vector that has sixteen components involving cubes of intensities. The response of a material for the scattering of light in a three photon process is described by 4 x 16 Muller matrix. Polarization in Polarization out (PIPO) experiments can be carried out to determine the elements of Muller matrix. For that we identify 16 independent points in Poincare sphere and construct triple Stokes vector for each point. Four measurements to find the linear Stokes vector of the scattered light for incident light in each of the sixteen three photon states determine the Muller matrix...

  14. Tropospheric Wind Profile Measurements with a Direct Detection Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin; Mathur, Savyasachee

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. In this paper we describe a recently developed prototype wind lidar system using a direct detection Doppler technique for measuring wind profiles from the surface through the troposphere. This system uses a pulsed ND:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm as the transmitter. The laser pulse is directed to the atmosphere using a 40 cm diameter scan mirror. The portion of the laser energy backscattered from aerosols and molecules is collected by a 40 cm diameter telescope and coupled via fiber optics into the Doppler receiver. Single photon counting APD's are used to detect the atmospheric backscattered signal. The principle element of the receiver is a dual bandpass tunable Fabry Perot etalon which analyzes the Doppler shift of the incoming laser signal using the double edge technique. The double edge technique uses two high resolution optical filters having bandpasses offset relative to one another such that the 'edge' of the first filter's transmission function crosses that of the second at the half power point. The outgoing laser frequency is located approximately at the crossover point. Due to the opposite going slopes of the edges, a Doppler shift in the atmospheric backscattered laser frequency produces a positive change in signal for one filter and a negative change in the second filter. Taking the ratio of the two edge channel signals yields a result which is directly proportional to the component of the wind along the line-of-sight of the laser. Measuring the radial wind in several directions provides sufficient information to determine the true wind speed and direction. The lidar has operated from our laboratory at Goddard since June, 1997. Wind profiles have been obtained to altitudes of 12 km with a vertical resolution of 330 in. Vector wind data are obtained by rotating the scan mirror to measure line-of-sight wind profiles for at least two azimuth angles at an elevation angle of 45 degrees. The precision of the data as determined from the standard deviation of multiple independent lidar profiles is in the range of 1 to 3 m/sec up to 10 km. Good agreement is obtained when the lidar data are compared with the upper air rawinsonde soundings taken at Dulles airport. Examples of the wind lidar data will be presented along with a description of the instrument and future developments.

  15. Wind Tunnel 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building John Seryak Kelly Kissock Project Engineer Associate Professor Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Dayton... Dayton, Ohio ABSTRACT Traditional buildings are cooled and ventilated by mechanically induced drafts. Natural ventilation aspires to cool and ventilate a building by natural means, such as cross ventilation or wind towers, without mechanical...

  16. Meteorology (Wind)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    ... is in each range (0-2, 3-6, 7-10, 11-14, 15-18, 19-25 m/s).   Wind Speed at 50 m at 3-hourly intervals (m/s)   ... be adjusted to heights from 10 to 300 meters using the Gipe power law. Wind speeds may be adjusted for different terrain by selecting from ...

  17. The predictability of large-scale wind-driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Lu, J.; Meacham, S. P.; Malanotte-Rizzoli, P.

    The singular values associated with optimally growing perturbations to stationary and time-dependent solutions for the general circulation in an ocean basin provide a measure of the rate at which solutions with nearby initial conditions begin to diverge, and hence, a measure of the predictability of the flow. In this paper, the singular vectors and singular values of stationary and evolving examples of wind-driven, double-gyre circulations in different flow regimes are explored. By changing the Reynolds number in simple quasi-geostrophic models of the wind-driven circulation, steady, weakly aperiodic and chaotic states may be examined. The singular vectors of the steady state reveal some of the physical mechanisms responsible for optimally growing perturbations. In time-dependent cases, the dominant singular values show significant variability in time, indicating strong variations in the predictability of the flow. When the underlying flow is weakly aperiodic, the dominant singular values co-vary with integral measures of the large-scale flow, such as the basin-integrated upper ocean kinetic energy and the transport in the western boundary current extension. Furthermore, in a reduced gravity quasi-geostrophic model of a weakly aperiodic, double-gyre flow, the behaviour of the dominant singular values may be used to predict a change in the large-scale flow, a feature not shared by an analogous two-layer model. When the circulation is in a strongly aperiodic state, the dominant singular values no longer vary coherently with integral measures of the flow. Instead, they fluctuate in a very aperiodic fashion on mesoscale time scales. The dominant singular vectors then depend strongly on the arrangement of mesoscale features in the flow and the evolved forms of the associated singular vectors have relatively short spatial scales. These results have several implications. In weakly aperiodic, periodic, and stationary regimes, the mesoscale energy content is usually relatively low and the predictability of the wind-driven circulation is determined by the large-scale structure of the flow. In the more realistic, strongly chaotic regime, in which energetic mesoscale eddies are produced by the meandering of the separated western boundary current extension, the predictability of the flow locally tends to be a stronger function of the local mesoscale eddy structure than of the larger scale structure of the circulation. This has a broader implication for the effectiveness of different approaches to forecasting the ocean with models which sequentially assimilate new observations.

  18. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented. PMID:17272245

  19. Magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitude related to solar wind dynamic pressure changes: The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. C.; Zong, Q.-G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Tian, A. M.; Sun, W. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Zhou, X. Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Hartinger, M. D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in transferring energy by buffeting the magnetosphere with solar wind pressure impulses. The amplitudes of magnetospheric ULF waves, which are induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements or shocks, are thought to damp in one half a wave cycle or an entire wave cycle. We report in situ observations of solar wind dynamic pressure impulse-induced magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitudes. We found six ULF wave events induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. During three or four wave cycles, the amplitudes of ion velocities and electric field of these waves increased continuously by 1.3-4.4 times. Two significant events were selected to further study the characteristics of these ULF waves. We found that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Three possible mechanisms of causing the wave amplitude increase are discussed. First, solar wind dynamic pressure perturbations, which are observed in a duration of 20-30 min, might transfer energy to the magnetospheric ULF waves continually. Second, the wave amplitude increase in the radial electric field may be caused by superposition of two wave modes, a standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse and a propagating compressional wave directly induced by solar wind oscillations. When superposed, the two wave modes fit observations as does a calculation that superposes electric fields from two wave sources. Third, the normal of the solar wind discontinuity is at an angle to the Sun-Earth line. Thus, the discontinuity will affect the dayside magnetopause continuously for a long time.

  20. Snow sometimes changes into sleet, a type of ice prectpitation that rattles against windows o r stings the face i n a strong wind.

    E-print Network

    a southerly wind, with a temperature of 40 degreeeground q e below freezing. o r so i n i t s warmest portion begins t o run over the cold layer near the ground. A t first, the portion of t h i s wanner wind that is abovo freezing, is very thin, and the snowflakes f a l l i n g through may become only slightly wet

  1. Probabilistic Path Planning of Montgolfier Balloons in Strong, Uncertain Wind Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Michael; Blackmore, James C.; Kuwata, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Lighter-than-air vehicles such as hot-air balloons have been proposed for exploring Saturn s moon Titan, as well as other bodies with significant atmospheres. For these vehicles to navigate effectively, it is critical to incorporate the effects of surrounding wind fields, especially as these winds will likely be strong relative to the control authority of the vehicle. Predictive models of these wind fields are available, and previous research has considered problems of planning paths subject to these predicted forces. However, such previous work has considered the wind fields as known a priori, whereas in practical applications, the actual wind vector field is not known exactly and may deviate significantly from the wind velocities estimated by the model. A probabilistic 3D path-planning algorithm was developed for balloons to use uncertain wind models to generate time-efficient paths. The nominal goal of the algorithm is to determine what altitude and what horizontal actuation, if any is available on the vehicle, to use to reach a particular goal location in the least expected time, utilizing advantageous winds. The solution also enables one to quickly evaluate the expected time-to-goal from any other location and to avoid regions of large uncertainty. This method is designed for balloons in wind fields but may be generalized for any buoyant vehicle operating in a vector field. To prepare the planning problem, the uncertainty in the wind field is modeled. Then, the problem of reaching a particular goal location is formulated as a Markov decision process (MDP) using a discretized space approach. Solving the MDP provides a policy of what actuation option (how much buoyancy change and, if applicable, horizontal actuation) should be selected at any given location to minimize the expected time-to-goal. The results provide expected time-to-goal values from any given location on the globe in addition to the action policy. This stochastic approach can also provide insights not accessible by deterministic methods; for example, one can evaluate variability and risk associated with different scenarios, rather than only viewing the expected outcome.

  2. Reminiscences on the study of wind waves.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyasu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The wind blowing over sea surface generates tiny wind waves. They develop with time and space absorbing wind energy, and become huge wind waves usually referred to ocean surface waves. The wind waves cause not only serious sea disasters but also take important roles in the local and global climate changes by affecting the fluxes of momentum, heat and gases (e.g. CO2) through the air-sea boundary. The present paper reviews the selected studies on wind waves conducted by our group in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (RIAM), Kyushu University. The themes discussed are interactions between water waves and winds, the energy spectrum of wind waves, nonlinear properties of wind waves, and the effects of surfactant on some air-sea interaction phenomena. PMID:25864467

  3. Light Vector Mesons

    E-print Network

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  4. Poynting-vector filter

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  5. Investigation of winds in Venus mesosphere by digital method using UV images from VMC aboard Venus Express.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsaeva, Marina; Khatuntsev, Igor; Ignatiev, Nikolai

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of winds at the top cloud layer is important for understanding the global circulation of the Venus atmosphere. The Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) aboard Venus Express has acquired a huge number of UV (365 nm) images. UV images of top cloud layer are customary to obtain the wind velocity due to their high contrast. Visual estimation of wind velocities is a labor intensive procedure. Authors have developed a digital method to estimate velocities of shifts of cloud details. The method is based on analysis of correlations between two UV images acquired at different moments. The method takes into account the change of a correlation function due to latitudinal peculiarities of cloud morphology and eliminates image regions which are far from the sub-spacecraft point. The digital method provides with good vector coverage of the Venus day side (9-16 local time) from the equator to high latitudes. The best agreement between the digital and visual methods is observed at low latitudes (below 35S). The discrepancy at higher latitudes is related to complicated cloud morphology, namely domination of streaks, which increases errors in the zonal wind speed. The method is productive for long-scale circulation at the top cloud layer. Sizes of regions for correlation were chosen empirically as a trade-off of sensitivity against noise immunity and varies from 10x7.5 ° to 20x10 ° depending on grid step. 580 orbits covering ten Venus years have been processed by using the digital method. The database of shift vectors counts about 400000 records. The mean wind speed at low latitudes is about 100 m/s. Wind vector fields were obtained for every orbit. The zonal wind speed in the equatorial region exhibits short-period (about 4.8 days) and long-period variations (long-term trend). Vector field averaged by all orbits show deviations of the main stream up to 5 degrees poleward in the early afternoon (12.5-14.5h) at 45-55S. The mean absolute value of the wind speed increases from 59.38 m/s at 10-12h to 76.46 m/s at 12.5-14.5h at the same latitude interval.

  6. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  7. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  8. Understanding extreme winds in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Gudrun Nina

    2015-04-01

    Iceland is a fairly windy country, due to it's location adjacent the North Atlantic storm track. The orography of the island is rugged, mountains are steep and fjords and valleys narrow, and this impacts local winds. Thus, mountain wind phenomena such as low level jets, gap winds, down-slope wind storms, mountain waves and wind wakes are common. To increase our knowledge of the behaviour of wind in Iceland an extreme value analysis was conducted based on observations from 61 automatic weather stations, applying the Peak Over Threshold technique on maximum daily wind speed and maximum daily wind gust at each site. The time series included at least 10 years of data and the threshold was chosen as the 0.9 quantile of maximum mean wind speed/maximum wind gust at each location. Among the results is the larger impact the local orography has on the extreme wind gusts compared to the mean wind. With extreme value models in place, a few significant weather events were selected from recent years and the observed wind speeds compared to the models in order to evaluate how extreme the events were and how large area they impacted. Actually, in most of these events the observed wind speed only turned out to be extreme at a few stations, emphasising the local effects. However, in an event from December 2007, when the observed maximum wind speed exceeded 23 m/s in most of western Iceland, the event was estimated as rare at a number of weather stations. Clearly this gives indication for further studying this particular weather event. An automatic system has been set up, running once an hour, comparing observed wind measurements to the extreme value models and producing maps of the return periods for all sites. This system gives us the possibility to, on a daily basis, evaluate the extremeness of each situation and simultaneously increase our knowledge of extreme wind behaviour in Iceland. This work is a foundation for studying changes in extreme winds in Iceland.

