Science.gov

Sample records for vehicle-related spinal injuries

  1. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Injury Information Page Condensed from Spinal Cord Injury: ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Spinal Cord Injury? A spinal cord injury usually begins with ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is ... stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what part of the spinal cord is damaged, as ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  4. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  7. Spinal injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... messages between your brain and body. The cord passes through your neck and back. A spinal cord ... Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Mosby; 2009:chap 40. Torg JS. Cervical ...

  8. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2008-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:18295084

  9. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2009-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:19084763

  10. Living with Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... techniques that may prevent injury and disease. A spinal cord injury (SCI) can result from trauma, such as ... with daily living skills. What can persons with spinal cord injuries and their friends and families do? ? Get ...

  11. Bridging spinal cord injuries

    E-print Network

    2008-10-15

    Abstract One strategy for spinal cord injury repair is to make cellular bridges that support axon regeneration. However, the bridging cells often fail to integrate with host tissue and may lead to increased pain sensitivity. Recent work has tested...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852 ... NeurosurgeryToday.org Every year, an estimated 11,000 spinal cord injury (SCI) accidents occur in the United States. ...

  13. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... with SCI is the lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish ...

  14. Tribal motor vehicle injury prevention programs for reducing disparities in motor vehicle-related injuries.

    PubMed

    West, Bethany A; Naumann, Rebecca B

    2014-04-18

    A previous analysis of National Vital Statistics System data for 2003-2007 that examined disparities in rates of motor vehicle-related death by race/ethnicity and sex found that death rates for American Indians/Alaska Natives were two to four times the rates of other races/ethnicities. To address the disparity in motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths among American Indians/Alaska Natives, CDC funded four American Indian tribes during 2004-2009 to tailor, implement, and evaluate evidence-based road safety interventions. During the implementation of these four motor vehicle-related injury prevention pilot programs, seat belt and child safety seat use increased and alcohol-impaired driving decreased. Four American Indian/Alaska Native tribal communities-the Tohono O'odham Nation, the Ho-Chunk Nation, the White Mountain Apache Tribe, and the San Carlos Apache Tribe-implemented evidence-based road safety interventions to reduce motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths. Each community selected interventions from the Guide to Community Preventive Services and implemented them during 2004-2009. Furthermore, each community took a multifaceted approach by incorporating several strategies, such as school and community education programs, media campaigns, and collaborations with law enforcement officers into their programs. Police data and direct observational surveys were the main data sources used to assess results of the programs. Results included increased use of seat belts and child safety seats, increased enforcement of alcohol-impaired driving laws, and decreased motor vehicle crashes involving injuries or deaths. CDC's Office of Minority Health and Health Equity selected the intervention analysis and discussion as an example of a program that might be effective for reducing motor vehicle-related injury disparities in the United States. The Guide to Community Preventive Services recognizes these selected interventions as effective; this report examines the feasibility and transferability for implementing the interventions in American Indian/Alaska Native tribal communities. The findings in this report underscore the effectiveness of community interventions to reduce motor vehicle crashes among selected American Indian/Alaska Native communities. PMID:24743664

  15. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  16. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to adjusting to spinal cord injury is personal motivation . Individuals who are newly injured are often motivated ... to find purpose in your life and the motivation to achieve your goals. It may help to ...

  17. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  18. Spinal Injury Rehabilitation in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, H. L.; Chua, K.; Chan, W.

    1998-01-01

    This study reviewed 231 cases of spinal cord injury treated in Singapore. Data on demographic characteristics, common causes (mostly falls and traffic accidents), types of spinal damage, and outcomes are reported. Following rehabilitation, 68 patients were able to ambulate independently and 45 patients achieved independence in activities of daily…

  19. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  20. Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in News and Social Media Heads Up to Concussion Injury Center Topics Saving Lives & Protecting People Home & Recreational Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Traumatic Brain Injury Injury Response Violence Prevention Data & Statistics (WISQARS) Funded Programs Communications Press Room ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living ... Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information ...

  2. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Care? Emergency Medical Services Hospital (Acute) Care Rehabilitation More FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) If you or a loved one ... spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ... on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number H133N110008). NIDILRR is a ...

  3. SPINAL CORD INJURY (SCI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from SCI cases in the United States. Since its inception, 24 federally funded Model SCI Care Systems have contributed data to the National SCI Database. Statistics are derived from this da...

  4. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  5. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients' family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  6. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  7. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... should be assessed for possible damage to the spinal cord 1 : Head injuries, particularly those with trauma to ... show if nerve signals can pass through the spinal cord. Spine X-rays. These may show fracture or ...

  8. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-25

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  9. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  10. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  11. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  12. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chronic pain in people with spinal cord injury. Robotic-assisted therapy Most recovery following SCI takes place ... the safety and efficacy of a type of robotic therapy device known as the AMES device. The ...

  13. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  14. Adiposity and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Wells, Kathryn M; Austin, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    The drastic changes in body composition following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been shown to play a significant role in cardiovascular and metabolic health. The pattern of storage and distribution of different types of adipose tissue may impact metabolic health variables similar to carbohydrate, lipid and bone metabolism. The use of magnetic resonance imaging provides insights on the interplay among different regional adipose tissue compartments and their role in developing chronic diseases. Regional adipose tissue can be either distributed centrally or peripherally into subcutaneous and ectopic sites. The primary ectopic adipose tissue sites are visceral, intramuscular and bone marrow. Dysfunction in the central nervous system following SCI impacts the pattern of distribution of adiposity especially between tetraplegia and paraplegia. The current editorial is focused primarily on introducing different types of adipose tissue and establishing scientific basis to develop appropriate dietary, rehabilitation or pharmaceutical interventions to manage the negative consequences of increasing adiposity after SCI. We have also summarized the clinical implications and future recommendations relevant to study adiposity after SCI. PMID:26396933

  15. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  16. Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Switches How GABA Affects Nociceptive Plasticity 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yung-Jen

    2015-05-11

    Research has shown that spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce neural hyperexcitability within the spinal cord that facilitates nociceptive reflexes. Nociceptive inputs have been shown to sensitize spinal nociceptive systems, inducing a learning...

  17. Neurotrophin gradients and axon growth after spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Laura Anne

    2007-01-01

    stem cells constitutively secrete neurotrophic factors and promote extensive host axonal growth after spinal cord injury.stem cells constitutively secrete neurotrophic factors and promote extensive host axonal growth after spinal cord injury.stem cells constitutively secrete neurotrophic factors and promote extensive host axonal growth after spinal cord injury.

  18. Automated Analysis of Remyelination Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    E-print Network

    Meenakshisundaram, Gopi

    Automated Analysis of Remyelination Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury Paper ID: 25 ABSTRACT disorders resulting in spinal cord injury (SCI). The lost myelin sheath can be replaced by remyelination ­ is a prominent fea- ture in many neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury

  19. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  20. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID:23087647

  1. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 2. Medical complications.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S B; Yarkony, G M; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in understanding medical complications of spinal cord injury through the lifespan. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers reasons for transferring patients to specialized spinal cord injury centers once they have been stabilized, and the management of common medical problems, including fever, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary tract infection, acute and chronic abdominal complications, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, and heterotopic ossification. Formulation of an educational program for prevention of late complications is also discussed, including late renal complications, syringomyelia, myelomalacia, burns, pathologic fractures, pressure ulcers, and cardiovascular disease. New advances covered in this section include new information on old problems, and a discussion of exercise tolerance in persons with tetraplegia, the pathophysiology of late neurologic deterioration after spinal cord injury, and a view of the care of these patients across the lifespan. PMID:9084368

  2. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  3. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following SCI. Each type of cardiac disturbance requires specific treatment. PMID:20108532

  4. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein thrombosis and long–term risk for coronary heart disease and systemic atherosclerosis are also described. Proper prophylaxis, including non–pharmacologic and pharmacological strategies, diminishes the occurrence of the vascular dysfunction following SCI. Each vascular disturbance requires a specific treatment. PMID:20945818

  5. Reducing Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries at an Arizona Indian Reservation: Ten Years of Application of Evidence-Based Strategies.

    PubMed

    Piontkowski, Stephen R; Peabody, Jon S; Reede, Christine; Velascosoltero, José; Tsatoke, Gordon; Shelhamer, Timothy; Hicks, Kenny R

    2015-12-01

    Unintentional injury is a significant public health burden for American Indians and Alaska Natives and was the leading cause of death among those aged 1 to 44 years between 1999 and 2004. Of those deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths cause the most mortality, justifying the need for intervention at an American Indian Reservation in Arizona (United States). We describe motor vehicle injury prevention program operations from 2004 through 2013. This community-based approach led by a multidisciplinary team primarily comprised of environmental public health and law enforcement personnel implemented evidence-based strategies to reduce the impact of motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths, focusing on reducing impaired driving and increasing occupant restraint use. Strategies included: mass media campaigns to enhance awareness and outreach; high-visibility sobriety checkpoints; passing and enforcing 0.08% blood alcohol concentration limits for drivers and primary occupant restraint laws; and child car seat distribution and education. Routine monitoring and evaluation data showed a significant 5% to 7% annual reduction of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), nighttime MVCs, MVCs with injuries/fatalities, and nighttime MVCs with injuries/fatalities between 2004 and 2013, but the annual percent change in arrests for driving under the influence (DUI) was not significant. There was also a 144% increase in driver/front seat passenger seat belt use, from 19% in 2011 before the primary occupant restraint law was enacted to 47% during the first full year of enforcement (2013). Car seat checkpoint data also suggested a 160% increase in car seat use, from less than 20% to 52% in 2013. Implementation of evidence-based strategies in injury prevention, along with employment of key program approaches such as strong partnership building, community engagement, and consistent staffing and funding, can narrow the public health disparity gap experienced among American Indian and Alaska Native communities. PMID:26681708

  6. Cannabinoids to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition for which there is no standard treatment beyond rehabilitation strategies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the use of cannabinoids to treat this condition. The endocannabinoid system is expressed in the intact spinal cord, and it is dramatically upregulated after lesion. Endogenous activation of this system counteracts secondary damage following SCI, and treatments with endocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists promote a better functional outcome in experimental models. The use of cannabinoids in SCI is a new research field and many questions remain open. Here, we discuss caveats and suggest some future directions that may help to understand the role of cannabinoids in SCI and how to take advantage of this system to regain functions after spinal cord damage. PMID:25805333

  7. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  8. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI)? Skip sharing on social media links ... no known ways to reverse damage to the spinal cord. However, researchers are continually working on new treatments, ...

