Sample records for vehicle exhaust gases

  1. Anti-pollution device for exhaust gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1980-01-01

    An anti-pollution device includes a cylindrical chamber attached in line with the exhaust of an automotive vehicle, which in conjunction with the velocity and heat of emitted exhaust gases further heats and burns emitted gases exiting the tail pipe into relatively harmless non-polluted vapors. The chamber is affixed in line with the exhaust tail pipe of an automotive vehicle near

  2. Catalyst for purifying exhaust gases

    SciTech Connect

    Fujitani, Y.; Kondoh, S.; Muraki, H.; Nakamura, T.; Sobukawa, H.; Tomita, M.; Yokota, K.

    1982-02-23

    A catalyst for reducing nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, the noxious components in exhaust gases from internal combustion engines, etc., is disclosed comprising: a porous carrier of ceramic selected from the group consisting of alumina and alumina-magnesia spinel; and a catalyst ingredient supported thereon consisting essentially of zirconium oxide, cerium oxide and a metal selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium and mixtures thereof.

  3. 49 CFR 229.43 - Exhaust and battery gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Exhaust and battery gases. 229.43 Section 229.43...Requirements § 229.43 Exhaust and battery gases. (a) Products of combustion...under usual operating conditions. (b) Battery containers shall be vented and...

  4. 49 CFR 229.43 - Exhaust and battery gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Exhaust and battery gases. 229.43 Section 229.43...Requirements § 229.43 Exhaust and battery gases. (a) Products of combustion...under usual operating conditions. (b) Battery containers shall be vented and...

  5. 49 CFR 229.43 - Exhaust and battery gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Exhaust and battery gases. 229.43 Section 229.43...Requirements § 229.43 Exhaust and battery gases. (a) Products of combustion...under usual operating conditions. (b) Battery containers shall be vented and...

  6. Vehicle Exhaust Monitoring System Based on ASM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen Peijiang

    2010-01-01

    In order to control the pollution of the vehicle emissions, the exhaust monitoring system based on ASM is studied. According to analyzing the methods of detecting the vehicle emissions, ASM is chosen to design the monitoring system. The total plan of the system is designed which is composed of chassis dynamometer, exhaust gas analyzer, main control computer, and so on,

  7. Inerting Aircraft Fuel Systems Using Exhaust Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hehemann, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Our purpose in this proposal was to determine the feasibility of using carbon dioxide, possibly obtained from aircraft exhaust gases as a substance to inert the fuel contained in fuel tanks aboard aircraft. To do this, we decided to look at the effects carbon dioxide has upon commercial Jet-A aircraft fuel. In particular, we looked at the solubility of CO2 in Jet-A fuel, the pumpability of CO2-saturated Jet-A fuel, the flashpoint of Jet-A fuel under various mixtures of air and CO2, the static outgassing of CO2-Saturated Jet-A fuel and the dynamic outgassing of Jet-A fuel during pumping of Jet-A fuel.

  8. Catalyst for purifying exhaust gases and carrier for the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Fujitani, Y.; Kondoh, S.; Muraki, H.; Yokota, K.

    1980-12-16

    A catalyst for removing nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon impurities from exhaust gases comprising a porous carrier consisting essentially of alumina-magnesia spinel; and a metal supported thereon selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium and mixtures thereof.

  9. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple relationship between number and mass emissions was not observed. Data were collected on-road to compare weekday with weekend air quality around the Twin Cities area. This portion of the study resulted in the development of a method to apportion the Diesel and SI contribution to on-road aerosol.

  10. Measurement of VOCs in vehicle exhaust by extractive FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Bernhard; Paar, H.; Sturm, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    12 The detection of benzene and other organic compounds in vehicle exhaust by FT-IR-spectroscopy is seriously limited by the strong interference of carbon dioxide and the rather weak absorption coefficient of the gases. Therefore, a measurement device was developed which separates the components of interest (mostly VOCs) from carbon dioxide, water and nitric oxide. In addition the VOCs have to be pre- concentrated. To avoid condensation of VOCs the measurements have to take place at higher temperatures. The vehicle exhaust was led through an activated charcoal tube where the organic compounds were adsorbed. Afterwards, the charcoal tube was heated in a furnace, the VOCs were desorbed thermically and were carried by (heated) nitrogen into a gas cell with a path-length of 10 m where the concentration of the different species was measured. With the help of this measurement device a lot of VOC- components like benzene, toluene, and xylene were detected successfully. Measurements were performed on an engine test bed and a chassis dynamometer for heavy duty vehicles. The detection limit of most of the VOCs was about 2 to 3 ppb for a sampling time of 20 min. Calibration measurements showed an accuracy of 15%.

  11. Vehicle's exhaust emissions under car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Li, Jin-Gang; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Yun-Peng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore each vehicle's exhaust emissions under the full velocity difference (FVD) model and the car-following model with consideration of the traffic interruption probability during three typical traffic situations. Numerical results show that the vehicle's exhaust emissions of the second model are less than those of the first model under the three typical traffic situations, which shows that the second model can reduce each vehicle's exhaust emissions.

  12. Catalyst for purifying exhaust gases and method for producing same

    SciTech Connect

    Fujitani, Y.; Kondoh, S.; Muraki, H.; Sobukawa, H.; Tomita, M.; Yokota, K.

    1981-11-10

    A catalyst is described for reducing nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, the noxious components in exhaust gases from internal combustion engines, etc., comprising: a porous carrier consisting essentially of zirconia and at least one oxide selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, manganese oxide and iron oxide; and a metal as a catalyst ingredient supported thereon selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium and mixtures thereof. A method for producing the aforesaid catalyst is described.

  13. Vehicle exhaust gas chemical sensors using acoustic wave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Cernosek, R.W.; Small, J.H.; Sawyer, P.S.; Bigbie, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, M.T. [3M Industrial and Consumer Sector Research Lab., St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, novel acoustic wave-based sensors were explored for detecting gaseous chemical species in vehicle exhaust streams. The need exists for on-line, real-time monitors to continuously analyze the toxic exhaust gases -- nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrocarbons (HC) -- for determining catalytic converter efficiency, documenting compliance to emission regulations, and optimizing engine performance through feedback control. In this project, the authors adapted existing acoustic wave chemical sensor technology to the high temperature environment and investigated new robust sensor materials for improving gas detection sensitivity and selectivity. This report describes one new sensor that has potential use as an exhaust stream residual hydrocarbon monitor. The sensor consists of a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator coated with a thin mesoporous silica layer ion-exchanged with palladium ions. When operated at temperatures above 300 C, the high surface area film catalyzes the combustion of the hydrocarbon vapors in the presence of oxygen. The sensor acts as a calorimeter as the exothermic reaction slightly increases the temperature, stressing the sensor surface, and producing a measurable deviation in the resonator frequency. Sensitivities as high as 0.44 (ppm-{Delta}f) and (ppm-gas) have been measured for propylene gas, with minimum detectable signals of < 50 ppm of propylene at 500 C.

  14. HCL measurements in space vehicle exhaust clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.; McRae, T.; Kennedy, R.; Garvis, D.; Kulp, T.; Berstein, L.S.; Bien, F.; Cheng, W.; Domingue, R.P.; Richtmeier, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The United States Space Program requires the use of large launch vehicles like the space shuttle, Titan 34D, Titan IV, and the proposed heavy-lift vehicle. These large launch systems utilize solid rocket motors to place heavy payloads into orbit. However, most solid rocket motors utilize ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizer and release an exhaust cloud, which is a dynamic mixture of water, hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and aluminum chloride. Described in this presentation are two infrared monitors which are designed for HCl field measurements. One monitor, developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), measures gaseous HCl and accounts for the presence of water and methane that absorb at the HCl wavelength. A detection limit of 0.2 ppM has been demonstrated. The second monitor, developed by Spectral Sciences, Inc., uses a unique HCl lamp which is free of interferences associated with conventional black body radiation sources. By combining the lamp with simple optics, a detection limit of 0.1 ppM has been obtained. Since much of the HCl in the ground cloud is entrained in small water droplets and the infrared technique measures only gaseous HCl, a method was required to account for aqueous HCl. The Spectral Sciences monitor features a preheater which vaporizes aerosols in the input gas stream so that total HCl can be measured. For both monitors, instrument design and operation are described in detail. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Nitride precipitation during high temperature corrosion of ductile cast irons in synthetic exhaust gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholence, F.; Norell, M.

    2005-02-01

    Internal nitrides form in two ductile cast irons (SiMo and Ni-Resist) intended for exhaust systems in vehicles. Samples oxidised at 650 1050 °C for 50 h in modified synthetic exhaust gases were analysed by using AES and FEG-SEM. No nitrides formed in absence of NOx. In dry petrol gas coarse nitrides (<20 ?m) precipitated heterogeneously deep (600 ?m at 950 °C) into SiMo. It is argued that the accommodation of volume change, preferential diffusion paths and increased N solubility as Si was depleted contribute to a self-accelerating process. The Si depletion around the coarse nitrides lowered the microhardness and the corrosion resistance of the alloy. In diesel and in normal petrol gases ?-sized MgSiN2 form in SiMo in cell boundaries where Mg segregates. This also occurs in Ni-Resist in both dry and normal petrol whereas no nitrides were observed in Ni-Resist exposed to diesel gases.

  16. Transport and Oxidation of Compartment Fire Exhaust Gases in an Adjacent Corridor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Y. Lattimer; David S. Ewens; Uri Vandsburger; Richard J. Roby

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of underventilated compartment fire exhaust gases during their transport down a corridor adjacent to the compartment was experimentally investigated. External burning from a compartment has been reported to decrease the toxic exhaust gas levels downstream of the compartment. The focus of the investigation was to identify the phenomena controlling the oxidation of the combustion gases external of the

  17. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF SIMILARITY CONCEPT FOR DISPERSION OF CAR EXHAUST GASES IN URBAN

    E-print Network

    Fedorovich, Evgeni

    EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF SIMILARITY CONCEPT FOR DISPERSION OF CAR EXHAUST GASES conditions, car exhaust gases are often emitted inside poorly ventilated street canyons. One may suppose however that moving cars can themselves produce a certain ventilation effect in addition to natural air

  18. Detection of HC in exhaust gases by an array of MISiC sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Svenningstorp; B Widén; P Salomonsson; L.-G Ekedahl; I Lundström; P Tobias; A. Lloyd Spetz

    2001-01-01

    Future legislations for car emissions make direct measurements in exhaust gases of hydrocarbon (HC) as well as CO and NOx interesting. Robust sensors that can stand the high temperature and rough environment in the exhaust gases are needed. Silicon carbide has the advantage of being a chemically very inert material, which, due to its high band gap, is a semiconductor

  19. Vehicle engines produce exhaust nanoparticles even when not fueled.

    PubMed

    Rönkkö, Topi; Pirjola, Liisa; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Heikkilä, Juha; Karjalainen, Panu; Hillamo, Risto; Keskinen, Jorma

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle engines produce submicrometer exhaust particles affecting air quality, especially in urban environments. In on-road exhaust studies with a heavy duty diesel vehicle and in laboratory studies with two gasoline-fueled passenger cars, we found that as much as 20-30% of the number of exhaust particles larger than 3 nm may be formed during engine braking conditions-that is, during decelerations and downhill driving while the engine is not fueled. Particles appeared at size ranges extending even below 7 nm and at high number concentrations. Their small size and nonvolatility, coupled with the observation that these particles contain lube-oil-derived metals zinc, phosphorus, and calcium, are suggestive of health risks at least similar to those of exhaust particles observed before. The particles' characteristics indicate that their emissions can be reduced using exhaust after-treatment devices, although these devices have not been mandated for all relevant vehicle types. Altogether, our findings enhance the understanding of the formation vehicle emissions and allow for improved protection of human health in proximity to traffic. PMID:24397401

  20. Inhibition of the regulatory ability of stomata caused by exhaust gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Fltickiger; H. Fltickiger-Keller; J. J. Oertli

    1978-01-01

    Summary It is demonstrated that very low concentrations of exhaust gases from a combustion engine inhibit the regulatory ability of stomata. However, when gas treatment was stopped, plants showed a quick recovery of the ability to close stomata.

  1. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  2. Method of removing oxides of sulfur and oxides of nitrogen from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Richard J. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A continuous method is presented for removing both oxides of sulfur and oxides of nitrogen from combustion or exhaust gases with the regeneration of the absorbent. Exhaust gas is cleaned of particulates and HCl by a water scrub prior to contact with a liquid absorbent that includes an aqueous solution of bisulfite and sulfite ions along with a metal chelate, such as, an iron or zinc aminopolycarboxylic acid. Following contact with the combustion gases the spent absorbent is subjected to electrodialysis to transfer bisulfite ions into a sulfuric acid solution while splitting water with hydroxide and hydrogen ion migration to equalize electrical charge. The electrodialysis stack includes alternate layers of anion selective and bipolar membranes. Oxides of nitrogen are removed from the liquid absorbent by air stripping at an elevated temperature and the regenerated liquid absorbent is returned to contact with exhaust gases for removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides.

  3. State of the Art of Thermoelectric Generators Based on Heat Recovered from the Exhaust Gases of Automobiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Vázquez; Miguel A. Sanz-Bobi; Rafael Palacios; Antonio Arenas; Alberto Aguilera

    The recovering of heat from exhaust gases in automobiles is a typical application of electricity generation using thermoelectricity. This paper is focused on reviewing the main characteristics and evolution of the different investigations performed over the last three decades concerning the use of thermoelectric generation using the heat from the exhaust gases produced in the combustion process of an automobile.

  4. Dilution Rates for Tailpipe Emissions: Effects of Vehicle Shape, Tailpipe Position, and Exhaust Velocity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor W.-C. Chang; Lynn M. Hildemann; Cheng-hisn Chang; Prabhakar Sharma; Tjalfe Poulsen; Prasad Kalluri; Steven Hoff; Dwaine Bundy; Minda Nelson; Brian Zelle; Larry Jacobson; Albert Heber; Jiqin Ni; Yuanhui Zhang; Jacek Koziel; David Beasley; Robert Joumard; Juhani Laurikko; Tuan Han; Savas Geivanidis; Zissis Samaras; Tama´s tei; Philippe Devaux; Jean-Marc Andre´; Ste´phanie Lacour; Erwin Cornelis; Joo-Youp Lee; Tim Keener; Y. Yang; Sheng-Wei Wang; Xiaogang Tang; Zhi-Hua Fan; Xiangmei Wu; Paul Lioy; Panos Georgopoulos; Augustine Quek; Rajasekhar Balasubramanian; Yi-Chi Chen; Lu-Yen Chen; Fu-Tien Jeng

    2009-01-01

    The rate at which motor vehicle exhaust undergoes dilution with ambient air will greatly affect the size distribution characteristics of the particulate emissions. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to investigate the impacts of vehicle shape, tailpipe orientation, and exhaust exit velocity on the dilution profiles under steady driving conditions for three model vehicles: a light-duty truck, a passenger car, and

  5. Experiments on the reduction of nitric oxide from exhaust gases by selective non-catalytic reactions

    E-print Network

    Narney, John Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The use of ammonia in a selective non-catalytic process for the removal of nitric oxide (NO) from exhaust gases was studied. A quartz lined flow reactor system was constructed in order to examine the behavior of the process with 15% oxygen...

  6. Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and water. Only oxygen content is varied leading to different gas mixtures. Conventional solid oxide fuel cells are separated into two compartments containing each electrode split

  7. Anatomical and physiological responses of Colorado blue spruce to vehicle exhausts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuebo; Sun, Nan; Ma, Lixin; Chang, Yingqiao; Mu, Liqiang

    2014-09-01

    In order to examine whether the leaves of the Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens) are damaged or not by traffic pollution, the traits of the anatomy and physiology of its leaves are investigated by exposure to vehicle exhausts in a laboratory experiment lasting 30 days. The results show that both the anatomical structures and physiological traits of the leaves are significantly affected by vehicle exhausts. The anatomical structures, including epidermis, cuticle, palisade, and spongy parenchyma are modified when exposed to the high concentrations (? 0.4 mg/m(3)) of vehicle exhausts. However, physiological traits such as total chlorophyll content are not changed when exposed to different concentrations of vehicle exhaust. Unlike the total chlorophyll content, the electrical conductivities increased, whereas the POD activities decreased when presented in vehicle exhausts. The present study indicates that the Colorado blue spruce changes its anatomical structures and physiological traits to avoid possible damage by vehicle exhausts. PMID:24878553

  8. Diesel exhaust emission control for motor vehicles. 1978-March 1981 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for 1978-Mar 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Citations to worldwide research were selected that discuss the control of exhaust gases from diesel motor vehicle engines. Most of the studies are concerned with emission control through engine design; however, some studies also cover the use of fuel additives for pollution control. (This updated bibliography contains 177 citations, 74 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Diesel exhaust emission control for motor vehicles. Volume 1. 1970-1977 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for 1970-1977

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    Research from worldwide journal literature on the control of exhaust gases from diesel motor vehicle engines is cited. Most studies are concerned with emission control through engine design; however, some studies cover the use of fuel additives for pollution control. (This updated bibliography contains 206 abstracts, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  10. Diesel exhaust emission control for motor vehicles. Volume 2. 1978-January 1980 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for 1978-Jan 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    Citations to worldwide research were selected that discuss the control of exhaust gases from diesel motor vehicle engines. Most of the studies are concerned with emission control through engine design; however, some studies also cover the use of fuel additives for pollution control. (This updated bibliography contains 103 abstracts, 48 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  11. Investigation into pedestrian exposure to near-vehicle exhaust emissions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhalation of diesel particulate matter (DPM) is known to have a negative impact on human health. Consequently, there are regulations and standards that limit the maximum concentrations to which persons may be exposed and the maximum concentrations allowed in the ambient air. However, these standards consider steady exposure over large spatial and time scales. Due to the nature of many vehicle exhaust systems, pedestrians in close proximity to a vehicle's tailpipe may experience events where diesel particulate matter concentrations are high enough to cause acute health effects for brief periods of time. Methods In order to quantify these exposure events, instruments which measure specific exhaust constituent concentrations were placed near a roadway and connected to the mouth of a mannequin used as a pedestrian surrogate. By measuring concentrations at the mannequin's mouth during drive-by events with a late model diesel truck, a representative estimate of the exhaust constituent concentrations to which a pedestrian may be exposed was obtained. Typical breathing rates were then multiplied by the measured concentrations to determine the mass of pollutant inhaled. Results The average concentration of diesel particulate matter measured over the duration of a single drive-by test often exceeded the low concentrations used in human clinical studies which are known to cause acute health effects. It was also observed that higher concentrations of diesel particulate matter were measured at the height of a stroller than were measured at the mouth of a mannequin. Conclusion Diesel particulate matter concentrations during drive-by incidents easily reach or exceed the low concentrations that can cause acute health effects for brief periods of time. For the case of a particularly well-tuned late-model year vehicle, the mass of particulate matter inhaled during a drive-by incident is small compared to the mass inhaled daily at ambient conditions. On a per breath basis, however, the mass of particulate matter inhaled is large compared to the mass inhaled at ambient conditions. Finally, it was determined that children, infants, or people breathing at heights similar to that of a passing vehicle's tailpipe may be exposed to higher concentrations of particulate matter than those breathing at higher locations, such as adults standing up. PMID:19331669

  12. Industrial Gases as a Vehicle for Competitiveness

    E-print Network

    Dale, J. R.

    and power. Improvements in air separation technology have resulted in a marked decrease in the cost of nitrogen and oxygen production. The use of those gases in industrial applications has resulted in energy savings. Several cases are reviewed to show... the unprecedented spiral of cost increases in order to maintain or improve our competitive position in domestic and world markets. Nitrogen, oxygen and argon are considered the bulk gases in our business. I will be focusing my comments on nitrogen and oxygen...

  13. Surface nanocrystallization of Al-plated steel for application in the exhaust system of vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Chen; C. J. Shang; D. Y. Li

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-plated or aluminized steel has been used in the exhaust system of vehicles, which exhibits a reasonably high corrosion resistance in the exhaust gas condensate environment. However, due to the inhomogeneous element distribution the outmost surface layer, which is directly exposed to the exhaust gas, is more like an aluminum layer (with little intermetallic compounds) that, though corrosion-resistant, may not

  14. Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  15. A scalable, configurable, SOA-compatible vehicle exhausts surveillance and management system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qing Cai; Shihong Chen; Jun Chen; Jingjing Dai; Yanzhen Ren; Lei Chen; Qiangguo Chen

    2010-01-01

    In order to protect people's health, to increase supervision and management efficiency and transparency on motor vehicle exhaust emissions, this paper presents a scalable, configurable, SOA-compatible Vehicle Exhausts Surveillance and Management System (VESMS). The system architecture and implementation are described in detail. Technologies such as server virtualization, Internet Communication Engine, Web services, Windows Workflow Foundation and plug-in based device access

  16. Combined remediation and lipid production using Chlorella sorokiniana grown on wastewater and exhaust gases.

    PubMed

    Lizzul, A M; Hellier, P; Purton, S; Baganz, F; Ladommatos, N; Campos, L

    2014-01-01

    Substitution of conventional feedstock with waste based alternatives is one route towards both remediation and reducing costs associated with production of algal biomass. This work explores whether exhaust gases and wastewater can replace conventional feedstock in the production of biomass from Chlorella sorokiniana. Exhaust gases were used to augment production in final effluent, anaerobic digester centrate or in standard medium. Cultures were grown in 1L bottles under illumination of 80 ?mol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed an average ?max ranging between 0.04 and 0.07 h(-1), whilst the final biomass yield in different media ranged between 220 and 330 mg L(-1). Lipid yield was increased over time to 31 mg L(-1). CO2 addition resulted in complete nitrogen removal between 48 and 96 h in both final effluent and centrate. The results also indicated that levels of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases can be reduced by between 20% and 95%. PMID:24189380

  17. Comparison of the smog forming properties of the exhaust gases from two types of motor fuels using plants as indicators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Noble; W. Pelle; L. Wright; P. P. Mader

    1958-01-01

    As part of a general study of the influence of fuel composition on the smog forming potential of exhausts from internal combustion engines, a comparison was made of the effect on growing plants produced by exposure to exhaust gases resulting from the combustion of high and low olefinic fuels under otherwise identical conditions. The two types of fuels were used

  18. On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Exhaust Emissions in Auckland, New Zealand

    E-print Network

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Exhaust Emissions in Auckland, New Zealand S. Xie, J. G. Bluett and regulating all vehicles equally. INTRODUCTION As in many other cities in the world, New Zealand's largest used vehicles. In addition, New Zealand's transport fuel has historically been of low quality (high

  19. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  20. Catalyst for purifying exhaust gases and a method for producing the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Fujitani, Y.; Kondoh, S.; Muraki, H.; Nakamura, T.; Sobukawa, H.; Tomita, M.; Yokota, K.

    1983-01-04

    A catalyst for reducing nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, the noxious components in exhaust gases from internal combustion engines, etc., which comprises: a carrier having a substructure of refractory material in the form of a honeycomb structure, etc., and a porous layer of a powder formed on the surface thereof selected from the group consisting of a powder of zirconium oxide and a mixed powder of zirconium oxide powder with at least one powder selected from the group consisting of alumina, alumina-magnesia spinel and cerium oxide; and a catalyst ingredient supported thereon consisting of cerium oxide and a metal selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium and mixtures thereof.

  1. A method for reducing exhaust pressure of vehicle compressed air powered engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenggang Xu; Xiaopeng Xie

    2009-01-01

    Compressed air powered engine is a type of zero-pollution engine, but its conversion efficiency is very low for its high pressure exhaust which causes much exergy loss. In this study, a control system was developed to reduce the exhaust pressure of vehicle compressed air powered engine. The control system is made up of a controller, a pressure sensor, a photoelectric

  2. Analysis of drying wood waste fuels with boiler exhaust gases: simulation, performance, and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, R.W.; Wilson, J.B.

    1984-09-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of retrofitting a rotary dryer to a hog fuel boiler, using the boiler exhaust gases as the drying medium. Two simulation models were developed. Each model accurately predicts system performance given site-specific parameters such as boiler steam demand, fue moisture content, boiler exhaust temperature and combustion excess air. Three rotary dryers/hog fuel boilers currently in operation in the forest products industry were analyzed. The data obtained were used to validate te accuracy of the simulation models and to establish the performance of boiler/dryer systems under field conditions. The boiler exhaust temperatures observed ranged from 340 to 500/sup 0/F and indicated that significant drying could be realized at moderate stack temperatures, as substantitated by experimental moisture content data. The simulation models were used to evaluate a general boiler/dryer system's sensitivity to variation in operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that under moderate conditions (400/sup 0/F boiler exhaust, etc.) the installation of a rotary dryer results in a 15% increase in boiler efficiency and a 13% decrease in fuel consumption. Both the field data and sensitivity analyses indicated that a greater increase in boiler efficiency could be realized at higher stack temperatures, approximately a 30% increase in boiler efficiency for a stack temperature of 600/sup 0/F. The cash flow basis payback periods based on hog fuel savings due to dryer installation ranged from 2.7 years for a used dryer to 3.9 years for a new dryer. The payback periods for equivalent BTU savings of gas and oil ranged from 1.2 to 2.0 for gas and from 1.3 to 2.1 years for oil. This study concludes that retrofitting a rotary dryer to an existing hog fuel boiler is an economically feasible option to the forest products industry. 31 references, 24 figures, 18 tables.

  3. Method for compressing and heating a heating medium to be externally supplied to an engine while using the energy available in the hot exhaust gases of the engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlquist

    1985-01-01

    In a method for compressing and heating a heating medium to be externally supplied to an engine, while using the energy available in the hot exhaust gases of the engine, the exhaust gases are caused to expand in at least two expansion stages to emit energy for compressing the heating medium in at least two compression stages, heat is transmitted

  4. 4-Nitrophenol, 1-nitropyrene, and 9-nitroanthracene emissions in exhaust particles from diesel vehicles with different exhaust gas treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Fushimi, Akihiro; Sato, Kei; Fujitani, Yuji; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of nitro-organic compound emissions in automotive exhaust particles on the type of aftertreatment used was investigated. Three diesel vehicles with different aftertreatment systems (an oxidation catalyst, vehicle-DOC; a particulate matter and NOx reduction system, vehicle-DPNR; and a urea-based selective catalytic reduction system, vehicle-SCR) and a gasoline car with a three-way catalyst were tested. Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and nitrophenols in the particles emitted were analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The secondary production of nitro-organic compounds on the filters used to collect particles and the adsorption of gaseous nitro-organic compounds by the filters were evaluated. Emissions of 1-nitropyrene, 9-nitroanthracene, and 4-nitrophenol in the diesel exhaust particles were then quantified. The NOx reduction process in vehicle-DPNR appeared to remove nitro-hydrocarbons efficiently but not to remove nitro-oxygenated hydrocarbons efficiently. The nitro-PAH emission factors were lower for vehicle-DOC when it was not fitted with a catalyst than when it was fitted with a catalyst. The 4-nitrophenol emission factors were also lower for vehicle-DOC with a catalyst than vehicle-DOC without a catalyst, suggesting that the oxidation catalyst was a source of both nitro-PAHs and 4-nitrophenol. The time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometry data suggested that nitro-organic compounds are mainly produced when an engine is working under load. The presence of 4-nitrophenol in the particles was not confirmed statistically because of interference from gaseous 4-nitrophenol. Systematic errors in the estimated amounts of gaseous 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene adsorbed onto the filters and the estimated amounts of volatile nitro-organic compounds that evaporated during sampling and during post-sampling conditioning could not be excluded. An analytical method in which all gaseous compounds are absorbed before particles are collected, and in which the volatile compounds are derivatized, would improve the precision and the accuracy of the data.

  5. Novel diesel exhaust filters for underground mining vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, K.L.; Taubert, T.R. [Bureau of Mines, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) pioneered the development of disposable filters for reducing diesel particulate emissions from permissible mining machines. The USBM is now evaluating filter media that can withstand the high exhaust temperatures on nonpermissible machines. The goal of the evaluation is to find an inexpensive medium that can be cleaned or disposed of after use, and will reduce particulate emissions by 50 % or more. This report summarizes the results from screening tests of a lava rock and woven fiberglass filter media. The lava rock media exhibited low collection efficiencies, but with very low increases in exhaust back pressure. Preliminary results indicate a collection efficiency exceeding 80 % for the woven fiber media. Testing of both media is continuing.

  6. Correlations of fuel economy, exhaust hydro-carbon concentrations, and vehicle performance efficiency 

    E-print Network

    Baumann, Philip Douglas

    1974-01-01

    of nondispersive infra- red spectrophotometry. This system has been shown to be reliable for the evaluation of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from motor vehicles. The monitor which was used for the analysis was the Autoscan Nodel 710 infrared...CORRELATIONS OF FUEL ECONOMY, EXHAUST HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS, AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE EFFICIENCY A Thesis by PHILIP DOUGLAS BAUMANN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  7. Infant leukemia and paternal exposure to motor vehicle exhaust fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Vianna, N.J.; Kovasznay, B.; Polan, A.; Ju, C.

    1984-09-01

    The children of fathers who work in gas stations, automobile or truck repair, and aircraft maintenance appear to be at increased risk for acute leukemia during their first year of life. The odds ratio was found to be about 2.5 overall, but risk appears to be greater for female offspring. A decline in sex ratio was observed for the three decades of the study, with the lowest ratio observed from 1969 through 1978. These preliminary findings suggest that exposure to one or more of the components of exhaust fumes might be of etiologic importance for this malignancy. The limitations of this investigation are discussed.

  8. Method of modal mass analysis of exhaust gas from a motor vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Mikasa; H. Kitamura

    1988-01-01

    A method of measuring the quantity of an ingredient gas in the exhaust gas from a motor vehicle during the time period of each of a sequence of driving modes, the time period of each driving mode having a starting time and an ending time, the ending time of the time period of each driving mode being the starting time

  9. Comparison of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine impinger techniques for the measurement of formaldehyde in vehicle exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Haack, L.P.; LaCourse, D.L.; Korniski, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to validate a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) sampling and analysis system for measurement of trace gases in vehicle exhaust utilizing gasoline-, gasohol-, diesel-, and methanol-fueled vehicles as the emission source and formaldehyde (HCHO) as the test molecule. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine impinger method was chosen as the reference method. Diluted exhaust was drawn continuously though the FT-IR cell and measured every 3 s. The FT-IR signals were averaged over a complete driving-test cycle and compared to the concentration determined from concurrent impinger sampling. By impinger measurements it was shown that HCHO losses between the tailpipe and the FT-IR cell were on the order of only 5%, independent of vehicle type or HCHO concentration (0.02-8.5 ppm). Comparisons between FT-IR and impinger measurements on 43 tests of methanol-fueled vehicles under transient conditions (diluted-exhaust HCHO 0.28-8.5 ppm) showed FT-IR/impinger = 1.055 +/- 0.095. 19 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Payload dose rate from direct beam radiation and exhaust gas fission products. [for nuclear engine for rocket vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Mickle, R.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made to determine the dose rate at the payload position in the NERVA System (1) due to direct beam radiation and (2) due to the possible effect of fission products contained in the exhaust gases for various amounts of hydrogen propellant in the tank. Results indicate that the gamma radiation is more significant than the neutron flux. Under different assumptions the gamma contribution from the exhaust gases was 10 to 25 percent of total gamma flux.

  11. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  12. The effect of gasoline RVP on exhaust emissions from current European vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.J.; Beckwith, P.; Goodfellow, C.L.; Skaardalsmo, K.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of gasoline RVP on regulated exhaust emissions has been investigated in a fleet consisting of five current European vehicles. The effects of MTBE with changing RVP and E70 were also studied. All vehicles were equipped with the standard OEM small carbon canisters and three-way catalytic converters and the regulated emissions measured over the new European test cycle. A rigorous refueling protocol was employed to ensure that the carbon canisters were loaded in a repeatable way before the emission tests. The results show that a reduction in RVP gave benefits in CO and NOx, but no effect on exhaust THC emissions. The benefits for CO and NOx were greater in non-oxygenated fuels. Of the five test vehicles, three showed CO emission benefits due to RVP reduction, while CO from the other two was insensitive to RVP changes. Four vehicles also showed NOx emission benefits due to RVP reduction while the NOx emissions from the other vehicle were insensitive to RVP changes. The benefits of reducing RVP were observed for the fleet over all three phases of the cycle, however, the largest percentage of changes were seen after the vehicles had warmed up. Although no significant overall effect of RVP on exhaust THC emissions was apparent, reductions in THC over the ECE 3+4 and EUDC phases were observed. At high RVP MTBE addition gave reductions in CO and NOx emissions, but at low RVP no emission reductions were observed. A reduction in E70 only influenced exhaust THC emissions, resulting in a small increase.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Exhaust Thermoelectric System and Application for Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, W. S.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    In this case study, an energy harvesting system using a thermoelectric power generator (TEG) has been constructed. Experimental investigation of the hot and cold sides of the thermoelectric modules (TMs) in this system has been undertaken to assess the feasibility for automotive applications. Two test benches have been developed to analyze the TM performance and the TEG system characteristics, especially the temperature difference, open-circuit voltage, and maximum power output of the TM and TEG system. As the performance of a TM is most influenced by the applied pressure and the temperature difference, a thermostatic heater, thermostatic water tank, and clamping devices are used in our experimental apparatus, increasing the output power of the TEG system. Based on the test bench, a new system called the "four-TEGs" system was designed and assembled into a prototype vehicle called "Warrior," and the characteristics of the system such as the maximum power output have been studied in road tests. The results show great potential for application of this technology in future vehicles.

  14. Effects of Fresh and Aged Vehicular Exhaust Emissions on Breathing Pattern and Cellular Responses – Pilot Single Vehicle Study

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Edgar A.; Chung, Yeonseung; Papapostolou, Vasileios; Lawrence, Joy; Long, Mark S.; Hatakeyama, Vivian; Gomes, Brenno; Calil, Yasser; Sato, Rodrigo; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The study presented here is a laboratory pilot study using diluted car exhaust from a single vehicle to assess differences in toxicological response between primary emissions and secondary products resulting from atmospheric photochemical reactions of gas phase compounds with O3, OH and other radicals. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for five hours to either filtered room air (Sham) or one of two different atmospheres: 1. Diluted Car Exhaust (P) + Mt. Saint Helens Ash (MSHA); 2. P+MSHA+SOA (Secondary Organic Aerosol, formed during simulated photochemical aging of diluted exhaust). Primary and secondary gases were removed using a non-selective diffusion denuder. Continuous respiratory data was collected during the exposure, and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) and complete blood counts (CBC) were performed 24 hours after exposure. ANOVA models were used to assess the exposure effect and to compare those effects across different exposure types. Total average exposures were 363±66 ?g/m3 P+MSHA and 212±95 ?g/m3 P+MSHA+SOA. For both exposures, we observed decreases in breathing rate, tidal and minute volumes (TV, MV) and peak and median flows (PIF, PEF and EF50) along with increases in breathing cycle times (Ti, Te) compared to sham. These results indicate that the animals are changing their breathing pattern with these test atmospheres. Exposure to P+MSHA+SOA produced significant increases in Total Cells, Macrophages and Neutrophils in the BAL and in-vivo chemiluminescence of the lung. There were no significant differences in CBC parameters. Our data suggest that simulated atmospheric photochemistry, producing SOA in the P+MSHA+SOA exposures, enhanced the toxicity of vehicular emissions. PMID:22486346

  15. Thermoelectric Power Generation System for Future Hybrid Vehicles Using Hot Exhaust Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Kook; Won, Byeong-Cheol; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Kim, Shi-Ho; Yoo, Jeong-Ho; Jang, Ju-Chan

    2011-05-01

    The present experimental and computational study investigates a new exhaust gas waste heat recovery system for hybrid vehicles, using a thermoelectric module (TEM) and heat pipes to produce electric power. It proposes a new thermoelectric generation (TEG) system, working with heat pipes to produce electricity from a limited hot surface area. The current TEG system is directly connected to the exhaust pipe, and the amount of electricity generated by the TEMs is directly proportional to their heated area. Current exhaust pipes fail to offer a sufficiently large hot surface area for the high-efficiency waste heat recovery required. To overcome this, a new TEG system has been designed to have an enlarged hot surface area by the addition of ten heat pipes, which act as highly efficient heat transfer devices and can transmit the heat to many TEMs. As designed, this new waste heat recovery system produces a maximum 350 W when the hot exhaust gas heats the evaporator surface of the heat pipe to 170°C; this promises great possibilities for application of this technology in future energy-efficient hybrid vehicles.

  16. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration. PMID:25518646

  17. Test of a theoretical commuter exposure model to vehicle exhaust in traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Flachsbart, P.; Ah Yo, C.