  9. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ? evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ?? 1. 4M ?. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various dynamical driving processes and what they imply for key wind parameters like the wind flow speed and mass loss rate.

  10. Damage localization in a residential-sized wind turbine blade by use of the SDDLV method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, R. J.; Hansen, L. M.; Ulriksen, M. D.; Tcherniak, D.; Damkilde, L.

    2015-07-01

    The stochastic dynamic damage location vector (SDDLV) method has previously proved to facilitate effective damage localization in truss- and plate-like structures. The method is based on interrogating damage-induced changes in transfer function matrices in cases where these matrices cannot be derived explicitly due to unknown input. Instead, vectors from the kernel of the transfer function matrix change are utilized; vectors which are derived on the basis of the system and state-to-output mapping matrices from output-only state-space realizations. The idea is then to convert the kernel vectors associated with the lowest singular values into static pseudo-loads and apply these alternately to an undamaged reference model with known stiffness matrix. By doing so, the stresses in the potentially damaged elements will, theoretically, approach zero. The present paper demonstrates an application of the SDDLV method for localization of structural damages in a cantilevered residential-sized wind turbine blade. The blade was excited by an unmeasured multi-impulse load and the resulting dynamic response was captured through accelerometers mounted along the blade. The static pseudo-loads were applied to a finite element (FE) blade model, which was tuned against the modal parameters of the actual blade. In the experiments, an undamaged blade configuration was analysed along with different damage scenarios, hereby testing the applicability of the SDDLV method.

  11. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel...

  12. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  13. Short-term changes in the mesozooplankton community and copepod gut pigment in the Chukchi Sea in autumn: reflections of a strong wind event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Nishino, S.; Inoue, J.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of atmospheric turbulence on a marine ecosystem, high-frequency samplings (two to four times per day) of a mesozooplankton community and the gut pigment of dominant copepods were performed at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 to 25 September 2013. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE) was observed on 18 September. After the SWE, the biomass of chlorophyll a (Chl a) increased, especially for micro-size (> 10 ?m) fractions. The zooplankton abundance ranged from 23 610 to 56 809 ind. m-2 and exhibited no clear changes as a result of the SWE. In terms of abundance, calanoid copepods constituted the dominant taxa (mean: 57 %), followed by barnacle larvae (31 %). Within the calanoid copepods, small-sized Pseudocalanus spp. (65 %) and large-sized C. glacialis (30 %) dominated. In the population structure of C. glacialis, copepodid stage 5 (C5) dominated, and the mean copepodid stage did not vary with the SWE. The dominance of accumulated lipids in C5 and C6 females with immature gonads indicated that they were preparing for seasonal diapause. The gut pigment of C. glacialis C5 was higher at night and was correlated with ambient Chl a (Chl a, and a significant increase was observed after the SWE (2.6 vs. 4.5 ng pigment ind.-1). The grazing impact by C. glacialis C5 was estimated to be 4.14 mg C m-2 day-1, which corresponded to 0.5-4.6 % of the biomass of the micro-size phytoplankton. Compared with the metabolic food requirement, C. glacialis feeding on phytoplankton accounted for 12.6 % of their total food requirement. These facts suggest that C. glacialis could not maintain their population by feeding solely on phytoplankton and that other food sources (i.e., microzooplankton) must be important in autumn. As observed by the increase in gut pigment, the temporal phytoplankton bloom, which is enhanced by the atmospheric turbulence (SWE) in autumn, may have a positive effect on copepod nutrition.

  14. Combined Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Hurricane Ocean Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2006-01-01

    The synergism of active and passive microwave techniques for hurricane ocean wind remote sensing is explored. We performed the analysis of Windsat data for Atlantic hurricanes in 2003-2005. The polarimetric third Stokes parameter observations from the Windsat 10, 18 and 37 GHz channels were collocated with the ocean surface winds from the Holland wind model, the QuikSCAT wind vectors and the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) operated by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The collocated data were binned as a function of wind speed and wind direction, and were expanded by sinusoidal series of the relative azimuth angles between wind and observation directions. The coefficients of the sinusoidal series, corrected for atmospheric attenuation, have been used to develop an empirical geophysical model function (GMF). The Windsat GMF for extreme high wind compares very well with the aircraft radiometer and radar measurements.

  15. Using Kites to Illustrate Some Features of Boundary Layer Winds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuller, Stanton E.

    1983-01-01

    Kites allow teachers to illustrate wind patterns by calling on past experience and by present demonstration. Features of the wind illustrated by kites--the effect of surface friction on wind speed, change of wind direction with elevation, gust and lull sequence, and atmospheric stability and turbulence type--are discussed. (SR)

  16. Scalable motion vector coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  17. PARALLEL BLOCK VECTORS: COLLECTION, ANALYSIS, AND USES

    E-print Network

    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... PARALLEL BLOCK VECTORS (PBVS) LINK A MULTITHREADED APPLICATION'S CODE TO THE VARYING DEGREES OF PARALLELISM can be teased apart for indi- vidual analysis, and users can track the changes in parallel- ism of fine-grained code regions. With careful engineering effort, PBVs are neither complex nor expensive

  18. Construction of solar-wind-like magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D Aaron

    2012-12-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfvén waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This Letter provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations; the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the "random" character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes ("discontinuities"), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles. PMID:23368180

  19. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  20. Vector WIMP Miracle

    E-print Network

    Tomohiro Abe; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Shigeki Matsumoto; Osamu Seto

    2012-05-25

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) is well known to be a good candidate for dark matter, and it is also predicted by many new physics models beyond the standard model at the TeV scale. We found that, if the WIMP is a vector particle (spin one particle) which is associated with some gauge symmetry broken at the TeV scale, the higgs mass is often predicted to be 120--125 GeV, which is very consistent with the result of higgs searches recently reported by ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. In this letter, we consider the vector WIMP using a non-linear sigma model in order to confirm this result as general as possible in a bottom-up approach. Near-future prospects to detect the vector WIMP at both direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter are also discussed.

  1. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  2. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  3. Bunyavirus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2014-11-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  4. A static investigation of yaw vectoring concepts on two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Mason, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The flow-turning capability and nozzle internal performance of yaw-vectoring nozzle geometries were tested in the NASA Langley 16-ft Transonic wind tunnel. The concept was investigated as a means of enhancing fighter jet performance. Five two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles were equipped for yaw-vectoring and examined. The configurations included a translating left sidewall, left and right sidewall flaps downstream of the nozzle throat, left sidewall flaps or port located upstream of the nozzle throat, and a powered rudder. Trials were also run with 20 deg of pitch thrust vectoring added. The feasibility of providing yaw-thrust vectoring was demonstrated, with the largest yaw vector angles being obtained with sidewall flaps downstream of the nozzle primary throat. It was concluded that yaw vector designs that scoop or capture internal nozzle flow provide the largest yaw-vector capability, but decrease the thrust the most.

  5. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  6. Uniformly elliptically-polarized vector optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-03-01

    We present a modified, more universal scheme for generating vector fields. Here we design in principle and experimentally generate a new kind of uniformly elliptically polarized vector field, which has the same ellipticity and sense of local elliptic polarization at any location and also has a flexibly designable distribution of orientation of the elliptic polarization. An introduced additional degree of freedom is used to flexibly change the ellipticity. In particular, the ellipticity and the orientation of polarization can be independently controlled by two parameters. This makes it easier to both control the spatial structure of the polarization and to engineer the focusing field.

  7. A threshold for wind-wave growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelan, Mark A.; Plant, William J.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements in a closed, recirculating wind-wave tank using variable wind speeds showed that wind waves in the gravity-capillary range exhibit a threshold in their growth. Surface wave height variance spectral densities in the wave number domain were measured for gravity-capillary waves using both radar backscatter and a wavelet transform technique applied to a laser probe. The measurements showed that when the wind speed was slowly ramped up, a threshold wind speed or friction velocity was required to produce waves. Turning the wind on suddenly showed that the wind stress did not grow as rapidly as the wind since the surface waves supporting the stress grew relatively slowly. Changing water temperature or current in the water caused a pronounced change in the wind speed threshold but not in the friction velocity threshold. Changes in fetch of as much as a factor of 2 had no discernible effect on the thresholds. The results imply that wind speed, being a condition imposed on the air-water interface, causes wave growth, while friction velocity, being a result of air-water interactions, is closely related to surface roughness, hence radar cross section, and changes during wave growth.

  8. Vector potential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.

    1989-01-01

    Vector potential and related methods, for the simulation of both inviscid and viscous flows over aerodynamic configurations, are briefly reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of several formulations are discussed and alternate strategies are recommended. Scalar potential, modified potential, alternate formulations of Euler equations, least-squares formulation, variational principles, iterative techniques and related methods, and viscous flow simulation are discussed.

  9. CALCULUS III Vector Calculus

    E-print Network

    Sutherland, Scott

    Calculus: concepts and contexts, by James Stewart, Brooks/Cole, 1998. RECITATIONS: Fr 12:40-1:35, ROOM SBMAT 205 CALCULUS III Vector Calculus SPRING 2000 This course represents the third semester in the standard Calculus sequence. We will develop the theory and practice of di#11;erentiation and integration

  10. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  11. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    E-print Network

    J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

    2009-08-03

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  12. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  13. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2010-08-01

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

  14. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  15. Winds over Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumley, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Before World War II, weather forecasters had little knowledge of upper-air wind patterns above 20000 feet. Data were seldom avai able at these heights, and the need was not great because commercial aircraft seldom flew at these altitudes. The war in the Pacific changed all that. Wind forecasts for 30000 feet plus became urgent to support the XXI Bomber Command in its bombing mission over Japan.The U.S. Army Air Force Pacific Ocean Area (AAFPOA) placed a Weather Central in the Marianas Islands in 1944 (Saipan in 1944 and Guam in 1945) to provide forecasting support for this mission. A forecasting procedure was put into operation that combined the elements known as "single-station forecasting" and an advanced procedure that used "altirmeter corrections" to analyze upper-airdata and make prognoses. Upper-air charts were drawn for constant pressure surfaces rather than constant height surfaces. The constant pressure surfaces were tied together by means of the atmospheric temperature field represented by specific temperature anomalies between pressure surfaces. Wind forecasts over the Marianas-Japan route made use of space cross sections that provided the data to forecast winds at each 5000-ft level to 35000 ft along the mission flight path. The new procedures allowed the forecaster to construct internally consistent meteorological charts in three dimensions in regions of sparse data.Army air force pilots and their crews from the Marianas were among the first to experience the extreme wind conditions now known as the "jet stream". Air force forecasters demonstrated that, with experience, such winds could reasonably be forecast under difficult operational conditions.

  16. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2009-07-01

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the past year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with significant federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. This report examines key trends.

  17. Effects of wind direction and wind farm layout on turbine wakes and power losses in wind farms: An LES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A recently-developed large-eddy simulation (LES) framework is validated and used to investigate the effects of wind direction and wind farm layout on the turbine wakes and power losses in wind farms. The subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulent stress is parameterized using a tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic SGS model. The turbine-induced forces are computed using a dynamic actuator-disk model with rotation (ADM-R), which couples blade-element theory with a turbine-specific relation between the blade angular velocity and the shaft torque to compute simultaneously turbine angular velocity and power output. Here, we choose the Horns Rev offshore wind farm as a case study for model validation. A series of simulations are performed for a wide range of wind direction angles. Results from the simulations are in good agreement with observed power data from the Horns Rev wind farm, and show a strong impact of wind direction on the farm power production and the spatial distribution of turbine-wake characteristics (e.g., velocity deficit and turbulence intensity). This can be explained by the fact that changing the wind angle can be viewed as changing the wind farm layout relative to the incoming wind, while keeping the same wind turbine density. To further investigate the effect of wind farm layout on the flow and the power extracted by the farm, simulations of wind farms with different circular and elliptic layouts are performed to compare with the results of the Horns Rev wind farm simulations. The results show that the proposed layouts not only provide more stable power output with different wind directions, but also enhance the performance of the total farm power production.

  18. Wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion on wind energy systems involved with the DOE wind energy program is presented. Some of the problems associated with wind energy systems are discussed. The cost, efficiency, and structural design of wind energy systems are analyzed.

