Science.gov

Sample records for vector wind change

  1. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    Multivariate analysis was used to determine the joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from 15 years of twice-daily rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, that the joint distribution of wind component change with respect to time is univariate normal, that the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and that the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh are tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from 1 to 5 hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented. Extension of the theoretical prediction (based on rawinsonde data) of wind component change standard deviation to time periods of 1 to 5 hours falls (with a few exceptions) within the 95 percentile confidence band of the population estimate obtained from the Jimsphere sample data. The joint distributions of wind change components, conditional wind components, and 1 km vector wind shear change components are illustrated by probability ellipses at the 95 percentile level.

  2. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida: Wind aloft profile change vs. time, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1977-01-01

    Wind vector change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is examined according to the theory of multivariate normality. The joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from fifteen years of twice daily Rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh, has been tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from one to five hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented.

  3. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the temporal variability of wind vectors at 1 km altitude intervals from 0 to 27 km altitude taken from a 10-year data sample of twice-daily rawinsode wind measurements over Vandenberg Air Force Base, California is presented.

  4. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.; Smith, O. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a vector wind gust model that is suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies was studied. Verification of the hypothesis that gust component variables are gamma distributed, gust modulus is approximately Weibull distributed, and zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed is emphasized. A method of testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables, and two distributions for gust modulus are described. The results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented, and the validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  5. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Work towards establishing a vector wind profile gust model for the Space Transportation System flight operations and trade studies is reported. To date, all the statistical and computational techniques required were established and partially implemented. An analysis of wind profile gust at Cape Kennedy within the theoretical framework is presented. The variability of theoretical and observed gust magnitude with filter type, altitude, and season is described. Various examples are presented which illustrate agreement between theoretical and observed gust percentiles. The preliminary analysis of the gust data indicates a strong variability with altitude, season, and wavelength regime. An extension of the analyses to include conditional distributions of gust magnitude given gust length, distributions of gust modulus, and phase differences between gust components has begun.

  6. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1981-01-01

    To enable development of a vector wind gust model suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies, hypotheses concerning the distributions of gust component variables were verified. Methods for verification of hypotheses that observed gust variables, including gust component magnitude, gust length, u range, and L range, are gamma distributed and presented. Observed gust modulus has been drawn from a bivariate gamma distribution that can be approximated with a Weibull distribution. Zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed. An analytical method for testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables is presented. Two distributions for gust modulus are described and the results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented. The validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  7. The change in wind vector and dust storm in the Middle East in last 32 years and their correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.; Yang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    [1] Winds play an important role in dust aerosols emission, transport, and deposition. Using NCEP reanalysis2 data, the changes in wind direction and speed during 1948 and 2010 were analyzed over the Middle East (the Gulf of Omen and Eastern Saudi Arabia abbreviated as R1). Wind patterns from R1 were compared with those in South Asia Monsoon Area (R2), East China (R3), and East China Sea (R4). The Weather Research and Forecasting model with online chemistry (WRF-Chem) was used to study the effects of winds change on dust emissions over the period from 1979 to 2010. Modifications to soil types and land cover types were implemented to the default WRF-Chem MOSAIC dust scheme to ensure realistic simulations of dust emissions. In all the four regions, the yearly average wind speed decreased. In R1 and R3, winds greater than 2.5 m/s exhibited a decreasing trend throughout the year; while in R2 and R4, the decreasing trend was found only in spring and summer. The model simulations were compared with available observations including satellite data (e.g. AERONET and Calipso) and continual improvements are being made to revise the dust emission scheme within WRF-Chem.

  8. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1983-01-01

    A five parameter gamma distribution (BGD) having two shape parameters, two location parameters, and a correlation parameter is investigated. This general BGD is expressed as a double series and as a single series of the modified bessel function, and reduces to the known special case for equal shape parameters. Practical functions for computer evaluations for the general BGD and for special cases are presented. Applications are to be bound in reliability theory, signal noise, and meteorology. Applications to wind gust modeling for the ascent flight of the space shuttle are illustrated.

  9. SSM/I and ECMWF Wind Vector Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Ashcroft, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Wentz was the first to convincingly show that satellite microwave radiometers have the potential to measure the oceanic wind vector. The most compelling evidence for this conclusion was the monthly wind vector maps derived solely from a statistical analysis of Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) observations. In a qualitative sense, these maps clearly showed the general circulation over the world's oceans. In this report we take a closer look at the SSM/I monthly wind vector maps and compare them to European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) wind fields. This investigation leads both to an empirical comparison of SSM/I calculated wind vectors with ECMWF wind vectors, and to an examination of possible reasons that the SSM/I calculated wind vector direction would be inherently more reliable at some locations than others.

  10. Wind Streak Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    2 September 2004 This pair of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images shows changes in dark wind streak patterns that occurred between 5 April 1999 (image M00-00534) and 17 August 2004 (image R20-00901). Unlike the spaghetti-like streak patterns made by dust devils, these streaks all begin on their upwind ends as tapered forms that fan outward in the downwind direction, and they all indicate winds that blew from the same direction. In both cases, winds blew from the southeast (lower right) toward the northwest (upper left). These streaks and the small pedestal craters found among them occur in the Memnonia region of Mars near 5.9oS, 162.2oW. The 400 meter scale bar is about 437 yards long. Sunlight illuminates each scene from the upper left.

  11. Rapid Temporal Changes of Boundary Layer Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    2005-01-01

    The statistical distribution of the magnitude of the vector wind change over 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2-h periods based on data from November 1999 through August 2001 is presented. The distributions of the 2-h u and v component wind changes are also presented for comparison. The wind changes at altitudes from 500 to 3000 m were measured using the Eastern Range network of five 915 MHz Doppler radar wind profilers. Quality controlled profiles were produced every 15 minutes for up to sixty gates, each representing 101 m in altitude over the range from 130 m to 6089 m. Five levels, each constituting three consecutive gates, were selected for analysis because of their significance to aerodynamic loads during the Space Shuttle ascent roll maneuver. The distribution of the magnitude of the vector wind change is found to be lognormal consistent with earlier work in the mid-troposphere. The parameters of the distribution vary with time lag, season and altitude. The component wind changes are symmetrically distributed with near-zero means, but the kurtosis coefficient is larger than that of a Gaussian distribution.

  12. The winds of change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind-based power generation has been growing steadily in the United States and around the world, and this growth will continue—and accelerate—in the future, as the following background statistics demonstrate. The U.S. wind industry installed 8,358 megawatts (MW) of new wind generating capacity in 20...

  13. An improved hurricane wind vector retrieval algorithm using SeaWinds scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laupattarakasem, Peth

    Over the last three decades, microwave remote sensing has played a significant role in ocean surface wind measurement, and several scatterometer missions have flown in space since early 1990's. Although they have been extremely successful for measuring ocean surface winds with high accuracy for the vast majority of marine weather conditions, unfortunately, the conventional scatterometer cannot measure extreme winds condition such as hurricane. The SeaWinds scatterometer, onboard the QuikSCAT satellite is NASA's only operating scatterometer at present. Like its predecessors, it measures global ocean vector winds; however, for a number of reasons, the quality of the measurements in hurricanes are significantly degraded. The most pressing issues are associated with the presence of precipitation and Ku-band saturation effects, especially in extreme wind speed regime such as tropical cyclones (hurricanes and typhoons). Under this dissertation, an improved hurricane ocean vector wind retrieval approach, named as Q-Winds, was developed using existing SeaWinds scatterometer data. This unique data processing algorithm uses combined SeaWinds active and passive measurements to extend the use of SeaWinds for tropical cyclones up to approximately 50 m/s (Hurricane Category-3). Results show that Q-Winds wind speeds are consistently superior to the standard SeaWinds Project Level 2B wind speeds for hurricane wind speed measurement, and also Q-Winds provides more reliable rain flagging algorithm for quality assurance purposes. By comparing to H*Wind, Q-Winds achieves ˜9% of error, while L2B-12.5km exhibits wind speed saturation at ˜30 m/s with error of ˜31% for high wind speed (>40 m/s).

  14. Rapid Temporal Changes of Midtropospheric Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    1997-01-01

    The statistical distribution of the magnitude of the vector wind change over 0.25-, 1-, 2-. and 4-h periods based on data from October 1995 through March 1996 over central Florida is presented. The wind changes at altitudes from 6 to 17 km were measured using the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler radar wind profiler. Quality controlled profiles were produced every 5 min for 112 gates, each representing 150 m in altitude. Gates 28 through 100 were selected for analysis because of their significance to ascending space launch vehicles. The distribution was found to be lognormal. The parameters of the lognormal distribution depend systematically on the time interval. This dependence is consistent with the behavior of structure functions in the f(exp 5/3) spectral regime. There is a small difference between the 1995 data and the 1996 data, which may represent a weak seasonal effect.

  15. Vector wind, horizontal divergence, wind stress and wind stress curl from SEASAT-SASS at one degree resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Sylvester, W. B.; Salfi, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional data obtained in 1983 are contrasted with SEASAT-A scatterometer and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data to show how observations at a single station can be extended to an area of about 150,000 square km by means of remotely sensed data obtained in nine minutes. Superobservations at a one degree resolution for the vector winds were estimated along with their standard deviations. From these superobservations, the horizontal divergence, vector wind stress, and the curl of the wind stress can be found. Weather forecasting theory is discussed and meteorological charts of the North Pacific Ocean are presented. Synoptic meteorology as a technique is examined.

  16. Designing Scatterometer Constellations for Sampling Global Ocean Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Chelton, D. B.; Stoffelen, A.; Schlax, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rapid temporal variations in ocean vector winds make it impossible to obtain synoptic global snapshots of winds and wind stress from a single spaceborne sensor. Even when multiple sensors are present, the peculiarities of the resulting space-time sampling pattern require that significant smoothing in space and time be performed to limit spatially and temporally inhomogeneous error characteristics in the merged data. Based on the collected common experience in its member states, the World Meteorological Organization collects requirements for spatio-temporal sampling in meteorological applications such as global and regional Numerical Weather Prediction, nowcasting, and climate. An additional concern, when constructing data sets from sun-synchronous missions, is that undersampling of diurnal and sub-diurnal variability may result in aliasing of the climate data record. Indeed, examination of climatologies constructed from different satellite missions, such as NASA's QuikSCAT and EUMETSAT's ASCAT scatterometers, show systematic differences that cannot be explained as being due solely to unresolved incoherent diurnal and sub-diurnal variability. Some of these differences, especially in the tropics, are probably explained by systematic diurnal and sub-diurnal variations. Other differences may be due to the difficulty of cross-calibrating sun-synchronous satellites with different local times. Forthcoming satellite missions may offer the possibility of overcoming or mitigating the space-time sampling and calibration challenges using multiple coordinated platforms. In the next decade, there is an expectation that ocean vector winds will be measured simultaneously by multiple satellites from the European community, India, China, and the United States. The coordination and suitable merging of the data from these satellites to produce a climate data record will be a challenge to the ocean vector winds community. In this presentation, we use climatologies constructed from

  17. 10 Years of Height Resolved, Cloud-Track, Vector Winds from MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Mueller, K. J.; Moroney, C. M.; Jovanovic, V.; Wu, D. L.; Diner, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    By utilizing multiple camera views and fast image matching algorithms to identify common features and determine feature motion, the MISR instrument on NASA’s Terra satellite has now collected nearly 10 years of height-resolved, cloud-track, vector winds using a single, globally consistent algorithm. The MISR cloud-track winds are reported globally on mesoscale domains of 70.4 km × 70.4 km and referenced to stereoscopically derived heights above the earth ellipsoid, which have a nominal vertical resolution of approximately 500 m. Importantly, from the standpoint of climate research, the stereo height assignment and wind retrieval are largely insensitive to instrument calibration changes because the pattern matcher relies only on relative brightness values, rather than the absolute magnitude of the brightness. We will describe comparisons with other wind datasets, including geostationary cloud drift winds, scatterometer surface winds, and reanalysis model winds, that demonstrate the quality of the MISR winds. We will also show the coverage and resolution advantages that MISR provides relative to these other datasets. Additionally, because the global winds are driven primarily by the global (im)balance of heating, monitoring variations in the winds over 10 years promises to yield important insights into the processes related to the hydrologic cycle and transport of heat and water vapor, such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  18. Study of wind change for the development of loads reduction techniques for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1987-01-01

    Wind change statistics are analyzed for Vandenberg AFB, California (VAFB) and Kennedy Space Center, Florida (KSC). Means and standard deviations of wind component change and vector wind change modulus within 3-9 and 9-16 km altitude bands are tabulated. The contribution to 3.5 hr wind component change by wind perturbations in various wavelength bands is evaluated. Probability distributions of maximum 3.5 hr wind change in an altitude band are presented and a model for wind change at a specified altitude is tested with data derived from six data bases from VAFB and Santa Monica, California.

  19. Using Daily Ocean Wind Vector and Speed Measurements to Estimate the Diurnal Cycle Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, F. J.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Haddad, Z. S.

    2014-12-01

    Over many oceanic regions, the surface wind varies widely throughout the day, owing to various meteorological forcings, such as land/sea temperature differences near coasts, or variations associated with tropical precipitation processes. Over the tropical oceans, several coarsely spaced buoy networks (TAO/TRITON in the Pacific, PIRATA in the Atlantic, RAMA in the Indian Ocean) are maintained as part of the Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array. For finer global scale analysis, further improvements to the modeling and understanding of physical processes within the coupled atmosphere ocean is based upon analysis of a disparate collection of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellite based ocean surface wind data records. Since LEO satellite observations represent intermittently spaced, instantaneous snapshots, sampling against the backdrop of continuously changing physical processes, its is important to carefully merge and analyze the multiple satellite datasets in order to extract meaningful information on diurnal and semi-diurnal wind cycles. Early analysis of an investigation are described whereby multi-year collections of global sun-synchronous and asynchronous orbiting satellite ocean wind data are used to investigate the diurnal and semi-diurnal ocean wind vector variability over certain regions. A unique feature of the effort is the utilization of all capable sensors, including both wind speed and wind vector capable sensors, using overlapping asynchronous satellite observations to establish self-consistency, including inter-sensor bias correction to a common reference platform.

  20. Triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting wind energy and as self-powered wind vector sensor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Zhu, Guang; Zhang, Hulin; Chen, Jun; Zhong, Xiandai; Lin, Zong-Hong; Su, Yuanjie; Bai, Peng; Wen, Xiaonan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-10-22

    We report a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that plays dual roles as a sustainable power source by harvesting wind energy and as a self-powered wind vector sensor system for wind speed and direction detection. By utilizing the wind-induced resonance vibration of a fluorinated ethylene-propylene film between two aluminum foils, the integrated TENGs with dimensions of 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm × 22 cm deliver an output voltage up to 100 V, an output current of 1.6 μA, and a corresponding output power of 0.16 mW under an external load of 100 MΩ, which can be used to directly light up tens of commercial light-emitting diodes. Furthermore, a self-powered wind vector sensor system has been developed based on the rationally designed TENGs, which is capable of detecting the wind direction and speed with a sensitivity of 0.09 μA/(m/s). This work greatly expands the applicability of TENGs as power sources for self-sustained electronics and also self-powered sensor systems for ambient wind detection. PMID:24044652

  1. Impact of Scatterometer Ocean Wind Vector Data on NOAA Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenak, Z.; Chang, P.; Brennan, M. J.; Sienkiewicz, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Near real-time measurements of ocean surface vector winds (OSVW), including both wind speed and direction from non-NOAA satellites, are being widely used in critical operational NOAA forecasting and warning activities. The scatterometer wind data data have had major operational impact in: a) determining wind warning areas for mid-latitude systems (gale, storm,hurricane force); b) determining tropical cyclone 34-knot and 50-knot wind radii. c) tracking the center location of tropical cyclones, including the initial identification of their formation. d) identifying and warning of extreme gap and jet wind events at all latitudes. e) identifying the current location of frontal systems and high and low pressure centers. f) improving coastal surf and swell forecasts Much has been learned about the importance and utility of satellite OSVW data in operational weather forecasting and warning by exploiting OSVW research satellites in near real-time. Since December 1999 when first data from QuikSCAT scatterometer became available in near real time NOAA operations have been benefiting from ASCAT scatterometer observations on MetOp-A and B, Indian OSCAT scatterometer on OceanSat-3 and lately NASA's RapidScat mission on International Space Station. With oceans comprising over 70 percent of the earth's surface, the impacts of these data have been tremendous in serving society's needs for weather and water information and in supporting the nation's commerce with information for safe, efficient, and environmentally sound transportation and coastal preparedness. The satellite OSVW experience that has been gained over the past decade by users in the operational weather community allows for realistic operational OSVW requirements to be properly stated for future missions. Successful model of transitioning research data into operation implemented by Ocean Winds Team in NOAA's NESDIS/STAR office and subsequent data impacts will be presented and discussed.

  2. Numerical study of 1-D, 3-vector component, thermally-conductive MHD solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, S.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, transient, 1-dimensional, 3-vector component MHD equations are used to simulate steady and unsteady, thermally conductive MHD solar wind expansions between the solar surface and 1 AU (astronomical unit). A variant of SIMPLE numerical method was used to integrate the equations. Steady state solar wind properties exhibit qualitatively similar behavior with the known Weber-Davies Solutions. Generation of Alfven shock, in addition to the slow and fast MHD shocks, was attempted by the boundary perturbations at the solar surface. Property changes through the disturbance were positively correlated with the fast and slow MHD shocks. Alfven shock was, however, not present in the present simulations.

  3. Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. Therefore we draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14%, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31%) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's aeroelastic wing (53%), as well as sudden changes in wing loading (16%) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95% confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square deviation) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≍0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable eddy-covariance flux measurements.

  4. Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. Therefore we draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14 %, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31 %) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's trim (53 %), as well as changes in the aircraft lift (16 %) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95 % confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square error) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≈0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable Eddy-Covariance flux measurements.

  5. Fault diagnosis of direct-drive wind turbine based on support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, X. L.; Jiang, D. X.; Li, S. H.; Chen, J.

    2011-07-01

    A fault diagnosis method of direct-drive wind turbine based on support vector machine (SVM) and feature selection is presented. The time-domain feature parameters of main shaft vibration signal in the horizontal and vertical directions are considered in the method. Firstly, in laboratory scale five experiments of direct-drive wind turbine with normal condition, wind wheel mass imbalance fault, wind wheel aerodynamic imbalance fault, yaw fault and blade airfoil change fault are carried out. The features of five experiments are analyzed. Secondly, the sensitive time-domain feature parameters in the horizontal and vertical directions of vibration signal in the five conditions are selected and used as feature samples. By training, the mapping relation between feature parameters and fault types are established in SVM model. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is verified through experimental data. The results show that the proposed method is effective in identifying the fault of wind turbine. It has good classification ability and robustness to diagnose the fault of direct-drive wind turbine.

  6. Single-Vector Calibration of Wind-Tunnel Force Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibrating a wind-tunnel force balance involves the use of a unique load application system integrated with formal experimental design methodology. The Single-Vector Force Balance Calibration System (SVS) overcomes the productivity and accuracy limitations of prior calibration methods. A force balance is a complex structural spring element instrumented with strain gauges for measuring three orthogonal components of aerodynamic force (normal, axial, and side force) and three orthogonal components of aerodynamic torque (rolling, pitching, and yawing moments). Force balances remain as the state-of-the-art instrument that provide these measurements on a scale model of an aircraft during wind tunnel testing. Ideally, each electrical channel of the balance would respond only to its respective component of load, and it would have no response to other components of load. This is not entirely possible even though balance designs are optimized to minimize these undesirable interaction effects. Ultimately, a calibration experiment is performed to obtain the necessary data to generate a mathematical model and determine the force measurement accuracy. In order to set the independent variables of applied load for the calibration 24 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 experiment, a high-precision mechanical system is required. Manual deadweight systems have been in use at Langley Research Center (LaRC) since the 1940s. These simple methodologies produce high confidence results, but the process is mechanically complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four weeks to complete. Over the past decade, automated balance calibration systems have been developed. In general, these systems were designed to automate the tedious manual calibration process resulting in an even more complex system which deteriorates load application quality. The current calibration approach relies on a one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) methodology, where each independent variable is

  7. Vector control of wind turbine on the basis of the fuzzy selective neural net*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    An article describes vector control of wind turbine based on fuzzy selective neural net. Based on the wind turbine system’s state, the fuzzy selective neural net tracks an maximum power point under random perturbations. Numerical simulations are accomplished to clarify the applicability and advantages of the proposed vector wind turbine’s control on the basis of the fuzzy selective neuronet. The simulation results show that the proposed intelligent control of wind turbine achieves real-time control speed and competitive performance, as compared to a classical control model with PID controllers based on traditional maximum torque control strategy.

  8. A Novel Empirical Mode Decomposition With Support Vector Regression for Wind Speed Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ye; Suganthan, Ponnuthurai Nagaratnam; Srikanth, Narasimalu

    2016-08-01

    Wind energy is a clean and an abundant renewable energy source. Accurate wind speed forecasting is essential for power dispatch planning, unit commitment decision, maintenance scheduling, and regulation. However, wind is intermittent and wind speed is difficult to predict. This brief proposes a novel wind speed forecasting method by integrating empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and support vector regression (SVR) methods. The EMD is used to decompose the wind speed time series into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residue. Subsequently, a vector combining one historical data from each IMF and the residue is generated to train the SVR. The proposed EMD-SVR model is evaluated with a wind speed data set. The proposed EMD-SVR model outperforms several recently reported methods with respect to accuracy or computational complexity. PMID:25222957

  9. Effects of Climate and Climate Change on Vectors and Vector-Borne Diseases: Ticks Are Different.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Nick H; Lindsay, L Robbin

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether global risk from vector-borne diseases will be impacted by climate change. This has focussed on important mosquito-borne diseases that are transmitted by the vectors from infected to uninfected humans. However, this debate has mostly ignored the biological diversity of vectors and vector-borne diseases. Here, we review how climate and climate change may impact those most divergent of arthropod disease vector groups: multivoltine insects and hard-bodied (ixodid) ticks. We contrast features of the life cycles and behaviour of these arthropods, and how weather, climate, and climate change may have very different impacts on the spatiotemporal occurrence and abundance of vectors, and the pathogens they transmit. PMID:27260548

  10. Compensation of vector and volume averaging bias in lidar wind speed measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clive, P. J. M.

    2008-05-01

    A number of vector and volume averaging considerations arise in relation to remote sensing, and in particular, Lidar. 1) Remote sensing devices obtain vector averages. These values are often compared to the scalar averages associated with cup anemometry. The magnitude of a vector average is less than or equal to the scalar average obtained over the same period. The use of Lidars in wind power applications has entailed the estimation of scalar averages by vector averages and vice versa. The relationship between the two kinds of average must therefore be understood. It is found that the ratio of the averages depends upon wind direction variability according to a Bessel function of the standard deviation of the wind direction during the averaging interval. 2) The finite probe length of remote sensing devices also incurs a volume averaging bias when wind shear is non-linear. The sensitivity of the devices to signals from a range of heights produces volume averages which will be representative of wind speeds at heights within that range. One can distinguish between the effective or apparent height the measured wind speeds represent as a result of volume averaging bias, and the configuration height at which the device has been set to measure wind speeds. If the wind shear is described by a logarithmic wind profile the apparent height is found to depend mainly on simple geometrical arguments concerning configuration height and probe length and is largely independent of the degree of wind shear. 3) The restriction of the locus of points at which radial velocity measurements are made to the circumference of a horizontally oriented disc at a particular height is seen to introduce ambiguity into results when dealing with wind vector fields which are not irrotational.

  11. Compensating for volume and vector averaging biases in lidar wind speed measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clive, Peter J. M.

    2008-10-01

    A number of vector and volume averaging considerations arise in relation to remote sensing, and in particular, Lidar. 1) Remote sensing devices obtain vector averages. These values are often compared to the scalar averages associated with cup anemometry. The magnitude of a vector average is less than or equal to the scalar average obtained over the same period. The use of Lidars in wind power applications has entailed the estimation of scalar averages by vector averages and vice versa. The relationship between the two kinds of average must therefore be understood. It is found that the ratio of the averages depends upon wind direction variability according to a Bessel function of the standard deviation of the wind direction during the averaging interval. 2) The finite probe length of remote sensing devices also incurs a volume averaging bias when wind shear is non-linear. The sensitivity of the devices to signals from a range of heights produces volume averages which will be representative of wind speeds at heights within that range. One can distinguish between the effective or apparent height the measured wind speeds represent as a result of volume averaging bias, and the configuration height at which the device has been set to measure wind speeds. If the wind shear is described by a logarithmic wind profile the apparent height is found to depend mainly on simple geometrical arguments concerning configuration height and probe length and is largely independent of the degree of wind shear. 3) The restriction of the locus of points at which radial velocity measurements are made to the circumference of a horizontally oriented disc at a particular height is seen to introduce ambiguity into results when dealing with wind vector fields which are not irrotational.

  12. The Dependence of Ocean Surface Emissivity on Wind Vector as Measured with TMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, N.; Vandemark, D.; Ruf, C.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Global TMR brightness temperature observations at 18, 21, and 37 GHz have been colocated with near-simultaneous SeaWinds wind vector data as well as with a monthly SST climatological product. The combined data allow us to study the dependence of ocean surface emissivity, at each frequency, upon both wind speed and direction. Results show a clear two-branch wind speed dependence; weak and linear below 6 m/s with an abrupt increase in sensitivity above that point. Our analysis also shows that the nadir-view ocean surface emissivity depends on the angle between the wind direction and TMR's antenna polarization orientation.

  13. Comparison Of High Winds Retrieved From RADARSAT 2 SAR Data With In Situ Buoy Data And QuikScat Wind Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tao; Perrie, Will

    2010-04-01

    Selected SAR images of high wind speeds have been obtained from RADARSAT-2 co-located with in situ observations from the HurricaneWatch program. In this presentation we use these RADARSAT-2 SAR images to retrieve ocean surface wind speeds, using CMOD_IFR, and modified algorithms. We compare these SAR- derived winds with in situ buoy data and QuikScat wind vectors. Results shows that SAR-derived wind speeds from CMOD5 are closer to the in situ buoy wind speeds than CMOD_IFR2 or CMOD4 winds. Moreover, these SAR-derived wind speeds are underestimates of the actual wind fields, especially in high wind conditions, whereas QuikScat wind vectors are overestimates. We also find that the wind speed discrepancies between buoy measurements and SAR-derived winds occurring in unstable atmosphere boundary conditions may be larger than those occurring in stable conditions.

  14. Climate Change: Potential Affect on Pesticide Application for Vector Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change has and will in the future contribute to the global burden of vector-borne disease by affecting the spatial and tempral distribution of disease. These changes in disease distributions are a direct result of altering the ecology of immature and adult habitats of insect vectors....

  15. Changes in Ocean Wind Retrieval Performance During the WindSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettenhausen, M. H.; Gaiser, P. W.; Adams, I. S.; Truesdale, D.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous improvements have been made to WindSat ground data processing software and retrieval algorithms since the initial evaluations of WindSat capabilities were published in 2006. These improvements include higher resolution retrievals, improved wind vector ambiguity selection, improved instrument characterization, better brightness temperature calibration and improved high wind speed retrievals. We briefly describe some of these improvements and provide statistical comparisons of the current WindSat ocean vector wind products to the older versions of the WindSat products. We also present comparisons for individual wind fields including examples of gap wind events and cyclonic storms. Limitations of the WindSat products and the underlying causes such as resolution and rain effects will be discussed.

  16. Wind changes above warm Agulhas Current eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouault, M.; Verley, P.; Backeberg, B.

    2016-04-01

    , change in wind speed above eddies was masked by a large-scale synoptic wind speed deceleration/acceleration affecting parts of the eddies.

  17. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  18. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Fisher, Mark; Muth, Allan

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  19. Short-interval SMS wind vector determinations for a severe local storms area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Short-interval SMS-2 visible digital image data are used to derive wind vectors from cloud tracking on time-lapsed sequences of geosynchronous satellite images. The cloud tracking areas are located in the Central Plains, where on May 6, 1975 hail-producing thunderstorms occurred ahead of a well defined dry line. Cloud tracking is performed on the Goddard Space Flight Center Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System. Lower tropospheric cumulus tracers are selected with the assistance of a cloud-top height algorithm. Divergence is derived from the cloud motions using a modified Cressman (1959) objective analysis technique which is designed to organize irregularly spaced wind vectors into uniformly gridded wind fields. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using satellite-derived wind vectors and their associated divergence fields in describing the conditions preceding severe local storm development. For this case, an area of convergence appeared ahead of the dry line and coincided with the developing area of severe weather. The magnitude of the maximum convergence varied between -10 to the -5th and -10 to the -14th per sec. The number of satellite-derived wind vectors which were required to describe conditions of the low-level atmosphere was adequate before numerous cumulonimbus cells formed. This technique is limited in areas of advanced convection.

  20. Effectiveness of Changing Wind Turbine Cut-in Speed to Reduce Bat Fatalities at Wind Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Huso, Manuela M. P.; Hayes, John P.

    2009-04-01

    This report details an experiment on the effectiveness of changing wind turbine cut-in speed on reducing bat fatality from wind turbines at the Casselman Wind Project in Somerset County, Pennsylvania.

  1. A Vector Control for Grid-connected Wind Power Generation with Doubly Fed Induction Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yuji; Kaneda, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Daichi; Tanaka, Akio

    Recently, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) and synchronous generator are mostly applied for wind power generation due to high efficiently for wind energy capture. An inverter system is required to control wind turbine speed and power factor in those generators. The inverter rating of the synchronous generator equals to generator rating. However, DFIG has the advantage that the inverter rating is about 25% to the generator rating. The paper describes a vector control of DFIG inter-connected to power line. The performance of proposed vector control is examined using power system simulation software PSCAD/EMTDC for the DFIG inter-connected to 6.6kv distribution line. The results show good dynamic responses and high accuracy to the stator active power control and the stator reactive power control.

  2. Scanning wind-vector scatterometers with two pencil beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirimoto, T.; Moore, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    A scanning pencil-beam scatterometer for ocean windvector determination has potential advantages over the fan-beam systems used and proposed heretofore. The pencil beam permits use of lower transmitter power, and at the same time allows concurrent use of the reflector by a radiometer to correct for atmospheric attenuation and other radiometers for other purposes. The use of dual beams based on the same scanning reflector permits four looks at each cell on the surface, thereby improving accuracy and allowing alias removal. Simulation results for a spaceborne dual-beam scanning scatterometer with a 1-watt radiated power at an orbital altitude of 900 km is described. Two novel algorithms for removing the aliases in the windvector are described, in addition to an adaptation of the conventional maximum likelihood algorithm. The new algorithms are more effective at alias removal than the conventional one. Measurement errors for the wind speed, assuming perfect alias removal, were found to be less than 10%.