    1986-04-01

    A theoretical model of commuter exposure is presented as a box or cell model with the automobile passenger compartment representing the microenvironment exposed to CO concentrations resulting from vehicle exhaust leaks and emissions from traffic. Equations that describe this situation are developed and discussed. The model is evaluated according to predictive power, explanatory power when compared to a more-parsimonious model, and the influence of initial CO concentrations inside a vehicle's passenger compartment. The model is shown to have relatively high predictive power and excellent explanatory power when compared to the more-conservative model.

  18. Toxicological properties of nanoparticles of organic compounds (NOC) from flames and vehicle exhausts.

    PubMed

    Sgro, L A; Simonelli, A; Pascarella, L; Minutolo, P; Guarnieri, D; Sannolo, N; Netti, P; D'Anna, A

    2009-04-01

    We examined the biological reactivity in vitro of nanoparticles of organic compounds (NOC) with diameters, d = 1-3 nm, a class of combustion-generated particulate relatively unstudied compared to larger more graphitic soot particles because of their small size even though they may contribute significantly to the organic fraction of PM sampled from vehicle exhausts and urban atmospheres. We tested NOC samples collected from 2004 model vehicle emissions and laboratory flames. NOC produced a dose dependent mutagenic response in Salmonella bacteria, suggesting that NOC may add significantly to the overall mutagenicity of vehicle emissions. Incubation with peptides caused agglomeration and precipitate of the otherwise stable NOC suspension, but the chemical and/or physical nature of the NOC-peptide interactions could not be resolved. A significant cytotoxic response was measured above a critical dose of NOC in mouse embryo fibroblasts NIH3T3 cells along with possible evidence of cellular uptake by optical and confocal microscopy. The toxicological assays showed that NOC collected from flames and vehicle exhausts effectively interacted in vitro with both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Differences in mutagenic potencies observed for various Salmonella strains with and without metabolic activation indicate differences in the chemical composition of NOC collected from different vehicles and flames. PMID:19452924

  19. 49 CFR 176.93 - Vehicles having refrigerating or heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...transport vehicles having refrigerating or heating equipment operated by internal combustion engines which will permit ready diffusion of exhaust gases to the open air. Passenger vehicles may not be stowed in a position adjacent to vehicles operating...

  20. Solid State Electrochemical Sensors for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Detection in Lean Exhaust Gases

    E-print Network

    Rheaume, Jonathan Michael

    2010-01-01

    Japan NOx (g/kWh) Figure 3. Exhaust regulations for trucksNOx abatement performance1 Photos of three types of impedance-based sensors evaluated.2 Exhaust regulationsNOx abatement performance. Winston Harrington, "The Design of Effective Regulations

  1. Carbon dioxide production from combustion exhaust gases with nitrogen and argon by-product recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Andrecovich, M.J.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a method for producing carbon dioxide and nitrogen from combustion exhaust gas containing less than about 10% oxygen by weight. It comprises treating the exhaust gas to remove particulate matter; compressing the exhaust gas to a pressure in the range from about 25 psia to about 200 psia; purifying the exhaust gas to remove trace contaminants; separating the exhaust gas to produce a carbon dioxide rich fraction and a nitrogen rich fraction; liquefying the carbon dioxide rich fraction and distilling off components that are more volatile than carbon dioxide; purifying the nitrogen rich fraction to remove carbon dioxide; and cryogenically fractionally distilling the nitrogen rich fraction to remove oxygen and argon therefrom.

  2. Volatile organic compounds from the exhaust of light-duty diesel vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, Sheng-You; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2012-12-01

    The exhaust gas constituents of light-duty diesel vehicles (LDDVs), including total hydrocarbon (THC), non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by a dynamometer study following federal test procedure-75 (FTP-75) and highway fuel economy cycle. The average fuel consumption of these LDDVs was 0.126 L km-1 for FTP-75, with about 10% fuel consumption savings for highway driving. The average emission factors of NMHC, CO and NOx for light-duty vehicles were 0.158/0.132 (90% of THC), 1.395/1.138, and 1.735/1.907 g km-1 for FTP-75/Highway, respectively. Styrene, n-propylbenzene, n-undecane, o-ethyltoluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, toluene, o-xylene, isopropylbenzene, m,p-xylene, and ethylbenzene were the dominant VOCs of LDDV exhaust, and the emission factors were about 10-60 mg kg-1. In addition, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, butyraldehyde, and m-tolualdehyde were the major carbonyl species from LDDV exhaust, and the emission factors ranged from 1 to 10 mg km-1. The ozone formation potentials of m,p-xylene, o-ethyltoluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, o-xylene, n-propylbenzene, styrene, and isoprene were >50 mg-O3 km-1. In addition, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and butyraldehyde revealed high ozone formation potential of carbonyl species, with values ranging from 10 to 95 mg-O3 km-1. Based on the exhaust constituents and ozone formation potential observed, diesel vehicles could be an important air pollution source for urban and industrial areas.

  3. ESTIMATION OF ETHANOL CONTENT IN FLEX-FUEL VEHICLES USING AN EXHAUST GAS OXYGEN SENSOR: MODEL, TUNING AND SENSITIVITY

    E-print Network

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    ESTIMATION OF ETHANOL CONTENT IN FLEX-FUEL VEHICLES USING AN EXHAUST GAS OXYGEN SENSOR: MODEL periods of intense interest in using ethanol as an alternative fuel to petroleum-based gasoline and diesel derivatives. Currently available flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) can operate on a blend of gasoline and ethanol

  4. Nucleation mode particles with a nonvolatile core in the exhaust of a heavy duty diesel vehicle.

    PubMed

    Rönkkö, Topi; Virtanen, Annele; Kannosto, Jonna; Keskinen, Jorma; Lappi, Maija; Pirjola, Liisa

    2007-09-15

    The characteristics of the nucleation mode particles of a Euro IV heavy-duty diesel vehicle exhaust were studied. The NOx and PM emissions of the vehicle were controlled through the use of cooled EGR and high-pressure fuel injection techniques; no exhaust gas after-treatment was used. Particle measurements were performed in vehicle laboratory and on road. Nucleation mode dominated the particle number size distribution in all the tested driving conditions. According to the on-road measurements, the nucleation mode was already formed after 0.7 s residence time in the atmosphere and no significant changes were observed for longer residence times. The nucleation mode was insensitive to the fuel sulfur content, dilution air temperature, and relative humidity. An increase in the dilution ratio decreased the size of the nucleation mode particles. This behavior was observed to be linked to the total hydrocarbon concentration in the diluted sample. In volatility measurements, the nucleation mode particles were observed to have a nonvolatile core with volatile species condensed on it. The results indicate that the nucleation mode particles have a nonvolatile core formed before the dilution process. The core particles have grown because of the condensation of semivolatile material, mainly hydrocarbons, during the dilution. PMID:17948783

  5. Pseudo-electret filter for micron sized particles in 300°C exhaust gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. I. Inculet; G. S. P. Castle; M. Slanina; M. Duca

    2000-01-01

    The pseudo electret fibres developed at the Applied Electrostatics Research Centre of the University of Western Ontario have been used to build an unlimited life, high efficiency filter for micron sized particles entrained in a 300°C hot exhaust gas. The pseudo-electret fibres used here consist of a close assembly of two submillimetre size fine wires, in which one of the

  6. Global emission projections of particulate matter (PM): I. Exhaust emissions from on-road vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Jung, Soonkyu; Bond, Tami C.; Streets, David G.

    2011-09-01

    We present global emission projections of primary particulate matter (PM) from exhaust of on-road vehicles under four commonly-used global fuel use scenarios from 2010 to 2050. The projections are based on a dynamic model of vehicle population linked to emission characteristics, SPEW-Trend. Unlike previous models of global emissions, this model incorporates more details on the technology stock, including the vehicle type and age, and the number of emitters with very high emissions ("superemitters"). However, our estimates of vehicle growth are driven by changes in predicted fuel consumption from macroeconomic scenarios, ensuring that PM projections are consistent with these scenarios. Total emissions are then obtained by integrating emissions of heterogeneous vehicle groups of all ages and types. Changes in types of vehicles in use are governed by retirement rates, timing of emission standards and the rate at which superemitters develop from normal vehicles. Retirement rates are modeled as a function of vehicle age and income level with a relationship based on empirical data, capturing the fact that people with lower income tend to keep vehicles longer. Adoption dates of emission standards are either estimated from planned implementation or from income levels. We project that global PM emissions range from 1100 Gg to 1360 Gg in 2030, depending on the scenario. An emission decrease is estimated until 2035 because emission standards are implemented and older engines built to lower standards are phased out. From 2010 to 2050, fuel consumption increases in all regions except North America, Europe and Pacific, according to all scenarios. Global emission intensities decrease continuously under all scenarios for the first 30 years due to the introduction of more advanced and cleaner emission standards. This leads to decreasing emissions from most regions. Emissions are expected to increase significantly in only Africa (1.2-3.1% per year). Because we have tied emission standards to income levels, Africa introduces those standards 30-40 years later than other regions and thus makes a remarkable contribution to the global emissions in 2050 (almost half). All Asian regions (South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia) have a decreasing fractional contribution to global totals, from 32% in 2030 to around 22% in 2050. Total emissions from normal vehicles can decrease 1.3-2% per year. However, superemitters have a large effect on emission totals. They can potentially contribute more than 50% of global emissions around 2020, which suggests that they should be specifically addressed in modeling and mitigation policies. As new vehicles become cleaner, the majority of on-road emissions will come from the legacy fleet. This work establishes a modeling framework to explore policies targeted at that fleet.

  7. Measurements of toxic exhaust emissions from gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warner-Selph, M.A.

    1989-11-01

    Exhaust emission rates of selected toxic substances were determined for two gasoline-powered passenger cars. These substances, which have appeared on California Air Resources Board Toxic Air Contaminant list or have been candidates for the lists, include volatile and semi-volatile halogenated hydrocarbons, 1,3-butadiene, acrolein, phenols, nitrobenzene, dialkylnitrosamines, and a number of other unregulated emissions. Regulated gaseous emissions and fuel economy were also measured. A literature search was performed to determine if any of these compounds had previously been measured in the exhaust of gasoline-powered vehicles and if appropriate analytical procedures were available. When unavailable, procedures were developed for sampling and analyzing the unregulated toxic emissions compounds. The two vehicles were then tested to determine the emission rates of the targeted compounds. In the tests, a 1987 Ford Taurus equipped with a 3-way plus oxidation catalyst and a 1986 Toyota Camry equipped with a 3-way catalyst only were operated over the Federal Test Procedure, the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. The test fuel was a regular unleaded gasoline without ethanol or methanol, and was obtained from California.

  8. Factors affecting cleanup of exhaust gases from a pressurized, fluidized-bed coal combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Kobak, J. A.

    1980-03-01

    The cleanup of effluent gases from the fluidized-bed combustion of coal is examined. Testing conditions include the type and feed rate of the coal and the sulfur sorbent, the coal-sorbent ratio, the coal-combustion air ratio, the depth of the reactor fluidizing bed, and the technique used to physically remove fly ash from the reactor effluent gases. Tests reveal that the particulate loading matter in the effluent gases is a function not only of the reactor-bed surface gas velocity, but also of the type of coal being burnt and the time the bed is operating. At least 95 percent of the fly ash particules in the effluent gas are removed by using a gas-solids separator under controlled operating conditions. Gaseous pollutants in the effluent (nitrogen and sulfur oxides) are held within the proposed Federal limits by controlling the reactor operating conditions and the type and quantity of sorbent material.

  9. Nanoparticle emissions from 11 non-vehicle exhaust sources - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Pirjola, Liisa; Ketzel, Matthias; Harrison, Roy M.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticle emissions from road vehicles have been studied extensively in the recent past due to their dominant contribution towards the total airborne particle number concentrations (PNCs) found in the urban atmospheric environment. In view of upcoming tighter vehicle emission standards and adoption of cleaner fuels in many parts of the world, the contribution to urban nanoparticles from non-vehicle exhaust sources (NES) may become more pronounced in future. As of now, only limited information exists on nanoparticle emissions from NES through the discretely published studies. This article presents critically synthesised information in a consolidated manner on 11 NES (i.e. road-tyre interaction, construction and demolition, aircraft, ships, municipal waste incineration, power plants, domestic biomass burning, forest fires, cigarette smoking, cooking, and secondary formation). Source characteristics and formation mechanisms of nanoparticles emitted from each NES are firstly discussed, followed by their emission strengths, airborne concentrations and physicochemical characteristics. Direct comparisons of the strengths of NES are not straightforward but an attempt has been made to discuss their importance relative to the most prominent source (i.e. road vehicles) of urban nanoparticles. Some interesting comparisons emerged such as 1 kg of fast and slow wood burning produces nearly the same number of particles as for each km driven by a heavy duty vehicle (HDV) and a light duty vehicle, respectively. About 1 min of cooking on gas can produce the similar particle numbers generated by ˜10 min of cigarette smoking or 1 m travel by a HDV. Apportioning the contribution of numerous sources from the bulk measured airborne PNCs is essential for determining their relative importance. Receptor modelling methods for estimation of source emission contributions are discussed. A further section evaluates the likely exposure risks, health and regulatory implications associated with each NES. It is concluded that much research is needed to provide adequate quantification of all nanoparticle sources, and to establish the relative toxicity of nanosize particles from each.

  10. Pseudoelectret filter for micrometer-sized particles in exhaust gases at 210°C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ion I. Inculet; G. S. Peter Castle; Mircea Slanina; Mihai Duca

    2002-01-01

    The pseudoelectret fibers developed at the Applied Electrostatics Research Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, have been used to build an unlimited-life high-efficiency filter for micron-sized particles entrained in up to 300°C hot exhaust gas. This pseudoelectret filter has considerable advantages when compared to mechanical or conventional electret-type filters. In a comparable unblinded mechanical filter, the pressure drop

  11. Waste heat recovery from heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust gases by medium temperature ORC system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MingShan Wei; JinLi Fang; ChaoChen Ma; Syed Noman Danish

    A medium-temperature waste-heat recovery system based on the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is designed to recover the exhaust\\u000a energy from a heavy-duty diesel engine. Analysis of the 1st law of thermodynamics for an ORC system is performed. This analysis\\u000a contains two parts. The first part is an analysis with undefined heat exchangers to gain an understanding of the ORC and

  12. The trapping system for the recirculated gases at different locations of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) pipe of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piperel, A.; Montagne, X.; Dagaut, P.

    2008-10-01

    Nowadays, in diesel engines, it is typical to recycle exhaust gases (EGR) in order to decrease pollutant emissions. However, few studies report the precisely measured composition of the recycled gases. Indeed, in order to know precisely the composition of the EGR gases, they have to be sampled hot and not diluted, in contrast to the usual practice. Thus, a new system to collect such samples was developed. With this new trapping system, it is possible to measure the concentrations of NOx, CO, CO2, O2, hydrocarbons (HCs) in the range C1-C9, aldehydes, ketones and PAHs. The trapping system and the analytical protocol used are described in this paper.

  13. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge 1992: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, W. A.; Larsen, R. P.; Zammit, M. G.; Davies, J. G.; Salmon, G. S.; Bruetsch, R. I.

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge '92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the U.S. Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  14. Space shuttle SRM plume expansion sensitivity analysis. [flow characteristics of exhaust gases from solid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    The exhaust plumes of the space shuttle solid rocket motors can have a significant effect on the base pressure and base drag of the shuttle vehicle. A parametric analysis was conducted to assess the sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle of analytical solid rocket motor flow fields to various analytical input parameters and operating conditions. The results of the analysis are presented and conclusions reached regarding the sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle to each parameter investigated. Operating conditions parametrically varied were chamber pressure, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle throat radius of curvature ratio and propellant particle loading. Empirical particle parameters investigated were mean size, local drag coefficient and local heat transfer coefficient. Sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle to gas thermochemistry model and local drag coefficient model assumptions were determined.

  15. Vehicle exhaust gas clearance by low temperature plasma-driven nano-titanium dioxide film prepared by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  16. Exhaust emissions from gasoline-fuelled light duty vehicles operated in different driving conditions: A chemical and biological characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerholm, Roger; Almén, Jacob; Li, Hang; Rannug, Ulf; Rosén, Åke

    Chemical analysis and mutagenicity tests on Salmonella typtimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 (Ames test) of exhaust emissions from five passengers vehicles, with or without a three-way catalyst, have been carried out to obtain emission factors and to characterize exhaust emissions. Both constant cruising speeds and transient driving conditions were investigated, regulated CO, HC, NO x and particulates, as well as unregulated pollutants, were analysed. The following unregulated pollutants were measured: particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), 1-nitropyrene, light aromatics and light oxygenates. In total, 39 individual compounds were assayed. Emissions from catalyst-equipped vehicles showed a dramatic decrease compared with those from the vehicle without a catalyst. An emission dependency of both regulated and unregulated pollutants and biological activity on driving conditions were determined. An increased emission of PAH, 1-nitropyrene, particulates and mutagenic activity was found with a higher cruising speed.

  17. Development of a TiAl turbocharger for passenger vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshimitsu Tetsui

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve acceleration and to reduce the amount of harmful substances in the exhaust gases of passenger vehicles, improvement of turbocharger response is highly effective. The simplest way to do this is to apply lightweight materials for the turbine wheel, in which Ni-based superalloys are currently used. However, as the turbine wheel is exposed to exhaust gases at

  18. Exhaust emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes and phenols from vehicles coming within different European classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Carbone, Claudio; Faedo, Davide; Ferrero, Luca; Maggioni, Angela; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    EU emission standards for vehicles do not include many particulate (PM) and gaseous species, despite their considerable impact on air pollution and health. Emission factors (EFs) were measured for unregulated species, i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes (ALKs) in the particle phase, and, for the first time, EFs for phenols in both particle and gas phases. Exhaust samples were collected under controlled operating conditions (chassis dynamometer tests) for in-service vehicles (private cars, PCs and light duty vehicles, LDVs) from different EURO classes. EFs of trace organics were highest for the old EURO 1 vehicles (the tested EURO 1 vehicles were without emission-control devices), and lowest for the more recent EURO 3 and 4 vehicles. ALKs (C20-C32) were the most abundant trace organic compounds found in PM vehicle exhaust, and their EF ranged between 2034 and 101 ?g km-1 (Euro 1-4 LDVs). PM-phased phenols EFs were in the range 0.42-2.50 ?g km-1, and 4-nitrophenol was the most abundant one. The highest EFs were measured for phenols in the gas phase (dominated by the presence of phenol) for gasoline EURO 1 (43.16 ± 9.99 ?g km-1). Emissions of PAHs changed depending on the fuel used. The PAH EFs of diesel-driven PCs were 4-5 times higher than those of gasoline vehicles, with PAHs diesel exhaust being mainly enriched in low 4-ring PAHs (85%), while 5-6 ring PAHs were prevalent (55%) in gasoline vehicles. Results of source profiles from chassis dynamometer tests were compared with ambient data, and the traffic PAH source profile derived from a tunnel study (Milan) agreed with the estimated emissions from a mix of diesel and gasoline vehicles circulating in the same area. Moreover, the impact of EURO regulatory changes on exhaust emissions was calculated, and this made it possible to estimate the downward trend of PAH emissions in the Province of Milan in the period 2005-2020.

  19. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  20. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 ?m. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high-sulfur fuel, the chemical submicron aerosol fraction is mainly composed of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) species. These include PAHs that are adsorbed onto the high number of ultrafine particles. Nevertheless, the chemical composition, typical particle sizes as well as emitted gaseous components vary substantially dependent on the engine or ship type, engine operation condition and fuel mixture. This results in cargo vessels compared to tankers, passenger ships and river boats being the largest polluters influencing the Elbe shipping lane areas by high amounts of NOx, SO2, CO2, PAH, BC and ultrafine particulate matter. The tropospheric ozone chemistry in this area is also substantially affected particularly due to the increasing number of Elbe-passing ships. As onshore regions can be influenced by aged shipping plumes, trajectory pathways and transportation times were examined. As a consequence of the plumes' aging, variations of the organic fraction of the mass spectral fingerprints were found. Eyring, V. et al. (2010), Atmospheric Environment, 44, 4735-4771.

  1. Effects of particulate matter from gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust emissions on silicate stones sulfation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, J.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    The effects of particulate matter (PM) from diesel and leaded gasoline motor vehicles exhaust emissions on sulfation of granites, syenite and gabbro stones have been experimentally studied. Abundant gypsum crystals and corrosion features developed on stones covered with diesel PM (DPM) following 72 h exposure to 100 ppm SO 2 at a relative humidity of 100%. In contrast, very small amounts of gypsum were observed on stones covered with gasoline PM (GPM), while no effect was observed on naked control stones. Abundant elemental C and Fe-rich particles in DPM play a critical role in the catalytic oxidation of SO 2 and the formation of H 2SO 4, which is responsible for silicate stone sulfation. Conversely, organic C and Pb-rich particles that are main components of GPM, do not play a significant role in sulfation. The response of each stone type towards sulfation is related to the stability of their constituent silicate minerals towards acid attack. Thus, the stones most susceptible to sulfation are those including nepheline (syenite), olivine, and pyroxene (gabbro), while granites in general, are most resistant to sulfation-related chemical weathering. These results help to explain how black (gypsum) crusts develop on silicate stones, and support limitations for (diesel) vehicular traffic and emission loads in urban centers.

  2. Characterization, concentrations and emission rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the exhaust emissions from in-service vehicles in Damascus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkurdi, Farouk; Karabet, François; Dimashki, Marwan

    2013-02-01

    Motor vehicles are significant sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions to the urban atmosphere. Improved understanding of PAH emission profiles in mobile sources is the key to determining the viable approach for reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles. Very limited data is available on the levels of PAH emissions in the urban atmospheres in Syria and no data are currently available on the level of PAH emissions from different combustion sources in the country. The aim of this study was to determine the profile and concentration of PAH in exhaust emissions of light and heavy-duty vehicles running on the roads of Damascus city. Three different types of vehicles (passenger cars, minivans and buses) were selected along with different age groups. Vapor- and particulate-phase PAH were collected from the vehicular exhausts of six in-service vehicles (with/without catalytic converters). High-performance liquid chromatography system, equipped with UV-Visible and fluorescence detectors, was used for the identification and quantification of PAH compounds in the cleaned extracts of the collected samples. The mean concentration of total PAH emissions (sum of 15 compounds) from all types of studied vehicles ranged between 69.28 ± 1.06 ?g/m3 for passenger cars equipped with catalytic converters and 2169.41 ± 5.17 ?g/m3 for old diesel buses without pollution controls. Values of total benzo(a)pyrene equivalent (? B[a]Peq) ranged between 1.868 ?g/m3and 37.652 ?g/m3. The results obtained in this study showed that the use of catalytic converters resulted into cleaner exhaust compositions and emissions with characteristics that are distinct from those obtained in the absence of catalytic converters.

  3. Influence of an Optimized Thermoelectric Generator on the Back Pressure of the Subsequent Exhaust Gas System of a Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Roland; Koeppen, Olaf; Kitte, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Numerous research projects in automotive engineering focus on the industrialization of the thermoelectric generator (TEG). The development and the implementation of thermoelectric systems into the vehicle environment are commonly supported by virtual design activities. In this paper a customized simulation architecture is presented that includes almost all vehicle parts which are influenced by the TEG (overall system simulation) but is nevertheless capable of real-time use. Moreover, an optimized planar TEG with minimum nominal power output of about 580 W and pressure loss at nominal conditions of 10 mbar, synthesized using the overall system simulation, and the overall system simulation itself are used to answer a generally neglected question: What influence does the position of a TEG have on the back pressure of the subsequent exhaust gas system of the vehicle? It is found that the influence of the TEG on the muffler is low, but the catalytic converter is strongly influenced. It is shown that the TEG can reduce the back pressure of an exhaust gas system so much that its overall back pressure is less than the back pressure of a standard exhaust gas system.

  4. Assessing the risk to firefighters from chemical vapors and gases during vehicle fire suppression.

    PubMed

    Fent, Kenneth W; Evans, Douglas E

    2011-03-01

    Despite the frequent occurrence of vehicle fires, very few studies investigating firefighters' potential inhalation exposures during vehicle fire suppression have been conducted. In this paper, we present an assessment of firefighters' health risk from vehicle fire suppression that accounts for the mixture of gases and vapors likely to be found in these fires. Summa canisters were used to collect emissions from the engine and cabin fires of a single vehicle and were analyzed for 75 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Firefighters' breathing zone concentrations (BZCs) of aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, isocyanates, and carbon monoxide were measured during the suppression of three vehicle fires. The Summa canister and BZC data were used to develop a simple model for predicting BZCs for the compounds that were not measured in the firefighters' breathing zones. Hazard quotients (HQs) were calculated by dividing the predicted and measured BZCs by the most conservative short-term exposure limits (STELs) or ceiling limits. Hazard indices (HIs) were determined by adding HQs for compounds grouped by the target organ for acute health effects. Any HIs above unity represented unacceptable risks. According to this mixture analysis, the estimated 95(th) percentile of the exposure distribution for the study population represents ? 9.2 times the acceptable level of risk to the respiratory tract and eyes. Furthermore, chemicals known or reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens contributed to > 45% of these HIs. While STELs are not usually based on carcinogenicity, maintaining exposures below STELs may protect individuals from the biological stress that could result from short-term exposures to carcinogens over time. Although vehicle fires are suppressed quickly (<10 min), this assessment suggests that firefighters have the potential to be overexposed to acute toxins during vehicle fire suppression and should therefore wear self-contained breathing apparatus at all times during vehicle fire response. PMID:21274476

  5. Light-Duty Vehicle Exhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Quanlu Wang; Catherine Kling; Daniel Sperling

    1993-01-01

    The substantial reductions in motor vehicle emissions that have occurred since the late 1960s have been accompanied by continuous increases in vehicle emission control costs, and cost increases or decreases due to changes in vehicle performance such as driveability, power, fuel economy, and vehicle maintenance. In this paper, a systematic approach has been developed to estimate emission control costs for

  6. Speciated hydrocarbon profiles and calculated reactivities of exhaust and evaporative emissions from 82 in-use light-duty Australian vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, B. L.; Nelson, P. F.; Ye, Y.; Weeks, I. A.

    Mass emissions of non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) from 26 pre-1986 and 56 post-1985 catalyst-equipped in-service vehicles were determined from measurements made on a chassis dynamometer using an urban drive cycle. Evaporative emissions were measured on a subset (4 pre-1986 and 8 post-1985) of these vehicles. Average ADR emissions (mg/km) of the individual HCs from the older pre-1986 vehicles were generally 4-7 times the emissions from newer catalyst-equipped vehicles. Evaporative emissions from the older vehicles are also much higher than those of newer vehicles. Exhaust from newer catalyst-equipped vehicles had lower proportions of substituted aromatics and alkenes and higher proportions of lower molecular weight alkanes. The effect of fuel type on the exhaust emissions was also investigated by refuelling 9 of the pre-1986 vehicles with both unleaded and leaded petrol. A 20-40% reduction in HC mass emissions was observed when unleaded petrol was used instead of leaded petrol. Reactivities of the emissions and the contributions from different classes of compounds are also reported. The specific reactivity of the exhaust emissions from newer vehicles was lower than that for older vehicles owing to the smaller proportions of highly reactive alkenes and substituted aromatic species. Moreover, as older vehicles have higher average mass emissions, when considered on a per-km basis, the pre-1986 vehicles have a greater ozone-forming potential than post-1985 vehicles. The specific reactivities of the NMHC (gO 3/gNMHC) of both the heat build and hot soak evaporative emissions were much lower than the exhaust emissions.

  7. The potential of a partial-flow constant dilution ratio sampling system as a candidate for vehicle exhaust aerosol measurements.

    PubMed

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Samaras, Zissis

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the measurement of airborne particle properties with use of a dedicated sampling protocol and a measurement setup directly installed in the exhaust line of vehicles and engines. The sampling system dilutes a small part of the exhaust directly at the tailpipe without the need of exhaust gas transfer lines that may lead to sampling artifacts. Dilution takes place in two steps with a primary dilution ratio universally set at a value of 12.5:1 for all vehicles and engines tested, and subsequent dilution steps reducing particle concentration within the measuring range of the instruments used. Dilution air temperature and residence time were set at 32 degrees C and 2.5 sec respectively, to allow repeatable measurement of nucleation-mode particles. The paper summarizes the specifications of the system, evaluates its performance in comparison to real-world dilution (chasing experiments), and presents the repeatability and reproducibility of measurements performed in different laboratories. In general, after taking precautions for the setup and condition of instruments, both measurement quality indices reached levels similar to the measurement of particulate matter (PM) mass. Application of the system, using the same protocol, to measure many light-duty vehicles and engines is finally demonstrated, providing useful conclusions for the emission performance of different sized engines. The study concludes that the use of partial-flow sampling systems may offer advantages for the measurement of particle emissions from low-emission engines compared with constant volume sampling facilities, including lower cost of purchase and operation, versatility, lack of artifacts, and possibilities for standardization in different environments. PMID:21090550

  8. Assessment of the capacity of vehicle cabin air inlet filters to reduce diesel exhaust-induced symptoms in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution especially derived from traffic is associated with increases in cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality. In this study, we evaluated the ability of novel vehicle cabin air inlet filters to reduce diesel exhaust (DE)-induced symptoms and markers of inflammation in human subjects. Methods Thirty healthy subjects participated in a randomized double-blind controlled crossover study where they were exposed to filtered air, unfiltered DE and DE filtered through two selected particle filters, one with and one without active charcoal. Exposures lasted for one hour. Symptoms were assessed before and during exposures and lung function was measured before and after each exposure, with inflammation assessed in peripheral blood five hours after exposures. In parallel, PM were collected from unfiltered and filtered DE and assessed for their capacity to drive damaging oxidation reactions in a cell-free model, or promote inflammation in A549 cells. Results The standard particle filter employed in this study reduced PM10 mass concentrations within the exposure chamber by 46%, further reduced to 74% by the inclusion of an active charcoal component. In addition use of the active charcoal filter was associated by a 75% and 50% reduction in NO2 and hydrocarbon concentrations, respectively. As expected, subjects reported more subjective symptoms after exposure to unfiltered DE compared to filtered air, which was significantly reduced by the filter with an active charcoal component. There were no significant changes in lung function after exposures. Similarly diesel exhaust did not elicit significant increases in any of the inflammatory markers examined in the peripheral blood samples 5 hour post-exposure. Whilst the filters reduced chamber particle concentrations, the oxidative activity of the particles themselves, did not change following filtration with either filter. In contrast, diesel exhaust PM passed through the active charcoal combination filter appeared less inflammatory to A549 cells. Conclusions A cabin air inlet particle filter including an active charcoal component was highly effective in reducing both DE particulate and gaseous components, with reduced exhaust-induced symptoms in healthy volunteers. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of cabin filters to protect subjects travelling in vehicles from diesel exhaust emissions. PMID:24621126

  9. Concentration measurement in a road tunnel as a method to assess "real-world" vehicles exhaust emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, G.; Berico, M.; Monforti, F.; Vitali, L.; Zambonelli, S.; Chiavarini, S.; Georgiadis, T.; Nardino, M.

    An experiment aimed at comparing particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations produced in a road tunnel by buses is described. The experiment took place in 2001 in Bologna when a couple of buses belonging to the public transport fleet where driven backwards and forwards in a road tunnel closed to all other vehicles. Buses run in the tunnel for 8 h a day for 4 experiment days, each day using a different fuel: biodiesel, diesel-water emulsion, diesel-water emulsion with low sulphur content and commercial diesel. Average daily concentrations of PM of different sizes and of 12 PHAs were measured and comparison between different fuels was attempted in order to assess "real-world" exhaust emissions of different fuels. Due to heterogeneity of experimental conditions in different days and the relatively large measurement uncertainties, the effort was only partially successful, and it was not possible to state any firm conclusion on fuels reliability even if some indications in agreement with literature were found. Nevertheless, the experiment and the data analysis method developed could be of interest as a methodological approach for future experiments aimed at evaluating "real-world" exhaust emissions of single vehicles.

  10. Modal Analysis and Study of the Vibration Characteristics of the Thermoelectric Modules of Vehicle Exhaust Power-Generation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Mu, Yu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Yu, Rui; Li, Guodong; Zhang, Qingjie

    2014-06-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials and modules are important components of vehicle exhaust power-generation systems. The road and the engine, the main sources of vibration of TE modules, have substantial effects on the vibration characteristics of TE modules. In this work, modal analysis and the vibration characteristics of TE modules were investigated in detail. On the basis of the TE modules and their service environment, simulations for modal analysis were performed by use of the finite-element method, and the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the TE modules were obtained. The numerical results were used to compare the natural frequencies of TE modules under different contact stiffness with the range of excitation frequencies of road and engine, in an attempt to prevent severe resonance. The effects on the vibration characteristics of geometric dimensions, service temperature, and thermal stress of the TE modules are also discussed in detail. The results reveal the vibration characteristics of the TE modules and provide theoretical guidance for structure optimization in the design of vehicle exhaust power-generation systems.

  11. Real-World Vehicle Exhaust Emissions Monitoring: Review and Critical Discussion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl Ropkins; Joe Beebe; Hu Li; Basil Daham; James Tate; Margaret Bell; Gordon Andrews

    2009-01-01

    Traffic-related emissions represent a major component of airborne pollution. Historically, dynamometer testing has been most widely used to estimate vehicle emission rates, and these emission rates, in turn, have been used as inputs when modeling traffic-related air quality impacts. However, such conventional drive cycle testing is not considered strictly representative of vehicles under real driving conditions. Therefore, in recent years,

  12. Evaluation of gas removal and bacterial community diversity in a biofilter developed to treat composting exhaust gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying-Chien Chung

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a new, but simply constructed, biofilter system, developed to purify composting exhaust air, was evaluated. The biofilter was packed with mature compost mixed with activated carbon and sludge sourced from a wastewater treatment plant. An alternating air flow system and a bioaerosol reduction device were designed to prevent pressure drop and reduce bioaerosol release. Experimental results demonstrated

  13. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  14. Detectability of vehicle exhaust hydrocarbons: the Wisconsin inspection/maintentance (I/M) analyzer and the remote vehicle emissions sensing (RVES) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cors, Rebecca; Rendahl, Craig S.

    1995-05-01

    The Wisconsin Departments of Transportation and Natural Resources evaluated the hydrocarbon (HC) detection capability of the Remote Vehicle Emissions Sensing (RVES) system, which employs remote sensing technology, and Wisconsin's I/M analyzers, which use BAR90 specifications. Both analyzers employ non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) technology. Other recent research has quantified HC measurement inaccuracies for vehicle emissions analyzers that use NDIR technology or have BAR90 specifications. This research shows that BAR90 analyzers undermeasure some water- soluble HCs and NDIR analyzers undermeasure olefinic and aromatic HCs. This evaluation was based on both field measurements and calculations that simulate these inaccuracies. These calculations give a measurement accuracy value, which estimates the fraction of the total HCs in a vehicle exhaust sample that each analyzer measures. Other calculations quantify the ozone forming potential of this measured fraction by considering the reactivity of measured HCs. Our field measurements and calculations show Wisconsin I/M analyzer HC measurements are on average 7 percent and 1 percent less than RVES, respectively. Calculations estimate that both analyzers measure at most 43 to 71 percent (an average 61 percent) of the total HCs in an emissions sample. Additional calculations estimate that the HCs measured by both analyzers have 49 to 71 percent (an average 62 percent) of the ozone forming potential of the total HCs in an emissions sample.

  15. Secondary organic aerosol production from diesel vehicle exhaust: impact of aftertreatment, fuel chemistry and driving cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Robertson, W. H.; Na, K.; Sahay, K. N.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2014-05-01

    Environmental chamber ("smog chamber") experiments were conducted to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from dilute emissions from two medium-duty diesel vehicles (MDDVs) and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) under urban-like conditions. Some of the vehicles were equipped with emission control aftertreatment devices, including diesel particulate filters (DPFs), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Experiments were also performed with different fuels (100% biodiesel and low-, medium- or high-aromatic ultralow sulfur diesel) and driving cycles (Unified Cycle,~Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, and creep + idle). During normal operation, vehicles with a catalyzed DPF emitted very little primary particulate matter (PM). Furthermore, photooxidation of dilute emissions from these vehicles produced essentially no SOA (below detection limit). However, significant primary PM emissions and SOA production were measured during active DPF regeneration experiments. Nevertheless, under reasonable assumptions about DPF regeneration frequency, the contribution of regeneration emissions to the total vehicle emissions is negligible, reducing PM trapping efficiency by less than 2%. Therefore, catalyzed DPFs appear to be very effective in reducing both primary PM emissions and SOA production from diesel vehicles. For both MDDVs and HDDVs without aftertreatment substantial SOA formed in the smog chamber - with the emissions from some vehicles generating twice as much SOA as primary organic aerosol after 3 h of oxidation at typical urban VOC / NOx ratios (3 : 1). Comprehensive organic gas speciation was performed on these emissions, but less than half of the measured SOA could be explained by traditional (speciated) SOA precursors. The remainder presumably originates from the large fraction (~30%) of the nonmethane organic gas emissions that could not be speciated using traditional one-dimensional gas chromatography. The unspeciated organics - likely comprising less volatile species such as intermediate volatility organic compounds - appear to be important SOA precursors; we estimate that the effective SOA yield (defined as the ratio of SOA mass to reacted precursor mass) was 9 ± 6% if both speciated SOA precursors and unspeciated organics are included in the analysis. SOA production from creep + idle operation was 3-4 times larger than SOA production from the same vehicle operated over the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS). Fuel properties had little or no effect on primary PM emissions or SOA formation.