  9. Current trends in spinal cord injury repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, W-Y; He, D-W

    2015-09-01

    One of the rapidly prevailing neurological disorders affecting thousands of people per year is spinal cord injury (SCI). Though, great research has been made in recent past to understand thoroughly the molecular bases of the diseases, no fully restorative treatments for SCI are available. However, various rehabilitative, cellular and molecular therapies are being tested in animal models. Some of them have shown promising results. So, the present review shall enlighten all these latest developments in the field of spinal cord injury repair. The review shall discuss latest upcoming areas being focused for the management of SCI patients like stem cell therapy approach, cell-based approaches, combination therapeutic approaches, neuronal plasticity and possible use of omega-3 fatty acids in SCI repair. PMID:26439026

  10. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 3. Functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Formal, C S; Cawley, M F; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in this topic area. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article contains information about mobility, ambulation, upper extremity function, bowel management, and technology to enhance function in the community. New advances covered in this section include functional electrical stimulation for enhancing mobility and upper extremity function. PMID:9084369

  11. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction. PMID:25479784

  12. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19–143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  13. Current therapeutic strategies for inflammation following traumatic spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka L.; Agarwal, Nitin; Barrese, James C.; Heary, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Damage from spinal cord injury occurs in two phases – the trauma of the initial mechanical insult and a secondary injury to nervous tissue spared by the primary insult. Apart from damage sustained as a result of direct trauma to the spinal cord, the post-traumatic inflammatory response contributes significantly to functional motor deficits exacerbated by the secondary injury. Attenuating the detrimental aspects of the inflammatory response is a promising strategy to potentially ameliorate the secondary injury, and promote significant functional recovery. This review details how the inflammatory component of secondary injury to the spinal cord can be treated currently and in the foreseeable future. PMID:25624806

  14. Pediatric spinal injury in the US: epidemiology and disparities.

    PubMed

    Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT In the US, race and economic status have pervasive associations with mechanisms of injury, severity of injury, management, and outcomes of trauma. The goal of the current study was to examine these relationships on a large scale in the setting of pediatric spinal injury. METHODS Admissions for spinal fracture without or with spinal cord injury (SCI), spinal dislocation, and SCI without radiographic abnormality were identified in the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) and the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) registry for 2009. Patients ranged in age from birth up to 21 years. Data from the KID were used to estimate nationwide annual incidences. Data from the NTDB were used to describe patterns of injury in relation to age, race, and payor, with corroboration from the KID. Multiple logistic regression was used to model rates of mortality and spinal fusion. RESULTS In 2009, the estimated incidence of hospital admission for spinal injury in the US was 170 per 1 million in the population under 21 years of age. The incidence of SCI was 24 per 1 million. Incidences varied regionally. Adolescents predominated. Patterns of injury varied by age, race, and payor. Black patients were more severely injured than patients of other races as measured by Injury Severity Scale scores. Among black patients with spinal injury in the NTDB, 23.9% suffered firearm injuries; only 1% of white patients suffered firearm injuries. The overall mortality rate in the NTDB was 3.9%. In a multivariate analysis that included a large panel of clinical and nonclinical factors, black race retained significance as a predictor of mortality (p = 0.006; adjusted OR 1.571 [1.141-2.163]). Rates of spinal fusion were associated with race and payor in the NTDB data and with payor in the KID: patients with better insurance underwent spinal fusion at higher rates. CONCLUSIONS The epidemiology of pediatric spinal injury in the US cannot be understood apart from considerations of race and economic status. PMID:26114993

  15. Diaphragmatic pacing in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Kevin; DiMarco, Anthony F

    2014-08-01

    After cervical spinal cord injuries, many patients are unable to sustain independent ventilation because of a disruption of diaphragm innervation and respiratory functioning. If phrenic nerve function is preserved, the patient may be able to tolerate exogenous pacing of the diaphragm via electrical stimulation. Previously this was accomplished by stimulation directly to the phrenic nerves, but may be accomplished less invasively by percutaneously stimulating the diaphragm itself. The benefits, when compared with mechanical ventilation, include a lower rate of pulmonary complications, improved venous return, more normal breathing and speech, facilitation of eating, cost-effectiveness, and increased patient mobility. PMID:25064791

  16. Natural Polyphenols and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to have some of the neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are attributed to a variety of biological activities, including free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. In this regard, many efforts have been made to study the effects of various well-known dietary polyphenols on spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effects. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanisms of neuroprotection of natural polyphenols used in animal models of SCI. PMID:24842137

  17. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  18. Cellular therapies for treating pain associated with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury leads to immense disability and loss of quality of life in human with no satisfactory clinical cure. Cell-based or cell-related therapies have emerged as promising therapeutic potentials both in regeneration of spinal cord and mitigation of neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury. This article reviews the various options and their latest developments with an update on their therapeutic potentials and clinical trialing. PMID:22394650

  19. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  20. Oligodendrocyte fate after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Almad, Akshata; Sahinkaya, F Rezan; McTigue, Dana M

    2011-04-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are particularly susceptible to the toxicity of the acute lesion environment after spinal cord injury (SCI). They undergo both necrosis and apoptosis acutely, with apoptosis continuing at chronic time points. Loss of OLs causes demyelination and impairs axon function and survival. In parallel, a rapid and protracted OL progenitor cell proliferative response occurs, especially at the lesion borders. Proliferating and migrating OL progenitor cells differentiate into myelinating OLs, which remyelinate demyelinated axons starting at 2 weeks post-injury. The progression of OL lineage cells into mature OLs in the adult after injury recapitulates development to some degree, owing to the plethora of factors within the injury milieu. Although robust, this endogenous oligogenic response is insufficient against OL loss and demyelination. First, in this review we analyze the major spatial-temporal mechanisms of OL loss, replacement, and myelination, with the purpose of highlighting potential areas of intervention after SCI. We then discuss studies on OL protection and replacement. Growth factors have been used both to boost the endogenous progenitor response, and in conjunction with progenitor transplantation to facilitate survival and OL fate. Considerable progress has been made with embryonic stem cell-derived cells and adult neural progenitor cells. For therapies targeting oligogenesis to be successful, endogenous responses and the effects of the acute and chronic lesion environment on OL lineage cells must be understood in detail, and in relation, the optimal therapeutic window for such strategies must also be determined. PMID:21404073

  1. Spinal cord injury. Rehabilitation adds life to years.

    PubMed Central

    De Vivo, M. J.; Richards, J. S.; Stover, S. L.; Go, B. K.

    1991-01-01

    The National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center data base contains information collected prospectively on 13,763 persons injured since 1973 and treated at model systems of care throughout the United States. These data clearly demonstrate improved neurologic status and independent function in activities of daily living following acute care and rehabilitation for most persons with spinal cord injuries. Decreased lengths of initial and subsequent hospital stays and increased survival rates are also documented. Most persons are discharged to a private residence in the community and remain there. Many complete their educations and return to gainful employment after injury. Spinal cord injury has only a short-term effect on marriage and divorce rates, which appears to dissipate within a few years after injury. Overall, these figures demonstrate the dramatic improvements in length and quality of life achieved by most persons with spinal cord injuries during the past two decades. PMID:1866959

  2. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ...Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey, VA...10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord patients' satisfaction with...

  3. Polyethylene glycol immediately repairs neuronal membranes and inhibits free radical production after acute spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    Shi, Riyi

    after acute spinal cord injury Jian Luo, Richard Borgens and Riyi Shi Department of Basic Medical and their processes after traumatic spinal cord injury. Using an in vitro guinea pig spinal cord injury model, we have an important causal effect of membrane disruption in generating ROS in spinal cord injury, suggesting membrane

  4. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  5. Optogenetics Applications for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Sadia; Komai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) are increasing all over the world; and in USA alone, there are 273,000 patients, which not only leads to morbidity and mortality but also results in a great economic burden. Many approaches are being used at the pre-clinical and clinical level to treat SCI including therapeutic agents, surgical decompression, stem cell therapy etc. Recently, a new approach called optogenetics has emerged in which light sensitive proteins are used to switch neurons on and off, and this approach has great potential to be used as therapy due to its specificity and rapid response in milliseconds. Few animal studies have been performed so far in which the respiratory and bladder function of rats was restored through the use of optogenetics. On the basis of promising results obtained, in the future, this approach can prove to be a valuable tool to treat patients with SCI. PMID:25901246

  6. Outcome Measures in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Marcalee S.; Anderson, Kim; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Blight, Andrew R.; Brannon, Ruth; Bryce, Thomas; Creasey, Graham; Catz, Amiram; Curt, Armin; Donovan, William; Ditunno, John; Ellaway, Peter; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Graves, Daniel E.; Haynes, Beth Ann; Heinemann, Allen W.; Jackson, Amie B.; Johnston, Mark; Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Kleitman, Naomi; Krassioukov, Andrei; Krogh, Klaus; Lammertse, Daniel; Magasi, Susan; Mulcahey, MJ; Schurch, Brigitte; Sherwood, Arthur; Steeves, John D.; Stiens, Steven; Tulsky, David S.; van Hedel, Hubertus J.A.; Whiteneck, Gale

    2009-01-01

    Study Design review by the Spinal Cord Outcomes Partnership Endeavor (SCOPE), which is a broad-based international consortium of scientists and clinical researchers representing academic institutions, industry, government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and foundations. Objectives assessment of current and evolving tools for evaluating human spinal cord injury (SCI) outcomes for both clinical diagnosis and clinical research studies. Methods a framework for the appraisal of evidence of metric properties was used to examine outcome tools or tests for accuracy, sensitivity, reliability and validity for human SCI. Results imaging, neurological, functional, autonomic, sexual health, bladder/bowel, pain, and psycho-social tools were evaluated. Several specific tools for human SCI studies have or are being developed to allow the more accurate determination for a clinically meaningful benefit (improvement in functional outcome or quality of life) being achieved as a result of a therapeutic intervention. Conclusion significant progress has been made, but further validation studies are required to identify the most appropriate tools for specific targets in a human SCI study or clinical trial. PMID:19381157

  7. Current and future surgery strategies for spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dalbayrak, Sedat; Yaman, Onur; Y?lmaz, Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord trauma is a prominent cause of mortality and morbidity. In developed countries a spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs every 16 min. SCI occurs due to tissue destruction, primarily by mechanical and secondarily ischemic. Primary damage occurs at the time of the injury. It cannot be improved. Following the primary injury, secondary harm mechanisms gradually result in neuronal death. One of the prominent causes of secondary harm is energy deficit, emerging from ischemia, whose main cause in the early stage, is impaired perfusion. Due to the advanced techniques in spinal surgery, SCI is still challenging for surgeons. Spinal cord doesn’t have a self-repair property. The main damage occurs at the time of the injury primarily by mechanical factors that cannot be improved. Secondarily mechanisms take part in the following sections. Spinal compression and neurological deficit are two major factors used to decide on surgery. According to advanced imaging techniques the classifications systems for spinal injury has been changed in time. Aim of the surgery is to decompress the spinal channel and to restore the spinal alinement and mobilize the patient as soon as possible. Use of neuroprotective agents as well as methods to achieve cell regeneration in addition to surgery would contribute to the solution. PMID:25621209