  19. Three-Dimensional Venturi Sensor for Measuring Extreme Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zysko, Jan A.; Perotti, Jose M.; Amis, Christopher; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Eckhoff, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Venturi sensor is being developed as a compact, rugged means of measuring wind vectors having magnitudes of as much as 300 mph (134 m/s). This sensor also incorporates auxiliary sensors for measuring temperature from -40 to +120 F (-40 to +49 C), relative humidity from 0 to 100 percent, and atmospheric pressure from 846 to 1,084 millibar (85 to 108 kPa). Conventional cup-and-vane anemometers are highly susceptible to damage by both high wind forces and debris, due to their moving parts and large profiles. In addition, they exhibit slow recovery times contributing to an inaccurately high average-speed reading. Ultrasonic and hot-wire anemometers overcome some of the disadvantages of the cup and-vane anemometers, but they have other disadvantageous features, including limited dynamic range and susceptibility to errors caused by external acoustic noise and rain. In contrast, the novel 3D Venturi sensor is less vulnerable to wind damage because of its smaller profile and ruggedness. Since the sensor has no moving parts, it provides increased reliability and lower maintenance costs. It has faster response and recovery times to changing wind conditions than traditional systems. In addition, it offers wide dynamic range and is expected to be relatively insensitive to rain and acoustic energy. The Venturi effect in this sensor is achieved by the mirrored double-inflection curve, which is then rotated 360 to create the desired detection surfaces. The curve is optimized to provide a good balance of pressure difference between sensor ports and overall maximum fluid velocity while in the shape. Four posts are used to separate the two shapes, and their size and location were chosen to minimize effects on the pressure measurements. The 3D Venturi sensor has smart software algorithms to map the wind pressure exerted on the surfaces of the design. Using Bernoulli's equation, the speed of the wind is calculated from the differences among the pressure readings at the various ports. The direction of the wind is calculated from the spatial distribution and magnitude of the pressure readings. All of the pressure port sizes and locations have been optimized to minimize measurement errors and to reside in areas demonstrating a stable pressure reading proportional to the velocity range.

  20. Short-Term Power Fluctuations of Large Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y.; Bucaneg, D.

    2002-01-01

    With electric utilities and other power providers showing increased interest in wind power and with growing penetration of wind capacity into the market, questions about how wind power fluctuations affect power system operations and about wind power's ancillary services requirements are receiving lots of attention. The project's purpose is to acquire actual, long-term wind power output data for analyzing wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of the changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services.

  1. Deceleration of the solar wind upstream from the earth's bow shock and the origin of diffuse upstream ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Paschmann, G.; Skopke, N.

    1980-01-01

    Observations with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut crossed-fan solar wind ion experiment on ISEE I reveal that the solar wind is decelerated and deflected away from the direction of the earth's bow shock as it enters that portion of the upstream region populated by diffuse bow shock ions and long-period (10-60 s) waves. Typically, the average directed velocity vector changes by 7-10 km/s as it enters the wave region. At times, average speed changes as large as 25-40 km/s are observed. Superposed upon these changes in average flow speed are large amplitude (+ or - 15) fluctuations in flow speed associated with the waves themselves. The observations suggest that the solar wind deceleration is the result of momentum transfer from reflected bow shock ions to the wind via the long-period waves as the reflected ion beams go unstable. The broad angular distributions of the diffuse ions thus appear to be produced as a consequence of the disruption of reflected ion beams.

  2. Numerical investigation of wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Suganthi

    A numerical method based on the solution of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations and actuator disk representation of turbine rotor is developed and implemented in the OpenFOAM software suite for aerodynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). The method and the implementation are validated against the 1-D momentum theory, the blade element momentum theory and against experimental data. The model is used for analyzing aerodynamics of a novel dual rotor wind turbine concept and wind farms. Horizontal axis wind turbines suffer from aerodynamic inefficiencies in the blade root region (near the hub) due to several non-aerodynamic constraints (e.g., manufacturing, transportation, cost, etc.). A new dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) concept is proposed that aims at mitigating these losses. A DRWT is designed using an existing turbine rotor for the main rotor (Risoe turbine and NREL 5 MW turbine), while the secondary rotor is designed using a high lift to drag ratio airfoil (the DU 96 airfoil from TU Delft). The numerical aerodynamic analysis method developed as a part of this thesis is used to optimize the design. The new DRWT design gives an improvement of about 7% in aerodynamic efficiency over the single rotor turbine. Wind turbines are typically deployed in clusters called wind farms. HAWTs also suffer from aerodynamic losses in a wind farm due to interactions with wind turbine wakes. An interesting mesoscale meteorological phenomenon called "surface flow convergence" believed to be caused by wind turbine arrays is investigated using the numerical method developed here. This phenomenon is believed to be caused by the pressure gradient set up by wind turbines operating in close proximity in a farm. A conceptual/hypothetical wind farm simulation validates the hypothesis that a pressure gradient is setup in wind farms due to turbines and that it can cause flow veering of the order of 10 degrees. Simulations of a real wind farm (Story County) are also conducted which give qualitatively correct flow direction change, however quantitative agreement with data is only moderately acceptable.

  3. Polarimetric Microwave Remote Sensing of Hurricane Ocean Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2006-01-01

    We presented the analysis of Windsat data for hurricanes Isabel and Fabian in 2003. The polarimetric third and fourth Stokes parameter observations from the Windsat 10, 18 and 37 GHz channels were collocated with the ocean surface winds from the Holland wind model, the QuikSCAT wind vectors and the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) operated by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The collocated data were binned as a function of wind speed and wind direction, and were expanded by sinusoidal series of the relative azimuth angles between wind and observation directions. The coefficients of the sinusoidal series, corrected for atmospheric attenuation, have been used to develop an empirical geophysical model function (GMF). The Windsat GMF for extreme high wind compares very well with the aircraft radiometer and radar measurements.

  4. Time-controlled descent guidance in uncertain winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menga, G.; Erzberger, H.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for constructing a statistical model of the altitude-dependent mean wind profile from the historical record of wind measurements at particular locations. The model is constructed by fitting a Markov process, with altitude as the stage variable, to the historical wind data. The wind model, together with the aircraft dynamics and the error characteristics of the navigation system, are incorporated in the design of a state estimator, which gives the minimum variance estimate of the aircraft state and the wind vector. The state and wind estimates are used as inputs to a linear feedback law for guiding the aircraft along the nominal trajectory. An example design of a time-constrained (4D RNAV) descent guidance system is presented, showing tracking accuracy, control activity, and probability of arrival time with and without the wind estimator.

  5. SSMI Wind Speed Climatology of the Time of Monsoon Wind Offset in the Western Arabian Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David

    2000-01-01

    Forecasting the time of onset of monsoon wind in the western Arabian Sea, which is believed to precede the onset of rainfall along the west coast of India, is an important unsolved problem. Prior to measurements of the surface wind field by satellite, there was an absence of suitable surface wind observations. NASA scatterometer (NSCAT) surface wind vectors revealed that the time of the 1997 onset of 12 m/s southwest monsoon wind speeds in the western Arabian Sea preceded the onset of monsoon rainfall in Goa, India, by 3 - 4 days. Wind speed and direction data were necessary to establish a dynamical mechanism between times of onset of 12 m/s wind speed off Somalia and rainfall in Goa. Except for NSCAT, no satellite scatterometer wind product recorded adequately sampled 2-day 1deg x 1deg averaged wind vectors, which are the required space and time scales, to examine the wind-rain relationship in other years. However, the greater-than-95% steadiness of summer monsoon winds allows an opportunity to use satellite measurements of surface wind speed. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) recorded surface wind speed with adequate sampling to produce a 1-day, 1deg x 1deg data product during 1988 - 1998. SSMI data had been uniformly processed throughout the period. Times of onset of 12 m/s wind speed off Somalia determined with the SSMI data set were 21 May 1988, 24 May 1989, 17 May 1990, 28 May 1991, 8 June 1992, 28 May 1993, 30 May 1994, 7 June 1995, 29 May 1996, 12 June 1997, and 15 May 1998. Uncertainty of the 1992 and 1996 times of onset were increased because of the absence of SSMI data on 6 and 7 June 1992 and on 30 May 1996. Correlations of timing of monsoon wind onset with El Nino will be described. Variability of the time difference between times of onset of 12 m/s wind speed and Goa rainfall will be discussed. At the time of submission of the abstract, the Goa rainfall data have not arrived from the India Meteorological Department.

  6. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  7. Measuring Winds With Pulsed C-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennon, Carl; Wesenberg, Richard; Britt, Thomas O.; Brooks, Michael; Edwards, Deloris; Franklin, Chris; Kiriazes, John; Kitayama, Brad; Medina, Jim

    1989-01-01

    Research has begun on use of pulsed C-band radar in multistatic configuration to measure winds in absence of clouds. Experimental system based on principle of multistatic radar. Multiple receivers track on same point in sky to measure winds from different angles, obtaining complete wind vector at that point. Includes one radar station that both transmits and receives and one or more other stations receiving only. Advantage of multistatic configuration greatly reduces effects of ground clutter on receive-only stations. Objective of effort to develop capability to use wind-measurement data to predict, as early and accurately as possible, formation of local thunderstorms-with lead times of several hours.

  8. Weak lensing induced by second-order vector mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2015-09-01

    The vector mode of cosmological perturbation theory imprints characteristic signals on the weak lensing signals such as curl and B modes which are never imprinted by the scalar mode. However, the vector mode is neglected in the standard first-order cosmological perturbation theory since it only has a decaying mode. This situation changes if the cosmological perturbation theory is expanded up to second order. The second-order vector and tensor modes are inevitably induced by the product of the first-order scalar modes. We study the effect of the second-order vector mode on the weak lensing curl and B modes. We find that the curl mode induced by the second-order vector mode is comparable to that induced by the primordial gravitational waves with the tensor-to-scalar ratio r =0.1 at ??200 . In this case, the curl mode induced by the second-order vector mode dominates at ?>200 . Furthermore, the B-mode cosmic shear induced by the second-order vector mode dominates on almost all scales. However, we find that the observational signatures of the second-order vector and tensor modes cannot exceed the expected noise of ongoing and upcoming weak lensing measurements. We conclude that the curl and B modes induced by the second-order vector and tensor modes are unlikely to be detected in future experiments.

  9. National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2013-08-01

    This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

  10. Simulation of wind performance in tropical cyclone for China's future dual-frequency wind field radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Fangli; Yin, Honggang; Gu, Songyan

    2014-11-01

    Ocean surface wind vectors (OVW) from scatterometers have been proved to be of great benefit to marine weather analysis and numerical model prediction. Conventional single-frequency scatterometers are capable to measure substantially accurate wind fields in clear atmospheric conditions, whereas winds obtained in marine extreme weather conditions are not so satisfying due to the high wind speed saturation effect and the rain perturbation. Therefore, a dualfrequency wind field measuring radar (WIFIR) to be onboard FengYun-3E is being predesigned to obtain relatively accurate wind fields in all weather conditions, which will compensate for the single-frequency shortcomings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential ability of WIFIR to measure OVW in tropical cyclones. A high-fidelity forward model was developed to simulate the sea surface normalize radar cross sections (NRCS) measured by WIFIR. The wind and rain rate fields used to drive the model are generated by UWNMS cloud model for Hurricane Ivan in 2004. High-wind GMFs and a theoretical rain model, which includes attenuation and volume scattering effect, have been utilized to describe the forward model. Based on the simulation results, the impact of rain on radar measurements and a dual-frequency retrieval algorithm were studied. The dual-frequency method was shown to have the ability to obtain information of rain rates up to 30mm/hr, and acquire more accurate wind vectors than single-frequency measurements. This method will be more effective to improve wind retrieval accuracy in tropical cyclones with the synchronous observation of microwave humidity sounder (MWHS) aboard FY-3 satellite.