  3. Global change and human vulnerability to vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Sutherst, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Global change includes climate change and climate variability, land use, water storage and irrigation, human population growth and urbanization, trade and travel, and chemical pollution. Impacts on vector-borne diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, infections by other arboviruses, schistosomiasis, trypanosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and leishmaniasis are reviewed. While climate change is global in nature and poses unknown future risks to humans and natural ecosystems, other local changes are occurring more rapidly on a global scale and are having significant effects on vector-borne diseases. History is invaluable as a pointer to future risks, but direct extrapolation is no longer possible because the climate is changing. Researchers are therefore embracing computer simulation models and global change scenarios to explore the risks. Credible ranking of the extent to which different vector-borne diseases will be affected awaits a rigorous analysis. Adaptation to the changes is threatened by the ongoing loss of drugs and pesticides due to the selection of resistant strains of pathogens and vectors. The vulnerability of communities to the changes in impacts depends on their adaptive capacity, which requires both appropriate technology and responsive public health systems. The availability of resources in turn depends on social stability, economic wealth, and priority allocation of resources to public health. PMID:14726459

  4. Global Change and Human Vulnerability to Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sutherst, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Global change includes climate change and climate variability, land use, water storage and irrigation, human population growth and urbanization, trade and travel, and chemical pollution. Impacts on vector-borne diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, infections by other arboviruses, schistosomiasis, trypanosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and leishmaniasis are reviewed. While climate change is global in nature and poses unknown future risks to humans and natural ecosystems, other local changes are occurring more rapidly on a global scale and are having significant effects on vector-borne diseases. History is invaluable as a pointer to future risks, but direct extrapolation is no longer possible because the climate is changing. Researchers are therefore embracing computer simulation models and global change scenarios to explore the risks. Credible ranking of the extent to which different vector-borne diseases will be affected awaits a rigorous analysis. Adaptation to the changes is threatened by the ongoing loss of drugs and pesticides due to the selection of resistant strains of pathogens and vectors. The vulnerability of communities to the changes in impacts depends on their adaptive capacity, which requires both appropriate technology and responsive public health systems. The availability of resources in turn depends on social stability, economic wealth, and priority allocation of resources to public health. PMID:14726459

  5. Angular Distribution of Solar Wind Magnetic Field Vector at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y.; Khabarova, O.; Miao, B.; le Roux, J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the angular distribution of the solar wind magnetic field vector at 1 AU and its solar cycle dependence using ACE observations. A total of twelve 27.27 day (the duration of a solar rotation) intervals during the solar maximum, the solar minimum, as well as the ascending and descending phases of solar cycle 23 are examined. For all selected intervals, we obtain the angular distribution function {{f}τ }(α ), where α is the angle between the instantaneous solar wind magnetic field vector and the average background magnetic field vector, and τ is the period length for the averaging. Our results show that in all periods {{f}τ }(α ) has two populations, one at small angles and one at large angles. We suggest that the second population is due to the presence of current sheets in the solar wind. The solar-cycle dependence of {{f}τ }(α ) and a τ-scaling property of the second population of {{f}τ }(α ) are discussed. The τ scaling shows a clear dependence on the solar wind type. The implication of {{f}τ }(α ) for particle acceleration at interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections, such as those in solar energetic particle events, is also discussed.

  6. Surface Wind Vector and Rain Rate Observation Capability of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; El-Nimri, Salem; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is the next-generation Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), and it will offer the capability of simultaneous wide-swath observations of both extreme ocean surface wind vector and strong precipitation from either aircraft (including UAS) or satellite platforms. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce valid wind observations under hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered by precipitation. The SFMR i s a proven aircraft remote sensing system for simultaneously observing extreme ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. The first version of the instrument will be a single polarization system for wind speed and rain rate, with a dual-polarization system to follow for wind vector capability. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by NASA s Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard (laboratory) version of the instrument has been completed and successfully tested in a test chamber. Development of the aircraft instrument is underway, with flight testing planned for the fall of 2009. Preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on surface wind analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor. New off-nadir data collected in 2008 by SFMR that affirms the ability of this measurement technique to obtain wind speed data at non-zero incidence angle will

  7. [Vector transmitted diseases and climate changes in Europe].

    PubMed

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2014-09-01

    The increase in temperatures recorded since the mid-nineteenth century is unprecedented in the history of mankind. The consequences of climate changes are numerous and can affect human health through direct (extreme events, natural disasters) or indirect (alteration of the ecosystem) mechanisms. Climate changes have repercussions on ecosystems, agriculture, social conditions, migration, conflicts and the transmission mode of infectious diseases. Vector-borne diseases are infections transmitted by the bite of infected arthropods such as mosquitoes, ticks, triatomines, sand flies and flies. Epidemiological cornerstones of vector-borne diseases are: the ecology and behaviour of the host, the ecology and behaviour of the vector, and the population's degree of immunity. Mosquito vectors related to human diseases mainly belong to the genus Culex, Aedes and Mansonia. Climate changes in Europe have increased the spread of new vectors, such as Aedes albopictus, and in some situations have made it possible to sustain the autochthonous transmission of some diseases (outbreak of Chukungunya virus in northern Italy in 2007, cases of dengue in the South of France and in Croatia). Despite the eradication of malaria from Europe, anopheline carriers are still present, and they may allow the transmission of the disease if the climatic conditions favour the development of the vectors and their contacts with plasmodium carriers. The tick Ixodes ricinus is a vector whose expansion has been documented both in latitude and in altitude in relation to the temperature increase; at the same time the related main viral and bacterial infections have increased. In northern Italy and Germany, the appearance of Leishmaniasis has been associated to climatic conditions that favour the development of the vector Phlebotomus papatasi and the maturation of the parasite within the vector, although the increase of cases of visceral leishmaniasis is also related to host immune factors, particularly

  8. Common themes in changing vector-borne disease scenarios.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, David H

    2003-01-01

    The impact of climate change on disease patterns is controversial. However, global burden of disease studies suggest that infectious diseases will contribute a proportionately smaller burden of disease over the next 2 decades as non-communicable diseases emerge as public health problems. However, infectious diseases contribute proportionately more in the poorest quintile of the population. Notwithstanding the different views of the impact of global warming on vector-borne infections this paper reviews the conditions which drive the changing epidemiology of these infections and suggests that such change is linked by common themes including interactions of generalist vectors and reservoir hosts at interfaces with humans, reduced biodiversity associated with anthropogenic environmental changes, increases in Plasmodium falciparum: P. vivax ratios and well-described land use changes such as hydrological, urbanization, agricultural, mining and forest-associated impacts (extractive activities, road building, deforestation and migration) which are seen on a global scale. PMID:14584362

  9. An unsupervised support vector method for change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovolo, F.; Camps-Valls, G.; Bruzzone, L.

    2007-10-01

    This paper formulates the problem of distinguishing changed from unchanged pixels in remote sensing images as a minimum enclosing ball (MEB) problem with changed pixels as target class. The definition of the sphere shaped decision boundary with minimal volume that embraces changed pixels is approached in the context the support vector formalism adopting a support vector domain description (SVDD) one-class classifier. The SVDD maps the data into a high dimensional feature space where the spherical support of the high dimensional distribution of changed pixels is computed. The proposed formulation of the SVDD uses both target and outlier samples for defining the MEB, and is included here in an unsupervised system for change detection. For this purpose, nearly certain examples for the classes of both targets (i.e., changed pixels) and outliers (i.e., unchanged pixels) for training are identified based on thresholding the magnitude of spectral change vectors. Experimental results obtained on two different multitemporal and multispectral remote sensing images pointed out the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Global climate change and vector-borne diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Global warming will have different effects on different diseases because of the complex and idiosynchratic interactions between vectors, hosts, and pathogens that influence transmission dynamics of each pathogen. Human activities, including urbanization, rapid global travel, and vector management, have profound effects on disease transmission that can operate on more rapid time scales than does global climate change. The general concern about global warming encouraging the spread of tropical diseases is legitimate, but the effects vary among diseases, and the ecological implications are difficult to predict.

  11. A vector auto-regressive model for onshore and offshore wind synthesis incorporating meteorological model information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D.; Bell, K. R. W.; McMillan, D.; Infield, D.

    2014-05-01

    The growth of wind power production in the electricity portfolio is striving to meet ambitious targets set, for example by the EU, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020. Huge investments are now being made in new offshore wind farms around UK coastal waters that will have a major impact on the GB electrical supply. Representations of the UK wind field in syntheses which capture the inherent structure and correlations between different locations including offshore sites are required. Here, Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) models are presented and extended in a novel way to incorporate offshore time series from a pan-European meteorological model called COSMO, with onshore wind speeds from the MIDAS dataset provided by the British Atmospheric Data Centre. Forecasting ability onshore is shown to be improved with the inclusion of the offshore sites with improvements of up to 25% in RMS error at 6 h ahead. In addition, the VAR model is used to synthesise time series of wind at each offshore site, which are then used to estimate wind farm capacity factors at the sites in question. These are then compared with estimates of capacity factors derived from the work of Hawkins et al. (2011). A good degree of agreement is established indicating that this synthesis tool should be useful in power system impact studies.

  12. The Alignment of the Mean Wind and Stress Vectors in the Unstable Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, M.; Dias, N. L.

    2010-01-01

    A significant non-alignment between the mean horizontal wind vector and the stress vector was observed for turbulence measurements both above the water surface of a large lake, and over a land surface (soybean crop). Possible causes for this discrepancy such as flow distortion, averaging times and the procedure used for extracting the turbulent fluctuations (low-pass filtering and filter widths etc.), were dismissed after a detailed analysis. Minimum averaging times always less than 30 min were established by calculating ogives, and error bounds for the turbulent stresses were derived with three different approaches, based on integral time scales (first-crossing and lag-window estimates) and on a bootstrap technique. It was found that the mean absolute value of the angle between the mean wind and stress vectors is highly related to atmospheric stability, with the non-alignment increasing distinctively with increasing instability. Given a coordinate rotation that aligns the mean wind with the x direction, this behaviour can be explained by the growth of the relative error of the u- w component with instability. As a result, under more unstable conditions the u- w and the v- w components become of the same order of magnitude, and the local stress vector gives the impression of being non-aligned with the mean wind vector. The relative error of the v- w component is large enough to make it undistinguishable from zero throughout the range of stabilities. Therefore, the standard assumptions of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory hold: it is fair to assume that the v- w stress component is actually zero, and that the non-alignment is a purely statistical effect. An analysis of the dimensionless budgets of the u- w and the v- w components confirms this interpretation, with both shear and buoyant production of u- w decreasing with increasing instability. In the v- w budget, shear production is zero by definition, while buoyancy displays very low-intensity fluctuations around

  13. Climate change and vector-borne diseases: a regional analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Githeko, A. K.; Lindsay, S. W.; Confalonieri, U. E.; Patz, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that inter-annual and inter-decadal climate variability have a direct influence on the epidemiology of vector-borne diseases. This evidence has been assessed at the continental level in order to determine the possible consequences of the expected future climate change. By 2100 it is estimated that average global temperatures will have risen by 1.0-3.5 degrees C, increasing the likelihood of many vector-borne diseases in new areas. The greatest effect of climate change on transmission is likely to be observed at the extremes of the range of temperatures at which transmission occurs. For many diseases these lie in the range 14-18 degrees C at the lower end and about 35-40 degrees C at the upper end. Malaria and dengue fever are among the most important vector-borne diseases in the tropics and subtropics; Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the USA and Europe. Encephalitis is also becoming a public health concern. Health risks due to climatic changes will differ between countries that have developed health infrastructures and those that do not. Human settlement patterns in the different regions will influence disease trends. While 70% of the population in South America is urbanized, the proportion in sub-Saharan Africa is less than 45%. Climatic anomalies associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon and resulting in drought and floods are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. They have been linked to outbreaks of malaria in Africa, Asia and South America. Climate change has far-reaching consequences and touches on all life-support systems. It is therefore a factor that should be placed high among those that affect human health and survival. PMID:11019462

  14. Wave-vector dependence of magnetic-turbulence spectra in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Narita, Y; Glassmeier, K-H; Sahraoui, F; Goldstein, M L

    2010-04-30

    Using four-point measurements of the Cluster spacecraft, the energy distribution was determined for magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind directly in the three-dimensional wave-vector domain in the range |k|vector anisotropy is estimated with respect to directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, and the result suggests the dominance of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence toward smaller spatial scales. PMID:20482101

  15. Evaluation and Validation of Operational RapidScat Ocean Surface Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul; Jelenak, Zorana; Soisuvarn, Seubson; Said, Faozi; Sienkiewicz, Joseph; Brennan, Michael

    2015-04-01

    NASA launched RapidScat to the International Space Station (ISS) on September 21, 2014 on a two-year mission to support global monitoring of ocean winds for improved weather forecasting and climate studies. The JPL-developed space-based scatterometer is conically scanning and operates at ku-band (13.4 GHz) similar to QuikSCAT. The ISS-RapidScat's measurement swath is approximately 900 kilometers and covers the majority of the ocean between 51.6 degrees north and south latitude (approximately from north of Vancouver, Canada, to the southern tip of Patagonia) in 48 hours. RapidScat data are currently being posted at a spacing of 25 kilometers, but a version to be released in the near future will improve the postings to 12.5 kilometers. RapidScat ocean surface wind vector data are being provided in near real-time to NOAA, and other operational users such as the U.S. Navy, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI). The quality of the RapidScat OSVW data are assessed by collocating the data in space and time with "truth" data. Typically "truth" data will include, but are not limited to, the NWS global forecast model analysis (GDAS) fields, buoys, ASCAT, WindSat, AMSR-2, and aircraft measurements during hurricane and winter storm experiment flights. The standard statistical analysis used for satellite microwave wind sensors will be utilized to characterize the RapidScat wind vector retrievals. The global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are a convenient source of "truth" data because they are available 4 times/day globally which results in the accumulation of a large number of collocations over a relatively short amount of time. The NWP model fields are not "truth" in the same way an actual observation would be, however, as long as there are no systematic errors in the NWP model output the collocations will

  16. Sensitivity of Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes: Role of relative wind stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, D. R.; Zhai, X.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of different wind stress bulk formulae on the response of the Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes is investigated using an idealised channel model. Surface/mixed layer properties are found to be sensitive to the use of the relative wind stress formulation, where the wind stress depends on the difference between the ocean and atmosphere velocities. Previous work has highlighted the surface eddy damping effect of this formulation, which we find leads to increased circumpolar transport. Nevertheless the transport due to thermal wind shear does lose sensitivity to wind stress changes at sufficiently high wind stress. In contrast, the sensitivity of the meridional overturning circulation is broadly the same regardless of the bulk formula used due to the adiabatic nature of the relative wind stress damping. This is a consequence of the steepening of isopycnals offsetting the reduction in eddy diffusivity in their contribution to the eddy bolus overturning, as predicted using a residual mean framework.

  17. Immunology, climate change and vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Patz, J A; Reisen, W K

    2001-04-01

    Global climate change might expand the distribution of vector-borne pathogens in both time and space, thereby exposing host populations to longer transmission seasons, and immunologically naive populations to newly introduced pathogens. In the African highlands, where cool temperatures limit malaria parasite development, increases in temperature might enhance malaria transmission. St Louis encephalitis viral replication and the length of the transmission season depend upon ambient temperature. Warming temperatures in the American southwest might place at risk migratory, non-immune elderly persons that arrive in early fall to spend the winter. Warm temperatures might intensify or extend the transmission season for dengue fever. Immunologists should examine this interplay between human immunocompetence and vector-borne disease risks in a warmer world. PMID:11274908

  18. The effect of the arbitrary level assignment of satellite cloud motion wind vectors on wind analyses in the pre-thunderstorm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived cloud motion vectors on SESAME rawinsonde wind fields was studied in two separate cases. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of the satellite data is assessed to coordinate surfaces in a severe storm environment marked by strong vertical wind shear. Objective analyses of SESAME rawinsonde winds and combined winds are produced and differences between these two analyzed fields are used to make an assessment of coordinate level choice. It is shown that the standard method of arbitrarily assigning wind vectors to a low level coordinate surface yields systematic differences between the rawinsonde and combined wind analyses. Arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to the 0.9 sigma surface produces smaller differences than assignment to the 825 mb pressure surface. Systematic differences occur near moisture discontinuities and in regions of horizontal and vertical wind shears. The differences between the combined and SESAME wind fields are made smallest by vertically interpolating cloud motions to either a pressure or sigma surface.

  19. Early effects of climate change: do they include changes in vector-borne disease?

    PubMed

    Kovats, R S; Campbell-Lendrum, D H; McMichael, A J; Woodward, A; Cox, J S

    2001-07-29

    The world's climate appears now to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Shifts in the distribution and behaviour of insect and bird species indicate that biological systems are already responding to this change. It is well established that climate is an important determinant of the spatial and temporal distribution of vectors and pathogens. In theory, a change in climate would be expected to cause changes in the geographical range, seasonality (intra-annual variability), and in the incidence rate (with or without changes in geographical or seasonal patterns). The detection and then attribution of such changes to climate change is an emerging task for scientists. We discuss the evidence required to attribute changes in disease and vectors to the early effects of anthropogenic climate change. The literature to date indicates that there is a lack of strong evidence of the impact of climate change on vector-borne diseases (i.e. malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, tick-borne diseases). New approaches to monitoring, such as frequent and long-term sampling along transects to monitor the full latitudinal and altitudinal range of specific vector species, are necessary in order to provide convincing direct evidence of climate change effects. There is a need to reassess the appropriate levels of evidence, including dealing with the uncertainties attached to detecting the health impacts of global change. PMID:11516383

  20. Combining TOPEX and SeaWinds Data to Refine Models for Ocean Surface Emissivity: Wind Vector Signatures at 18, 21 and 37 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemark, D.; Tran, N.; Ruf, C.; Vandemark, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    TOPEX Microwave Radiometer (TMR) brightness temperature observations at 18, 21, and 37 GHz have been collocated with near-simultaneous SeaWinds wind vector data as well as with a monthly SST climatological product. The combined data set allows us to study the dependence of ocean surface emissivity (at each frequency) upon both wind speed. Results show clear two-branch wind speed dependence; weak and linear below 6 m/s with an abrupt increase in sensitivity above that point. The analysis also shows that the zenith-directed ocean surface emissivity is polarization dependent above wind speeds of 5-6 m/s with an azimuthal variation related to the wind direction. This last result accords with recent polarimetric radiometer observations collected from aircraft. Implications of these observations to water vapor retrieval algorithms, nadir-viewing polarimetry, and ocean emission modeling will be discussed.

  1. Ground-based remote sensing of wind vector and visibility: latest results from guideline development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesenberg, Jens; Danzeisen, Hans H.; Engelbart, Dirk; Fritzsche, Klaus; Klein, Volker; Muenkel, Christoph; Trickl, Thomas; Werner, Christian; Woppowa, Ljuba

    2001-12-01

    The guideline series VDI 3786 'Environmental meteorology; Meteorological measurements' is organized into several parts. The present guideline VDI 3786 Part 14 describes the determination of the three-dimensional wind vector using Doppler LIDAR ('LIght Detection and Ranging' or 'Light Identificaiton, Detection and Ranging'). The guideline refers to guideline VDI 3786 Part 2 with regard to the definition of the measurement variable wind and goes back to the guideline VDI 3786 Part 1 in considering the averaging time. Use is also made of the guideline VDI 3786 Part 8. Safety problems are not treated; reference may be made here to relevant Standards [VBG 93, DIN EN 60825-1]. Wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer yield a very important contribution also to the investigation of atmospheric exchange processes. The wind field in the atmospheric boundary layer is highly variable in spatial and temporal scales. For a few applications a more frequeent wind sensing is necessary, i.e. (1) on airports located in low level jet areas, (2) near chemical plants to get information of the transport of toxic gases from leakages, (3) for metrology in general to improve the weather forecast, (4) for environment protection purposes like dispersion studies. The following statements are valid for visibility measurements [visual range LIDAR (VDI 3786 Part 15)]: (1) Lidar can provide the same information of the visibility as conventional sensors, but in addition lidar will provide range resolved measurements. (2) It is possible to shrink a lidar down to the size of binoculars. (3) It is possible to measure local visibility with an eye- safe (class 1) lidar. (4) Layers can be detected up to 250 m distance in approximately 2 s even with a small size instrument.

  2. Assessment of NOAA Processed OceanSat-2 Scatterometer Ocean Surface Vector Wind Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.; Jelenak, Z.; Soisuvarn, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) launched the Oceansat-2 satellite on 23 September 2009. Oceansat-2 carries a radar scatterometer instrument (OSCAT) capable of measuring ocean surface vector winds (OSVW) and an ocean color monitor (OCM), which will retrieve sea spectral reflectance. Oceansat-2 is ISRO's second in a series of satellites dedicated to ocean research. It will provide continuity to the services and applications of the Oceansat-1 OCM data along with additional data from a Ku-band pencil beam scatterometer. Oceansat-2 is a three-axis, body stabilized spacecraft placed into a near circular sun-synchronous orbit, at an altitude of 720 kilometers (km), with an equatorial crossing time of around 1200 hours. ISRO, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) share the common goal of optimizing the quality and maximizing the utility of the Oceansat-2 data for the benefit of future global and regional scientific and operational applications. NOAA, NASA and EUMETSAT have been collaboratively working with ISRO on the assessment and analysis of OSCAT data to help facilitate continuation of QuikSCAT's decade-long Ku-band scatterometer data record. NOAA's interests are focused on the utilization of OSCAT data to support operational weather forecasting and warning in the marine environment. OSCAT has the potential to significantly mitigate the loss of NASA's QuikSCAT, which has negatively impacted NOAA's marine forecasting and warning services. Since March 2011 NOAA has been receiving near real time OSCAT measurements via EumetSat. NOAA has developed its own OSCAT wind processor. This processor produces ocean surface vector winds with resolution of 25km. Performance of NOAA OSCAT product will and its availability to larger user community will be presented and discussed.

  3. Vegetation change detection for urban areas based on extended change vector analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Jia, Yonghong

    2006-10-01

    This study sought to develop a modified change vector analysis(CVA) using normalized multi-temporal data to detect urban vegetation change. Because of complex change in urban areas, modified CVA application based on NDVI and mask techniques can minify the effect of non-vegetation changes and improve upon efficiency to a great extent. Moreover, drawing from methods in Polar plots, the extended CVA technique measures absolute angular changes and total magnitude of perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) and two of Tasseled Cap indices (greenness and wetness). Polar plots summarized change vectors to quantify and visualize both magnitude and direction of change, and magnitude is applied to determine change pixels through threshold segmentation while direction is applied as pixel's feature to classifying change pixels through supervised classification. Then this application is performed with Landsat ETM+ imageries of Wuhan in 2002 and 2005, and assessed by error matrix, which finds that it could detect change pixels 95.10% correct, and could classify change pixels 91.96% correct in seven change classes through performing supervised classification with direction angles. The technique demonstrates the ability of change vectors in multiple biophysical dimensions to vegetation change detection, and the application can be trended as an efficient alternative to urban vegetation change detection and classification.

  4. Using support vector machines for anomalous change detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Steinwart, Ingo; Llamocca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We cast anomalous change detection as a binary classification problem, and use a support vector machine (SVM) to build a detector that does not depend on assumptions about the underlying data distribution. To speed up the computation, our SVM is implemented, in part, on a graphical processing unit. Results on real and simulated anomalous changes are used to compare performance to algorithms which effectively assume a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we investigate the use of support vector machines (SVMs) with radial basis kernels for finding anomalous changes. Compared to typical applications of SVMs, we are operating in a regime of very low false alarm rate. This means that even for relatively large training sets, the data are quite meager in the regime of operational interest. This drives us to use larger training sets, which in turn places more of a computational burden on the SVM. We initially considered three different approaches to to address the need to work in the very low false alarm rate regime. The first is a standard SVM which is trained at one threshold (where more reliable estimates of false alarm rates are possible) and then re-thresholded for the low false alarm rate regime. The second uses the same thresholding approach, but employs a so-called least squares SVM; here a quadratic (instead of a hinge-based) loss function is employed, and for this model, there are good theoretical arguments in favor of adjusting the threshold in a straightforward manner. The third approach employs a weighted support vector machine, where the weights for the two types of errors (false alarm and missed detection) are automatically adjusted to achieve the desired false alarm rate. We have found in previous experiments (not shown here) that the first two types can in some cases work well, while in other cases they do not. This renders both approaches unreliable for automated change detection. By contrast, the third approach reliably produces good results, but at

  5. Impact of Short Interval SMS Digital Data on Wind Vector Determination for a Severe Local Storms Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of 5 minute interval SMS-2 visible digital image data in analyzing severe local storms is examined using wind vectors derived from cloud tracking on time lapsed sequence of geosynchronous satellite images. The cloud tracking areas are located in the Central Plains, where on 6 May 1975, hail-producing thunderstorms occurred ahead of a well defined dry line. The results demonstrate that satellite-derived wind vectors and their associated divergence fields complement conventional meteorological analyses in describing the conditions preceding severe local storm development.

  6. Corrigendum to "Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shiftmicrolight aircraft" published in Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 1421-1444, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. We draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14 %, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31 %) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's trim (53 %), as well as changes in the aircraft lift (16 %) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95 % confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square error) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≈0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable Eddy-Covariance flux measurements.

  7. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  8. Calibration Performance and Capabilities of the New Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.; Focardi, P.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Montes, O.; Padmanabhan, S.; Redick, R.; Russell, D.; Wincentsen, J.

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes performance and capabilities of a new satellite conically imaging microwave radiometer system, the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COWVR), being built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for an Air Force demonstration mission. COWVR is an 18-34 GHz fully polarimetric radiometer designed to provide measurements of ocean vector winds with an accuracy that meets or exceeds that provided by WindSat, but using a simpler design which has both calibration and cost advantages. Heritage conical radiometer systems, such as WindSat, AMSR, GMI or SSMI(S), all have a similar overall architecture and have exhibited significant intra-channel and inter-sensor calibration biases, due in part to the relative independence of the radiometers between the different polarizations and frequencies in the system. The COWVR system uses a broadband compact hybrid combining architecture and Electronic Polarization Basis Rotation to minimize the number of free calibration parameters between polarization and frequencies, as well as providing a definitive calibration reference from the modulation of the mean polarized signal from the Earth. This second calibration advantage arises because the sensor modulates the incoming polarized signal at the input antenna aperture in a known way based only on the instrument geometry which forces relative calibration consistency between the polarimetric channels of the sensor and provides a gain and offset calibration independent of a model or other ancillary data source, which has typically been a weakness in the calibration and inter-calibration of heritage microwave sensors. This paper will give a description of the COWVR instrument and an overview of the technology demonstration mission. We will discuss the overall calibration approach for this system, its advantages over existing systems and how many of the calibration issues that impact existing satellite radiometers can be eliminated in future operational systems based on

  9. Wind farm induced changes in wind speed and surface fluxes over the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Fabien; van Lipzig, Nicole; Meyers, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Offshore wind farm deployment in the North Sea is foreseen to expand dramatically in the coming years. The strong expansion of offshore wind parks is likely to affect the regional climatology on the North Sea. We assess this impact by conducting a regional climate model simulation over future wind farms built near the German coast. In order to achieve this, the wind farm parameterisation of Fitch et al. 2012, where wind farms are parameterised as elevated sources of turbulent kinetic energy and sinks of momentum ( Blahak et al 2010 and Fitch et al 2012) is implemented in COSMO-CLM at a 1.5 km resolution. As a first step, COSMO-CLM's ability to reproduce wind profiles over the North Sea is evaluated using wind speed data from the FINO1 meteorological mast, toghether with QuikScat scatterometer data, for a time period of 2000-2008. Subsequently, the impact of windfarms on the regional climate over a period of ten years (1999-2008) is assessed. A large scale wind farm can create wakes which depending on the wind direction could affect the power production of a neighbouring farm. Furthermore, wind farms decelerate the flow and create a vertical circulation in the inflow region. As a result, changes in vertical fluxes of moisture are observed. This leads to enhanced low level cloud cover which may trigger changes in precipitation.

  10. Solar Wind Change Exchange from the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a long (approximately 100 ks) XMM-Newton observation designed to observe solar wind charge exchange emission (SWCX) from Earth's magnetosheath. By luck, the observation took place during a period of minimal solar wind flux so the SWCX emission was also minimal. Never-the-less, there is a significant if not stunning correlation between the observed O VIII count rate and our model for magnetosheath emission. We also report on the observed O VII and O VII emission.

  11. A targeted change-detection procedure by combining change vector analysis and post-classification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Su; Chen, Dongmei; Yu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    In remote sensing, conventional supervised change-detection methods usually require effective training data for multiple change types. This paper introduces a more flexible and efficient procedure that seeks to identify only the changes that users are interested in, here after referred to as "targeted change detection". Based on a one-class classifier "Support Vector Domain Description (SVDD)", a novel algorithm named "Three-layer SVDD Fusion (TLSF)" is developed specially for targeted change detection. The proposed algorithm combines one-class classification generated from change vector maps, as well as before- and after-change images in order to get a more reliable detecting result. In addition, this paper introduces a detailed workflow for implementing this algorithm. This workflow has been applied to two case studies with different practical monitoring objectives: urban expansion and forest fire assessment. The experiment results of these two case studies show that the overall accuracy of our proposed algorithm is superior (Kappa statistics are 86.3% and 87.8% for Case 1 and 2, respectively), compared to applying SVDD to change vector analysis and post-classification comparison.

  12. Methods of reducing wind power changes from large turbine arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.; Dorsey, J.; Lotfalian, M.; Park, G.; Shayanfar, M.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses methods of reducing the WECS generation change through selection of the wind turbine model for each site, selection of an appropriate siting configuration, and wind array controls. An analysis of wind generation change from an echelon and a farm for passage of a thunderstorm is presented to establish the factors concerning the wind turbine model and siting configuration that contribute to these variations. Detailed simulation results indicate more precisely how these factors can be exploited to minimize the WECS generation changes observed. Reduction of the wind generation change over ten minutes is shown to reduce the increase in spinning reserve, unloadable generation and load following requirements on unit commitment when significant WECS generation is present and the farm penetration constraint is satisfied. Controls on the blade pitch angle of all wind turbines in an array or a battery control are shown to reduce both the wind generation change out of an array and the effective farm penetration in anticipation of a storm so that the farm penetration constraint may be satisfied.

  13. Genomic Changes of Chagas Disease Vector, South America

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean Pierre; Nicolini, Paula; Caraccio, María Noel; Rose, Virginia; Tellez, Tatiana; Bermúdez, Hernán; Bargues, María Dolores; Mas-Coma, Santiago; O’Connor, José Enrique; Pérez, Ruben

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the main karyologic changes that have occurred during the dispersion of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease. We identified two allopatric groups, named Andean and non-Andean. The Andean specimens present C-heterochromatic blocks in most of their 22 chromosomes, whereas non-Andean specimens have only 4–7 autosomes with C-banding. These heterochromatin differences are the likely cause of a striking DNA content variation (approximately 30%) between Andean and non-Andean insects. Our study, together with previous historical and genetic data, suggests that T. infestans was originally a sylvatic species, with large quantities of DNA and heterochromatin, inhabiting the Andean region of Bolivia. However, the spread of domestic T. infestans throughout the non-Andean regions only involved insects with an important reduction of heterochromatin and DNA amounts. We propose that heterochromatin and DNA variation mainly reflected adaptive genomic changes that contribute to the ability of T. infestans to survive, reproduce, and disperse in different environments. PMID:15109410

  14. Quantifying Changes in Intrinsic Molecular Motion Using Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    Leighty, Ralph E; Varma, Sameer

    2013-02-12

    The ensemble of three-dimensional (3-D) configurations exhibited by a molecule, that is, its intrinsic motion, can be altered by several environmental factors, and also by the binding of other molecules. Quantification of such induced changes in intrinsic motion is important because it provides a basis for relating thermodynamic changes to changes in molecular motion. This task is, however, challenging because it requires comparing two high-dimensional data sets. Traditionally, when analyzing molecular simulations, this problem is circumvented by first reducing the dimensions of the two ensembles separately, and then comparing summary statistics from the two ensembles against each other. However, since dimensionality reduction is carried out prior to ensemble comparison, such strategies are susceptible to artifactual biases from information loss. Here, we introduce a method based on support vector machines that yields a normalized quantitative estimate for the difference between two ensembles after comparing them directly against one another. While this method can be applied to any molecular system, including nonbiological molecules and crystals, here, we show how it can be applied to identify the specific regions of a paramyxovirus G protein that are affected by the binding of its preferred human receptor, Ephrin B2. This protein-protein interaction initiates the fusion of the virus with the host cell. Specifically, for every residue in the G protein, we obtain separately a quantitative difference between the ensemble of configurations they sample in the presence and in the absence of Ephrin B2. These ensembles were generated using molecular dynamics simulations. Rank-ordering and then mapping the residues that undergo the greatest change in motion onto the 3-D structure of the G protein reveals that they are clustered primarily on a single contiguous facet of the protein and include the set that is known experimentally to play a vital role in regulating viral

  15. World Wind Tools Reveal Environmental Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Originally developed under NASA's Learning Technologies program as a tool to engage and inspire students, World Wind software was released under the NASA Open Source Agreement license. Honolulu, Hawaii based Intelesense Technologies is one of the companies currently making use of the technology for environmental, public health, and other monitoring applications for nonprofit organizations and Government agencies. The company saved about $1 million in development costs by using the NASA software.