  16. Mathematical modeling of catalytic converter lightoff; Part III: Prediction of vehicle exhaust emissions and parametric analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Oh; J. C. Cavendish

    1985-01-01

    The converter warmup model developed previously (Oh and Cavendish, 1985) has been used to simulate the performance of a packed-bed converter during the cold-start portion of vehicle emission tests. Despite the highly transient converter inlet conditions, the model successfully predicts tailpipe mass emissions as a function of time.

  17. 40 CFR 1037.105 - Exhaust emission standards for CO2 for vocational vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...105—CO2 Standards for Vocational Vehicles GVWR(pounds) CO2 standard (g/ton-mile) for model years 2014-2016 CO2 standard (g/ton-mile) for model year 2017 and later GVWR ?19,500 388 373 19,500

  18. 40 CFR 1037.105 - Exhaust emission standards for CO2 for vocational vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...105—CO2 Standards for Vocational Vehicles GVWR(pounds) CO2 standard (g/ton-mile) for model years 2014-2016 CO2 standard (g/ton-mile) for model year 2017 and later GVWR ? 19,500 388 373 19,500 < GVWR ?...

  19. 40 CFR 1037.105 - Exhaust emission standards for CO2 for vocational vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...105—CO2 Standards for Vocational Vehicles GVWR(pounds) CO2 standard (g/ton-mile) for model years 2014-2016 CO2 standard (g/ton-mile) for model year 2017 and later GVWR ? 19,500 388 373 19,500 < GVWR ?...

  20. Investigation of remote sensing devices for chemical characterization of motor vehicle exhaust. Final report, February 1995--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.W.; Ripberger, C.T.; Vescio, N.

    1998-12-01

    The report summarizes results of tests to (1) evaluate the accuracy and precision of two different remote sensing devices (RSDs) for measuring carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs), and nitric oxide (NO), and (2) evaluating the capabilities of three RSDs for characterizing fleet emissions of NO. `Puff` tests (in which simulated motor vehicle exhaust gas was repeatedly injected in bursts or puffs into the RSDs) were conducted. The accuracy and precision of data from these measurements, which showed a generally linear response over a range of concentrations, were in the order CO > HCs > NO. Subsequently, three vehicles were driven at constant speed on a dynamometer and on a test track. The average emissions data measured by the three RSDs at the track, when compared to the dynanmometer emissions data (which were used as the standard), in general showed just the opposite result; i.e., NO > HCs > CO. However, the test track data showed a considerable amount of variation. The three RSDs were tested for several hours on a freeway ramp in Raleigh, NC.

  1. Engine exhaust control system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Billington, W.G.

    1990-04-03

    This patent describes an exhaust gas control apparatus for an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a rotary fan blade assembly having a hollow hub and plurality of hollow blades, each having a plurality of apertures in a trailing edge; drive means for driving the rotary fan blade assembly; feed means feeding exhaust gases from the engine into the hollow hub and hollow blades; air intake means for feeding intake air to the rotary fan blade assembly from a direction opposite to the direction of flow of the exhaust gases into the hollow hub of the rotary fan blade assembly; exhaust means for exhausting a mixture of air and the exhaust gases; whereby the flow of exhaust gases through the rotary fan blade assembly and out through the exhaust means reduces back-pressure, exhaust noise, exhaust temperature and exhaust pollutants.

  2. Experimental studies of the dilution of vehicle exhaust pollutants by environment-protecting pervious pavement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chung-Ming Liu; Jui-Wen Chen; Jen-Hui Tsai; Wei-Shian Lin; M.-T. Yen; Ting-Hao Chen

    2012-01-01

    This study determines whether environment-protecting pervious pavement can dilute pollutants immediately after emissions from vehicle. The turbulence-driven dry-deposition process is too slow to be considered in this aspect. The pavement used is the JW pavement (according to its inventor's name), a high-load-bearing water-permeable pavement with patents in over 100 countries, which has already been used for more than 8 years

  3. Experimental studies of the dilution of vehicle exhaust pollutants by environment-protecting pervious pavement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chung-Ming; Chen, Jui-Wen; Tsai, Jen-Hui; Lin, Wei-Shian; Yen, M-T; Chen, Ting-Hao

    2012-01-01

    This study determines whether environment-protecting pervious pavement can dilute pollutants immediately after emissions from vehicle. The turbulence-driven dry-deposition process is too slow to be considered in this aspect. The pavement used is the JW pavement (according to its inventors name), a high-load-bearing water-permeable pavement with patents in over 100 countries, which has already been used for more than 8 years in Taiwan and is well suited to replacing conventional road pavement, making the potential implementation of the study results feasible. The design of this study included two sets of experiments. Variation of the air pollutant concentrations within a fenced area over the JW pavement with one vehicle discharging emissions into was monitored and compared with results over a non-JW pavement. The ambient wind speed was low during the first experiment, and the results obtained were highly credible. It was found that the JW pavement diluted vehicle pollutant emissions near the ground surface by 40%-87% within 5 min of emission; whereas the data at 2 m height suggested that about 58%-97% of pollutants were trapped underneath the pavement 20 min after emission. Those quantitative estimations may be off by +/- 10%, if errors in emissions and measurements were considered. SO2 and CO2 underwent the most significant reduction. Very likely, pollutants were forced to move underneath due to the special design of the pavement. During the second experiment, ambient wind speeds were high and the results obtained had less credibility, but they did not disprove the pollutant dilution capacity of the JW pavement. In order to track the fate of pollutants, parts of the pavement were removed to reveal a micro version of wetland underneath, which could possibly hold the responsibility of absorbing and decomposing pollutants to forms harmless to the environment and human health. PMID:22393814

  4. 40 CFR 1051.107 - What are the exhaust emission standards for all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and offroad utility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...the exhaust emission standards in this section by model year. Measure emissions...comply with the emission standards for those model years. Calculate...Exhaust Emission Standards for ATVs (g/km) Phase Model year...

  5. 40 CFR 1051.107 - What are the exhaust emission standards for all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and offroad utility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...the exhaust emission standards in this section by model year. Measure emissions...comply with the emission standards for those model years. Calculate...Exhaust Emission Standards for ATVs (g/km) Phase Model year...

  6. 40 CFR 1051.107 - What are the exhaust emission standards for all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and offroad utility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...the exhaust emission standards in this section by model year. Measure emissions...comply with the emission standards for those model years. Calculate...Exhaust Emission Standards for ATVs (g/km) Phase Model year...

  7. 40 CFR 1051.107 - What are the exhaust emission standards for all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and offroad utility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...the exhaust emission standards in this section by model year. Measure emissions...comply with the emission standards for those model years. Calculate...Exhaust Emission Standards for ATVs (g/km) Phase Model year...

  8. 40 CFR 1051.107 - What are the exhaust emission standards for all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and offroad utility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...the exhaust emission standards in this section by model year. Measure emissions...comply with the emission standards for those model years. Calculate...Exhaust Emission Standards for ATVs (g/km) Phase Model year...

  9. Simulation and Design of Vehicle Exhaust Power Generation Systems: The Interaction Between the Heat Exchanger and the Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Cong; Chen, Gang; Mu, Yu; Liu, Lisheng; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2015-06-01

    Vehicle exhaust power generation systems (VEPGS), mainly consisting of a heat exchanger, cooling system, thermoelectric modules (TEMs), and clamping device, have attracted wide interest and attention for power generation from waste heat. In this work, systematical research was conducted to investigate the thermal performance, power output, and thermal stress of a VEPGS by using the multifield coupling method. Different from previous research, this work simulates a model that integrates the heat exchanger and TEMs, focusing on the effect of the TEMs on the thermal performance of the heat exchanger. It is found that the TEMs have a significant effect on the thermal performance of the heat exchanger. When not considering the effects of the TEMs, the hot-end temperature of the TEMs would be seriously underestimated, which would result in underestimation of the power output of the VEPGS and the level of thermal stress of the TEMs. Meanwhile, when considering the effect of the TEMs, the hot-end temperature distribution exhibits significant changes, and its temperature uniformity is significantly improved. The results suggest that, in VEPGS design and optimization, the interaction between the heat exchanger and TEMs should be considered. This study also contributes to a more accurate assessment method for VEPGS design and simulation.

  10. The effect of exhaust plume/afterbody interaction on installed Scramjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Thomas Alan

    1988-01-01

    Newly emerging aerospace technology points to the feasibility of sustained hypersonic flight. Designing a propulsion system capable of generating the necessary thrust is now the major obstacle. First-generation vehicles will be driven by air-breathing scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. Because of engine size limitations, the exhaust gas leaving the nozzle will be highly underexpanded. Consequently, a significant amount of thrust and lift can be extracted by allowing the exhaust gases to expand along the underbody of the vehicle. Predicting how these forces influence overall vehicle thrust, lift, and moment is essential to a successful design. This work represents an important first step toward that objective. The UWIN code, an upwind, implicit Navier-Stokes computer program, has been applied to hypersonic exhaust plume/afterbody flow fields. The capability to solve entire vehicle geometries at hypersonic speeds, including an interacting exhaust plume, has been demonstrated for the first time. Comparison of the numerical results with available experimental data shows good agreement in all cases investigated. For moderately underexpanded jets, afterbody forces were found to vary linearly with the nozzle exit pressure, and increasing the exit pressure produced additional nose-down pitching moment. Coupling a species continuity equation to the UWIN code enabled calculations indicating that exhaust gases with low isentropic exponents (gamma) contribute larger afterbody forces than high-gamma exhaust gases. Moderately underexpanded jets, which remain attached to unswept afterbodies, underwent streamwise separation on upswept afterbodies. Highly underexpanded jets produced altogether different flow patterns, however. The highly underexpanded jet creates a strong plume shock, and the interaction of this shock with the afterbody was found to produce complicated patterns of crossflow separation. Finally, the effect of thrust vectoring on vehicle balance has been shown to alter dramatically the vehicle pitching moment.

  11. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of df2 (diesel fuel) used in vehicle engine exhaust smoke systems (VEESS). Technical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Callahan; C. L. Crouse; G. E. Affleck; E. G. Cummings; R. L. Farrand

    1986-01-01

    Mice and rats were exposed by the airborne route to average total hydrocarbon concentrations of 2340 + or - 450 mg\\/cu m of M60A1 tank-generated DF2 smoke\\/exhaust or 6.0 + or - mg\\/cu m of DF2 exhaust only. The exposures were performed under static airflow conditions and consisted of 15- or 60-min daily exposures lasting for up to 13 weeks.

  12. 49 CFR 393.83 - Exhaust systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Exhaust systems. 393.83...Accessories § 393.83 Exhaust systems. (a...expelling harmful combustion fumes shall have a system...the discharge of such fumes. No part shall be...vehicle. (b) No exhaust system shall discharge...filler pipe. (c) The exhaust system of a bus...

  13. Emissions of organic aerosol mass, black carbon, particle number, and regulated and unregulated gases from scooters and light and heavy duty vehicles with different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Giechaskiel, B.; Heringa, M. F.; Elsasser, M.; Martini, G.; Manfredi, U.; Streibel, T.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Astorga, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    A sampling campaign with seven different types of vehicles was conducted in 2009 at the vehicle test facilities of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra (Italy). The vehicles chosen were representative of some categories circulating in Europe and were fueled either with standard gasoline or diesel and some with blends of rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel. The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the emission factors of gas phase and particle-associated regulated and unregulated species from vehicle exhaust. Unregulated species such as black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (OA) content, particle number (PN), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a~selection of unregulated gaseous compounds, including nitrous acid (N2O), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and methane (CH4), were measured in real time with a suite of instruments including a high-resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Diesel vehicles, without particle filters, featured the highest values for particle number, followed by gasoline vehicles and scooters. The particles from diesel and gasoline vehicles were mostly made of BC with a low fraction of OA, while the particles from the scooters were mainly composed of OA. Scooters were characterized by super high emissions factors for OA, which were orders of magnitude higher than for the other vehicles. The heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) featured the highest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, while the scooters had the highest emissions for total hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds due to the unburned and partially burned gasoline and lubricant oil mixture. Generally, vehicles fuelled with biodiesel blends showed lower emission factors of OA and total aromatics than those from the standard fuels. The scooters were the main emitters of aromatic compounds, followed by the gasoline vehicle, the diesel vehicles and the HDDV.

  14. Abating exhaust noises in jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, I. R. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A noise abating improvement for jet engines including turbojets, turbofans, turboprops, ramjets, scramjets, and hybrid jets is introduced. A provision is made for an apparatus in the primary and/or secondary flow streams of the engines; the apparatus imparts to the exhaust gases a component rotation or swirl about the engine's longitudinal axis. The rotary component in the exhaust gases causes a substantial suppression of sound energy build up normally produced by an axial flow exhaust system.

  15. Similar cellular effects induced by diesel exhaust particles from a representative diesel vehicle recovered from filters and Standard Reference Material 1650.

    PubMed

    Boland, S; Baeza-Squiban, A; Bonvallot, V; Houcine, O; Pain, C; Meyer, M; Marano, F

    2001-01-01

    Standard reference diesel exhaust particles (DEP) SRM 1650 are often used to evaluate the toxicity of DEP. However, these particles did not necessarily reflect the effects of DEP representative of present diesel automobiles. This study was designed to compare the effects of SRM 1650 to DEP from representative cars (RC-DEP) on airway epithelial cells. Therefore we established a method to recover RC-DEP impacted on filters after emission from diesel automobiles on test beds. Electron microscopy and flow cytometry showed that these two types of particles were phagocytosed to the same extent by epithelial cells. This phagocytosis is not dependent on the adsorbed organic compounds in contrast to the cytotoxic effect evaluated by measurements of LDH release. This is emphasized by the fact that RC-DEP equipped with an oxidation catalyst are less cytotoxic than particles from a non-equipped vehicle or SRM 1650. This type of catalyst also reduces significantly the release of GM-CSF by bronchial epithelial cells. We have shown in the present paper that SRM 1650 may be used as a surrogate of DEP. However, exhaust gas post-treatment devices of current diesel automobiles reduce the cytotoxicity as well as the inflammatory response of these particles. PMID:11566567

  16. Fouling effects of turbine exhaust gases on heat exchanger tubes for heat recovery systems. Research and development report for period ending March 1978

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rogalski

    1979-01-01

    The use of heat recovery with shipboard gas turbine engine exhausts has generated a need to examine operational problem areas of waste heat boilers (WHB's). To ensure dependable boiler operation, it is necessary to minimize gas-side fouling of boiler tubes if the fouling cannot be eliminated. This fouling of a waste heat boiler will produce increased boiler core gas pressure

  17. Axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric exhaust jet induced effects on a V/STOL vehicle design. Part 3: Experimental technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    The jet induced effects of several exhaust nozzle configurations (axisymmetric, and vectoring/modulating varients) on the aeropropulsive performance of a twin engine V/STOL fighter design was determined. A 1/8 scale model was tested in an 11 ft transonic tunnel at static conditions and over a range of Mach Numbers from 0.4 to 1.4. The experimental aspects of the static and wind-on programs are discussed. Jet effects test techniques in general, fow through balance calibrations and tare force corrections, ASME nozzle thrust and mass flow calibrations, test problems and solutions are emphasized.

  18. The Response of the Auto Industry and Consumers to Changes in the Exhaust Emission and Fuel Economy Standards (1975-2003): A Historical Review of Changes in Technology, Prices and Sales of Various Classes of Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy Burke; Ethan Abeles; Belinda Chen

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the responses of the auto ind ustry and consumers to changes in the exhaust emission and fuel economy standards that have occurred in the United States and California in the past thirty years (1975-2003), (2) to relate qualitatively these responses to technology developments and changing economic factors, such as vehicle prices,

  19. Development and integration of a solar powered unmanned aerial vehicle and a wireless sensor network to monitor greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Malaver, Alexander; Motta, Nunzio; Corke, Peter; Gonzalez, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Measuring gases for environmental monitoring is a demanding task that requires long periods of observation and large numbers of sensors. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) currently represent the best alternative to monitor large, remote, and difficult access areas, as these technologies have the possibility of carrying specialized gas sensing systems. This paper presents the development and integration of a WSN and an UAV powered by solar energy in order to enhance their functionality and broader their applications. A gas sensing system implementing nanostructured metal oxide (MOX) and non-dispersive infrared sensors was developed to measure concentrations of CH4 and CO2. Laboratory, bench and field testing results demonstrate the capability of UAV to capture, analyze and geo-locate a gas sample during flight operations. The field testing integrated ground sensor nodes and the UAV to measure CO2 concentration at ground and low aerial altitudes, simultaneously. Data collected during the mission was transmitted in real time to a central node for analysis and 3D mapping of the target gas. The results highlights the accomplishment of the first flight mission of a solar powered UAV equipped with a CO2 sensing system integrated with a WSN. The system provides an effective 3D monitoring and can be used in a wide range of environmental applications such as agriculture, bushfires, mining studies, zoology and botanical studies using a ubiquitous low cost technology. PMID:25679312

  20. Development and Integration of a Solar Powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Wireless Sensor Network to Monitor Greenhouse Gases

    PubMed Central

    Malaver, Alexander; Motta, Nunzio; Corke, Peter; Gonzalez, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Measuring gases for environmental monitoring is a demanding task that requires long periods of observation and large numbers of sensors. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) currently represent the best alternative to monitor large, remote, and difficult access areas, as these technologies have the possibility of carrying specialized gas sensing systems. This paper presents the development and integration of a WSN and an UAV powered by solar energy in order to enhance their functionality and broader their applications. A gas sensing system implementing nanostructured metal oxide (MOX) and non-dispersive infrared sensors was developed to measure concentrations of CH4 and CO2. Laboratory, bench and field testing results demonstrate the capability of UAV to capture, analyze and geo-locate a gas sample during flight operations. The field testing integrated ground sensor nodes and the UAV to measure CO2 concentration at ground and low aerial altitudes, simultaneously. Data collected during the mission was transmitted in real time to a central node for analysis and 3D mapping of the target gas. The results highlights the accomplishment of the first flight mission of a solar powered UAV equipped with a CO2 sensing system integrated with a WSN. The system provides an effective 3D monitoring and can be used in a wide range of environmental applications such as agriculture, bushfires, mining studies, zoology and botanical studies using a ubiquitous low cost technology. PMID:25679312

  1. Concentration measurement in a road tunnel as a method to assess “real-world” vehicles exhaust emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Zanini; M. Berico; F. Monforti; L. Vitali; S. Zambonelli; S. Chiavarini; T. Georgiadis; M. Nardino

    2006-01-01

    An experiment aimed at comparing particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations produced in a road tunnel by buses is described. The experiment took place in 2001 in Bologna when a couple of buses belonging to the public transport fleet where driven backwards and forwards in a road tunnel closed to all other vehicles. Buses run in the

  2. Crossfire calibrated exhaust system

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.S.

    1992-09-08

    This patent describes a dual-exhaust system for an internal combustion engine having a pair of spaced-apart pipes channeling exhaust gases from the engine towards a muffler. It comprises first and second additional pipes connected between the pair of spaced-apart pipes at substantially 45[degrees] angles with respect to each of the pair of pipes and at substantially a 90[degrees] angle with respect to each other; and wherein the first and second additional pipes are also interconnected with each other substantially at the midpoints thereof, measured along their respective lengths, and substantially midway between the pair of spaced-apart pipes.

  3. Thermal and Kinetic Impact of CO, CO2, and H2O on the Postoxidation of IC-Engine Exhaust Gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorg M. Anderlohr; Antonio Pires da Cruz; Roda Bounaceur; Frédérique Battin-Leclerc

    2010-01-01

    The thermal and kinetic impact of the residual species CO, CO2, and H2O on hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation chemistry was investigated numerically. The case of pure dilution by N2 was tested against a dilutant composed of CO, CO2, and H2O in proportions corresponding to internal combustion (IC)-engine Postoxidation conditions (at the end of the expansion stroke and throughout exhaust). The impact

  4. Analysis of possibilities of waste heat recovery in off-road vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, K. T.; Zybala, R.; Leszczynski, J.; Nieroda, P.; Schmidt, M.; Merkisz, J.; Lijewski, P.; Fuc, P.

    2012-06-01

    The paper presents the preliminary results of the waste heat recovery investigations for an agricultural tractor engine (7.4 dm3) and excavator engine (7.2 dm3) in real operating conditions. The temperature of exhaust gases and exhaust mass flow rate has been measured by precise portable exhaust emissions analyzer SEMTECH DS (SENSORS Inc.). The analysis shows that engines of tested vehicles operate approximately at constant speed and load. The average temperature of exhaust gases is in the range from 300 to 400 °C for maximum gas mass flows of 1100 kg/h and 1400 kg/h for tractor and excavator engine respectively. Preliminary tests show that application of TEGs in tested off-road vehicles offers much more beneficial conditions for waste heat recovery than in case of automotive engines.

  5. Catalytic automotive exhaust aftertreatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grigorios C. Koltsakis; Anastasios M. Stamatelos

    1997-01-01

    Catalytic exhaust aftertreatment of vehicle engines is increasingly employed to the benefit of the atmosphere quality, especially in the large urban area of the world. Both spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines benefit from the application of catalytic converters for the elimination of their main pollutants. Catalysts are further employed in various forms as regeneration aids in particulate filters of diesel engines.

  6. Vehicle non-exhaust emissions from the tyre-road interface - effect of stud properties, traction sanding and resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupiainen, Kaarle J.; Pirjola, Liisa

    2011-08-01

    In Northern cities respirable street dust emission levels (PM 10) are especially high during spring. The spring time dust has been observed to cause health effects as well as discomfort among citizens. Major sources of the dust are the abrasion products from the pavement and traction sand aggregates that are formed due to the motion of the tyre. We studied the formation of respirable abrasion particles in the tyre-road interface due to tyre studs and traction sanding by a mobile laboratory vehicle Sniffer. The measurements were preformed on a test track, where the influence of varying stud weight and stud number per tyre on PM 10 emissions was studied. Studded tyres resulted in higher emission levels than studless tyres especially with speeds 50 km h -1 and higher; however, by using light weight studs, which approximately halves the weight of studs, or by reducing the number of studs per tyre to half, the emission levels decreased by approximately half. Additionally measurements were done with and without traction sand coverage on the pavement of a public road. After traction sanding the emission levels were not affected by tyre type but by formation and suspension of traction sand related dust from the road surface. The emissions after traction sanding decreased as a function of time as passing vehicles' motion shifted the sand grains away from the areas with most tyre-road contact.

  7. Quick Access Rocket Exhaust Rig Testing of Coated GRCop-84 Sheets Used to Aid Coating Selection for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation of reusable launch vehicles calls for using GRCop-84 copper alloy liners based on a composition1 invented at the NASA Glenn Research Center: Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb. Many of the properties of this alloy have been shown to be far superior to those of other conventional copper alloys, such as NARloy-Z. Despite this considerable advantage, it is expected that GRCop-84 will suffer from some type of environmental degradation depending on the type of rocket fuel utilized. In a liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid oxygen (LO2) booster engine, copper alloys undergo repeated cycles of oxidation of the copper matrix and subsequent reduction of the copper oxide, a process termed "blanching". Blanching results in increased surface roughness and poor heat-transfer capabilities, local hot spots, decreased engine performance, and premature failure of the liner material. This environmental degradation coupled with the effects of thermomechanical stresses, creep, and high thermal gradients can distort the cooling channel severely, ultimately leading to its failure.

  8. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J.; Sioutas, C.

    2007-12-01

    A photo-electric aerosol sensor, a diffusion charger, an Aethalometer, and a continuous particle counter were used along with other real-time instruments to characterize the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (p-PAH) content, and the physical/chemical characteristics of aerosols collected a) in Wilmington (CA) near the Los Angeles port and close to 2 major freeways, and b) at a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA), where 3 diesel trucks were tested. In Wilmington, the p-PAH, surface area, particle number, and "black" carbon concentrations were 4-8 times higher at 09:00-11:00 a.m. than between 17:00 and 18:00 p.m., suggesting that during rush hour traffic people living in that area are exposed to a higher number of diesel combustion particles enriched in p-PAH coatings. Dynamometer tests revealed that the p-PAH emissions from the "baseline" truck (no catalytic converted) were up to 200 times higher than those from the 2 vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies, and increased when the truck was accelerating. In Wilmington, integrated filter samples were collected and analyzed to determine the concentrations of the most abundant p-PAHs. A correlation between the total p-PAH concentration (?g/m3) and the measured photo-electric aerosol sensor signal (fA) was also established. Estimated ambient p-PAH concentrations (Average = 0.64 ng/m3; Standard deviation = 0.46 ng/m3) were in good agreement with those reported in previous studies conducted in Los Angeles during a similar time period. Finally, we calculated the approximate theoretical lifetime (70 years per 24-h/day) lung-cancer risk in the Wilmington area due to inhalation of multi-component p-PAHs and "black" carbon. Our results indicate that the lung-cancer risk is highest during rush hour traffic and lowest in the afternoon, and that the genotoxic risk of the considered p-PAHs does not seem to contribute to a significant part of the total lung-cancer risk attributable to "black" carbon.

  9. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J.; Sioutas, C.

    2008-03-01

    A photo-electric aerosol sensor, a diffusion charger, an Aethalometer, and a continuous particle counter were used along with other real-time instruments to characterize the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (p-PAH) content, and the physical/chemical characteristics of aerosols collected a) in Wilmington (CA) near the Los Angeles port and close to 2 major freeways, and b) at a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA), where 3 diesel trucks were tested. In Wilmington, the p-PAH, surface area, particle number, and "black" carbon concentrations were 4-8 times higher at 09:00-11:00 a.m. than between 17:00 and 18:00 p.m., suggesting that during rush hour traffic people living in that area are exposed to a higher number of diesel combustion particles enriched in p-PAH coatings. Dynamometer tests revealed that the p-PAH emissions from the "baseline" truck (no catalytic converter) were up to 200 times higher than those from the 2 vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies, and increased when the truck was accelerating. In Wilmington, integrated filter samples were collected and analyzed to determine the concentrations of the most abundant p-PAHs. A correlation between the total p-PAH concentration (?g/m3) and the measured photo-electric aerosol sensor signal (fA) was also established. Estimated ambient p-PAH concentrations (Average=0.64 ng/m3; Standard deviation=0.46 ng/m3 were in good agreement with those reported in previous studies conducted in Los Angeles during a similar time period. Finally, we calculated the approximate theoretical lifetime (70 years per 24-h/day) lung-cancer risk in the Wilmington area due to inhalation of multi-component p-PAHs and "black" carbon. Our results indicate that the lung-cancer risk is highest during rush hour traffic and lowest in the afternoon, and that the genotoxic risk of the considered p-PAHs does not seem to contribute to a significant part of the total lung-cancer risk attributable to "black" carbon.

  10. First online measurements of sulfuric acid gas in modern heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust: implications for nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, F; Pirjola, L; Rönkkö, T; Reichl, U; Schlager, H; Lähde, T; Heikkilä, J; Keskinen, J

    2012-10-16

    To mitigate the diesel particle pollution problem, diesel vehicles are fitted with modern exhaust after-treatment systems (ATS), which efficiently remove engine-generated primary particles (soot and ash) and gaseous hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, ATS can promote formation of low-vapor-pressure gases, which may undergo nucleation and condensation leading to formation of nucleation particles (NUP). The chemical nature and formation mechanism of these particles are only poorly explored. Using a novel mass spectrometric method, online measurements of low-vapor-pressure gases were performed for exhaust of a modern heavy-duty diesel engine operated with modern ATS and combusting low and ultralow sulfur fuels and also biofuel. It was observed that the gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) concentration varied strongly, although engine operation was stable. However, the exhaust GSA was observed to be affected by fuel sulfur level, exhaust after-treatment, and driving conditions. Significant GSA concentrations were measured also when biofuel was used, indicating that GSA can be originated also from lubricant oil sulfur. Furthermore, accompanying NUP measurements and NUP model simulations were performed. We found that the exhaust GSA promotes NUP formation, but also organic (acidic) precursor gases can have a role. The model results indicate that that the measured GSA concentration alone is not high enough to grow the particles to the detected sizes. PMID:23035617

  11. Studies on potential emission of hazardous gases due to uncontrolled open-air burning of waste vehicle tyres and their possible impacts on the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Pawan R.; Shrestha, Pratima; Tamrakar, Chirika S.; Bhattarai, Pradeep K.

    Uncontrolled open-air burning of waste vehicle tyres causing environmental pollution has become a popular practice in Nepal despite official ban considering the environment and public health hazards. In this study, an experimental model was set up in a laboratory scale in an attempt to understand the potential emission of hazardous gases such as CO, SO 2 and NO 2 due to such activities in Kathmandu Valley and their possible impacts on the environment. For this purpose, four types of tyre were collected representing two from passenger car and two from motorbike category. The emission level of CO in the tyre smoke was measured with a CO gas detector tube while SO 2 and NO 2 were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometer. Among the three types of the gases analyzed, SO 2 was emitted in significantly high levels by all the representative tyre samples. The emission levels of CO, SO 2 and NO 2 ranged from 21to 49, 102to 820 and 3to 9 ?g g -1, respectively. Results revealed that the emission levels also varied with the tyre types and qualities. The potential emission of the hazardous gases per representative scrap tyre mass was also estimated. Results indicate that the gaseous pollutants due to the tyre fires could make a significant contribution for deterioration of the environmental condition of the Valley or elsewhere.

  12. Entake or exhaust valve actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Smietana, J.M.

    1993-08-03

    Intake or exhaust valve actuator assembly is described for an internal combustion engine for hydraulically opening and closing an intake or exhaust valve for admitting intake gases from an intake conduit into a combustion chamber or permitting exhaust gases to escape from the combustion chamber into an exhaust conduit, the engine including a piston which oscillates in the combustion chamber, a cylinder head which encloses the combustion chamber and contains the intake or exhaust valve and the intake or exhaust conduit, and timing means to detect phase of the piston as it oscillates in the combustion chamber; the intake or exhaust valve actuator assembly comprising a sleeve mounted in the cylinder head, a piston member slidably disposed in the sleeve cylindrical cavity, the piston member being affixed onto the stem of the associated intake or exhaust valve, and a rod bearing member mounted in the distal end of the sleeve for guiding the rod portion and forming a sliding seal therewith, and the sleeve having a distal port and a proximal port formed therein for communicating fluid pressure to the cylindrical cavity respectively distally and proximally of the piston member head portion; and hydraulic valve means actuated by the timing means and coupled to the distal and proximal ports to apply fluid pressure to at least one of the ports to move the piston member and open and close the associated intake or exhaust valve in accordance with the detected phase of the piston of the engine; and wherein the actuator assembly piston member is provided with a coating of titanium nitride on the cylindrical face of the head portion and on the rod portion, and wherein the mating surfaces of the sleeve cylindrical cavity and the rod bearing member are provided with a coating of a hard material of a lower hardness than the titanium nitride.

  13. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ROCKET EXHAUST SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an engineering study and design of methods for scrubbing the exhaust of static-tested solid rockets. Pollutants of major concern were hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride gases. The best process for removing these gases was found to be a gas-atomize...

  14. Internal combustion engine with an exhaust gas turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Hiereth, H.; Withalm, G.

    1981-06-09

    An internal combustion engine with an exhaust-gas turbocharger, particularly a mixture-compressing internal combustion engine, is disclosed in which a bleeder valve is provided which during the operation of the internal combustion engine in the partial load range conducts the exhaust gases in bypassing relationship to the turbine of the exhaust gas turbocharger.

  15. 78 FR 34375 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Exhaust Emissions of Light-Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ...Comment Request; Exhaust Emissions of Light-Duty Vehicles in Metropolitan Detroit...request (ICR), ``Exhaust Emissions of Light-duty Vehicles in Metropolitan Detroit...population for the project will include light-duty cars and trucks certified to...

  16. Sensor Modeling, Low-Complexity Fusion Algorithms, and Mixed-Signal IC Prototyping for Gas Measures in Low-Emission Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio Saponara; Esa Petri; Luca Fanucci; Pierangelo Terreni

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the detection of hydrogen leaks for safety warning systems in automotive applications and the measurement of nitrogen oxide concentration in exhaust gases of zero-emission vehicles. The presented approach is based on the development of accurate models (including nonlinearity and error sources of real building components) for all the system elements: sensors and acquisition chain. This methodology enables

  17. Comparison of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gases from Natural Gas Pathways for Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fan; Jaramillo, Paulina; Azevedo, Inês M L

    2015-06-16

    The low-cost and abundant supply of shale gas in the United States has increased the interest in using natural gas for transportation. We compare the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from different natural gas pathways for medium and heavy-duty vehicles (MHDVs). For Class 8 tractor-trailers and refuse trucks, none of the natural gas pathways provide emissions reductions per unit of freight-distance moved compared to diesel trucks. When compared to the petroleum-based fuels currently used in these vehicles, CNG and centrally produced LNG increase emissions by 0-3% and 2-13%, respectively, for Class 8 trucks. Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) powered with natural gas-produced electricity are the only fuel-technology combination that achieves emission reductions for Class 8 transit buses (31% reduction compared to the petroleum-fueled vehicles). For non-Class 8 trucks (pick-up trucks, parcel delivery trucks, and box trucks), BEVs reduce emissions significantly (31-40%) compared to their diesel or gasoline counterparts. CNG and propane achieve relatively smaller emissions reductions (0-6% and 19%, respectively, compared to the petroleum-based fuels), while other natural gas pathways increase emissions for non-Class 8 MHDVs. While using natural gas to fuel electric vehicles could achieve large emission reductions for medium-duty trucks, the results suggest there are no great opportunities to achieve large emission reductions for Class 8 trucks through natural gas pathways with current technologies. There are strategies to reduce the carbon footprint of using natural gas for MHDVs, ranging from increasing vehicle fuel efficiency, reducing life cycle methane leakage rate, to achieving the same payloads and cargo volumes as conventional diesel trucks. PMID:25938939

  18. Explosion protection for vehicles intended for the transport of flammable gases and liquids--an investigation into technical and operational basics.

    PubMed

    Förster, Hans; Günther, Werner

    2009-05-30

    In Europe, the transport of flammable gases and liquids in tanks has been impacted by new developments: for example, the introduction of the vapour-balancing technique on a broad scale and the steady increase in the application of electronic components with their own power sources; furthermore, new regulatory policies like the ATEX Directives are being enforced in the European Union. With this background in mind, the present investigation aims to provide a basis for future developments of the relevant explosion protection regulations in the safety codes for the transport of dangerous goods (RID/ADR). Specifically, the concentration of gas in the air was measured under various practical conditions while tank vehicles were being loaded with flammable gases or liquids. These spot-test data were supplemented by systematic investigations at a road tanker placed in our test field. With respect to non-electrical ignition sources, a closer investigation of the effect of hot surfaces was carried out. With regard to improving the current regulations, the results of our investigation show that it would be reasonable to implement a stronger differentiation of the characteristics of the dangerous goods (gaseous/liquid, flashpoint) on the one hand and of the techniques applied (loading with and without vapour-balancing system) on the other hand. Conclusions for the further development of the current international regulations are proposed. PMID:18922633

  19. Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

  20. Diesel exhaust odor: its evaluation and relation to exhaust gas composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. G. Rounds; H. W. Pearsall

    1972-01-01

    Techniques, based on panel estimates, were developed for evaluating the odor and irritation intensities of undiluted diesel-engine exhaust gases or of various dilutions of these gases in air. Along with the estimates, chemical analyses were made to determine the concentrations of total aldehydes, formaldehyde, and oxides of nitrogen. Statistically significant correlations were found between odor or irritation intensity estimates and

  1. Exhaust system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenoya, Y.; Otani, J.

    1982-10-19

    An exhaust system for an engine of a motorcycle is disclosed having catalytic and silencing mufflers arranged in adjacent side -by-side series flow relationship, the catalytic muffler extending rearwardly of the motorcycle, and, adjacent its rear end, being interconnected with the silencing muffler, the silencing muffler including plural expansion chambers which are interconnected in flow reversal relationship for gases to be exhausted rearwardly of the motorcycle.