  11. Flying with the wind: scale dependency of speed and direction measurements in modelling wind support in avian flight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safi, Kamran; Kranstauber, Bart; Weinzierl, Rolf; Griffin, Larry; Reese, Eileen C.; Cabot, David; Cruz, Sebastian; Proaño, Carolina; Takekawa, John Y.; Newman, Scott H.; Waldenström, Jonas; Bengtsson, Daniel; Kays, Roland; Wikelski, Martin; Bohrer, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding how environmental conditions, especially wind, influence birds' flight speeds is a prerequisite for understanding many important aspects of bird flight, including optimal migration strategies, navigation, and compensation for wind drift. Recent developments in tracking technology and the increased availability of data on large-scale weather patterns have made it possible to use path annotation to link the location of animals to environmental conditions such as wind speed and direction. However, there are various measures available for describing not only wind conditions but also the bird's flight direction and ground speed, and it is unclear which is best for determining the amount of wind support (the length of the wind vector in a bird’s flight direction) and the influence of cross-winds (the length of the wind vector perpendicular to a bird’s direction) throughout a bird's journey. Results: We compared relationships between cross-wind, wind support and bird movements, using path annotation derived from two different global weather reanalysis datasets and three different measures of direction and speed calculation for 288 individuals of nine bird species. Wind was a strong predictor of bird ground speed, explaining 10-66% of the variance, depending on species. Models using data from different weather sources gave qualitatively similar results; however, determining flight direction and speed from successive locations, even at short (15 min intervals), was inferior to using instantaneous GPS-based measures of speed and direction. Use of successive location data significantly underestimated the birds' ground and airspeed, and also resulted in mistaken associations between cross-winds, wind support, and their interactive effects, in relation to the birds' onward flight. Conclusions: Wind has strong effects on bird flight, and combining GPS technology with path annotation of weather variables allows us to quantify these effects for understanding flight behaviour. The potentially strong influence of scaling effects must be considered and implemented in developing sampling regimes and data analysis.

  12. 77 FR 29633 - Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC, Alta Wind XIII, LLC, Alta Wind XIV, LLC, Alta Wind XV, LLC, Alta Windpower... Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207, Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta...

  13. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  14. Improving Ku-band Scatterometer Ocean Surface Wind Direction Retrievals in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Zhang, J.; Black, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are regions of very strong rain and very high winds, both of which present major challenges to surface wind vector retrieval from Ku-band scatterometers. Wind speed and wind direction retrievals can incur severe errors in regions of high rain rates. One particular signature of rain contamination is wind directions in the across-swath direction, which often leads to displaced circulation centers. Recently, Stiles et al. (2014) developed a method for retrieving QuikSCAT tropical cyclone wind speeds using a neural network approach that was tuned using H*WIND surface wind analyses and passive microwave-estimated rain rates from satellites. We are developing a scene-wide methodology by which a set of dynamically-consistent wind directions can be estimated from these wind speeds. The method is based on an iterative use of a tropical cyclone-specific sea-level pressure retrieval technique that we developed. The sea-level pressure analysis uses a boundary layer model that includes the dynamical shallowing of the tropical cyclone boundary layer toward the storm center, a roll-off in surface drag at high wind speeds, and, storm motion-corrected nonlinear mean flow advection effects. Scene-wide consistency is enforced by the integral nature (with respect to the surface wind vector field) of the derived surface pressure pattern and a constraint that the geostrophic contribution to the total flow is non-divergent. We are currently developing methods to evaluate the retrieved wind directions based on HRD aircraft observations and a limited-domain wind vector partitioning of the retrieved wind vectors into irrotational, non-divergent, and, background flow deformation contributions.

  15. SMES for wind energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul Antony, Anish

    Renewable energy sources are ubiquitous, wind energy in particular is one of the fastest growing forms of renewable energy, yet the stochastic nature of wind creates fluctuations that threaten the stability of the electrical grid. In addition to stability with increased wind energy, the need for additional load following capability is a major concern hindering increased wind energy penetration. Improvements in power electronics are required to increase wind energy penetration, but these improvements are hindered by a number of limitations. Changes in physical weather conditions, insufficient capacity of the transmission line and inaccurate wind forecasting greatly stymie their effect and ultimately lead to equipment damage. With this background, the overall goal of this research effort is to pitch a case for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) by (1) optimally designing the SMES to be coupled with wind turbines thus reducing wind integration challenges and (2) to help influence decision makers in either increasing superconducting wire length/fill factor or improving superconducting splice technology thereby increasing the storage capacity of the SMES. Chapter 1 outlines the scope of this thesis by answering the following questions (1) why focus on wind energy? (2) What are the problems associated with increasing wind energy on the electric grid? (3) What are the current solutions related to wind integration challenges and (4) why SMES? Chapter 2, presents a detailed report on the study performed on categorizing the challenges associated with integrating wind energy into the electric grid. The conditions under which wind energy affected the electric grid are identified both in terms of voltage stability and excess wind generation. Chapter 3, details a comprehensive literature review on the different superconducting wires. A technology assessment of the five selected superconductors: [Niobium Titanium (NbTi), Niobium Tin (Nb3Sn), Bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (BSCCO), Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) and Magnesium diboride (MgB 2)] is carried out. The assessed attributes include superconducting transition temperature (Tc), critical current density (Jc ), the irreversibility field (H*) and the superconducting critical field (Hc). Chapter 4 presents the design of a solenoid shaped 1MJ MgB2 SMES. This SMES is used to mitigate the problem of momentary interruptions on a wind turbine. The total length of superconducting wire required for a 1MJ solenoid is calculated to be 21km. The maximum wire lengths currently available are 6km thus we hypothesize that either wire lengths have to be increased or work has to be done on MgB2 superconducting splice technology for multifilament wire. Another design consisting of 8 solenoids storing 120 kJ each is presented. The stress analysis on the proposed coil is performed using finite element analysis exhibiting the safety of the proposed design. Chapter 5 presents the design of a toroid shaped 20MJ MgB2 SMES. This is used to mitigate the problem of sustained interruptions on a wind turbine. The toroid coil is chosen since the magnetic field could be completely contained within the coil, thus reducing stray magnetic fields. A combination of genetic algorithm and nonlinear programming is used in determining the design. In Chapter 6, the different methods of operation of the SMES are examined. The Voltage Source Convertor (VSC) based SMES topology was chosen based on its ease of switching. The VSC switching strategy is based on a sinusoidal pulse width modulation technique. EMTDC/PSCAD software was used to demonstrate the efficacy of the VSC based SMES coupled to a wind turbine. The wind generator was modeled as an induction machine feeding into a load. The simulation results established that SMES connected to wind turbines improved output quality. Although the efficacy of SMES for wind energy has been stated previously in other work, this chapter specifically demonstrates through simulation results the utility of SMES in voltage sag mitigation for momentary interruptions

  16. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel Energy Services, Inc., Southwestern...LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, and High Plains Wind Power, LLC (Complainants) filed a formal...

  17. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  18. Work of the Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    18 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a few dark wind streaks in the lee -- the downwind side -- of shallow craters on a lava- and dust-covered plain in eastern Tharsis. Streaks in east Tharsis, such as these, are usually very superficial features that change on timescales as quickly as a few weeks to months as very thin coatings of dust are redistributed by the wind.

    Location near: 2.4oN, 95.6oW Image width: 1 km (0.6 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  19. Solar wind and magnetosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Allen, J. H.; Cauffman, D. P.; Feynman, J.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Holzer, R. E.; Kaye, S. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Manka, R. H.; Rostoker, G.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between the magnetosphere and the solar wind is addressed. It is noted that this interface determines how much of the solar plasma and field energy is transferred to the Earth's environment, and that this coupling not only varies in time, responding to major solar disturbances, but also to small changes in solar wind conditions and interplanetary field directions. It is recommended that the conditions of the solar wind and interplanetary medium be continuously monitored, as well as the state of the magnetosphere. Other recommendations include further study of the geomagnetic tail, tests of Pc 3,4 magnetic pulsations as diagnostics of the solar wind, and tests of kilometric radiation as a remote monitor of the auroral electrojet.

  20. Empirical wind retrieval model based on SAR spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilova, Maria; Karaev, Vladimir; Balandina, Galina; Kanevsky, Mikhail; Portabella, Marcos; Stoffelen, Ad

    The present paper considers polarimetric SAR wind vector applications. Remote-sensing measurements of the near-surface wind over the ocean are of great importance for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interaction. In recent years investigations for wind vector retrieval using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data have been performed. In contrast with scatterometers, a SAR has a finer spatial resolution that makes it a more suitable microwave instrument to explore wind conditions in the marginal ice zones, coastal regions and lakes. The wind speed retrieval procedure from scatterometer data matches the measured radar backscattering signal with the geophysical model function (GMF). The GMF determines the radar cross section dependence on the wind speed and direction with respect to the azimuthal angle of the radar beam. Scatterometers provide information on wind speed and direction simultaneously due to the fact that each wind vector cell (WVC) is observed at several azimuth angles. However, SAR is not designed to be used as a high resolution scatterometer. In this case, each WVC is observed at only one single azimuth angle. That is why for wind vector determination additional information such as wind streak orientation over the sea surface is required. It is shown that the wind vector can be obtained using polarimetric SAR without additional information. The main idea is to analyze the spectrum of a homogeneous SAR image area instead of the backscattering normalized radar cross section. Preliminary numerical simulations revealed that SAR image spectral maxima positions depend on the wind vector. Thus the following method for wind speed retrieval is proposed. In the first stage of the algorithm, the SAR spectrum maxima are determined. This procedure is carried out to estimate the wind speed and direction with ambiguities separated by 180 degrees due to the SAR spectrum symmetry. The second stage of the algorithm allows us to select the correct wind direction ambiguity from polarimetric SAR. A criterion based on the complex correlation coefficient between the VV and VH signals sign is applied to select the wind direction. An additional quality control on the wind speed value retrieved with the spectral method is applied. Here, we use the direction obtained with the spectral method and the backscattered signal for CMOD wind speed estimate. The algorithm described above may be refined by the use of numerous SAR data and wind measurements. In the present preliminary work the first results of SAR images combined with in situ data processing are presented. Our results are compared to the results obtained using previously developed models CMOD, C-2PO for VH polarization and statistical wind retrieval approaches [1]. Acknowledgments. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation of Basic Research (grants 13-05-00852-a). [1] M. Portabella, A. Stoffelen, J. A. Johannessen, Toward an optimal inversion method for synthetic aperture radar wind retrieval, Journal of geophysical research, V. 107, N C8, 2002

  1. Provisionally corrected surface wind data, worldwide ocean-atmosphere surface fields, and Sahelian rainfall variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.N. )

    1992-05-01

    Worldwide ship datasets of sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure (SLP), and surface vector wind are analyzed for a July-September composite of five Sahelian wet years (1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1958) minus five Sahelian dry years (1972, 1973, 1982, 1983, 1984) (W - D). The results are compared with fields for a number of individual years and for 1988 minus 1987 (88 - 87); Sahelian rainfall in 1988 was near the 1951-80 normal, whereas 1987 was very dry. An extensive study of the geostrophic consistency of trends in pressure gradients and observed wind was undertaken. The results suggest, during the period 1949-88, a mean increase in reported wind speed of about 16% that cannot be explained by trends in geostrophic winds derived from seasonal mean SLP. Estimates of the wind bias are averaged for 18 ocean regions. A map of correlations between Sahelian rainfall and SLP in all available ocean regions is shown to be field significant. Remote atmospheric associations with Sahelian rainfall are consistent with recent suggestions that SST forcing from the tropical Atlantic and the other ocean basins may contribute to variability in seasonal Sahelian rainfall. It is suggested that wetter years in the Sahel are often accompanied by a stronger surface monsoonal flow over the western Indian Ocean and low SLP in the tropical western Pacific near New Guinea, and that there is increased cyclonicity over the extratropical eastern North Atlantic and northwest Europe. In the tropical Atlantic, W - D shows many of the features identified by previous authors. However, the 88-87 fields do not reflect these large-scale tropical Atlantic changes. Instead there is only local strengthening of the pressure gradient and wind flow from Brazil to Senegal. Further individual years are presented (1958, 1972, 1975) to provide specific examples.