  16. Southern Ocean isopycnal mixing and ventilation changes driven by winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathey, Ryan; Ferreira, David

    2015-12-01

    Observed and predicted changes in the strength of the westerly winds blowing over the Southern Ocean have motivated a number of studies on the response of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and Southern Ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) to wind perturbations and led to the hypothesis of the "eddy compensation" regime, wherein the MOC becomes insensitive to wind changes. In addition to the MOC, tracer transport also depends on mixing processes. Here we show, in a high-resolution process model, that isopycnal mixing by mesoscale eddies is strongly dependent on the wind strength. This dependence can be explained by mixing length theory and is driven by increases in eddy kinetic energy; the mixing length does not change strongly in our simulation. Simulation of a passive ventilation tracer (analogous to CFCs or anthropogenic CO2) demonstrates that variations in tracer uptake across experiments are dominated by changes in isopycnal mixing, rather than changes in the MOC. We argue that to properly understand tracer uptake under different wind-forcing scenarios, the sensitivity of isopycnal mixing to winds must be accounted for.

  17. A modified approach for change detection using change vector analysis in posterior probability space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouzi, S. A.; Vidal, A.; Bentounes, H. A.

    2015-04-01

    The multispectral and multitemporal data coming from satellites allow us to extract valuable spatiotemporal change. Consequently, Earth surface change detection analysis has been used in the past to monitor land cover changes caused by different reasons. Several techniques have been used for that purpose and change vector analysis (CVA) has been frequently employed to carry out automatic spatiotemporal information extraction. This work describes a modified methodology based on Supervised Change Vector Analysis in Posterior probability Space (SCVAPS) with the final aim of obtaining a change detection map in Blida, Algeria. The proposed technique is a Modified version of Supervised Change Vector Analysis Posterior probability Space (MSCVAPS) and it is applied at the same region that the original technique studied in the literature. The classical Maximum Likelihood classifier is the selected method for supervised classification since it provides good properties in the posterior probability map. An improved method for threshold determination based on Double Flexible Pace Search (DFPS) is proposed in this work and it is employed to obtain the most adequate threshold value. Then, the MSCVAPS approach is evaluated by two cases study of the land cover change detection in the region of Blida, Algeria, and in the region of Shunyi District, Beijing, China, using a pair of Landsat Thematic Mapper images and pair of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper images, respectively. The final evaluation is given by the overall accuracy of changed and unchanged pixels and the kappa coefficient. The results show that the modified approach gives excellent results using the same area of study that was selected in the literature.

  18. Noise model based ν-support vector regression with its application to short-term wind speed forecasting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghua; Zhang, Shiguang; Xie, Zongxia; Mi, Jusheng; Wan, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Support vector regression (SVR) techniques are aimed at discovering a linear or nonlinear structure hidden in sample data. Most existing regression techniques take the assumption that the error distribution is Gaussian. However, it was observed that the noise in some real-world applications, such as wind power forecasting and direction of the arrival estimation problem, does not satisfy Gaussian distribution, but a beta distribution, Laplacian distribution, or other models. In these cases the current regression techniques are not optimal. According to the Bayesian approach, we derive a general loss function and develop a technique of the uniform model of ν-support vector regression for the general noise model (N-SVR). The Augmented Lagrange Multiplier method is introduced to solve N-SVR. Numerical experiments on artificial data sets, UCI data and short-term wind speed prediction are conducted. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed technique. PMID:24874183

  19. Measuring the turbulent wind vector with a weight-shift Microlight Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Neidl, F.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Beyrich, F.; Zheng, X. H.; Foken, T.

    2009-09-01

    The Small Environmental Research Aircraft (SERA) D-MIFUs initial fields of application are aerosol / cloud and radiation transfer research. Therefore a comparatively slow (True Airspeed, TAS ~25 ms-1) but highly mobile microlight aircraft was envisaged. To broaden the application area of D-MIFU we explore whether the microlight can also be used for Eddy Covariance (EC) flux measurement. To obtain useful data sets for airborne EC a reliable turbulent Wind Vector (WV) measurement is a key requirement. Here we present methodology and results to calibrate and express performance and uncertainty of microlight based WV measurement. Specific attention is given to the influence of the flexible-wing weight-shift geometry on the WV measurement. For the WV measurement we equipped D-MIFU with a 70 cm long noseboom supporting a classical 5 hole probe and a fast 50 μm diameter thermocouple. An Inertial Navigation System (INS) supplies high accuracy ground speeds (Ï?=0.05 ms-1) and attitude angles (Ï?=0.03° , 0.1° respectively for heading). Data are stored with 10 Hz yielding a horizontal resolution of 2.5 m. The INS also allows to analyze aircraft dynamics such as 3d rotation rates and acceleration of the nacelle body. Further estimates for 3d acceleration of airfoil and noseboom are obtained at 100 Hz. The noseboom calibration coefficients under laboratory conditions were obtained by wind tunnel- and thermal bath measurements. To transfer these characteristics for in-flight conditions we carried out a series of flights with D-MIFU above the Boundary Layer under calm conditions. On basis of level flights at different power settings we were able to determine dynamic pressure-, sideslip- and attack angle offsets. Additionally forced maneuvers, such as e.g. phugoids, have been performed. By means of multivariate analysis these data are used to assess and minimize the impact of microlight nacelle and airfoil rapidly varying motions (RVM) on the WV components. In the final

  20. Climate change. Climate change and wind intensification in coastal upwelling ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sydeman, W J; García-Reyes, M; Schoeman, D S; Rykaczewski, R R; Thompson, S A; Black, B A; Bograd, S J

    2014-07-01

    In 1990, Andrew Bakun proposed that increasing greenhouse gas concentrations would force intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in eastern boundary current systems that contribute substantial services to society. Because there is considerable disagreement about whether contemporary wind trends support Bakun's hypothesis, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature on upwelling-favorable wind intensification. The preponderance of published analyses suggests that winds have intensified in the California, Benguela, and Humboldt upwelling systems and weakened in the Iberian system over time scales ranging up to 60 years; wind change is equivocal in the Canary system. Stronger intensification signals are observed at higher latitudes, consistent with the warming pattern associated with climate change. Overall, reported changes in coastal winds, although subtle and spatially variable, support Bakun's hypothesis of upwelling intensification in eastern boundary current systems. PMID:24994651

  1. IABC 83/The Winds of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association of Business Communicators, San Francisco, CA.

    Drawn from a conference focusing on the changing nature of the communication function, the papers in this collection analyze and outline the professional and personal developmental techniques necessary to anticipate and capitalize upon those changes. Among the specific topics discussed in the 32 papers are the following: (1) the techniques and…

  2. Evaluation of turbulent magnetic energy spectra in the three-dimensional wave vector domain in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S Peter; Narita, Y; Glassmeier, K H; Goldstein, M L; Safraoui, F; Treumann, R A

    2009-01-01

    Using four-point measurements of the CLUSTER spacecraft, the energy distribution of magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly in the three-dimensional wave vector domain in the range 3 x 10{sup -4} rad/km < k < 3 x 10{sup -3} rad/km. The analysis method takes account of a regular tetrahedron configuration of CLUSTER and the Doppler effect. The energy distribution in the flow rest frame is anisotropic, characterized by two distinct extended structures perpendicular to the mean magnetic field and furthermore perpendicular to the flow direction. The three-dimensional distribution is averaged around the direction of the mean magnetic field direction, and then is further reduced to one-dimensional distributions in the wave number domain parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. The one-dimensional energy spectra are characterized by the power law with the index -5/3 and furthermore very close energy density between parallel and perpendicular directions to the mean magnetic field at the same wave numbers. Though the distributions and the spectra are not covered in a wide range of wave vectors, our measurements suggest that the solar wind fluctuation is anisotropic in the three-dimensional wave vector space. It is, however, rather isotropic when reduced into the parallel and perpendicular wave vector geometries due to the second anisotropy imposed by the flow direction.

  3. Water Vapor Winds and Their Application to Climate Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lerner, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The retrieval of satellite-derived winds and moisture from geostationary water vapor imagery has matured to the point where it may be applied to better understanding longer term climate changes that were previously not possible using conventional measurements or model analysis in data-sparse regions. In this paper, upper-tropospheric circulation features and moisture transport covering ENSO periods are presented and discussed. Precursors and other detectable interannual climate change signals are analyzed and compared to model diagnosed features. Estimates of winds and humidity over data-rich regions are used to show the robustness of the data and its value over regions that have previously eluded measurement.

  4. Effects of Local Anthropogenic Changes on Potential Malaria Vector Anopheles hyrcanus and West Nile Virus Vector Culex modestus, Camargue, France

    PubMed Central

    Ponçon, Nicolas; Balenghien, Thomas; Toty, Céline; Ferré, Jean Baptiste; Thomas, Cyrille; Dervieux, Alain; L’Ambert, Grégory; Schaffner, Francis; Bardin, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Using historical data, we highlight the consequences of anthropogenic ecosystem modifications on the abundance of mosquitoes implicated as the current most important potential malaria vector, Anopheles hyrcanus, and the most important West Nile virus (WNV) vector, Culex modestus, in the Camargue region, France. From World War II to 1971, populations of these species increased as rice cultivation expanded in the region in a political context that supported agriculture. They then fell, likely because of decreased cultivation and increased pesticide use to control a rice pest. The species increased again after 2000 with the advent of more targeted pest-management strategies, mainly the results of European regulations decisions. An intertwined influence of political context, environmental constraints, technical improvements, and social factors led to changes in mosquito abundance that had potential consequences on malaria and WNV transmission. These findings suggest that anthropogenic changes should not be underestimated in vectorborne disease recrudescence. PMID:18258028

  5. Methods of Recording Rapid Wind Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnan, A

    1932-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to determine the rapid changes of air currents which impose varying stresses on the wings of airplanes. We attempted to express in figures the turbulence of the air, which perhaps plays some role in the behavior of airplanes in flight, as well as in the realization of certain methods of gliding flight. This is the reason which led us to conceive and develop the experimental equipment (hot-wire anemometer) described herein.

  6. Host Life History Strategy, Species Diversity, and Habitat Influence Trypanosoma cruzi Vector Infection in Changing Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. Methodology/Principal Findings R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as rmax, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of rmax were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. Conclusions/Significance In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially

  7. Potential contribution of wind energy to climate change mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.

    2014-08-01

    It is still possible to limit greenhouse gas emissions to avoid the 2 °C warming threshold for dangerous climate change. Here we explore the potential role of expanded wind energy deployment in climate change mitigation efforts. At present, most turbines are located in extra-tropical Asia, Europe and North America, where climate projections indicate continuity of the abundant wind resource during this century. Scenarios from international agencies indicate that this virtually carbon-free source could supply 10-31% of electricity worldwide by 2050 (refs , ). Using these projections within Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) climate forcing scenarios, we show that dependent on the precise RCP followed, pursuing a moderate wind energy deployment plan by 2050 delays crossing the 2 °C warming threshold by 1-6 years. Using more aggressive wind turbine deployment strategies delays 2 °C warming by 3-10 years, or in the case of RCP4.5 avoids passing this threshold altogether. To maximize these climate benefits, deployment of non-fossil electricity generation must be coupled with reduced energy use.

  8. SECULAR CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE'S WIND 1998-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Martin, John C.; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Walter, Frederick M.

    2012-05-20

    Stellar wind-emission features in the spectrum of eta Carinae have decreased by factors of 1.5-3 relative to the continuum within the last 10 years. We investigate a large data set from several instruments (STIS, GMOS, UVES) obtained between 1998 and 2011 and analyze the progression of spectral changes in direct view of the star, in the reflected polar-on spectra at FOS4, and at the Weigelt knots. We find that the spectral changes occurred gradually on a timescale of about 10 years and that they are dependent on the viewing angle. The line strengths declined most in our direct view of the star. About a decade ago, broad stellar wind-emission features were much stronger in our line-of-sight view of the star than at FOS4. After the 2009 event, the wind-emission line strengths are now very similar at both locations. High-excitation He I and N II absorption lines in direct view of the star strengthened gradually. The terminal velocity of Balmer P Cyg absorption lines now appears to be less latitude dependent, and the absorption strength may have weakened at FOS4. Latitude-dependent alterations in the mass-loss rate and the ionization structure of eta Carinae's wind are likely explanations for the observed spectral changes.

  9. Long-Term Changes in the Equatorial Pacific Trade Winds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Allan J.; Lebedev, Anna

    1996-05-01

    Past work has shown that surface zonal equatorial wind stress, zonally integrated from one side of the Pacific to the other, is the key variable for estimating long-term El Niño behavior in the eastern Pacific. The long-term behavior of this key variable is difficult to determine directly because of the paucity of the equatorial wind observations and because of false trends in the wind data introduced by gradual changes in the methods of wind measurement. However, surface pressure data generally does not suffer from these false trends and theory suggests that this key wind variable is linearly related to the difference (p) of surface atmospheric pressure between the eastern and western equatorial Pacific. Detrended COADS pressure in the eastern and western equatorial Pacific and post 1960 detrended equatorial wind stress zonally averaged across the Pacific were used to verify this relationship. Pressure difference and zonally averaged equatorial zonal windstress () were highly correlated (r = 0.90) and the regression also showed that advection of zonal momentum contributes substantially to the momentum balance in the equatorial atmospheric boundary layer. Further, hindcasts of eastern equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature and sea level indicated that from p was more accurate than from winds even since 1960 when wind data were more plentiful. This suggests that the simple pressure difference p is an effective way to monitor both in the past and in the future.Using the p time series as a proxy for zonally integrated wind stress suggests that the equatorial trades strengthened during the early and mid-1930s, weakened from the late 1930s to late 1950s, strengthened during the 1960s, and weakened rapidly since. This pattern is qualitatively consistent with the long record of sea surface temperature measurements at Puerto Chicama (Peru). The more recent rapid weakening is consistent with trends in several physical variables reported previously by others. The long

  10. Combining Climatic Projections and Dispersal Ability: A Method for Estimating the Responses of Sandfly Vector Species to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Dominik; Moeller, Philipp; Thomas, Stephanie M.; Naucke, Torsten J.; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Old World, sandfly species of the genus Phlebotomus are known vectors of Leishmania, Bartonella and several viruses. Recent sandfly catches and autochthonous cases of leishmaniasis hint on spreading tendencies of the vectors towards Central Europe. However, studies addressing potential future distribution of sandflies in the light of a changing European climate are missing. Methodology Here, we modelled bioclimatic envelopes using MaxEnt for five species with proven or assumed vector competence for Leishmania infantum, which are either predominantly located in (south-) western (Phlebotomus ariasi, P. mascittii and P. perniciosus) or south-eastern Europe (P. neglectus and P. perfiliewi). The determined bioclimatic envelopes were transferred to two climate change scenarios (A1B and B1) for Central Europe (Austria, Germany and Switzerland) using data of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. We detected the most likely way of natural dispersal (“least-cost path”) for each species and hence determined the accessibility of potential future climatically suitable habitats by integrating landscape features, projected changes in climatic suitability and wind speed. Results and Relevance Results indicate that the Central European climate will become increasingly suitable especially for those vector species with a current south-western focus of distribution. In general, the highest suitability of Central Europe is projected for all species in the second half of the 21st century, except for P. perfiliewi. Nevertheless, we show that sandflies will hardly be able to occupy their climatically suitable habitats entirely, due to their limited natural dispersal ability. A northward spread of species with south-eastern focus of distribution may be constrained but not completely avoided by the Alps. Our results can be used to install specific monitoring systems to the projected risk zones of potential sandfly establishment. This is urgently needed for adaptation

  11. Analysis of wind bias change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical analysis is presented of the temporal variability of wind vectors at 1 km altitude intervals from 0 to 27 km altitude after applying a digital filter to the original wind profile data sample.

  12. Effect of wind turbine generator model and siting on wind power changes out of large WECS arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleuter, R. A.; Park, G. L.; Lotfalian, M.; Dorsey, J.; Shayanfar, H.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of reducing the WECS generation change through selection of the wind turbine model for each site, selection of an appropriate siting configuration, and wind array controls are discussed. An analysis of wind generation change from an echelon and a farm for passage of a thunderstorm is presented. Reduction of the wind generation change over ten minutes is shown to reduce the increase in spinning reserve, unloadable generation and load following requirements on unit commitment when significant WECS generation is present and the farm penetration constraint is satisfied. Controls on the blade pitch angle of all wind turbines in an array or a battery control are shown to reduce both the wind generation change out of an array and the effective farm penetration in anticipation of a storm so that the farm penetration constraint may be satisfied.

  13. Effect of climate change on vector-borne disease risk in the UK.

    PubMed

    Medlock, Jolyon M; Leach, Steve A

    2015-06-01

    During the early part of the 21st century, an unprecedented change in the status of vector-borne disease in Europe has occurred. Invasive mosquitoes have become widely established across Europe, with subsequent transmission and outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya virus. Malaria has re-emerged in Greece, and West Nile virus has emerged throughout parts of eastern Europe. Tick-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease, continue to increase, or, in the case of tick-borne encephalitis and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever viruses, have changed their geographical distribution. From a veterinary perspective, the emergence of Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses show that northern Europe is equally susceptible to transmission of vector-borne disease. These changes are in part due to increased globalisation, with intercontinental air travel and global shipping transport creating new opportunities for invasive vectors and pathogens. However, changes in vector distributions are being driven by climatic changes and changes in land use, infrastructure, and the environment. In this Review, we summarise the risks posed by vector-borne diseases in the present and the future from a UK perspective, and assess the likely effects of climate change and, where appropriate, climate-change adaptation strategies on vector-borne disease risk in the UK. Lessons from the outbreaks of West Nile virus in North America and chikungunya in the Caribbean emphasise the need to assess future vector-borne disease risks and prepare contingencies for future outbreaks. Ensuring that adaptation strategies for climate change do not inadvertently exacerbate risks should be a primary focus for decision makers. PMID:25808458

  14. Predicting malaria vector distribution under climate change scenarios in China: Challenges for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Wang, Duoquan; Ma, Aimin; Hwang, Jimee; Bennett, Adam; Sturrock, Hugh J W; Fan, Junfu; Zhang, Wenjie; Yang, Dian; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Projecting the distribution of malaria vectors under climate change is essential for planning integrated vector control activities for sustaining elimination and preventing reintroduction of malaria. In China, however, little knowledge exists on the possible effects of climate change on malaria vectors. Here we assess the potential impact of climate change on four dominant malaria vectors (An. dirus, An. minimus, An. lesteri and An. sinensis) using species distribution models for two future decades: the 2030 s and the 2050 s. Simulation-based estimates suggest that the environmentally suitable area (ESA) for An. dirus and An. minimus would increase by an average of 49% and 16%, respectively, under all three scenarios for the 2030 s, but decrease by 11% and 16%, respectively in the 2050 s. By contrast, an increase of 36% and 11%, respectively, in ESA of An. lesteri and An. sinensis, was estimated under medium stabilizing (RCP4.5) and very heavy (RCP8.5) emission scenarios. in the 2050 s. In total, we predict a substantial net increase in the population exposed to the four dominant malaria vectors in the decades of the 2030 s and 2050 s, considering land use changes and urbanization simultaneously. Strategies to achieve and sustain malaria elimination in China will need to account for these potential changes in vector distributions and receptivity. PMID:26868185

  15. Predicting malaria vector distribution under climate change scenarios in China: Challenges for malaria elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Wang, Duoquan; Ma, Aimin; Hwang, Jimee; Bennett, Adam; Sturrock, Hugh J. W.; Fan, Junfu; Zhang, Wenjie; Yang, Dian; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2016-02-01

    Projecting the distribution of malaria vectors under climate change is essential for planning integrated vector control activities for sustaining elimination and preventing reintroduction of malaria. In China, however, little knowledge exists on the possible effects of climate change on malaria vectors. Here we assess the potential impact of climate change on four dominant malaria vectors (An. dirus, An. minimus, An. lesteri and An. sinensis) using species distribution models for two future decades: the 2030 s and the 2050 s. Simulation-based estimates suggest that the environmentally suitable area (ESA) for An. dirus and An. minimus would increase by an average of 49% and 16%, respectively, under all three scenarios for the 2030 s, but decrease by 11% and 16%, respectively in the 2050 s. By contrast, an increase of 36% and 11%, respectively, in ESA of An. lesteri and An. sinensis, was estimated under medium stabilizing (RCP4.5) and very heavy (RCP8.5) emission scenarios. in the 2050 s. In total, we predict a substantial net increase in the population exposed to the four dominant malaria vectors in the decades of the 2030 s and 2050 s, considering land use changes and urbanization simultaneously. Strategies to achieve and sustain malaria elimination in China will need to account for these potential changes in vector distributions and receptivity.

  16. Predicting malaria vector distribution under climate change scenarios in China: Challenges for malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Wang, Duoquan; Ma, Aimin; Hwang, Jimee; Bennett, Adam; Sturrock, Hugh J. W.; Fan, Junfu; Zhang, Wenjie; Yang, Dian; Feng, Xinyu; Xia, Zhigui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Projecting the distribution of malaria vectors under climate change is essential for planning integrated vector control activities for sustaining elimination and preventing reintroduction of malaria. In China, however, little knowledge exists on the possible effects of climate change on malaria vectors. Here we assess the potential impact of climate change on four dominant malaria vectors (An. dirus, An. minimus, An. lesteri and An. sinensis) using species distribution models for two future decades: the 2030 s and the 2050 s. Simulation-based estimates suggest that the environmentally suitable area (ESA) for An. dirus and An. minimus would increase by an average of 49% and 16%, respectively, under all three scenarios for the 2030 s, but decrease by 11% and 16%, respectively in the 2050 s. By contrast, an increase of 36% and 11%, respectively, in ESA of An. lesteri and An. sinensis, was estimated under medium stabilizing (RCP4.5) and very heavy (RCP8.5) emission scenarios. in the 2050 s. In total, we predict a substantial net increase in the population exposed to the four dominant malaria vectors in the decades of the 2030 s and 2050 s, considering land use changes and urbanization simultaneously. Strategies to achieve and sustain malaria elimination in China will need to account for these potential changes in vector distributions and receptivity. PMID:26868185

  17. Modeling vector-borne disease risk in migratory animals under climate change.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard J; Brown, Leone M; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-08-01

    Recent theory suggests that animals that migrate to breed at higher latitudes may benefit from reduced pressure from natural enemies, including pathogens ("migratory escape"), and that migration itself weeds out infected individuals and lowers infection prevalence ("migratory culling"). The distribution and activity period of arthropod disease vectors in temperate regions is expected to respond rapidly to climate change, which could reduce the potential for migratory escape. However, climate change could have the opposite effect of reducing transmission if differential responses in the phenology and distribution of migrants and disease vectors reduce their overlap in space and time. Here we outline a simple modeling framework for exploring the influence of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics in a migratory host. We investigate two scenarios under which pathogen transmission dynamics might be mediated by climate change: (1) vectors respond more rapidly than migrants to advancing phenology at temperate breeding sites, causing peak susceptible host density and vector emergence to diverge ("migratory mismatch") and (2) reduced migratory propensity allows increased nonbreeding survival of infected hosts and larger breeding-site epidemics (loss of migratory culling, here referred to as "sedentary amplification"). Our results highlight the need for continued surveillance of climate-induced changes to migratory behavior and vector activity to predict pathogen prevalence and its impacts on migratory animals. PMID:27252225

  18. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2008-04-22

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  19. Confidence and sensitivity study of the OAFlux multisensor synthesis of the global ocean surface vector wind from 1987 onward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lisan; Jin, Xiangze

    2014-10-01

    This study presented an uncertainty assessment of the high-resolution global analysis of daily-mean ocean-surface vector winds (1987 onward) by the Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project. The time series was synthesized from multiple satellite sensors using a variational approach to find a best fit to input data in a weighted least-squares cost function. The variational framework requires the a priori specification of the weights, or equivalently, the error covariances of input data, which are seldom known. Two key issues were investigated. The first issue examined the specification of the weights for the OAFlux synthesis. This was achieved by designing a set of weight-varying experiments and applying the criteria requiring that the chosen weights should make the best-fit of the cost function be optimal with regard to both input satellite observations and the independent wind time series measurements at 126 buoy locations. The weights thus determined represent an approximation to the error covariances, which inevitably contain a degree of uncertainty. Hence, the second issue addressed the sensitivity of the OAFlux synthesis to the uncertainty in the weight assignments. Weight perturbation experiments were conducted and ensemble statistics were used to estimate the sensitivity. The study showed that the leading sources of uncertainty for the weight selection are high winds (>15 ms-1) and heavy rain, which are the conditions that cause divergence in wind retrievals from different sensors. Future technical advancement made in wind retrieval algorithms would be key to further improvement of the multisensory synthesis in events of severe storms.

  20. A view from Minnesota: A changing climate for wind power

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, M.T.

    1997-12-31

    The author describes a program begun in Minnesota to address the problem of climate change and possible global warming. This projects aims at increasing understanding and appreciation of changes being seen in the US weather patterns and possible correlations with greenhouse gas emissions. Minnesota has taken a stance on mandating support for renewable power sources as a part of their electric utility mix. The author urges the business and industrial sectors of our economy to consider the impact on the US and its citizens of not supporting programs which are directed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, including support for wind power projects.

  1. Determination of the Wind-Velocity Vector Above the Ocean Surface Using the Image Spectrum of a Polarimetric Radar with Synthesized Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilova, M. A.; Kanevsky, M. B.; Balandina, G. N.; Karaev, V. Yu.; Stoffelen, A.; Verkhoev, A.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new method for determining the wind-velocity vector above the ocean surface using the data of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar. The preliminary calculations show that for wind waves, the location of the maximum in the radar image is unambiguously related to the wind velocity, whereas the wind direction is retrieved with an uncertainty of 180°, which is related to the central symmetry of the image spectrum. To eliminate the ambiguity when determining the wind direction, a criterion based on the information on the sign of the coefficient of correlation among the complex signals on the co- and cross polarizations is used. It is shown that using the polarimetric radar, it is theoretically possible to obtain information on both the wind velocity and direction without exact radar calibration.

  2. Ground-based remote sensing of wind vector and visibility: latest results from guideline development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesenberg, Jens; Danzeisen, Hans H.; Engelbart, Dirk; Fritzsche, Klaus; Klein, Volker; Muenkel, Christoph; Trickl, Thomas; Werner, Christian; Woppowa, Ljuba

    1999-09-01

    Methods which are in discussion to enter a VDI guideline will be presented. Examples of application in local scale area selected. The VDI 'Richtlinie VDI 3786 Umweltmeteorologie,' is divided in many parts. Part 15 shows the remote sensing methods for visibility measurements, part 14 describes the wind profile measurements. Wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer yield a very important contribution also to the investigation of atmospheric exchange processes. The wind field in the atmospheric boundary layer is highly variable in spatial and temporal scales. For a few applications a more frequent wind sensing is necessary, i.e. (1) on airports located in low level jet areas, (2) near chemical plants to get information of the transport of toxic gases from leakages,(3) for meteorology in general to improve the weather forecast, (4) for environment protection purposes like dispersion studies. The following statements are valid for visibility measurements: (1) Lidar can provide the same information of the visibility as conventional sensors, but in addition lidar will provide range resolved measurements. (2) It is possible to shrink a lidar down to the size of binoculars. (3) It is possible to measure local visibility with an eye-safe (class 1) lidar. (4) Layers can be detected up to 250 m distance in approximately 2 s even with a small size instrument.

  3. Predicting the effect of climate change on African trypanosomiasis: integrating epidemiology with parasite and vector biology

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean; Shrestha, Sourya; Tomlinson, Kyle W.; Vuong, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Climate warming over the next century is expected to have a large impact on the interactions between pathogens and their animal and human hosts. Vector-borne diseases are particularly sensitive to warming because temperature changes can alter vector development rates, shift their geographical distribution and alter transmission dynamics. For this reason, African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), a vector-borne disease of humans and animals, was recently identified as one of the 12 infectious diseases likely to spread owing to climate change. We combine a variety of direct effects of temperature on vector ecology, vector biology and vector–parasite interactions via a disease transmission model and extrapolate the potential compounding effects of projected warming on the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. The model predicts that epidemics can occur when mean temperatures are between 20.7°C and 26.1°C. Our model does not predict a large-range expansion, but rather a large shift of up to 60 per cent in the geographical extent of the range. The model also predicts that 46–77 million additional people may be at risk of exposure by 2090. Future research could expand our analysis to include other environmental factors that influence tsetse populations and disease transmission such as humidity, as well as changes to human, livestock and wildlife distributions. The modelling approach presented here provides a framework for using the climate-sensitive aspects of vector and pathogen biology to predict changes in disease prevalence and risk owing to climate change. PMID:22072451

  4. Vector-borne parasitic diseases--an overview of recent changes.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, D H

    1998-06-01

    This paper summarises the impact of different changes (environmental, ecological, developmental) on the one hand, with the impact of control measures on the other. The former group of changes have tended to exacerbate the incidence and prevalence of vector-borne parasitic diseases while the reduced public funds available for the health sector have reduced disease surveillance systems. However, some vector control/eradication programmes have been successful. Vector control in onchocerciasis and Chagas' disease and immediate host control in Guinea worm have reduced the public health importance of these disease. This contrasts, with malaria, where the complexity of different ecological situations and the variable vector ecology have made control difficult and epidemics frequent and unpredictable. Advances in our knowledge of how to implement and sustain insecticide-impregnated bednets which reduce morbidity and mortality in under 5-year olds will be a key issue for the coming years. In African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis, where control is dependent on effective diagnosis and surveillance followed by high-cost drug treatment, the health services are faced with major challenges--lack of drug availability and diagnostics no vector control--the diseases in some areas assuming epidemic status yet health services are unable to respond. Human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis are fatal if untreated, and require an emergency response approach. Changing vector distribution of Glossina is related to the ability of riverine flies of Glossina palpalis group to adapt to new vegetation patterns. In leishmaniasis changes have occurred in the distribution of the disease associated with development impact, urbanisation, civil unrest and changed agroforestry practice. PMID:9673871

  5. Characteristics of wind velocity and temperature change near an escarpment-shaped road embankment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small. PMID:25136681

  6. Characteristics of Wind Velocity and Temperature Change Near an Escarpment-Shaped Road Embankment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small. PMID:25136681

  7. A Delay Vector Variance based Marker for an Output-Only Assessment of Structural Changes in Tension Leg Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksic, V.; Wright, C.; Mandic, D. P.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    Although aspects of power generation of many offshore renewable devices are well understood, their dynamic responses under high wind and wave conditions are still to be investigated to a great detail. Output only statistical markers are important for these offshore devices, since access to the device is limited and information about the exposure conditions and the true behaviour of the devices are generally partial, limited, and vague or even absent. The markers can summarise and characterise the behaviour of these devices from their dynamic response available as time series data. The behaviour may be linear or nonlinear and consequently a marker that can track the changes in structural situations can be quite important. These markers can then be helpful in assessing the current condition of the structure and can indicate possible intervention, monitoring or assessment. This paper considers a Delay Vector Variance based marker for changes in a tension leg platform tested in an ocean wave basin for structural changes brought about by single column dampers. The approach is based on dynamic outputs of the device alone and is based on the estimation of the nonlinearity of the output signal. The advantages of the selected marker and its response with changing structural properties are discussed. The marker is observed to be important for monitoring the as- deployed structural condition and is sensitive to changes in such conditions. Influence of exposure conditions of wave loading is also discussed in this study based only on experimental data.