  8. Self-Esteem Differences among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 63 people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in either their first, second, or fifth year post-injury. Results indicated that perceived levels of self-esteem decreased following the SCI. Found that self-esteem was lowest in the second year of injury. Self-esteem may be connected to loss of employment. (RJM)

  9. Race-Ethnicity, Education, and Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee; Staten, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify the relationship between race-ethnicity and employment after spinal cord injury (SCI), while evaluating interrelationships with gender, injury severity, and education. The authors used a cohort design using the most current status from a post-injury interview from the National SCI Statistical Center.…

  10. Injury to the spinal cord in motor vehicle traffic crashes.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Peter

    2002-07-01

    Motor vehicle traffic crashes (MVTCs) are the leading cause of traumatic spinal cord injury. Evidence of putative risk factors for this type of injury comes largely from descriptive studies. This study is the first case-control study of risk factors for spinal cord injury specifically in car crashes. Cases of occupant spinal cord injury in South Australia were identified from the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register (ASCIR) which provides full coverage of the adult population. The comparison group was other seriously injured car occupants. In single vehicle car crashes in the country, the likelihood of spinal cord injury was five times higher for occupants of non-sedan type cars compared with sedans. The likelihood of spinal cord injury was especially high in non-sedan type cars involved in rollover crashes; ten times higher than sedans. The implications of the findings for prevention are highlighted. Concern is expressed over the increasing proportion of four wheel drive passenger vehicles (sport utility vehicles) in the car fleet in Australia, and in the USA, as they are more prone to rollover. PMID:12067110

  11. Molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, A; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of the molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury and their contribution in pathogenesis. First of all, we reviewed the anatomy of spinal cord vessels. The pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries revealed two types of pathogenic mechanisms. The primary event, the mechanic trauma, results in a disruption of neural and vascular structures into the spinal cord. It is followed by secondary pathogenesis that leads to the progression of the initial lesion. We reviewed vascular responses following spinal cord injury, focusing on both primary and secondary events. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a direct consequence of trauma; it has a typical pattern of distribution into the contused spinal cord, inside the gray matter and, it is radially extended into the white matter. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is restricted to the dorsal columns, into adjacent rostral and caudal spinal segments. Distribution of chronic lesions overlaps the pattern of the early intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We described the mechanisms of action, role, induction and distribution of the heme oxygenase isoenzymes 1 and 2. Posttraumatic inflammatory response contributes to secondary pathogenesis. We analyzed the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the moment of appearance after the injury, the decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. The disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier is biphasic. It exposes the spinal cord to inflammatory cells and to toxic effects of other molecules. Endothelin 1 mediates oxidative stress into the spinal cord through the modulation of spinal cord blood flow. The role of matrix metalloproteinases in blood–spinal cord barrier disruption, inflammation, and angiogenesis are reviewed. PMID:20945816

  12. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  13. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  14. Spinal Cord Injury: Facts and Figures at a Glance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Statistical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. I ncidence : It is estimated that the annual incidence of spinal cord injury ( ... alive in 2012 who have SCI has been estimated to be approximately 270,000 persons, with a ...

  15. Characterization of Morphine Self-Administration Following Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-print Network

    Woller, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-16

    Approximately two-thirds of patients will experience pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). This pain can arise as an immediate consequence of SCI, or can develop over time into chronic, neuropathic pain. Individuals are frequently prescribed...

  16. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    White-Schenk, Désirée; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. PMID:25673988

  17. Calibrated forceps model of spinal cord compression injury.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Ashley; Monterrubio, Angela; Ariza, Jeanelle; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Compression injuries of the murine spinal cord are valuable animal models for the study of spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal regenerative therapy. The calibrated forceps model of compression injury is a convenient, low cost, and very reproducible animal model for SCI. We used a pair of modified forceps in accordance with the method published by Plemel et al. (2008) to laterally compress the spinal cord to a distance of 0.35 mm. In this video, we will demonstrate a dorsal laminectomy to expose the spinal cord, followed by compression of the spinal cord with the modified forceps. In the video, we will also address issues related to the care of paraplegic laboratory animals. This injury model produces mice that exhibit impairment in sensation, as well as impaired hindlimb locomotor function. Furthermore, this method of injury produces consistent aberrations in the pathology of the SCI, as determined by immunohistochemical methods. After watching this video, viewers should be able to determine the necessary supplies and methods for producing SCI of various severities in the mouse for studies on SCI and/or treatments designed to mitigate impairment after injury. PMID:25938880

  18. Calibrated Forceps Model of Spinal Cord Compression Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Jeanelle; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Compression injuries of the murine spinal cord are valuable animal models for the study of spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal regenerative therapy. The calibrated forceps model of compression injury is a convenient, low cost, and very reproducible animal model for SCI. We used a pair of modified forceps in accordance with the method published by Plemel et al. (2008) to laterally compress the spinal cord to a distance of 0.35 mm. In this video, we will demonstrate a dorsal laminectomy to expose the spinal cord, followed by compression of the spinal cord with the modified forceps. In the video, we will also address issues related to the care of paraplegic laboratory animals. This injury model produces mice that exhibit impairment in sensation, as well as impaired hindlimb locomotor function. Furthermore, this method of injury produces consistent aberrations in the pathology of the SCI, as determined by immunohistochemical methods. After watching this video, viewers should be able to determine the necessary supplies and methods for producing SCI of various severities in the mouse for studies on SCI and/or treatments designed to mitigate impairment after injury. PMID:25938880

  19. Original Article Gait training regimen for incomplete spinal cord injury using functional

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    Original Article Gait training regimen for incomplete spinal cord injury using functional spinal cord injuries. Setting: Rehabilitation hospital for spinal cord injury (SCI) in Toronto, Canada is viable for rehabilitation of gait in incomplete SCI. Spinal Cord (2006) 44, 357­361. doi:10.1038/sj

  20. Reshaping the chromatin landscape after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    WONG, Jamie K.; ZOU, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology underlying spinal cord injury is complex. Mechanistic understanding of the adaptive responses to injury is critical for targeted therapy aimed at reestablishing lost connections between proximal and distal neurons. After injury, cell-type specific gene transcription programs govern distinct cellular behaviors, and chromatin regulators play a central role in shaping the chromatin landscape to adjust transcriptional profiles in a context-dependent manner. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the pleiotropic roles of chromatin regulators in mediating the diverse adaptive behaviors of neurons and glial cells after spinal cord injury, and wherever possible, discuss the underlying mechanisms and genomic targets. We specifically draw attention to the perspective that takes into consideration the impact of epigenetic modulation on axon growth potential, together with its effect on wound-healing properties of glial cells. Epigenetic modulation of chromatin state represents an emerging therapeutic direction to promote neural repair and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:25554728

  1. Upper cervical spinal cord gunshot injury without bone destruction???

    PubMed Central

    Seçer, Mehmet; Uluta?, Murat; Yayla, Erdal; Ç?nar, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report describes a rare case of the gunshot injury of the spine and spinal cord. PRESENTATION OF CASE A rare case of the bullet lodged intra-durally in the upper cervical region without damaging the vertebrae or the spinal cord. The bullet was removed as microneurosurgical and duraplasty was performed. DISCUSSION Surgical management of the gunshot wounds of the spine and spinal cord is not widely advocated and controversial. CONCLUSION Advances in microneurosurgical instrumentation and microscopic techniques may open up a new era of surgical treatment of spinal cord gunshot wounds. PMID:24566426

  2. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    ScienceCinema

    Cohen, Avis [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States

    2010-01-08

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  3. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Avis

    2009-02-04

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  4. Spinal fractures in recreational bobsledders: an unexpected mechanism of injury

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Erik P.; Sofianos, Dmitri A.; Powell, Amy; Daubs, Michael; Patel, Rakesh; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Study design:?Retrospective case series and literature review. Objective:?To report and discuss spinal fractures occurring in recreational bobsledders. Summary of background data:?Spinal fractures have been commonly described following traumatic injury during a number of recreational sports. Reports have focused on younger patients and typically involved high-impact sports or significant injuries. With an aging population and a wider array of recreational sports, spinal injuries may be seen after seemingly benign activities and without a high-impact injury. Methods:?A retrospective review of two patients and review of the literature was performed. Results:?Two patients with spinal fractures after recreational bobsledding were identified. Both patients, aged 57 and 54 years, noticed a simultaneous onset of severe back pain during a routine turn on a bobsled track. Neither was involved in a high-impact injury during the event. Both patients were treated conservatively with resolution of symptoms. An analysis of the bobsled track revealed that potential forces imparted to the rider may be greater than the yield strength of vertebral bone. Conclusions:?Older athletes may be at greater risk for spinal fracture associated with routine recreational activities. Bobsledding imparts large amounts of force during routine events and may result in spinal trauma. Older patients, notably those with osteoporosis or metabolic bone disease, should be educated about the risks associated with seemingly benign recreational sports. PMID:23230417

  5. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akku?, Selami; U?urlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  6. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  7. Osteoporosis in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology, clinical considerations, and relevant experimental findings with regard to osteoporosis in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) will be discussed. The bone loss that occurs acutely after more neurologically motor complete SCI is unique for its sublesional skeletal distribution and rate, at certain skeletal sites approaching 1% of bone mineral density per week, and its resistance to currently available treatments. The areas of high bone loss include the distal femur, proximal tibia, and more distal boney sites. Evidence from a study performed in monozygotic twins discordant for SCI indicates that sublesional bone loss in the twin with SCI increases for several decades, strongly suggesting that the heightened net bone loss after SCI may persist for an extended period of time. The increased frequency of fragility fracture after paralysis will be discussed, and a few risk factors for such fractures after SCI will be examined. Because vitamin D deficiency, regardless of disability, is a relevant consideration for bone health, as well as an easily reversible condition, the increased prevalence of and treatment target values for vitamin D in this deficiency state in the SCI population will be reviewed. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches to preserving bone integrity in persons with acute and chronic SCI will be reviewed, with emphasis placed on efficacy and practicality. Emerging osteoanabolic agents that improve functioning of WNT/?-catenin signaling after paralysis will be introduced as therapeutic interventions that may hold promise. PMID:25171878