  2. Are local wind power resources well estimated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib; Jørgensen, Hans E.; Mann, Jakob

    2013-03-01

    Planning and financing of wind power installations require very importantly accurate resource estimation in addition to a number of other considerations relating to environment and economy. Furthermore, individual wind energy installations cannot in general be seen in isolation. It is well known that the spacing of turbines in wind farms is critical for maximum power production. It is also well established that the collective effect of wind turbines in large wind farms or of several wind farms can limit the wind power extraction downwind. This has been documented by many years of production statistics. For the very large, regional sized wind farms, a number of numerical studies have pointed to additional adverse changes to the regional wind climate, most recently by the detailed studies of Adams and Keith [1]. They show that the geophysical limit to wind power production is likely to be lower than previously estimated. Although this problem is of far future concern, it has to be considered seriously. In their paper they estimate that a wind farm larger than 100 km2 is limited to about 1 W m-2. However, a 20 km2 off shore farm, Horns Rev 1, has in the last five years produced 3.98 W m-2 [5]. In that light it is highly unlikely that the effects pointed out by [1] will pose any immediate threat to wind energy in coming decades. Today a number of well-established mesoscale and microscale models exist for estimating wind resources and design parameters and in many cases they work well. This is especially true if good local data are available for calibrating the models or for their validation. The wind energy industry is still troubled by many projects showing considerable negative discrepancies between calculated and actually experienced production numbers and operating conditions. Therefore it has been decided on a European Union level to launch a project, 'The New European Wind Atlas', aiming at reducing overall uncertainties in determining wind conditions. The project is structured around three areas of work, to be implemented in parallel. Creation and publication of a European wind atlas in electronic form [2], which will include the underlying data and a new EU wind climate database which will as a minimum include: wind resources and their associated uncertainty; extreme wind and uncertainty; turbulence characteristics; adverse weather conditions such as heavy icing, electrical storms and so on together with the probability of occurrence; the level of predictability for short-term forecasting and assessment of uncertainties; guidelines and best practices for the use of data especially for micro-siting. Development of dynamical downscaling methodologies and open-source models validated through measurement campaigns, to enable the provision of accurate wind resource and external wind load climatology and short-term prediction at high spatial resolution and covering Europe. The developed downscaling methodologies and models will be fully documented and made publicly available and will be used to produce overview maps of wind resources and other relevant data at several heights and at high horizontal resolution. Measurement campaigns to validate the model chain used in the wind atlas. At least five coordinated measurement campaigns will be undertaken and will cover complex terrains (mountains and forests), offshore, large changes in surface characteristics (roughness change) and cold climates. One of the great challenges to the project is the application of mesoscale models for wind resource calculation, which is by no means a simple matter [3]. The project will use global reanalysis data as boundary conditions. These datasets, which are time series of the large-scale meteorological situation covering decades, have been created by assimilation of measurement data from around the globe in a dynamical consistent fashion using large-scale numerical models. For wind energy, the application of the reanalysis datasets is as a long record of the large-scale wind conditions. The large-scale reanalyses are performed in only a few glo

  3. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Vectored Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Results show how the shock generated at the nozzle lip affects the near field pressure signature, and thereby the potential sonic boom contribution for a nozzle at vector angles from 3 to 8 . The experiment was based on the NASA F-15 nozzle used in the Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock experiment, which possessed a large external boat-tail angle. In this case, the large boat-tail angle caused a dramatic expansion, which dominated the near field pressure signature. The impact of nozzle vector angle and nozzle pressure ratio are summarized.

  4. Cerberus Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 May 2002) The Science Cerberus is a dark region on Mars that has shrunk down from a continuous length of about 1000 km to roughly three discontinuous spots a few 100 kms in length in less than 20 years. There are two competing processes at work in the Cerberus region that produce the bright and dark features seen in this THEMIS image. Bright dust settles out of the atmosphere, especially after global dust storms, depositing a layer just thick enough to brighten the dark surfaces. Deposition occurs preferentially in the low wind 'shadow zones' within craters and downwind of crater rims, producing the bright streaks. The direction of the streaks clearly indicates that the dominant winds come from the northeast. Dust deposition would completely blot out the dark areas if it were not for the action of wind-blown sand grains scouring the surface and lifting the dust back into the atmosphere. Again, the shadow zones are protected from the blowing sand, preserving the bright layer of dust. Also visible in this image are lava flow features extending from the flanks of the huge Elysium volcanoes to the northwest. Two shallow channels and a raised flow lobe are just barely discernable. The lava channel in the middle of the image crosses the boundary of the bright and dark surfaces without any obvious change in its morphology. This demonstrates that the bright dust layer is very thin in this location, perhaps as little as a few millimeters. The Story Mars is an ever-changing land of spectacular contrasts. This THEMIS image shows the Cerberus region of Mars, a dark area located near the Elysium volcanoes and fittingly named after the three-headed, dragon-tailed dog who guards the door of the underworld. Two opposing processes are at work here: a thin layer of dust falling from the atmosphere and/or dust storms creating brighter surface areas (e.g. the top left portion of this image) and dust being scoured away by the action of the Martian wind disturbing the sand grains and freeing the lighter dust to fly away once more (the darker portions of this image). There are, however, some darker areas that are somewhat shielded and protected from the wind that have yielded bright, dusty crater floors and wind streaks that trail out behind the craters. These wind streaks tell a story all their own as to the prevailing wind direction coming from the northeast. This, added to the fact that this dark region was once 1000 km in length and has dwindled to just a few isolated dark splotches of 100 kilometers in the past 20 years, help us to see that the Martian environment is still quite dynamic and capable of changing. Finally, this being a volcanic region, a lobe of a lava flow from the immense Elysium volcanoes to the northwest is visible stretching across the bottom one-quarter of the image.

  5. Eliminating malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vectors which predominantly feed indoors upon humans have been locally eliminated from several settings with insecticide treated nets (ITNs), indoor residual spraying or larval source management. Recent dramatic declines of An. gambiae in east Africa with imperfect ITN coverage suggest mosquito populations can rapidly collapse when forced below realistically achievable, non-zero thresholds of density and supporting resource availability. Here we explain why insecticide-based mosquito elimination strategies are feasible, desirable and can be extended to a wider variety of species by expanding the vector control arsenal to cover a broader spectrum of the resources they need to survive. The greatest advantage of eliminating mosquitoes, rather than merely controlling them, is that this precludes local selection for behavioural or physiological resistance traits. The greatest challenges are therefore to achieve high biological coverage of targeted resources rapidly enough to prevent local emergence of resistance and to then continually exclude, monitor for and respond to re-invasion from external populations. PMID:23758937

  6. Careers in Wind Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liming, Drew; Hamilton, James

    2011-01-01

    As a common form of renewable energy, wind power is generating more than just electricity. It is increasingly generating jobs for workers in many different occupations. Many workers are employed on wind farms: areas where groups of wind turbines produce electricity from wind power. Wind farms are frequently located in the midwestern, western, and…

  7. Prospecting for Wind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swapp, Andy; Schreuders, Paul; Reeve, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Many people use wind to help meet their needs. Over the years, people have been able to harness or capture the wind in many different ways. More recently, people have seen the rebirth of electricity-generating wind turbines. Thus, the age-old argument about technology being either good or bad can also be applied to the wind. The wind can be a…

  8. Investigation of advanced thrust vectoring exhaust systems for high speed propulsive lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, R. A.; Petit, J. E.; Capone, F. J.; Whittaker, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a wind tunnel investigation conducted at the NASA-Langley research center to determine thrust vectoring/induced lift characteristics of advanced exhaust nozzle concepts installed on a supersonic tactical airplane model. Specific test objectives include: (1) basic aerodynamics of a wing body configuration, (2) investigation of induced lift effects, (3) evaluation of static and forward speed performance, and (4) the effectiveness of a canard surface to trim thrust vectoring/induced lift forces and moments.

  9. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  10. 75 FR 23263 - Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC; Alta Wind VI, LLC; Alta Wind VII, LLC; Alta Wind VIII, LLC; Alta Windpower... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 285.207 (2009), Alta Wind I, LLC, Alta Wind...

  11. The vertical structure of airflow turbulence characteristics within a boundary layer during wind blown sand transport over a beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Z. S.; Baas, A. C.; Jackson, D.; Cooper, J. A.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested the significant role of boundary layer turbulence and coherent flow structures on sand transport by wind over beaches and desert dunes. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated a move beyond the basic monitoring of shear velocities and bulk sediment transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a small-scale point-location field study of boundary layer turbulence and shear stresses conducted under obliquely onshore winds over a beach at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. High-frequency (25 Hz) 3D wind vector measurements were collected at five different heights between 0.13 and 1.67 metres above the bed using sonic anemometry for durations of several hours, and the associated sand transport response was measured using an array of Safires. The wind data are used to investigate the vertical structure of Reynolds shear stresses and burst-sweep event characteristics, as well as a comparison with the standard logarithmic (law-of-the-wall) wind profile. The study explores the identification and selection of a characteristic event duration based on integral time-scales as well as spectral analysis, and includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u’, v’, w’). Results show how the contributions to shear stress and the average pitch of bursts and sweeps changes as a function of height above the bed, indicating the transformation of top-down turbulent eddies as they travel toward the surface. A comparison between the turbulence data and the synchronous sand transport events, meanwhile, reveals the potential effects of enhanced saltation layer roughness feedback on eddies close to the bed.

  12. The self-accelerating universe with vectors in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2011-12-01

    We explore the possibility of realising self-accelerated expansion of the Universe taking into account the vector components of a massive graviton. The effective action in the decoupling limit contains an infinite number of terms, once the vector degrees of freedom are included. These can be re-summed in physically interesting situations, which result in non-polynomial couplings between the scalar and vector modes. We show there are self-accelerating background solutions for this effective action, with the possibility of having a non-trivial profile for the vector fields. We then study fluctuations around these solutions and show that there is always a ghost, if a background vector field is present. When the background vector field is switched off, the ghost can be avoided, at the price of entering into a strong coupling regime, in which the vector fluctuations have vanishing kinetic terms. Finally we show that the inclusion of a bare cosmological constant does not change the previous conclusions and it does not lead to a ghost mode in the absence of a background vector field.

  13. Scan patterns and accuracy of a Radar Wind Sensor (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Shuxian; Beh, Beng; Moore, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    The Radar Wind Sensor (RAWS) was proposed as a complement to laser wind sensors, allowing coverage in cloudy regions excluded from laser coverage. Previous University of Kansas studies showed the feasibility of the wind measurement at various levels in the atmosphere and indicated that RAWS can also measure rain rates and ocean-surface winds. Here we discuss measurement of the wind vector in terms of the scan patterns for a conically scanned antenna. By using many measurements from cells about 66 km square and 132 km square, a least-squares algorithm gives results that are reasonable for insertion into global atmospheric models. For RAWS to be used successfully as a complement to a laser wind sensor, the design of the two sensors should be integrated and radial velocity measurements in a given atmospheric cell should be combined to get the most accurate results.

  14. Horizontal Wind Measurements using the HARLIE Holographic Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas; Andrus, Ionio; Sanders, Jason; Schwemmer, Geary; Miller, David; Guerra, David; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of three campaigns in which the horizontal wind vector at cloud altitudes was measured using the holographic, conical-scan lidar HARLIE in its nadir-viewing mode. Measurements were made during the HOLO-1 and -2 tests in Utah and New Hampshire in March and June 1999, respectively, and at the DoE-ARM site in Oklahoma in September/October 2000. A novel algorithm facilitates the wind vector analysis of the HARLIE data. Observed wind velocity and direction were compared with radiosonde records and with other data obtained from video cloud imagery and independent lidar ranging. The results demonstrate good agreement between HARLIE data and the results of other methods. The conically scanning holographic lidar opens up new possibilities for obtaining the vertical profile of horizontal winds.

  15. Horizontal wind measurements using the HARLIE holographic lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Andrus, Ionio Q.; Sanders, Jason A.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Guerra, David V.

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of three campaigns in which the horizontal wind vector at cloud altitudes was measured using the holographic, conical-scan lidar HARLIE in its zenith-viewing mode. Measurements were made during the HOLO-1 and HOLO-2 tests in Utah and New Hampshire in March and June 1999, respectively, and at the DoE-ARM site in Oklahoma in September/October 2000. A novel algorithm facilitates the wind vector analysis of the HARLIE data. Observed wind velocity and direction were compared with radiosonde records and with other data obtained from video cloud imagery and independent lidar ranging. The results demonstrate good agreement between HARLIE data and the results of other methods. The conically scanning holographic lidar opens up new possibilities for obtaining the vertical profile of horizontal winds.