  8. Monte Carlo studies of ocean wind vector measurements by SCATT: Objective criteria and maximum likelihood estimates for removal of aliases, and effects of cell size on accuracy of vector winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The scatterometer on the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS) is studied by means of Monte Carlo techniques so as to determine the effect of two additional antennas for alias (or ambiguity) removal by means of an objective criteria technique and a normalized maximum likelihood estimator. Cells nominally 10 km by 10 km, 10 km by 50 km, and 50 km by 50 km are simulated for winds of 4, 8, 12 and 24 m/s and incidence angles of 29, 39, 47, and 53.5 deg for 15 deg changes in direction. The normalized maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) is correct a large part of the time, but the objective criterion technique is recommended as a reserve, and more quickly computed, procedure. Both methods for alias removal depend on the differences in the present model function at upwind and downwind. For 10 km by 10 km cells, it is found that the MLE method introduces a correlation between wind speed errors and aspect angle (wind direction) errors that can be as high as 0.8 or 0.9 and that the wind direction errors are unacceptably large, compared to those obtained for the SASS for similar assumptions.

  9. Climate Change and Vector Borne Diseases on NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Shepanek, Marc A.; Kamel, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Increasing global temperature, weather patterns with above average storm intensities, and higher sea levels have been identified as phenomena associated with global climate change. As a causal system, climate change could contribute to vector borne diseases in humans. Vectors of concern originate from the vicinity of Langley Research Center include mosquitos and ticks that transmit disease that originate regionally, nationwide, or from outside the US. Recognizing changing conditions, vector borne diseases propagate under climate change conditions, and understanding the conditions in which they may exist or propagate, presents opportunities for monitoring their progress and mitigating their potential impacts through communication, continued monitoring, and adaptation. Personnel comprise a direct and fundamental support to NASA mission success, continuous and improved understanding of climatic conditions, and the resulting consequence of disease from these conditions, helps to reduce risk in terrestrial space technologies, ground operations, and space research. This research addresses conditions which are attributed to climatic conditions which promote environmental conditions conducive to the increase of disease vectors. This investigation includes evaluation of local mosquito population count and rainfall data for statistical correlation and identification of planning recommendations unique to LaRC, other NASA Centers to assess adaptation approaches, Center-level planning strategies.

  10. Impact to Space Shuttle Vehicle Trajectory on Day of Launch from change in Low Frequency Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Puperi, Daniel; Leach, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle utilizes atmospheric winds on day of launch to develop throttle and steering commands to best optimize vehicle performance while keeping structural loading on the vehicle within limits. The steering commands and resultant trajectory are influenced by both the high and low frequency component of the wind. However, the low frequency component has a greater effect on the ascent design. Change in the low frequency wind content from the time of trajectory design until launch can induce excessive loading on the vehicle. Wind change limits have been derived to protect from launching in an environment where these temporal changes occur. Process of developing wind change limits are discussed followed by an observational study of temporal wind change in low frequency wind profiles at the NASA's Kennedy Space Center area are presented.

  11. Flare-related changes in pseudo-vector magnetic field derived from line-of-sight magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga; Gosain, Sanjay; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal field is a projection of full vector field to the line-of-sight direction. Thus, it is possible to derive some information about the vector field from line-of-sight data in round sunspots, assuming that average properties of vector magnetic field in these sunspots depend mostly on distance from center of sunspot. Under this assumption, one can reconstruct vertical, radial, and tangential components of vector magnetic field using azimuthal averaging. This technique can be useful for investigation of twist and inclination in magnetic field in particular in flaring regions when vector data are not available. In this study we validate the cylindrical symmetry technique on example of a simple round sunspot. Then we attempt to study changes in (pseudo-vector) magnetic fields in isolated and round sunspots associated with flare events using SDO/HMI longitudinal magnetograms. We compare the pseudo-vector results with vector data.

  12. Assessment of changes of vector borne diseases with wetland characteristics using multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheela, A M; Sarun, S; Justus, J; Vineetha, P; Sheeja, R V

    2015-04-01

    Vector borne diseases are a threat to human health. Little attention has been paid to the prevention of these diseases. We attempted to identify the significant wetland characteristics associated with the spread of chikungunya, dengue fever and malaria in Kerala, a tropical region of South West India using multivariate analyses (hierarchical cluster analysis, factor analysis and multiple regression). High/medium turbid coastal lagoons and inland water-logged wetlands with aquatic vegetation have significant effect on the incidence of chikungunya while dengue influenced by high turbid coastal beaches and malaria by medium turbid coastal beaches. The high turbidity in water is due to the urban waste discharge namely sewage, sullage and garbage from the densely populated cities and towns. The large extent of wetland is low land area favours the occurrence of vector borne diseases. Hence the provision of pollution control measures at source including soil erosion control measures is vital. The identification of vulnerable zones favouring the vector borne diseases will help the authorities to control pollution especially from urban areas and prevent these vector borne diseases. Future research should cover land use cover changes, climatic factors, seasonal variations in weather and pollution factors favouring the occurrence of vector borne diseases. PMID:25412801

  13. Evidence that implicit assumptions of 'no evolution' of disease vectors in changing environments can be violated on a rapid timescale.

    PubMed

    Egizi, Andrea; Fefferman, Nina H; Fonseca, Dina M

    2015-04-01

    Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be fixed over relevant time-scales, when they may actually be capable of rapid evolutionary change and even adaptation. We examine the genetic signature of a spatial expansion by an invasive vector into locations with novel temperature conditions compared to its native range as a proxy for how existing vector populations may respond to temporally changing habitat. Specifically, we compare invasions into different climate ranges and characterize the importance of selection from the invaded habitat. We demonstrate that vector species can exhibit evolutionary responses (altered allelic frequencies) to a temperature gradient in as little as 7-10 years even in the presence of high gene flow, and further, that this response varies depending on the strength of selection. We interpret these findings in the context of climate change predictions for vector populations and emphasize the importance of incorporating vector evolution into models of future vector-borne disease dynamics. PMID:25688024

  14. Climate change and threat of vector-borne diseases in India: are we prepared?

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Ramesh C; Pahwa, Sharmila; Dhillon, G P S; Dash, Aditya P

    2010-03-01

    It is unequivocal that climate change is happening and is likely to expand the geographical distribution of several vector-borne diseases, including malaria and dengue etc. to higher altitudes and latitudes. India is endemic for six major vector-borne diseases (VBD) namely malaria, dengue, chikungunya, filariasis, Japanese encephalitis and visceral leishmaniasis. Over the years, there has been reduction in the incidence of almost all the diseases except chikungunya which has re-emerged since 2005. The upcoming issue of climate change has surfaced as a new threat and challenge for ongoing efforts to contain vector-borne diseases. There is greater awareness about the potential impacts of climate change on VBDs in India and research institutions and national authorities have initiated actions to assess the impacts. Studies undertaken in India on malaria in the context of climate change impact reveal that transmission windows in Punjab, Haryana, Jammu and Kashmir and north-eastern states are likely to extend temporally by 2-3 months and in Orissa, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu there may be reduction in transmission windows. Using PRECIS model (driven by HadRM2) at the resolution of 50 x 50 Km for daily temperature and relative humidity for year 2050, it was found that Orissa, West Bengal and southern parts of Assam will still remain malarious and transmission windows will open up in Himachal Pradesh and north-eastern states etc. Impact of climate change on dengue also reveals increase in transmission with 2 C rise in temperature in northern India. Re-emergence of kala-azar in northern parts of India and reappearance of chikungunya mainly in southern states of India has also been discussed. The possible need to address the threat and efforts made in India have also been highlighted. The paper concludes with a positive lead that with better preparedness threat of climate change on vector-borne diseases may be negated. PMID:20155369

  15. Climate Change and Aedes Vectors: 21st Century Projections for Dengue Transmission in Europe.

    PubMed

    Liu-Helmersson, Jing; Quam, Mikkel; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Stenlund, Hans; Ebi, Kristie; Massad, Eduardo; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-05-01

    Warming temperatures may increase the geographic spread of vector-borne diseases into temperate areas. Although a tropical mosquito-borne viral disease, a dengue outbreak occurred in Madeira, Portugal, in 2012; the first in Europe since 1920s. This outbreak emphasizes the potential for dengue re-emergence in Europe given changing climates. We present estimates of dengue epidemic potential using vectorial capacity (VC) based on historic and projected temperature (1901-2099). VC indicates the vectors' ability to spread disease among humans. We calculated temperature-dependent VC for Europe, highlighting 10 European cities and three non-European reference cities. Compared with the tropics, Europe shows pronounced seasonality and geographical heterogeneity. Although low, VC during summer is currently sufficient for dengue outbreaks in Southern Europe to commence-if sufficient vector populations (either Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus) were active and virus were introduced. Under various climate change scenarios, the seasonal peak and time window for dengue epidemic potential increases during the 21st century. Our study maps dengue epidemic potential in Europe and identifies seasonal time windows when major cities are most conducive for dengue transmission from 1901 to 2099. Our findings illustrate, that besides vector control, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions crucially reduces the future epidemic potential of dengue in Europe. PMID:27322480

  16. Projected Future Distributions of Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in North America under Climate Change Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Miroslava; Feria Arroyo, Teresa Patricia; Casillas, Edgar A.; Sanchez-Cordero, Victor; Rivaldi, Chissa-Louise; Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease kills approximately 45 thousand people annually and affects 10 million people in Latin America and the southern United States. The parasite that causes the disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, can be transmitted by insects of the family Reduviidae, subfamily Triatominae. Any study that attempts to evaluate risk for Chagas disease must focus on the ecology and biogeography of these vectors. Expected distributional shifts of vector species due to climate change are likely to alter spatial patterns of risk of Chagas disease, presumably through northward expansion of high risk areas in North America. Methodology/Principal Findings We forecast the future (2050) distributions in North America of Triatoma gerstaeckeri and T. sanguisuga, two of the most common triatomine species and important vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern United States. Our aim was to analyze how climate change might affect the future shift of Chagas disease in North America using a maximum entropy algorithm to predict changes in suitable habitat based on vector occurrence points and predictive environmental variables. Projections based on three different general circulation models (CCCMA, CSIRO, and HADCM3) and two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2) were analyzed. Twenty models were developed for each case and evaluated via cross-validation. The final model averages result from all twenty of these models. All models had AUC >0.90, which indicates that the models are robust. Our results predict a potential northern shift in the distribution of T. gerstaeckeri and a northern and southern distributional shift of T. sanguisuga from its current range due to climate change. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study provide baseline information for monitoring the northward shift of potential risk from Chagas disease in the face of climate change. PMID:24831117

  17. Regional and seasonal response of a West Nile virus vector to climate change.

    PubMed

    Morin, Cory W; Comrie, Andrew C

    2013-09-24

    Climate change will affect the abundance and seasonality of West Nile virus (WNV) vectors, altering the risk of virus transmission to humans. Using downscaled general circulation model output, we calculate a WNV vector's response to climate change across the southern United States using process-based modeling. In the eastern United States, Culex quinquefasciatus response to projected climate change displays a latitudinal and elevational gradient. Projected summer population depressions as a result of increased immature mortality and habitat drying are most severe in the south and almost absent further north; extended spring and fall survival is ubiquitous. Much of California also exhibits a bimodal pattern. Projected onset of mosquito season is delayed in the southwestern United States because of extremely dry and hot spring and summers; however, increased temperature and late summer and fall rains extend the mosquito season. These results are unique in being a broad-scale calculation of the projected impacts of climate change on a WNV vector. The results show that, despite projected widespread future warming, the future seasonal response of C. quinquefasciatus populations across the southern United States will not be homogeneous, and will depend on specific combinations of local and regional conditions. PMID:24019459

  18. Regional and seasonal response of a West Nile virus vector to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Cory W.; Comrie, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change will affect the abundance and seasonality of West Nile virus (WNV) vectors, altering the risk of virus transmission to humans. Using downscaled general circulation model output, we calculate a WNV vector's response to climate change across the southern United States using process-based modeling. In the eastern United States, Culex quinquefasciatus response to projected climate change displays a latitudinal and elevational gradient. Projected summer population depressions as a result of increased immature mortality and habitat drying are most severe in the south and almost absent further north; extended spring and fall survival is ubiquitous. Much of California also exhibits a bimodal pattern. Projected onset of mosquito season is delayed in the southwestern United States because of extremely dry and hot spring and summers; however, increased temperature and late summer and fall rains extend the mosquito season. These results are unique in being a broad-scale calculation of the projected impacts of climate change on a WNV vector. The results show that, despite projected widespread future warming, the future seasonal response of C. quinquefasciatus populations across the southern United States will not be homogeneous, and will depend on specific combinations of local and regional conditions. PMID:24019459

  19. Things Fall Apart: Topology Change From Winding Tachyons

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.

    2005-02-04

    We argue that closed string tachyons drive two spacetime topology changing transitions--loss of genus in a Riemann surface and separation of a Riemann surface into two components. The tachyons of interest are localized versions of Scherk-Schwarz winding string tachyons arising on Riemann surfaces in regions of moduli space where string-scale tubes develop. Spacetime and world-sheet renormalization group analyses provide strong evidence that the decay of these tachyons removes a portion of the spacetime, splitting the tube into two pieces. We address the fate of the gauge fields and charges lost in the process, generalize it to situations with weak flux backgrounds, and use this process to study the type 0 tachyon, providing further evidence that its decay drives the theory sub-critical. Finally, we discuss the time-dependent dynamics of this topology-changing transition and find that it can occur more efficiently than analogous transitions on extended supersymmetric moduli spaces, which are limited by moduli trapping.

  20. Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

  1. Robust Change Vector Analysis (RCVA) for multi-sensor very high resolution optical satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonfeld, Frank; Feilhauer, Hannes; Braun, Matthias; Menz, Gunter

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of rapid land cover/land use changes by means of remote sensing is often based on data acquired under varying and occasionally unfavorable conditions. In addition, such analyses frequently use data acquired by different sensor systems. These acquisitions often differ with respect to sun position and sensor viewing geometry which lead to characteristic effects in each image. These differences may have a negative impact on reliable change detection. Here, we propose an approach called Robust Change Vector Analysis (RCVA), aiming to mitigate these effects. RCVA is an improvement of the widely-used Change Vector Analysis (CVA), developed to account for pixel neighborhood effects. We used a RapidEye and Kompsat-2 cross-sensor change detection test to demonstrate the efficiency of RCVA. Our analysis showed that RCVA results in fewer false negatives as well as false positives when compared to CVA under similar test conditions. We conclude that RCVA is a powerful technique which can be utilized to reduce spurious changes in bi-temporal change detection analyses based on high- or very-high spatial resolution imagery.

  2. Projection of Climate Change Influences on U.S. West Nile Virus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Heidi E.; Young, Alex; Lega, Joceline; Andreadis, Theodore G.; Schurich, Jessica; Comrie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    While estimates of the impact of climate change on health are necessary for health care planners and climate change policy makers, models to produce quantitative estimates remain scarce. We describe a freely available dynamic simulation model parameterized for three West Nile virus vectors, which provides an effective tool for studying vector-borne disease risk due to climate change. The Dynamic Mosquito Simulation Model is parameterized with species specific temperature-dependent development and mortality rates. Using downscaled daily weather data, we estimate mosquito population dynamics under current and projected future climate scenarios for multiple locations across the country. Trends in mosquito abundance were variable by location, however, an extension of the vector activity periods, and by extension disease risk, was almost uniformly observed. Importantly, mid-summer decreases in abundance may be off-set by shorter extrinsic incubation periods resulting in a greater proportion of infective mosquitoes. Quantitative descriptions of the effect of temperature on the virus and mosquito are critical to developing models of future disease risk. PMID:27057131

  3. Projected changes in the annual wind-wave cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin; Hemer, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The uneven distribution of the sun's energy directly and indirectly drives physical atmosphere and ocean processes. This creates intricate spatial patterns within the seasonal cycle where higher order harmonics are seen to play an important role in regional climates. The annual cycle and associated harmonics are the strongest oscillations within the climate system and describe the majority of variance across the oceans. Consequently when studying climate oscillations, it is common practice to remove the seasonal cycle in order to elucidate inter-annual cycles. Furthermore the annual cycle plays an important role in the evolution of other inter-annual oscillations through non-linear coupling (e.g ENSO). Despite the important role of the seasons within the climate system very few studies describe the seasonality with any rigor. Therefore our focus is to describe the higher harmonics linked to the annual cycle and how they are expected to evolve in a changing climate. Using simulations from the Coordinated Ocean Wave Climate Project, the seasonality of multiple mid and end of the 21st century wind-wave climate projections are analyzed relative to historical experiment forced simulations. A comparison of various GCM forced wave simulations to reanalysis datasets reveals that a multi-model ensemble best describes the seasons. This ensemble is used to describe the changes within the wave seasonality. A systematic analysis reveals the primary mode of the seasons is relatively unchanged in the mid and end century. The largest changes occur in the second and third modes. The second mode defines the shift or translation within the seasons while the third mode characterizes relative change between the seasonal extremes (ie sharpening or flattening of the waveform). The relative changes in the second and third modes are not homogeneous and intricate patterns are revealed. Certain regions have sharper contrast in seasonality while other regions have a longer strong season. In

  4. The Learning Process and Technological Change in Wind Power: Evidence from China's CDM Wind Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Tian; Popp, David

    2016-01-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is a project-based carbon trade mechanism that subsidizes the users of climate-friendly technologies and encourages technology transfer. The CDM has provided financial support for a large share of Chinese wind projects since 2002. Using pooled cross-sectional data of 486 registered CDM wind projects in China…

  5. Climate Change, Public Health, and Decision Support: The New Threat of Vector-borne Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, F.; Kumar, S.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change and vector-borne diseases constitute a massive threat to human development. It will not be enough to cut emissions of greenhouse gases-the tide of the future has already been established. Climate change and vector-borne diseases are already undermining the world's efforts to reduce extreme poverty. It is in the best interests of the world leaders to think in terms of concerted global actions, but adaptation and mitigation must be accomplished within the context of local community conditions, resources, and needs. Failure to act will continue to consign developed countries to completely avoidable health risks and significant expense. Failure to act will also reduce poorest of the world's population-some 2.6 billion people-to a future of diminished opportunity. Northrop Grumman has taken significant steps forward to develop the tools needed to assess climate change impacts on public health, collect relevant data for decision making, model projections at regional and local levels; and, deliver information and knowledge to local and regional stakeholders. Supporting these tools is an advanced enterprise architecture consisting of high performance computing, GIS visualization, and standards-based architecture. To address current deficiencies in local planning and decision making with respect to regional climate change and its effect on human health, our research is focused on performing a dynamical downscaling with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to develop decision aids that translate the regional climate data into actionable information for users. For the present climate WRF was forced with the Max Planck Institute European Center/Hamburg Model version 5 (ECHAM5) General Circulation Model 20th century simulation. For the 21th century climate, we used an ECHAM5 simulation with the Special Report on Emissions (SRES) A1B emissions scenario. WRF was run in nested mode at spatial resolution of 108 km, 36 km and 12 km and 28 vertical levels

  6. Metabolic changes in rat urine after acute paraquat poisoning and discriminated by support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wen, Congcong; Wang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Meiling; Wang, Shuanghu; Geng, Peiwu; Sun, Fa; Chen, Mengchun; Lin, Guanyang; Hu, Lufeng; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat is quick-acting and non-selective, killing green plant tissue on contact; it is also toxic to human beings and animals. In this study, we developed a urine metabonomic method by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate the effect of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both partial least squares discriminate analysis and principal component analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the levels of benzeneacetic acid and hexadecanoic acid of the acute paraquat poisoning group (intragastric administration 36 mg/kg) increased, while the levels of butanedioic acid, pentanedioic acid, altronic acid decreased. Based on these urinary metabolomics data, support vector machine was applied to discriminate the metabolomic change of paraquat groups from the control group, which achieved 100% classification accuracy. In conclusion, metabonomic method combined with support vector machine can be used as a useful diagnostic tool in paraquat-poisoned rats. PMID:26419410

  7. Quantifying changes in the bone microarchitecture using Minkowski-functionals and scaling vectors: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Link, Thomas M.; Boehm, Holger; Monetti, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease leading to de-mineralization and increased risk of fracture. The two major factors that determine the biomechanical competence of bone are the degree of mineralization and the micro-architectural integrity. Today, modern imaging modalities exist that allow to depict structural details of trabecular bone tissue. Recently, non-linear techniques in 2D and 3D based on the scaling vector method (SVM) and the Minkowski functionals (MF) have been introduced, which show excellent performance in predicting bone strength and fracture risk. However, little is known about the performance of the various parameters with respect to monitoring structural changes due to progression of osteoporosis or as a result of medical treatment. We test and compare the two methodologies using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameter of the system, become discernible by applying both the MF and the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results obtained with SVM are superior to those obtained with the Minkowski functionals. An additive combination of both measures drastically increases the sensitivity to slight changes in bone structures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  8. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHANGING PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELDS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, H. M.; Mao, X. J.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, H. Q.; Deng, Y. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, G. P.

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations have provided evidence that the solar photospheric magnetic fields could have rapid and permanent changes in both longitudinal and transverse components associated with major flares. As a result, the Lorentz force (LF) acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior could be perturbed, and the change of LF is always nearly in the downward direction. However, these rapid and permanent changes have not been systematically investigated, yet, using vector magnetograms. In this paper, we analyze photospheric vector magnetograms covering five flares to study the evolution of photospheric magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate two-dimensional spatial distributions of the changing LF. Around the major flaring polarity inversion line, the net change of the LF is directed downward in an area of {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} for X-class flares. For all events, the white-light observations show that sunspots darken in this location after flares, and magnetic fields become more inclined, which is consistent with the ideas put forward by Hudson et al. and Fisher et al., and observations.

  9. Magnetosheath for almost-aligned solar wind magnetic field and flow vectors: Windobservations across the dawnside magnetosheath at X = -12 Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Charles

    While there are many approximations describing the flow of the solar wind past the mag-netosphere in the magnetosheath, the case of perfectly aligned (parallel or anti-parallel) in-terplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind flow vectors can be treated exactly in an magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach (Spreiter and Rizzi, 1974). In this work we examine a case of nearly-opposed (to within 15 deg) interplanetary field and flow vectors, which occurred on October 24-25, 2001 during passage of the last interplanetary coronal mass ejection in an ejecta merger. Interplanetary data are from the ACE spacecraft. Simultaneously Wind was crossing the near-Earth (X -13 Re) geomagnetic tail and subsequently made a 5-hour-long magnetosheath crossing close to the ecliptic plane (Z = -0.7 Re). Geomagnetic activity was returning steadily to quiet, "ground" conditions. We first compare the predictions of the Spre-iter and Rizzi theory with the Wind magnetosheath observations and find fair agreement, in particular as regards the proportionality of the magnetic field strength and the product of the plasma density and bulk speed. We then carry out a small-perturbation analysis of the Spreiter and Rizzi solution to account for the small IMF components perpendicular to the flow vector. The resulting expression is compared to the time series of the observations and satisfactory agreement is obtained. We also present and discuss observations in the dawnside boundary layer of pulsed, high-speed (v 600 km/s) flows exceeding the solar wind flow speeds. We examine various generating mechanisms and suggest that the most likely causeis a wave of frequency 3.2 mHz excited at the inner edge of the boundary layer.

  10. The impact of climate change on the U.S. wind energy resource

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Kirk-Davidoff; Daniel Barrie

    2013-03-19

    The growing need for low-carbon emitting electricity sources has resulted in rapid growth in the wind power industry. The size and steadiness of the offshore wind resource has attracted growing investment in the planning of offshore wind turbine installations. Decisions about the location and character of wind farms should be made with an eye not only to present but also future wind resource, which may change as increasing carbon dioxide forces reductions in the poleward temperature gradient, and thus potentially in the mean tropospheric westerly winds. I propose to use the new North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program climate projections to estimate the change of the wind power resource under various carbon dioxide loading scenarios and for a range of climate models. We will compare our assessment with both our assessment based on the IPCC AR4 model runs, to explore the extent to which improved model resolution changes the prediction for the wind power resource, and with present day estimates from reanalysis and scatterometer winds.

  11. Simulation comparison of a decoupled longitudinal control system and a velocity vector control wheel steering system during landings in wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simulator comparison of the velocity vector control wheel steering (VCWS) system and a decoupled longitudinal control system is presented. The piloting task was to use the electronic attitude direction indicator (EADI) to capture and maintain a 3 degree glide slope in the presence of wind shear and to complete the landing using the perspective runway included on the EADI. The decoupled control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The decoupled control system improved the pilots' ability to control airspeed and flight path angle during the final stages of an approach made in severe wind shear. The system also improved their ability to complete safe landings. The pilots preferred the decoupled control system in severe winds and, on a pilot rating scale, rated the approach and landing task with the decoupled control system as much as 3 to 4 increments better than use of the VCWS system.

  12. Recent tax law changes create new opportunities for leasing wind energy property

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer, George J.

    2010-01-15

    Recent changes in tax law make leveraged lease transactions far more attractive on paper than they were before the changes. However, changes in the economy and the financial industry and other changes in law counterbalance the favorable tax law changes and make it uncertain whether lease transactions will be used to finance new wind facilities. (author)

  13. Wind shear measuring on board an airliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauspe, P.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement technique which continuously determines the wind vector on board an airliner during takeoff and landing is introduced. Its implementation is intended to deliver sufficient statistical background concerning low frequency wind changes in the atmospheric boundary layer and extended knowledge about deterministic wind shear modeling. The wind measurement scheme is described and the adaptation of apparatus onboard an A300 airbus is shown. Preliminary measurements made during level flight demonstrate the validity of the method.

  14. North Sea wind climate in changing weather regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Ivonne; Rockel, Burkhardt

    2015-04-01

    Results from regional climate models (RCMs) are getting more and more important in future wind climate assessment. From RCMs often only the daily wind speed is available, but no information on prevailing wind direction of each day. Weather regime classification can close this gap and models ability of simulating surface wind speed can be analysed in detail. Several objective regime classifications have been investigated to be a sufficient diagnostic tool to evaluate the present wind climate at the German and Dutch coastal area of the North Sea. The classification by Jenkinson and Collison (1977) uses values for mean sea level pressure at 16 locations centered over the North Sea. Beside the predefined 8 prevailed wind directions and the two possibilities on cyclonic or anticyclonic turbulence, 2x8 hybrid weather types can be defined. In this way 27 different regimes can be distinguished including a class of non-classifiable cases. The 27 regimes could be reduced to a number of 11 by allotting the hybrid types to the directional or the centered types. As the classification is carried out for the North Sea based on ERA40 mean sea level pressure the different regimes clearly reflect the mean wind characteristics at the stations. Comparing the wind roses for the individual observations leads to the assumption that the regime classification described before fits the requirements to carry out the regime dependent evaluation of the RCMs with a focus on the German and Dutch coast. Trends in the occurrence of the regimes in the winter period of 1961 to 2000 show an increase of the regimes with Western and Southwestern wind directions and a decrease of wind events from Eastern directions in the North Sea. The trend is dominated by the strong positive phase of the NAO especially in the months January to March starting in the beginning of the 1980s. Due to the applied method ERA40 and the RCMs do not necessarily show the same regime at each day. The agreement among the RCM

  15. Mosquitoes and Culicoides biting midges: vector range and the influence of climate change.

    PubMed

    Elbers, A R W; Koenraadt, C J M; Meiswinkel, R

    2015-04-01

    Vector-borne animal diseases pose a continuous and substantial threat to livestock economies around the globe. Increasing international travel, the globalisation of trade, and climate change are likely to play a progressively more important role in the introduction, establishment and spread of arthropod-borne pathogens worldwide. A review of the literature reveals that many climatic variables, functioning singly or in combination, exert varying effects on the distribution and range of Culicoides vector midges and mosquitoes. For example, higher temperatures may be associated with increased insect abundance--thereby amplifying the risk of disease transmission--but there are no indications yet of dramatic shifts occurring in the geographic range of Culicoides midges. However, the same cannot be said for mosquitoes: over the last few decades, multiple Asian species have established themselves in Europe, spread and are unlikely to ever be eradicated. Research on how insects respond to changes in climate is still in its infancy. The authors argue that we need to grasp how other annectant changes, such as extremes in precipitation (drought and flooding), may affect the dispersal capability of mosquitoes. Models are useful for assessing the interplay between mosquito vectors expanding their range and the native flora and fauna; however, ecological studies employing classical mark-release-recapture techniques remain essential for addressing fundamental questions about the survival and dispersal of mosquito species, with the resulting parameters fed directly into new-generation disease transmission models. Studies on the eventual impact of mosquitoes on animal and human health should be tackled through large-scale integrated research programmes. Such an approach calls for more collaborative efforts, along the lines of the One Health Initiative. PMID:26470453

  16. Dynamics of Sylvatic Chagas Disease Vectors in Coastal Ecuador Is Driven by Changes in Land Cover

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Mario J.; Terán, David; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a serious public health problem in Latin America where about ten million individuals show Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite significant success in controlling domiciliated triatomines, sylvatic populations frequently infest houses after insecticide treatment which hampers long term control prospects in vast geographical areas where vectorial transmission is endemic. As a key issue, the spatio-temporal dynamics of sylvatic populations is likely influenced by landscape yet evidence showing this effect is rare. The aim of this work is to examine the role of land cover changes in sylvatic triatomine ecology, based on an exhaustive field survey of pathogens, vectors, hosts, and microhabitat characteristics' dynamics. Methodology and Principal Findings The study was performed in agricultural landscapes of coastal Ecuador as a study model. Over one year, a spatially-randomized sampling design (490 collection points) allowed quantifying triatomine densities in natural, cultivated and domestic habitats. We also assessed infection of the bugs with trypanosomes, documented their microhabitats and potential hosts, and recorded changes in landscape characteristics. In total we collected 886 individuals, mainly represented by nymphal stages of one triatomine species Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. As main results, we found that 1) sylvatic triatomines had very high T. cruzi infection rates (71%) and 2) densities of T. cruzi-infected sylvatic triatomines varied predictably over time due to changes in land cover and occurrence of associated rodent hosts. Conclusion We propose a framework for identifying the factors affecting the yearly distribution of sylvatic T. cruzi vectors. Beyond providing key basic information for the control of human habitat colonization by sylvatic vector populations, our framework highlights the importance of both environmental and sociological factors in shaping the spatio-temporal population dynamics of triatomines. A better

  17. Potential Influence of Climate Change on Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases: A Review and Proposed Research Plan

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James N.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Khan, Ali S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of complex interactions of climate variables at the levels of the pathogen, vector, and host, the potential influence of climate change on vector-borne and zoonotic diseases (VBZDs) is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Climate effects on the nonvector-borne zoonotic diseases are especially obscure and have received scant treatment. Objective We described known and potential effects of climate change on VBZDs and proposed specific studies to increase our understanding of these effects. The nonvector-borne zoonotic diseases have received scant treatment and are emphasized in this paper. Data sources and synthesis We used a review of the existing literature and extrapolations from observations of short-term climate variation to suggest potential impacts of climate change on VBZDs. Using public health priorities on climate change, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we developed six specific goals for increasing understanding of the interaction between climate and VBZDs and for improving capacity for predicting climate change effects on incidence and distribution of VBZDs. Conclusions Climate change may affect the incidence of VBZDs through its effect on four principal characteristics of host and vector populations that relate to pathogen transmission to humans: geographic distribution, population density, prevalence of infection by zoonotic pathogens, and the pathogen load in individual hosts and vectors. These mechanisms may interact with each other and with other factors such as anthropogenic disturbance to produce varying effects on pathogen transmission within host and vector populations and to humans. Because climate change effects on most VBZDs act through wildlife hosts and vectors, understanding these effects will require multidisciplinary teams to conduct and interpret ecosystem-based studies of VBZD pathogens in host and vector populations and to identify the hosts, vectors, and pathogens with the

  18. Changes in the Burgers Vector of Perfect Dislocation Loops without Contact with the External Dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, K.; Hatanaka, M.; Mori, H.; Kuramoto, E.; Ono, K.