  8. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Wei; Chou, Tzu-Yi; Jou, Herng-Jeng; Yang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung-Y.; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between spinal cord injury (SCI) and the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a cohort study with a large representative sample. The National Health Insurance Database was used to select patients who were diagnosed from 2000 to 2010. Patients with a history of PAD were excluded. The SCI group comprised 42,673 patients diagnosed with SCI, and we enrolled 170,389 matched controls (non-SCI group). We used a Cox proportional hazards regression model to analyze the adjusted risk of PAD between the case and control patients. Patients with SCI exhibited a significantly higher risk (hazard ratio [HR]?=?1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.22–1.53) of PAD than patients without SCI. Patients with diabetes were at the highest risk of developing PAD (adjusted HR?=?3.11, 95% CI?=?2.80–3.44). Among patients without comorbidity, SCI patients exhibited a significantly higher risk of PAD than non-SCI patients. Furthermore, lumbar, sacral, or coccygeal spine, and multiple spine SCI were significantly associated with an increased risk of PAD (HR?=?1.56, 95% CI?=?1.33–1.84, HR?=?2.11, 95% CI?=?1.59–2.79, respectively). SCI is associated with an increased risk of PAD. Future studies should focus on modifying risk factors to reduce PAD risk among patients with SCI. PMID:26469900

  9. Osteoporotic fractures and hospitalization risk in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Battaglino, R. A.; Stolzmann, K. L.; Hallett, L. D.; Waddimba, A.; Gagnon, D.; Lazzari, A. A.; Garshick, E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a well acknowledged complication of spinal cord injury. We report that motor complete spinal cord injury and post-injury alcohol consumption are risk factors for hospitalization for fracture treatment. The clinical assessment did not include osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment considerations, indicating a need for improved clinical protocols. Introduction Treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures often results in lengthy hospitalizations for individuals with spinal cord injury. Clinical features and factors that contribute to hospitalization risk have not previously been described. Methods Three hundred and fifteen veterans ? 1 year after spinal cord injury completed a health questionnaire and underwent clinical exam at study entry. Multivariate Cox regression accounting for repeated events was used to assess longitudinal predictors of fracture-related hospitalizations in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers 1996–2003. Results One thousand four hundred and eighty-seven hospital admissions occurred among 315 participants, and 39 hospitalizations (2.6%) were for fracture treatment. Median length of stay was 35 days. Fracture-related complications occurred in 53%. Independent risk factors for admission were motor complete versus motor incomplete spinal cord injury (hazard ratio = 3.73, 95% CI = 1.46–10.50). There was a significant linear trend in risk with greater alcohol consumption after injury. Record review indicated that evaluation for osteoporosis was not obtained during these admissions. Conclusions Assessed prospectively, hospitalization in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers for low-impact fractures is more common in motor complete spinal cord injury and is associated with greater alcohol use after injury. Osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment considerations were not part of a clinical assessment, indicating the need for improved protocols that might prevent low-impact fractures and related admissions. PMID:18581033

  10. The Role of Hope in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen; And Others

    Hope has motivational importance to individuals who have suffered a major physical loss. Theories of adjustment to a spinal cord injury take one of three approaches: (1) premorbid personality, which highlights the individual's past experiences, personal meanings, and body image; (2) typologies of injury reactions, which range from normal to…

  11. The Relationship between Productivity and Adjustment Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Examined adjustment and productivity of persons (N=344) with spinal cord injuries. Found 45 percent of subjects gainfully employed, 14 percent engaged in unpaid productive activities, 41 percent not engaged in any productive activities. Employed subjects had best overall adjustment. Injury level was not related to level of productive activity,…

  12. Incidence of Secondary Complications in Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, C. A.; Shepherd, C.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 348 patients (mean age 37) with postacute spinal cord injury revealed that 95% reported at least 1 secondary problem, and 58% reported 3 or more. The number and severity of complications varied with time since the injury. Obesity, pain, spasticity, urinary tract infections, pressure sores, and lack of social integration were common…

  13. Spinal injuries in the 2012 twin earthquakes, northwest iran.

    PubMed

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Golzari, Samad E J; Salehpour, Firooz; Imani, Taghi; Bazzazi, Amir Mohammad; Ghaffari, Alireza; Khanli, Hadi Mohammad; Tizro, Parastou; Taghizade, Shabnam; Shakouri, Seyed Kazem

    2013-01-01

    On 11 August 2012, twin earthquakes measured 6.3 and 6.4 on the Richter scale hit three towns (Ahar, Varzaqan, and Heris) in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran resulting in tragic loss of three hundred lives and leaving thousands of injured. The aim of the present study was to report the spinal injuries during recent earthquake in northwest Iran, its consequences and management. Of the 923 hospitalized patients, 26 (2.8%) had neurosurgical complications. The imaging and clinical data of the patients were retrospectively studied regarding the anatomical location of the injury, the severity of spinal injury and associated neurological deficit. To further analyze the findings, Magerl (AO) and Frankel's classifications were used. The injuries without any fracture were considered as minor spinal injuries. The mean age of the patients was 44.54±22.52 (range: 5-88) years. We detected a total of 38 vertebral injuries including 24 major (63.15%) and 14 minor injuries (36.85%). The most common injuries were observed in the lumbar spine (19 injuries, 50%). The 24 major injuries chiefly included Magerl type A (14 injuries, 58.3%). According to the Frankel's classification, majority of the patients (88.46%) had no neurological deficit. In this study, three patients had nerve injuries. In conclusion, the number and proportion of spinal fractures patients in the recent twin earthquakes, northwest Iran was limited and caused less nerve injuries compared to the previous similar disasters. This might be due to the milder earthquake consequences since the incident happened in the middle of the day when men were working their fields. Potential complications in patients traumatized in earthquake incidents should be monitored for and early assessment of the neurological function is required to prioritize care for the victims. PMID:23568085

  14. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 ...PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? This...

  15. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 ...PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? This...

  16. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 ...PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? This...

  17. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 ...PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? This...

  18. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 ...PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1...Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program? This...

  19. Injury alters intrinsic functional connectivity within the primate spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Min; Mishra, Arabinda; Yang, Pai-Feng; Wang, Feng; Gore, John C

    2015-05-12

    Recent demonstrations of correlated low-frequency MRI signal variations between subregions of the spinal cord at rest in humans, similar to those found in the brain, suggest that such resting-state functional connectivity constitutes a common feature of the intrinsic organization of the entire central nervous system. We report our detection of functional connectivity within the spinal cords of anesthetized squirrel monkeys at rest and show that the strength of connectivity within these networks is altered by the effects of injuries. By quantifying the low-frequency MRI signal correlations between different horns within spinal cord gray matter, we found distinct functional connectivity relationships between the different sensory and motor horns, a pattern that was similar to activation patterns evoked by nociceptive heat or tactile stimulation of digits. All horns within a single spinal segment were functionally connected, with the strongest connectivity occurring between ipsilateral dorsal and ventral horns. Each horn was strongly connected to the same horn on neighboring segments, but this connectivity reduced drastically along the spinal cord. Unilateral injury to the spinal cord significantly weakened the strength of the intrasegment horn-to-horn connectivity only on the injury side and in slices below the lesion. These findings suggest resting-state functional connectivity may be a useful biomarker of functional integrity in injured and recovering spinal cords. PMID:25902510

  20. Acute traumatic spinal injury following bicycle accidents: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    McGoldrick, Niall P; Green, Connor; Burke, Neil; Synnott, Keith

    2012-06-01

    Although the vast majority of injuries suffered while cycling are minor, acute spinal injuries have been reported. We describe three cases of acute spinal injury occurring while cycling. All three patients reported being thrown over the handlebars, while travelling downhill at speed. Two of the cases resulted in profound neurological deficit. These cases show that there is a spectrum of spinal injury due to bicycle accidents, ranging from no neurological deficit to profound insult, and from high cervical injury to mid-thoracic spinal injury. In cases of bicycle accidents, increased awareness of the possibility of such spinal injury is advisable. PMID:22822586

  1. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  2. Detrimental Effects of Uncontrollable Stimulation on Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Kara

    2007-07-23

    When a person suffers a spinal cord injury, peripheral damage often accompanies it, such as damage to the legs, for instance. The pain (nociceptive) signals from this peripheral injury are being sent to the damaged spinal cord, but the patient...

  3. Behavioral assessment of depressive-like symptoms in a rodent model of spinal cord injury 

    E-print Network

    Luedtke, Kelsey 1988-

    2011-05-05

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) currently affects over 250,000 people in the United States alone with approximately 11,000 new cases occurring each year. In addition to its debilitating physical consequences, spinal cord injury significantly impacts...

  4. Paratracks, November 2000. Publication of Canadian Paraplegic Association (Manitoba) Inc. Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Research Report

    E-print Network

    Manitoba, University of

    Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Research Report by Orpha Schryvers I believe a short explanation is needed towards understanding the spinal cord and investigating ways of curing an injury to the spinal cord to the spinal cord. Four of the clinical research projects previously completed attheRehabilitation Hospital

  5. Pressure ulcer incidence on a spinal cord injury unit.

    PubMed

    Hammond, M C; Bozzacco, V A; Stiens, S A; Buhrer, R; Lyman, P

    1994-11-01

    Because of the high risk for pressure ulcers among hospitalized, spinal cord injured patients, one quality improvement measure is to monitor incidence of pressure ulcers. A retrospective chart review of each patient who developed an ulcer during an 18-month period revealed patient characteristics associated with pressure ulcer risk. Of 468 inpatient admissions, 35 patients developed 81 pressure ulcers. Patient variables associated with an incidence rate of 7.5% were an admission diagnosis of pressure ulcer, surgical repair of pressure ulcers, length of stay, new spinal cord injury, longstanding injury (> 10 years), and the use of condom catheters. PMID:7795866

  6. Hydralazine inhibits compression and acrolein-mediated injuries in ex vivo spinal cord

    E-print Network

    Duerstock, Bradley

    Hydralazine inhibits compression and acrolein-mediated injuries in ex vivo spinal cord Kristin, slow down, and even reverse the development of various diseases. In the case of spinal cord injury that post-trauma oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury

  7. W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience THE SPINAL CORD INJURY PROJECT

    E-print Network

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience THE SPINAL CORD INJURY PROJECT WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FORM Spinal Cord Injury Research Methods Workshop. (Please indicate 1st and 2nd choice.) ___ March. Registration is not final until payment has been received. ___ Spinal Cord Injury Research Methods, $800