  16. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. 2013; 00:112

    E-print Network

    dynamics and convex constraints. Thus, the problem can be globally solved, using robust, fast solvers. The simulation results using real wind data demonstrate the ability to reject the disturbances from fast changes plants (WPP) are interfaced with power electronic converters that are required and designed to fulfill

  17. Social Media: Wind #WindSafety #WinterSafety

    E-print Network

    : http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/wind/during.shtml Facebook Driving in fog can be dangerous. Be on the lookout for sudden changes in visibility. The patchy nature of fog can lower visibility quickly. #12;Twitter The patchy nature of #fog can lower visibility quickly--slow down and stay alert

  18. Weather, host and vector — their interplay in the spread of insect-borne animal virus diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The spread of insect-borne animal virus diseases is influenced by a number of factors. Hosts migrate, move or are conveyed over long distances: vectors are carried on the wind for varying distances in search of hosts and breeding sites; weather and climate affect hosts and vectors through temperature, moisture and wind. As parasites of host and vector, viruses are carried by animals, birds and insects, and their spread can be correlated with the migration of hosts and the carriage of vectors on winds associated with the movements of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and warm winds to the north and south of the limits of the ITCZ. The virus is often transmitted from a local cycle to a migratory cycle and back again. Examples of insect-borne virus diseases and their spread are analysed. Japanese, Murray Valley, Western equine, Eastern equine and St Louis encephalitis represent viruses transmitted by mosquito—bird or pig cycles. The areas experiencing infection with these viruses can be divided into a number of zones: A, B, C, D, E and F. In zone A there is a continuous cycle of virus in host and vector throughout the year; in zone B, there is an upsurge in the cycle during the wet season, but the cycle continues during the dry season; there is movement of infected vectors between and within zones A and B on the ITCZ and the virus is introduced to zone C by infected vectors on warm winds; persistence may occur in zone C if conditions are right. In zone D, virus is introduced each year by infected vectors on warm winds and the arrival of the virus coincides with the presence of susceptible nestling birds and susceptible piglets. The disappearance of virus occurs at the time when migrating mosquitoes and birds are returning to warmer climates. The virus is introduced to zone E only on occasions every 5-10 years when conditions are suitable. Infected hosts introduced to zone F do not lead to circulation of virus, since the climate is unsuitable for vectors. Zones A, B and C correspond to endemic and zones D and E to epidemic conditions. Similar zones can be recognized for African horse sickness, bluetongue, Ibaraki disease and bovine ephemeral fever — examples of diseases transmitted in a midge-mammal cycle. In zones A and B viruses are transported by infected midges carried on the wind in association with the movement of ITCZ and undergo cycles in young animals. In these zones and in zone C there is a continual movement of midges on the warm wind between one area and another, colonizing new sites or reinforcing populations of midges already present. Virus is introduced at times into fringe areas (zones D and E) and, as there is little resistance in the host, gives rise to clinical signs of disease. In some areas there is persistence during adverse conditions; in others, the virus is carried back to the endemic zones by infected midges or vectors. Examples of viruses maintained in a mosquito/biting fly—mammal cycle are Venezuelan equine encephalitis and vesicular stomatitis. These viruses enter a migratory cycle from a local cycle and the vectors in the migratory cycle are carried over long distances on the wind. Further examples of virus spread by movement of vectors include West Nile, Rift Valley fever, yellow fever, epizootic haemorrhagic disease of deer and Akabane viruses. In devising means of control it is essential to decide the relationship of host, vector and virus and the nature of the zone in which the area to be controlled lies. Because of the continual risk of reintroduction of infected vectors, it is preferable to protect the host by dipping, spraying or by vaccination rather than attempting to eliminate the local population of insects. PMID:6131919

  19. Charge density of positively charged vector boson may be negative.

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Kuchiev, M. Yu; Physics; Univ. of New South Wales

    2007-05-04

    The charge density of vector particles, for example W{sup {+-}}, may change sign. The effect manifests itself even for a free propagation, when the energy of the W-boson satisfies {var_epsilon} > {radical}2m and the standing wave is considered. The charge density of W also changes sign in a vicinity of a Coulomb center. For an arbitrary vector boson (e.g., for spin 1 mesons), this effect depends on the g-factor. An origin of this surprising effect is traced to the electric quadrupole moment and spin-orbit interaction of vector particles; their contributions to the current have a polarization nature. The corresponding charge density equals {rho}{sub Pol} = {del} {center_dot} P, where P is an effective polarization vector that depends on the quadrupole moment and spin-orbit interaction. This density oscillates in space, producing zero contribution to the total charge.

  20. WIND VARIABILITY IN BZ CAMELOPARDALIS

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W. E-mail: skafka@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-02-01

    Sequences of spectra of the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) BZ Cam were acquired on nine nights in 2005-2006 in order to study the time development of episodes of wind activity known to occur frequently in this star. We confirm the results of Ringwald and Naylor that the P-Cygni absorption components of the lines mostly evolve from higher expansion velocity to lower velocity as an episode progresses. We also commonly find blueshifted emission components in the H{alpha} line profile, whose velocities and durations strongly suggest that they are also due to the wind. Curiously, Ringwald and Naylor reported common occurrences of redshifted H{alpha} emission components in their BZ Cam spectra. We have attributed these emission components in H{alpha} to occasions when gas concentrations in the bipolar wind (both front side and back side) become manifested as emission lines as they move beyond the disk's outer edge. We also suggest, based on changes in the P-Cygni profiles during an episode, that the progression from larger to smaller expansion velocities is due to the higher velocity portions of a wind concentration moving beyond the edge of the continuum light of the disk first, leaving a net redward shift of the remaining absorption profile. We derive a new orbital ephemeris for BZ Cam, using the radial velocity of the core of the He I {lambda}5876 line, finding P = 0.15353(4). Using this period, the wind episodes in BZ Cam are found to be concentrated near the inferior conjunction of the emission line source. This result helps confirm that the winds in nova-like CVs are often phase dependent, in spite of the puzzling implication that such winds lack axisymmetry. We argue that the radiation-driven wind in BZ Cam receives an initial boost by acting on gas that has been lifted above the disk by the interaction of the accretion stream with the disk, thereby imposing flickering timescales onto the wind events, as well as leading to an orbital modulation of the wind due to the non-axisymmetric nature of the stream/disk interaction. Simultaneous photometry and spectroscopy were acquired on three nights in order to test the possible connection between flickering continuum light and the strength of the front-side wind. We found strong agreement on one night, some agreement on another, and no agreement on the third. We suggest that some flickering events lead to only back-side winds which will not have associated P-Cygni profiles.

  1. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier

    2014-06-01

    Here we use accurate observations of the wind speed vector to analyze the behavior with height of the wind direction. The observations are a combination of tall meteorological mast and long-range wind lidar measurements covering the entire atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were performed at the Høvsøre site in Denmark, which is a flat farmland area with a nearly homogeneous easterly upstream sector. Therefore, within that sector, the turning of the wind is caused by a combination of atmospheric stability, Coriolis, roughness, horizontal pressure gradient and baroclinity effects. Atmospheric stability was measured using sonic anemometers placed at different heights on the mast. Horizontal pressure gradients and baroclinity are derived from outputs of a numerical weather prediction model and are used to estimate the geostrophic wind. It is found, for these specific and relatively short periods of analysis, that under both barotropic and baroclinic conditions, the model predicts the gradient and geostrophic wind well, explaining for a particular case an 'unusual' backing of the wind. The observed conditions at the surface, on the other hand, explain the differences in wind veering. The simulated winds underpredict the turning of the wind and the boundary-layer winds in general.

  2. Learning to forecast wind at remote sites for wind energy applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Notis, C.; Trettel, D.W.; Aquino, J.T.; Piazza, T.R.; Taylor, L.E.; Trask, D.C.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Observed wind patterns are correlated with synoptic or mescoscale weather systems. Six sites selected for analysis include Montauk Point, New York; Boone, North Carolina; Ludington, Michigan; Clayton, New Mexico; Amarillo, Texas; and San Gorgonio Pass, California. Objectives of the analysis are: to identify synoptic and/or mesoscale weather patterns that are associated with recognizable wind events at the sites; to define a set of criteria that uniquely describes such weather patterns; to estimate the reliability (accuracy) of forecasting rules derived from the association of weather patterns and site winds; and to attempt to separate any mesoscale effects of local topography from the synoptic-scale effects. One-to-one mapping of wind regimes onto synoptic types was not found. It was concluded that four factors should be examined when stratifying wind regimes: synoptic situation, descriptive climatology, pressure gradient vector, and winds aloft. The wind forecasting approach developed was intended for forecasting hourly average winds out to the 24 hour or possibly 36 hour time horizon. (LEW)

  3. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  4. Wind for Schools (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.

    2007-06-01

    Schools are key to achieving the goal of producing 20% of the nation's electricity demand. Most significantly, schools are training the scientists, technicians, businesspeople, decisionmakers, and teachers of the future. What students learn and believe about wind energy will impact the United States' ability to create markets and policy, develop and improve technology, finance and implement projects, and create change in all of our public and private institutions. In the nearer term, school districts have large facility costs, electrical loads, and utility costs. They are always in search of ways to reduce costs or obtain revenue to improve educational programs. Schools value teaching about the science and technology of renewable energy. They are important opinion leaders, particularly in rural communities. And their financial structures are quite different from other institutions (funding, incentives, restrictions, etc.). Learning objectives: The presentation will use case studies, project experience, and discussion with the audience to convey the current status of wind energy applications and education in U.S. schools and understanding of the elements that create a successful school wind energy project. The presentation will provide attendees with a background in the current level of knowledge and generate discussion on several themes.

  5. An adaptive vector quantization scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.

    1990-01-01

    Vector quantization is known to be an effective compression scheme to achieve a low bit rate so as to minimize communication channel bandwidth and also to reduce digital memory storage while maintaining the necessary fidelity of the data. However, the large number of computations required in vector quantizers has been a handicap in using vector quantization for low-rate source coding. An adaptive vector quantization algorithm is introduced that is inherently suitable for simple hardware implementation because it has a simple architecture. It allows fast encoding and decoding because it requires only addition and subtraction operations.

  6. VLSI Processor For Vector Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Pixel intensities in each kernel compared simultaneously with all code vectors. Prototype high-performance, low-power, very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit designed to perform compression of image data by vector-quantization method. Contains relatively simple analog computational cells operating on direct or buffered outputs of photodetectors grouped into blocks in imaging array, yielding vector-quantization code word for each such block in sequence. Scheme exploits parallel-processing nature of vector-quantization architecture, with consequent increase in speed.

  7. Localization and vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the following localization property for vector spherical harmonics: a wide class of non-local, vector-valued operators reduce to local, multiplication-type operations when applied to a vector spherical harmonic. As localization occurs in a very precise, quantifiable and explicitly computable fashion, the localization property provides a set of useful formulae for analyzing vector-valued fractional diffusion and non-local differential equations defined on S d - 1. As such analyses require a detailed understanding of operators for which localization occurs, we provide several applications of the result in the context of non-local differential equations.

  8. NOSS-SCAT wind direction alias removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugan, K. S.; Narayanan, V.; Stiles, J.

    1982-01-01

    The use of automated algorithms for removing aliases in NOSS-SCAT data is reported. The algorithms used for alias removal consist of histogram analysis, local averaging and curve fitting. The histogram analysis is used to determine the degree of homogeneity of the wind field defined by the largest probability alias vector at each grid point. The alias directions are compared with the preferred direction at each grid location and one of the multiple aliases is chosen as the true direction.

  9. Wind energy program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-02-01

    This overview emphasizes the amount of electric power that could be provided by wind power rather than traditional fossil fuels. New wind power markets, advances in technology, technology transfer, and wind resources are some topics covered in this publication.

  10. Text-independent Speaker Verification using a Hybrid I-Vector/DNN Approach

    E-print Network

    -Fan Chang1 Yu Tsao1 Shao-Hua Cheng2 Kai-Hsuan Chan2 Chia-Wei Liao2 Wen-Tsung Chang2 1 2 {she2113, yu-Welch Statistics I-VectorI-Vector SVM [6] (Deep Neural NetworkDNN) [7-10] I-Vector 177 12 6 Voice, "Exploring strategies for training deep neural networks," Machine Learning, vol. 10, pp. 1-40, 2009. [8] G

  11. LAWS simulation: Sampling strategies and wind computation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, G. D. A.; Wood, S. A.; Houston, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    In general, work has continued on developing and evaluating algorithms designed to manage the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) lidar pulses and to compute the horizontal wind vectors from the line-of-sight (LOS) measurements. These efforts fall into three categories: Improvements to the shot management and multi-pair algorithms (SMA/MPA); observing system simulation experiments; and ground-based simulations of LAWS.

  12. Effects of Fine-Scale Wind Direction Information on Retrieval of Surface Layer Wind Speed From SAR Ocean Surface Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyant, M. C.; Foster, R. C.; Stern, H.; Vachon, P. W.; Mourad, P. D.