  2. Injection of Nuclear Rocket Engine Exhaust into Deep Unsaturated Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Decker, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear rocket engine technology is being considered as a means of interplanetary vehicle propulsion for a manned mission to Mars. To achieve this, a test and development facility must be constructed to safely run nuclear engines. The testing of nuclear engines in the 1950's and 1960's was accomplished by exhausting the engine gases into the atmosphere, a practice that is no longer acceptable. Injection into deep unsaturated zones of radioactive exhaust gases and water vapor associated with the testing of nuclear rocket engines is being considered as a way of sequestering radionuclides from the environment. Numerical simulations were conducted to determine the ability of an unsaturated zone with the hydraulic properties of Frenchman Flat alluvium at the Nevada Test Site to contain gas-phase radionuclides. Gas and water vapor were injected for two hours at rates of 14.5 kg s-1 and 15 kg s-1, respectively, in an interval between 100 and 430 m below the land surface into alluvium with an intrinsic permeability of 10-11 m2 and porosity of 0.35. The results show that during a test of an engine, radionuclides with at least greater than 10-year half-lives may reach the land surface within several years after injection. Radionuclide transport is primarily controlled by the upward pressure gradient from the point of injection to the lower (atmospheric) pressure boundary condition at the land surface. Radionuclides with half-lives on the order of days should undergo enough decay prior to reaching the land surface. A cooling water vapor injected into the unsaturated zone simultaneously with the exhaust gas will condense within several meters of the injection point and drain downward toward the water table. However, the nearly horizontal hydraulic groundwater gradient present in several of the basins at NTS should limit lateral migration of radionuclides away from the vicinity of injection.

  3. Axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric exhaust jet induced effects on a V/STOL vehicle design. Part 2: Analysis of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation, employing a 1/8 scale model in an 11 foot transonic wind tunnel (Mach 0.4-1.4), was conducted to determine the jet effects of several exhaust nozzles on the aeropropulsive performance of a V/STOL fighter design. The force and pressure data show that significant differences in aeropropulsion performance can be expected by varying the exhaust nozzle type, jet area and deflection angle on an underwing nacelle installation. At unvectored conditions, the single expansion ramp nozzles show large performance gains relative to a circular nozzle installation. Additionally, a further drag reduction is realized when the nonaxisymmetric nozzle is vectored through a 10 degree deflection angle. The combined payoff of the vectored nonaxisymmetric nozzle over the baseline circular nozzle installation is equivalent to 25 percent of zero lift drag.

  4. Study Pinpoints Sources of Polluting Vehicle Emissions (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Unburned lubricant produces 60%-90% of organic carbon emissions. While diesel fuel is often viewed as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more significantly degrade air quality. Gasoline exhaust is at least as toxic on a per-unit-mass basis as diesel exhaust, and contributes up to 10 times more particulate matter (PM) to the emission inventory. Because emissions from both fuels can gravely impact health and the environment, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched a study to understand how these pollutants relate to fuels, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project tested a variety of vehicles over different drive cycles at moderate (72 F) and cold (20 F) temperatures. Testing included: (1) Normal and high-emitting light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles; (2) Gasoline, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles; (3) New and aged lubricants representative of those currently on the market; and (4) Gasoline containing no ethanol, E10, Texas-mandated low-emission diesel fuel, biodiesel, and CNG. The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems for gasoline light-duty vehicles are very effective at controlling organic carbon (OC) emissions. Diesel vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approximately one order of magnitude higher than gasoline vehicles. High-emitter gasoline vehicles produced OC emissions similar to diesel vehicles without exhaust aftertreatment emission control. Exhaust catalysts combusted or converted more than 75% of lubricating oil components in the exhaust gases. Unburned crankcase lubricant made up 60%-90% of OC emissions. This OC represented 20%-50% of emitted PM in all but two of the vehicles. Three-way catalysts proved effective at reducing most of the OC. With high PM emitters or vehicles with deteriorated aftertreatment, high-molecular-weight fuel components and unburned lubricant were emitted at higher rates than in vehicles in good repair, with functioning emissions systems. Light-duty gasoline, medium-duty diesel, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles produced more particles with fresh oil than with aged oil. The opposite trend was observed in light- and medium-duty high PM emitters. This effect was not readily apparent with heavy-duty diesel vehicles, perhaps because the lubricant represented a much smaller fraction of the total PM in those trucks.

  5. Axisymmetric & non-axisymmetric exhaust jet induced-effects on a V/STOL vehicle design. Part 1: Data presentation. [conducted in Ames 11-foot transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, W. C.; Ordonez, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    A 1/8 scale jet-effects model was tested in the NASA Ames 11 ft transonic tunnel at static conditions and over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.4. The data presented show that significant differences in aeropropulsion performance can be expected by varying the exhaust nozzle type and its geometric parameters on a V/STOL underwing nacelle installation.

  6. Manure Gases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The gases of most concern are ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. Other gases of concern include methane and ... present? Since most of these gases in particular hydrogen sulfide are heavier-than-air, they tend to ...

  7. The Effects of Neat Biodiesel and Biodiesel and HVO Blends in Diesel Fuel on Exhaust Emissions from a Light Duty Vehicle with a Diesel Engine.

    PubMed

    Prokopowicz, Adam; Zaciera, Marzena; Sobczak, Andrzej; Bielaczyc, Piotr; Woodburn, Joseph

    2015-06-16

    The influence of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) diesel blends on the exhaust emissions from a passenger car was examined. The impact of FAME for the cold urban phase (UDC) was increased CO and HC emissions, probably due to blend physical properties promoting incomplete combustion. The HVO blend caused the lowest CO and HC emissions for the UDC. NOx emissions did not change significantly with the fuel used, however the UDC was characterized by lower NOx emission for FAME blends. Particle emissions were highest with standard diesel. Emissions of carbonyl compounds increased as fuel biodiesel content increased, especially during the UDC. HVO in diesel fuel decreased carbonyl emissions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the most abundant carbonyl compounds in the exhaust gas. Total particle-bound PAH emissions were variable, the emission of heavier PAHs increased with blend biodiesel content. The HVO blend increased emission of lighter PAHs. Nitro-PAHs were identified only during the UDC and not for all blends; the highest emissions were measured for pure diesel. The results showed that emission of nitro-PAHs may be decreased to a greater extent by using biodiesel than using a HVO blend. PMID:25993509

  8. 40 CFR 1037.104 - Exhaust emission standards for CO2, CH4, and N2O for heavy-duty vehicles at or below 14,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...on the FEL(s) you specify for your vehicles during certification. You must adjust the calculated emissions by the global warming potential (GWP): GWP equals 25 for CH4 and 298 for N2 O. This means you must use 25 Mg of positive CO2...

  9. 40 CFR 1037.104 - Exhaust emission standards for CO2, CH4, and N2O for heavy-duty vehicles at or below 14,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...on the FEL(s) you specify for your vehicles during certification. You must adjust the calculated emissions by the global warming potential (GWP): GWP equals 25 for CH4 and 298 for N2 O. This means you must use 25 Mg of positive CO2...

  10. 40 CFR 1037.104 - Exhaust emission standards for CO2, CH4, and N2O for heavy-duty vehicles at or below 14,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...on the FEL(s) you specify for your vehicles during certification. You must adjust the calculated emissions by the global warming potential (GWP): GWP equals 25 for CH4 and 298 for N2 O. This means you must use 25 Mg of positive CO2...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A PROPORTIONAL SAMPLER FOR AUTOMOBILE EXHAUST EMISSIONS TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a device that is capable of sampling gaseous emissions from automobiles. The device samples exhaust gases at a mass rate that is proportional to the total exhaust gas mass flow rate, which is measured using an ultrasonic vortex flowmeter. T...

  12. Dynamic Scheduling of Internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems.

    E-print Network

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    -fuel charge and lower the combustion temperature which reduces NOx feedgas emissions. Conventionally, exhaust gas recirculation. The dynamic sched- ule consists of a steady-state map of the camshaft timing- trogen (NOx) in internal combustion engines. The in- ert exhaust gases dilute the inducted air

  13. Improved Exhaust Diffuser for Jet-Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Sarohia, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    High-altitude simulator reduced power requirements. Test cell uses its exhaust-capture duct only to remove gases from engine; cooling air evacuated through separate path by auxiliary suction system. This way, capture duct cross-sectional area kept close to exhaust jet area, leading to greatly improved recovery performance.

  14. 49 CFR 325.91 - Exhaust systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...violation of this subpart); (b) Is not equipped with either a muffler or other noise dissipative device, such as a turbocharger (supercharger driven by exhaust gases); or (c) Is equipped with a cut-out, by-pass, or similar device,...

  15. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    DOEpatents

    Fensom, Rod (Peterborough, GB); Kidder, David J. (Peterborough, GB)

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  16. Assessing and predicting the exposures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their carcinogenic potencies from vehicle engine exhausts to highway toll station workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Perng-Jy; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chen, Hsiao-Lung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lai, Ching-Huang; Liou, Saou-Hsing

    The objective of this study was set out to assess the exposure levels of both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their corresponding carcinogenic potencies for highway toll station workers associated with vehicle emissions. We collected 48, 35, and 33 personal PAH samples from booth attendants of the dayshift (08:00 AM-16:00 PM), nightshift (16:00 PM-00:00 AM), and late-nightshift (00:00 AM-08:00 AM), respectively. We found no significant difference in PAH homologue distributions among the workers' exposure profiles of the three work shifts. Both total-PAH and total-BaP eq exposure levels for dayshift workers (=12,300 and 230 ng/m 3, respectively) were not significantly different from that for nightshift workers (=11,500 and 203 ng/m 3, respectively), but both were significantly higher than that for late-nightshift workers (=8280 and 151 ng/m 3, respectively). We conducted multivariate linear regression analyses to relate booth attendants' exposure levels to the involved vehicle flow rates and environmental factors. We found none of the three environmental factors (i.e., wind speed, humidity and air temperature) was significant. On the other hand, we found the vehicle flow rate was able to explain 76% and 62% variations of booth attendants' total-PAH and total-BaP eq exposures, respectively. Considering measuring vehicle flow rate is much less labor consuming and costly than direct measuring PAHs, the above regression results can be regarded, at least, as a useful indirect approach for estimating the booth attendants' exposure levels.

  17. 40 CFR 86.159-08 - Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. 86.159-08...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.159-08 Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 86.160-00 - Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. 86.160-00...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.160-00 Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 86.159-08 - Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. 86.159-08...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.159-08 Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 86.159-08 - Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. 86.159-08...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.159-08 Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 86.160-00 - Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. 86.160-00...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.160-00 Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. (a)...

  2. 40 CFR 86.159-08 - Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. 86.159-08...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.159-08 Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 86.159-08 - Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. 86.159-08...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.159-08 Exhaust emission test procedures for US06 emissions. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 86.160-00 - Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. 86.160-00...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.160-00 Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 86.160-00 - Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. 86.160-00...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.160-00 Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 86.160-00 - Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. 86.160-00...Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.160-00 Exhaust emission test procedure for SC03 emissions. (a)...

  7. Emission of carcinogenic components with automobile exhausts.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, U; Alsberg, T; Westerholm, R

    1983-01-01

    Different sampling methods for mutagenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are described. These methods involve either direct sampling of raw exhausts which prior to filtering are cooled in a condenser, or filter sampling of exhausts diluted in a tunnel. The relevance of gas-phase PAHs of samples from diluted exhausts is discussed; methods used are either adsorbents (XAD-2) or cryogenic condensation. The emission of benzo(a)pyrene and certain other PAHs is reported from vehicles using different fuels (gasoline, diesel, LPG, alcohols) or different emission control systems. The emission of some volatiles, such as benzene, ethylene and alkylnitrites, is also presented from different types of fuels used. PMID:6186483

  8. Solar space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.E.

    1982-10-19

    This invention relates to space vehicle where solar energy is used to generate steam, which in turn, propels the vehicle in space. A copper boiler is provided and a novel solar radiation condensing means is used to focus the sunlight on said boiler. Steam generated in said boiler is exhausted to the environment to provide a thrust for the vehicle.

  9. Solar space vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to space vehicle where solar energy is used to generate steam, which in turn, propels the vehicle in space. A copper boiler is provided and a novel solar radiation condensing means is used to focus the sunlight on said boiler. Steam generated in said boiler is exhausted to the environment to provide a thrust for the vehicle.

  10. NOBLE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Noble Gases symposium, on which this report is based, provided comprehensive coverage of the noble gases. The coverage included, but was not limited to, the properties, biokinetics, bioeffects, production and release to the environment, detection techniques, standards, and ap...

  11. 40 CFR 80.62 - Vehicle test procedures to place vehicles in emitter group sub-fleets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...screen candidate vehicles for their exhaust THC emissions to place them within the emitter...vehicles may be tested for their exhaust THC emissions using the Federal test procedure...vehicles may be screened for their exhaust THC emissions with the IM240 short test...

  12. 40 CFR 80.62 - Vehicle test procedures to place vehicles in emitter group sub-fleets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...screen candidate vehicles for their exhaust THC emissions to place them within the emitter...vehicles may be tested for their exhaust THC emissions using the Federal test procedure...vehicles may be screened for their exhaust THC emissions with the IM240 short test...

  13. 40 CFR 80.62 - Vehicle test procedures to place vehicles in emitter group sub-fleets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...screen candidate vehicles for their exhaust THC emissions to place them within the emitter...vehicles may be tested for their exhaust THC emissions using the Federal test procedure...vehicles may be screened for their exhaust THC emissions with the IM240 short test...

  14. 40 CFR 80.62 - Vehicle test procedures to place vehicles in emitter group sub-fleets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...screen candidate vehicles for their exhaust THC emissions to place them within the emitter...vehicles may be tested for their exhaust THC emissions using the Federal test procedure...vehicles may be screened for their exhaust THC emissions with the IM240 short test...

  15. Switching to a U.S. hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fleet: The resultant change in emissions, energy use, and greenhouse gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Colella; M. Z. Jacobson; D. M. Golden

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the potential change in primary emissions and energy use from replacing the current U.S. fleet of fossil-fuel on-road vehicles (FFOV) with hybrid electric fossil fuel vehicles or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCV). Emissions and energy usage are analyzed for three different HFCV scenarios, with hydrogen produced from: (1) steam reforming of natural gas, (2) electrolysis powered by

  16. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  17. Electronegative gases

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Recent knowledge on electronegative gases essential for the effective control of the number densities of free electrons in electrically stressed gases is highlighted. This knowledge aided the discovery of new gas dielectrics and the tailoring of gas dielectric mixtures. The role of electron attachment in the choice of unitary gas dielectrics or electronegative components in dielectric gas mixtures, and the role of electron scattering at low energies in the choice of buffer gases for such mixtures is outlined.

  18. Jet exhaust noise suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Noise suppression for a jet engine exhaust is provided by an annular divergent body attached to an exhaust nozzle. The smallest diameter of the divergent body is larger than the diameter of the exhaust nozzle exit to form an annular step which produces a shock wave in the exhaust as it passes the step. An annular shroud is disposed around the divergent body and causes outside air to pass through voids in the divergent body to mix with the jet exhaust gas. The divergent body includes a plurality of channels with separators between the channels.

  19. Control logic for exhaust gas driven turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Adeff, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a method of controlling an exhaust gas driven turbocharger supplying charge air for an internal combustion engine powering vehicle, the turbocharger being adjustable from a normal mode to a power mode in which the charge air available to the engine during vehicle acceleration is increased over that available when the turbocharger is in the normal mode, the vehicle including engine power control means switchable by the vehicle operator from a normal mode to a power mode so that the vehicle operator may selectively elect either the normal mode or the power mode, comprising the steps of measuring the speed of the vehicle, permitting the vehicle operator to elect either the power mode or the normal mode for a subsequent vehicle acceleration, and then adjusting the turbocharger to the power mode when the speed of the vehicle is less than a predetermined reference speed and the vehicle operator has elected to power mode to increase the charge air available to the engine and thereby increasing engine power on a subsequent acceleration of the vehicle.

  20. Marine exhaust manifold and elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstedt, D.H.

    1992-05-05

    This patent describes a marine propulsion system having an internal combustion engine exhausted through a water jacketed exhaust assembly. This patent describes improvement in a manifold portion having intake exhaust passages receiving engine exhaust; an elbow portion extending upwardly from the manifold portion and having transfer exhaust passages extending from the intake exhaust passages and communicating through a bend with a discharge exhaust passage, wherein exhaust flows upwardly from the manifold portion into the elbow portion and around the bend to the discharge exhaust passage; water jacket means around the intake exhaust passages and the transfer exhaust passages and directing water along the exterior of the intake exhaust passages and the transfer exhaust passages, wherein water flows upwardly along the manifold portion to the elbow portion and then upwardly and around the bend and then to the end of the discharge exhaust passage to mix with exhaust thereat; wall supports between the water jacket means and the elbow portion.

  1. Developing a "Research Test Bed" to introduce innovative Emission Testing Technology to improve New Zealand's Vehicle Emission Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen J.

    2012-05-01

    Vehicle exhaust emissions arise from the combustion of the fuel and air mixture in the engine. Exhaust emission gases generally include carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC), particulates, and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2). In New Zealand improvements have occurred in emissions standards over the past 20 years however significant health related issues are now being discovered in Auckland as a direct effect of high vehicle emission levels. Pollution in New Zealand, especially via vehicle emissions are an increasing concern and threatens New Zealand's "clean and green" image. Unitec Institute of Technology proposes establishing a Vehicle Emissions Testing Facility, and with an understanding with Auckland University, National Institute of Water & Atmosphere Research Ltd (NIWA) this research group can work collaboratively on vehicle emissions testing. New Zealand research providers would support an application in the UK led by the University of Huddersfield to a range of European Union Structural Funds. New Zealand has an ideal "vehicle emissions research environment" supported by significant expertise in vehicle emission control technology and associated protocols at the University of Auckland, and the effects of high vehicle emissions on health at the National Institutes of Water and Atmosphere (NIWA).

  2. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  3. Acoustic Optimization of Automotive Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Ye, B. Q.; Guo, X.; Hui, P.

    2012-06-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has been increasing with recent advances in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). This study analyzes the acoustic attenuation performance of exhaust-based TEGs. The acoustic characteristics of two different thermal designs of exhaust gas heat exchanger in TEGs are discussed in terms of transmission loss and acoustic insertion loss. GT-Power simulations and bench tests on a dynamometer with a high-performance production engine are carried out. Results indicate that the acoustic attenuation of TEGs could be determined and optimized. In addition, the feasibility of integration of exhaust-based TEGs and engine mufflers into the exhaust line is tested, which can help to reduce space and improve vehicle integration.

  4. Noble gas impurity balance and exhaust model for DIII-D and JET 1 Research sponsored in part by the US Department of Energy, under contract number DE-AC05-96OR22464 with Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Hillis; J. Hogan; M. von Hellermann; J. Ehrenberg; L. Horton; R. König; P. Morgan; G. Saibene; M. R. Wade

    1999-01-01

    Experiments to study the exhaust of noble gases (helium and neon) with cryopumping in DIII-D (Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) configuration) and in JET (Mk1 configuration) found significant differences in the global exhaust rate of helium, while efficient neon exhaust was observed in both machines. An attempt to better understand the basic processes governing the exhaust of noble gases in ELMy

  5. Influence of MTBE addition into gasoline on automotive exhaust emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Poulopoulos; C. Philippopoulos

    2000-01-01

    The effect of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE) addition into gasoline on the exhaust emissions from internal combustion engines was studied. A four-cylinder OPEL 1.6l engine equipped with a hydraulic brake dynamometer was used in all the experiments. Fuels containing 0.0–11.0% MTBE were used in a wide range of engine operations, and the exhaust gases were analyzed for CO, HC (total unburned

  6. Automobile exhaust emission modal analysis model extension and refinement. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    McAdams

    1974-01-01

    This report on modal analysis of automobile emissions constitutes a refinement and extension of a modal analysis exhaust emission model previously developed. The modal analysis exhaust emission model makes it possible to calculate the amounts of emission products emitted by individual vehicles or groups of vehicles over an arbitrary driving sequence. Refinements to the model permit an improvement in computational

  7. Exhaust gas purification device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, H.; Hibi, T.; Sayo, S.; Sugiura, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1980-02-19

    The exhaust gas purification device includes an exhaust manifold , a purification cylinder connected with the exhaust manifold through a first honey-comb shaped catalyst, and a second honeycomb shaped catalyst positioned at the rear portion of the purification cylinder. Each catalyst is supported by steel wool rings including coarse and dense portions of steel wool. The purification device further includes a secondary air supplying arrangement.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS FROM VEHICLES USING METHANOL AND METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDED FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaust and evaporative emissions were examined from vehicles fueled with methanol or a gasoline-methanol blend. Regulated automobile pollutants, as well as detailed hydrocarbons, methanol, and aldehydes were measured, and exhaust emission trends were obtained for vehicle operati...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1777-99 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Calculations; exhaust emissions. 86.1777-99 Section 86.1777-99...AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES...Provisions for the Voluntary National Low Emission Vehicle Program for Light-Duty...

  10. Exhaust gas deflector for truck exhaust stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, C.I.; Krah, R.W.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes an improved exhaust gas deflector for the top of a vertical truck exhaust stack. It comprises: a vertical tubular member having an upper and a lower end; means to attach the tubular member lower end to the top of a truck exhaust stack; a deflector body affixed to the tubular member at the upper end thereof, the deflector body having a forward and a rearward end and a passageway therethrough communicating with the tubular member; an upwardly inclined air scoop means at the forward end of the deflector body having a rearward edge, the rearward edge extending above and over the tubular member; and an upwardly inclined deflector means at the rearward end of the deflector body.

  11. Calculation of infrared spectral transmittances of inhomogeneous gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. M.

    1966-01-01

    Calculation of spectral transmittance for a particular inhomogeneous gas path is made by combining known data on gases at constant temperature, pressure, and concentration. The spectral transmittances of the inhomogeneous plume gases is needed to calculate the heat radiated from the exhaust plume to the rocket base of a multiple engine rocket.

  12. Prediction of IM240 Mass Emissions Using Portable Exhaust Analyzers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul L. Guenther; Donald H. Stedman; Jon M. Lesko

    1996-01-01

    Inspection and maintenance programs for motor vehicles in the United States increasingly use loaded mode mass emissions testing (IM240). A method was developed to predict mass emission rates and mass emission changes, particularly from repair benefits, using a low-cost, portable four-gas non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) vehicle exhaust gas analyzer. A single vehicle was tested several times with the analyzer while on

  13. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6?h/d?×?50?d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  14. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  15. Compressed air propulsion system for a vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johnson

    1986-01-01

    A compressed air propulsion system for a vehicle is described which consists of: an engine including cylinders reciprocatingly receiving therein a respective plurality of pistons, and an exhaust means connected to the cylinders, the engine drivingly connected to an axle of the vehicle to propel the vehicle; a transaxle operatively mounted on and rotatably driven by the vehicle; air compressing

  16. Comparison of flexible fuel vehicle and life-cycle fuel consumption and emissions of selected pollutants and greenhouse gases for ethanol 85 versus gasoline.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Haibo; Frey, H Christopher; Rouphail, Nagui M; Gonçalves, Gonçalo A; Farias, Tiago L

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate differences in fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions of flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) operated on ethanol 85 (E85) versus gasoline. Theoretical ratios of fuel consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for both fuels are estimated based on the same amount of energy released. Second-by-second fuel consumption and emissions from one FFV Ford Focus fueled with E85 and gasoline were measured under real-world traffic conditions in Lisbon, Portugal, using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). Cycle average dynamometer fuel consumption and emission test results for FFVs are available from the U.S. Department of Energy, and emissions certification test results for ethanol-fueled vehicles are available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. On the basis of the PEMS data, vehicle-specific power (VSP)-based modal average fuel and emission rates for both fuels are estimated. For E85 versus gasoline, empirical ratios of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions agree within a margin of error to the theoretical expectations. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were found to be typically lower. From the PEMS data, nitric oxide (NO) emissions associated with some higher VSP modes are higher for E85. From the dynamometer and certification data, average hydrocarbon (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission differences vary depending on the vehicle. The differences of average E85 versus gasoline emission rates for all vehicle models are -22% for CO, 12% for HC, and -8% for NOx emissions, which imply that replacing gasoline with E85 reduces CO emissions, may moderately decrease NOx tailpipe emissions, and may increase HC tailpipe emissions. On a fuel life cycle basis for corn-based ethanol versus gasoline, CO emissions are estimated to decrease by 18%. Life-cycle total and fossil CO2 emissions are estimated to decrease by 25 and 50%, respectively; however, life-cycle HC and NOx emissions are estimated to increase by 18 and 82%, respectively. PMID:19728485

  17. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST (Final 2002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment examined information regarding the possible health hazards associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust (DE), which is a mixture of gases and particles. The assessment concludes that long-term (i.e., chronic) inhalation exposure is likely to pose a l...

  18. Atmospheric scavenging exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

  19. Astrophysics: Exhaust inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, David L.

    2008-04-01

    What do you see if you peer into the exhaust of a jet engine larger than our Solar System? Only astronomers with the largest radio telescopes can see the full picture - and definitive observations are beginning to filter through.

  20. Exhaust back pressure reducer

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, H.E.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes an exhaust back pressure reducer for the internal combustion engine of a tractor for pulling a trailer. The tractor has a cab. An air deflector on the top of the cab deflect air over the top of the trailer as the tractor pulls the trailer over the road, and it includes exhaust system for the engine. The reducer comprises: means at the top of the air deflector on the top of the cab for aspirating gas from the engine exhaust system to reduce the exhaust back pressure on the engine. The aspirating means is positioned for flow therepast of air relative to the air deflector as the tractor travels forward. The aspirating means is ported for suctioning gas therefrom by the air flowing therepast.

  1. Vehicle suspension apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Suzumura, M.; Tatemoto, M.; Kumagai, N.; Abe, H.; Tanaka, T.; Chikamori, S.; Harara, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Taniguchi, Y.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a suspension apparatus comprising: suspension units mounted on respective wheels and having fluid spring chambers; fluid supply means for supplying a fluid to the fluid spring chambers of the suspension units through control valves; fluid exhaust means for exhausting the fluid from the fluid spring chambers through exhaust valves; acceleration detecting means for detecting acceleration acting on a vehicle body in a longitudinal direction thereof; and nose dive preventing means, for preventing a nose dive, in which front wheel fluid supply solenoid valves are opened for a control time T to supply the fluid to corresponding fluid spring chambers. Also, rear wheel fluid exhaust solenoid valves are opened for the control time T to exhaust the fluid from corresponding fluid spring chambers when a negative acceleration detected by the acceleration detecting means exceeds a reference negative acceleration.

  2. Controlling automotive exhaust emissions: successes and underlying science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martyn V. Twigg

    2005-01-01

    Photochemical reactions of vehicle exhaust pollutants were responsible for photochemical smog in many cities during the 1960s and 1970s. Engine improvements helped, but additional measures were needed to achieve legislated emissions levels. First oxidation catalysts lowered hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide, and later nitrogen oxides were reduced to nitrogen in a two-stage process. By the 1980s, exhaust gas could be kept

  3. Review of Federally Sponsored Research on Diesel Exhaust Odors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph H. Somers; George D. Kittredge

    1971-01-01

    The information presented in this paper is directed to persons concerned with control of exhaust odors from diesel-engine-powered vehicles. This paper summarizes projects sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the past years in the field of diesel-exhaust odor. These investigations have concentrated on developing measurement methods for quantifying different odor levels, evaluating various odor control methods, and evaluating

  4. Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; van Eijk, A. M. J.; Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the plume. Exhaust plumes come in different shapes, sizes, and opaqueness and depending on atmospheric parameters like wind speed and direction, as well as engine settings (power, gas or diesel, etc.). A CFD model is used to determine the plume's flow field outside the stack on the basis of exhaust flow properties, the interaction with the superstructure of the ship, the meteorological conditions and the interaction of ship's motion and atmospheric wind fields. A modified version of the NIRATAM code performs the gas radiation calculations and provides the radiant intensity of the (hot) exhaust gases and the transmission of the atmosphere around the plume is modeled with MODTRAN. This allows assessing the irradiance of a sensor positioned at some distance from the ship and its plume, as function of the conditions that influence the spatial distribution and thermal properties of the plume. Furthermore, an assessment can be made of the probability of detecting objects behind the plume. This plume module will be incorporated in the TNO EOSTAR-model, which provides estimates of detection range and image quality of EO-sensors under varying meteorological conditions.

  5. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the Earth and the rest of the inner solar were made by collecting the solids, to the rather efficient exclusion of the gases. In this grand separation the noble gases, because they are noble, were partitioned strongly into the gas phase. The resultant generalization is that the noble gases are very scarce in the materials of the inner solar system, whence their common synonym "rare gases."This scarcity is probably the most important single feature to remember about noble-gas cosmochemistry. As illustration of the absolute quantities, for example, a meteorite that contains xenon at a concentration of order 10 -10 cm3STP g -1 (4×10-15 mol g-1) would be considered relatively rich in xenon. Yet this is only 0.6 ppt (part per trillion, fractional abundance 10-12) by mass. In most circumstances, an element would be considered efficiently excluded from some sample if its abundance, relative to cosmic proportions to some convenient reference element, were depleted by "several" orders of magnitude. But a noble gas would be considered to be present in quite high concentration if it were depleted by only four or five orders of magnitude (in the example above, 10-10 cm3STP g-1 of xenon corresponds to depletion by seven orders of magnitude), and one not uncommonly encounters noble-gas depletion of more than 10 orders of magnitude.The second most important feature to note about noble-gas cosmochemistry is that while a good deal of the attention given to noble gases really is about chemistry, traditionally a good deal of attention is also devoted to nuclear phenomena, much more so than for most other elements. This feature is a corollary of the first feature noted above, namely scarcity. A variety of nuclear transmutation processes - decay of natural radionuclides and energetic particle reactions - lead to the production of new nuclei that are often new elements. Most commonly, the quantity of new nuclei originating in nuclear transmutation is very small compared to the quantity already present in the sample in question,

  6. Selection and training of judges for sensory evaluation of the intensity and character of diesel exhaust odors. Environmental health series; air pollution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1967-01-01

    Exhaust gases emitted by diesel engines are characterized by offensive odors. These odors must be rated numerically by human judges with the ultimate objectives of (1) correlating such ratings with the chemical composition of diesel exhaust and (2) establishing Federal standards for control of diesel exhaust odors. Judges are selected on the basis of (1) their ability to distinguish among

  7. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification – F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed questionnaires about exhaustion, mental state, sleep disturbance, pain and quality of life. The evaluation was repeated 4 weeks later, after half of the patients and healthy subjects had engaged in a therapy method called ‘Grounding’, a physical exercise inspired by African dance. The patients reported significantly higher levels of hyperventilation as compared to the healthy subjects. All patients’ average score on NQ was 26.57 ± 10.98, while that of the healthy subjects was 15.14 ± 7.89 (t = ?3.48, df = 42, p < 0.001). The NQ scores correlated strongly with two measures of exhaustion (Karolinska Exhaustion Scale KES r = 0.772, p < 0.01; Shirom Melamed Burnout Measure SMBM r = 0.565, p < 0.01), mental status [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) depression r = 0.414, p < 0.01; HADS anxiety r = 0.627, p < 0.01], sleep disturbances (r = ?0.514, p < 0.01), pain (r = ?.370, p < 0.05) and poor well-being (Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 questionnaire- SR Health r = ?0.529, p < 0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, the variance in the scores from NQ were explained to a high degree (R2 = 0.752) by scores in KES and HADS. The brief Grounding training contributed to a near significant reduction in hyperventilation (F = 2.521, p < 0.124) and to significant reductions in exhaustion scores and scores of depression and anxiety. The conclusion is that hyperventilation is common in exhaustion syndrome patients and that it can be reduced by systematic physical therapy such as Grounding. PMID:24134551

  8. Exhaust gas recirculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Rachedi, S.H.

    1983-08-30

    An engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is provided in which a sonic flow EGR valve is moved to open positions to establish a different constant rate of flow at each open position of the EGR valve in response to air pressure acting on a servo means secured to the valve, the air pressure force being controlled by changes in a control vacuum opposing the air pressure force and modified by an air bleed device as a function of changes in engine exhaust gas backpressure levels, to provide an EGR valve movement that varies essentially in proportion to changes in engine air flow.

  9. Modelling of CO 2 Adsorption from Exhaust Gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcin Panowski; Roman Klainy; Karol Sztelder

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a World tendencies in environmental protection points out necessity of reduction of CO2 emission to atmosphere. The one of the main sources of CO2 emission is placed in energy sector where electric energy and heat are produced based on fossil fuels combustion. Therefore,\\u000a it seems to be necessary to perform research on CO2 emission reduction in this sector. The main aim

  10. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  11. Diesel exhaust odor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lesley; C. C. J. French

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between diesel exhaust odor and build and setting of the engine is reported. Odor was measured by a panel of observers, using a differential technique. Two odors were presented in each test, one from a reference engine, and one from an engine with variable characteristics. The observers were asked to score the difference between the two odors. This

  12. Hybrid Exhaust Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Gerard D. (Inventor); Logan, Charles P. (Inventor); McEnerney, Bryan William (Inventor); Haynes, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An exhaust includes a wall that has a first composite material having a first coefficient of thermal expansion and a second composite material having a second coefficient of the thermal expansion that is less than the first coefficient of thermal expansion.

  13. EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Clark R.

    to be an effective approach to reduce NOx emissions in order to meet US2007 and US2010 emissions regulations environmental regulations for diesel engine emissions are becoming increas- ingly stringent, and are driving) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers is considered

  14. Toxicity and health effects of vehicle emissions in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shun-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Song, Jian; Peng, Bao-Cheng; Yuan, Dong; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Qi, Ping-Ping

    In China, the number of vehicles is increasing rapidly with the continuous development of economy, and vehicle emission pollution in major cities is more serious than ever. In this article, we summarized the results of a series of short-term assays, animal experiments and epidemiology investigations on the genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, respiratory toxicity and health effects of vehicle emissions in Shanghai, including gasoline exhausts (gas condensate and particles), diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and scooter exhaust particles (SEP). The results showed that: (1) Both gases and particulate phases of the exhausts of different kinds of vehicles showed strong mutagenicity in Ames test (TA98 and TA100 strains), rat hepatocyte unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay, and mouse micronucleus assay, and vehicle emissions could induce the transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. DEP and SEP could induce the transformation of human diploid cell strain (KMB-13) cells, immunohistochemistry assay showed that c-myc and p21 proteins were highly expressed in the transformed cells. DEP and SEP could also inhibit the gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) of BALB/C3T3 cells (2) Vehicle emissions could decrease the number of macrophages in the lung (bronchial alveolar lavage fluid) (BALF) of male SD rats. Vehicle emissions could also increase the proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), the content of cetyneuraminic acid (NA), the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkali phosphate (AKP), acid phosphate (ACP) in the lung BALF of the animals. (3) In epidemiology investigation, the proportion of those who have respiratory symptoms and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) in the workers who were exposed to DEP ( n=806) were much higher than those of the controls ( n=413). The OR (odd ratio) values of angina, nasal obstruction, phlegm, short of breath and COPD were 2.27, 3.08, 3.00, 3.19 and 2.32, respectively, and the proportion of those who have indisposed sensation of nose or laryngopharynx, cough, phlegm and pharyngitis in the workers who were occupationally exposed to gasoline exhausts ( n=157) were also higher than those of controls ( n=121), the OR values were 2.43, 3.76, 2.58, and 3.70, respectively, and in the 40 gasoline exhausts exposed workers, the frequencies of 6-TG (thioguanine), sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei in peripheral blood were markedly higher ( P<0.05) than those of controls. The SI (T lymphocytes transformation) activity, total E rosette, E active rosette, content of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and fibrin (FN) of the exposed group were significantly ( P<0.05) decreased compared with those of the control. All the results showed that vehicle emissions could not only induce adverse effects on respiratory and immune system of occupationally exposed people, but also have potential carcinogenicity to human beings.