    2006-03-31

    We report the observations of a new type of changing process in the Burgers vector of dislocations by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Small interstitial-type perfect dislocation loops in bcc iron with diameters less than approximately 50 nm are transformed from a 1/2<111> loop to another 1/2<111> one or an energetically unfavorable <100> one; furthermore, a <100> loop is transformed to a 1/2<111> one. These transformations occurred on high-energy electron irradiation or simple heating without contact with external dislocations. The origin of these phenomena is discussed.

  19. Operation of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system under conditions of stochastic change of wind energy.

    PubMed

    Tomczewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author's opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical parameters of a wind turbine-energy storage system and its geographical location one can determine the boundary capacity of the storage, which helps prevent power cuts to the grid at the assumed probability. Flywheel energy storage was selected due to its characteristics and technical parameters. The storage capacity was determined based on an empirical relationship using the results of the proposed statistical and energetic analysis of the measured wind velocity courses. A detailed algorithm of the WT-FESS with the power grid system was developed, eliminating short-term breaks in the turbine operation and periods when the wind turbine power was below the assumed level. PMID:25215326

  20. Operation of a Wind Turbine-Flywheel Energy Storage System under Conditions of Stochastic Change of Wind Energy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author's opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical parameters of a wind turbine-energy storage system and its geographical location one can determine the boundary capacity of the storage, which helps prevent power cuts to the grid at the assumed probability. Flywheel energy storage was selected due to its characteristics and technical parameters. The storage capacity was determined based on an empirical relationship using the results of the proposed statistical and energetic analysis of the measured wind velocity courses. A detailed algorithm of the WT-FESS with the power grid system was developed, eliminating short-term breaks in the turbine operation and periods when the wind turbine power was below the assumed level. PMID:25215326

  1. Projecting Wind Energy Potential Under Climate Change with Ensemble of Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Shashikanth, K.; Ghosh, S.; Mukherjee, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing global concern over energy sustainability and security, triggered by a number of issues, such as (though not limited to): fossil fuel depletion, energy resource geopolitics, economic efficiency versus population growth debate, environmental concerns and climate change. Wind energy is a renewable and sustainable form of energy in which wind turbines convert the kinetic energy of wind into electrical energy. Global warming and differential surface heating may significantly impact the wind velocity and hence the wind energy potential. Sustainable design of wind mills requires understanding the impacts of climate change on wind energy potential, which we evaluate here with multiple General Circulation Models (GCMs). GCMs simulate the climate variables globally considering the greenhouse emission scenarios provided as Representation Concentration path ways (RCPs). Here we use new generation climate model outputs obtained from Coupled model Intercomparison Project 5(CMIP5). We first compute the wind energy potential with reanalysis data (NCEP/ NCAR), at a spatial resolution of 2.50, where the gridded data is fitted to Weibull distribution and with the Weibull parameters, the wind energy densities are computed at different grids. The same methodology is then used, to CMIP5 outputs (resultant of U-wind and V-wind) of MRI, CMCC, BCC, CanESM, and INMCM4 for historical runs. This is performed separately for four seasons globally, MAM, JJA, SON and DJF. We observe the muti-model average of wind energy density for historic period has significant bias with respect to that of reanalysis product. Here we develop a quantile based superensemble approach where GCM quantiles corresponding to selected CDF values are regressed to reanalysis data. It is observed that this regression approach takes care of both, bias in GCMs and combination of GCMs. With superensemble, we observe that the historical wind energy density resembles quite well with

  2. Climate, Environmental, and Socioeconomic Change Weighing up the Balance in Vector-Borne Disease Transmission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parham, Paul; Waldock, Johanna; Christophides, George; Hemming, Deborah; Agusto, Folashade; Evans, Katherine J; Fefferman, Nina; Gaff, Holly; Gumel, Abba; LaDeau, Shannon; et al

    2015-01-01

    Arguably one of the most important effects of climate change is the potential impact on human health. While this is likely to take many forms, the implications for future transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs), given their ongoing contribution to global disease burden, are both extremely important and highly uncertain. In part, this is due not only to data limitations and methodological challenges when integrating climate-driven VBD models and climate change projections, but, perhaps most crucially, the multitude of epidemiological, ecological, and socioeconomic factors that drive VBD transmission, and this complexity has generated considerable debate over the last 10-15 years. Inmore » this article, and Theme Issue, we seek to elucidate current knowledge around this topic, identify key themes and uncertainties, evaluate ongoing challenges and open research questions, and, crucially, offer some solutions for the field moving forwards. Although many of these challenges are ubiquitous across multiple VBDs, more specific issues also arise in different vector-pathogen systems. This Theme Issue seeks to cover both, reflected in the breadth and depth of the topics and VBD-systems considered, itself strongly indicative of the challenging, but necessary, multidisciplinary nature of this research field.« less

  3. Climate, Environmental, and Socioeconomic Change Weighing up the Balance in Vector-Borne Disease Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, Paul; Waldock, Johanna; Christophides, George; Hemming, Deborah; Agusto, Folashade; Evans, Katherine J; Fefferman, Nina; Gaff, Holly; Gumel, Abba; LaDeau, Shannon; Lenhart, Suzanne; Mickens, Ronald; Naumova, Elena; Ostfeld, Richard; Ready, Paul; Thomas, Matthew; Velasco-Hernandez, Jorge; Edwin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Arguably one of the most important effects of climate change is the potential impact on human health. While this is likely to take many forms, the implications for future transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs), given their ongoing contribution to global disease burden, are both extremely important and highly uncertain. In part, this is due not only to data limitations and methodological challenges when integrating climate-driven VBD models and climate change projections, but, perhaps most crucially, the multitude of epidemiological, ecological, and socioeconomic factors that drive VBD transmission, and this complexity has generated considerable debate over the last 10-15 years. In this article, and Theme Issue, we seek to elucidate current knowledge around this topic, identify key themes and uncertainties, evaluate ongoing challenges and open research questions, and, crucially, offer some solutions for the field moving forwards. Although many of these challenges are ubiquitous across multiple VBDs, more specific issues also arise in different vector-pathogen systems. This Theme Issue seeks to cover both, reflected in the breadth and depth of the topics and VBD-systems considered, itself strongly indicative of the challenging, but necessary, multidisciplinary nature of this research field.

  4. Effects of El Niño-driven changes in wind patterns on North Pacific albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Thorne, L H; Conners, M G; Hazen, E L; Bograd, S J; Antolos, M; Costa, D P; Shaffer, S A

    2016-06-01

    Changes to patterns of wind and ocean currents are tightly linked to climate change and have important implications for cost of travel and energy budgets in marine vertebrates. We evaluated how El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven wind patterns affected breeding Laysan and black-footed albatross across a decade of study. Owing to latitudinal variation in wind patterns, wind speed differed between habitat used during incubation and brooding; during La Niña conditions, wind speeds were lower in incubating Laysan (though not black-footed) albatross habitat, but higher in habitats used by brooding albatrosses. Incubating Laysan albatrosses benefited from increased wind speeds during El Niño conditions, showing increased travel speeds and mass gained during foraging trips. However, brooding albatrosses did not benefit from stronger winds during La Niña conditions, instead experiencing stronger cumulative headwinds and a smaller proportion of trips in tailwinds. Increased travel costs during brooding may contribute to the lower reproductive success observed in La Niña conditions. Furthermore, benefits of stronger winds in incubating habitat may explain the higher reproductive success of Laysan albatross during El Niño conditions. Our findings highlight the importance of considering habitat accessibility and cost of travel when evaluating the impacts of climate-driven habitat change on marine predators. PMID:27278360

  5. Evaluation of High-Resolution Ocean Surface Vector Winds Measured by QuikSCAT Scatterometer in Coastal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy; Stiles, Bryan W.

    2004-01-01

    The SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT covers approximately 90% of the global ocean under clear and cloudy condition in 24 h, and the standard data product has 25-km spatial resolution. Such spatial resolution is not sufficient to resolve small-scale processes, especially in coastal oceans. Based on range-compressed normalized backscatter and a modified wind retrieval algorithm, a coastal wind dataset at 12.5-km resolution was produced. Even with larger error, the high-resolution winds, in medium to high strength, would still be useful over coastal ocean. Using measurements from moored buoys from the National Buoy Data Center, the high-resolution QuikSCAT wind data are found to have similar accuracy as standard data in the open ocean. The accuracy of both high- and standard-resolution winds, particularly in wind directions, is found to degrade near shore. The increase in error is likely caused by the inadequacy of the geophysical model function/ambiguity removal scheme in addressing coastal conditions and light winds situations. The modified algorithm helps to bring the directional accuracy of the high-resolution winds to the accuracy of the standard-resolution winds in near-shore regions, particularly in the nadir and far zones across the satellite track.

  6. 20% Wind Energy - Diversifying Our Energy Portfolio and Addressing Climate Change (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-05-01

    This brochure describes the R&D efforts needed for wind energy to meet 20% of the U.S. electrical demand by 2030. In May 2008, DOE published its report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, which presents an in-depth analysis of the potential for wind energy in the United States and outlines a potential scenario to boost wind electric generation from its current production of 16.8 gigawatts (GW) to 304 GW by 2030. According to the report, achieving 20% wind energy by 2030 could help address climate change by reducing electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 825 million metric tons (20% of the electric utility sector CO2 emissions if no new wind is installed by 2030), and it will enhance our nation's energy security by diversifying our electricity portfolio as wind energy is an indigenous energy source with stable prices not subject to fuel volatility. According to the report, increasing our nation's wind generation could also boost local rural economies and contribute to significant growth in manufacturing and the industry supply chain. Rural economies will benefit from a substantial increase in land use payments, tax benefits and the number of well-paying jobs created by the wind energy manufacturing, construction, and maintenance industries. Although the initial capital costs of implementing the 20% wind scenario would be higher than other generation sources, according to the report, wind energy offers lower ongoing energy costs than conventional generation power plants for operations, maintenance, and fuel. The 20% scenario could require an incremental investment of as little as $43 billion (net present value) more than a base-case no new wind scenario. This would represent less than 0.06 cent (6 one-hundredths of 1 cent) per kilowatt-hour of total generation by 2030, or roughly 50 cents per month per household. The report concludes that while achieving the 20% wind scenario is technically achievable, it will require enhanced transmission infrastructure

  7. Environmental change and water-related, vector borne diseases in eastern Africa: the HEALTHY FUTURES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David; Kienberger, Stefan; Tompkins, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Pathogens that spend time outside the human body, and any organisms involved in their transmission, have particular ecological requirements; as environment, including climate, conditions change, then the transmission characteristics of associated pathogens - and the diseases caused - are also likely to vary. Relationships between environment and health in many parts of the world remain poorly studied and are often overlooked, however. This is particularly the case in developing countries, because of budgetary and available expertise constraints. Moreover the relationship is often confounded by other factors. These other factors contribute to human vulnerability, and thus to the overall disease risk due to environmental change. This presentation will highlight the importance of environmental, including climate, change information to a better understanding of the risks to health of projected future environmental changes, and to the more efficient and effective use of scarce health resources in the developing world. The paper will focus on eastern Africa, and in particular the health effects of future projected environmental change impacts on water-related, vector borne diseases in the East African Community region. Moreover the paper will highlight how the EU FP7-funded project HEALTHY FUTURES is, through a broadly-based, integrative approach that distinguishes environmental change-induced health hazard from health risk aims to support the health decisions making process, thereby attempting to help mitigate negative health impacts.

  8. An appraisal of the full geomagnetic vector in wind-blown sediments - does it have a future? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchinsky, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent progress in the relative paleointensity (RPI) studies of the loess and paleosol deposits of China demonstrate the applicability of the technique in some sections. The PRI record of the Lingtai section (Pan et al., 2001) is mostly comparable to the reference curves of Valet et al. (2005) and Channel et al. (2009). Climate driven chemical alterations of remnant magnetization signal is additionally suggested as an explanation to the intervals of dissimilarities. The newest results of Yang et al. (2012) reveal more complex situations. At the Baoji section, where pedogenesis is relatively weak, the RPI results might possibly suggest a reflection of global paleointensity variations. The record from the Xifeng section, where pedogenesis is stronger, does not reveal any interpretable results. Studies of the Luochuan section suggest that chemical remnant magnetization is strongly linked to the pedogenesis process implying serious constrains on the interpretation of the high resolution paleomagnetic records from the paleosol and the underlying loess intervals (Liu and Zhang, 2013). At the same time, recent paleomagnetic and mineral magnetic investigations indicate that the Alaskan loess is an excellent geomagnetic direction recorder in the upper Matuyama and Brunhes epoch (Evans et al., 2011). The fine structure of the geomagnetic field can be accurately evaluated for the intervals, which are reliably dated with modern techniques (Jensen, 2013). The strong magnetic signal carried by magnetite from the igneous rock sources overwrites complexities caused by the pedogenesis process, therefore our newly obtained Alaskan geomagnetic record is the first candidate for both reliable paleointensity data set from the wind-blown sediments and the fine structure of the full geoomagnetic vector (inclination, declination, RPI). High resolution geochronology and high latitude position of the Alaskan loess help resolving the fine features of the geomagnetic excursions which are

  9. Evaluation of wind vectors observed by HY-2A scatterometer using ocean buoy observations, ASCAT measurements, and numerical model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dawei; Shen, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The first Chinese microwave ocean environment satellite HY-2A was launched successfully in August, 2011. This study presents a quality assessment of HY-2A scatterometer (HYSCAT) data based on comparison with ocean buoy data, the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) data, and numerical model data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The in-situ observations include those from buoy arrays operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) project. Only buoys located offshore and in deep water were analyzed. The temporal and spatial collocation windows between HYSCAT data and buoy observations were 30 min and 25 km, respectively. The comparisons showed that the wind speeds and directions observed by HYSCAT agree well with the buoy data. The root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs) of wind speed and direction for the HYSCAT standard wind products are 1.90 m/s and 22.80°, respectively. For the HYSCAT-ASCAT comparison, the temporal and spatial differences were limited to 1 h and 25 km, respectively. This comparison yielded RMSEs of 1.68 m/s for wind speed and 19.1° for wind direction. We also compared HYSCAT winds with reanalysis data from NCEP. The results show that the RMSEs of wind speed and direction are 2.6 m/s and 26°, respectively. The global distribution of wind speed residuals (HYSCAT-NCEP) is also presented here for evaluation of the HYSCAT-retrieved wind field globally. Considering the large temporal and spatial differences of the collocated data, it is concluded that the HYSCAT-retrieved wind speed and direction met the mission requirements, which were 2 m/s and 20° for wind speeds in the range 2-24 m/s. These encouraging assessment results show that the wind data obtained from HYSCAT will be useful for the scientific community.

  10. Eclipse-induced wind changes over the British Isles on the 20 March 2015.

    PubMed

    Gray, S L; Harrison, R G

    2016-09-28

    The British Isles benefits from dense meteorological observation networks, enabling insights into the still-unresolved effects of solar eclipse events on the near-surface wind field. The near-surface effects of the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 are derived through comparison of output from the Met Office's operational weather forecast model (which is ignorant of the eclipse) with data from two meteorological networks: the Met Office's land surface station (MIDAS) network and a roadside measurement network operated by Vaisala. Synoptic-evolution relative calculations reveal the cooling and increase in relative humidity almost universally attributed to eclipse events. In addition, a slackening of wind speeds by up to about 2 knots in already weak winds and backing in wind direction of about 20° under clear skies across middle England are attributed to the eclipse event. The slackening of wind speed is consistent with the previously reported boundary layer stabilization during eclipse events. Wind direction changes have previously been attributed to a large-scale 'eclipse-induced cold-cored cyclone', mountain slope flows, and changes in the strength of sea breezes. A new explanation is proposed here by analogy with nocturnal wind changes at sunset and shown to predict direction changes consistent with those observed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550759

  11. Future changes to the Indonesian Throughflow and Pacific circulation: The differing role of wind and deep circulation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen Gupta, Alex; McGregor, Shayne; Sebille, Erik; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Brown, Jaclyn N.; Santoso, Agus

    2016-02-01

    Climate models consistently project a substantial decrease in the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) in response to enhanced greenhouse warming. On interannual timescales ITF changes are largely related to tropical Pacific wind variability. However, on the multidecadal timescales investigated here we demonstrate that regional winds and associated changes in the upper ocean circulation cannot explain the projected ITF decrease. Instead, the decrease is related to a weakening in the northward flow of deep waters entering the Pacific basin at ~40°S and an associated reduction in the net basin-wide upwelling to the north of the southern tip of Australia. This can be traced back to consistent changes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and Southern Ocean overturning, although questions still remain as to the ultimate drivers. In contrast to the ITF decrease, substantial projected changes to the upper ocean circulation of the Pacific basin are well explained by robust changes in the surface winds.

  12. Age-related changes in the control of finger force vectors.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Shweta; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2010-12-01

    We explored changes in finger interaction in the process of healthy aging as a window into neural control strategies of natural movements. In particular, we quantified the amount of force produced by noninstructed fingers in different directions, the amount of force produced by the instructed finger orthogonally to the task direction, and the strength of multifinger synergies stabilizing the total force magnitude and direction during accurate force production. Healthy elderly participants performed accurate isometric force production tasks in five directions by individual fingers and by all four fingers acting together. Their data were compared with a dataset obtained in a similar earlier study of young subjects. Finger force vectors were measured using six-component force/torque sensors. Multifinger synergies were quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. The elderly participants produced lower force magnitudes by noninstructed fingers and higher force magnitudes by instructed fingers in nontask directions. They showed strong synergies stabilizing the magnitude and direction of the total force vector. However, the synergy indexes were significantly lower than those observed in the earlier study of young subjects. The results are consistent with an earlier hypothesis of preferential weakening of intrinsic hand muscles with age. We interpret the findings as a shift in motor control from synergic to element-based, which may be causally linked to the documented progressive neuronal death at different levels of the neural axis. PMID:20829494

  13. Effect of sudden solar wind dynamic pressure changes at subauroral latitudes - Change in magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Petrinec, S. M.; Ginskey, M.

    1993-01-01

    The observations obtained during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) from the magnetometers of the IGS network extending from Cambridge, England, to Tromso, Norway, are used to study the response of subauroral current systems to sudden changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. Observations show that the response is very strong at subauroral latitudes. The preliminary response in the H component is a brief, small increase in the dayside morning sector and a decrease in the aftenoon and night sectors. The main response in the horizontal field (the H and D components) is toward the pole except in the dayside morning sector. The inferred ionospheric current is mainly a circulatory system flowing counterclockwise when viewed from the north pole everywhere at subauroral latitudes except the dayside morning sector.

  14. Effect of sudden solar wind dynamic pressure changes at subauroral latitudes: Change in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Le, G.; Russell, C.T.; Petrinec, S.M.; Ginskey, M. )

    1993-03-01

    The observations obtained during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) from the magnetometers of the IGS network extending from Cambridge, England, to Tromso, Norway, are used to study the response of subauroral current systems to sudden changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. Observations show that the response is very strong at subauroral latitudes. The preliminary response in the H component is a brief, small increase in the dayside moring sector and a decrease in the afternoon and night sectors. The main response in the horizontal field (the H and D components) is toward the pole except in the dayside morning sector. The inferred ionospheric current is mainly a circulatory system flowing counterclockwise when viewed form the north pole everywhere at subauroral latitudes except the dayside morning sector. 29 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Enhancement of the double flexible pace search threshold determination for change vector analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouzi, S. A.; Vidal, A.; Bentounes, H. A.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing is one of the most reliable ways to monitor land use and land cover change of large areas. On the other hand, satellite images from different agencies are becoming accessible due to the new user dissemination policies. For that reason, interpretation of remotely sensed data in a spatiotemporal context is becoming a valuable research topic. In the present day, a map of change has a great significant for scientific purposes or planning and management applications. However, it is difficult to extract useful visual information from the large collection of available satellite images. For that reason, automatic or semi-automatic exploration is needed. One of the key stages in the change detection methods is threshold selection. This threshold determination problem has been addressed by several recent techniques based on Change Vector Analysis (CVA). Thus, this work provides a simple semi-automatic procedure that defines the change/no change condition and a comparative study will be involved together with the previous existing method called Double Flexible Pace Search (DFPS). This study uses Landsat Thematic Mapper scenes acquired on different dates in an Algerian region. First, some training data sets containing all possible classes of change are required and their respective supervised posterior probability maps for each scene are obtained. The selected supervised classifier is based on the Maximum Likelihood method. Then four training sets (two sets from each date) are chosen from their corresponding probability maps based on their spatial location in the original images. The optimal average will be obtained as an average of the thresholds obtained at every set. This work verifies that the proposed approach is effective on the selected area, providing improved change map results.

  16. Wind-tunnel investigation of the powered low-speed longitudinal aerodynamics of the Vectored-Engine-Over (VEO) wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W.; Whitten, P. D.; Stumpfl, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation incorporating both static and wind-on testing was conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the effects of vectored thrust along with spanwise blowing on the low-speed aerodynamics of an advanced fighter configuration. Data were obtained over a large range of thrust coefficients corresponding to takeoff and landing thrust settings for many nozzle configurations. The complete set of static thrust data and the complete set of longitudinal aerodynamic data obtained in the investigation are presented. These data are intended for reference purposes and, therefore, are presented without analysis or comment. The analysis of the thrust-induced effects found in the investigation are not discussed.

  17. Integrated data processing of remotely sensed and vector data for building change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofina, N.; Ehlers, M.; Michel, U.

    2012-10-01

    In recent years natural disasters have had an increasing impact leading to tremendous economic and human losses. Remote sensing technologies are being used more often for rapid detection and visualization of changes in the affected areas, providing essential information for damage assessment, planning and coordination of recovery activities. This study presents a GIS-based approach for the detection of damaged buildings. The methodology is based on the integrated analysis of vector data containing information about the original urban layout and remotely sensed images obtained after a catastrophic event. For the classification of building integrity a new `Detected Part of Contour' (DPC) feature was developed. The DPC feature defines a part of the building contour that can be detected in the related remotely sensed image. It reaches maximum value (100%) if the investigated building contour is intact. Next, several features based on the analysis of textural information of the remotely sensed image are considered. Finally, a binary classification of building conditions concludes the change detection analysis. The proposed method was applied to the 2010 earthquake in Qinghai (China). The results indicate that a GIS-based analysis can markedly improve the accuracy of change detection analysis. The proposed methodology has been developed solely within the Open Source Software environment (GRASS GIS, Python, Orange). The employment of Open Source Software provides the way for an innovative, flexible and costeffective implementation of change detection operations.

  18. Climate change influences on global distributions of dengue and chikungunya virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lindsay P; Luther, Caylor; Moo-Llanes, David; Ramsey, Janine M; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Peterson, A Townsend

    2015-04-01

    Numerous recent studies have illuminated global distributions of human cases of dengue and other mosquito-transmitted diseases, yet the potential distributions of key vector species have not been incorporated integrally into those mapping efforts. Projections onto future conditions to illuminate potential distributional shifts in coming decades are similarly lacking, at least outside Europe. This study examined the global potential distributions of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in relation to climatic variation worldwide to develop ecological niche models that, in turn, allowed anticipation of possible changes in distributional patterns into the future. Results indicated complex global rearrangements of potential distributional areas, which--given the impressive dispersal abilities of these two species--are likely to translate into actual distributional shifts. This exercise also signalled a crucial priority: digitization and sharing of existing distributional data so that models of this sort can be developed more rigorously, as present availability of such data is fragmentary and woefully incomplete. PMID:25688023

  19. Modelling potential changes in marine biogeochemistry due to large-scale offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan; Rees, Jon; Limpenny, Sian

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale renewable energy generation by offshore wind farms may lead to changes in marine ecosystem processes through the following mechanism: 1) wind-energy extraction leads to a reduction in local surface wind speeds; 2) these lead to a reduction in the local wind wave height; 3) as a consequence there's a reduction in SPM resuspension and concentrations; 4) this results in an improvement in under-water light regime, which 5) may lead to increased primary production, which subsequently 6) cascades through the ecosystem. A three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamics-biogeochemistry model (GETM_ERSEM) was used to investigate this process for a hypothetical wind farm in the central North Sea, by running a reference scenario and a scenario with a 10% reduction (as was found in a case study of a small farm in Danish waters) in surface wind velocities in the area of the wind farm. The ERSEM model included both pelagic and benthic processes. The results showed that, within the farm area, the physical mechanisms were as expected, but with variations in the magnitude of the response depending on the ecosystem variable or exchange rate between two ecosystem variables (3-28%, depending on variable/rate). Benthic variables tended to be more sensitive to the changes than pelagic variables. Reduced, but noticeable changes also occurred for some variables in a region of up to two farm diameters surrounding the wind farm. An additional model run in which the 10% reduction in surface wind speed was applied only for wind speeds below the generally used threshold of 25 m/s for operational shut-down showed only minor differences from the run in which all wind speeds were reduced. These first results indicate that there is potential for measurable effects of large-scale offshore wind farms on the marine ecosystem, mainly within the farm but for some variables up to two farm diameters away. However, the wave and SPM parameterisations currently used in the model are crude and need to be

  20. ERS-1 scatterometer calibration and validation activities at ECMWF. B: From radar backscatter characteristics to wind vector solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffelen, AD; Anderson, David L. T.; Woiceshyn, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    Calibration and validation activities for the ERS-1 scatterometer were carried out at ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast) complementary to the 'Haltenbanken' field campaign off the coast of Norway. At a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) center a wealth of verifying data is available both in time and space. This data is used to redefine the wind retrieval procedure given the instrumental characteristics. It was found that a maximum likelihood estimation procedure to obtain the coefficients of a reformulated sigma deg to wind relationship should use radar measurements in logarithmic rather than physical space, and use winds as the wind components rather than wind speed and direction. Doing this, a much more accurate transfer function than the one currently operated by ESA was derived. Sigma deg measurement space shows no signature of a separation in an upwind solution cone and a downwind solution cone. As such signature was anticipated in ESA's wind direction ambiguity removal algorithm, reconsideration of the procedure is necessary. Despite the fact that revisions have to be made in the process of wind retrieval; a grid potential is shown for scatterometry in meteorology and climatology.

  1. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site: Evidence for a Change in Wind Regime from Lander and Orbiter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael D.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2000-01-01

    Surface features related to the wind are observed in the vicinity of the Mars Pathfinder (MPR landing site data from the lander and in data from orbit by the Viking Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor missions. Features seen from the surface include wind tails associated with small rocks, barchanoid duneforms, ripplelike patterns, and ventifact flutes cut into some rocks. Features seen from orbit include wind tails associated with impact craters, ridges inferred to be duneforms, and modified crater rims interpreted to have been eroded and mantled by windblown material. The orientations of these features show two prevailing directions. One is inferred to represent winds from the northeast, which is consistent with strongest winds predicted by a general circulation model to occur during the Martian northern winter under current conditions. A second wind blowing from the ESE was responsible for modifying the crater rims and cutting some of the ventifacts. The two wind regimes could reflect a change in climate related to Mars' obliquity or some other, unknown factor. Regardless of the cause, the MPF area has been subjected to a complex pattern of winds and supply of small particles, and the original surface formed by sedimentary processes from Tiu and Ares Vallis flooding events has been modified by repeated burial and exhumation.

  2. SeaWinds Scatterometer Wind Vector Retrievals Within Hurricanes Using AMSR and NEXRAD to Perform Corrections for Precipitation Effects: Comparison of AMSR and NEXRAD Retrievals of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla; Callahan, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The opportunity provided by satellite scatterometers to measure ocean surface winds in strong storms and hurricanes is diminished by the errors in the received backscatter (SIGMA-0) caused by the attenuation, scattering and surface roughening produced by heavy rain. Providing a good rain correction is a very challenging problem, particularly at Ku band (13.4 GHz) where rain effects are strong. Corrections to the scatterometer measurements of ocean surface winds can be pursued with either of two different methods: empirical or physical modeling. The latter method is employed in this study because of the availability of near simultaneous and collocated measurements provided by the MIDORI-II suite of instruments. The AMSR was designed to measure atmospheric water-related parameters on a spatial scale comparable to the SeaWinds scatterometer. These quantities can be converted into volumetric attenuation and scattering at the Ku-band frequency of SeaWinds. Optimal estimates of the volume backscatter and attenuation require a knowledge of the three dimensional distribution of reflectivity on a scale comparable to that of the precipitation. Studies selected near the US coastline enable the much higher resolution NEXRAD reflectivity measurements evaluate the AMSR estimates. We are also conducting research into the effects of different beam geometries and nonuniform beamfilling of precipitation within the field-of-view of the AMSR and the scatterometer. Furthermore, both AMSR and NEXRAD estimates of atmospheric correction can be used to produce corrected SIGMA-0s, which are then input to the JPL wind retrieval algorithm.