    2002-12-01

    Wind speed retrievals from C-band SAR sea surface imagery using algorithms such as CMOD4 or CMOD_IFR2 depend significantly on the assumed local surface wind direction. To evaluate this dependence, we present retrievals of surface wind speed from RADARSAT SAR images acquired during the Shoaling Waves Experiment (SHOWEX) off the coast of North Carolina in November and December 1999, and retrievals from ScanSAR scenes acquired over the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Project (TAO) 95 W buoys during April and May 2000. These cases include moderate and low wind regimes and stable and unstable boundary layer stratification. A few images contain the signature of boundary layer roll vortices. SAR backscatter images can provide wind speed retrievals of ~300m resolution or better, as compared with a typical 25-km scatterometer footprint. SAR wind retrievals typically rely on wind-direction input from relatively coarse numerical models or from a buoy point source. When present, the signature of roll vortices in an image is often used to assign wind direction. Even so, the SAR wind speed images often show wind variability over regions much smaller than typical scatterometer footprints. The question remains: How much of this apparent variability is due to spatial changes in wind direction rather than wind speed? For the SHOWEX cases we coordinated 50km LongEZ flight legs at ~20m above the sea surface with the SAR overpasses. These surface layer flights provide km-scale wind-direction input for the CMOD4 algorithm. The fine-scale wind-speed and flux measurements also provide 10m wind-speed estimates to compare with the retrieved wind speeds. We present our evaluation of SAR wind retrievals obtained from applying the various wind-direction inputs. We also show the sensitivity of winds retrieved over the TAO array when nearly coincident QuikSCAT scatterometer wind directions are applied instead of point-source winds from TAO buoys.

  13. Scientific Impacts of Wind Direction Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Kim, Seung-Bum; Lee, Tong; Song, Y. Tony; Tang, Wen-Qing; Atlas, Robert

    2004-01-01

    An assessment on the scientific impact of random errors in wind direction (less than 45 deg) retrieved from space-based observations under weak wind (less than 7 m/s ) conditions was made. averages, and these weak winds cover most of the tropical, sub-tropical, and coastal oceans. Introduction of these errors in the semi-daily winds causes, on average, 5% changes of the yearly mean Ekman and Sverdrup volume transports computed directly from the winds, respectively. These poleward movements of water are the main mechanisms to redistribute heat from the warmer tropical region to the colder high- latitude regions, and they are the major manifestations of the ocean's function in modifying Earth's climate. Simulation by an ocean general circulation model shows that the wind errors introduce a 5% error in the meridional heat transport at tropical latitudes. The simulation also shows that the erroneous winds cause a pile-up of warm surface water in the eastern tropical Pacific, similar to the conditions during El Nino episode. Similar wind directional errors cause significant change in sea-surface temperature and sea-level patterns in coastal oceans in a coastal model simulation. Previous studies have shown that assimilation of scatterometer winds improves 3-5 day weather forecasts in the Southern Hemisphere. When directional information below 7 m/s was withheld, approximately 40% of the improvement was lost

  14. Synergistic measurements of ocean winds and waves from SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; He, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    In this study we present a synergistic method to retrieve both ocean surface wave and wind fields from spaceborne quad-polarization (QP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode data. This algorithm integrates QP-SAR wind vector retrieval model and the wave retrieval model, with consideration to the nonlinear mapping relationship between ocean wave spectra and SAR image spectra, in order to synergistically retrieve wind fields and wave directional spectra. The method does not require a priori information on the sea state. It combines the observed VV-polarized SAR image spectra with the retrieved wind vectors from the VH-polarized SAR image, to estimate the wind-generated wave directional spectra. The differences between the observed SAR spectra and optimal SAR image spectra associated with the wind waves are interpreted as the contributions from the swell waves. The retrieved ocean wave spectra are used to estimate the integrated spectral wave parameters such as significant wave heights, wavelengths, wave directions and wave periods. The wind and wave parameters retrieved by QP-SAR are validated against those measured by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) directional wave buoys under different sea states. The validation results show that the QP-SAR SAR has potential to simultaneously measure the ocean surface waves and wind fields from space.

  15. Cliffordtori and unbiased vectors

    E-print Network

    Ole Andersson; Ingemar Bengtsson

    2015-06-30

    The existence problem for mutually unbiased bases is an unsolved problem in quantum information theory. A related question is whether every pair of bases admits vectors that are unbiased to both. Mathematically this translates to the question whether two Lagrangian Clifford tori intersect, and a body of results exists concerning it. These (deep!) results are however rather weak when viewed from the point of view of the first problem. We make a detailed study of how the intersections behave in the simplest non-trivial case, that of complex projective 2-space (the qutrit), for which the set of Clifford tori can be usefully parametrized by the unistochastic subset of Birkhoff's polytope. An interesting picture emerges. A foray into higher dimensions is included.

  16. Chameleon Vector Bosons

    E-print Network

    A. E. Nelson; J. Walsh

    2008-02-06

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This "chameleon" effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 microns, there remains an experimental window for a long range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  17. Chameleon vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ann E.

    2008-05-01

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This chameleon effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 {mu}m, there remains an experimental window for a long-range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  18. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  19. Wind Power in Australia: Overcoming Technological and Institutional Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, Gerard; Bunting, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, Australia had little installed wind capacity, although there had been many investigations into its potential during the preceding decades. Formerly, state-owned monopoly utilities showed only token interest in wind power and could dictate the terms of energy debates. This situation changed in the late 1990s: Installed wind capacity…

  20. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  1. Execution of vector operations for Intel 860

    SciTech Connect

    Khaletskii, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    When designing a portable setup compiler from the C[] language, the compiler setup problem is solved for various SIMD computers. A vector and vector operations are defined in C[]. A map of vector operations is trivial for computers with vector registers. Some problems appear when mapping them to computers without vector registers. It is shown how to effectively perform vector operations for the 1860 microcomputer as an example of one without vector registers.

  2. Amplification of bedrock canyon incision by wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, J. P.; Finnegan, N. J.; de Silva, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Bedrock canyons etch much of the surface of Earth and Mars, and commonly inform interpretations of long-term hydrologic or tectonic changes within these landscapes. However, many bedrock canyons (particularly on Mars) exist in arid environments where wind abrasion can dramatically alter surface morphology. Although it is hypothesized that wind carves or modifies bedrock canyons on Mars, the interplay of wind and fluvial processes in shaping canyon landscapes is, to our knowledge, unexplored. Consequently, here we exploit a natural experiment along the 4.09 Ma Puripicar ignimbrite, situated on the western slope of the Andes in the Atacama Desert and subject to significant erosion from both wind and rivers. The Puripicar exhibits a series of bedrock gorges nested behind a broad north-south escarpment whose southern half is protected from wind by a large topographic barrier. This shielding provides a natural control to examine the effects of wind abrasion on canyon morphology and in particular knickpoint retreat. Our results show that for a given drainage area, knickpoints in wind-affected canyons have incised an order of magnitude farther upstream than wind-protected canyons. In addition, wind-affected canyons are wider and have more streamlined aspect ratios for a given drainage area than wind-protected canyons. Aeolian abrasion appears to result in knickpoints with average slopes half those of shielded canyons (0.2 and 0.4, respectively). Lastly, although the magnitude of knickpoint retreat is larger in wind-affected canyons, the scaling exponent between knickpoint retreat and drainage area is virtually identical for wind-affected canyons (0.56, R = 0.71) and wind-protected canyons (0.60, R = 0.80). Taken together, our results suggest that fluvial incision and wind abrasion are coupled processes in this landscape: convergent canyons funnel wind towards knickpoints, thereby leading to enhanced aeolian abrasion rates at knickpoints. We speculate that the apparent drainage area dependence of knickpoint retreat in wind-affected canyons reflects the fact that larger rivers create wider canyon mouths. Larger canyons mouths, in turn, increase wind convergence and drive higher aeolian abrasion rates at the heads of larger canyons. This study is the first to demonstrate knickpoint retreat via wind abrasion, and highlights that even in landscapes where large river gorges are present, wind may still exert a dominant control on canyon morphology.

  3. The Probability Distribution of Sea Surface Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    Air-sea exchanges of momentum, energy, and material substances are strongly influenced by sea surface wind speeds. Because exchange fluxes are generally nonlinear in wind speed, mean fluxes are determined not just by the mean wind speed but also by higher order moments. This fact motivates the development of models of the probability density function (pdf) of sea surface wind speeds. This talk will present characterisations of the pdf of sea surface wind speeds on a global scale obtained using SeaWinds scatterometer observations. It will be shown that the skewness field of wind speed is characterised by three distinct provinces: the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, the tropics, and the Southern Ocean. These provinces reflect the fact that the skewness is a decreasing function of the ratio of mean wind speed to the standard deviation, such that the skewness is positive for small values of the ratio, near zero for intermediate values, and negative for large values. This relationship between moments is characteristic of the Weibull distribution, which has been used in the past to model surface wind speed pdfs. However, distinct non-Weibull structure is evident in the observed sea surface wind speeds. A mechanistic model for the pdf of sea surface wind speeds, constructed from basic boundary layer physics, is used to demonstrate that the observed relationship between wind speed moments is a consequence of non-Gaussianity in the sea surface vector winds which follows from the nonlinear dependence of surface drag on surface wind speed. This model characterises the observed sea surface wind speed pdfs at least as well as the Weibull distribution and has the benefit that it mechanistic rather than empirical.

  4. Comparison of covariant and orthogonal Lyapunov vectors

    E-print Network

    Hong-liu Yang; Günter Radons

    2010-08-11

    Two sets of vectors, covariant and orthogonal Lyapunov vectors (CLVs/OLVs), are currently used to characterize the linear stability of chaotic systems. A comparison is made to show their similarity and difference, especially with respect to the influence on hydrodynamic Lyapunov modes (HLMs). Our numerical simulations show that in both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems HLMs formerly detected via OLVs survive if CLVs are used instead. Moreover the previous classification of two universality classes works for CLVs as well, i.e. the dispersion relation is linear for Hamiltonian systems and quadratic for dissipative systems respectively. The significance of HLMs changes in different ways for Hamiltonian and dissipative systems with the replacement of OLVs by CLVs. For general dissipative systems with nonhyperbolic dynamics the long wave length structure in Lyapunov vectors corresponding to near-zero Lyapunov exponents is strongly reduced if CLVs are used instead, whereas for highly hyperbolic dissipative systems the significance of HLMs is nearly identical for CLVs and OLVs. In contrast the HLM significance of Hamiltonian systems is always comparable for CLVs and OLVs irrespective of hyperbolicity. We also find that in Hamiltonian systems different symmetry relations between conjugate pairs are observed for CLVs and OLVs. Especially, CLVs in a conjugate pair are statistically indistinguishable in consequence of the micro- reversibility of Hamiltonian systems. Transformation properties of Lyapunov exponents, CLVs and hyperbolicity under changes of coordinate are discussed in appendices.

  5. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  6. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  7. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface–atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern ‘wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today. PMID:26537669

  8. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Derek W T; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A G

    2015-01-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern 'wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today. PMID:26537669

  9. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern `wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  10. Relationships of storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density with solar wind/IMF parameters and ring current index of Sym-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunliang; Ma, S. Y.; Xiong, Chao; Luehr, Hermann

    The total air mass densities at about 500 km altitude are derived using super-STAR accelerom-eter measurements onboard GRACE satellites for 25 great magnetic storms with minimum Dst less than 100 nT during 2002 to 2006 years. Taking NRLMSISE-00 model-predicted densities without active ap index input as a reference baseline of quiet-time mass density, the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass densities are obtained by subtraction for all the storm events and sorted into different grids of latitude by local time sector. The relationships of the storm-time density changes with various interplanetary parameters and magnetospheric ring current index of Sym-H are statistically investigated. The parameters include Akasofu energy coupling function, the merging electric field Em, the magnitude of IMF component in the GSM y-z plane etc. as calculated from OMNI data at 1 AU. It is found that the storm-time changes in the upper thermospheric mass density have the best linear correlation with the Sym-H index in general, showing nearly zero time delay at low-latitudes and a little time ahead at high-latitudes for most cases. Unexpectedly, the magnitude of IMF component in the y-z plane, Byz, shows correlation with storm-time mass density changes better and closer than Akasofu function and even Em. And, the mass density changes lag behind Byz about 1-4 hours for most cases at low-latitudes. The correlations considered above are local time dependent, showing the lowest at dusk sectors. For the largest superstorm of November 2003, the changes in mass density are correlated very closely with Byz, Em, and Sym-H index, showing correlation coefficients averaged over all latitudes in noon sector as high as 0.93, 0.91 and 0.90 separately. The physical factors controlling the lag times between the mass density changes at mid-low-latitudes and the interplanetary parameter variations are also analyzed. The results in this study may pro-vide useful suggestions for establishing empirical model to predict storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass density. This work is supported by NSFC (No. 40804049) and Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (No. 200804860012).