  15. Validation of Inlet and Exhaust Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shishir A. Pandya; Scott M. Murman; Michael J. Aftosmis

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involved in the modeling of engine details and flow physics. However, the omission is often improper since inlet or plume flows may have a substantial e ect on vehicle aerodynamics. A method for modeling the e ect of inlets and exhaust plumes using boundary

  16. ROUND ROBIN ANALYSIS OF ALCOHOL AND CARBONYL SYNTHETIC EXHAUST SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent changes in regulatory practices have brought about a need for speciated analysis of the volatile organic components of vehicle exhaust. he purpose of this study was to allow interested laboratories to participate in a Round Robin so that each could assess their speciation ...

  17. Nitric Oxide: Surface Reactions and Removal from Auto Exhaust

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Shelef

    1975-01-01

    In the last 10 years an extensive research and development effort has been made to implement the catalytic removal of noxious constituents from automotive exhaust. This effort is finally coming to fruition as this paper is going into print. Vehicles sold in the United States in 1975 will be, in a significant proportion, equipped with catalytic devices. The incorporation of

  18. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1979-01-01

    Current design philosophy for hydrogen-fueled, scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with strong couplings between the engine plume and vehicle aerodynamics. The experimental verification of the scramjet exhaust simulation is described. The scramjet exhaust was reproduced for the Mach 6 flight condition by the detonation tube simulator. The exhaust flow pressure profiles, and to a large extent the heat transfer rate profiles, were then duplicated by cool gas mixtures of Argon and Freon 13B1 or Freon 12. The results of these experiments indicate that a cool gas simulation of the hot scramjet exhaust is a viable simulation technique except for phenomena which are dependent on the wall temperature relative to flow temperature.

  19. Results of an investigation of jet plume effects on an 0.010-scale model (75-OTS) of the space shuttle integrated vehicle in the 9 x 7-foot leg of the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel (IA82B), volume 1. [an exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The base pressure environment was investigated for the first and second stage mated vehicle in a supersonic flow field from Mach 1.55 through 2.20 with simulated rocket engine exhaust plumes. The pressure environment was investigated for the orbiter at various vent port locations at these same freestream conditions. The Mach number environment around the base of the model with rocket plumes simulated was examined. Data were obtained at angles of attack from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero yaw, and at yaw angles from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero angle of attack, with rocket plume sizes varying from smaller than nominal to much greater than nominal. Failed orbiter engine data were also obtained. Elevon hinge moments and wing panel load data were obtained during all runs. Photographs of the tested configurations are shown.

  20. Results of an investigation of jet plume effects on a 0.010-scale model (75-OTS) of the space shuttle integrated vehicle in the 8 x 7-foot leg of the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel (IA82C), volume 1. [(an exhaust flow simulation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The primary test objective was to define the base pressure environment of the first and second stage mated vehicle in a supersonic flow field from Mach 2.60 through 3.50 with simulated rocket engine exhaust plumes. The secondary objective was to obtain the pressure environment of the Orbiter at various vent port locations at these same freestream conditions. Data were obtained at angles of attack from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero yaw, and at yaw angles from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero angle of attack, with rocket plume sizes varying from smaller than nominal to much greater than nominal. Failed Orbiter engine data were also obtained. Elevon hinge moments and wing panel load data were obtained during all runs. Photographs of test equipment and tested configurations are shown.

  1. RE-ENTRAINMENT AND DISPERSION OF EXHAUSTS FROM INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS: ANALYSIS OF TRACER GAS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses two tracer gas studies, to quantify the extent to which exhaust gases from indoor radon reduction systems are re-entrained into pitched-roof houses (exposing persons indoors), and the manner in which the exhausts disperse outdoors (exposing persons outside the...

  2. Design of an exhaust manifold to improve transient performance of a high-speed turbocharged diesel engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Galindo; J. M. Luján; J. R. Serrano; V. Dolz; S. Guilain

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a study to analyse the influence of exhaust gases thermal energy saving and reduction of pressure pulses interference on engine dynamic performance during the load transient of high speed direct injection turbocharged diesel engines is described. The analysis has been performed thanks to the use of a dual walled air gap exhaust manifold and a 4-2-1 pulse

  3. Detection of soot particles in gas turbine engine combustion gases using nonintrusive FTIR spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moira Hilton; John D. Black

    1998-01-01

    Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy for making non- intrusive measurements of gas turbine exhaust gases and laser induced incandescence for measuring soot content are being evaluated in EU Brite EuRam project AEROJET. Soot concentrations in modern aero-engine exhausts are very low with mean particle sizes < 100 nm. The standard extractive filter paper soot measurement gives results expressed in terms

  4. Diesel exhaust rapidly degrades floral odours used by honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Robbie D.; Lusebrink, Inka; Farthing, Emily; Newman, Tracey A.; Poppy, Guy M.

    2013-01-01

    Honeybees utilise floral odours when foraging for flowers; we investigated whether diesel exhaust pollution could interrupt these floral odour stimuli. A synthetic blend of eight floral chemicals, identified from oilseed rape, was exposed to diesel exhaust pollution. Within one minute of exposure the abundances of four of the chemicals were significantly lowered, with two components rendered undetectable. Honeybees were trained to recognise the full synthetic odour mix; altering the blend, by removing the two chemicals rendered undetectable, significantly reduced the ability of the trained honeybees to recognize the altered odour. Furthermore, we found that at environmentally relevant levels the mono-nitrogen oxide (NOx) fraction of the exhaust gases was a key facilitator of this odour degradation. Such changes in recognition may impact upon a honeybee's foraging efficiency and therefore the pollination services that they provide. PMID:24091789

  5. Greenhouse gases: What is their role in climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, J.A.; Chandler, W.U. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wuebbles, D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-12-01

    This paper summarizes information relevant to understanding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It examines the nature of the greenhouse effect, the Earth's radiation budget, the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere, how these concentrations have been changing, natural processes which regulate these concentrations of greenhouse gases, residence times of these gases in the atmosphere, and the rate of release of gases affecting atmospheric composition by human activities. We address the issue of the greenhouse effect itself in the first section. In the second section we examine trends in atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases and emissions sources. In the third section, we examine the natural carbon cycle and its role in determining the atmospheric residence time of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the fourth section, we examine the role atmospheric chemistry plays in the determining the concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive treatment of these issues. Exhaustive treatments can be found in other volumes, many of which are cited throughout this paper. Rather, this paper is intended to summarize some of the major findings, unknowns, and uncertainties associated with the current state of knowledge regarding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 57 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. 40 CFR 86.1816-08 - Emission standards for complete heavy-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Exhaust emission standards. (1) Exhaust...from 2008 and later model year complete...test groups to the standards applicable to model year 2008 vehicles...the evaporative standards applicable to model year 2007...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1816-08 - Emission standards for complete heavy-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Exhaust emission standards. (1) Exhaust...from 2008 and later model year complete...test groups to the standards applicable to model year 2008 vehicles...the evaporative standards applicable to model year 2007...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1816-08 - Emission standards for complete heavy-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Exhaust emission standards. (1) Exhaust...from 2008 and later model year complete...test groups to the standards applicable to model year 2008 vehicles...the evaporative standards applicable to model year 2007...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1816-08 - Emission standards for complete heavy-duty vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Exhaust emission standards. (1) Exhaust...from 2008 and later model year complete...test groups to the standards applicable to model year 2008 vehicles...the evaporative standards applicable to model year 2007...

  10. Remote passive detection of aircraft exhausts at airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus P.; Jahn, Carsten; Harig, Roland; Aleyt, Christian; Rusch, Peter

    Emissions from vented sources are often important inputs for the development of emission inventories and contribute to local air pollution and global enhancement of greenhouse gases. Aircraft engines are part of these emission sources. A passive measurement technique such as FTIR emission spectrometry is more cost effective and faster in operation for the determination of the composition of hot exhausts of this kind than other measurement systems as e.g. in situ techniques. Within the scope of aircraft emission investigations the measurements were performed from a measurement van which is equipped with an FTIR spectrometer of high spectral resolution coupled with a telescope and a two-axis movable mirror for rapid orientation towards the emission sources. At airports the emission indices of CO2, CO and NO of main engines and auxiliary power units of standing aircraft were determined. The measurement time is about one minute. The accuracy is better than 30 % as found from burner experiments with calibration gases (CO and NO). The method is also applied to detect exhausts of flares and smoke stacks. Currently, a new scanning FTIR-system is developed. The system allows imaging of the exhaust gas and rapid automated alignment of the field of view. The goal of the new development is to measure aircraft exhausts during normal operations at the airport. The spectrometer is coupled with a camera giving an image of the scenery so that a rapid selection of the hottest exhaust area is possible. It is planned to equip the system with an infrared camera for automatic tracking of this area with the scanning mirror so that measurements of the exhausts of a moving aircraft are possible.

  11. An Investigation of Reentrainment of Chemical Fume Hood Exhaust Air in a Heat Recovery Unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. KHOURY; S. N. CHANG; D. A. LESSLEY; A. A. ABDELGHANI; A. C. ANDERSON

    1988-01-01

    Energy conservation measures such as air-to-air heat exchangers provide financial savings but also may produce contamination of fresh air by the exhaust. An investigation was conducted to determine the existence and extent of reentrainment of gases and vapors from building exhaust into the fresh-air supply of a rotary air-to-air heat recovery system, the heat wheel (a revolving cylinder made up

  12. On-line laser detection of gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. C. Harbert

    1983-01-01

    Petrochemical plants, platforms, refineries, etc, can now be surveyed by a laser instrument which responds to and measures gases in the beam. Scanning with the beam, which can be up to 1 km in length, permits a complete plant to be covered with a single instrument. Another application uses and instrument mounted on a vehicle or an aircraft moving along

  13. Industrial Gases as a Vehicle for Competitiveness 

    E-print Network

    Dale, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    : 2 x 1.5 MM BTU/Hr x 264 Hrs/month /3412.8 BTU/kwh = 232,000 Kwh (A) Two compressors: 2 x 125 hp x 264 Hrs/month x 0.7457 kwh/hp = 49,216 Kwh (8) Total kwh 281,216 Liquid nitrogen system energy requirements: 3.0 MM scf/mo x 2.0 kwh/ccf = 60... produced was oxygen. For years, the means of production was the cryogenic cycle and supply was served either by a pipeline or cylinder delivery. In the 1950's, technical change brought the concept of liquid delivery of gaseous products...

  14. Thermoelectric generator for motor vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Bass, John C. (6121 La Pintra Dr., La Jolla, CA 92037)

    1997-04-29

    A thermoelectric generator for producing electric power for a motor vehicle from the heat of the exhaust gasses produced by the engine of the motor vehicle. The exhaust gasses pass through a finned heat transfer support structure which has seat positions on its outside surface for the positioning of thermoelectric modules. A good contact cylinder provides a framework from which a spring force can be applied to the thermoelectric modules to hold them in good contact on their seats on the surface of the heat transfer support structure.

  15. Optical fibre sensors for the monitoring of harmful emissions from land transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulrooney, Jim; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Lewis, Elfed; Zhao, W. Z.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Degner, M.; Ewald, H.; Lochmann, S.; Al-Shamma'a, A.; Lucas, J.; Merlone Borla, E.; Faraldi, P.; Pidria, M.

    2005-06-01

    In order to meet increasingly stringent emission control laws it is necessary to develop a sensor that can accurately monitor the level of pollutants entering the atmosphere from land transport vehicles. These pollutants are generally a mixture of hot gases and particulates. An optical fibre sensor is particularly well suited to this task. Due to it's small size and weight it is minimally invasive making it suitable for insertion into the vehicle's exhaust system. Optical fibres are immune from poisoning by the analyte gases, although they do require shielding from airborne particulates. As they do not transmit electricity they are also highly safe and furthermore they are immune from electromagnetic interference. To detect the presence of the gases it is proposed to use an optical absorption technique. The majority of gases of industrial and environmental importance have their fundamental absorption line in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, with weaker overtones in the near infrared. Due to the greater availability of components, optimised for communications, most optical fibre gas sensing has taken place in the near-infrared region of the spectrum. In this paper mid-infrared optical fibre gas sensing techniques are investigated and the results of the investigation are presented. Due to the inhomogeneous state of the gas flow it is necessary to measure temperature especially just upstream of the after-treatment section where this can rise to as high as 650oC with large temporal gradients. Measurements of temperature of hot gases from a full size test engine using an optical fibre probe based on fluorescence decay time measurements are also presented.

  16. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Buriko, Y. Y.

    The conversion of fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 + H2SO4) in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. Model results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(VI). It is also shown that, for a high sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is kinetically limited by the level of atomic oxygen. This results in a higher oxidation efficiency at lower sulfur loadings. SO3 is the primary S(VI) oxidation product and calculated H2SO4 emission levels were less than 1% of the total fuel sulfur. This source of S(VI) can exceed the S(VI) source due to gas phase oxidation in the exhaust wake.

  17. Variable area exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, E. A. (inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle for a gas turbine engine comprises a number of arcuate flaps pivotally connected to the trailing edge of a cylindrical casing which houses the engine. Seals disposed within the flaps are spring biased and extensible beyond the side edges of the flaps. The seals of adjacent flaps are maintained in sealing engagement with each other when the flaps are adjusted between positions defining minimum nozzle flow area and the cruise position. Extensible, spring biased seals are also disposed within the flaps adjacent to a supporting pylon to thereby engage the pylon in a sealing arrangement. The flaps are hinged to the casing at the central portion of the flaps' leading edges and are connected to actuators at opposed outer portions of the leading edges to thereby maximize the mechanical advantage in the actuation of the flaps.

  18. Driving force characteristics of 40kW switched reluctance motor for electric vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Watanabe; S. Aida; A. Komatsuzaki; I. Miki

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest in an electric vehicle (EV), a hybrid-electric vehicle and a fuel-cell vehicle due to air pollution and exhaustion of fossil fuels. These vehicles use motors to obtain the driving force. Switched reluctance motors (SRMs) have a simple structure, high reliability and low cost. Furthermore, these are desirable features for electric vehicle. Our purpose is conversion

  19. Control of diesel exhaust odors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl J. Springer; Ralph C. Stahman

    1974-01-01

    Attempts to reduce diesel exhaust odors, particularly from city buses, are reviewed along with some of the problems associated with odor measurement. Most research on diesel exhaust odor utilizes the Environmental Protection Agency Diesel Odor Quality-Intensity Rating System which consists of 28 plastic squeeze bottles, each partially filled with a different intensity or odor. A trained panel routinely evaluates simultaneously

  20. Treatment of power utilities exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Koermer, Gerald (Basking Ridge, NJ)

    2012-05-15

    Provided is a process for treating nitrogen oxide-containing exhaust produced by a stationary combustion source by the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide in the presence of a reductant comprising hydrogen, followed by ammonia selective catalytic reduction to further reduce the nitrogen oxide level in the exhaust.

  1. Prediction of Launch Vehicle Ignition Overpressure and Liftoff Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The LAIOP (Launch Vehicle Ignition Overpressure and Liftoff Acoustic Environments) program predicts the external pressure environment generated during liftoff for a large variety of rocket types. These environments include ignition overpressure, produced by the rapid acceleration of exhaust gases during rocket-engine start transient, and launch acoustics, produced by turbulence in the rocket plume. The ignition overpressure predictions are time-based, and the launch acoustic predictions are frequency-based. Additionally, the software can predict ignition overpressure mitigation, using water-spray injection into the rocket exhaust stream, for a limited number of configurations. The framework developed for these predictions is extensive, though some options require additional relevant data and development time. Once these options are enabled, the already extensively capable code will be further enhanced. The rockets, or launch vehicles, can either be elliptically or cylindrically shaped, and up to eight strap-on structures (boosters or tanks) are allowed. Up to four engines are allowed for the core launch vehicle, which can be of two different types. Also, two different sizes of strap-on structures can be used, and two different types of booster engines are allowed. Both tabular and graphical presentations of the predicted environments at the selected locations can be reviewed by the user. The output includes summaries of rocket-engine operation, ignition overpressure time histories, and one-third octave sound pressure spectra of the predicted launch acoustics. Also, documentation is available to the user to help him or her understand the various aspects of the graphical user interface and the required input parameters.

  2. Characterization of exhaust emissions from trap-equipped light-duty diesels. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the project was to thoroughly characterize and quantify the criteria and toxic-pollutant emissions from two different types of trap-equipped light-duty diesel vehicles. These vehicles included a 1986 Mercedes-Benz 300 SDL, which utilizes a catalyzed trap system, and a prototype Volkswagen, which utilizes an additive trap system (organometallic iron additive). Exhaust emissions from the two vehicles were evaluated

  3. The influence of deposit control additives on exhaust CO and HC emissions from gasoline engines (case study: Tehran)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Daryabeigi Zand; Gholamreza Nabi bidhendi; Hamid Pezeshk

    2007-01-01

    Air pollution is the most serious environmental problem in Tehran with exhaust emissions from spark-ignition engines accounting for a major part of problem. The formation and accumulation of deposits on the internal surfaces of engines could adversely affect the exhaust emission from vehicles. It is the perception that some of fuel additives can remove these deposits due to their detergency.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.130 - Engine exhaust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...exhaust tubing should be specified as the sample point, or first point of dilution...air, and exhaust according to § 1065.655 to verify exhaust system integrity. ...restriction, and sufficiently upstream of any sample probes to ensure complete mixing...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.130 - Engine exhaust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...exhaust tubing should be specified as the sample point, or first point of dilution...air, and exhaust according to § 1065.655 to verify exhaust system integrity. ...restriction, and sufficiently upstream of any sample probes to ensure complete mixing...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.130 - Engine exhaust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...exhaust tubing should be specified as the sample point, or first point of dilution...air, and exhaust according to § 1065.655 to verify exhaust system integrity. ...restriction, and sufficiently upstream of any sample probes to ensure complete mixing...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.130 - Engine exhaust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...exhaust tubing should be specified as the sample point, or first point of dilution...air, and exhaust according to § 1065.655 to verify exhaust system integrity. ...restriction, and sufficiently upstream of any sample probes to ensure complete mixing...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.130 - Engine exhaust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...exhaust tubing should be specified as the sample point, or first point of dilution...air, and exhaust according to § 1065.655 to verify exhaust system integrity. ...restriction, and sufficiently upstream of any sample probes to ensure complete mixing...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...System § 27.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion resistant...must have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...System § 29.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion resistant...must have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...System § 29.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion resistant...must have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...System § 27.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion resistant...must have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...System § 29.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion resistant...must have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...System § 27.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion resistant...must have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to...

  15. Biodiesel exhaust-induced cytotoxicity and proinflammatory mediator production in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Kicic, Anthony; Ling, Kak-Ming; Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Larcombe, Alexander N

    2014-07-01

    Increasing use of biodiesel has prompted research into the potential health effects of biodiesel exhaust exposure. Few studies directly compare the health consequences of mineral diesel, biodiesel, or blend exhaust exposures. Here, we exposed human epithelial cell cultures to diluted exhaust generated by the combustion of Australian ultralow-sulfur-diesel (ULSD), unprocessed canola oil, 100% canola biodiesel (B100), and a blend of 20% canola biodiesel mixed with 80% ULSD. The physicochemical characteristics of the exhaust were assessed and we compared cellular viability, apoptosis, and levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) in exposed cultured cells. Different fuel types produced significantly different amounts of exhaust gases and different particle characteristics. All exposures resulted in significant apoptosis and loss of viability when compared with control, with an increasing proportion of biodiesel being correlated with a decrease in viability. In most cases, exposure to exhaust resulted in an increase in mediator production, with the greatest increases most often in response to B100. Exposure to pure canola oil (PCO) exhaust did not increase mediator production, but resulted in a significant decrease in IL-8 and RANTES in some cases. Our results show that canola biodiesel exhaust exposure elicits inflammation and reduces viability of human epithelial cell cultures in vitro when compared with ULSD exhaust exposure. This may be related to an increase in particle surface area and number in B100 exhaust when compared with ULSD exhaust. Exposure to PCO exhaust elicited the greatest loss of cellular viability, but virtually no inflammatory response, likely due to an overall increase in average particle size. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2014. PMID:25045158

  16. Secondary organic aerosol formation from road vehicle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieber, Simone M.; Platt, Stephen M.; El Haddad, Imad; Zardini, Alessandro A.; Suarez-Bertoa, Ricardo; Slowik, Jay G.; Huang, Ru-Jin; Hellebust, Stig; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Drinovec, Luca; Mocnik, Grisa; Baltensperger, Urs; Astorga, Covadogna; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2014-05-01

    Organic aerosol particles (OA) are a major fraction of the submicron particulate matter. OA consists of directly emitted primary (POA) and secondary OA (SOA). SOA is formed in-situ in the atmosphere via the reaction of volatile organic precursors. The partitioning of SOA species depends not only on the exposure to oxidants, but for instance also on temperature, relative humidity (RH), and the absorptive mass chemical composition (presence of inorganics) and concentration. Vehicle exhaust is a known source of POA and likely contributes to SOA formation in urban areas [1;2]. This has recently been estimated by (i) analyzing ambient data from urban areas combined with fuel consumption data [3], (ii) by examining the chemical composition of raw fuels [4], or (iii) smog chamber studies [5, 6]. Contradictory and thus somewhat controversial results in the relative quantity of SOA from diesel vs. gasoline vehicle exhaust were observed. In order to elucidate the impact of variable ambient conditions on the potential SOA formation of vehicle exhaust, and its relation to the emitted gas phase species, we studied SOA formed from the exhaust of passenger cars and trucks as a function of fuel and engine type (gasoline, diesel) at different temperatures (T 22 vs. -7oC) and RH (40 vs. 90%), as well as with different levels of inorganic salt concentrations. The exhaust was sampled at the tailpipe during regulatory driving cycles on chassis dynamometers, diluted (200 - 400x) and introduced into the PSI mobile smog chamber [6], where the emissions were subjected to simulated atmospheric ageing. Particle phase instruments (HR-ToF-AMS, aethalometers, CPC, SMPS) and gas phase instruments (PTR-TOF-MS, CO, CO2, CH4, THC, NH3 and other gases) were used online during the experiments. We found that gasoline emissions, because of cold starts, were generally larger than diesel, especially during cold temperatures driving cycles. Gasoline vehicles also showed the highest SOA formation. Furthermore, we observed that vehicle emissions and SOA are significantly affected by temperature and RH: doubling the RH in the chamber resulted in significantly increased SOA formation. Primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation from diesel and gasoline vehicles will be compared at different temperature and RH. Also the interaction and influence of inorganics on organics will be discussed. References: [1] Robinson, A.L., et al. (2007) Science 315, 1259. [2] Weitkamp, E.A., et al. (2007) Environ. Sci. Technol. 41, 6969. [3] Bahreini, R., et al. (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L06805. [4] Gentner, D.R. et al. (2012) PNAS 109, 18318. [5] Gordon, T.D. et al. (2013) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss 13, 23173. [6] Platt, S.M., et al. (2013) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. 12, 28343.

  17. Electrical breakdown of gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Meek; J. D. Craggs

    1978-01-01

    A collection of individual works on electrical discharges is presented. Topics covered include: fundamental processes in the electrical breakdown of gases; vacuum breakdown; spark breakdown in uniform fields; corona discharge; spark breakdown in non-uniform fields; breakdown voltage characteristics; irradiation and time lags; high-frequency breakdown of gases; laser-induced electrical breakdown of gases; spark channels; and electrode phenomena. (GHT)

  18. EXHAUST MAIN PERSONNEL EXPOSURE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Su

    1999-09-29

    The purpose of this activity is to identify and determine potential radiation hazards in the service exhaust main due to a waste package leakage from an emplacement drift. This work supports the subsurface ventilation system design for the EDA II, which consists of an accessible service exhaust main for personnel, and an exhaust main for hot air flow. The objective is to provide the necessary radiation exposure calculations to determine if the service exhaust main is accessible following a waste package leak. This work includes the following items responsive to the stated purpose and objective: Calculate the limiting transient radiation exposure of personnel in the service exhaust main due to the passage of airborne radioactive material through the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise to the exhaust main in the event of a leaking waste package Calculate the potential exposures to maintenance workers in the service exhaust main from residual radioactive material deposited inside of the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise This calculation is limited to external radiation only, since the airborne and contamination sources will be contained in the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise.

  19. Overview of Thermoelectric Generation for Hybrid Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaodong Zhang; K. T. Chau; C. C. Chan

    2008-01-01

    With ever increasing concern on oil prices and energy conservation, there is a fast growing interest in hybrid vehicles globally. Currently, all hybrid vehicles, including micro, mild and full hybrids, adopt internal combustion engines which are inefficient in general. The corresponding waste heat of exhaust gas constitutes up to 40% of the fuel consumption. So, it is a pressing need

  20. Supporting design information for portable exhauster installation at tanks S-109, SX-102/103, BY-105/106, S-101/102, S-107

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.M.

    1997-10-09

    This document provides supporting calculations and equipment dedication plans for portable exhausters and ductwork installed on tanks S-109, SX-102/103, BY-105/106, S-101/102, and S-107. The exhausters will ventilate the tanks during saltwell pumping to prevent the potential accumulation of flammable gases.

  1. Detection of mutagenic activity in automobile exhaust.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Y; Kachi, K; Sato, K; Tahara, I; Takeyoshi, H; Tokiwa, H

    1980-03-01

    Using the Ames Salmonella-microsome system, we detected mutagenic activity in the exhaust from two kinds of 4-cycle gasoline engines of unregulated and regulated cars, and from diesel engines, as well as in the particulates from air collected in tunnels. The mutagenicity of particulates from a car equipped with a catalyst (regulated car), as compared with that from an unregulated car, was reduced very much (down to 500 from 4500 revertants/plate/m3 in tester strain TA98). However, the mutagenicity of the ether-soluble acid and neutral fractions from the condensed water of emissions from a regulated car was still high (down to 2880 from 10 900 revertants/plate/m3 in tester strain TA100). The mutagenic activity of emission exhaust from old diesel car engines was very high; the particulates showed 9140 and 19 600 revertants/plate/m3 from strain TA98 incubated with an activating rat-liver S9 fraction. A small diesel engine of the type used for the generation of electric power or in farm machinery also produced exhaust with highly mutagenic particulates. The mutagenic activity of a methanol extract of particulate air pollutants collected in a highway tunnel showed 39 revertants/plate/m3 toward strain TA98 and 87 toward strain TA100. The ether-soluble neutral fraction yielded 86 revertants/plate/m3 from strain TA98 and 100 from strain TA100. This fraction also contained carcinogenic compounds, including benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[ghi]perylene and chrysene. Very high mutagenic activity was detected, especially in the particulate air pollutants collected at night, in another tunnel on a superhighway: 60-88 revertants/plate/m3 from strain TA100 for the sample collected by day, but 121-238, by night. Night traffic includes many more diesel-powered vehicles compared with gasoline-powered automobiles. PMID:6155611

  2. Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2001-03-05

    Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  3. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  4. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  5. Design of a fuzzy controller for energy management of a parallel hybrid electric vehicle 

    E-print Network

    Estrada Gutierrez, Pedro Cuauhtemoc

    1997-01-01

    This thesis addresses the design of a control scheme based on Fuzzy Logic to minimize automobile fuel consumption and exhaust emissions while maximizing battery state of charge (SOC) for hybrid vehicles. The advantages the hybrid vehicle has over...

  6. Divergent Electrocardiographic Responses to Whole and Particle-Free Diesel Exhaust Inhalation in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major contributor to traffic-related fine PM2.5. While inroads have been made in understanding the mechanisms of PM related health effects, DE?s complex mixture of PM, gases and volatile organics makes it difficult to determine how the constituents contri...

  7. Treating exhaust gas from a pressurized fluidized bed reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI); Koskinen, Jari (Karhula, FI)

    1995-01-01

    Hot gases from a pressurized fluidized bed reactor system are purified. Under superatmospheric pressure conditions hot exhaust gases are passed through a particle separator, forming a flitrate cake on the surface of the separator, and a reducing agent--such as an NO.sub.x reducing agent (like ammonia), is introduced into the exhaust gases just prior to or just after particle separation. The retention time of the introduced reducing agent is enhanced by providing a low gas velocity (e.g. about 1-20 cm/s) during passage of the gas through the filtrate cake while at superatmospheric pressure. Separation takes place within a distinct pressure vessel the interior of which is at a pressure of about 2-100 bar, and-introduction of reducing agent can take place at multiple locations (one associated with each filter element in the pressure vessel), or at one or more locations just prior to passage of clean gas out of the pressure vessel (typically passed to a turbine).

  8. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere. Estimates are given for the emissions, summarizing relevant earlier work (CIAP) and reviewing current propulsion research efforts. The chemical evolution and the mixing and vortical motion of the exhaust are analyzed to track the exhaust and its speciation as the emissions are mixed to atmospheric scales. The species tracked include those that could be heterogeneously reactive on the surfaces of the condensed solid water (ice) particles and on exhaust soot particle surfaces. Dispersion and reaction of chemical constituents in the far wake are studied with a Lagrangian air parcel model, in conjunction with a radiation code to calculate the net heating/cooling. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous chemistry of aqueous sulfuric acid and nitric acid hydrates are also described. Results include the solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid which is a key parameter for modeling stratospheric processing. We also report initial results for condensation of nitric acid trihydrate from gas phase H2O and HNO3.

  9. Benzene, toluene and xylenes levels in new and used vehicles of the same model.

    PubMed

    Faber, Joanna; Brodzik, Krzysztof; Golda-Kopek, Anna; Lomankiewicz, Damian

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the level of benzene, toluene, o-xylene and m, p-xylene (BTX) in air samples collected from the cabins of new and used vehicles of the same model. Ten new vehicles were examined in order to check interior emission from materials used to equip the passenger compartment. In order to compare and define the impact of exhaust gases, air samples were also collected from two used cars, at different mileages (up to 20,000 km). All vehicles tested were of the same type. Samples were collected onto Carbograph 1TD sorbent, thermally desorbed and examined with the use of gas chromatography with flame ionisation and mass spectrometry detectors. All results obtained were referred to Polish and German requirements for indoor air quality (both in public buildings and in workspace environments). Average benzene, toluene, o-xylene and m, p-xylene concentrations in new cars were determined at the level of 11.8 microg/m3, 82.7 micro/m3, 21.2 microg/m3 and 89.5 micro/m3, respectively. In the used cars, BTX concentration increased with increasing vehicle mileage. The most significant increase of BTX concentration was observed above 11,000 km mileage. PMID:24552062

  10. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1993-01-01

    Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

  11. Natural Cycles, Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.; Rood, R. B.; Aikin, A. C.; Stolarski, R. S.; Mccormick, M. P.; Fahey, David W.

    1992-01-01

    The major gaseous components of the exhaust of stratospheric aircraft are expected to be the products of combustion (CO2 and H2O), odd nitrogen (NO, NO2 HNO3), and products indicating combustion inefficiencies (CO and total unburned hydrocarbons). The species distributions are produced by a balance of photochemical and transport processes. A necessary element in evaluating the impact of aircraft exhaust on the lower stratospheric composition is to place the aircraft emissions in perspective within the natural cycles of stratospheric species. Following are a description of mass transport in the lower stratosphere and a discussion of the natural behavior of the major gaseous components of the stratospheric aircraft exhaust.

  12. Effect of the Sequence of the Thermoelectric Generator and the Three-Way Catalytic Converter on Exhaust Gas Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuqi; Tong, Naiqiang; Xu, Yuman; Chen, Shan; Liu, Xun

    2013-07-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has increased with recent improvements in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The problem with using thermoelectric generators for vehicle applications is whether the device is compatible with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. Based on ANSYS CFX simulation analysis of the impact of two positional relationships between the TEG and three-way catalytic converter in the exhaust system on the working efficiency of both elements, it is concluded that the layout with the front three-way catalytic converter has an advantage over the other layout mode under current conditions. New ideas for an improvement program are proposed to provide the basis for further research.

  13. Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a Delta Wing and a Swept Wing-Body Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Lake, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic travel is not allowed over populated areas due to the disturbance caused by the sonic boom. Research has been performed on sonic boom reduction and has included the contribution of the exhaust nozzle plume. Plume effect on sonic boom has progressed from the study of isolated nozzles to a study with four exhaust plumes integrated with a wing-body vehicle. This report provides a baseline analysis of the generic wing-body vehicle to demonstrate the effect of the nozzle exhaust on the near-field pressure profile. Reductions occurred in the peak-to-peak magnitude of the pressure profile for a swept wing-body vehicle. The exhaust plumes also had a favorable effect as the nozzles were moved outward along the wing-span.

  14. Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and hydrocarbon denuded diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Lucas, Donald; Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Koshland, Catherine P

    2007-11-01

    In vitro studies with the organic extracts of diesel particles have suggested that hydrocarbons such as PAH may play a role in an inflammatory response, but these have been limited by the possible artifacts introduced in the particle collection and processing. In this study, we avoid these artifacts and use an activated carbon denuder to remove hydrocarbons from the exhaust stream to investigate their role in the inflammatory response. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o) were exposed at the air-cell interface to diluted and aged exhaust from a diesel generator operated at partial and no load conditions. When particles were removed with a filter before cell exposure, exhaust gases accounted for almost half of the response compared to the whole exhaust. Removal of gas phase and a portion of the particle phase hydrocarbons with the denuder decreased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion to unexposed levels. PMID:17767946

  15. HUBBLE SEES SUPERSONIC EXHAUST FROM NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. Ground-based studies have shown that the nebula's size increases with time, suggesting that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1,200 years ago. The central star in M2-9 is known to be one of a very close pair which orbit one another at perilously close distances. It is even possible that one star is being engulfed by the other. Astronomers suspect the gravity of one star pulls weakly bound gas from the surface of the other and flings it into a thin, dense disk which surrounds both stars and extends well into space. The disk can actually be seen in shorter exposure images obtained with the Hubble telescope. It measures approximately 10 times the diameter of Pluto's orbit. Models of the type that are used to design jet engines ('hydrodynamics') show that such a disk can successfully account for the jet-exhaust-like appearance of M2-9. The high-speed wind from one of the stars rams into the surrounding disk, which serves as a nozzle. The wind is deflected in a perpendicular direction and forms the pair of jets that we see in the nebula's image. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Vincent Icke (Leiden University, The Netherlands), Garrelt Mellema (Stockholm University), and NASA

  16. Hydrophobic Catalysts For Removal Of NOx From Flue Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.; Voecks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Improved catalysts for removal of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) from combustion flue gases formulated as composites of vanadium pentoxide in carbon molecular sieves. Promotes highly efficient selective catalytic reduction of NOx at relatively low temperatures while not being adversely affected by presence of water vapor and sulfur oxide gases in flue gas. Apparatus utilizing catalyst of this type easily integrated into exhaust stream of power plant to remove nitrogen oxides, generated in combustion of fossil fuels and contribute to formation of acid rain and photochemical smog.

  17. Dispersal of gases generated near a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Duric, Nebojsa; Sulkanen, Martin; Fernini, Ilias

    1990-01-01

    The dispersal of gases evolved by prospective lunar base operations is presently modeled analytically using continuous (mining and habitat-venting) and impulsive (primarily rocket exhaust) injections of gases. In the case of impulsive injection, the neutral atmosphere and associated ionosphere both decay on time-scales of about 20 min; in that of continuous injection, the atmosphere near the base grows and achieves a steady state after about 20 min. Both direct and diffusive transport mechanisms are considered, and it is concluded that for the injection rates and assumptions presently employed the artificial lunar atmospheres produced are not significantly detrimental to astronomical observations and high-vacuum materials processing operations.

  18. Optimized control studies of a parallel hybrid electric vehicle 

    E-print Network

    Bougler, Benedicte Bernadette

    1995-01-01

    This thesis addresses the development of a control scheme to maximize automobile fuel economy and battery state-of-charge (SOC) while meeting exhaust emission standards for parallel hybrid electric vehicles, which are an alternative to conventional...

  19. Noble gases in meteorites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald D. Bogard

    1971-01-01

    The measurement of isotopic abundances of the noble gases in meteorites and other extraterrestrial samples became a large and active field during the past decade, especially within the last four years. The five stable noble gases proved to be excellent keys for unlocking the secrets of past physical events in the solar system and are used in studies of such

  20. Mercaptans emissions in diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Sérgio Machado; Arbilla, Graciela

    Biodiesel and ethanol are fuels in clear growth and evidence, basically due to its relation with the greenhouse effect reduction. There are several works regarding regulated pollutants emissions, but there is a lack of reports in non-regulated emissions. In a previous paper (Corrêa and Arbilla, 2006) the emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons were reported and in 2007 another paper was published in 2008 focusing carbonyls emissions (Corrêa and Arbilla, 2008). In this work four mercaptans (methyl, ethyl, n-propyl and n-butyl mercaptans) were evaluated for a heavy-duty diesel engine, fueled with pure diesel (D) and biodiesel blends (v/v) of 2% (B2), 5% (B5), 10% (B10), and 20% (B20). The tests were carried using a six cylinder heavy-duty engine, typical of the Brazilian fleet of urban buses, during a real use across the city. The exhaust gases were diluted near 20 times and the mercaptans were sampled with glass fiber filters impregnated with mercuric acetate. The chemical analyses were performed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. The results indicated that the mercaptans emissions exhibit a reduction with the increase of biodiesel content, but this reduction is lower as the mercaptan molar mass increases. For B20 results the emission reduction was 18.4% for methyl mercaptan, 18.1% for ethyl mercaptan, 16.3% for n-propyl mercaptan, and 9.6% for n-butyl mercaptan.