  8. Continuous decoding of Motor Attempt and Motor Imagery from EEG Activity in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    E-print Network

    Minguez, Javier

    Continuous decoding of Motor Attempt and Motor Imagery from EEG Activity in Spinal Cord Injury-- Spinal cord injury (SCI) associates brain reor- ganization with a loss of cortical representation broader activation associated patterns that are easier to recognize. I. INTRODUCTION Spinal cord injury

  9. W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience THE SPINAL CORD INJURY PROJECT

    E-print Network

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience THE SPINAL CORD INJURY PROJECT WORKSHOP INFORMATION Please save for your reference Spinal Cord Injury Research Methods Workshop. (Mark date of your of payment: Spinal Cord Injury Research Methods, $800. Refresher Course (for previous attendees), $425

  10. Original Article Functional electrical therapy: retraining grasping in spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    Original Article Functional electrical therapy: retraining grasping in spinal cord injury MR intervention-versus-control trial. Setting: Rehabilitation hospital for spinal cord injury in Toronto, Canada. Methods: A total of 21 people with new spinal cord injuries ranging from C3 to C7 were randomly assigned

  11. Barriers to implementing intermittent catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients in Northwest Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, U.K.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Singh, Gurpreet; Oo, Tun; Hughes, Peter L

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent catheterisation is the preferred method of managing the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. However, spinal cord physicians experienced problems when trying to implement an intermittent catheterisation regime in some spinal cord injury patients in the northwest of England. We present illustrative cases to describe practical difficulties encountered by patients while trying to adopt an intermittent catheterisation regime. Barriers to intermittent catheterisation are (1) caregivers or nurses are not available to carry out five or six catheterisations a day; (2) lack of time to perform intermittent catheterisations; (3) unavailability of suitable toilet facilities in public places, including restaurants and offices; (4) redundant prepuce in a male patient, which prevents ready access to urethral meatus; (5) urethral false passage; (6) urethral sphincter spasm requiring the use of flexible-tip catheters and á-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; (7) reluctance to perform intermittent catheterisation in patients >60 years by some health professionals; and (8) difficulty in accessing the urethral meatus for catheterisation while the patient is sitting up, especially in female patients. These cases demonstrate the urgent need for provision of trained caregivers who can perform intermittent catheterisation, and improvement in public facilities that are suitable for performing catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients. Further, vigilance should be exercised during each catheterisation in order to prevent complications, such as urethral trauma and consequent false passages. Health professionals should make additional efforts to implement intermittent catheterisation in female spinal cord injury patients and in those >60 years. PMID:21218264

  12. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:26240569

  13. Muscular, Skeletal, and Neural Adaptations Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is associated with adaptations to the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems. Experimental data are lacking regarding the extent to which rehabilitative methods may influence these adaptations. An understanding of the plasticity of the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems after paralysis may be important as new rehabilitative technologies emerge in the 21st century. Moreover, individuals injured today may become poor candidates for future scientific advancements (cure) if their neuromusculoskeletal systems are irreversibly impaired. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the physiological properties of skeletal muscle as a result of spinal cord injury; secondarily, to consider associated changes at the skeletal and spinal levels. Muscular adaptations include a transformation to faster myosin, increased contractile speeds, shift to the right on the torque-frequency curve, increased fatigue, and enhanced doublet potentiation. These muscular adaptations may be prevented in individuals with acute paralysis and partially reversed in individuals with chronic paralysis. Moreover, the muscular changes may be coordinated with motor unit and spinal circuitry adaptations. Concurrently, skeletal adaptations, as measured by bone mineral density, show extensive loss within the first six months after paralysis. The underlying science governing neuromusculoskeletal adaptations after paralysis will help guide professionals as new rehabilitation strategies evolve in the future. PMID:11838582

  14. Perceptions of Positive Attitudes toward People with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lys, K.; Pernice, R.

    1995-01-01

    This New Zealand study examined attitudes toward persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) via a survey of 35 people with SCI, 27 SCI rehabilitation workers, 16 outpatient hospital rehabilitation workers, and 37 people from the general population. Results were analyzed in terms of age, ethnic identity, gender, professional training, and amount of…

  15. Employment after Spinal Cord Injury: Transition and Life Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, J. Stuart

    1996-01-01

    Tested two competing hypotheses regarding employment, adjustment, and spinal cord injury (SCI). Longitudinal data collected on 142 participants with SCI on two occasions separated by an 11-year interval showed a correlation between enhanced adjustment and a positive transition from unemployment to employment. Results support hypothesis that…

  16. Drinking Patterns, Drinking Expectancies, and Coping after Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Drinking patterns, alcohol expectancies, and coping strategies were assessed for 121 persons with recent spinal cord injuries during hospitalization, 3 months after surgery, and 12 months after surgery. Although the rate of heavy drinking decreased, preinjury problem drinkers still had the lowest rate of positive reappraisal, problem solving, and…

  17. Spinal Injuries in the Aquatics Environment, Part I: Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Gerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Water-related activities are the number one cause of spinal cord injuries resulting from sports and recreation activities. This article discusses principles of safe diving; principles of safe water sliding; ways to reduce springboard diving accidents; factors contributing to springboard diving accidents; and safety recommendations for open water…

  18. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  19. FGF-2-Responsive and Spinal Cord-Resident Cells Improve Locomotor Function after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Masaki; Jikoh, Takahiro; Fukumitsu, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The adult central nervous system has only a limited capacity for axonal regeneration. In this study, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was injected once into the spinal cord tissue around the injury site immediately after complete spinal cord transection in rats. This treatment markedly improved the locomotor function of the animals. Histological analysis demonstrated that tissue composed of FGF-2-induced fibronectin-positive cells (FIFs) had infiltrated the injury site and filled large cystic cavities, into which numerous axons with growth-associated protein-43 immunoreactivity penetrated. The FIFs could also be cultured from the intact spinal cord tissue, demonstrating that they were resident in the non-injured spinal cord. They had a spindle-shaped morphology and enhanced expression of mRNAs of N-cadherin and neurotrophic factors, suggesting the beneficial properties of the FIFs for axonal regeneration. Thus, these results argue for the continual use of autologous transplantation as a novel and promising cell therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:20199141

  20. Management of severe spinal cord injury following hyperbaric exposure.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bruce; Laden, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence that drainage of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) improves functional neurological outcome after reperfusion injury to the spinal cord that occasionally follows aortic reconstructive surgery. This beneficial effect is considered owing to lowering of the CSF pressure thereby normalising spinal cord blood flow and reducing the 'secondary' cord injury caused by vascular congestion and cord swelling in the relatively confined spinal canal. Whilst lacking definitive proof, there are convincing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort data and systematic reviews supporting this intervention. The therapeutic window for lumbar CSF drainage requires further elucidation; however, it appears to be days rather than hours post insult. We contend that the same benefit is likely to be achieved following other primary spinal cord injuries that cause cord swelling and elicit the 'secondary' injury. Traditionally the concept of CSF drainage has been considered more applicable to the brain as contained in a 'closed box' by lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) to improve cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The control of CPP is intended to limit 'secondary' brain injury and is a key concept of brain injury management. Using microdialysis in the spinal cords of trauma patients, it has been shown that intraspinal pressure (ISP) needs to be kept below 20 mmHg and spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP) above 70 mmHg to avoid biochemical evidence of secondary cord damage. Vasopressor have also been used in spinal cord injury to improve perfusion, however complications are common, typically cardiac in nature, and require very careful monitoring; the evidence supporting this approach is notably less convincing. Decompression illness (DCI) of the spinal cord is treated with recompression, hyperbaric oxygen, various medications designed to reduce the inflammatory response and fluid administration to normalise blood pressure and haematocrit. These management protocols are based largely on anecdote and transferred evidence from conventional cord trauma, as the low numbers and sporadic nature of DCI in divers makes RCTs nigh on impossible. Unfortunately even with best management, some patients are left with significant neurological deficit. The 'iceberg phenomenon', occurs when patients with DCI of the cord make a good neurological recovery but actually have profound cord damage as revealed in one case some four years later at post mortem and another example in a diver who developed late functional deterioration due to loss of neuronal reserve. This clinical evidence, together with animal study data, support the notion that even a modest preservation of spinal cord axons is associated with significant improvement in neurological outcome. In the light of the positive level two evidence in the vascular literature that CSF drainage limits 'secondary' injury thereby improving neurological outcome, we propose that centres with appropriate clinical experience consider using lumbar CSF drainage to normalise SCPP, as an adjunct to the conventional treatment of severe spinal cord DCI. Divers with severe spinal cord DCI are generally in the most productive years of their lives and, given the potentially devastating impact of this condition, should be given the benefit of any possible adjuvant treatment that may serve to improve long-term outcome. PMID:26415075

  1. Endogenous Proliferation after Spinal Cord Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Ashley; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in motor and sensory deficits, the severity of which depends on the level and extent of the injury. Animal models for SCI research include transection, contusion, and compression mouse models. In this paper we will discuss the endogenous stem cell response to SCI in animal models. All SCI animal models experience a similar peak of cell proliferation three days after injury; however, each specific type of injury promotes a specific and distinct stem cell response. For example, the transection model results in a strong and localized initial increase of proliferation, while in contusion and compression models, the initial level of proliferation is lower but encompasses the entire rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. All injury types result in an increased ependymal proliferation, but only in contusion and compression models is there a significant level of proliferation in the lateral regions of the spinal cord. Finally, the fate of newly generated cells varies from a mainly oligodendrocyte fate in contusion and compression to a mostly astrocyte fate in the transection model. Here we will discuss the potential of endogenous stem/progenitor cell manipulation as a therapeutic tool to treat SCI. PMID:23316243

  2. Return to Work for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehman, Paul; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Supported employment was utilized in the vocational rehabilitation of two people with traumatic brain injury and one with a traumatic spinal cord injury. Supported employment was found to yield real work outcomes, though it required substantial amounts of money to return the three patients to relatively low-paying jobs. Funding issues are…

  3. Spinal Musculoskeletal Injuries Associated with Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Henry; Fernandez, Matt