  11. Robustifying descriptor instability using Fisher vectors.

    PubMed

    Everts, Ivo; van Gemert, Jan C; Mensink, Thomas; Gevers, Theo

    2014-12-01

    Many computer vision applications, including image classification, matching, and retrieval use global image representations, such as the Fisher vector, to encode a set of local image patches. To describe these patches, many local descriptors have been designed to be robust against lighting changes and noise. However, local image descriptors are unstable when the underlying image signal is low. Such low-signal patches are sensitive to small image perturbations, which might come e.g., from camera noise or lighting effects. In this paper, we first quantify the relation between the signal strength of a patch and the instability of that patch, and second, we extend the standard Fisher vector framework to explicitly take the descriptor instabilities into account. In comparison to common approaches to dealing with descriptor instabilities, our results show that modeling local descriptor instability is beneficial for object matching, image retrieval, and classification. PMID:25373082

  12. Looking forward by looking back: using historical calibration to improve forecasts of human disease vector distributions.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Emily Sohanna; Kerr, Jeremy Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Arthropod disease vectors, most notably mosquitoes, ticks, tsetse flies, and sandflies, are strongly influenced by environmental conditions and responsible for the vast majority of global vector-borne human diseases. The most widely used statistical models to predict future vector distributions model species niches and project the models forward under future climate scenarios. Although these methods address variations in vector distributions through space, their capacity to predict changing distributions through time is far less certain. Here, we review modeling methods used to validate and forecast future distributions of arthropod vectors under the effects of climate change and outline the uses or limitations of these techniques. We then suggest a validation approach specific to temporal extrapolation models that is gaining momentum in macroecological modeling and has great potential for epidemiological modeling of disease vectors. We performed systematic searches in the Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar to identify peer-reviewed English journal articles that model arthropod disease vector distributions under future environment scenarios. We included studies published up to and including June, 2014. We identified 29 relevant articles for our review. The majority of these studies predicted current species niches and projected the models forward under future climate scenarios without temporal validation. Historically calibrated forecast models improve predictions of changing vector distributions by tracking known shifts through recently observed time periods. With accelerating climate change, accurate predictions of shifts in disease vectors are crucial to target vector control interventions where needs are greatest. PMID:25793472

  13. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  14. Climate change impacts on West Nile virus transmission in a global context.

    PubMed

    Paz, Shlomit

    2015-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), the most widely distributed virus of the encephalitic flaviviruses, is a vector-borne pathogen of global importance. The transmission cycle exists in rural and urban areas where the virus infects birds, humans, horses and other mammals. Multiple factors impact the transmission and distribution of WNV, related to the dynamics and interactions between pathogen, vector, vertebrate hosts and environment. Hence, among other drivers, weather conditions have direct and indirect influences on vector competence (the ability to acquire, maintain and transmit the virus), on the vector population dynamic and on the virus replication rate within the mosquito, which are mostly weather dependent. The importance of climatic factors (temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and winds) as drivers in WNV epidemiology is increasing under conditions of climate change. Indeed, recent changes in climatic conditions, particularly increased ambient temperature and fluctuations in rainfall amounts, contributed to the maintenance (endemization process) of WNV in various locations in southern Europe, western Asia, the eastern Mediterranean, the Canadian Prairies, parts of the USA and Australia. As predictions show that the current trends are expected to continue, for better preparedness, any assessment of future transmission of WNV should take into consideration the impacts of climate change. PMID:25688020

  15. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  16. Attitude Control for an Aero-Vehicle Using Vector Thrusting and Variable Speed Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Lim, K. B.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization of passively unstable thrust-levitated vehicles can require significant control inputs. Although thrust vectoring is a straightforward choice for realizing these inputs, this may lead to difficulties discussed in the paper. This paper examines supplementing thrust vectoring with Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs). The paper describes how to allocate VSCMGs and the vectored thrust mechanism for attitude stabilization in frequency domain and also shows trade-off between vectored thrust and VSCMGs. Using an H2 control synthesis methodology in LMI optimization, a feedback control law is designed for a thrust-levitated research vehicle and is simulated with the full nonlinear model. It is demonstrated that VSCMGs can reduce the use of vectored thrust variation for stabilizing the hovering platform in the presence of strong wind gusts.

  17. Segmentation of discrete vector fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Chen, Wenbin; Shen, I-Fan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for 2D discrete vector field segmentation based on the Green function and normalized cut. The method is inspired by discrete Hodge Decomposition such that a discrete vector field can be broken down into three simpler components, namely, curl-free, divergence-free, and harmonic components. We show that the Green Function Method (GFM) can be used to approximate the curl-free and the divergence-free components to achieve our goal of the vector field segmentation. The final segmentation curves that represent the boundaries of the influence region of singularities are obtained from the optimal vector field segmentations. These curves are composed of piecewise smooth contours or streamlines. Our method is applicable to both linear and nonlinear discrete vector fields. Experiments show that the segmentations obtained using our approach essentially agree with human perceptual judgement. PMID:16640243

  18. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested. PMID:20092978

  19. Radiometric correction of scatterometric wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Use of a spaceborne scatterometer to determine the ocean-surface wind vector requires accurate measurement of radar backscatter from ocean. Such measurements are hindered by the effect of attenuation in the precipitating regions over sea. The attenuation can be estimated reasonably well with the knowledge of brightness temperatures observed by a microwave radiometer. The NASA SeaWinds scatterometer is to be flown on the Japanese ADEOS2. The AMSR multi-frequency radiometer on ADEOS2 will be used to correct errors due to attenuation in the SeaWinds scatterometer measurements. Here we investigate the errors in the attenuation corrections. Errors would be quite small if the radiometer and scatterometer footprints were identical and filled with uniform rain. However, the footprints are not identical, and because of their size one cannot expect uniform rain across each cell. Simulations were performed with the SeaWinds scatterometer (13.4 GHz) and AMSR (18.7 GHz) footprints with gradients of attenuation. The study shows that the resulting wind speed errors after correction (using the radiometer) are small for most cases. However, variations in the degree of overlap between the radiometer and scatterometer footprints affect the accuracy of the wind speed measurements.

  20. Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag

    E-print Network

    Vries, Hans de

    Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag changes Niels Zweers KNMI - Weather surges to surface drag changes Delft, 27 - 29 April 2009 #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction Low and `moderate' wind speeds Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag changes Delft, 27

  1. Towards an Optimal Noise Versus Resolution Trade-Off in Wind Scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    A scatterometer is a radar that measures the normalized radar cross section sigma(sup 0) of the Earth's surface. Over the ocean this signal is related to the wind via the geophysical model function (GMF). The objective of wind scatterometry is to estimate the wind vector field from sigma(sup 0) measurements; however, there are many subtleties that complicate this problem-making it difficult to obtain a unique wind field estimate. Conventionally, wind estimation is split into two stages: a wind retrieval stage in which several ambiguous solutions are obtained, and an ambiguity removal stage in which ambiguities are chosen to produce an appropriate wind vector field estimate. The most common approach to wind field estimation is to grid the scatterometer swath into wind vector cells and estimate wind vector ambiguities independently for each cell. Then, field wise structure is imposed on the solution by an ambiguity selection routine. Although this approach is simple and practical, it neglects field wise structure in the retrieval step and does not account for the spatial correlation imposed by the sampling. This makes it difficult to develop a theoretically appropriate noise versus resolution trade-off using pointwise retrieval. Fieldwise structure may be imposed in the retrieval step using a model-based approach. However, this approach is generally only practical if a low order wind field model is applied, which may discard more information than is desired. Furthermore, model-based approaches do not account for the structure imposed by the sampling. A more general fieldwise approach is to estimate all the wind vectors for all the WVCs simultaneously from all the measurements. This approach can account for structure of the wind field as well as structure imposed by the sampling in the wind retrieval step. Williams and Long in 2010 developed a fieldwise retrieval method based on maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP). This MAP approach can be extended to perform a noise versus resolution trade-off, and deal with ambiguity selection. This paper extends the fieldwise MAP estimation approach and investigates both the noise versus resolution trade-off as well as ambiguity removal in the fieldwise wind retrieval step. The method is then applied to the Sea Winds scatterometer and the results are analyzed. This paper extends the fieldwise MAP estimation approach and investigates both the noise versus resolution trade-off as well as ambiguity removal in the fieldwise wind retrieval step. The method is then applied to the Sea Winds scatterometer and the results are analyzed.

  2. TOWARDS BAYESIAN ESTIMATOR SELECTION FOR QUIKSCAT WIND AND RAIN Michael P. Owen and David G. Long

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    TOWARDS BAYESIAN ESTIMATOR SELECTION FOR QUIKSCAT WIND AND RAIN ESTIMATION Michael P. OwenSCAT scatterometer infers wind vectors over the ocean using measurements of the surface backscatter. During rain events the QuikSCAT observations are subject to rain contamination. Three separate estimators have been

  3. Review of Wind Energy Forecasting Methods for Modeling Ramping Events

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N; Williams, J L; Rhodes, M; Chow, T K; Maxwell, R

    2011-03-28

    Tall onshore wind turbines, with hub heights between 80 m and 100 m, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere since they generally encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complexity of boundary layer flows. This complexity of the lowest layers of the atmosphere, where wind turbines reside, has made conventional modeling efforts less than ideal. To meet the nation's goal of increasing wind power into the U.S. electrical grid, the accuracy of wind power forecasts must be improved. In this report, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of California at Berkeley, and Colorado School of Mines, evaluates innovative approaches to forecasting sudden changes in wind speed or 'ramping events' at an onshore, multimegawatt wind farm. The forecast simulations are compared to observations of wind speed and direction from tall meteorological towers and a remote-sensing Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instrument. Ramping events, i.e., sudden increases or decreases in wind speed and hence, power generated by a turbine, are especially problematic for wind farm operators. Sudden changes in wind speed or direction can lead to large power generation differences across a wind farm and are very difficult to predict with current forecasting tools. Here, we quantify the ability of three models, mesoscale WRF, WRF-LES, and PF.WRF, which vary in sophistication and required user expertise, to predict three ramping events at a North American wind farm.

  4. Going Through Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Earth's surface is always changing. Much of that change happens because of air, wind, water, and temperature differences. If you have ever observed mud and rocks being carried along by a stream of water after a heavy rain, you have observed the Earth being changed. This month's Science Shorts will investigate how the Earth changes through a…

  5. Tropical Cyclone Winds Retrieved from Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Jochen; Wackerman, Chris; Foster, Ralph; Caruso, Michael; Graber, Hans

    2013-04-01

    Within this paper we will introduce and validate our methodologies to retrieve high-resolution wind fields from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with particular focus on tropical cyclones. SAR wind directions are extracted from the orientation of wind induced streaks, which are visible in the SAR images and that in general are well aligned with the mean surface wind direction. Wind speeds are retrieved from the measured normalized radar cross section (NRCS) from the ocean surface under consideration on the SAR derived wind direction and imaging geometry. Depending on the frequency as well as the SAR polarization for transmit and receive different geophysical model functions (GMF) have to be considered. In case of SAR data acquired at C-band with co-polarization using vertical (V) polarization in transmit and receive we use the well-known C-band model CMOD5n. For horizontal polarization in transmit and receive (HH-polarization) the CMOD5n model is extended by a function that describes the ratio of V to H polarization. For images acquired at H-polarization for transmit and V-polarization for receive (cross pol) or vice versa, we have developed our own GMF. We have investigated a large data set of SAR data acquired under tropical cyclone conditions and compared our retrieved wind fields to scatterometer winds, GPS drope sonde surface wind vectors and SFMR wind speeds acquired during the storms. The results show the quality of the SAR-retrieved wind fields from co-pol and, in particular, cross-pol winds., The later have an rms error similar to the SFMR measurements, which up to date is one of the best accepted wind measurement sources for tropical cyclone winds.

  6. Air travel and vector-borne disease movement.

    PubMed

    Tatem, A J; Huang, Z; Das, A; Qi, Q; Roth, J; Qiu, Y

    2012-12-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial expansions in the global air travel network and rapid increases in traffic volumes. The effects of this are well studied in terms of the spread of directly