  3. Wave spectral response to sudden changes in wind direction in finite-depth waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aijaz, Saima; Rogers, W. Erick; Babanin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The response of a wind-sea spectrum to sudden changes in wind directions of 180° and 90° is investigated. Numerical simulations using the third-generation wave spectral model SWAN have been undertaken at micro timescales of 30 s and fine spatial resolution of less than 10 m. The results have been validated against the wave data collected during the field campaign at Lake George, Australia. The newly implemented 'ST6' physics in the SWAN model has been evaluated using a selection of bottom-friction terms and the two available functions for the nonlinear energy transfer: (1) exact solution of the nonlinear term (XNL), and (2) discrete interactions approximation (DIA) that parameterizes the nonlinear term. Good agreement of the modelled data is demonstrated directly with the field data and through the known experimental growth curves obtained from the extensive Lake George data set. The modelling results show that of the various combinations of models tested, the ST6/XNL model provides the most reliable computations of integral and spectral wave parameters. When the winds and waves are opposing (180° wind turn), the XNL is nearly twice as fast in the aligning the young wind-sea with the new wind direction than the DIA. In this case, the young wind-sea gradually decouples from the old waves and forms a new secondary peak. Unlike the 180° wind turn, there is no decoupling in the 90° wind turn and the entire spectrum rotates smoothly in the new direction. In both cases, the young wind-sea starts developing in the new wind direction within 10 min of the wind turn for the ST6 while the directional response of the default physics lags behind with a response time that is nearly double of ST6. The modelling results highlight the differences in source term balance among the different models in SWAN. During high wind speeds, the default settings provide a larger contribution from the bottom-friction dissipation than the whitecapping. In contrast, the whitecapping

  4. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Cameron; Capps, Scott

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  5. [Impact of changes in the environment on vector-transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Mouchet, J; Carnevale, P

    1997-01-01

    We have defined the relationship between infectious diseases and environmental conditions and considered the development of this relationship to its current situation, where human intervention is occurring more often and is becoming more aggressive. The increase in the transport of freight and passengers by air has allowed parasite vectors to spread quickly and easily over large distances. Every country can now be reached from any other country within a couple of days. Usually, foreign species are unable to establish themselves and to persist in the new environment; but the recent arrival of Aedes albopictus in Albania, Italy and the Americas is a cause for concern. Demographic pressure has increased the need for land and the exploitation of new areas leads to large changes in the vegetation. The classic example of this man-made damage is the destruction of tropical forest in Western Africa, but the destruction of herbaceous vegetation, such as papyrus, in East Africa, could also have serious epidemiological consequences. Streams and rivers have been managed for power production and irrigation. The use of dams, both large and small, and the culture of rice in paddy-fields produces large expanses of water which are suitable breeding grounds for mosquitoes and snails, the vectors of human diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. They are, however, of lesser importance in Asia and the Americas. Urbanization imposes a set of very similar structures on a specific rural environment. The effect of these two factors on each other determines the pathologies associated with each town. The suburban area is a specific environment where both urban and rural diseases occur and are made worse by poor hygiene conditions (waste, sewage, etc.). However, not all man-made changes to the environment cause a deterioration in public health. Urban and agricultural development projects must consider these issues and should use medical and environmental studies to

  6. Limited change in dune mobility in response to a large decrease in wind power in semi-arid northern China since the 1970s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, J.A.; Swinehart, J.B.; Lu, H.; Miao, X.; Cha, P.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The climatic controls on dune mobility, especially the relative importance of wind strength, remain incompletely understood. This is a key research problem in semi-arid northern China, both for interpreting past dune activity as evidence of paleoclimate and for predicting future environmental change. Potential eolian sand transport, which is approximately proportional to wind power above the threshold for sand entrainment, has decreased across much of northern China since the 1970s. Over the same period, effective moisture (ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration) has not changed significantly. This "natural experiment" provides insight on the relative importance of wind power as a control on dune mobility in three dunefields of northern China (Mu Us, Otindag, and Horqin), although poorly understood and potentially large effects of human land use complicate interpretation. Dune forms in these three regions are consistent with sand transport vectors inferred from weather station data, suggesting that wind directions have remained stable and the stations adequately represent winds that shaped the dunes. The predicted effect of weaker winds since the 1970s would be dune stabilization, with lower sand transport rates allowing vegetation cover to expand. Large portions of all three dunefields remained stabilized by vegetation in the 1970s despite high wind power. Since the 1970s, trends in remotely sensed vegetation greenness and change in mobile dune area inferred from sequential Landsat images do indicate widespread dune stabilization in the eastern Mu Us region. On the other hand, expansion of active dunes took place farther west in the Mu Us dunefield and especially in the central Otindag dunefield, with little overall change in two parts of the Horqin dunes. Better ground truth is needed to validate the remote sensing analyses, but results presented here place limits on the relative importance of wind strength as a control on dune mobility in the

  7. Characterization Of Ocean Wind Vector Retrievals Using ERS-2 High-Resolution Long-Term Dataset And Buoy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polverari, F.; Talone, M.; Crapolicchio, R. Levy, G.; Marzano, F.

    2013-12-01

    The European Remote-sensing Satellite (ERS)-2 scatterometer provides wind retrievals over Ocean. To satisfy the needs of high quality and homogeneous set of scatterometer measurements, the European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the project Advanced Scatterometer Processing System (ASPS) with which a long-term dataset of new ERS-2 wind products, with an enhanced resolution of 25km square, has been generated by the reprocessing of the entire ERS mission. This paper presents the main results of the validation work of such new dataset using in situ measurements provided by the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA). The comparison indicates that, on average, the scatterometer data agree well with buoys measurements, however the scatterometer tends to overestimates lower winds and underestimates higher winds.

  8. Cytoplasmic pH dynamics in maize pulvinal cells induced by gravity vector changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannes, E.; Collings, D. A.; Rink, J. C.; Allen, N. S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, changes in orientation of stems are perceived by pulvinal tissue, which responds to the stimulus by differential growth resulting in upward bending of the stem. The amyloplast-containing bundle sheath cells are the sites of gravity perception, although the initial steps of gravity perception and transmission remain unclear. In columella cells of Arabidopsis roots, we previously found that cytoplasmic pH (pH(c)) is a mediator in early gravitropic signaling (A.C. Scott, N.S. Allen [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1291-1298). The question arises whether pH(c) has a more general role in signaling gravity vector changes. Using confocal ratiometric imaging and the fluorescent pH indicator carboxy seminaphtorhodafluor acetoxymethyl ester acetate, we measured pH(c) in the cells composing the maize pulvinus. When stem slices were gravistimulated and imaged on a horizontally mounted confocal microscope, pH(c) changes were only apparent within the bundle sheath cells, and not in the parenchyma cells. After turning, cytoplasmic acidification was observed at the sides of the cells, whereas the cytoplasm at the base of the cells where plastids slowly accumulated became more basic. These changes were most apparent in cells exhibiting net amyloplast sedimentation. Parenchyma cells and isolated bundle sheath cells did not show any gravity-induced pH(c) changes although all cell types responded to external stimuli in the predicted way: Propionic acid and auxin treatments induced acidification, whereas raising the external pH caused alkalinization. The results suggest that pH(c) has an important role in the early signaling pathways of maize stem gravitropism.

  9. Cytoplasmic pH Dynamics in Maize Pulvinal Cells Induced by Gravity Vector Changes1[w

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, Eva; Collings, David A.; Rink, Jochen C.; Allen, Nina Strömgren

    2001-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, changes in orientation of stems are perceived by pulvinal tissue, which responds to the stimulus by differential growth resulting in upward bending of the stem. The amyloplast-containing bundle sheath cells are the sites of gravity perception, although the initial steps of gravity perception and transmission remain unclear. In columella cells of Arabidopsis roots, we previously found that cytoplasmic pH (pHc) is a mediator in early gravitropic signaling (A.C. Scott, N.S. Allen [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1291–1298). The question arises whether pHc has a more general role in signaling gravity vector changes. Using confocal ratiometric imaging and the fluorescent pH indicator carboxy seminaphtorhodafluor acetoxymethyl ester acetate, we measured pHc in the cells composing the maize pulvinus. When stem slices were gravistimulated and imaged on a horizontally mounted confocal microscope, pHc changes were only apparent within the bundle sheath cells, and not in the parenchyma cells. After turning, cytoplasmic acidification was observed at the sides of the cells, whereas the cytoplasm at the base of the cells where plastids slowly accumulated became more basic. These changes were most apparent in cells exhibiting net amyloplast sedimentation. Parenchyma cells and isolated bundle sheath cells did not show any gravity-induced pHc changes although all cell types responded to external stimuli in the predicted way: Propionic acid and auxin treatments induced acidification, whereas raising the external pH caused alkalinization. The results suggest that pHc has an important role in the early signaling pathways of maize stem gravitropism. PMID:11553740

  10. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes

    PubMed Central

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  11. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  12. Changes in wind pattern alter albatross distribution and life-history traits.

    PubMed

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Louzao, Maite; de Grissac, Sophie; Delord, Karine

    2012-01-13

    Westerly winds in the Southern Ocean have increased in intensity and moved poleward. Using long-term demographic and foraging records, we show that foraging range in wandering albatrosses has shifted poleward in conjunction with these changes in wind pattern, while their rates of travel and flight speeds have increased. Consequently, the duration of foraging trips has decreased, breeding success has improved, and birds have increased in mass by more than 1 kilogram. These positive consequences of climate change may be temporary if patterns of wind in the southern westerlies follow predicted climate change scenarios. This study stresses the importance of foraging performance as the key link between environmental changes and population processes. PMID:22246774

  13. Winds of Change: How Black Holes May Shape Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    New observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provide evidence for powerful winds blowing away from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy. This discovery indicates that "average" supermassive black holes may play an important role in the evolution of the galaxies in which they reside. For years, astronomers have known that a supermassive black hole grows in parallel with its host galaxy. And, it has long been suspected that material blown away from a black hole - as opposed to the fraction of material that falls into it -- alters the evolution of its host galaxy. A key question is whether such "black hole blowback" typically delivers enough power to have a significant impact. Powerful relativistic jets shot away from the biggest supermassive black holes in large, central galaxies in clusters like Perseus are seen to shape their host galaxies, but these are rare. What about less powerful, less focused galaxy-scale winds that should be much more common? "We're more interested here in seeing what an "average"-sized supermassive black hole can do to its galaxy, not the few, really big ones in the biggest galaxies," said Dan Evans of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who presented these results at the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Kona, Hawaii. Evans and his colleagues used Chandra for five days to observe NGC 1068, one of the nearest and brightest galaxies containing a rapidly growing supermassive black hole. This black hole is only about twice as massive as the one in the center of our Galaxy, which is considered to be a rather ordinary size. The X-ray images and spectra obtained using Chandra's High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) showed that a strong wind is being driven away from the center of NGC 1068 at a rate of about a million miles per hour. This wind is likely generated as surrounding gas is accelerated and heated as it swirls toward the black hole. A

  14. Multispectral MRI segmentation of age related white matter changes using a cascade of support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Damangir, Soheil; Manzouri, Amirhossein; Oppedal, Ketil; Carlsson, Stefan; Firbank, Michael J; Sonnesyn, Hogne; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; O'Brien, John T; Beyer, Mona K; Westman, Eric; Aarsland, Dag; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Spulber, Gabriela

    2012-11-15

    White matter changes (WMC) are the focus of intensive research and have been linked to cognitive impairment and depression in the elderly. Cumbersome manual outlining procedures make research on WMC labor intensive and prone to subjective bias. We present a fast, fully automated method for WMC segmentation using a cascade of reduced support vector machines (SVMs) with active learning. Data of 102 subjects was used in this study. Two MRI sequences (T1-weighted and FLAIR) and masks of manually outlined WMC from each subject were used for the image analysis. The segmentation framework comprises pre-processing, classification (training and core segmentation) and post-processing. After pre-processing, the model was trained on two subjects and tested on the remaining 100 subjects. The effectiveness and robustness of the classification was assessed using the receiver operating curve technique. The cascade of SVMs segmentation framework outputted accurate results with high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (99.5%) values, with the manually outlined WMC as reference. An algorithm for the segmentation of WMC is proposed. This is a completely competitive and fast automatic segmentation framework, capable of using different input sequences, without changes or restrictions of the image analysis algorithm. PMID:22921728

  15. Climate Change and Spatiotemporal Distributions of Vector-Borne Diseases in Nepal – A Systematic Synthesis of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dhimal, Meghnath; Ahrens, Bodo; Kuch, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its largely mountainous terrain for which this Himalayan country is a popular tourist destination, Nepal is now endemic for five major vector-borne diseases (VBDs), namely malaria, lymphatic filariasis, Japanese encephalitis, visceral leishmaniasis and dengue fever. There is increasing evidence about the impacts of climate change on VBDs especially in tropical highlands and temperate regions. Our aim is to explore whether the observed spatiotemporal distributions of VBDs in Nepal can be related to climate change. Methodology A systematic literature search was performed and summarized information on climate change and the spatiotemporal distribution of VBDs in Nepal from the published literature until December2014 following providing items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Principal Findings We found 12 studies that analysed the trend of climatic data and are relevant for the study of VBDs, 38 studies that dealt with the spatial and temporal distribution of disease vectors and disease transmission. Among 38 studies, only eight studies assessed the association of VBDs with climatic variables. Our review highlights a pronounced warming in the mountains and an expansion of autochthonous cases of VBDs to non-endemic areas including mountain regions (i.e., at least 2,000 m above sea level). Furthermore, significant relationships between climatic variables and VBDs and their vectors are found in short-term studies. Conclusion Taking into account the weak health care systems and difficult geographic terrain of Nepal, increasing trade and movements of people, a lack of vector control interventions, observed relationships between climatic variables and VBDs and their vectors and the establishment of relevant disease vectors already at least 2,000 m above sea level, we conclude that climate change can intensify the risk of VBD epidemics in the mountain regions of Nepal if other non-climatic drivers of VBDs remain constant. PMID

  16. Comparison of special sensor microwave imager vector wind stress with model-derived and subjective products for the tropical Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Busalacchi, A.J.; Atlas, R.M. ); Hackert, E.C. )

    1993-04-15

    The authors address the role of wind data in the development of general ocean circulation model studies. Satellite scatterometry has been proposed, but only minimally implemented, as a means of providing global information on ocean surface wind speed and direction. However, a number of microwave systems have monitored wind speed information on a global scale, some over extended periods of time, which provide day-to-day coverage, compared to the sparse information available from ship or buoy data collections. Recently data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager, for the period July 1987 to June 1988 was utilized, in conjunction with conventional data collections to build a model system which included wind directions. The authors here take this data set and use it as a forcing function in a general ocean circulation model study. Their interest is in knowing if this gives results comparable with such data sets built from much more limited observational and subjective analysis. The results are encouraging, and they suggest reexamination of earlier information collections with the idea of reconstructing ocean surface wind speed and direction data sets to be used in further modeling studies.

  17. Determination of statistics for any rotation of axes of a bivariate normal elliptical distribution. [of wind vector components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falls, L. W.; Crutcher, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    Transformation of statistics from a dimensional set to another dimensional set involves linear functions of the original set of statistics. Similarly, linear functions will transform statistics within a dimensional set such that the new statistics are relevant to a new set of coordinate axes. A restricted case of the latter is the rotation of axes in a coordinate system involving any two correlated random variables. A special case is the transformation for horizontal wind distributions. Wind statistics are usually provided in terms of wind speed and direction (measured clockwise from north) or in east-west and north-south components. A direct application of this technique allows the determination of appropriate wind statistics parallel and normal to any preselected flight path of a space vehicle. Among the constraints for launching space vehicles are critical values selected from the distribution of the expected winds parallel to and normal to the flight path. These procedures are applied to space vehicle launches at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

  18. Supervised Change Detection in VHR Images Using Support Vector Machines and Contextual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpi, Michele; Kanevski, Mikhail

    2010-05-01

    One of the recent challenges in environmental studies is how to include and exploit multitemporal information from multispectral very high resolution (VHR) images. This problem is also known as change detection (CD). Nowadays, many approaches, both supervised and unsupervised, are known and the selection of the method depends strongly on the application, the scope of the study and on available time. In the present research an accurate multiclass supervised method based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) for multitemporal remotely sensed image classification is proposed. SVM is a method issued from the statistical learning theory, known for its good generalization abilities and its performance when dealing with high dimensional spaces. Moreover, its sparse solution provides a final model depending only on a few patterns with an associated nonzero weights (support vectors), and resulting in an optimal regularized complexity. The final decision is obtained with a linear separation of data in an induced kernel feature space, corresponding to a nonlinear classification in the input space. When dealing with CD in VHR imagery, misclassified patterns are often caused by the high variance of the information at pixel level, caused by noise and by the influence of the high spatial resolution. Considering a precise coregistration, the variance at object level is high both in space and in time. The usefulness of adding such information is in smoothing, following an object based or a texture based criteria, the interclass variance and increasing the intraclass variance. By adding such information the classifier can better perform when predicting the class of pixels, because of the neighborhood information that was intrinsically extrapolated by the filtering. In the proposed approach, the behavior of mathematical morphology and morphological profiles obtained with different parameters are studied in a CD setting. The series of features are extracted both on the multispectral images

  19. Changes in Solar Wind Composition Resulting from CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, A. K.; Espinosa, M.; Campagna, A.; Amador, J.

    2015-12-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is an expulsion of high charged particles from the sun into the solar system. CMEs can damage satellites, endanger astronauts, and affect powerlines on earth, so understanding and predicting CMEs is a priority. It is hypothesized that an incoming intense CME will push the particles in front, increasing the velocity of these particles. Due to conservation of momentum, it is proposed that the lighter elements will have a greater increase in velocity. Data was collected from the SWICS (Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) instrument on the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) satellite and SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) and analyzed. It was found that with an increase in the ratio of light elements to heavier elements, such as Helium to Oxygen, an intense CME is likely to occur a few days after. However, not all increases of Helium to Oxygen ratio were associated with a CME, especially if the CME was relatively weak. In addition, a 0.9976 correlation was found between the density of Helium particles and the ratio of Helium to Oxygen. It was found that an increase in velocity of Helium also leads to numerous increases in Helium to Oxygen ratio. These indicators may be used to forecast incoming CMEs.

  20. Impact of changing wind conditions on foraging and incubation success in male and female wandering albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Cornioley, Tina; Börger, Luca; Ozgul, Arpat; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-09-01

    Wind is an important climatic factor for flying animals as by affecting their locomotion, it can deeply impact their life-history characteristics. In the context of globally changing wind patterns, we investigated the mechanisms underlying recently reported increase in body mass of a population of wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) with increasing wind speed over time. We built a foraging model detailing the effects of wind on movement statistics and ultimately on mass gained by the forager and mass lost by the incubating partner. We then simulated the body mass of incubating pairs under varying wind scenarios. We tracked the frequency at which critical mass leading to nest abandonment was reached to assess incubation success. We found that wandering albatrosses behave as time minimizers during incubation as mass gain was independent of any movement statistics but decreased with increasing mass at departure. Individuals forage until their energy requirements, which are determined by their body conditions, are fulfilled. This can come at the cost of their partner's condition as mass loss of the incubating partner depended on trip duration. This behaviour is consistent with strategies of long-lived species which favoured their own survival over their current reproductive attempt. In addition, wind speed increased ground speed which in turn reduced trip duration and males foraged further away than females at high ground speed. Contrasted against an independent data set, the simulation performed satisfactorily for males but less so for females under current wind conditions. The simulation predicted an increase in male body mass growth rate with increasing wind speed, whereas females' rate decreased. This trend may provide an explanation for the observed increase in mass of males but not of females. Conversely, the simulation predicted very few nest abandonments, which is in line with the high breeding success of this species and is contrary to the hypothesis that

  1. Surveillance of vector-borne diseases in Germany: trends and challenges in the view of disease emergence and climate change.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Andreas; Frank, Christina; Koch, Judith; Stark, Klaus

    2008-12-01

    The changing epidemiology of vector-borne diseases represents a growing threat to human health. Contemporary surveillance systems have to adapt to these changes. We describe temporal trends and geographic origins of vector-borne diseases in Germany with regard to strengths of existing disease surveillance and to areas marked for improvement. We focused on hantavirus infection (endemic in Germany), chikungunya fever (recently emerging in Europe) and dengue fever (imported from tropical regions), representing important subgroups of vector-borne infections. Routine surveillance data on demographics, origin of infection and the date of reporting were analysed. From 2001 through 2007, 3,005 symptomatic hantavirus infections, and 85 cases of chikungunya fever were reported, similarly 1,048 cases of dengue fever in 2002 through 2007. The geographic origin of hantavirus infection was reported for 95.5% of all cases (dengue virus, 98.4%; chikungunya virus, 100%). Hantavirus infections were acquired in Germany in 97.6% of cases (n = 2800). In 2007, there was a marked increase of hantavirus cases, mainly in areas known to be endemic for hantavirus. In 2006, imported cases of chikungunya fever primarily returned from several islands of the Indian Ocean, while the majority of imported cases in 2007 came from India. The reported number of dengue fever cases have increased since 2004. Thailand contributed the largest proportion of cases (17-43% in individual years), followed by India, Brazil and Indonesia. Surveillance of notifiable vector-borne diseases in Germany is able to timely detect spatial and temporal changes of autochthonous an imported infections. Geographic and temporal data obtained by routine surveillance served as a basis for public health recommendations. In addition to surveillance of vector-borne infections in humans, nationwide monitoring programs and inventory techniques for emerging and reemerging vectors and for wildlife disease are warranted. PMID:19030882

  2. The impact of functional connectivity changes on support vector machines mapping of fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Sato, João Ricardo; Mourão-Miranda, Janaina; Morais Martin, Maria da Graça; Amaro, Edson; Morettin, Pedro Alberto; Brammer, Michael John

    2008-07-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently one of the most widely used methods for studying human brain function in vivo. Although many different approaches to fMRI analysis are available, the most widely used methods employ so called "mass-univariate" modeling of responses in a voxel-by-voxel fashion to construct activation maps. However, it is well known that many brain processes involve networks of interacting regions and for this reason multivariate analyses might seem to be attractive alternatives to univariate approaches. The current paper focuses on one multivariate application of statistical learning theory: the statistical discrimination maps (SDM) based on support vector machine, and seeks to establish some possible interpretations when the results differ from univariate approaches. In fact, when there are changes not only on the activation level of two conditions but also on functional connectivity, SDM seems more informative. We addressed this question using both simulations and applications to real data. We have shown that the combined use of univariate approaches and SDM yields significant new insights into brain activations not available using univariate methods alone. In the application to a visual working memory fMRI data, we demonstrated that the interaction among brain regions play a role in SDM's power to detect discriminative voxels. PMID:18499266

  3. Support vector machines for detecting age-related changes in running kinematics.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Reginaldo K; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Duarte, Marcos; Ferber, Reed

    2011-02-01

    Age-related changes in running kinematics have been reported in the literature using classical inferential statistics. However, this approach has been hampered by the increased number of biomechanical gait variables reported and subsequently the lack of differences presented in these studies. Data mining techniques have been applied in recent biomedical studies to solve this problem using a more general approach. In the present work, we re-analyzed lower extremity running kinematic data of 17 young and 17 elderly male runners using the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification approach. In total, 31 kinematic variables were extracted to train the classification algorithm and test the generalized performance. The results revealed different accuracy rates across three different kernel methods adopted in the classifier, with the linear kernel performing the best. A subsequent forward feature selection algorithm demonstrated that with only six features, the linear kernel SVM achieved 100% classification performance rate, showing that these features provided powerful combined information to distinguish age groups. The results of the present work demonstrate potential in applying this approach to improve knowledge about the age-related differences in running gait biomechanics and encourages the use of the SVM in other clinical contexts. PMID:20980005

  4. Changes in measured vector magnetic fields when transformed into heliographic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The changes that occur in measured magnetic fields when they are transformed into a heliographic coordinate system are investigated. To carry out this investigation, measurements of the vector magnetic field of an active region that was observed at 1/3 the solar radius from disk center are taken, and the observed field is transformed into heliographic coordinates. Differences in the calculated potential field that occur when the heliographic normal component of the field is used as the boundary condition rather than the observed line-of-sight component are also examined. The results of this analysis show: (1) that the observed fields of sunspots more closely resemble the generally accepted picture of the distribution of umbral fields if they are displayed in heliographic coordinates; (2) that the differences in the potential calculations are less than 200 G in field strength and 20 deg in field azimuth outside sunspots; and (3) that differences in the two potential calculations in the sunspot areas are no more than 400 G in field strength but range from 60 to 80 deg in field azimuth in localized umbral areas.

  5. Zoom in at African country level: potential climate induced changes in areas of suitability for survival of malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Predicting anopheles vectors’ population densities and boundary shifts is crucial in preparing for malaria risks and unanticipated outbreaks. Although shifts in the distribution and boundaries of the major malaria vectors (Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis) across Africa have been predicted, quantified areas of absolute change in zone of suitability for their survival have not been defined. In this study, we have quantified areas of absolute change conducive for the establishment and survival of these vectors, per African country, under two climate change scenarios and based on our findings, highlight practical measures for effective malaria control in the face of changing climatic patterns. Methods We developed a model using CLIMEX simulation platform to estimate the potential geographical distribution and seasonal abundance of these malaria vectors in relation to climatic factors (temperature, rainfall and relative humidity). The model yielded an eco-climatic index (EI) describing the total favourable geographical locations for the species. The EI values were classified and exported to a GIS package. Using ArcGIS, the EI shape points were clipped to the extent of Africa and then converted to a raster layer using Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method. Generated maps were then transformed into polygon-based geo-referenced data set and their areas computed and expressed in square kilometers (km2). Results Five classes of EI were derived indicating the level of survivorship of these malaria vectors. The proportion of areas increasing or decreasing in level of survival of these malaria vectors will be more pronounced in eastern and southern African countries than those in western Africa. Angola, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, South Africa and Zambia appear most likely to be affected in terms of absolute change of malaria vectors suitability zones under the selected climate change scenarios. Conclusion The potential shifts of

  6. Wind River Changes Its Course: The St. Stephens Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes changes in instructional methods, in techniques of social grouping, and in teacher sensitivity to the cultural and experiential differences that the Shoshoni and Arapaho children bring to the classroom. All have increased attendance and achievement in this reservation school. (IRT)

  7. Variations of helium abundance in the solar wind and its changes across IP shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durovcova, Tereza; Cagas, Petr; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2016-04-01

    The relative abundance of helium in the solar wind mediates the physical processes ongoing at the Sun surface. The ratio of alpha and proton densities is believed to characterize the source of the currently observed solar wind stream. Thus abrupt changes of this ratio are usually associated with encounters of the boundary between flux tubes emanating from different sources. However, a preliminary analysis of the data from the BMSW instrument (the Spektr-R spacecraft) shows that the He abundance can rapidly vary over much shorter time scales and we suggest that the differential motion of the proton and alpha solar wind components provides the driving energy for turbulence that is able to create the observed fast changes of the alpha/proton ratio. The differential velocity would significantly change across interplanetary shocks, whereas the density ratio does not. Thus, to separate the changes corresponding to flux tube crossings from those caused by turbulence within these flux tubes, we analyze the fast variations of helium/proton ratios prior to and after IP shocks. We compare measurements of two spacecraft (Spektr-R around the Earth, and Wind in L1 point) across the interplanetary shocks and focus on the variations of the helium abundance in a connection with the changes of the alpha/proton differential velocity. The two-case study is complemented with statistical analysis of correlations between related quantities.

  8. Improving the textural characterization of trabecular bone structure to quantify its changes: the locally adapted scaling vector method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Boehm, Holger F.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Monetti, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    We extend the recently introduced scaling vector method (SVM) to improve the textural characterization of oriented trabecular bone structures in the context of osteoporosis. Using the concept of scaling vectors one obtains non-linear structural information from data sets, which can account for global anisotropies. In this work we present a method which allows us to determine the local directionalities in images by using scaling vectors. Thus it becomes possible to better account for local anisotropies and to implement this knowledge in the calculation of the scaling properties of the image. By applying this adaptive technique, a refined quantification of the image structure is possible: we test and evaluate our new method using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. The partial differential equations involved in the model are solved numerically using cellular automata (CA). Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameters of the system, become discernible by applying the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results are superior to those obtained by isotropic and/or bulk measures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  9. Climate change, vector-borne disease and interdisciplinary research: social science perspectives on an environment and health controversy.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Ben W; Ali, S Harris

    2010-12-01

    Over the last two decades, the science of climate change's theoretical impacts on vector-borne disease has generated controversy related to its methodological validity and relevance to disease control policy. Critical social science analysis, drawing on science and technology studies and the sociology of social movements, demonstrates consistency between this controversy and the theory that climate change is serving as a collective action frame for some health researchers. Within this frame, vector-borne disease data are interpreted as a symptom of climate change, with the need for further interdisiplinary research put forth as the logical and necessary next step. Reaction to this tendency on the part of a handful of vector-borne disease specialists exhibits characteristics of academic boundary work aimed at preserving the integrity of existing disciplinary boundaries. Possible reasons for this conflict include the leadership role for health professionals and disciplines in the envisioned interdiscipline, and disagreements over the appropriate scale of interventions to control vector-borne diseases. Analysis of the competing frames in this controversy also allows identification of excluded voices and themes, such as international political economic explanations for the health problems in question. A logical conclusion of this analysis, therefore, is the need for critical reflection on environment and health research and policy to achieve integration with considerations of global health equity. PMID:21125310

  10. An Ill Wind? Climate Change, Migration, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Background: Climate change is projected to cause substantial increases in population movement in coming decades. Previous research has considered the likely causal influences and magnitude of such movements and the risks to national and international security. There has been little research on the consequences of climate-related migration and the health of people who move. Objectives: In this review, we explore the role that health impacts of climate change may play in population movements and then examine the health implications of three types of movements likely to be induced by climate change: forcible displacement by climate impacts, resettlement schemes, and migration as an adaptive response. Methods: This risk assessment draws on research into the health of refugees, migrants, and people in resettlement schemes as analogs of the likely health consequences of climate-related migration. Some account is taken of the possible modulation of those health risks by climate change. Discussion: Climate-change–related migration is likely to result in adverse health outcomes, both for displaced and for host populations, particularly in situations of forced migration. However, where migration and other mobility are used as adaptive strategies, health risks are likely to be minimized, and in some cases there will be health gains. Conclusions: Purposeful and timely policy interventions can facilitate the mobility of people, enhance well-being, and maximize social and economic development in both places of origin and places of destination. Nevertheless, the anticipated occurrence of substantial relocation of groups and communities will underscore the fundamental seriousness of human-induced climate change. PMID:22266739

  11. Detecting cross-equatorial wind change as a fingerprint of climate response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Xie, Shang-Ping; Tokinaga, Hiroki; Liu, Qinyu; Kosaka, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are a major driver of the twetieth century climate change. In climate models, the aerosol forcing, larger in the Northern than Southern Hemispheres, induces an interhemispheric Hadley circulation. In support of the model result, we detected a robust change in the zonal mean cross-equatorial wind over the past 60 years from ship observations and reanalyses, accompanied by physically consistent changes in atmospheric pressure and marine cloud cover. Single-forcing experiments indicate that the observed change in cross-equatorial wind is a fingerprint of aerosol forcing. This zonal mean mode follows the evolution of global aerosol forcing that is distinct from regional changes in the Atlantic sector. Atmospheric simulations successfully reproduce this interhemispheric mode, indicating the importance of sea surface temperature mediation in response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. As societies awaken to reduce aerosol emissions, a phase reversal of this interhemispheric mode is expected in the 21st century.

  12. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-05-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  13. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-01-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  14. The impact of changes in the Antarctic wind field on the Southern Ocean sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, Verena; Iovino, Dorotea; Masina, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Satellite observations show an enlargement of the sea ice extent of the Southern Ocean in the last decades. A possible trigger for the increase is a change in the atmospheric circulation, which leads to a southward shift and intensification of the westerlies around Antarctica. We performed a sensitivity study with an eddy-permitting sea ice-ocean model forced by ERA-Interim data. We compare a set of numerical simulations with simple manipulations of the wind velocities in the forcing data and investigate the response of sea ice and on-shelf water properties. In our results, increases of the zonal wind component lead to the onset of deep convection in the Weddell Sea within 10 years (with one exception) and a reduction of sea ice. Manipulations of the meridional wind component can lead to an increase of ice extent and volume, but only if regions of strengthened northward wind alternate with regions of increased southward wind. The convergent drift against the shoreline is necessary to thicken the sea ice. Without it, enhanced northward drift leads to an exhanced ice extent during winter but combined with a loss of sea ice thickness which entails a strongly reduced ice extent during summer. For increases of the westward/eastward wind component at the Antarctic coastline, the on-shelf water temperatures increase/decrease due to Ekman pumping. Except for regions with more southerly winds, the manipulated forcing in all cases increases the sea ice production at the coastline and therefore the on-shelf waters are more saline. After a period of 10 years in all the experiments the increased wind results in a higher density of the on-shelf water column.