  1. Carbon monoxide exposure from aircraft fueling vehicles.

    PubMed

    McCammon, C S; Halperin, W F; Lemen, R A

    1981-01-01

    Investigators from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health observed deficiencies in maintenance of fueling trucks at an international airport. The exhaust system is vented under the front bumper, a standard design on fueling trucks which is intended to minimize the proximity of the exhaust system to the jet fuel in the vehicles. Carbon monoxide levels were measured in the cabs of 17 fueling trucks with windows closed, heaters on, and in different positions relative to the wind. One truck had an average CO level of 300 ppm, two exceeded 100 ppm, five others exceeded 50 ppm, while levels in the other nine averaged less than or equal to 500 ppm. Levels of CO depended on the mechanical condition of the vehicle and the vehicle's orientation to the wind. Stringent maintenance is required as the exhaust design is not fail-safe. PMID:6166254

  2. User's manual for the REEDM (Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model) computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, J. R.; Dumbauld, R. K.; Cheney, C. S.; Geary, H. V.

    1982-01-01

    The REEDM computer program predicts concentrations, dosages, and depositions downwind from normal and abnormal launches of rocket vehicles at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The atmospheric dispersion models, cloud-rise models, and other formulas used in the REEDM model are described mathematically Vehicle and source parameters, other pertinent physical properties of the rocket exhaust cloud, and meteorological layering techniques are presented as well as user's instructions for REEDM. Worked example problems are included.

  3. Round Robin analysis of alcolol and carbonyl synthetic exhaust samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.L.; Biller, W.F.; Tejada, S.B.; Siegl, W.O.; Jensen, T.E.

    1994-07-25

    Recent changes in regulatory practices have brought about a need for speciated analysis of the volatile organic components of vehicle exhaust. The purpose of the study was to allow interested laboratories to participate in a Round Robin so that each could assess their speciation methodologies. 'Synthetic exhaust' samples were prepared of mixed DN-carbonyl standards deposited on DNPH-coated cartridges, and solutions of alcohol in water. The fifteen participating laboratories included automotive, contract, petroleum, and regulatory organizations. The results described in this paper consider only variability asociated with the analytical measurement of the samples that have already been collected in impingers or on cartridges. In general, alochols (methanol and ethanol) were quantified without difficulty. With the exception of acrolein and crotonaldehyde, the quantitation of the carbonyl samples was fairly good considering the variety of analytical methods that were employed.

  4. Round robin analysis of alcohol and carbonyl synthetic exhaust samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.L.; Biller, W.F.; Tejada, S.B.; Siegl, W.O.; Rosenhamer, D.; Newkirk, M.S.; Crowley, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    Recent changes in regulatory practices have brought about a need for speciated analysis of the volatile organic components of vehicle exhaust. The purpose of this study was to allow interested laboratories to participate in a Round Robin so that each could assess their speciation methodologies. `Synthetic exhaust` samples were prepared of mixed DNPH-carbonyl standards deposited on DNPH cartridges, and solutions of alcohol in water. The fifteen participating laboratories included automotive, contract, petroleum and regulatory organizations. The results described in this paper consider only variability associated with the analyltical measurement of samples that have already been collected in impingers or on cartridges. In general, alcohols (methanol and ethanol) were quantified without difficulty. With the exception of acrolein and crotonaldehyde, the quantitation of the carbonyl samples was very good considering the variety of analytical methods that were used. 9 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Exhaustion syndrome in palliative care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilson Astudillo; Carmen Mendinueta

    1996-01-01

    Exhaustion syndrome is a potential risk for palliative-care workers and families because of their special contact with suffering. In this article we review its manifestations, the ways it affects every member of the team and other carers. It is possible to prevent it through an early recognition of job stress and the developing of strategies of self-control. It can be

  6. Space shuttle exhaust cloud properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Anderson; V. W. Keller

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the Space Transportation System and the acidic fallout observed after each of the first four launches was assembled from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Additional data were obtained from ground-based measurements during

  7. Exhaust oxygen sensor dynamic study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Da Yu Wang; Eric Detwiler

    2006-01-01

    We used transfer function approach to investigate the dynamics of oxygen sensors in engine exhaust environment, operated in both Lambda and wide range sensing modes. We measured the sensor transfer functions of the sensor responses and compared with the model. All the dynamic mechanisms involved were identified. The dynamic contributions are from the louver-shield, the protection coating-layer, the sensing electrode

  8. Exhaust elbow for marine propulsion system

    SciTech Connect

    Entringer, D.C.; Gruenwald, D.J.; Felix, D.K.

    1986-03-04

    A marine propulsion system is described having an internal combustion engine exhausted through a water jacketed exhaust elbow, an improved exhaust elbow: consisting of: an intake exhaust passage communicating through a bend with a discharge exhaust passage; water jacket means around the exhaust passages; central channel means extending longitudinally along the exterior of the discharge exhaust passage to guide water therealong in the water jacket means to the end of the discharge exhaust passage to mix with exhaust thereat; and means for maintaining the end tip of the discharge exhaust passage dry to prevent water ingestion and creeping back into the discharge exhaust passage due to pulsations of the engine, the last mentioned means comprising transition means at the end of the central channel means creating an outward draw from the central channel means to minimize break-up of outward water flow from the central channel means at the end tip of the discharge exhaust passage which may otherwise deposit water on the end tip of the discharge exhaust passage.

  9. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

    1993-01-15

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  10. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweig, Herbert R.; Fischler, Stanley; Wagner, William R.

    1993-01-01

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  11. Determination of Pd, Pt and Rh in vehicles escape fumes by GF-AAS and ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Antonio; Domínguez, José R; Alvarado, José

    2008-04-15

    Automotive exhaust gases from vehicles using catalytic converters were filtered through cellulose filter papers to collect suspended particles expulsed along with the engine's escape fumes. A specially designed sample collector was used for supporting the filter papers during collection. The collector was manufactured from a new car's exhaust pipe. A cellulose circular paper filter, 11 cm diameter, was attached to one end of the pipe and kept centered by pressing it against the borders of the pipe by means of a perforated aluminum cap, slightly wider than the pipe, used to cover this end of the collector. Filter papers loaded with the solid particles were acid-digested using a modified domestic microwave oven to bring the solid material into solution. The resulting solutions were analyzed for Pt by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) and for Pd and Rh by inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). Results indicate that concentration of these analytes in the particulate is higher for new vehicles, having new catalytic converters, than for old ones. Maximum Pd, Pt and Rh in the samples analyzed were found to be 5.36, 12.60 and 1.03 microg g(-1), respectively. PMID:18371916

  12. 14 CFR 25.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 25.1123 Exhaust piping. For powerplant and...apply: (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion...have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Piping must be supported to...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 25.1123 Exhaust piping. For powerplant and...apply: (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion...have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Piping must be supported to...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 25.1123 Exhaust piping. For powerplant and...apply: (a) Exhaust piping must be heat and corrosion...have provisions to prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Piping must be supported to...

  15. Design and construction of a solar-electric vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Bhavnani

    1994-01-01

    Recent concerns relating to global warming caused by greenhouse gases, coupled with a growing awareness of the limited available resources of fossil fuels, have spurred an interest in alternative energy powered vehicles. This paper describes the analysis, development, and testing of an aerodynamic vehicle powered by photovoltaic cells. The primary components of the vehicle are the composite material body, the

  16. A Survey of Challenges in Aerodynamic Exhaust Nozzle Technology for Aerospace Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyne, Rickey J.

    2002-01-01

    The current paper discusses aerodynamic exhaust nozzle technology challenges for aircraft and space propulsion systems. Technology advances in computational and experimental methods have led to more accurate design and analysis tools, but many major challenges continue to exist in nozzle performance, jet noise and weight reduction. New generations of aircraft and space vehicle concepts dictate that exhaust nozzles have optimum performance, low weight and acceptable noise signatures. Numerous innovative nozzle concepts have been proposed for advanced subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic vehicle configurations such as ejector, mixer-ejector, plug, single expansion ramp, altitude compensating, lobed and chevron nozzles. This paper will discuss the technology barriers that exist for exhaust nozzles as well as current research efforts in place to address the barriers.

  17. Simulation of exhaust gas pollution within an eventdriven multimodal dynamic traffic model

    E-print Network

    Toint, Philippe

    pollution caused by urban vehicles (cars and busses), a major source of urban environment deterioration1 Simulation of exhaust gas pollution within an event­driven multimodal dynamic traffic model E BELGIUM #12; 2 1. INTRODUCTION Public awareness for the environment is often thought to be a major

  18. Stratospheric plume dispersion: Measurements from STS and Titan solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beiting

    1999-01-01

    Plume expansion was measured from nine Space Shuttle and Titan IV vehicles at altitudes of 18, 24, and 30 km in the stratosphere. The plume diameters were inferred from electronic images of polarized, near-infrared solar radiation scattered from the exhaust particles, and these diameters were found to increase linearly with time. The expansion rate was measured for as long as

  19. 40 CFR 80.60 - Test fleet requirements for exhaust emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...vehicles for the test fleet must be screened for their exhaust VOC emissions in accordance with the provisions in § 80.62... 3W = 3-Way catalyst 3W+OX = 3-Way catalyst plus an oxidation catalyst Air Injection: Air = Air injection EGR =...

  20. 40 CFR 80.60 - Test fleet requirements for exhaust emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...vehicles for the test fleet must be screened for their exhaust VOC emissions in accordance with the provisions in § 80.62... 3W = 3-Way catalyst 3W+OX = 3-Way catalyst plus an oxidation catalyst Air Injection: Air = Air injection EGR =...

  1. 40 CFR 80.60 - Test fleet requirements for exhaust emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...vehicles for the test fleet must be screened for their exhaust VOC emissions in accordance with the provisions in § 80.62... 3W = 3-Way catalyst 3W+OX = 3-Way catalyst plus an oxidation catalyst Air Injection: Air = Air injection EGR =...

  2. 40 CFR 80.60 - Test fleet requirements for exhaust emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...vehicles for the test fleet must be screened for their exhaust VOC emissions in accordance with the provisions in § 80.62... 3W = 3-Way catalyst 3W+OX = 3-Way catalyst plus an oxidation catalyst Air Injection: Air = Air injection EGR =...

  3. 40 CFR 80.60 - Test fleet requirements for exhaust emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...vehicles for the test fleet must be screened for their exhaust VOC emissions in accordance with the provisions in § 80.62... 3W = 3-Way catalyst 3W+OX = 3-Way catalyst plus an oxidation catalyst Air Injection: Air = Air injection EGR =...

  4. Evaluation of a disposable diesel exhaust filter for permissible mining machines. Report of investigations/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ambs, J.L.; Cantrell, B.K.; Watts, W.F.; Olson, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) Diesel Research Program emphasizes the development and evaluation of emission control devices to reduce exposure of miners to diesel exhaust pollutants. Studies by the USBM have shown that diesel exhaust aerosol (DEA) contributes a substantial portion of the respirable aerosol in underground coal mining using diesel equipment not equipped with emission controls. The USBM and the Donaldson Co., Inc., Minneapolis, MN, have developed a low-temperature, disposable diesel exhaust filter (DDEF) for use on permissible diesel haulage vehicles equipped with waterban exhaust conditioners. These were evaluated in three underground mines to determine their effectiveness in reducing DEA concentrations. The DDEF reduced DEA concentrations from 70 to 90 pct at these mines. The usable life of the filter ranged from 10 to 32 h, depending on factors that affect DEA output, such as mine altitude, engine type, and duty-cycle. Cost per filter is approximately $40.

  5. Evaluation of a disposable diesel exhaust filter for permissible mining machines

    SciTech Connect

    Ambs, J.L.; Cantrell, B.K.; Watts, W.F.; Olson, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Diesel Research Program emphasizes the development and evaluation of emission control devices to reduce exposure of miners to diesel exhaust pollutants. Studies by the USBM have shown that diesel exhaust aerosol (DEA) contributes a substantial portion of the respirable aerosol in underground coal mines using diesel equipment not equipped with emission controls. The USBM and the Donaldson Co., Inc., Minneapolis, MN, have developed a low-temperature, disposable diesel exhaust filter (DDEF) for use on permissible diesel haulage vehicles equipped with waterbath exhaust conditioners. These were evaluated in three underground mines to determine their effectiveness in reducing DEA concentrations. The DDEF reduced DEA concentrations from 70 to 90% at these mines. The usable life of the filter ranged from 10 to 32 h, depending on factors that affect DEA output, such as mine altitude, engine type, and duty-cycle. Cost per filter is approximately $40.

  6. Method and apparatus for thermal management of vehicle exhaust systems

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1995-12-26

    A catalytic converter is surrounded by variable conductance insulation for maintaining the operating temperature of the catalytic converter at an optimum level, for inhibiting heat loss when raising catalytic converter temperature to light-off temperature, for storing excess heat to maintain or accelerate reaching light-off temperature, and for conducting excess heat away from the catalytic converter after reaching light-off temperature. The variable conductance insulation includes vacuum gas control and metal-to-metal thermal shunt mechanisms. Radial and axial shielding inhibits radiation and convection heat loss. Thermal storage media includes phase change material, and heat exchanger chambers and fluids carry heat to and from the catalytic converter. 7 figs.

  7. ydrocarbon detector for the remote sensing of vehicle exhaust emissions

    E-print Network

    Denver, University of

    of ozone and other components of photochemical smog. These HCs also provide nighttime reservoirs of NO-nitrogen-cooled indium antimonide detectors, a rotating gas filter correlation cell which pre- cluded the simultaneous

  8. The Characteristics of Fuel Consumption And Exhaust Emissions of the Side Exhaust Port Rotary Engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ritsuharu Shimizu; Haruo Okimoto; Seijo Tashima; Suguru Fuse

    Mazda has been pursuing the research of side exhaust porting for its rotary engine in an effort to improve the engine's fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions characteristics. The side exhaust porting configuration provides greater flexibility in setting port timing and shape, as compared to the peripheral exhaust porting configuration, which is in use in the current-generation rotary engines; the side

  9. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  10. 46 CFR 182.430 - Engine exhaust pipe installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 182.430 Engine exhaust pipe installation. (a) The...come in contact with an exhaust pipe. (b) Exhaust gas must not leak from the piping or any connections...under normal conditions. (d) Pipes used for wet exhaust...

  11. 46 CFR 119.430 - Engine exhaust pipe installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 119.430 Engine exhaust pipe installation. (a) The...come in contact with an exhaust pipe. (b) Exhaust gas must not leak from the piping or any connections...under normal conditions. (d) Pipes used for wet exhaust...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 25.1125 Section 25... Exhaust System § 25.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine...following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 29.1125 Section 29... Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine...following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 29.1125 Section 29... Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine...following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... Exhaust System § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine...following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 25.1125 Section 25... Exhaust System § 25.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine...following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... Exhaust System § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine...following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and...

  18. Exhaust emission control and diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Christopher John; Upadhyay, Devesh

    2006-11-14

    A diesel engine emission control system uses an upstream oxidation catalyst and a downstream SCR catalyst to reduce NOx in a lean exhaust gas environment. The engine and upstream oxidation catalyst are configured to provide approximately a 1:1 ratio of NO to NO2 entering the downstream catalyst. In this way, the downstream catalyst is insensitive to sulfur contamination, and also has improved overall catalyst NOx conversion efficiency. Degradation of the system is determined when the ratio provided is no longer near the desired 1:1 ratio. This condition is detected using measurements of engine operating conditions such as from a NOx sensor located downstream of the catalysts. Finally, control action to adjust an injected amount of reductant in the exhaust gas based on the actual NO to NO2 ratio upstream of the SCR catalyst and downstream of the oxidation catalyst.

  19. RE-ENTRAINMENT AND DISPERSION OF EXHAUSTS FROM INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS: ANALYSIS OF TRACER GAS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracer gas studies were conducted around four model houses in a wind tunnel, and around one house in the field, to quantify re-entrainment and dispersion of exhaust gases released from residential indoor radon reduction systems. Re-entrainment tests in the field suggest that acti...

  20. Measuring soot particles from automotive exhaust emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Hanspeter; Lüönd, Felix; Schlatter, Jürg; Auderset, Kevin; Jordan-Gerkens, Anke; Nowak, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Buhr, Egbert; Klein, Tobias; Tuch, Thomas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Mamakos, Athanasios; Riccobono, Francesco; Discher, Kai; Högström, Richard; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko; Quincey, Paul

    2014-08-01

    The European Metrology Research Programme participating countries and the European Union jointly fund a three year project to address the need of the automotive industry for a metrological sound base for exhaust measurements. The collaborative work on particle emissions involves five European National Metrology Institutes, the Tampere University of Technology, the Joint Research Centre for Energy and Transport and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research. On one hand, a particle number and size standard for soot particles is aimed for. Eventually this will allow the partners to provide accurate and comparable calibrations of measurement instruments for the type approval of Euro 5b and Euro 6 vehicles. Calibration aerosols of combustion particles, silver and graphite proof partially suitable. Yet, a consensus choice together with instrument manufactures is pending as the aerosol choice considerably affects the number concentration measurement. Furthermore, the consortium issued consistent requirements for novel measuring instruments foreseen to replace today's opacimeters in regulatory periodic emission controls of soot and compared them with European legislative requirements. Four partners are conducting a metrological validation of prototype measurement instruments. The novel instruments base on light scattering, electrical, ionisation chamber and diffusion charging sensors and will be tested at low and high particle concentrations. Results shall allow manufacturers to further improve their instruments to comply with legal requirements.

  1. Correlates of work exhaustion for medical technologists.

    PubMed

    Blau, Gary; Tatum, Donna Surges; Ward-Cook, Kory

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 196 medical technologists followed over a 4-year period, this study investigated if work-related demand and resource variables were related to subsequent work exhaustion. As hypothesized, increased levels of perceived work interference with family and task load and lower organizational support were related to higher subsequent work exhaustion. Distributive justice, as an intervening variable, had direct and partially mediating effects on work exhaustion. Distributive justice partially mediated the effects of work interfering with family and organizational support on work exhaustion. Distributive justice also mediated the impact of procedural justice on work exhaustion. Study limitations and future research issues are discussed. PMID:14526896

  2. Space shuttle exhaust cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.

    1983-12-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the Space Transportation System and the acidic fallout observed after each of the first four launches was assembled from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Additional data were obtained from ground-based measurements during firings of the 6.4 percent model of the Solid Rocket Booster at the Marshall Center. Analysis indicates that the acidic fallout is produced by atomization of the deluge water spray by the rocket exhaust on the pad followed by rapid scavening of hydrogen chloride gas aluminum oxide particles from the Solid Rocket Boosters. The atomized spray is carried aloft by updrafts created by the hot exhaust and deposited down wind. Aircraft measurements in the STS-3 ground cloud showed an insignificant number of ice nuclei. Although no measurements were made in the column cloud, the possibility of inadvertent weather modification caused by the interaction of ice nuclei with natural clouds appears remote.

  3. Space shuttle exhaust cloud properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the Space Transportation System and the acidic fallout observed after each of the first four launches was assembled from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Additional data were obtained from ground-based measurements during firings of the 6.4 percent model of the Solid Rocket Booster at the Marshall Center. Analysis indicates that the acidic fallout is produced by atomization of the deluge water spray by the rocket exhaust on the pad followed by rapid scavening of hydrogen chloride gas aluminum oxide particles from the Solid Rocket Boosters. The atomized spray is carried aloft by updrafts created by the hot exhaust and deposited down wind. Aircraft measurements in the STS-3 ground cloud showed an insignificant number of ice nuclei. Although no measurements were made in the column cloud, the possibility of inadvertent weather modification caused by the interaction of ice nuclei with natural clouds appears remote.

  4. PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE CALIBRATION GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the audit was to determine the accuracy of inspection and maintenance calibration gases for motor vehicle emission analyzers. Cylinders containing approximately 1.6 percent carbon monoxide and 640 parts per million propane in nitrogen were purchased from 13 special...

  5. Turbocharged engine exhaust gas recirculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowicz, R.W.

    1984-01-24

    Improved exhaust gas recirculation systems for turbocharged gas engines that include an exhaust pipe, a turbocharger connected thereto, and a carburetor connected with a source of gas for the engine. The recirculation system includes an air conduit extending from the turbocharger compressor discharge to a venturi, an exhaust gas conduit that extends from a connection with the exhaust pipe between the engine and the turbocharger to the venturi, a second air conduit that extends from the exhaust pipe to a connection with the first air conduit, and control valves located in the exhaust gas conduit and in the second air conduit. The valves are closed when the engine is being started or idling at no load and open when a load is imposed or when engine rpm's are increased. No pumps, blowers, etc. are needed because the system operates on a differential in pressure created within the system to cause the exhaust gas recirculation.

  6. Modular Analysis of Automobile Exhaust Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. D.; Zhang, Y.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, an automobile exhaust thermoelectric power generation system is packaged into a model with its own operating principles. The inputs are the engine speed and power, and the output is the power generated by the system. The model is divided into two submodels. One is the inlet temperature submodel, and the other is the power generation submodel. An experimental data modeling method is adopted to construct the inlet temperature submodel, and a theoretical modeling method is adopted to construct the power generation submodel. After modeling, simulation is conducted under various engine operating conditions to determine the variation of the power generated by the system. Finally, the model is embedded into a Honda Insight vehicle model to explore the energy-saving effect of the system on the vehicle under Economic Commission for Europe and cyc-constant_60 driving cycles.

  7. On-line laser detection of gases

    SciTech Connect

    Harbert, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    Petrochemical plants, platforms, refineries, etc, can now be surveyed by a laser instrument which responds to and measures gases in the beam. Scanning with the beam, which can be up to 1 km in length, permits a complete plant to be covered with a single instrument. Another application uses and instrument mounted on a vehicle or an aircraft moving along a pipeline searching for gas leaks. The use of lasers permits the detection of gases on-line. A laser operating at the required wavelength produces a beam which surveys the plant; some of the infrared light is scattered form the ground onto a detector adjacent to the laser. Any gas in the beam causes the signal at the detector to fall. Accuracies corresponding to +/- 1.0 ppm can be achieved with response times of 10 milliseconds. (JMT)

  8. Characterization of model automotive exhaust catalysts: Pd on ceria and ceria–zirconia supports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-W Jen; G. W Graham; W Chun; R. W McCabe; J.-P Cuif; S. E Deutsch; O Touret

    1999-01-01

    Pure cerias, silica-doped ceria, ceria–zirconia solid solutions, and ceria–zirconia solid solutions with partial incorporation of praseodymium in the structure were prepared by Rhodia as high-surface-area powders and used as supports in model Pd automotive three-way catalysts prepared at Ford. The catalysts were aged for 12h at 1050°C, both in air and under redox conditions simulating automotive exhaust gases. Both the

  9. The reactor design for diesel exhaust control using a magnetic pulse compressor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douyan Wang; Takao Namihira; Koji Fujiya; Sunao Katsuki; Hidenori Akiyama

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic pulse compressor (MPC) was used to control the exhaust gases from a diesel generator employing a wire-to-plate plasma reactor in this work. To obtain efficient NOX removal, the energy transfer efficiency from the MPC to the plasma reactor and the pulse streamer discharge physics were investigated by varying the number of anode wires and wire-to-wire distance of the

  10. Oxidation and exhaust gas corrosion resistance of the cobalt base clad layers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Smolenska

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is describing the behaviour of the cobalt base cladding layers after treatment in hot air (750°C, 200 hours) and exhaust gases (700°C, two month). Design\\/methodology\\/approach: The layers were produced by two cladding, laser and PTA, cladding technique. Cladding was conducted with a high power diode laser HDPL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 and Plasma Transformed Arc

  11. ENHANCEMENTS OF REMOTE SENSING FOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS IN TUNNELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The University of Denver in cooperation with the Desert Research Institute, U.S. EPA, and General Motors Corporation have successfully adapted the University of Denver's remote sensing system for vehicle exhaust to the measurement of vehicles in a tunnel environment. wo studies c...

  12. Effects on symptoms and lung function in humans experimentally exposed to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, B; Ledin, M C; Hammarström, U; Stjernberg, N; Lundbäck, B; Sandström, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diesel exhaust is a common air pollutant made up of several gases, hydrocarbons, and particles. An experimental study was carried out which was designed to evaluate if a particle trap on the tail pipe of an idling diesel engine would reduce effects on symptoms and lung function caused by the diesel exhaust, compared with exposure to unfiltered exhaust. METHODS: Twelve healthy non-smoking volunteers (aged 20-37) were investigated in an exposure chamber for one hour during light work on a bicycle ergometer at 75 W. Each subject underwent three separate double blind exposures in a randomised sequence: to air and to diesel exhaust with the particle trap at the tail pipe and to unfiltered diesel exhaust. Symptoms were recorded according to the Borg scale before, every 10 minutes during, and 30 minutes after the exposure. Lung function was measured with a computerised whole body plethysmograph. RESULTS: The ceramic wall flow particle trap reduced the number of particles by 46%, whereas other compounds were relatively constant. It was shown that the most prominent symptoms during exposure to diesel exhaust were irritation of the eyes and nose and an unpleasant smell increasing during exposure. Both airway resistance (R(aw)) and specific airway resistance (SR(aw)) increased significantly during the exposures to diesel exhaust. Despite the 46% reduction in particle numbers by the trap effects on symptoms and lung function were not significantly attenuated. CONCLUSION: Exposure to diesel exhaust caused symptoms and bronchoconstriction which were not significantly reduced by a particle trap. PMID:8943829

  13. Development of naval diesel engine duty cycles for air exhaust emission environmental impact analysis. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Markle, S.P.

    1994-05-01

    A strategy for testing naval diesel engines for exhaust emissions was developed. A survey of existing international and national standard diesel engine duty cycles was conducted. All were found to be inadequate for testing and certification of engine exhaust emissions from naval diesel powered ships. Naval ship data covering 11,500 hours of engine operation of four U.S. Navy LSD 41 Class amphibious ships was analyzed to develop a 27 point class operating profile. A procedure combining ship hull form characteristics, ship propulsion plant parameters, and ship operating profile was detailed to derive an 11-Mode duty cycle representative for testing LSD 41 Class propulsion diesel engines. A similar procedure was followed for ship service diesel engines. Comparisons with industry accepted duty cycles were conducted using exhaust emission contour plots for the Colt-Pielstick PC-4B diesel engines. Results showed the 11-Mode LSD 41 Class Duty Cycle best predicted ship propulsion engine emissions compared to the 27 point operating profile propeller curve. The procedure was applied to T-AO 187 Class with similar results. The application of civilian industry standards to measure naval diesel ship propulsion engine exhaust emissions was found to be inadequate. Engine exhaust flow chemistry post turbocharger was investigated using the SANDIA Lab computer tool CHEMKIN. Results showed oxidation and reduction reactions within exhaust gases are quenched in the exhaust stack. Since the exhaust stream in the stack is unreactive, emission sampling may be performed where most convenient. A proposed emission measurement scheme for LSD 41 Class ships was presented.

  14. [Urinary 1-OHP excretion of urban traffic exhausts exposed workers].

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, M; d'Ettorre, G; Cazzato, R G; De Giorgio, N

    2007-01-01

    The vehicles exhaust in the traffic represents an important contributing factor for common air pollutants inhalation. The aim of this study was to investigate, the possible correlation between occupational exposition to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generated from incomplete combustion, by dosage of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP u) as biomarker of internal dose for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the study were included 29 workers exposed to urban traffic exhausts and of 18 non exposed workers. In boths populations was considered the tobacco smoke exposition. The results showed that exposed had levels of 1-OHP u in end-of-shift samples generally higher than those in pre-shift samples and showed an association to tobacco smoke exposition. In the control population tobacco smoke exposition appeared associated to the highest levels of 1-OHP u. The study suggests that the occupational exposure to traffic exhausts is associated with increased urinary excretion of 1-OHP. In addition, by our results seems to be a correlation between high levels of 1-OHP in the urine and increased risk of PAHs inhalation. PMID:18409820

  15. Remote sensing of turbine engine gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killinger, D. K.; Menyuk, N.; Mooradian, A.

    1980-09-01

    This is the FY 80 final report for a laser remote sensing program designed to investigate remote sensing techniques for the detection of jet aircraft exhaust gases. The specific tasks which were performed consisted of the following: (1) continuation of feasibility demonstration of CO2 TEA laser remote sensing system and the detection of NO and C2H4 in the atmosphere; (2) continuation of laboratory absorption measurements of CO, NO, and C2H4; (3) initial laboratory investigation of suitability of laser remote s U;e, Unsing of hydrazine, UDMH, and MMH; (4) implemenation of digital data acquisition and processing system; and (5) preliminary development of dual-laser DIAL system.

  16. Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Burnham; M. Q. Wang; Y. Wu

    2006-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and

  17. Electric vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Riezenman

    1992-01-01

    The renewed interest in electric vehicles (EVs) in the wake of the California Air Resources Board mandate that 2% of the vehicles lighter than 3750 lb (1700 kg) sold by each manufacturer in that state in 1998 be zero-emission vehicles is examined. The reasons why replacing an internal combustion vehicle (ICV) with an electrically powered equivalent greatly reduces air pollution,

  18. Gases: Characteristics and Properties

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brieske, Joel A.

    The first site related to ideal gas, called Ideal and Real Gas Laws, is maintained by Liina Ladon of Townsen University (1). Visitors can read about the properties of ideal gases, what the ideal gas law is, how to use it, and much more. The next site, titled Gas Laws, (2) is offered by the Ohio State University Department of Chemistry. This interactive site contains Shockwave movies of animations and audio files that describe what a gas is, the Ideal Gas Law equation, mixtures of gases, and problems using the ideal gas law. The University of Oregon site, Virtual Laboratory, teaches about the ideal gas law on the Welcome to the Pressure Chamber page (3). Those who enjoy online interaction will enjoy being able to control the action of a piston in a pressure chamber to see how the gases inside react. The fourth site includes another fun multimedia activity related to ideal gases provided by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Western Washington University. The Air Filled Balloon in Liquid Nitrogen (4) movie shows an actual experiment of the effects on a balloon that's covered with liquid nitrogen. The page contains some additional information on the science behind the observations. The next site, called Ideal Gas Equations (5) is an online calculator that's part of Kean University's Department of Geology and Meteorology Web site. Users can calculate the pressure, volume, or temperature of a gas by inputting known variables into the various forms. Several methods and variations of calculating the values are provided as well as brief instructions. The next page from North Carolina State University's Basic Concepts in Environmental Science Web site is called Characteristics of Gases (6). Part of a larger learning module, the lesson plans objective is to use the ideal gas law to determine gas volumes at different absolute temperatures and absolute pressures. Everything needed to conduct the activity is provided including links to a volume calculator and practice problems. The seventh site is another animation that illustrates how gases react, called Molecular Model for an Ideal Gas (7). By changing the number of molecules in the chamber, their velocity, and the pressure and width of the container, users get to see how the molecules react to the conditions. The last site, Gases and Their Properties, is maintained by the Electronic Teaching Assistance Program(8). Students learn about the history of gas science, how gas laws describe ideal gases, what Dalton's Law and Graham's Law are, and much more.

  19. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Richard J. (McMurray, PA)

    1989-01-01

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

  20. Cleaning the air and improving health with hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Z. Jacobson; W. G. Colella; D. M. Golden

    2005-01-01

    Converting all U.S. onroad vehicles to hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (HFCVs) may improve air quality, health, and climate significantly, whether the hydrogen is produced by steam reforming of natural gas, wind electrolysis, or coal gasification. Most benefits would result from eliminating current vehicle exhaust. Wind and natural gas HFCVs offer the greatest potential health benefits and could save 3700 to 6400

  1. Temperature effects on particulate matter emissions from light-duty, gasoline-powered motor vehicles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kansas City Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions study measured exhaust emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from over 500 vehicles randomly recruited in the Kansas City metropolitan area in 2004 and 2005. Vehicle emissions testing occurred during the summer and winter, ...

  2. Photoionization in Gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Varney; L. B. Loeb

    1935-01-01

    The balanced space charge positive ion detector, used in the experiments on ionization by positive alkali ions has been used in the study of photoionization in gases. The following experiments were performed: (1) A hydrogen discharge tube, operated by either a 1000- or an 8000-volt transformer, was set up so that the radiation emitted could pass through a fluorite window

  3. Gases in Seawater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Nightingale; P. S. Liss

    2003-01-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate,

  4. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  5. Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Yu; Stroia; S. C. Huang; Kenneth C. Howden; Steven Chalk

    2002-01-01

    Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and;\\u000adurability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI);\\u000aengines have been used extensively to power almost all;\\u000ahighway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine;\\u000acarriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35;\\u000ato 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable;\\u000asize, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon;\\u000aDioxides), which have been

  6. Occupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, Anjoeka; Coble, Joseph; Stewart, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust (DE) is classified as a probable human carcinogen. Aims were to describe the major occupational uses of diesel engines and give an overview of personal DE exposure levels and determinants of exposure as reported in the published literature. Methods Measurements representative of personal DE exposure were abstracted from the literature for the following agents: elemental carbon (EC), particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Information on determinants of exposure was abstracted. Results In total, 3528 EC, 4166 PM, 581 CO, 322 NO, and 1404 NO2 measurements were abstracted. From the 10,001 measurements, 32% represented exposure from on-road vehicles, and 68% from off-road vehicles (30% mining, 15% railroad, and 22% other). Highest levels were reported for enclosed underground work sites where heavy equipment is used: mining, mine maintenance, and construction, (EC: 27-658 ?g/m3). Intermediate exposure levels were generally reported for above ground (semi-)enclosed areas where smaller equipment was run: mechanics in a shop, emergency workers in fire stations, distribution workers at a dock, and workers loading/unloading inside a ferry (generally: EC< 50 ?g/m3). Lowest levels were reported for enclosed areas separated from the source such as drivers and train crew, or outside such as surface mining, parking attendants, vehicle testers, utility service workers, surface construction and airline ground personnel (EC<25 ?g/m3). The other agents showed a similar pattern. Determinants of exposure reported for enclosed situations were ventilation and exhaust after treatment devices. Conclusions Reported DE exposure levels were highest for underground mining and construction, intermediate for working in above ground (semi-)enclosed areas and lowest for working outside or separated from the source. The presented data can be used as a basis for assessing occupational exposure in population-based epidemiological studies and guide future exposure assessment efforts for industrial hygiene and epidemiological studies. PMID:19277070

  7. Occupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Anjoeka; Coble, Joseph; Stewart, Patricia A

    2009-07-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is classified as a probable human carcinogen. Aims were to describe the major occupational uses of diesel engines and give an overview of personal DE exposure levels and determinants of exposure as reported in the published literature. Measurements representative of personal DE exposure were abstracted from the literature for the following agents: elemental carbon (EC), particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)). Information on determinants of exposure was abstracted. In total, 3528 EC, 4166 PM, 581 CO, 322 NO, and 1404 NO(2) measurements were abstracted. From the 10,001 measurements, 32% represented exposure from on-road vehicles and 68% from off-road vehicles (30% mining, 15% railroad, and 22% others). Highest levels were reported for enclosed underground work sites in which heavy equipment is used: mining, mine maintenance, and construction (EC: 27-658 microg/m(3)). Intermediate exposure levels were generally reported for above-ground (semi-) enclosed areas in which smaller equipment was run: mechanics in a shop, emergency workers in fire stations, distribution workers at a dock, and workers loading/unloading inside a ferry (generally: EC<50 microg/m(3)). Lowest levels were reported for enclosed areas separated from the source, such as drivers and train crew, or outside, such as surface mining, parking attendants, vehicle testers, utility service workers, surface construction and airline ground personnel (EC<25 microg/m(3)). The other agents showed a similar pattern. Determinants of exposure reported for enclosed situations were ventilation and exhaust after treatment devices. Reported DE exposure levels were highest for underground mining and construction, intermediate for working in above-ground (semi-) enclosed areas and lowest for working outside or separated from the source. The presented data can be used as a basis for assessing occupational exposure in population-based epidemiological studies and guide future exposure assessment efforts for industrial hygiene and epidemiological studies. PMID:19277070

  8. Exhaust pressure pulsation observation from turbocharger instantaneous speed measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Macián; J. M. Luján; V. Bermúdez; C. Guardiola

    2004-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, instantaneous exhaust pressure measurements are difficult to perform in a production environment. The high temperature of the exhaust manifold and its pulsating character make its application to exhaust gas recirculation control algorithms impossible. In this paper an alternative method for estimating the exhaust pressure pulsation is presented. A numerical model is built which enables the exhaust

  9. Sulfur Hexaflouride Tracer Gas Evaluations on Hood Exhaust Reductions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Mosovsky

    1995-01-01

    Proposed facility energy reductions, which include exhaust fan speed and corresponding exhaust volume reductions, demand evaluations of exhaust hoods to ensure adequate containment efficiencies. Sulfur hexafluoride tracer tests were conducted on various designs of exhaust hoods in order to evaluate their performance in an exhaust-reduction mode. Performance tests were conducted on semiconductor-type wet process stations and plating tools operating in

  10. Characterization and analysis of diesel exhaust odor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shala

    1983-01-01

    An instrumental method known as the Diesel Odor Analysis System or DOAS, has been developed at A.D. Little, Inc. for measuring diesel exhaust odor. It was of interest to determine which compound or compounds in the oxygenated fraction of the exhaust were primarily responsible for the odor correlation as developed at A.D. Little, Inc. This was accomplished by observing how

  11. Motorcycle with closeable engine intake exhaust passages

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuta, H.; Kawai, Y.; Tsuchida, N.