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To review the biomechanics of the swimming stroke and examine common injuries which occur in swimming. A review of diagnosis and management strategies of these injuries is also performed. Background: Most injuries and complaints encountered in swimming athletes occur because of repetitive microtrauma or overuse, with many injuries originating from faulty technique and poor swimming biomechanics. As a result, assessment of an injured athlete requires the practitioner to have an understanding of the four swimming strokes and hydrodynamics. Methods: A Literature search of the MEDLINE and MANTIS databases was performed on all swimming related articles. Results: Twenty seven journal articles and 7 text books were chosen that satisfied the search criteria and related to the aims of this review. Discussion: The correct swimming technique is discussed and predisposing factors to injury in the stroke are identified. Specific injury sites are examined and pathologies to these areas are detailed. Conclusion: The shoulder, neck and back are the injuries considered in this review. These regions are considered in the total training program of the athlete to identify other factors, such as weight training or other dry land programs that may be contributing to injury. However, whilst rest or reduced training may be necessary for recovery, every effort must be made to keep the swimmer “in the water” as cessation of training may lead to a rapid detraining effect and loss of competitive advantage. PMID:17987215

  4. Injury-related characteristics and quality-of-life among Iranian individuals with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sabour, Hadis; Soltani, Zahra; Latifi, Sahar; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Arman, Farid; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Ghodsi, Seyed Mohammad; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health-related quality-of-life (HR-QOL) may be affected by various factors including injury-related characteristics among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the impact of the influence of these variables has not yet been fully described in Iranian population. Here, we assessed the relationships between injury-related characteristics and HR-QOL among Iranian people with SCI. Methods: HR-QOL was assessed using short-form health survey (SF-36). Referred patients to Brain and Spinal Injury Research Center between 2010 and 2012 were invited to participate in this investigation. Injury-related characteristics including injury level and completeness, time since injury, plegia type, and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale were evaluated. Results: Total of 104 patients (85 men and 19 women) entered the study. The majority of patients had a complete injury (77.9%). The most frequent ASIA score was A (75%), and the most common level of injury was at thoracic sections (61.5%). Lower injury levels were associated with higher scores in physical component summary (P = 0.040), mental component summary (P = 0.010) and subsequently total score (P = 0.006). Mean age and time since injury were 52.58 ± 12.69 and 10.88 ± 16.68 years, respectively, and were not related with HR-QOL (P = 0.70 and 0.220, respectively). There was no difference in terms of HR-QOL between patients with complete and incomplete injury. Paraplegic individuals had significantly higher scores in the domain of physical functioning compared to patients with tetraplegia (P = 0.007). Conclusion: lower injury level is a significant predictor of better QOL among individuals with SCI whereas other injury-related characteristics including completeness, time since injury and plegia type may not influence HR-QOL. PMID:26622978

  5. Effects of injury level and severity on direct costs of care for acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, Mohan; Makriyianni, Ioli; Marcoux, Judith; Zhang, Xun

    2014-12-01

    New treatments are being investigated for spinal cord injury (SCI), and any improvement may result in incremental cost savings. The objective of this study was to determine the direct costs of care 2 years after an SCI, stratifying for completeness and level of injury. A retrospective database analysis was carried out using data from the Quebec Trauma Registry, the Quebec Medical Insurance Board, and the Quebec Automobile Insurance Corporation between 1997 and 2007. Excluding individuals sustaining moderate or severe traumatic brain injuries, 481 individuals who sustained an SCI from motor vehicle accidents were identified. Individuals were classified as complete and incomplete in the following categories: C1-C7, C8-T6, T7-L1, L2-S5. Using data from governmental public healthcare organizations makes this study comprehensive. For C1-C7 complete and incomplete spinal cord injuries, the first-year cost was $157?718 and $56?505, respectively (2009 Canadian dollars calculated per patient). Similar differences between complete and incomplete spinal cord injuries were seen for the other groups. Furthermore, for complete injuries, costs were higher for higher levels of injury during both the first and the second year after injury. For incomplete lesions, costs did not differ significantly between groups during the first or the second year. Incomplete spinal cord injuries result in lower healthcare costs compared with complete injuries across all groups during the first 2 years after injury. As less severe levels of injury result in measurably lower costs, the funds spent to reduce the severity or level of SCI could at least partially be recouped through healthcare savings. PMID:25192008

  6. Windup of Flexion Reflexes in Chronic Human Spinal Cord Injury: A Marker for Neuronal Plateau Potentials?

    E-print Network

    Windup of Flexion Reflexes in Chronic Human Spinal Cord Injury: A Marker for Neuronal Plateau., W. Z. Rymer, E. N. Benz, and B. D. Schmit. Windup of flexion reflexes in chronic human spinal cord.2001. The physiological basis of flexion spasms in individuals after spinal cord injury (SCI) may involve alterations

  7. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey, VA Form 10-0515. OMB Control Number... on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord patients' satisfaction with...

  8. W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience THE SPINAL CORD INJURY PROJECT

    E-print Network

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience THE SPINAL CORD INJURY PROJECT THE MASCIS IMPACTOR Overview The MASCIS Impactor is a device designed to deliver graded reproducible spinal cord contusions in rats. Developed over ten years ago, the Impactor is part of a well-defined rodent spinal cord injury

  9. Spastic Long-Lasting Reflexes in the Awake Rat After Sacral Spinal Cord Injury

    E-print Network

    Gorassini, Monica

    Spastic Long-Lasting Reflexes in the Awake Rat After Sacral Spinal Cord Injury D. J. Bennett, L in the awake rat after sacral spinal cord injury. J Neurophysiol 91: 2247­2258, 2004; 10.1152/jn.00946.2003. Following chronic sacral spinal cord transec- tion in rats the affected tail muscles exhibit marked

  10. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey.... Abstract: Information collected on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord...

  11. Earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related injuries in spinal injury patients: differentiation with multidetector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, several massive earthquakes have occurred across the globe. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is reliable in detecting spinal injuries. The purpose of this study was to compare the features of spinal injuries resulting from the Sichuan earthquake with those of non-earthquake-related spinal trauma using MDCT. Methods Features of spinal injuries of 223 Sichuan earthquake-exposed patients and 223 non-earthquake-related spinal injury patients were retrospectively compared using MDCT. The date of non-earthquake-related spinal injury patients was collected from 1 May 2009 to 22 July 2009 to avoid the confounding effects of seasonal activity and clothing. We focused on anatomic sites, injury types and neurologic deficits related to spinal injuries. Major injuries were classified according to the grid 3-3-3 scheme of the Magerl (AO) classification system. Results A total of 185 patients (82.96%) in the earthquake-exposed cohort experienced crush injuries. In the earthquake and control groups, 65 and 92 patients, respectively, had neurologic deficits. The anatomic distribution of these two cohorts was significantly different (P < 0.001). Cervical spinal injuries were more common in the control group (risk ratio (RR) = 2.12, P < 0.001), whereas lumbar spinal injuries were more common in the earthquake-related spinal injuries group (277 of 501 injured vertebrae; 55.29%). The major types of injuries were significantly different between these cohorts (P = 0.002). Magerl AO type A lesions composed most of the lesions seen in both of these cohorts. Type B lesions were more frequently seen in earthquake-related spinal injuries (RR = 1.27), while we observed type C lesions more frequently in subjects with non-earthquake-related spinal injuries (RR = 1.98, P = 0.0029). Conclusions Spinal injuries sustained in the Sichuan earthquake were located mainly in the lumbar spine, with a peak prevalence of type A lesions and a high occurrence of neurologic deficits. The anatomic distribution and type of spinal injuries that varied between earthquake-related and non-earthquake-related spinal injury groups were perhaps due to the different mechanism of injury. PMID:21190568

  12. DARPA challenge: developing new technologies for brain and spinal injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonia, Christian; Zamisch, Monica; Judy, Jack; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The repair of traumatic injuries to the central nervous system remains among the most challenging and exciting frontiers in medicine. In both traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries, the ultimate goals are to minimize damage and foster recovery. Numerous DARPA initiatives are in progress to meet these goals. The PREventing Violent Explosive Neurologic Trauma program focuses on the characterization of non-penetrating brain injuries resulting from explosive blast, devising predictive models and test platforms, and creating strategies for mitigation and treatment. To this end, animal models of blast induced brain injury are being established, including swine and non-human primates. Assessment of brain injury in blast injured humans will provide invaluable information on brain injury associated motor and cognitive dysfunctions. The Blast Gauge effort provided a device to measure warfighter's blast exposures which will contribute to diagnosing the level of brain injury. The program Cavitation as a Damage Mechanism for Traumatic Brain Injury from Explosive Blast developed mathematical models that predict stresses, strains, and cavitation induced from blast exposures, and is devising mitigation technologies to eliminate injuries resulting from cavitation. The Revolutionizing Prosthetics program is developing an avant-garde prosthetic arm that responds to direct neural control and provides sensory feedback through electrical stimulation. The Reliable Neural-Interface Technology effort will devise technologies to optimally extract information from the nervous system to control next generation prosthetic devices with high fidelity. The emerging knowledge and technologies arising from these DARPA programs will significantly improve the treatment of brain and spinal cord injured patients.

  13. Subcutaneous Tri-Block Copolymer Produces Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury

    E-print Network

    Duerstock, Bradley

    Subcutaneous Tri-Block Copolymer Produces Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury Richard B. Borgens,1 compression of the adult guinea pig spinal cord is able to: (1) preserve the anatomic integrity of the cord a behavioral recov- ery of a spinal cord dependent long tract spinal cord reflex. These observations stood out

  14. An electromechanical spinal injury technique with dynamic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, B T; Noyes, D H; Behrmann, D L

    1992-01-01

    Over the past decade, our laboratory has attempted to create a simple, accurate device that could be used to produce reliable and quantifiable spinal cord injuries in the rodent. We report here on our latest of several modifications of a spinal cord impactor that has allowed us to meet these design criteria. The impactor uses the dynamic capacity of an electromagnetic driver (Ling shaker) and a unique pattern generator to briefly compress the dorsal surface of the spinal cord at velocities that may mimic compression injuries seen in the human. Calibrated, independent transducer systems provide open-loop output of the precise movement (displacement) of the impactor probe and the force necessary to achieve a given displacement. Touch sensitivity is accomplished by vibrating the probe slightly as it approaches the dural surface. This also allows a known biomechanical starting point. This combination of improvements in sensitivity and ability to measure all components of the dynamic compression has allowed us to determine detailed biomechanical descriptors of these impact injuries with low coefficients of variation. Furthermore, such descriptors correlate highly with histopathologic and behavioral outcome measures in animal populations with a variety of injury severities. PMID:1474607