  15. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a large scale blended arrow advanced supersonic transport model having variable cycle engines and vectoring exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlett, L. P.; Shivers, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in a full-scale tunnel to determine the performance and static stability and control characteristics of a large-scale model of a blended-arrow advanced supersonic transport configuration incorporating variable-cycle engines and vectoring exhaust nozzles. Configuration variables tested included: (1) engine mode (cruise or low-speed), (2) engine exit nozzle deflection, (3) leading-edge flap geometry, and (4) trailing-edge flap deflection. Test variables included values of C sub micron from 0 to 0.38, values of angle of attack from -10 degrees to 30 degrees, values of angle of sideslip, from -5 degrees to 5 degrees, and values of Reynolds number, from 3.5 million to 6.8 million.

  16. Evidence that implicit assumptions of ‘no evolution’ of disease vectors in changing environments can be violated on a rapid timescale

    PubMed Central

    Egizi, Andrea; Fefferman, Nina H.; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2015-01-01

    Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be fixed over relevant time-scales, when they may actually be capable of rapid evolutionary change and even adaptation. We examine the genetic signature of a spatial expansion by an invasive vector into locations with novel temperature conditions compared to its native range as a proxy for how existing vector populations may respond to temporally changing habitat. Specifically, we compare invasions into different climate ranges and characterize the importance of selection from the invaded habitat. We demonstrate that vector species can exhibit evolutionary responses (altered allelic frequencies) to a temperature gradient in as little as 7–10 years even in the presence of high gene flow, and further, that this response varies depending on the strength of selection. We interpret these findings in the context of climate change predictions for vector populations and emphasize the importance of incorporating vector evolution into models of future vector-borne disease dynamics. PMID:25688024

  17. [Physiological response of corn seedlings to changes of wind-sand flow strength].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ha-lin; Li, Jin; Zhou, Rui-lian; Qu, Hao; Yun, Jian-ying; Pan, Cheng-chen

    2015-01-01

    Corn seedlings are often harmed by strong wind-sand in the spring in semi-arid wind-sand area of west of Northeast China. In order to understand physiological response mechanisms of the corn seedlings to wind-sand damage, the changes in MDA content, membrane permeability, protective enzymes activities and osmotic regulation substances at 0 (CK) , 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 m . s-1 wind speed (wind-sand flow strength: 0, 1.00, 28.30, 63.28, 111.82 and 172.93 g . cm-1 . min-1, respectively) for 10 min duration were studied during the spring, 2013 in the Horqin Sand Land of Inner Mongolia. The results showed that effects of wind-sand flow blowing on the RWC of the corn seedling were lighter in the 6-12 m . s-1 treatments, but the RWC decreased by 19.0% and 18.7% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively. The MDA content tended to decline with increasing the wind-sand flow strength, and decreased by 35.0% and 39.0% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively. The membrane permeability increased significantly with increasing the wind-sand flow strength, and increased by 191.3% and 187.8% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively. With the increase of wind-sand flow strength, SOD activities decreased and changes of CAT activities were not significant, only POD activities increased significantly, which played an important role in the process of scavenging reactive oxygen species and protecting cell membrane against damage. For lighter water stress caused, by wind-sand flow blowing, proline and soluble sugar did not play any role in osmotic adjustment, but the proline content increased by 11.4% and 24.5% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively, which played an important role in osmotic adjustment. PMID:25985654

  18. Implications of climate change on wind erosion of agricultural lands in the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change may impact soil health and productivity as a result of accelerated or decelerated rates of erosion. Previous studies suggest a greater risk of wind erosion on arid and semi-arid lands due to loss of biomass under a future warmer climate. There have been no studies conducted to assess ...

  19. Interhemispheric Geomagnetic Field Response to Sudden Change in Solar Wind Pressure and IMF Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Cai, X.; Clauer, C. R.; Stolle, C.; Matzka, J.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary investigation of geomagnetic field response to sudden change in solar wind pressure and IMF orientation is presented using data from satellite and ground magnetometer array in both northern and southern hemispheres. Some data sets in this study have been provided by AGO (Automatic Geophysical Observatory) and AAL-PIP (Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform) stations deployed in Antarctica along the 40° magnetic meridian. These stations facilitate high-latitude multi-point magnetic conjugate observation pairs to the Greenland West Coast magnetometer chain for interhemispheric investigations, which have been rarely made because of the difficulty in accessing the Antarctic regions. Geomagnetic field perturbations in response to solar wind pressure impulse events, in which the solar wind pressure changes are more than ˜5 nPa in less than ~16 minutes and the pressures are steady for ~1 hour before and ~20 minutes after the pressure changes, have been examined using the data sets obtained from 1998 to 2010 to show global local time distribution of the ground response, timing response between the two hemispheres and its seasonal variation, and the relationship between IMF orientation and the ground response accompanied by the solar wind sudden pressure change.

  20. Winds of Change: Charting the Course for IT in the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Brian L.

    2007-01-01

    In the spring of 2005, the author, the retiring president of EDUCAUSE, was asked to be the keynote speaker at the EDUCAUSE Western Regional Conference. The conference theme was "Winds of Change: Charting the Course for Technology in Challenging Times." What that brought to his mind was the era of the great sailing ships of the eighteenth and…

  1. Aedes aegypti (L.) in Latin American and Caribbean region: With growing evidence for vector adaptation to climate change?

    PubMed

    Chadee, Dave D; Martinez, Raymond

    2016-04-01

    Within Latin America and the Caribbean region the impact of climate change has been associated with the effects of rainfall and temperature on seasonal outbreaks of dengue but few studies have been conducted on the impacts of climate on the behaviour and ecology of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.This study was conducted to examine the adaptive behaviours currently being employed by A. aegypti mosquitoes exposed to the force of climate change in LAC countries. The literature on the association between climate and dengue incidence is small and sometimes speculative. Few laboratory and field studies have identified research gaps. Laboratory and field experiments were designed and conducted to better understand the container preferences, climate-associated-adaptive behaviour, ecology and the effects of different temperatures and light regimens on the life history of A. aegypti mosquitoes. A. aegypti adaptive behaviours and changes in container preferences demonstrate how complex dengue transmission dynamics is, in different ecosystems. The use of underground drains and septic tanks represents a major behaviour change identified and compounds an already difficult task to control A. aegypti populations. A business as usual approach will exacerbate the problem and lead to more frequent outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya in LAC countries unless both area-wide and targeted vector control approaches are adopted. The current evidence and the results from proposed transdisciplinary research on dengue within different ecosystems will help guide the development of new vector control strategies and foster a better understanding of climate change impacts on vector-borne disease transmission. PMID:26796862

  2. Spatial Orientation and Balance Control Changes Induced by Altered Gravito-Inertial Force Vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Galen D.; Wood, Scott J.; Gianna, Claire C.; Black, F. Owen; Paloski, William H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Seventeen healthy and eight vestibular deficient subjects were exposed to an interaural centripetal acceleration of 1 G (resultant 45 deg roll tilt of 1.4 G) on a 0.8 meter radius centrifuge for a period of 90 minutes in the dark. The subjects sat with head fixed upright, except every 4 of 10 minutes when instructed to rotate their head so that their nose and eyes pointed towards a visual point switched on every 3 to 5 seconds at random places (within +/- 30 deg) in the Earth horizontal plane. Motion sickness caused some subjects to limit their head movements during significant portions of the 90 minute period, and led three normal subjects to stop the test earlier. Eye movements, including directed saccades for subjective Earth- and head-referenced planes, were recorded before, during, and immediately after centrifugation using electro-oculography. Postural stability measurements were made before and within ten minutes after centrifugation. In normal subjects, postural sway and multisegment body kinematics were gathered during an eyes-closed head movement cadence (sway-referenced support platform), and in response to translational/rotational platform perturbations. A significant increase in postural sway, segmental motion amplitude and hip frequency was observed after centrifugation. This effect was short-lived, with a recovery time of several postural test trials. There were also asymmetries in the direction of post-centrifugation center of sway and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). To delineate the effect of the magnitude of the gravito-inertial vector versus its direction during the adaptive centrifugation period, we tilted eight normal subjects in the roll axis at a 45 deg angle in the dark for 90 minutes without rotational motion. Their postural responses did not change following the period of tilt. Based on verbal reports, normal subjects overestimated roll

  3. Large warming trends associated with blocked winds over the Antarctic Peninsula and changes in zonal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, A.; Hunt, J.; Light, M.; Cresswell, D.

    2003-04-01

    katabatic winds are not (at present) accurately represented. \\vspace{0.1cm} References: \\vspace{0.1cm} Kwok, R. and Comiso, J. C., `Spatial patterns of variability in Antarctic surface temperature: Connections to the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode and the Southern Oscillation', Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, No. 10, 2002. \\vspace{0.1cm} Hunt, J. C. R., Orr, A., Rottman, J. and Capon, R., `Coriolis effects in mesoscale flows with sharp changes in surface conditions', Submitted to Q. J. Roy. Met. Soc, 2002.

  4. Modelling the historical changes in physical soil properties caused by wind erosion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackóová, Lenka

    2016-04-01

    Soil physical properties could be significantly affected by land degradation processes. Spatial variation modelling of physical soil properties in time is important in areas where wind erosion occurs regularly. The objectives of this study were to determine the changes of spatial variability of sand, silt and clay % contents in selected area in Slovakia over 45 years using topsoil physical properties at European scale (using LUCAS topsoil) and historical Complex Soil Survey Data. The Complex Soil Survey was made in the period 1960-1970 for the whole of the Slovak Republic, using a unified methodology to build an important soil properties database including physical topsoil properties. Spatial model distribution using regression kriging algorithm created by Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute was used for comparison with LUCAS topsoil particle size distribution datasets and their derived products of clay, sand and silt % content. The results of this study will show the effects of wind erosion in long time scale. Continual total mass removal during wind erosion can produce dramatic changes in the texture of the soil surface. Fine particles are removed, which tend to concentrate sand as erosion continues. Wind erosion physically removes the most fertile portion of the soil which may lead to lower productivity or destroying the characteristics of topsoil beneficial to plant growth. Historical changes of physical soil properties are discussed in this study.

  5. Predicted altitudinal shifts and reduced spatial distribution of Leishmania infantum vector species under climate change scenarios in Colombia.

    PubMed

    González, Camila; Paz, Andrea; Ferro, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is caused by the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania infantum (=Leishmania chagasi), and is epidemiologically relevant due to its wide geographic distribution, the number of annual cases reported and the increase in its co-infection with HIV. Two vector species have been incriminated in the Americas: Lutzomyia longipalpis and Lutzomyia evansi. In Colombia, L. longipalpis is distributed along the Magdalena River Valley while L. evansi is only found in the northern part of the Country. Regarding the epidemiology of the disease, in Colombia the incidence of VL has decreased over the last few years without any intervention being implemented. Additionally, changes in transmission cycles have been reported with urban transmission occurring in the Caribbean Coast. In Europe and North America climate change seems to be driving a latitudinal shift of leishmaniasis transmission. Here, we explored the spatial distribution of the two known vector species of L. infantum in Colombia and projected its future distribution into climate change scenarios to establish the expansion potential of the disease. An updated database including L. longipalpis and L. evansi collection records from Colombia was compiled. Ecological niche models were performed for each species using the Maxent software and 13 Worldclim bioclimatic coverages. Projections were made for the pessimistic CSIRO A2 scenario, which predicts the higher increase in temperature due to non-emission reduction, and the optimistic Hadley B2 Scenario predicting the minimum increase in temperature. The database contained 23 records for L. evansi and 39 records for L. longipalpis, distributed along the Magdalena River Valley and the Caribbean Coast, where the potential distribution areas of both species were also predicted by Maxent. Climate change projections showed a general overall reduction in the spatial distribution of the two vector species, promoting a shift in altitudinal distribution for L

  6. Change of solar wind quasi-invariant in solar cycle 23—Analysis of PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, M.; Farrugia, C. J.; Vörös, Z.

    2011-02-01

    An in situ solar wind measurement which is a very good proxy for solar activity, correlating well with the sunspot number, is the solar wind “quasi-invariant” (QI), which is defined as the ratio between magnetic and kinetic energy densities. Here we use 1-min OMNI data to determine yearly probability density functions (PDFs) for QI. We distinguish between fast and slow solar winds, and exclude interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) from the data, since the latter have a different distribution. Fitting the PDFs by a log-kappa distribution, we discuss the variation of QI in the period 1995-2009, encompassing solar cycle 23 and the long, very quiet minimum in 2007-2009. The additional value of kappa allows us to obtain a better description for the tails of the distribution than the log-normal approach. Here we describe for the first time how parameter kappa changes over one solar cycle.

  7. Climate change projected fire weather sensitivity: California Santa Ana wind occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Norman L.; Schlegel, Nicole J.

    2006-08-01

    A new method based on global climate model pressure gradients was developed for identifying coastal high-wind fire weather conditions, such as the Santa Ana Occurrence (SAO). Application of this method for determining southern California Santa Ana wind occurrence resulted in a good correlation between derived large-scale SAOs and observed offshore winds during periods of low humidity. The projected change in the number of SAOs was analyzed using two global climate models, one a low temperature sensitivity and the other a middle-temperature sensitivity, both forced with low and high emission scenarios, for three future time periods. This initial analysis shows consistent shifts in SAO events from earlier (September-October) to later (November-December) in the season, suggesting that SAOs may significantly increase the extent of California coastal areas burned by wildfires, loss of life, and property.

  8. An improved theory for determining changes in satellite orbits caused by meridional winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King-Hele, D. G.; Walker, Doreen M. C.

    1987-05-01

    Meridional (south-to-north) winds in the upper atmosphere may be specified by the equivalent angular rotation rate, Phi, and previous theories for the effect of meridional winds on satellite orbits have used Phi as the controlling parameter. In this report the theory is developed anew in terms of the parameter M = Phi sec phi, where phi is the latitude. It is shown that in practice M is just as useful as Phi; and M has the advantage of leading to a much simpler and more accurate theory for expressing the changes in orbital inclination and right ascension of an orbit of any eccentricity (e greater than 0 and less than 1) produced by meridional winds in an oblate atmosphere. The theory is developed in two parts: for high eccentricity (e greater than 0.05) and for low eccentricity (e less than 0.05).

  9. Catastrophic wind damage to North American forests and the potential impact of climate change.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C J

    2000-11-15

    Catastrophic winds from tornadoes and downbursts are a major cause of natural disturbance in forests of eastern North America, accounting for thousands of hectares of disturbed area annually. Wind disturbance shows substantial regional variation, decreasing from the mid-west to the east and from the south-east to New England. In terms of the relative importance among these types of storms, more forest damage results from tornadoes in the south-east and mid-west, while downbursts are the most important type of wind disturbance in the Great Lakes area. Downbursts vary widely in size, but large ones can damage thousands of hectares, while tornadoes are much smaller, seldom affecting more than several hundred hectares. Tornadoes cause the most severe wind disturbances. Site characteristics such as physiography, soil moisture, and soil depth; stand characteristics like density and canopy roughness; and tree characteristics such as size, species, rooting depth, and wood strength, are the factors most recognized as influencing damage patterns. The consequences of wind damage to forests, such as change in environmental conditions, density, size structure, species composition, and successional status, occur on both immediate (hours-to-days) and long-term (months-to-decades) time scales. Most wind disturbances result in the post-disturbance vegetation being comprised of surviving canopy trees, and varying amounts of sprouts, released understory stems, and new seedlings. Stand size structure is usually reduced, and successional status of a forest is often advanced. Diversity can be either increased or decreased, depending on the measure of abundance used to calculate diversity. Because tornadoes and downbursts are in part products of thermodynamic climatic circumstances, they may be affected by anticipated changes in climatic conditions as the 21st century progresses. However, the current understanding of tornado and downburst formation from supercell storms is very

  10. A new Global Observational Dataset for Detecting Changes in Surface Winds and Storm Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardulli, L.; Wentz, F. J.

    2006-12-01

    Remote Sensing Systems just released a new version of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data products. SSM/I is an intercalibrated and unified dataset of continuous satellite observations of surface wind speed, cloud liquid water, water vapor, and rain rate over the global oceans since 1987. In the new Version 6, all six SSM/Is (F08, F10, F11, F13, F14, and F15) have been carefully intercalibrated and a spurious decadal scale trend in wind speed has been corrected. This will now allow investigators to confidently use the SSM/I products for detailed analysis of atmospheric variability at interannual and decadal time scales. Unlike ship data, this satellite dataset provides, for the first time, 19 years of reliable spatially and temporally continuous observations of surface winds (and other cloud-related variables) over the global oceans at 25 km resolution. Here we show global trend maps of surface wind speeds, and analyze in detail patterns in the Atlantic and Pacific extratropical regions. Investigation of changes in storm location is attempted with the aide of rain and cloud liquid water data. A comparison of similar studies we performed using winds from NCEP-NCAR and ERA40 reanalyses, and COADS observations is also addressed.

  11. The role of Southern Ocean winds and CO2 in glacial abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, R.; Alvarez-Solas, J.; Montoya, M.

    2011-12-01

    The last glacial period (ca. 110-10 kyr before present, hereafter kyr BP) is characterized by substantial climate instability, manifested as climatic variability on millennial timescales. Two types of events dominate this variability: Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, which involve decadal-scale warming by more than 10K, and Heinrich events, massive iceberg discharges from the Laurentide Ice Sheet at intervals of ca. 10 kyr during peak glacial conditions. Both DO and Heinrich events are associated with widespread centennial to millennial scale climatic changes, including a synchronous temperature response over the North Atlantic and an anti-phase temperature relationship over Antarctica and most of the Southern Ocean, as revealed by a wealth of deep sea sediments and terrestrial record. Recent studies indicate CO2 changes during deglaciation and, possibly, during glacial abrupt climate changes were preceded by significant increases of Southern Ocean upwelling caused by an enhancement and/or a shift of surface winds over that region. The proposed hypothesis is that periods of halted or reduced North Atlantic deep water (NADW) formation resulted in warming of the Southern Ocean through the bipolar see-saw effect leading to a reorganization of Southern Hemisphere (SH) surface winds, and thereby enhanced upwelling and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, the role of SH surface wind and CO2 changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is analyzed in a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. We investigate whether changes in the former could eventually trigger an intensification of the Atlantic overturning circulation and a northward shift of NADW formation, which would allow to explain glacial abrupt climate changes as the result of an oscillation which involves the MOC, CO2 and the winds.

  12. Assessment of change in hydration in women during pregnancy and postpartum with bioelectrical impedance vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increases in total body water (TBW) are typical of late-stage pregnancy. Because excessive TBW expansion or contraction can lead to adverse outcomes, a safe non-invasive method for routine assessment of TBW would be useful clinically. Impedance vectors are derived from resistance (R) and reactance...

  13. Uncovering spider silk nanocrystalline variations that facilitate wind-induced mechanical property changes.

    PubMed

    Blamires, Sean J; Wu, Chao-Chia; Wu, Chung-Lin; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Tso, I-Min

    2013-10-14

    Spider major ampullate (MA) silk varies in mechanical properties when spun in different environments. Amino acid compositional changes induced by variations in MaSp1 and MaSp2 expression, and various biochemical and physiological glandular processes induce silk property variability. Quantifying the contributions of these mechanisms on silk variability may facilitate the development of silk biomimetics. Wind is a medium that induces variations in MA silk mechanics. We exposed the spider Cyclosa mulmeinensis to wind and measured the amino acid composition, tensile mechanics, and crystalline structure of its MA silk using HPLC, tensile tests, and X-ray diffraction. We found the mechanical properties of MA silks from spiders exposed to wind to differ from unexposed spiders. The amino acid compositions did not differ, but X-ray diffraction found a lower crystal density and greater β-sheet alignment relative to the fiber axis in the silks of spiders exposed to wind. We found no evidence that the mechanical property variations were a product of profound changes to the alignment of the protein within the amorphous region. We conclude that variations in the density and alignment of the crystalline β-sheets, probably accompanied by some alignment change in the amorphous region as a result of "stretching" during spinning of the silk, probably explains the mechanical property variations that we found across treatment subgroups. As C. mulmeinensis MA silk increases both in strength and elasticity when the spiders are exposed to wind, bioengineers may consider it as a model for the development of high-performance silk biomimetics. PMID:23947397

  14. Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jannice; Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The rich literature that characterizes the field of pollination biology has focused largely on animal-pollinated plants. At least 10 % of angiosperms are wind pollinated, and this mode of pollination has evolved on multiple occasions among unrelated lineages, and hence this discrepancy in research interest is surprising. Here, the evolution and functional ecology of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants are discussed, a theoretical framework for modelling the selection of wind pollination is outlined, and pollen capture and the occurrence of pollen limitation in diverse wind-pollinated herbs are investigated experimentally. Scope and Conclusions Wind pollination may commonly evolve to provide reproductive assurance when pollinators are scarce. Evidence is presented that pollen limitation in wind-pollinated plants may not be as common as it is in animal-pollinated species. The studies of pollen capture in wind-pollinated herbs demonstrate that pollen transfer efficiency is not substantially lower than in animal-pollinated plants as is often assumed. These findings challenge the explanation that the evolution of few ovules in wind-pollinated flowers is associated with low pollen loads. Floral and inflorescence architecture is crucial to pollination and mating because of the aerodynamics of wind pollination. Evidence is provided for the importance of plant height, floral position, and stamen and stigma characteristics in promoting effective pollen dispersal and capture. Finally, it is proposed that geitonogamous selfing may alleviate pollen limitation in many wind-pollinated plants with unisexual flowers. PMID:19218583

  15. Range expansion of the Bluetongue vector, Culicoides imicola, in continental France likely due to rare wind-transport events

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Stéphanie; Huber, Karine; Pagès, Nonito; Talavera, Sandra; Burgin, Laura E.; Carpenter, Simon; Sanders, Christopher; Dicko, Ahmadou H.; Djerbal, Mouloud; Goffredo, Maria; Lhor, Youssef; Lucientes, Javier; Miranda-Chueca, Miguel A.; Pereira Da Fonseca, Isabel; Ramilo, David W.; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Bouyer, Jérémy; Chevillon, Christine; Balenghien, Thomas; Guis, Hélène; Garros, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The role of the northward expansion of Culicoides imicola Kieffer in recent and unprecedented outbreaks of Culicoides-borne arboviruses in southern Europe has been a significant point of contention. We combined entomological surveys, movement simulations of air-borne particles, and population genetics to reconstruct the chain of events that led to a newly colonized French area nestled at the northern foot of the Pyrenees. Simulating the movement of air-borne particles evidenced frequent wind-transport events allowing, within at most 36 hours, the immigration of midges from north-eastern Spain and Balearic Islands, and, as rare events, their immigration from Corsica. Completing the puzzle, population genetic analyses discriminated Corsica as the origin of the new population and identified two successive colonization events within west-Mediterranean basin. Our findings are of considerable importance when trying to understand the invasion of new territories by expanding species. PMID:27263862

  16. Range expansion of the Bluetongue vector, Culicoides imicola, in continental France likely due to rare wind-transport events.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Stéphanie; Huber, Karine; Pagès, Nonito; Talavera, Sandra; Burgin, Laura E; Carpenter, Simon; Sanders, Christopher; Dicko, Ahmadou H; Djerbal, Mouloud; Goffredo, Maria; Lhor, Youssef; Lucientes, Javier; Miranda-Chueca, Miguel A; Pereira Da Fonseca, Isabel; Ramilo, David W; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Bouyer, Jérémy; Chevillon, Christine; Balenghien, Thomas; Guis, Hélène; Garros, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The role of the northward expansion of Culicoides imicola Kieffer in recent and unprecedented outbreaks of Culicoides-borne arboviruses in southern Europe has been a significant point of contention. We combined entomological surveys, movement simulations of air-borne particles, and population genetics to reconstruct the chain of events that led to a newly colonized French area nestled at the northern foot of the Pyrenees. Simulating the movement of air-borne particles evidenced frequent wind-transport events allowing, within at most 36 hours, the immigration of midges from north-eastern Spain and Balearic Islands, and, as rare events, their immigration from Corsica. Completing the puzzle, population genetic analyses discriminated Corsica as the origin of the new population and identified two successive colonization events within west-Mediterranean basin. Our findings are of considerable importance when trying to understand the invasion of new territories by expanding species. PMID:27263862

  17. A case study of effects of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence, wind speed, and stability on wind farm induced temperature changes using observations from a field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Geng; Zhou, Liming; Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Roy, Somnath Baidya; Harris, Ronald A.; Cervarich, Matthew Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that operational wind farms in west-central Texas increase local nighttime land surface temperature (LST) by 0.31-0.70 °C, but no noticeable impact is detected during daytime, and that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the magnitude of this warming are likely determined by those in the magnitude of wind speed. This paper further explores these findings by using the data from a year-long field campaign and nearby radiosonde observations to investigate how thermodynamic profiles and surface-atmosphere exchange processes work in tandem with the presence of wind farms to affect the local climate. Combined with satellite data analyses, we find that wind farm impacts on LST are predominantly determined by the relative ratio of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) induced by the wind turbines compared to the background TKE. This ratio explains not only the day-night contrast of the wind farm impact and the warming magnitude of nighttime LST over the wind farms, but also most of the seasonal variations in the nighttime LST changes. These results indicate that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the turbine-induced turbulence relative to the background TKE play an essential role in determining those in the magnitude of LST changes over the wind farms. In addition, atmospheric stability determines the sign and strength of the net downward heat transport as well as the magnitude of the background TKE. The study highlights the need for better understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and wind farm interactions, and for better parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

  18. Scanning of wind turbine upwind conditions: numerical algorithm and first applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaf, Marc; Cortina, Gerard; Sharma, Varun; Parlange, Marc B.

    2014-11-01

    Wind turbines still obtain in-situ meteorological information by means of traditional wind vane and cup anemometers installed at the turbine's nacelle, right behind the blades. This has two important drawbacks: 1-turbine misalignment with the mean wind direction is common and energy losses are experienced; 2-the near-blade monitoring does not provide any time to readjust the profile of the wind turbine to incoming turbulence gusts. A solution is to install wind Lidar devices on the turbine's nacelle. This technique is currently under development as an alternative to traditional in-situ wind anemometry because it can measure the wind vector at substantial distances upwind. However, at what upwind distance should they interrogate the atmosphere? A new flexible wind turbine algorithm for large eddy simulations of wind farms that allows answering this question, will be presented. The new wind turbine algorithm timely corrects the turbines' yaw misalignment with the changing wind. The upwind scanning flexibility of the algorithm also allows to track the wind vector and turbulent kinetic energy as they approach the wind turbine's rotor blades. Results will illustrate the spatiotemporal evolution of the wind vector and the turbulent kinetic energy as the incoming flow approaches the wind turbine under different atmospheric stability conditions. Results will also show that the available atmospheric wind power is larger during daytime periods at the cost of an increased variance.

  19. Recent changes in measured wind in the NE Atlantic and variability of correlation with NAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirazzoli, P. A.; Tomasin, A.; Ullmann, A.

    2010-10-01

    The paper deals with wind measurements, recorded since the 1950s, at twelve meteorological stations along a transect near the westernmost European border, between 64° and 44° N. Extreme wind speed tends to decrease sharply near the northern boundary (at Reykjavick), near the middle of the study area (at Shannon and Valentia) and near the southern boundary (at Brest and Cap Ferret), to increase at Thorshavn, with less significant trends at the other stations. Average wind speeds confirm the above tendencies, with an additional increasing speed at Lerwick, Kirkwall, Malin Head, Belle-Ile and Cap Ferret. To compare changes in wind activity, the data have been subdivided into three periods: until 1975, 1976-1992 and 1993-2008. Frequencies have been computed also for the "winter" (October to March) period, per quadrants, and for occurrences exceeding the speed of 15 m s-1. At Reykjavick a recent increase in the frequency of strong winds has occurred from various directions. Between 62° N (Thorshavn) and 59° N (Kirkwall) strong wind has been increasing since 1975. Minor changes can be observed at Stornoway, whereas at Malin Head the greatest increase for southerlies and westerlies is observed during the 1976-1992 period. At Belmullet, the frequency of strong southerlies has almost doubled since 1992, while at Shannon and Valentia it remains quite low. Finally at Brest and Belle-Ile, westerlies are predominant among winds >15 m s-1. Important changes in time and latitude appear in the correlation with the NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) index. The highest correlation coefficients, calculated with monthly or seasonal means between the early 1950s and 1975, are observed from between 58° N (Stornoway) and Iceland, whereas low positive coefficients are reported more south. During the period 1976-1992, when increasing NAO index is predominant, positive correlation improves southwards as far as 54° (Belmullet) with some improvement also at Shannon and Valentia, while it

  20. Spatial orientation and balance control changes induced by altered gravitoinertial force vectors.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, G D; Wood, S J; Gianna, C C; Black, F O; Paloski, W H

    2001-04-01

    were short-lived, however, with a recovery time of several postural test trials (minutes). There were also asymmetries in the direction of postcentrifugation COP and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). The amount of total head movements during centrifugation correlated poorly or inversely with postcentrifugation postural stability, and the most unstable subject made no head movements. There was no decrease in postural stability after static tilt, although these subjects also reported a perceived tilt briefly after return to upright, and they also had COP asymmetries. Abnormal subjects underestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation, and their directed saccades revealed permanent spatial distortions. Bilateral abnormal subjects started out with poor postural control, but showed no postural decrements after centrifugation, while unilateral abnormal subjects had varying degrees of postural decrement, both in their everyday function and as a result of experiencing the centrifugation. In addition, three unilateral, abnormal subjects, who rode twice in opposite orientations, revealed a consistent orthogonal pattern of COP offsets after centrifugation. These results suggest that both orientation and magnitude of the gravitoinertial vector are used by the central nervous system for calibration of multiple orientation systems. A change in the background gravitoinertial force (otolith input) can rapidly initiate postural and perceptual adaptation in several sensorimotor systems, independent of a structured visual surround. PMID:11355385

  1. Spatial orientation and balance control changes induced by altered gravitoinertial force vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Wood, S. J.; Gianna, C. C.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    were short-lived, however, with a recovery time of several postural test trials (minutes). There were also asymmetries in the direction of postcentrifugation COP and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). The amount of total head movements during centrifugation correlated poorly or inversely with postcentrifugation postural stability, and the most unstable subject made no head movements. There was no decrease in postural stability after static tilt, although these subjects also reported a perceived tilt briefly after return to upright, and they also had COP asymmetries. Abnormal subjects underestimated roll-tilt during centrifugation, and their directed saccades revealed permanent spatial distortions. Bilateral abnormal subjects started out with poor postural control, but showed no postural decrements after centrifugation, while unilateral abnormal subjects had varying degrees of postural decrement, both in their everyday function and as a result of experiencing the centrifugation. In addition, three unilateral, abnormal subjects, who rode twice in opposite orientations, revealed a consistent orthogonal pattern of COP offsets after centrifugation. These results suggest that both orientation and magnitude of the gravitoinertial vector are used by the central nervous system for calibration of multiple orientation systems. A change in the background gravitoinertial force (otolith input) can rapidly initiate postural and perceptual adaptation in several sensorimotor systems, independent of a structured visual surround.