    1984-03-06

    An intake and exhaust system for a compact motorcycle including a valve arrangement for closing both the intake and exhaust systems so as to preclude the excape of fuel vapors to the surrounding area when the motorcycle is not in use.

  12. Controlled human exposures to diesel exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of gaseous and particulate compounds resulting from an incomplete combustion of diesel fuel. Controlled human exposures to DE and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have contributed to understanding health effects. Such exposure studies of h...

  13. Vibrational Relaxation in Gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Lambert; R. Salter

    1959-01-01

    The velocity of ultrasonic waves has been measured in a number of gases at 25 degrees C and for values of the ratio, ultrasonic frequency\\/pressure, ranging from 2 × 105 to 2 × 107 c s-1 atm-1. Dispersion, corresponding to a single vibrational relaxation process was shown by acetylene, CD3Br and hexafluoro-ethane; and, to a double relaxation process, by ethane.

  14. Carbonyl emissions in diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado Corrêa, Sérgio; Arbilla, Graciela

    With the use of biodiesel in clear growth, it is important to quantify any potential emission benefits or liabilities of this fuel. Several researches are available concerning the regulated emissions of biodiesel/diesel blends, but there is a lack of information about non-regulated emissions. In a previous paper [Corrêa, S.M., Arbilla, G., 2006. Emissões de formaldeído e acetaldeído de misturas biodiesel/diesel. Periódico Tchê Química, 3, 54-68], the emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons were reported. In this work, seven carbonyl emissions (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acetone, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde) were evaluated by a heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with pure diesel (D) and biodiesel blends (v/v) of 2% (B2), 5% (B5), 10% (B10), and 20% (B20). The tests were conducted using a six cylinder heavy-duty engine, typical of the Brazilian fleet of urban buses, in a steady-state condition under 1000, 1500, and 2000 rpm. The exhaust gases were diluted nearly 20 times and the carbonyls were sampled with SiO 2-C18 cartridges, impregnated with acid solution of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The chemical analyses were performed by high performance liquid chromatography using UV detection. Using average values for the three modes of operation (1000, 1500, and 2000 rpm) benzaldehyde showed a reduction on the emission (-3.4% for B2, -5.3% for B5, -5.7% for B10, and -6.9% for B20) and all other carbonyls showed a significative increase: 2.6, 7.3, 17.6, and 35.5% for formaldehyde; 1.4, 2.5, 5.4, and 15.8% for acetaldehyde; 2.1, 5.4, 11.1, and 22.0% for acrolein+acetone; 0.8, 2.7, 4.6, and 10.0% for propionaldehyde; 3.3, 7.8, 16.0, and 26.0% for butyraldehyde.

  15. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  16. Effect on exhaust emissions by the use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) fuel additive and other lead replacement gasolines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Savas Geivanidis; Panayotis Pistikopoulos; Zissis Samaras

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the potential effects on car exhaust emissions of a range of alternative lead replacement gasolines in the context of south European countries such as Greece. The main objective of this study was to assess the effects on emissions from non-catalyst passenger vehicles by the substitution of leaded (‘super’) gasoline with Euro95 unleaded enriched with the additive MMT

  17. 40 CFR 600.510-12 - Calculation of average fuel economy and average carbon-related exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES...design changes expected to have comparable effects on in-use fuel economy; (5...manufacturer must use the value of F that is in effect in paragraphs (j)(2)(vi)...

  18. 40 CFR 600.510-12 - Calculation of average fuel economy and average carbon-related exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES...design changes expected to have comparable effects on in-use fuel economy; (5...manufacturer must use the value of F that is in effect in paragraphs (j)(2)(vi)...

  19. 40 CFR 600.510-12 - Calculation of average fuel economy and average carbon-related exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES...design changes expected to have comparable effects on in-use fuel economy; (5) The...manufacturer must use the value of F that is in effect in paragraphs (j)(2)(vi)...

  20. The Analysis of Exhaust Gas Thermal Energy Recovery Through a TEG Generator in City Traffic Conditions Reproduced on a Dynamic Engine Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkisz, Jerzy; Fuc, Pawel; Lijewski, Piotr; Ziolkowski, Andrzej; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof T.

    2015-06-01

    We present an analysis of thermal energy recovery through a proprietary thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an actual vehicle driving cycle reproduced on a dynamic engine test bed. The tests were performed on a 1.3-L 66-kW diesel engine. The TEG was fitted in the vehicle exhaust system. In order to assess the thermal energy losses in the exhaust system, advanced portable emission measurement system research tools were used, such as Semtech DS by Sensors. Aside from the exhaust emissions, the said analyzer measures the exhaust mass flow and exhaust temperature, vehicle driving parameters and reads and records the engine parameters. The difficulty related to the energy recovery measurements under actual traffic conditions, particularly when passenger vehicles and TEGs are used, spurred the authors to develop a proprietary method of transposing the actual driving cycle as a function V = f( t) onto the engine test bed, opn which the driving profile, previously recorded in the city traffic, was reproduced. The length of the cycle was 12.6 km. Along with the motion parameters, the authors reproduced the parameters of the vehicle and its transmission. The adopted methodology enabled high repeatability of the research trials while still ensuring engine dynamic states occurring in the city traffic.

  1. Three dimensional nozzle-exhaust flow field analysis by a reference plane technique.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Del Guidice, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical method based on reference plane characteristics has been developed for the calculation of highly complex supersonic nozzle-exhaust flow fields. The difference equations have been developed for three coordinate systems. Local reference plane orientations are employed using the three coordinate systems concurrently thus catering to a wide class of flow geometries. Discontinuities such as the underexpansion shock and contact surfaces are computed explicitly for nonuniform vehicle external flows. The nozzles considered may have irregular cross-sections with swept throats and may be stacked in modules using the vehicle undersurface for additional expansion. Results are presented for several nozzle configurations.

  2. Investigations of piston-effect and jet fan-effect in model vehicle tunnels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Y. Chen; Y. T. Lee; C. C. Hsu

    1998-01-01

    This research is concerned with experimental studies of the effects of moving vehicles (piston-effect) and jet fans (jet fan-effect) on the tunnel ventilation in rotating-belt model vehicle tunnels. Specifically, the aerodynamics of the flow induced by moving vehicles and effects of jet fans on the distribution of vehicle exhausts were investigated under different traffic conditions. The results of these studies

  3. Motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y.; Sano, S.

    1986-04-15

    An improvement in a motor vehicle is described including: a vehicle body; a front road wheel disposed in the front part of the vehicle body; a rear road wheel disposed in the rear part of the vehicle body; an engine for driving at least either of the front and rear road wheels; and a steering wheel for steering at least either of the front and rear road wheels; comprising: detection means connected to the vehicle for detecting the transverse sliding angle of the vehicle body; and display means connected to the detection means for visually displaying the moving direction of the vehicle body on the basis of an output of the detection means; and the detection means comprises a first sensor for detecting the advancing speed of the vehicle, a second sensor for detecting the transverse acceleration of the vehicle, a third sensor for detecting the yawing velocity of the vehicle, and a processor for calculating the transverse sliding angle on the basis of the advancing speed, the transverse acceleration and the yawing velocity.

  4. Chemical Pollution from Transportation Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Starkman, Ernest S.

    1969-01-01

    Recent publicity on electrically powered vehicles notwithstanding, the gasoline engine will probably be the principal power plant for passenger cars for at least the next decade. Chemical pollutants discharged by the gasoline engine are now under partial control. Motor cars of 1968 and 1969 model discharge only about 30 percent as much carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons as do older models. In theory, carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen ultimately can be completely removed from gasoline engine exhaust. In order to accomplish this it would be necessary to modify cars to operate satisfactorily on a lean mixture and perhaps to use a catalyst in the exhaust system. Present designs of gas turbines for aircraft and for future projected application to ground vehicles yield pollutants (except for smoke) at levels below those of gasoline engines for a decade to come. It has also been shown possible to eliminate smoke as well as odor from the gas turbine. Thus with proper effort it is feasible to reduce pollution of the atmosphere due to transportation to an acceptable level, even if electrically or alternatively powered vehicles cannot be developed for a decade. PMID:4183827

  5. Chemical pollution from transportation vehicles.

    PubMed

    Starkman, E S

    1969-04-01

    Recent publicity on electrically powered vehicles notwithstanding, the gasoline engine will probably be the principal power plant for passenger cars for at least the next decade. Chemical pollutants discharged by the gasoline engine are now under partial control. Motor cars of 1968 and 1969 model discharge only about 30 percent as much carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons as do older models. In theory, carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen ultimately can be completely removed from gasoline engine exhaust. In order to accomplish this it would be necessary to modify cars to operate satisfactorily on a lean mixture and perhaps to use a catalyst in the exhaust system. Present designs of gas turbines for aircraft and for future projected application to ground vehicles yield pollutants (except for smoke) at levels below those of gasoline engines for a decade to come. It has also been shown possible to eliminate smoke as well as odor from the gas turbine. Thus with proper effort it is feasible to reduce pollution of the atmosphere due to transportation to an acceptable level, even if electrically or alternatively powered vehicles cannot be developed for a decade. PMID:4183827

  6. A computational environment for exhaust nozzle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsey, Andrew; Smith, Don

    1995-01-01

    The Nozzle Design Associate (NDA) is a computational environment for the design of jet engine exhaust nozzles for supersonic aircraft. NDA may be used either to design new aircraft or to design new nozzles that adapt existing aircraft so they may be reutilized for new missions. NDA was developed in a collaboration between computer scientists at Rutgers University and exhaust nozzle designers at General Electric (GE) Aircraft Engines and General Electric Corporate Research and Development. The NDA project has two principal goals: to provide a useful engineering tool for exhaust nozzle design, and to explore fundamental research issues that arise in the application of automated design optimization methods to realistic engineering problems.

  7. Meteorological assessment of SRM exhaust products' environmental impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental impact of solid rocket motor (SRM) exhaust products discharged into the free air stream upon the launching of space vehicles that depend upon SRM boosters to obtain large thrust was assessed. The emission of Al2O3 to the troposphere from the SRMs in each Shuttle launch is considered. The Al2O3 appears as particles suitable for heterogeneous nucleation of hydrochloric acid which under frequently occurring atmospheric conditions may form a highly acidic rain capable of damaging property and crops and of impacting upon the health of human and animal populations. The cloud processes leading to the formation of acid rain and the concentration of the acid that then reaches the ground, and the atmospheric situations that lead to the production of cloud and rain at and near a launch site, and the prediction of weather conditions that may permit or prohibit a launch operation are studied.

  8. Air pollution and lung cancer: diesel exhaust, coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, I.T.

    1984-03-01

    It is known, that cigarette smoking is by far the most important cause of lung cancer and that about a dozen occupational exposures are also established as causes of this disease. There has been continuing uncertainty about the role of general air pollution. During the past few years, this uncertainty has been compounded with anxiety that the increasing use of diesel-powered vehicles might lead to a deterioration in air quality and, with it, an increase in the incidence of lung cancer. The purpose of this paper is to assess the current role of air pollution as a factor in lung cancer and specifically the contribution of diesel exhaust emissions to the incidence of that disease.

  9. Proinflammatory effects of diesel exhaust nanoparticles on scleroderma skin cells.

    PubMed

    Mastrofrancesco, A; Alfè, M; Rosato, E; Gargiulo, V; Beatrice, C; Di Blasio, G; Zhang, B; Su, D S; Picardo, M; Fiorito, S

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of unknown etiology thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to verify whether environmental pollution from diesel engine exhaust nanoparticulate (DEP) of actually operating vehicles could play a role in the development of a rare immune-mediated disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc), in which the pathogenetic role of environment has been highlighted. The effects of carbon-based nanoparticulate collected at the exhaust of newer (Euro 5) and older (Euro 4) diesel engines on SSc skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts were evaluated in vitro by assessing the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 ? , IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?) and fibroblast chemical mediators (metalloproteases 2, 3, 7, 9, and 12; collagen types I and III; VEGF). DEP was shown to stimulate cytokine gene expression at a higher extent in SSc keratinocytes versus normal cells. Moreover, the mRNA gene expression of all MMPs, collagen types, and VEGF genes was significantly higher in untreated SSc fibroblasts versus controls. Euro 5 particle exposure increased the mRNA expression of MMP-2, -7, and -9 in SSc fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner and only at the highest concentration in normal cells. We suggest that environmental DEP could trigger the development of SSc acting on genetically hyperreactive cell systems. PMID:24982919

  10. Fast automotive diesel exhaust measurement using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, J.; Brunner, R.; Lambrecht, A.

    2013-12-01

    Step by step, US and European legislations enforce the further reduction of atmospheric pollution caused by automotive exhaust emissions. This is pushing automotive development worldwide. Fuel efficient diesel engines with SCRtechnology can impede NO2-emission by reduction with NH3 down to the ppm range. To meet the very low emission limits of the Euro6 resp. US NLEV (National Low Emission Vehicle) regulations, automotive manufacturers have to optimize continuously all phases of engine operation and corresponding catalytic converters. Especially nonstationary operation holds a high potential for optimizing gasoline consumption and further reducing of pollutant emissions. Test equipment has to cope with demanding sensitivity and speed requirements. In the past Fraunhofer IPM has developed a fast emission analyzer called DEGAS (Dynamic Exhaust Gas Analyzer System), based on cryogenically cooled lead salt lasers. These systems have been used at Volkswagen AG`s test benches for a decade. Recently, IPM has developed DEGAS-Next which is based on cw quantum cascade lasers and thermoelectrically cooled detectors. The system is capable to measure three gas components (i.e. NO, NO2, NH3) in two channels with a time resolution of 20 ms and 1 ppm detection limits. We shall present test data and a comparison with fast FTIR measurements.

  11. Proinflammatory Effects of Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles on Scleroderma Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mastrofrancesco, A.; Alfè, M.; Rosato, E.; Gargiulo, V.; Beatrice, C.; Di Blasio, G.; Zhang, B.; Su, D. S.; Picardo, M.; Fiorito, S.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of unknown etiology thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to verify whether environmental pollution from diesel engine exhaust nanoparticulate (DEP) of actually operating vehicles could play a role in the development of a rare immune-mediated disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc), in which the pathogenetic role of environment has been highlighted. The effects of carbon-based nanoparticulate collected at the exhaust of newer (Euro 5) and older (Euro 4) diesel engines on SSc skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts were evaluated in vitro by assessing the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?) and fibroblast chemical mediators (metalloproteases 2, 3, 7, 9, and 12; collagen types I and III; VEGF). DEP was shown to stimulate cytokine gene expression at a higher extent in SSc keratinocytes versus normal cells. Moreover, the mRNA gene expression of all MMPs, collagen types, and VEGF genes was significantly higher in untreated SSc fibroblasts versus controls. Euro 5 particle exposure increased the mRNA expression of MMP-2, -7, and -9 in SSc fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner and only at the highest concentration in normal cells. We suggest that environmental DEP could trigger the development of SSc acting on genetically hyperreactive cell systems. PMID:24982919

  12. Variability in onset of ECG changes indicative of ischemia after exposure to whole vs filtered diesel exhaust in hypertensive rats. Insight on mechanism?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of gases including C02, O2, N02, CO, aldehydes, benzene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as highly respirable particulate matter. DE is a significant component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution, which its...

  13. Cargo transfer vehicle RCS propellant contamination issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to address Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) RCS contamination issues and contribute to the resources necessary to optimize the vehicle and propulsion systems required in the CTV of the National Launch System (NLS) Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV). This study reviews the thruster-induced contaminants; their transportation from the thrust chamber to the vehicle, payload, and SSF; and the mechanism by which damage is inflicted on their components. The effect of both monopropellant and bipropellant RCS rocket exhaust plumes on a spacecraft and related functional surfaces has been the subject of considerable study over the years. It is recognized that the RCS rocket produces contaminants which can significantly degrade the performance of optical windows, solar cells, thermal-protective coatings, and other external vehicle components. This is particularly true when the rocket is operating in the pulse mode. The exhaust plume impingement pressure and heat-transfer phenomena also complicate the environment to which the vehicle and its functional surfaces are exposed, but are not addressed in this study. Bipropellant contamination presented several modes of damage to incident surfaces, which can pose a long-term deleterious consequence to CTV payloads and the Space Station Freedom (SSF). Monopropellant contamination did not pose any significant long-term issues other than the possibility of aniline deposition. The use of either bipropellant and monopropellant propulsion systems can have a design impact on the CTV propulsion system with respect to maneuvering operations in the proximity of SSF.

  14. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Each exhaust system must be supported to withstand the vibration and inertia loads to which it may be subjected in operation. (c) Parts of the system connected to components between which...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Each exhaust system must be supported to withstand the vibration and inertia loads to which it may be subjected in operation. (c) Parts of the system connected to components between which...

  16. Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Vuk, Carl T. (Denver, IA)

    2011-11-29

    An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

  17. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...prevent failure due to expansion by operating temperatures. (b) Each exhaust system must be supported to withstand the vibration and inertia loads to which it may be subjected in operation. (c) Parts of the system connected to components...

  18. An exploratory drilling exhaustion sequence plot program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuenemeyer, J.H.; Drew, L.J.

    1977-01-01

    The exhaustion sequence plot program computes the conditional area of influence for wells in a specified rectangular region with respect to a fixed-size deposit. The deposit is represented by an ellipse whose size is chosen by the user. The area of influence may be displayed on computer printer plots consisting of a maximum of 10,000 grid points. At each point, a symbol is presented that indicates the probability of that point being exhausted by nearby wells with respect to a fixed-size ellipse. This output gives a pictorial view of the manner in which oil fields are exhausted. In addition, the exhaustion data may be used to estimate the number of deposits remaining in a basin. ?? 1977.

  19. Dispersion of turbojet engine exhaust in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The dispersion of the exhaust of turbojet engines into the atmosphere is estimated by using a model developed for the mixing of a round jet with a parallel flow. The analysis is appropriate for determining the spread and dilution of the jet exhaust from the engine exit until it is entrained in the aircraft trailing vortices. Chemical reactions are not expected to be important and are not included in the flow model. Calculations of the dispersion of the exhaust plumes of three aircraft turbojet engines with and without afterburning at typical flight conditions are presented. Calculated average concentrations for the exhaust plume from a single engine jet fighter are shown to be in good agreement with measurements made in the aircraft wake during flight.

  20. Power and particle exhaust in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The status of power and particle exhaust research in tokamaks is reviewed in the light of ITER requirements. There is a sound basis for ITER`s nominal design positions; important directions for further research are identified.

  1. Taxation of exhaustible resources. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, P.; Heal, G.; Stiglitz, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of taxation on the intertemporal allocation of an exhaustible resource. A general framework within which a large variety of taxes can be analyzed is developed and then applied to a number of specific taxes. It is shown that there exists a pattern of taxation which can generate essentially any desired pattern of resource usage. Many tax policies, however, have effects markedly different both from the effects that these policies would have in the case of produced commodities and from those which they are designed (or widely thought) to have. For instance, if extraction costs are zero, a depletion allowance at a constant rate (widely thought to encourage the extraction of resources) has absolutely no effect; its gradual removal (usually thought to be preferable to a sudden removal) leads to faster rates of depletion (and lower prices) now, but higher prices in the future; which its sudden and unanticipated removal has absolutely no distortionary effect on the pattern of extraction. More generally, it is shown that the effects of tax structure on the patterns of extraction are critically dependent on expectations concerning future taxation. The changes in tax structure that have occurred in the past fifty years are of the kind that, if they were anticipated, (or if similar further changes are expected to occur in the future) lead to excessively fast exploitation of natural resources. However, if it is believed that current tax policies (including rates) will persist indefinitely, the current tax structure would lead to excessive conservationism. Thus, whether in fact current tax policies have lead to excessive conservationism is a moot question.

  2. Experimental research in the use of electrets in measuring effluents from rocket exhaust and a review of standard air quality measuring devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1976-01-01

    Seven standard types of measuring devices used to obtain the chemical composition of rocket exhaust effluents were discussed. The electrets, a new measuring device, are investigated and compared with established measuring techniques. The preliminary results obtained show that electrets have multipollutant measuring capabilities, simplicity of deployment, speed of assessment or analysis, and may be an important and valuable tool in measuring pollutants from space vehicle rocket exhaust.

  3. Revisiting Immune Exhaustion During HIV Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alka Khaitan; Derya Unutmaz

    2011-01-01

    Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection, yet the underlying triggers of immune activation remain unclear.\\u000a Persistent antigenic stimulation during HIV infection may also lead to immune exhaustion, a phenomenon in which effector T\\u000a cells become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. Several markers of immune exhaustion, such\\u000a as PD-1, LAG-3, Tim-3, and CTLA-4, which are

  4. Compact high-speed MWIR spectrometer applied to monitor CO2 exhaust dynamics from a turbojet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares-Herrero, R.; Vergara, G.; Gutiérrez Álvarez, R.; Fernández Montojo, C.; Gómez, L. J.; Villamayor, V.; Baldasano Ramírez, A.; Montojo, M. T.; Archilla, V.; Jiménez, A.; Mercader, D.; González, A.; Entero, A.

    2013-05-01

    Dfgfdg Due to international environmental regulations, aircraft turbojet manufacturers are required to analyze the gases exhausted during engine operation (CO, CO2, NOx, particles, unburned hydrocarbons (aka UHC), among others).Standard procedures, which involve sampling the gases from the exhaust plume and the analysis of the emissions, are usually complex and expensive, making a real need for techniques that allow a more frequent and reliable emissions measurements, and a desire to move from the traditional gas sampling-based methods to real time and non-intrusive gas exhaust analysis, usually spectroscopic. It is expected that the development of more precise and faster optical methods will provide better solutions in terms of performance/cost ratio. In this work the analysis of high-speed infrared emission spectroscopy measurements of plume exhaust are presented. The data was collected during the test trials of commercial engines carried out at Turbojet Testing Center-INTA. The results demonstrate the reliability of the technique for studying and monitoring the dynamics of the exhausted CO2 by the observation of the infrared emission of hot gases. A compact (no moving parts), high-speed, uncooled MWIR spectrometer was used for the data collection. This device is capable to register more than 5000 spectra per second in the infrared band ranging between 3.0 and 4.6 microns. Each spectrum is comprised by 128 spectral subbands with aband width of 60 nm. The spectrometer operated in a passive stand-off mode and the results from the measurements provided information of both the dynamics and the concentration of the CO2 during engine operation.

  5. Modeling Languages Refine Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Cincinnati, Ohio s TechnoSoft Inc. is a leading provider of object-oriented modeling and simulation technology used for commercial and defense applications. With funding from Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts issued by Langley Research Center, the company continued development on its adaptive modeling language, or AML, originally created for the U.S. Air Force. TechnoSoft then created what is now known as its Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Environment, or IDEA, which can be used to design a variety of vehicles and machinery. IDEA's customers include clients in green industries, such as designers for power plant exhaust filtration systems and wind turbines.

  6. The Appearance of a Boric Oxide Exhaust Cloud from a Turbojet Engine Operating on Trimethylborate Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Albert M; Kaufman, Warner B

    1956-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on the size and density of the boric oxide exhaust cloud from a J47-25 turbojet engine operating on trimethylborate fuel at sea-level static condition. Movies and still photographs were taken from the ground and from a helicopter. Objects could not be perceived through the main body of the cloud at distances up to 800 feet from the engine. Data are included on the amount of fallout from the cloud and the concentration of boric oxide in the cloud. A radiation detection device was set up to determine whether the glowing oxide particles would be more susceptible than hydrocarbon exhaust gases to this type of tracking device. The device showed an increase in radiation by a factor of 3 for trimethylborate over that for JP-4.

  7. Environmental policy constraints for acidic exhaust gas scrubber discharges from ships.

    PubMed

    Ülpre, H; Eames, I

    2014-11-15

    Increasingly stringent environmental legislation on sulphur oxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels onboard ships (International Maritime Organization (IMO) Regulation 14) can be met by either refining the fuel to reduce sulphur content or by scrubbing the exhaust gases. Commonly used open loop marine scrubbers discharge warm acidic exhaust gas wash water into the sea, depressing its pH. The focus on this paper is on the physics and chemistry behind the disposal of acidic discharges in seawater. The IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 59/24/Add.1 Annex 9) requires the wash water to reach a pH greater than 6.5 at a distance of 4m from the point of discharge. We examine the engineering constraints, specifically size and number of ports, to identify the challenges of meeting regulatory compliance. PMID:25284442

  8. Diffusivity of Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quastel, Jeremy; Valkó, Benedek

    2013-10-01

    We consider one-component lattice gases with local dynamics and a stationary product Bernoulli measure on {{Z}^d}. We study the scaling exponents of the space-time correlations of the system in equilibrium at a given density. We consider a variance-like quantity computed from the correlations called the diffusivity (connected to the Green-Kubo formula) and give rigorous upper and lower bounds on it that depend on the dimension and the local behavior of the macroscopic flux function. Our results identify the cases in which the system scales superdiffusively; these cases have been predicted before, using non-rigorous scaling arguments. Our main tool is the resolvent method: the estimates are the result of a careful analysis of a complicated variational problem.

  9. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  10. Vehicle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Perspectives of the subpanel on expendable launch vehicle structures and cryotanks are: (1) new materials which provide the primary weight savings effect on vehicle mass/size; (2) today's investment; (3) typically 10-20 years to mature and fully characterize new materials.

  11. Vehicle systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Bales; Tom Modlin; Jack Suddreth; Tom Wheeler; Darrel R. Tenney; Ernest O. Bayless; W. Barry Lisagor; Donald A. Bolstad; Harold Croop; J. Dyer

    1993-01-01

    Perspectives of the subpanel on expendable launch vehicle structures and cryotanks are: (1) new materials which provide the primary weight savings effect on vehicle mass\\/size; (2) today's investment; (3) typically 10-20 years to mature and fully characterize new materials.

  12. 40 CFR 89.416 - Raw exhaust gas flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Raw exhaust gas flow. 89.416 Section 89.416 Protection...COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.416 Raw exhaust gas flow. The exhaust gas flow shall be...

  13. 40 CFR 89.416 - Raw exhaust gas flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Raw exhaust gas flow. 89.416 Section 89.416 Protection...COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.416 Raw exhaust gas flow. The exhaust gas flow shall be...

  14. 46 CFR 182.430 - Engine exhaust pipe installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...come in contact with an exhaust pipe. (b) Exhaust gas must...normal conditions. (d) Pipes used for wet exhaust lines...the action of oil, acid, and heat, has a wall thickness sufficient...practicable. (f) Where an exhaust pipe passes through a...

  15. 46 CFR 119.430 - Engine exhaust pipe installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...come in contact with an exhaust pipe. (b) Exhaust gas must...normal conditions. (d) Pipes used for wet exhaust lines...the action of oil, acid, and heat, and has a wall thickness...practicable. (f) Where an exhaust pipe passes through a...

  16. 8, 82738326, 2008 Greenhouse gases

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 8, 8273­8326, 2008 Greenhouse gases from satellite ­ Part 2: Methane O. Schneising et al.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Three years of greenhouse gas column-averaged dry­8326, 2008 Greenhouse gases from satellite ­ Part 2: Methane O. Schneising et al. Title Page Abstract

  17. 8, 54775536, 2008 Greenhouse gases

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 8, 5477­5536, 2008 Greenhouse gases from satellite ­ Part 1: CO2 O. Schneising et al. Title.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Three years of greenhouse gas column-averaged dry­5536, 2008 Greenhouse gases from satellite ­ Part 1: CO2 O. Schneising et al. Title Page Abstract

  18. 5, 213242, 2008 Greenhouse gases

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 5, 213­242, 2008 Greenhouse gases German bog S. Glatzel et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Environmental controls of greenhouse gas Correspondence to: S. Glatzel (stephan.glatzel@uni-rostock.de) 213 #12;BGD 5, 213­242, 2008 Greenhouse gases

  19. Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program was suspended May 2011. It was a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., could report to the Energy Information Administration, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

  20. Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David N. Blauch

    Applets dealing with the meaning of the Maxwell distribution of gases and pressure of gases are discussed. The Maxwell distribution experiment allow the user to explore the most probable speed of gas molecules. The pressure experiment allows the user to explore the effects of size and mass on collision rate, direction, and relative speed of gas molecules within a fixed volume.

  1. High Temperature Corrosion of Cast Alloys in Exhaust Environments. II—Cast Stainless Steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Tholence; M. Norell

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the oxidation of two cast stainless steels in synthetic diesel and gasoline exhaust gases.\\u000a One alloy was ferritic (Fe18Cr1.4Nb2.1Mn0.32C) and one austenitic (Fe20Cr9Ni1.9Nb2.7W0.47C). Polished sections were exposed,\\u000a mostly for 50 h, at temperatures between 650 and 1,050 °C. The oxidation product was characterized by means of SEM\\/EDX, AES,\\u000a and XRD. Inter-dendritic non-Cr carbides initiated thick oxides. The

  2. Physico-chemical characteristics of particles emitted from vehicles using gasoline with methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ardeleanu, A.; Loranger, S.; Gareau, L.; Zayed, J. [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada); L`Esperance, G.; Kennedy, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), an organic derivative of manganese, has been used exclusively in Canada since 1990 as an antiknock agent in unleaded gasoline. Its combustion leads to the formation and the release to the atmosphere of oxides of Mn, especially manganese tetraoxide or hausmanite. The aim of this research is to estimate the quantity of Mn oxides emitted at the tailpipe and to determine the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles. A total of nine different vehicles were used, with engine sizes varying from 2 to 5 liters and previously driven from 3,500 to 124,000 km. The tests were carried out with urban (UDDS -- Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule) and highway (HWFET -- Highway Fuel Economy Test) cycles based on the Federal Test Procedure. Particles to be analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for size distribution and chemical composition were collected at the end of the tailpipe using a pump and 0.4 {micro}m Teflon filters. Other solid particles were collected by bubbling the exhaust gases through water and the Mn concentrations were measured by neutron activation analysis. The Mn emissions from the vehicles varied from 4 to 52% which is of the same order of magnitude as previous studies on the subject. A positive correlation between % emission and vehicle mileage was obtained for the urban cycle only with a coefficient of 0.57 (p < 0.05) Scanning electron microscopy enabled the identification of Mn oxide particles bound to different elements such as S, Fe, Cr, Si and Al. The size of the agglomerates varied from 0.2 to 30 {micro}m. Almost 50% of the Mn particles were found to be in the respirable fraction (<0.5 {micro}m).

  3. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.

  4. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    DOEpatents

    Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Driscoll, James Joshua (Dunlap, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Peterborough, GB)

    2008-05-13

    A system of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The system includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream may be converted into ammonia.

  5. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    DOEpatents

    Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Driscoll, James Joshua (Dunlap, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Helpston, GB)

    2010-10-12

    A method of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The method includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream my be converted into ammonia.

  6. Gases in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2003-12-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health, respectively. For example, ˜30% of the world's population (1,570 million) is thought to be at risk of iodine-deficiency disorders that impair mental development (WHO, 1996). The main source of iodine to land is the supply of volatile iodine compounds produced in the ocean and then transferred to the atmosphere via the air-surface interface. The flux of these marine iodine species to the atmosphere is also thought to be important in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere by the production of the iodine oxide radical ( Alicke et al., 1999). A further example is that the net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean, ˜1.7±0.5 Gt C yr-1, represents ˜30% of the annual release of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere (IPCC, 2001). This net flux is superimposed on a huge annual flux (90 Gt C yr-1) of CO2 that is cycled "naturally" between the ocean and the atmosphere. The long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2 is recognized as transfer to the ocean from the atmosphere. A final example is the emission of volatile sulfur, in the form of DMS, from the oceans. Not only is an oceanic flux from the oceans needed to balance the loss of sulfur (a bioessential element) from the land via weathering, it has also been proposed as having a major control on climate due to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (Charlson et al., 1987). Indeed, the existence of DMS and CH3I has been used as evidence in support of the Gaia hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979).There are at least four main processes that affect the concentration of gases in the water column: biological production and consumption, photochemistry, air-sea exchange, and vertical mixing. We will not discuss the effect of vertical mixing on gases in seawater and instead refer the reader to Chapter 6.08. Nor will we consider the deeper oceans as this region is discussed in chapters on benthic fluxes and early diagenesis (Chapter 6.11), the biological pump (Chapter 6.04), and the oceanic calcium carbonate cycle (Chapter 6.19) all in this volume. We will discuss the cycling of gases in surface oceans, including the thermocline, and in particular concentrate on the exchange of various volatile compounds across the air-sea interface.As we will show, while much is known about the cycling of gases such as CO2 and DMS in the water column, frustratingly little is known about many of the chemical species for which the ocean is believed to be a significant source to the atmosphere. We suspect the passage of time will reveal that the cycling of volatile compounds containing selenium and iodine may well prove as complex as that of DMS. Early studies of DMS assumed that it was produced from a precursor compound, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), known to be present in some species of phytoplankton, and that the main sink in the water column was exchange across the air-sea interface. We now know that DMSP and DMS are both rapidly cycled in water column by a complex interaction between phytoplankton, microzooplankton, bacteria, and viruses (see Figure 1). Some detailed process experiments have revealed that only ˜10% of the total DMS produced (and less than 1.3% of the DMSP produced) is transferred to the atmosphere, with the bulk of the DMS and DMSP, either being recycled in the water column or photo-oxidized (Archer et al., 2002b).

  7. [Measurement of exhaust gases of cars in the neighbourhood of roads (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wanner, H U; Deuber, A; Satish, J; Meier, M; Sommer, H

    1976-07-01

    Air samples were collected in plastic bags simultaneously at various measuring points in the close range of streets. When examining the various bag materials, Teflon bags showed the smallest deviations in direct analyses and in analyses of up to two hours after the drawing of samples. The following methods were used for the analysis of the air samples collected in the bags: coulometry for CO and SO2, chemiluminescence for NO/NO2, chromotropic acid for CH2O and flame ionization for hydrocarbon. The various components were measured close to a highway and near streets in residential and business areas. PMID:63198

  8. The heterogeneous generation of N2O from exhaust gases of combustion: A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, M.; Rossi, M. J.

    The heterogeneous reaction of NO, SO2 and O2 in the presence of condensed or adsorbed H2O results in high yields of N2O under conditions mimicking flue gas from fossil fuel combustion. We observed a strong influence of the nature of the substrate surface on the rate of N2O formation. The maximum rate of N2O formation of 350 ppm h-1 occurred on soot and fly ash at relative humidities approaching 100% at 368K final yields of 80-100% N2O. The mechanism corresponds to a complex multiphase system in which NO2 seems to be a key species. The observed abundance of NO2 does not correspond to the one predicted by the simple mechanism by Lyon and Cole (1988).

  9. The simulation of condensation removal of a heavy metal from exhaust gases onto sorbent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A.; Hall, M.J

    2003-07-01

    A numerical model BAEROSOL for solving the general dynamic equation (GDE) of aerosols is presented. The goal was to model the capture of volatilized metals by sorbents under incinerator-like conditions. The model is based on algorithms presented by Jacobson and Turco [Aerosol Science and Technology 22 (1995) 73]. A hybrid size bin was used to model growth and formation of particles from the continuum phase and the coagulation of existing particles. Condensation and evaporation growth were calculated in a moving size bin approach, where coagulation and nucleation was modeled in the fixed size bin model of the hybrid grid. To account for the thermodynamic equilibrium in the gas phase, a thermodynamic equilibrium code CET89 was implemented. The particle size distribution (PSD) calculated with the model was then compared to analytical solutions provided for growth, coagulation and both combined. Finally, experimental findings by Rodriguez and Hall [Waste Management 21 (2001) 589-607] were compared to the PSD predicted by the developed model and the applicability of the model under incineration conditions is discussed.