  15. The Effect of Injury-Related Characteristics on Changes in Marital Status after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    MERGHATI KHOI, Effat; LATIFI, Sahar; RAHDARI, Fereshteh; SHAKERI, Hania; ARMAN, Farid; KOUSHKI, Davood; NOROUZI JAVIDAN, Abbas; TAHERI OTAGHSARA, Seyede-Mohadeseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) imposes a significant burden on the social and marital life. Here, we assessed the divorce rate and changes in marital status among a sample of Iranian individuals with SCI. Methods: Referred patients to Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research Center were invited to participate in this cross-sectional investigation. The Main exclusion criteria were coincidental brain injury, history of chronic diseases before SCI and substance use. Demographic characteristics (including age, gender, educational level, marital status before and after injury and duration of marriage) and Injury characteristics (level of the injury, American spinal injury association (ASIA) scale and Spinal cord independence measure III (SCIM)) were collected. Results: Total of 241 subjects with SCI participated in this investigation (164 (68%) male and 77 (32%) female). Among men, 16.5% [95% CI: 10.81%–22.18%] and among women 18.2% [95% CI: 9.58%–26.81%] got divorced after injury. Duration of marriage before injury was significantly related to lower divorce rate (P< 0.001 and 0.016 in men and women, respectively). Injury characteristics had no relationship with marital longevity. Age was a protective factor against marital dissolution only in men (P< 0.004). Conclusion: Our study revealed the divorce rate of 17% [95% CI: 13%–20.9%] after SCI in a sample of Iranian population. The protective influence of age in maintenance of marriage was only detected in men, which proposes existence of a sexual polymorphism in the role of age. Divorce rate was similar between two genders and injury characteristics were not related to divorce rate as well. PMID:26576353

  16. Spinal interneurons and forelimb plasticity after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa Janine; Rombola, Angela M; Rousseau, Celeste A; Mercier, Lynne M; Fitzpatrick, Garrett M; Reier, Paul J; Fuller, David D; Lane, Michael A

    2015-06-15

    Cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) disrupts bulbospinal projections to motoneurons controlling the upper limbs, resulting in significant functional impairments. Ongoing clinical and experimental research has revealed several lines of evidence for functional neuroplasticity and recovery of upper extremity function after SCI. The underlying neural substrates, however, have not been thoroughly characterized. The goals of the present study were to map the intraspinal motor circuitry associated with a defined upper extremity muscle, and evaluate chronic changes in the distribution of this circuit following incomplete cSCI. Injured animals received a high cervical (C2) lateral hemisection (Hx), which compromises supraspinal input to ipsilateral spinal motoneurons controlling the upper extremities (forelimb) in the adult rat. A battery of behavioral tests was used to characterize the time course and extent of forelimb motor recovery over a 16 week period post-injury. A retrograde transneuronal tracer - pseudorabies virus - was used to define the motor and pre-motor circuitry controlling the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) muscle in spinal intact and injured animals. In the spinal intact rat, labeling was observed unilaterally within the ECRL motoneuron pool and within spinal interneurons bilaterally distributed within the dorsal horn and intermediate gray matter. No changes in labeling were observed 16 weeks post-injury, despite a moderate degree of recovery of forelimb motor function. These results suggest that recovery of the forelimb function assessed following C2Hx injury does not involve recruitment of new interneurons into the ipsilateral ECRL motor pathway. However, the functional significance of these existing interneurons to motor recovery requires further exploration. PMID:25625912

  17. Low-level laser therapy for spinal cord injury in rats: effects of polarization

    E-print Network

    Ando, Takahiro

    The effects of laser polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared low-level laser therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) are presented. Rat spinal cords were injured with a weight-drop device, and the lesion sites were ...

  18. Urinary tract infections in patients with spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection remains an important problem for patients with spinal cord injury. Interventions used to promote bladder emptying and maintain low-pressure voiding have variable risks for urinary tract infection. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in this population and should not be treated. However, identification of symptomatic infection is compromised by difficulties in ascertainment of symptoms. Use of hydrophilic coated catheters for intermittent catheterization does not influence the frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection. Botulinum toxin injection in the detrusor muscle or the urethral sphincter improves bladder emptying and does not influence the frequency of urinary infection. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common finding in pregnant women with spinal cord injury, but optimal management is not clear. Other research needs include further development and evaluation of interventions to decrease the frequency of infection, improve diagnostic precision, and limit the emergence of resistant organisms. PMID:24445675

  19. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  20. Spinal Cord Injury—Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, William H

    2007-01-01

    Summary: This special report traces the path of spinal cord injury (SCI) from ancient times through the present and provides an optimistic overview of promising clinical trials and avenues of basic research. The spinal cord injuries of Lord Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, President James A. Garfield, and General George Patton provide an interesting perspective on the evolution of the standard of care for SCI. The author details the contributions of a wide spectrum of professionals in the United States, Europe, and Australia, as well as the roles of various government and professional organizations, legislation, and overall advances in surgery, anesthesia, trauma care, imaging, pharmacology, and infection control, in the advancement of care for the individual with SCI. PMID:17591221

  1. Robot-Assisted Locomotion Training after Spinal Cord Injury: Comparison of Rodent Stepping in Virtual and Physical Treadmill Environments

    E-print Network

    Reinkensmeyer, David J.

    Robot-Assisted Locomotion Training after Spinal Cord Injury: Comparison of Rodent Stepping to Robotica #12;1 Abstract We are developing robotic devices for locomotion training after spinal cord injury,000 people experience a traumatic spinal cord injury each year, and over 200,000 people with spinal cord

  2. Neurologic recovery and neurologic decline after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Little, J W; Burns, S P; James, J J; Stiens, S A

    2000-02-01

    Physicians caring for patients with spinal cord injury facilitate neurologic recovery by optimizing nutrition and general health, by coordinating active exercise and functional training to enhance the underlying synapse growth, reversal of muscle atrophy, and motor learning, and by controlling interfering spasticity. SCI physicians also must monitor for neurologic decline during initial rehabilitation and later in life, diagnose promptly and accurately such decline, and orchestrate the appropriate intervention. PMID:10680159

  3. Nonmissile penetrating spinal injury with an impaled knife: case report.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Vemula, Ramesh Chandra; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of non missile penetrating spinal injury (NMPSI) caused due to an impaled knife in the lumbar region. The patient was neurologically preserved and presented with the knife blade retained in his back. The wound with the knife in situ was explored, the knife removed and a dural laceration was repaired. The wound healed without evidence for cerebrospinal fluid leakage or infection. PMID:24426437

  4. Serotonergic pharmacotherapy promotes cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ganzer, Patrick D.; Moxon, Karen A.; Knudsen, Eric B.; Shumsky, Jed S.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical reorganization plays a significant role in recovery of function after injury of the central nervous system. The neural mechanisms that underlie this reorganization may be the same as those normally responsible for skilled behaviors that accompany extended sensory experience and, if better understood, could provide a basis for further promoting recovery of function after injury. The work presented here extends studies of spontaneous cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury to the role of rehabilitative strategies on cortical reorganization. We use a complete spinal transection model to focus on cortical reorganization in response to serotonergic (5-HT) pharmacotherapy without any confounding effects from spared fibers left after partial lesions. 5-HT pharmacotherapy has previously been shown to improve behavioral outcome after SCI but the effect on cortical organization are unknown. After a complete spinal transection in the adult rat, 5-HT pharmacotherapy produced more reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex than would be expected by transection alone. This reorganization was dose dependent, extended into intact (forelimb) motor cortex, and, at least in the hindlimb sensorimotor cortex, followed a somatotopic arrangement. Animals with the greatest behavioral outcome showed the greatest extent of cortical reorganization suggesting that the reorganization is likely to be in response to both direct effects of 5-HT on cortical circuits and indirect effects in response to the behavioral improvement below the level of the lesion. PMID:23262119

  5. Depression, Pain Intensity, and Interference in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The high prevalence of pain and depression in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) is well known. However the link between pain intensity, interference, and depression, particularly in the acute period of injury, has not received sufficient attention in the literature. Objective: To investigate the relationship of depression, pain intensity, and pain interference in individuals undergoing acute inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic SCI. Methods: Participants completed a survey that included measures of depression (PHQ-9), pain intensity (“right now”), and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory: general activity, mood, mobility, relations with others, sleep, and enjoyment of life). Demographic and injury characteristics and information about current use of antidepressants and pre-injury binge drinking also were collected. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to test depression models in 3 steps: (1) age, gender, days since injury, injury level, antidepressant use, and pre-injury binge drinking (controlling variables); (2) pain intensity; and (3) pain interference (each tested separately). Results: With one exception, pain interference was the only statistically significant independent variable in each of the final models. Although pain intensity accounted for only 0.2% to 1.2% of the depression variance, pain interference accounted for 13% to 26% of the variance in depression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that pain intensity alone is insufficient for understanding the relationship of pain and depression in acute SCI. Instead, the ways in which pain interferes with daily life appear to have a much greater bearing on depression than pain intensity alone in the acute setting. PMID:24574820

  6. Nonfatal All-Terrain Vehicle-Related Injuries to Youths Living on Farms in the United States, 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, E. Michael; Myers, John; Hendricks, Kitty; Layne, Larry; Helmkamp, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) in agriculture appears to be growing. Purpose: To provide estimates of ATV ownership and exposure on US farms and an overview of injuries to youths as a result of ATV use on the farm in 2001. Methods: Analysis of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and US Department of Agriculture 2001…

  7. A comparison of oral health in spinal cord injury and other disability groups.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, D J; Truelove, E L; Persson, R S; Chin, M M; Mandel, L S

    1993-01-01

    A controlled pilot study determined oral health in persons with quadriplegia due to spinal cord injury, and compared dental disease rates in spinal cord injury and other disability groups. Seventeen adults with spinal cord injury and 17 controls were assessed for dental/medical/social history; manual function; head, neck, and oral lesions; salivary flow; DMFS; and gingivitis, periodontal pockets, plaque, and calculus. Findings were compared with those from prior studies according to the same protocol, for groups of similar age with mental retardation, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and chronic mental illness. No significant differences between spinal cord injury and control subjects were noted, except that fewer spinal cord injury subjects brushed daily or flossed (p < 0.05); dependent subjects tended to have more plaque and gingivitis than those brushing independently. Subjects with spinal cord injury and mental illness had less gingivitis than those with mental retardation and cerebral palsy (p < 0.001); on calculus, subjects with spinal cord injury ranked lower than subjects with mental illness (p < 0.05). On DFS, mentally ill subjects and those with traumatic brain injury ranked higher than mentally retarded and cerebral palsy groups, with spinal cord injury subjects intermediate. Mentally retarded and traumatic-brain-injured subjects had fewer teeth than other groups (p < 0.05). The findings suggest differences in oral health status and oral care for various disabled populations. PMID:8042130