  2. Effects of Southern Hemisphere Wind Changes on the Meridional Overturning Circulation in Ocean Models.

    PubMed

    Gent, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Observations show that the Southern Hemisphere zonal wind stress maximum has increased significantly over the past 30 years. Eddy-resolving ocean models show that the resulting increase in the Southern Ocean mean flow meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is partially compensated by an increase in the eddy MOC. This effect can be reproduced in the non-eddy-resolving ocean component of a climate model, providing the eddy parameterization coefficient is variable and not a constant. If the coefficient is a constant, then the Southern Ocean mean MOC change is balanced by an unrealistically large change in the Atlantic Ocean MOC. Southern Ocean eddy compensation means that Southern Hemisphere winds cannot be the dominant mechanism driving midlatitude North Atlantic MOC variability. PMID:26163010

  3. Climate Change and Risk of Leishmaniasis in North America: Predictions from Ecological Niche Models of Vector and Reservoir Species

    PubMed Central

    González, Camila; Wang, Ophelia; Strutz, Stavana E.; González-Salazar, Constantino; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Sarkar, Sahotra

    2010-01-01

    Background Climate change is increasingly being implicated in species' range shifts throughout the world, including those of important vector and reservoir species for infectious diseases. In North America (México, United States, and Canada), leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is autochthonous in México and Texas and has begun to expand its range northward. Further expansion to the north may be facilitated by climate change as more habitat becomes suitable for vector and reservoir species for leishmaniasis. Methods and Findings The analysis began with the construction of ecological niche models using a maximum entropy algorithm for the distribution of two sand fly vector species (Lutzomyia anthophora and L. diabolica), three confirmed rodent reservoir species (Neotoma albigula, N. floridana, and N. micropus), and one potential rodent reservoir species (N. mexicana) for leishmaniasis in northern México and the United States. As input, these models used species' occurrence records with topographic and climatic parameters as explanatory variables. Models were tested for their ability to predict correctly both a specified fraction of occurrence points set aside for this purpose and occurrence points from an independently derived data set. These models were refined to obtain predicted species' geographical distributions under increasingly strict assumptions about the ability of a species to disperse to suitable habitat and to persist in it, as modulated by its ecological suitability. Models successful at predictions were fitted to the extreme A2 and relatively conservative B2 projected climate scenarios for 2020, 2050, and 2080 using publicly available interpolated climate data from the Third Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report. Further analyses included estimation of the projected human population that could potentially be exposed to leishmaniasis in 2020, 2050, and 2080 under the A2 and B2 scenarios. All confirmed vector and

  4. Engineering changes to the 0.1m cryogenic wind tunnel at Southampton University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The more important changes to the 0.1 m cryogenic wind tunnel since its completion in 1977 are outlined. These include detailed improvements in the fan drive to allow higher speeds, and the provision of a test section leg suitable for use with a magnetic suspension and balance system. The instrumentation, data logging, data reduction and tunnel controls were also improved and modernized. A tunnel performance summary is given.

  5. Impacts of Climate Change on Vector Borne Diseases in the Mediterranean Basin - Implications for Preparedness and Adaptation Policy.

    PubMed

    Negev, Maya; Paz, Shlomit; Clermont, Alexandra; Pri-Or, Noemie Groag; Shalom, Uri; Yeger, Tamar; Green, Manfred S

    2015-06-01

    The Mediterranean region is vulnerable to climatic changes. A warming trend exists in the basin with changes in rainfall patterns. It is expected that vector-borne diseases (VBD) in the region will be influenced by climate change since weather conditions influence their emergence. For some diseases (i.e., West Nile virus) the linkage between emergence andclimate change was recently proved; for others (such as dengue) the risk for local transmission is real. Consequently, adaptation and preparation for changing patterns of VBD distribution is crucial in the Mediterranean basin. We analyzed six representative Mediterranean countries and found that they have started to prepare for this threat, but the preparation levels among them differ, and policy mechanisms are limited and basic. Furthermore, cross-border cooperation is not stable and depends on international frameworks. The Mediterranean countries should improve their adaptation plans, and develop more cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary and participatory approaches. In addition, based on experience from existing local networks in advancing national legislation and trans-border cooperation, we outline recommendations for a regional cooperation framework. We suggest that a stable and neutral framework is required, and that it should address the characteristics and needs of African, Asian and European countries around the Mediterranean in order to ensure participation. Such a regional framework is essential to reduce the risk of VBD transmission, since the vectors of infectious diseases know no political borders. PMID:26084000

  6. Impacts of Climate Change on Vector Borne Diseases in the Mediterranean Basin — Implications for Preparedness and Adaptation Policy

    PubMed Central

    Negev, Maya; Paz, Shlomit; Clermont, Alexandra; Pri-Or, Noemie Groag; Shalom, Uri; Yeger, Tamar; Green, Manfred S.

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is vulnerable to climatic changes. A warming trend exists in the basin with changes in rainfall patterns. It is expected that vector-borne diseases (VBD) in the region will be influenced by climate change since weather conditions influence their emergence. For some diseases (i.e., West Nile virus) the linkage between emergence andclimate change was recently proved; for others (such as dengue) the risk for local transmission is real. Consequently, adaptation and preparation for changing patterns of VBD distribution is crucial in the Mediterranean basin. We analyzed six representative Mediterranean countries and found that they have started to prepare for this threat, but the preparation levels among them differ, and policy mechanisms are limited and basic. Furthermore, cross-border cooperation is not stable and depends on international frameworks. The Mediterranean countries should improve their adaptation plans, and develop more cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary and participatory approaches. In addition, based on experience from existing local networks in advancing national legislation and trans-border cooperation, we outline recommendations for a regional cooperation framework. We suggest that a stable and neutral framework is required, and that it should address the characteristics and needs of African, Asian and European countries around the Mediterranean in order to ensure participation. Such a regional framework is essential to reduce the risk of VBD transmission, since the vectors of infectious diseases know no political borders. PMID:26084000

  7. Mapping the interacting winds of Eta Carinae: Changes Across the Apastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, T.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the May 2009 servicing mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, we have systematically mapped the central 1-2" region of Eta Carinae with the 0.1"-wide, long slit of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Six mappings of selected forbidden emission lines began in the late recovery after the 2009.1 periastron event and now extend to phase 0.85 of Eta Carina's 5.54 year period. In addition to the recovery of the high state as depicted by [Fe III] (IP=16.6 eV) strictures and the stabilization of [Fe II] (IP=7.8 eV) features, we see components of at least three wind-blown shells that expand outward at 400 to 500 km/s. Virtually all forbidden emission originates from primary wind structures. The [Fe II] shells, moving at 470 km/s, are primary wind (420 km/s) structures slightly accelerated by the fast secondary wind (Teodoro et al, 2013 ApJ 773, L16T). The [Fe III] arcs, directly photo-ionized by the secondary star, also shift outward with time. Structures in both emissions shift in a general clockwork direction consistent with the derived orbital motion by Gull et al (2009 MNRAS 396, 1308) and revised by Madura et al (2012 MNRAS 420, 2064). With the continued development of the 3D hydrodynamic models we are able to compare the changing structures and determine limits to changes in the mass loss rate over this period of time. Additional mappings, to be obtained by seven additional HST visits, are scheduled at selected orbital phases to follow major changes in ionization structue due to the drop of high ionization to low ionization across the 2014.5 periastron passage. This work is funded by NASA grants to support HST research.

  8. Tracking Changes in Winds and Ocean Currents in the South Atlantic Using Terrigenous Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L.; Franzese, A. M.; Rutberg, R. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    Terrigenous sediments in the ocean can provide constraints on key climate variables such as winds and surface and deep currents. Sediments are brought to the ocean via river runoff, winds and ice, and are redistributed in the ocean by currents. Thus provenance and flux variations reflect the pathways of distribution. Temporal changes in sediment provenance may result from latitudinal wind shifts and ocean current patterns due to climate changes. In the South Atlantic, the pattern of clay minerals in surface sediments tracks the pattern of modern surface currents. Provenance boundaries cross large bathymetric features, indicating that surface currents are the first order control on terrigenous sediment distributions. Surface sediment Sr isotope ratios show systematic variations reflecting the geologic age of the sources. Southward from the Equator, South American sources show a gradient from from old (Brazil Craton) to young (Andes), and this is reflected in the Sr isotopes in proximal sediments. It appears to be possible to separate contributions from wind and surface and deep currents using provenance methods. South of 20oS westerly winds dominate, and South American sources are the most likely aeolian contributions. A counterclockwise gyre composed of the Benguela Current (fed partly by the Agulhas Current from the Indian Ocean), and the Equatorial, Brazil, and Falklands currents dominate the surface currents. Convergence of currents (the Agulhas Retroflection and Malvinas Confluence) produce areas that are potentially sensitive monitors of wind-driven circulation changes. Terrigenous sediment provenance studies in strategically chosen areas are powerful tools to constrain changes in wind, wind driven and deep circulation in paleoceanographic/paleoclimate studies. The Southern Cape Basin illustrates the utility of provenance studies in paleoclimate applications. Ancient continental crust of SE Africa is the source of Mozambique Channel detritus with with very

  9. Global Climate Change and Its Potential Impact on Disease Transmission by Salinity-Tolerant Mosquito Vectors in Coastal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Surendran, Sinnathamby Noble

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change can potentially increase the transmission of mosquito vector-borne diseases such as malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue in many parts of the world. These predictions are based on the effects of changing temperature, rainfall, and humidity on mosquito breeding and survival, the more rapid development of ingested pathogens in mosquitoes and the more frequent blood feeds at moderately higher ambient temperatures. An expansion of saline and brackish water bodies (water with <0.5 ppt or parts per thousand, 0.5–30 ppt and >30 ppt salt are termed fresh, brackish, and saline respectively) will also take place as a result of global warming causing a rise in sea levels in coastal zones. Its possible impact on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases has, however, not been adequately appreciated. The relevant impacts of global climate change on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones are discussed with reference to the Ross–McDonald equation and modeling studies. Evidence is presented to show that an expansion of brackish water bodies in coastal zones can increase the densities of salinity-tolerant mosquitoes like Anopheles sundaicus and Culex sitiens, and lead to the adaptation of fresh water mosquito vectors like Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes albopictus to salinity. Rising sea levels may therefore act synergistically with global climate change to increase the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones. Greater attention therefore needs to be devoted to monitoring disease incidence and preimaginal development of vector mosquitoes in artificial and natural coastal brackish/saline habitats. It is important that national and international health agencies are aware of the increased risk of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones and develop preventive and mitigating strategies. Application of appropriate counter measures can greatly reduce the potential for

  10. Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, S.M.; Belnap, J.; Okin, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 y of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces.

  11. Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Seth M.; Belnap, Jayne; Okin, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 y of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces. PMID:21368143

  12. Global effects of changes in wind forcing of Southern Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.B. ); Semtner, A.J. ); Chervin, R.M. )

    1990-01-09

    An identical twin numerical experiment has been performed using the global ocean circulation model of Semtner and Chervin. The wind forcing within a band of 120[degree] East [+-] 45[degrees] and 50[degrees] South [+-] 5[degrees] was varied smoothly in space and time to be approximately 4% greater for the twin run than the original. The twin experiment was run for 60 model days. Within nine days small changes of mass transport of the N. Guiana current were observed. Within 24 days changes appeared in mass transport of Pacific Equatorial Rossby waves, and after 60 days mass transport changes were seen in all ocean basins. Within three days small differences in 160 m (mid-thermocline) temperature appeared in the Atlantic basin. Within thirty days, similar changes were evident globally. Similar results were found for mid-thermocline horizontal velocity. These results imply a predictability limit to the accuracy of ocean circulation models due to rapid communication of wave energy between ocean basins. Changes to Pacific Equatorial Rossby wave transport imply possible effects on El Nino by Southern Indian Ocean winds via oceanic coupling.

  13. Causes of change in Northern Hemisphere winter meridional winds and regional hydroclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Isla R.; Seager, Richard; Ting, Mingfang; Shaw, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    A critical aspect of human-induced climate change is how it will affect precipitation around the world. Broadly speaking, warming increases atmospheric moisture holding capacity, intensifies moisture transports and makes sub-tropical dry regions drier and tropical and mid-to-high-latitude wet regions wetter. Extra-tropical precipitation patterns vary strongly with longitude, however, owing to the control exerted by the storm tracks and quasi-stationary highs and lows or stationary waves. Regional precipitation change will, therefore, also depend on how these aspects of the circulation respond. Current climate models robustly predict a change in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter stationary wave field that brings wetting southerlies to the west coast of North America, and drying northerlies to interior southwest North America and the eastern Mediterranean. Here we show that this change in the meridional wind field is caused by strengthened zonal mean westerlies in the sub-tropical upper troposphere, which alters the character of intermediate-scale stationary waves. Thus, a robust and easily understood model response to global warming is the prime cause of these regional wind changes. However, the majority of models probably overestimate the magnitude of this response because of biases in their climatological representation of the relevant waves, suggesting that winter season wetting of the North American west coast will be notably less than projected by the multi-model mean.

  14. Equatorial thermospheric wind changes during the solar cycle - Measurements at Arequipa, Peru, from 1983 to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biondi, M. A.; Meriwether, J. W., Jr.; Fejer, B. G.; Gonzalez, S. A.; Hallenbeck, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    Near-equatorial thermospheric wind velocities at Arequipa, Peru, are determined over about two-thirds of a solar cycle using Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of Doppler shifts in the nightglow 630-nm emission line. Mean monthly nocturnal variations in the meridional and zonal wind components are calculated from the nightly data to remove short-term (day-to-day) variability as well as any additional changes introduced by the progression of the solar cycle. For most of the years, at the winter solstice, there is a weak (more than 100 m/s) transequatorial flow from the summer to the winter hemisphere in the early and the late night, with essentially zero velocities in between. At the equinoxes, an early-night poleward (southward) flow at solar minimum (1986) is replaced by an equatorward (northward) flow at solar maximum (1989-1990).

  15. Oceanography. Centennial changes in North Pacific anoxia linked to tropical trade winds.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Curtis; Berelson, William; Thunell, Robert; Weber, Thomas; Tems, Caitlin; McManus, James; Crusius, John; Ito, Taka; Baumgartner, Timothy; Ferreira, Vicente; Mey, Jacob; van Geen, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Climate warming is expected to reduce oxygen (O2) supply to the ocean and expand its oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). We reconstructed variations in the extent of North Pacific anoxia since 1850 using a geochemical proxy for denitrification (δ(15)N) from multiple sediment cores. Increasing δ(15)N since ~1990 records an expansion of anoxia, consistent with observed O2 trends. However, this was preceded by a longer declining δ(15)N trend that implies that the anoxic zone was shrinking for most of the 20th century. Both periods can be explained by changes in winds over the tropical Pacific that drive upwelling, biological productivity, and O2 demand within the OMZ. If equatorial Pacific winds resume their predicted weakening trend, the ocean's largest anoxic zone will contract despite a global O2 decline. PMID:25104384

  16. Topological Winding Number Change and Broken Inversion Symmetry in a Hofstadter's Butterfly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Cheng, Bin; Martynov, Oleg; Miao, Tengfei; Jing, Lei; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Aji, Vivek; Lau, Chun Ning; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-10-14

    Graphene's quantum Hall features are associated with a π Berry's phase due to its odd topological pseudospin winding number. In nearly aligned graphene-hexagonal BN heterostructures, the lattice and orientation mismatch produce a superlattice potential, yielding secondary Dirac points in graphene's electronic spectrum, and under a magnetic field, a Hofstadter butterfly-like energy spectrum. Here we report an additional π Berry's phase shift when tuning the Fermi level past the secondary Dirac points, originating from a change in topological winding number from odd to even when the Fermi-surface electron orbit begins to enclose the secondary Dirac points. At large hole doping inversion symmetry breaking generates a distinct hexagonal pattern in the longitudinal resistivity versus magnetic field and charge density. Major Hofstadter butterfly features persist up to ∼100 K, demonstrating the robustness of the fractal energy spectrum in these systems. PMID:26401645

  17. Evidence for link between modelled trends in Antarctic sea ice and underestimated westerly wind changes.

    PubMed

    Purich, Ariaan; Cai, Wenju; England, Matthew H; Cowan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Despite global warming, total Antarctic sea ice coverage increased over 1979-2013. However, the majority of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 models simulate a decline. Mechanisms causing this discrepancy have so far remained elusive. Here we show that weaker trends in the intensification of the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind jet simulated by the models may contribute to this disparity. During austral summer, a strengthened jet leads to increased upwelling of cooler subsurface water and strengthened equatorward transport, conducive to increased sea ice. As the majority of models underestimate summer jet trends, this cooling process is underestimated compared with observations and is insufficient to offset warming in the models. Through the sea ice-albedo feedback, models produce a high-latitude surface ocean warming and sea ice decline, contrasting the observed net cooling and sea ice increase. A realistic simulation of observed wind changes may be crucial for reproducing the recent observed sea ice increase. PMID:26842498

  18. Simulated effects of southern hemispheric wind changes on the Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzlaff, Julia; Dietze, Heiner; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A coupled ocean biogeochemistry-circulation model is used to investigate the impact of observed past and anticipated future wind changes in the Southern Hemisphere on the oxygen minimum zone in the tropical Pacific. We consider the industrial period until the end of the 21st century and distinguish effects due to a strengthening of the westerlies from effects of a southward shift of the westerlies that is accompanied by a poleward expansion of the tropical trade winds. Our model results show that a strengthening of the westerlies counteracts part of the warming-induced decline in the global marine oxygen inventory. A poleward shift of the trade-westerlies boundary, however, triggers a significant decrease of oxygen in the tropical oxygen minimum zone. In a business-as-usual CO2 emission scenario, the poleward shift of the trade-westerlies boundary and warming-induced increase in stratification contribute equally to the expansion of suboxic waters in the tropical Pacific.

  19. Evidence for link between modelled trends in Antarctic sea ice and underestimated westerly wind changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purich, Ariaan; Cai, Wenju; England, Matthew H.; Cowan, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Despite global warming, total Antarctic sea ice coverage increased over 1979-2013. However, the majority of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 models simulate a decline. Mechanisms causing this discrepancy have so far remained elusive. Here we show that weaker trends in the intensification of the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind jet simulated by the models may contribute to this disparity. During austral summer, a strengthened jet leads to increased upwelling of cooler subsurface water and strengthened equatorward transport, conducive to increased sea ice. As the majority of models underestimate summer jet trends, this cooling process is underestimated compared with observations and is insufficient to offset warming in the models. Through the sea ice-albedo feedback, models produce a high-latitude surface ocean warming and sea ice decline, contrasting the observed net cooling and sea ice increase. A realistic simulation of observed wind changes may be crucial for reproducing the recent observed sea ice increase.

  20. Evidence for link between modelled trends in Antarctic sea ice and underestimated westerly wind changes

    PubMed Central

    Purich, Ariaan; Cai, Wenju; England, Matthew H.; Cowan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Despite global warming, total Antarctic sea ice coverage increased over 1979–2013. However, the majority of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 models simulate a decline. Mechanisms causing this discrepancy have so far remained elusive. Here we show that weaker trends in the intensification of the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind jet simulated by the models may contribute to this disparity. During austral summer, a strengthened jet leads to increased upwelling of cooler subsurface water and strengthened equatorward transport, conducive to increased sea ice. As the majority of models underestimate summer jet trends, this cooling process is underestimated compared with observations and is insufficient to offset warming in the models. Through the sea ice-albedo feedback, models produce a high-latitude surface ocean warming and sea ice decline, contrasting the observed net cooling and sea ice increase. A realistic simulation of observed wind changes may be crucial for reproducing the recent observed sea ice increase. PMID:26842498

  1. Centennial changes in North Pacific anoxia linked to tropical trade winds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deutsch, Curtis; Berelson, William; Thunell, Robert; Weber, Thomas; Tems, Caitlin; McManus, James; Crusius, John; Ito, Taka; Baumgartner, Timothy; Ferreira, Vicente; Mey, Jacob; van Geen, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming is expected to reduce oxygen (O2) supply to the ocean and expand its oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). We reconstructed variations in the extent of North Pacific anoxia since 1850 using a geochemical proxy for denitrification (δ15N) from multiple sediment cores. Increasing δ15N since ~1990 records an expansion of anoxia, consistent with observed O2 trends. However, this was preceded by a longer declining δ15N trend that implies that the anoxic zone was shrinking for most of the 20th century. Both periods can be explained by changes in winds over the tropical Pacific that drive upwelling, biological productivity, and O2 demand within the OMZ. If equatorial Pacific winds resume their predicted weakening trend, the ocean’s largest anoxic zone will contract despite a global O2 decline.

  2. Modelling the influence of predicted future climate change on the risk of wind damage within New Zealand's planted forests.

    PubMed

    Moore, John R; Watt, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    Wind is the major abiotic disturbance in New Zealand's planted forests, but little is known about how the risk of wind damage may be affected by future climate change. We linked a mechanistic wind damage model (ForestGALES) to an empirical growth model for radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) and a process-based growth model (cenw) to predict the risk of wind damage under different future emissions scenarios and assumptions about the future wind climate. The cenw model was used to estimate site productivity for constant CO2 concentration at 1990 values and for assumed increases in CO2 concentration from current values to those expected during 2040 and 2090 under the B1 (low), A1B (mid-range) and A2 (high) emission scenarios. Stand development was modelled for different levels of site productivity, contrasting silvicultural regimes and sites across New Zealand. The risk of wind damage was predicted for each regime and emission scenario combination using the ForestGALES model. The sensitivity to changes in the intensity of the future wind climate was also examined. Results showed that increased tree growth rates under the different emissions scenarios had the greatest impact on the risk of wind damage. The increase in risk was greatest for stands growing at high stand density under the A2 emissions scenario with increased CO2 concentration. The increased productivity under this scenario resulted in increased tree height, without a corresponding increase in diameter, leading to more slender trees that were predicted to be at greater risk from wind damage. The risk of wind damage was further increased by the modest increases in the extreme wind climate that are predicted to occur. These results have implications for the development of silvicultural regimes that are resilient to climate change and also indicate that future productivity gains may be offset by greater losses from disturbances. PMID:25703827

  3. Do changes in the size of mud flocs affect the acoustic backscatter values recorded by a Vector ADV?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, Mohamad; Keyvani, Ali; Strom, Kyle

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of mud floc growth on the acoustic back-scatter signal recorded by a Nortek Vector acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Several studies have shown that calibration equations can be developed to link the backscatter strength with average suspended sediment concentration (SSC) when the sediment particle size distribution remains constant. However, when mud is present, the process of flocculation can alter the suspended particle size distribution. Past studies have shown that it is still unclear as to the degree of dependence of the calibration equation on changes in floc size. Part of the ambiguity lies in the fact that flocs can be porous and rather loosely packed and therefore will not scatter sound waves as a solid particle would. In addition, direct, detailed measurements of floc size have not accompanied experiments examining the dependence of ADV backscatter and suspended sediment concentration. In this set of experiments, direct measurement of the floc size distribution is made with time in a mixing chamber using a floc camera system. A Vector ADV and an OBS are also placed within the tank to measure acoustic backscatter and SSC as the flocs change size with time; concentration in the experiments ranges from 15 to 90 mg/l. Results showed that the growth of mud flocs did influence the SNR recorded by the Vector ADV, and that the sensitivity of the SNR signal to changes in floc size was higher for flocs with diameters less than ≈80 μm (it kr=1 at a diameter of 80 μm). The response of SNR to changes in floc size and SSC was modeled with a modified sonar equation. If properly calibrated, the model was able to capture the functional behavior of SNR with changes in floc size and concentration. Values of the calibration coefficients showed that while changes in floc diameter up to about 80 μm did alter the SNR, the change was less than what would be expected from a similar change in the size of solid

  4. The national assessment of shoreline change: A GIS compilation of vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the New England and Mid-Atlantic Coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith; Hapke, Cheryl; Thieler, E. Robert; List, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the fact that coastal infrastructure is subjected to flooding and erosion. As a result, there is an increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present shoreline changes. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project has compiled a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and shoreline-change rates for the New England and Mid-Atlantic Coasts. There is currently no widely accepted standard for analyzing shoreline change. Existing measurement and rate-calculation methods vary from study to study and preclude combining results into statewide or regional assessments. The impetus behind the National Assessment project was to develop a standardized method that is consistent from coast to coast for measuring changes in shoreline position. The goal was to facilitate the process of periodically and systematically updating the results in an internally consistent manner.

  5. Effects of Microclimate Condition Changes Due to Land Use and Land Cover Changes on the Survivorship of Malaria Vectors in China-Myanmar Border Region.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Daibin; Wang, Xiaoming; Xu, Tielong; Zhou, Guofa; Wang, Ying; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Hartsel, Joshua A; Cui, Liwang; Zheng, Bin; Yan, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, developing countries have been experiencing rapid land use and land cover changes, including deforestation and cultivation of previously forested land. However, little is known about the impact of deforestation and land-use changes on the life history of malaria vectors and their effects on malaria transmission. This study examined the effects of deforestation and crop cultivation on the adult survivorship of major malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles sinensis and An. minimus in the China-Myanmar border region. We examined three conditions: indoor, forested, and banana plantation. Mean survival time of An. sinensis in banana plantation environment was significantly longer than those in forested environment, and mosquitoes exhibited the longest longevity in the indoor environment. This pattern held for both males and females, and also for An. minimus. To further test the effect of temperature on mosquito survival, we used two study sites with different elevation and ambient temperatures. Significantly higher survivorship of both species was found in sites with lower elevation and higher ambient temperature. Increased vector survival in the deforested area could have an important impact on malaria transmission in Southeast Asia. Understanding how deforestation impacts vector survivorship can help combat malaria transmission. PMID:27171475

  6. Effects of Microclimate Condition Changes Due to Land Use and Land Cover Changes on the Survivorship of Malaria Vectors in China-Myanmar Border Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Daibin; Wang, Xiaoming; Xu, Tielong; Zhou, Guofa; Wang, Ying; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Hartsel, Joshua A.; Cui, Liwang; Zheng, Bin; Yan, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, developing countries have been experiencing rapid land use and land cover changes, including deforestation and cultivation of previously forested land. However, little is known about the impact of deforestation and land-use changes on the life history of malaria vectors and their effects on malaria transmission. This study examined the effects of deforestation and crop cultivation on the adult survivorship of major malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles sinensis and An. minimus in the China-Myanmar border region. We examined three conditions: indoor, forested, and banana plantation. Mean survival time of An. sinensis in banana plantation environment was significantly longer than those in forested environment, and mosquitoes exhibited the longest longevity in the indoor environment. This pattern held for both males and females, and also for An. minimus. To further test the effect of temperature on mosquito survival, we used two study sites with different elevation and ambient temperatures. Significantly higher survivorship of both species was found in sites with lower elevation and higher ambient temperature. Increased vector survival in the deforested area could have an important impact on malaria transmission in Southeast Asia. Understanding how deforestation impacts vector survivorship can help combat malaria transmission. PMID:27171475

  7. Evolution of dengue in Sri Lanka-changes in the virus, vector, and climate.

    PubMed

    Sirisena, P D N N; Noordeen, F

    2014-02-01

    Despite the presence of dengue in Sri Lanka since the early 1960s, dengue has become a major public health issue, with a high morbidity and mortality. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are the vectors responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). The four DENV serotypes (1, 2, 3, and 4) have been co-circulating in Sri Lanka for more than 30 years. The new genotype of DENV-1 has replaced an old genotype, and new clades of DENV-3 genotype III have replaced older clades. The emergence of new clades of DENV-3 in the recent past coincided with an abrupt increase in the number of dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases, implicating this serotype in severe epidemics. Climatic factors play a pivotal role in the epidemiological pattern of DF/DHF in terms of the number of cases, severity of illness, shifts in affected age groups, and the expansion of spread from urban to rural areas. There is a regular incidence of DF/DHF throughout the year, with the highest incidence during the rainy months. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with DF/DHF, it is important to implement effective vector control programs in the country. The economic impact of DF/DHF results from the expenditure on DF/DHF critical care units in several hospitals and the cost of case management. PMID:24334026

  8. Incidence of Vector-borne Disease and Climate Change: A Study in Semi-arid Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakey, T.; Bounoua, L.

    2012-12-01

    Leishmaniases are among the most important emerging and resurging vector-borne diseases, second only to malaria in terms of the number of affected people. Leishmaniases are endemic in 88 countries worldwide and threaten about 350 million people (WHO, 2007). Since the first reported case of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in Saida, Algeria in 1991, 1,275 cases have been recorded (Makhlouf & Houti, 2010) with the vast majority of study-area cases (99%) reported between the years of 2000 and 2009. An investigation of potential climatic indicators for the apparent shift in disease prevalence was conducted by comparing anomalies in the climate data specific to the local pathogen cycle. It was determined that long term climate trends have resulted in conditions that promote the prevalence of ZCL. Increased precipitation have resulted in greater vegetation and promoted host and vector population growth through a trophic cascade. Increased minimum temperatures have lengthened the annual duration of sandfly activity. Short term variations in maximum temperatures, however show a correlation with disease suppression in the subsequent years. These findings indicate a potential to forecast the risk of ZCL infection through models of the trophic cascade and sandfly population growth.

  9. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    As the world's most rapidly growing source of energy, wind power has vast potential for mitigating climate change and advancing global environmental sustainability. Yet, the challenges facing wind energy remain both complex and substantial. Two such challenges are: 1) wildlife impacts; and 2) perceived negative effects on tourism. This dissertation examines these challenges in a multi-paper format, and also investigates the role that climate change perceptions play in garnering public support for wind power. The first paper assesses optimal approaches for addressing wind power's wildlife impacts. Comparative analysis reveals that avian mortality from turbines ranks far behind avian mortality from a number of other anthropogenic sources. Additionally, although bats have recently emerged as more vulnerable to wind turbines than birds, they are generally less federally protected. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects over 800 bird species, regardless of their threatened or endangered status. Moreover, it criminalizes the incidental take of birds without a permit and simultaneously grants no permits for such incidental take, thereby creating a legal conundrum for the wind industry. An examination of the legislative and case history of the MBTA, however, reveals that wind operators are not likely to be prosecuted for incidental take if they cooperate with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and take reasonable steps to reduce siting and operational impacts. Furthermore, this study's analysis reveals modest wildlife impacts from wind power, in comparison with numerous other energy sources. Scientific-research, legal, and policy recommendations are provided to update the present legal and regulatory regime under the MBTA and to minimize avian and bat impacts. For instance, FWS should: establish comprehensive federal guidelines for wind facility siting, permitting, monitoring, and mitigation; and promulgate regulations under the MBTA for the issuance of

  10. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site: Evidence for a Change in Wind Regime and Climate from Lander and Orbiter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Kraft, M. D.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Bridges, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    Surface features related to the wind are observed in data from the Mars Pathfinder lander and from orbit by the Viking Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor missions. Features seen from the surface include wind tails associated with small rocks, barchanoid duneforms, ripplelike patterns, and ventifact flutes cut into some rocks. Features seen from orbit include wind tails associated with impact craters, ridges inferred to be duneforms, and modified crater rims interpreted to have been eroded and mantled by windblown material. The orientations of these features show two prevailing directions, one inferred to represent winds from the northeast which is consistent with strongest winds predicted by a general circulation model to occur during the Martian northern winter under current conditions, and a second wind pattern oriented approx. 90 degrees to the first. This latter wind could be from the W-NW or from the E-SE and was responsible for cutting the ventifacts and modifying the crater rims. The two wind regimes could reflect a change in climate related to Mars' obliquity or some other, unknown factor. Regardless of the cause, the MPF area has been subjected to a complex pattern of winds and supply of small particles, in which the original surface formed by sedimentary processes from Tiu and Ares Vallis events has been modified by repeated burial and exhumation.