  10. Experiments on the reduction of nitric oxide from exhaust gases by selective non-catalytic reactions 

    E-print Network

    Narney, John Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    programmed to allow a ramp cooling of I 'K per minute. This is important when cooling the reactor to avoid distorting the metal reactor tube by uneven or rapid cooling. The reactor itself is a 1" internal diameter schedule 80 tube of inconel 600 which...

  11. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from gasohol and ethanol vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rui de Abrantes; João Vicente de Assunção; Célia Regina Pesquero; Roy Edward Bruns; Raimundo Paiva Nóbrega

    2009-01-01

    The exhaust emission of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) considered toxic to human health were investigated on two spark ignition light duty vehicles, one being gasohol (Gasohol, in Brazil, is the generic denomination for mixtures of pure gasoline plus 20–25% of anhydrous ethyl alcohol fuel (AEAF).)-fuelled and the other a flexible-fuel vehicle fuelled with hydrated ethanol. The influence of fuel

  12. A stochastic control strategy for hybrid electric vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chan-Chiao Lin; Huei Pengl; J. W. Grizzle

    2004-01-01

    The supervisory control strategy of a hybrid vehicle coordinates the operation of vehicle sub-systems to achieve performance targets such as maximizing fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions. This high-level control problem is commonly referred as the power management problem. In the past, many supervisory control strategies were developed on the basis of a few pre-defined driving cycles, using intuition and

  13. Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pitstick, M.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

  14. Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pitstick, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

  15. Diffusion algorithms and data reduction routine for onsite launch predictions for the transport of Titan 3 C exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Hamilton, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion algorithms have been specialized for the prediction of the surface impact for the dispersive transport of the exhaust effluents from the launch of a Titan 3 vehicle. This specialization permits these transport predictions to be made at the launch range in real time so that the effluent monitoring teams can optimize their monitoring grids. Basically, the data reduction routine requires just the meteorology profiles for the thermodynamics and kinematics of the atmosphere as an input. These profiles are graphed along with the resulting exhaust cloud rise history, the center line concentrations and dosages, and the hydrogen chloride isopleths.

  16. Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

    2011-11-01

    The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) – including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances – were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

  17. Hybrid propulsion systems for motor vehicles with predominantly intermittent modes of operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartsch, H.; Helling, J.; Schreck, H.

    1977-01-01

    A small delivery vehicle was equipped with a flywheel-hybrid drive and compared in test stand and driving tests with a conventional drive vehicle. It turned out that with the hybrid drive, energy can be saved and exhaust emissions can be reduced.

  18. Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Hybrid Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

    2007-12-01

    Using advanced materials, thermoelectric conversion of efficiencies on the order of 20% may be possible in the near future. Thermoelectric generators offer potential to increase vehicle fuel economy by recapturing a portion of the waste heat from the engine exhaust and generating electricity to power vehicle accessory or traction loads.

  19. Discharges In Electronegative Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.

    2008-10-01

    This talk will come in three parts. First, the early work in electronegative plasmas, principally by Emeleus and co-workers in Iodine, and by Massey and co-workers in Oxygen. They were at opposite ends of the ``spectrum'' of electronegativity - the ratio of negative ion density to electron density. Secondly, we cover in more detail work in Oxygen, where in retrospect we know that too many parameters were included to reveal the underlying structure of electronegative plasmas. That is associated with Edgley and von Engel, and later with Ferriera and co-workers. From there until the present day we describe work coming from different directions, showing that by questioning prior assumptions, we have arrived at our present understanding. The basic elements are, that in general there is a negative ion core, surrounded by a conventional plasma, and that at low pressures the situation is significantly different from higher pressures. The talk will seek to avoid mathematical complexity and concentrate on the physics, explaining the reason for previous differences, and show the way forward for a more Complete understanding of the very complex problem of strongly electronegative plasmas and their structure when diluted by rare gases. All of this involves a multiplicity of ion species of both signs, and a variety of reaction rates.

  20. Monitoring Engine Vibrations And Spectrum Of Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Carol L.; Randall, Michael R.; Reinert, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time computation of intensities of peaks in visible-light emission spectrum of exhaust combined with real-time spectrum analysis of vibrations into developmental monitoring technique providing up-to-the-second information on conditions of critical bearings in engine. Conceived to monitor conditions of bearings in turbopump suppling oxygen to Space Shuttle main engine, based on observations that both vibrations in bearings and intensities of visible light emitted at specific wavelengths by exhaust plume of engine indicate wear and incipient failure of bearings. Applicable to monitoring "health" of other machinery via spectra of vibrations and electromagnetic emissions from exhausts. Concept related to one described in "Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage", (MFS-29734).

  1. Acid droplet generation in SRM exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    A free energy analysis is applied to the co-condensation/evaporation of H2O and HCl vapors on wettable particles in open air in order to model droplet nucleation in solid rocket motor (SRM) exhaust clouds. Formulations are defined for the free energy change, the drop radius, the saturation ratio, the total number of molecules, and the mean molecular radius in solution, as well as the molecular volume and the concentration range. The free energy release in the phase transition for the AL2O3 nuclei in the SRM exhaust is examined as a function of the HCl molefraction and nucleating particle radius, based on Titan III launch exhaust cloud conditions 90 sec after ignition. The most efficient droplet growth is determined to occur at an HCl molefraction of 0.082 and a particle radius of 0.0000013 cm, i.e. a molality of 5.355.

  2. Simulation of a hydrocarbon fueled scramjet exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, J.

    1982-01-01

    Exhaust nozzle flow fields for a fully integrated, hydrocarbon burning scramjet were calculated for flight conditions of M (undisturbed free stream) = 4 at 6.1 km altitude and M (undisturbed free stream) = 6 at 30.5 km altitude. Equilibrium flow, frozen flow, and finite rate chemistry effects are considered. All flow fields were calculated by method of characteristics. Finite rate chemistry results were evaluated by a one dimensional code (Bittker) using streamtube area distributions extracted from the equilibrium flow field, and compared to very slow artificial rate cases for the same streamtube area distribution. Several candidate substitute gas mixtures, designed to simulate the gas dynamics of the real engine exhaust flow, were examined. Two mixtures are found to give excellent simulations of the specified exhaust flow fields when evaluated by the same method of characteristics computer code.

  3. Two stroke engine exhaust emissions separator

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A separator for substantially resolving at least one component of a process stream, such as from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. The separator includes a body defining a chamber therein. A nozzle housing is located proximate the chamber. An exhaust inlet is in communication with the nozzle housing and the chamber. A nozzle assembly is positioned in the nozzle housing and includes a nozzle moveable within and relative to the nozzle housing. The nozzle includes at least one passage formed therethrough such that a process stream entering the exhaust inlet connection passes through the passage formed in the nozzle, which imparts a substantially rotational flow to the process stream as it enters the chamber. A positioning member is configured to position the nozzle relative to the nozzle housing in response to changes in process stream pressure to adjust flowrate of said process stream entering into the chamber.

  4. Laser beam probing of jet exhaust turbulence.

    PubMed

    Hogge, C B; Visinsky, W L

    1971-04-01

    A He-Ne (6328-A) laser beam was passed through the highly turbulent region in the exhaust of a jet engine (J-57 with afterburner). Estimates of a structure constant that would characterize the turbulence in the exhaust are made from the beam spread of focused and collimated beams. The structure constant obtained in this manner is then compared with that determined from scintillation measurements of a (10.6-micro) beam and with the results of hot-wire anemometer readings taken in the exhaust. The various methods yield results for the structure constant that are in good agreement (typically a structure constant of the order of 3 x 10(-5) m(-?)). PMID:20094556

  5. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  6. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  7. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  8. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  9. Investigating and Using Biomass Gases

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eric Benson

    2012-07-03

    In this activity, learners will be introduced to biomass gasification and will generate their own biomass gases. Learners generate these gases everyday on their own and find it quite amusing, but this time they’ll do it by heating wood pellets or wood splints in a test tube. They will collect the resulting gases and use the gas to roast a marshmallow. Learners will also evaluate which biomass fuel is the best either according to their own criteria or by examining the volume of gas produced by each type of fuel.

  10. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  11. Generation and characterization of radiolabeled diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, J S; Sun, J D; Lopez, J A; Wolf, I; Wolff, R K; McClellan, R O

    1984-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks associated with increased use of diesel engines, information is needed on the biological fate of inhaled diesel exhaust components. Appropriately radiolabeled exhaust produced by burning radiolabeled fuel could be used to gain this information. The purpose of this study was to characterize different radiolabeled diesel exhausts with respect to their potential use in studies of the biological fate of exhaust carbon particles and particle-associated organic compounds (particle extracts). A single-cylinder diesel engine was used to burn diesel fuel containing trace amounts of 14C-labeled hexadecane, dotriacontane, benzene, phenanthrene or benzo(a)pyrene. Greater than 98% of the 14C in all additives was converted to volatile materials upon combustion. The remainder was distributed in varying amounts between the carbon particles and particle extracts. Aromatic additives labeled carbon particles more efficiently than aliphatic additives. Column chromatography of the particle extracts showed that, in most cases, the majority of the radioactivity eluted in fractions identical to the specific fuel additive employed, suggesting that a large amount of the particle-associated organic compounds consisted of uncombusted fuel constituents. Applying an electrical load to the engine-electrical generator increased carbon particle radioactivity, but had variable effects on the amount of radioactivity in the particle extracts. 67Ga-tetramethylheptanedione was also studied as a fuel additive to label carbon particles. 67Ga was incorporated into the exhaust particles and lung deposition of particles in rats was found to be approximately 10%. However, the 67Ga-radiolabel was found to separate from the particles in vivo, making it an unsuitable radiolabel for studying the long-term lung retention of diesel exhaust carbonaceous particles. PMID:6205579

  12. On-road measurement of particle emission in the exhaust plume of a diesel passenger car.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Rainer; Scheer, Volker; Casati, Roberto; Benter, Thorsten

    2003-09-15

    Particle size distributions were measured under real world dilution conditions in the exhaust plume of a diesel passenger car closely followed by a mobile laboratory on a high speed test track. Under carefully controlled conditions the exhaust plume was continuously sampled and analyzed inside the mobile laboratory. Exhaust particle size distribution data were recorded together with exhaust gas concentrations, i.e., CO, CO2, and NO(x), and compared to data obtained from the same vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer. Good agreement was found for the soot mode particles which occurred at a geometric mean diameter of approximately 50 nm and a total particle emission rate of 10(14) particles km(-1). Using 350 ppm high sulfur fuel and the standard oxidation catalyst a bimodal size distribution with a nucleation mode at 10 nm was observed at car velocities of 100 km h(-1) and 120 km h(-1), respectively. Nucleation mode particles were only present if high sulfur fuel was used with the oxidation catalyst installed. This is in agreement with prior work that these particles are of semivolatile nature and originate from the nucleation of sulfates formed inside the catalyst. Temporal effects of the occurrence of nucleation mode particles during steady-state cruising and the dynamical behavior during acceleration and deceleration were investigated. PMID:14524437

  13. Prototype Variable-Area Exhaust Nozzle Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gangbring

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center s Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for adaptive aeropropulsion components has resulted in the design of a prototype variable-area exhaust nozzle (see the preceding photograph). The novel design exploits the potential of smart materials to improve the performance of existing fixed-area exhaust nozzles by introducing new capabilities for adaptive shape control, vibration damping, and flow manipulation. The design utilizes two different smart materials: shape memory alloy wires as actuators and magnetorheological fluids as damper locks.

  14. Exhaust gas turbocharger for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Regar, K.N.

    1982-01-26

    An exhaust gas turbocharger is described for a diesel engine, the turbocharger including a compressor, an exhaust gas turbine, and a shaft joining the compressor and turbine. A flywheel is mounted on another shaft, and a device, such as a freewheel, alternatively couples and uncouples the flywheel shaft and turbocharger shaft. The flywheel shaft is in two sections, and a summation mechanism, such as a planetary gear arrangement, is between the two shaft sections. The summation mechanism is controlled by a hydrostatic device and/or an electronic device. A brake is provided for selectively preventing rotation of the flywheel shaft section between the summation mechanism and the turbocharger shaft.

  15. Gradient search with autonomous underwater vehicles using scalar measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Burian; Dana Yoerger; Albert Bradley; Hanumant Singh

    1996-01-01

    We examine how AUVs can be used to locate features of interest from scalar measurements without exhaustive search. It is first shown how the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) was used to successfully locate the deepest part of a pond. ABE computed the total water depth by combining the computed vehicle depth with the return of a single beam sonar altimeter.

  16. Proposal for a Solar-Laser-Driven Vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Yabe; Hirokazu Oozono; Kazumoto Taniguchi; Tomomasa Ohkubo; Shou Miyazaki; Choijil Baasandash; Shigeaki Uchida

    2004-01-01

    We propose an automobile engine driven by water-laser coupling without fuel. The automobile can load a solarpumped fiber laser or can be driven by ground-based lasers. The vehicle will be useful on other planets because the piston is in a closed system and the water will not be exhausted into a vacuum. In the preliminary experiment, we succeeded in driving

  17. Drivers’ psychological and physical reactions after motor vehicle accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L. Lucas

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if drivers that reported being in at least one motor vehicle accident (MVA) within the past five years would report greater psychological and physical reactions than drivers not being in an accident. Of particular interest were psychological conditions such as greater fears for personal safety, worries about driving, driver stress, exhaustion, and

  18. CENTRAL CAROLINA VEHICLE PARTICULATE EMISSION STUDY (FINAL REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study to characterize the exhaust emissions from a light-duty fleet of in-use vehicles representative of central North Carolina was conducted in 1999 during both a winter phase (February) and a summer phase (June - July). Summer temperatures averaged 78 F, while the winter te...

  19. ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICULATE AND GAS PHASE CONTRIBUTIONS TO VASCULAR TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicular emissions (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 days, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein, 3-nitrotyrosine, and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  20. Process of selectively desulfurizing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Doerges, A.; Kempf, G.; Schlauer, J.

    1981-10-27

    In a process of selectively desulfurizing gases which contain hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide comprising scrubbing the gases with an aqueous potassium carbonate solution under superatmospheric pressure and at temperatures of about 100* C., regenerating the laden scrubbing solution and recycling the regenerated scrubbing solution, the improvement wherein the gases to be purified are scrubbed with an aqueous potassium carbonate solution so as to maintain a mass ratio of 1.0 to 3.0 vals (Gram equivalents) of alkali in the solution per mole of co2 and h2s in the gases to be purified, the laden scrubbing liquor is subsequently regenerated by being stripped with a gas in which a co2 partial pressure above 0.2 bar is maintained, and the so regenerated scrubbing solution is recycled.

  1. Process of selectively desulfurizing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schlauer, J.; Kempf, G.; Doerges, A.

    1981-10-27

    This process selectively desulfurizes gases which contain hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. It is comprised of scrubbing the gases with an aqueous potassium carbonate solution under superatmospheric pressure and at temperatures of ca. 100 c. The laden scrubbing solution is regenerated and the regenerated scrubbing solution is recycled. In turn, the gases to be purified are scrubbed with an aqueous potassium carbonate solution so as to maintain a mass ratio of 1.0 to 3.0 vals (gram equivalents) of alkali in the solution per mole of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in the gases to be purified. The laden scrubbing liquor is subsequently regenerated by being stripped with a gas in which a CO/sub 2/ partial pressure above 0.2 bar is maintained, and the regenerated scrubbing solution is recycled. 7 claims.

  2. Degenerate quantum gases of strontium

    E-print Network

    Stellmer, Simon; Killian, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Degenerate quantum gases of alkaline-earth-like elements open new opportunities in research areas ranging from molecular physics to the study of strongly correlated systems. These experiments exploit the rich electronic structure of these elements, which is markedly different from the one of other species for which quantum degeneracy has been attained. Specifically, alkaline-earth-like atoms, such as strontium, feature metastable triplet states, narrow intercombination lines, and a non-magnetic, closed-shell ground state. This review covers the creation of quantum degenerate gases of strontium and the first experiments performed with this new system. It focuses on laser-cooling and evaporation schemes, which enable the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of all strontium isotopes, and shows how they are used for the investigation of optical Feshbach resonances, the study of degenerate gases loaded into an optical lattice, as well as the coherent creation of Sr_2 molecules.

  3. MRI using hyperpolarized noble gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-U. Kauczor; R. Surkau; T. Roberts

    1998-01-01

    .   The aim of this study was to review the physical basis of MRI using hyperpolarized noble gases as well as the present status\\u000a of preclinical and clinical applications. Non-radioactive noble gases with a nuclear spin 1\\/2 (He-3, Xe-129) can be hyperpolarized\\u000a by optical pumping. Polarization is transferred from circularly polarized laser light to the noble-gas atoms via alkali-metal\\u000a vapors

  4. Hybrid and electronic vehicles: Volume 4, Number 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cupp, C.C.; Levine, P.

    1998-06-01

    Hybrid vehicles combine the best of gasoline, electricity and energy storage systems. Government and industry research and development programs are working on the multimillion dollar program to develop a fleet of experimental hybrid vehicles. The DARPA Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Technology program is pursuing research, development and demonstrations of technologies for electric and hybrid vehicles that address military missions, modernization and cost mitigation. The hybrid technology is equally important to both military and industry. Environmental regulations motivate both to find alternatives to the traditional vehicle. In an effort to comply with these strict regulations research efforts focus on building engines with high efficiency and low exhaust emission. In addition to improving air quality, it is also desirable to build inexpensive, reliable, long lasting, and compact vehicles. Formidable technological barriers exist, however, to achieving performance cost and reliability.

  5. Achieving Acceptable Air Quality: Some Reflections on Controlling Vehicle Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, J. G.; Heywood, J. B.; Sawyer, R. F.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    1993-07-01

    Motor vehicle emissions have been and are being controlled in an effort to abate urban air pollution. This article addresses the question: Will the vehicle exhaust emission control and fuel requirements in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and the California Air Resources Board regulations on vehicles and fuels have a significant impact? The effective control of in-use vehicle emissions is the key to a solution to the motor vehicle part of the urban air pollution problem for the next decade or so. It is not necessary, except perhaps in Southern California, to implement extremely low new car emission standards before the end of the 20th century. Some of the proposed gasoline volatility and composition changes in reformulated gasoline will produce significant reductions in vehicle emissions (for example, reduced vapor pressure, sulfur, and light olefin and improved high end volatility), whereas others (such as substantial oxygenate addition and aromatics reduction) will not.

  6. Hydrodynamics of unitary Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ryan E.

    Unitary fermi gases have been widely studied as they provide a tabletop archetype for re- search on strongly coupled many body systems and perfect fluids. Research into unitary fermi gases can provide insight into may other strongly interacting systems including high temperature superconductor, quark-gluon plasmas, and neutron stars. Within the unitary regime, the equilib- rium transport coefficients and thermodynamic properties are universal functions of density and temperature. Thus, unitary fermi gases provide a archetype to study nonperturbative many-body physics, which is of fundamental significance and crosses several fields. This thesis reports on two topics regarding unitary fermi gases. A recent string theory conjecture gives a lower bound for the dimensionless ratio of shear viscosity of entropy, ?/s ? 4pi /kb . Unitary fermi gases are a candidate for prefect fluids, yet ?/s is well above the string theory bound. Using a stochastic formulation of hydrodynamics, we calculate a lower bound for this ratio accounting for the momentum dissipation from fluctuations. This lower bound is in good agreement with both theoretical and experimental results. The second question addressed is the simulation of elliptic flow. Elliptic flow, first observed in 2002, is a characteristic of strongly coupled systems and has been studied in both quark-gluon plasmas and unitary fermi gases. As such, simulations of these systems are of interest. We test a variety of lattice Boltzmann models and compare the simulation results to the theoretical and experimental findings.

  7. On-line monitoring methodology for determining E/sub r/ in carbon adsorber exhaust air

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    Methodology was developed to determine the concentrations of US OSHA-regulated and odorous gaseous species in the adsorber exhaust air from a vehicle coating operation at an automotive assembly plant and to define appropriate instrumentation for the continuous monitoring of these species. On-line gas chromatography (GC) and total hydrocarbon (THC) instruments were employed. The main species identified in the adsorber effluent were n-butanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethanol and ethyl acetate. The time for the adsorber effluent concentration to reach a fraction (E/sub r/) equal to 10% of the US OSHA value for the combined solvent mixture depended on the adsorber influent concentration. The correlation between the GC and the THC varied between 2 and 17%. The E/sub r/ value can be predicted by THC monitoring as long as the qualitative composition of the exhaust air does not change significantly. 13 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Interlaboratory Test of Exhaust PM Using ELPI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Zervas; P. Dorlhène; L. Forti; C. Perrin; J. C. Momique; R. Monier; H. Ing; B. Lopez

    2005-01-01

    The Particulate Measurement Programme (PMP) works on the development of an improved method for the exhaust particulate matter (PM) measurement, which can include, if feasible and necessary, the measurement of particle number. The French PMP subgroup, composed of IFP, PSA Peugeot-Citroën, Renault, and UTAC, has defined a measurement protocol based on electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and conducted an interlaboratory test

  9. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirohumi Shinjoh

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of

  10. Nature of Odor Components in Diesel Exhaust

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Vogh

    1969-01-01

    Offensive exhaust odors are characteristic of diesel engines. One problem in control and reduction of odor is lack of understanding of odorant sources and mode of formation. The solution of this problem depends on identification of the odorants so that study of their formation and control can be undertaken. A human panel performed odor assessments in studying raw and modified

  11. EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM A DIESEL ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were performed using (1) Diesel particles collected from the undiluted exhaust of a single-cylinder engine, operated at constant speed and load, using a binary pure hydrocarbon fuel with air or gas mixture oxidizers, and (2) Diesel particles collected from the diluted exh...

  12. Salivary cortisol patterns in vital exhaustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy A Nicolson; Rob van Diest

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The syndrome of vital exhaustion (VE), a risk indicator for myocardial infarction, is characterized by excessive fatigue, irritability, and demoralization. Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis is a potential pathogenic mechanism in fatigue syndromes, but little is known about HPA function in syndromal VE. Method: We assessed basal free cortisol levels and responses to a speech task and to

  13. OUTDOOR SMOG CHAMBER EXPERIMENTS USING AUTOMOBILE EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Outdoor smog chamber experiments using automobile exhaust were performed in this study. The purpose of the study was to provide a data base that modelers could use to develop new, improved mechanisms for use in the Empirical Kinetics Modeling Approach (EKMA). Thirty-three dual sm...

  14. Exhaust Speciation Studies for Aftertreatment Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Ron

    2000-08-20

    Lean NOx reduction shown to be strongly affected by HC reductant composition. Possibility exists to tailor exhaust HC composition by manipulating HC post-injection process. Why is this relevant if lean NOx catalysis ''isn't going to work'' ? Lean NOx (esp. with post-injection of HC) offers unmatched ''passiveness'' NOx adsorber technology will require reductant - potentially introduced the same way

  15. Autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meyrowitz, A.L. [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States)] [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States); Blidberg, D.R. [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States)] [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States); Michelson, R.C. [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States)] [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States); [International Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems, Smyrna, GA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

  16. Evaluation of response time of a portable system for in-use vehicle tailpipe emissions measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaishan; Frey, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to quantify and evaluate the effects of response time of a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). The PEMS measures tailpipe emissions and vehicle dynamics on a second-by-second basis. Response times of the PEMS for exhaust concentrations were quantified on the basis of fixed periods of measurement of calibration gases for NO, hydrocarbons (HC), CO, and CO2. The time constant was quantified on the basis of the time to reach 63% of the maximum measured value when calibration gas was continuously administered for a period of typically 20 s or more. The time constant was found to be 6 s for NO and 3 s each for CO, HC, and CO2. Measurement errors associated with the response time of the PEMS were quantified. A first-order dynamic discrete model was developed to simulate the instrument measurements. Simulations showed that correction improves the measurement accuracy. Correction with smoothing better improves the measurement accuracy, especially when the noise is relatively large. On a trip level, the average error of the simulated measurements relative to the simulated signal before correction is -4%, which is deemed to be acceptable. For real-world data, smoothing and correction is recommended for major peaks to improve the measurement accuracy. PMID:18350900

  17. Ion Temperature Anisotropy across Reconnection Exhaust Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection redistributes energy by releasing magnetic energy into plasma kinetic energy - high speed bulk flows, heating, and particle acceleration. In the magnetotail, most of the released energy appears to go into ion heating. However, previous observations and simulations show that this heating is anisotropic with the plasma temperature parallel to the magnetic field generally increasing more than the perpendicular temperature. Simulations and theory indicate that this temperature anisotropy can balance part of the magnetic tension force that accelerates the jet, and may even exceed it leading to firehose instability.Here we report the results of a new study of ion temperature anisotropy in reconnection exhausts generated by anti-parallel reconnection. We have examined ARTEMIS dual-spacecraft observations of long-duration magnetotail exhausts at lunar distances in conjunction with Particle-In-Cell simulations. In particular, we have studied spatial variations in the ion temperature anisotropy across the outflows far away (>100 ion inertial lengths) from the X-line. A consistent pattern is found in both the spacecraft data and the simulations: whilst the total temperature profile across the exhaust is flat, near the exhaust boundaries the parallel temperature dominates. A consequence of this is that firehose threshold is greatly exceeded in a significant fraction of the exhaust. In contrast, the perpendicular temperature dominates at the neutral plane (|BX| < 0.1 B0), indicating that, despite the turbulence and the large distance to the X-line, particles undergo Speiser-like motion (rather than isotropization by scattering). We also analyse the characteristics of the particle distributions leading to these anisotropies at different distances from the mid-plane.

  18. Using Compressed Gases and Novel Liquids for Lubrication on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use of compressed gases and novel liquids for lubricating the drives of roving vehicles which may be employed for exploring the surface of Mars. Topics cover include: Mars atmospheric and temperature conditions, the Sojourner Rover, the Martian surface, liquids of interest for lubrication studies and CO2 gellation.

  19. Temperature, Pressure, and Infrared Image Survey of an Axisymmetric Heated Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Edward L.; Mahan, J. Robert; Birckelbaw, Larry D.; Turk, Jeffrey A.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Hange, Craig E.

    1996-01-01

    The focus of this research is to numerically predict an infrared image of a jet engine exhaust plume, given field variables such as temperature, pressure, and exhaust plume constituents as a function of spatial position within the plume, and to compare this predicted image directly with measured data. This work is motivated by the need to validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes through infrared imaging. The technique of reducing the three-dimensional field variable domain to a two-dimensional infrared image invokes the use of an inverse Monte Carlo ray trace algorithm and an infrared band model for exhaust gases. This report describes an experiment in which the above-mentioned field variables were carefully measured. Results from this experiment, namely tables of measured temperature and pressure data, as well as measured infrared images, are given. The inverse Monte Carlo ray trace technique is described. Finally, experimentally obtained infrared images are directly compared to infrared images predicted from the measured field variables.

  20. Process and apparatus for exhausting fumes and oxide particles generated by plasma-ARC cutting machine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, M.

    1984-04-10

    A process and apparatus for absorbing and exhausting efficiently dust (oxide particles), fumes, smoke, harmful gases and the like generated by plasma-arc cutting. The lower space of a fixed board for supporting the material which is cut is divided by plural partition plates to the direction crossing at right angles with the driving direction of the cutting machine body, an absorbing hood connected with a dust collector through a duct is installed and fixed to the cutting machine body in order to exhaust from the side of partition space corresponding to the plasma-arc cutting torch, fumes in each partition space at every position of cutting at the shortest distance and efficiently by making the absorbing hood move together with the movement of the cutting machine body. A reduction of the dust collector's capacity and a simplification of the accessory equipment are possible and cost reduction of the equipment for exhausting smoke including dust, fumes and the like in the plasma-arc cutting machine is possible.

  1. 40 CFR 1065.330 - Exhaust-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...calibration. We recommend that you use a calibration subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter and simulate exhaust temperatures...within 0.5% uncertainty. (c) If you use a subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter for raw exhaust flow...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.330 - Exhaust-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...calibration. We recommend that you use a calibration subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter and simulate exhaust temperatures...within 0.5% uncertainty. (c) If you use a subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter for raw exhaust flow...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.330 - Exhaust-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...calibration. We recommend that you use a calibration subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter and simulate exhaust temperatures...within 0.5% uncertainty. (c) If you use a subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter for raw exhaust flow...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.330 - Exhaust-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...calibration. We recommend that you use a calibration subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter and simulate exhaust temperatures...within 0.5% uncertainty. (c) If you use a subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter for raw exhaust flow...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.330 - Exhaust-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...calibration. We recommend that you use a calibration subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter and simulate exhaust temperatures...within 0.5% uncertainty. (c) If you use a subsonic venturi or ultrasonic flow meter for raw exhaust flow...

  6. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for...emissions of smoke from each new aircraft gas turbine engine of class T8 manufactured...

  7. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for...emissions of smoke from each new aircraft gas turbine engine of class T8 manufactured...

  8. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for...smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning...

  9. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for...smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning...

  10. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for...smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning...

  11. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for...smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning...

  12. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for...emissions of smoke from each new aircraft gas turbine engine of class T8 manufactured...

  13. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for...smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning...

  14. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for...emissions of smoke from each new aircraft gas turbine engine of class T8 manufactured...

  15. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for...emissions of smoke from each new aircraft gas turbine engine of class T8 manufactured...

  16. 40 CFR 90.103 - Exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Engine Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Handheld Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Class III, IV or V standards and requirements, as appropriate, through model year 2002...

  17. 40 CFR 90.103 - Exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Engine Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Handheld Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Class III, IV or V standards and requirements, as appropriate, through model year 2002...

  18. 40 CFR 90.103 - Exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Engine Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Handheld Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Class III, IV or V standards and requirements, as appropriate, through model year 2002...

  19. 40 CFR 90.103 - Exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Engine Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Handheld Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Class III, IV or V standards and requirements, as appropriate, through model year 2002...

  20. 40 CFR 90.103 - Exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Engine Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Handheld Exhaust Emission Standards by Model Year [grams per...Class III, IV or V standards and requirements, as appropriate, through model year 2002...

  1. 46 CFR 119.430 - Engine exhaust pipe installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false Engine exhaust pipe installation. 119.430 Section 119...THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements...119.430 Engine exhaust pipe installation. (a) The design of...

  2. 46 CFR 119.430 - Engine exhaust pipe installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Engine exhaust pipe installation. 119.430 Section 119...THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements...119.430 Engine exhaust pipe installation. (a) The design of...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Exhaust gas recirculation. Use the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system installed with the engine or one that represents a typical in-use configuration. This includes any applicable EGR cooling...

  4. 40 CFR 91.407 - Engine inlet and exhaust systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.407 Engine inlet and exhaust systems. (a) The...

  5. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  6. Minimizing Greenhouse Emissions in Vehicle Routing Gilbert Laporte, Ph.D., frsc

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Minimizing Greenhouse Emissions in Vehicle Routing Gilbert Laporte, Ph.D., frsc Canada Research the industrial revolution 393 ppmv in April 2012 · Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (CO2, methane, nitrous dioxide;Greenhouse gases (GHGs) Greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), cause the average global temperature

  7. Vehicle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, E.A.

    1984-05-01

    There is provided a vehicle which includes a frame, a steerable wheel mounted on the frame and at least one further wheel mounted for free rotation on the frame. A flywheel is mounted for rotation adjacent one of the wheels. The vehicle includes means for imparting rotation to the flywheel, and a clutch plate rotatably and coaxially mounted adjacent the same wheel to which the flywheel is adjacent. Speed-reduction means allows rotation of the flywheel to rotate the clutch plate at a faster rate than the flywheel, and a frictionless clutch is provided between the clutch plate and the adjacent wheel.

  8. Investigation of NH3 emissions from new technology vehicles as a function of vehicle operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Huai, Tao; Durbin, Thomas D; Miller, J Wayne; Pisano, John T; Sauer, Claudia G; Rhee, Sam H; Norbeck, Joseph M

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to measure ammonia (NH3) emissions from modern technology vehicles since information is scarce aboutthis importantsource of particulate matter (PM) precursors. Test variables included the emission level to which the vehicle was certified, the vehicle operating conditions, and catalyst age. Eight vehicles with low-emission vehicle (LEV) to super-ultralow-emission vehicle (SULEV) certification levels were tested over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP75), a US06 cycle, a hot running 505, a New York City Cycle (NYCC), and a specially designed Modal Emissions Cycle (MEC01v7) using both as-received and bench-aged catalysts. NH3 emissions in the raw exhaust were measured by tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption spectroscopy. The results show that NH3 emissions depend on driving mode and are primarily generated during acceleration events. More specifically, high NH3 emissions were found for high vehicle specific power (VSP) events and rich operating conditions. For some vehicles, NH3 emissions formed immediately after catalyst light-off during a cold start. PMID:14620808

  9. Internal combustion engine with an exhaust gas recirculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Saiki, J.

    1980-03-25

    Disclosed is an internal combustion engine with an exhaust gas recirculation system. The engine is provided with a carburetor which includes a primary system and a secondary system. The recirculated exhaust gas is supplied to the intake passage via an exhaust gas supply pipe which is disposed at a position downstream of the carburetor. The top end of the exhaust gas supply pipe is open at a space having a predetermined positional relationship with the wall of the primary system.

  10. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  11. Aero-acoustic design and test of a multiple splitter exhaust noise suppressor for a 0.914m diameter lift fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A lift fan exhaust suppression system to meet future VTOL aircraft noise goals was designed and tested. The test vehicle was a 1.3 pressure ratio, 36 inch (91.44 cm) diameter lift fan with two chord rotor to stator spacing. A two splitter fan exhaust suppression system thirty inches (76.2 cm) long achieved 10 PNdB exhaust suppression in the aft quadrant compared to a design value of 20 PNdB. It was found that a broadband noise floor limited the realizable suppression. An analytical investigation of broadband noise generated by flow over the treatment surfaces provided very good agreement with the measured suppression levels and noise floor sound power levels. A fan thrust decrement of 22% was measured for the fully suppressed configuration of which 11.1% was attributed to the exhaust suppression hardware.

  12. Research about intake and exhaust mulffer: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fuguo Zhao

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of research on intake and exhaust muffler in the past 3 years. First, a detailed introduction to the basic noise theory of intake and exhaust muffler is given. And then, the status quo of research on inlet and exhaust muffler is in focus in the past 3 years. Finally, a summary on the research status

  13. Device for controlling supercharging pressure of an exhaust gas turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Y.

    1988-04-12

    A supercharge pressure control apparatus is described comprising: a turbocharger having an exhaust turbine rotated by exhaust gas flow of an internal combustion engine and a compressor rotated by the exhaust gas flow toward the turbine and having a valve member disposed in the turbine.

  14. 40 CFR 86.144-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample corrected for background, in ppm carbon...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample or, for diesel-cycle (or methanol-fueled...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample as calculated from the integrated...

  15. 40 CFR 86.144-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample corrected for background, in ppm carbon...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample or, for diesel-cycle (or methanol-fueled...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample as calculated from the integrated...

  16. 40 CFR 86.144-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample corrected for background, in ppm carbon...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample or, for diesel-cycle (or methanol-fueled...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample as calculated from the integrated...

  17. 40 CFR 86.144-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample corrected for background, in ppm carbon...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample or, for diesel-cycle (or methanol-fueled...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample as calculated from the integrated...

  18. 40 CFR 86.144-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample corrected for background, in ppm carbon...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample or, for diesel-cycle (or methanol-fueled...hydrocarbon concentration of the dilute exhaust sample as calculated from the integrated...

  19. Exhaust gas composition measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, installation, checkout, and operation of an exhaust gas composition measurement system for collecting and analyzing the exhaust gas from a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are described. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an exhaust gas composition measurement which meets the performance criteria specified.

  20. Biofiltration of the Critical Minimum Ventilation Exhaust Air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Hoff; J. D. Harmon

    This research project investigated the gas and odor emission reduction potential from a deep-pit swine finisher using a strategy of partial biofiltration of a critical minimum amount of exhausted air (CMEA). The CMEA was defined as the amount of air exhausted to a stable hot-weather atmosphere, typical of summer night conditions. Ventilation air exhausted during the heat of summer days