  8. Contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging for assessment of spinal cord blood flow in experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dubory, Arnaud; Laemmel, Elisabeth; Badner, Anna; Duranteau, Jacques; Vicaut, Eric; Court, Charles; Soubeyrand, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Reduced spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) (i.e., ischemia) plays a key role in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) pathophysiology and is accordingly an important target for neuroprotective therapies. Although several techniques have been described to assess SCBF, they all have significant limitations. To overcome the latter, we propose the use of real-time contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEU). Here we describe the application of this technique in a rat contusion model of SCI. A jugular catheter is first implanted for the repeated injection of contrast agent, a sodium chloride solution of sulphur hexafluoride encapsulated microbubbles. The spine is then stabilized with a custom-made 3D-frame and the spinal cord dura mater is exposed by a laminectomy at ThIX-ThXII. The ultrasound probe is then positioned at the posterior aspect of the dura mater (coated with ultrasound gel). To assess baseline SCBF, a single intravenous injection (400 µl) of contrast agent is applied to record its passage through the intact spinal cord microvasculature. A weight-drop device is subsequently used to generate a reproducible experimental contusion model of SCI. Contrast agent is re-injected 15 min following the injury to assess post-SCI SCBF changes. CEU allows for real time and in-vivo assessment of SCBF changes following SCI. In the uninjured animal, ultrasound imaging showed uneven blood flow along the intact spinal cord. Furthermore, 15 min post-SCI, there was critical ischemia at the level of the epicenter while SCBF remained preserved in the more remote intact areas. In the regions adjacent to the epicenter (both rostral and caudal), SCBF was significantly reduced. This corresponds to the previously described "ischemic penumbra zone". This tool is of major interest for assessing the effects of therapies aimed at limiting ischemia and the resulting tissue necrosis subsequent to SCI. PMID:25993259

  9. Neuropathological Differences Between Rats and Mice after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Fricke, Stanley T.; Faden, Alan I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols to demonstrate pathological differences between rats and mice after SCI. Rats and mice are commonly used to model spinal cord injury (SCI), however histology and immunohistochemistry have shown differences in neuropathology between the two species, including cavity formation and scar/inflammatory responses. Materials and Methods Moderate contusion SCI was performed on adult male rats and mice. At 28 days post-injury, animals underwent T1-weighted (T1W), with or without gadolinium contrast, or T2-weighted (T2W) MRI, to be compared with histology at the same time point. Results In both species, all MRI methods demonstrated changes in spinal cord anatomy. Immunohistochemistry indicated that T2W accurately reflected areas of inflammation and glial scar formation in rats and mice. Quantitation of lesion volume by histology and functional performance correlated best with T2W measurements in both species. Gadolinium contrast accurately reflected the blood-spinal cord-barrier permeability in both species, which appeared greater in rats than in mice. Conclusion These data demonstrate that MRI, with either a T1W or T2W protocol, can effectively distinguish pathological differences between rats and mice. PMID:20882614

  10. CD36 deletion improves recovery from spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Scott A.; Andres, Kariena R.; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    CD36 is a pleiotropic receptor involved in several pathophysiological conditions, including cerebral ischemia, neurovascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis, and recent reports implicate its involvement in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response (ERSR). We hypothesized that CD36 signaling contributes to the inflammation and microvascular dysfunction following spinal cord injury. Following contusive injury, CD36?/? mice demonstrated improved hindlimb functional recovery and greater white matter sparing than CD36+/+ mice. CD36?/? mice exhibited a reduced macrophage, but not neutrophil, infiltration into the injury epicenter. Fewer infiltrating macrophages were either apoptotic or positive for the ERSR marker, phospho-ATF4. CD36?/? mice also exhibited significant improvements in injury heterodomain vascularity and function. These microvessels accumulated less of the oxidized lipid product 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4HNE) and exhibited a reduced ERSR, as detected by vascular phospho-ATF4, CHOP and CHAC-1 expression. In cultured primary endothelial cells, deletion of CD36 diminished 4HNE-induced phospho-ATF4 and CHOP expression. A reduction in phospho-eIF2? and subsequent increase in KDEL-positive, ER-localized proteins suggest that 4HNE-CD36 signaling facilitates the detection of misfolded proteins upstream of eIF2? phosphorylation, ultimately leading to CHOP-induced apoptosis. We conclude that CD36 deletion modestly, but significantly, improves functional recovery from spinal cord injury by enhancing vascular function and reducing macrophage infiltration. These phenotypes may, in part, stem from reduced ER stress-induced cell death within endothelial and macrophage cells following injury. PMID:24690303

  11. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Mehar; Parvez, Suhel

    2014-01-01

    Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-??, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI) includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it. PMID:25587567

  12. Post-traumatic growth following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; McCullumsmith, Cheryl B.; Fann, Jesse R.; Richards, John S.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Bombardier, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Context/objective Examine the relationship of post-traumatic psychological growth (PTG), depression, and personal and injury characteristics in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Community. Participants Eight hundred and twenty-four adults with SCI. Interventions None. Outcome measures Five items from the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory, reflecting positive change after injury in life priorities, closeness to others, new opportunities being available, stronger faith, and personal strength. Results Initial structural equation model testing of a conceptual model of personal and injury characteristics, violent etiology, depression, and PTG resulted in a poor fit. Model modifications resulted in an improved fit, but explained only 5% of the variance in PTG. Being female, younger, having less formal education, and less time since injury had significant relationships with PTG, whereas depression, violent etiology, and injury level/severity did not. In each PTG domain, between 54 and 79% of the sample reported at least some positive change after injury. Conclusions The results of this study, while promising, explained only a small portion of the variance in PTG. A majority of the sample experienced some positive change after injury, with the greatest change in discovering that they were stronger than they thought they were. Comparing means previously reported in a non-SCI sample of those who experienced trauma, positive change after injury was comparable for each PTG item except for new opportunities being available, which was significantly lower for those with SCI. Future directions of research include the development of theoretical models of PTG after SCI. PMID:24559420

  13. Analgesia or Addiction: Implications for Morphine Use After Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-print Network

    Woller, Sarah Ann

    2012-07-16

    Up to 65% of individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) experience neuropathic pain, and cite this as one of the most significant consequences of injury. Opiate analgesics are one of the most effective, but also most concerning, treatments...

  14. Zinc and osteoporosis in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ohry, A; Shemesh, Y; Zak, R; Herzberg, M

    1980-06-01

    Thirty-eight patients (8 women and 30 men) with spinal cord injury were investigated. All had been immobilised after the traumatic event. The time elapsed since their accidents varied from 2 to 74 weeks. Blood and urine samples were collected to investigated calcium, zinc, magnesium, sodium, alkaline phosphate, phosphore, haemoglobin, creatinine, uric acid and proteins in blood, and the urinary excretion of phosphore, hydroxyproline, creatinine, amino acids, calcium, calcium, magnesium and zinc. The methods were estimately by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The serum zinc levels did not differ statistically from normal and the calcium and magnesium levels in the serum were lower among the patients than in normal controls. The urinary excretion of zinc, calcium, phosphore and hydroxyproline was higher among the patients without correlation to the patients' age. The zinc excretion is negatively correlated to the time elapsed since the injury, but it is still high 3 months after trauma. The highly significant correlation between urinary zinc and hydroxyproline excretion, together with increased calcium and phosphore excretion, suggests that zinc may be involved in the process of osteoporosis in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:7413239

  15. Sexual and Reproductive Function in Spinal Cord Injury and Spinal Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Theodore H.; Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J. Mason; Palumbo, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data. PMID:26605025

  16. Following spinal cord injury (SCI) significant reorganization of the sensorimotor pathways occurs

    E-print Network

    Reinkensmeyer, David J.

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI) significant reorganization of the sensorimotor pathways occurs, on the lesioned and non-lesioned side of the lumbosacral spinal cord following a low-thoracic hemisection Retraining the injured spinal cord V. Reggie Edgerton*, Ray D. de Leon*, Susan J. Harkema*§, John A. Hodgson

  17. Spinal cord injury causes chronic liver pathology in rats.

    PubMed

    Sauerbeck, Andrew D; Laws, J Lukas; Bandaru, Veera V R; Popovich, Phillip G; Haughey, Norman J; McTigue, Dana M

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes major disruption to peripheral organ innervation and regulation. Relatively little work has investigated these post-SCI systemic changes, however, despite considerable evidence that multiple organ system dysfunction contributes to chronic impairments in health. Because metabolic dysfunction is common after SCI and the liver is a pivotal site for metabolic homeostasis, we sought to determine if liver pathology occurs as a result of SCI in a rat spinal contusion model. Histologic evidence showed excess lipid accumulation in the liver for at least 21 days post-injury after cervical or midthoracic SCI. Lipidomic analysis revealed an acute increase in hepatic ceramides as well as chronically elevated lactosylceramide. Post-SCI hepatic changes also included increased proinflammatory gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-1?, chemokine ligand-2, and tumor necrosis factor-? mRNA. These were coincident with increased CD68+ macrophages in the liver through 21 days post-injury. Serum alanine transaminase, used clinically to detect liver damage, was significantly increased at 21 days post-injury, suggesting that early metabolic and inflammatory damage preceded overt liver pathology. Surprisingly, liver inflammation was even detected after lumbar SCI. Collectively, these results suggest that SCI produces chronic liver injury with symptoms strikingly similar to those of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (fatty liver disease). These clinically significant hepatic changes after SCI are known to contribute to systemic inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, all of which are more prevalent in persons with SCI. Targeting acute and prolonged hepatic pathology may improve recovery and reduce long-term complications after SCI. PMID:25036371

  18. Quality Assessment of Spinal Cord Injury Patient Education Resources.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Singh, Priyanka L; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-04-01

    Study Design. Analysis of spinal cord injury patient education resources.Objective. To assess the quality of online patient education materials written about spinal cord injury.Summary of Background Data. The use of online materials by healthcare consumers to access medical information presents unique challenges. Most Americans have access to the Internet and frequently turn to it as a first-line resource.Methods. The quality of online patient education materials was evaluated via a readability analysis. Materials provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); Centers for Disease Control (CDC); American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS); National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA); Mayo Clinic (Mayo); Department of Veterans Affairs (VA); Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (Kessler); American Academy of Neurology (AAN); Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA); and the Shepherd Center (SC) were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level evaluations with Microsoft Office Word software. Unnecessary formatting was removed and the readability was evaluated with the Spelling and Grammar function.Results. A total of 104 sections from 10 different websites were analyzed. Overall, the average values of the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (11.9) and Flesch Reading Ease (40.2) indicated that most Americans would not be able to fully comprehend this material.Conclusion. Results indicate that the language used on materials provided by the aforementioned sites is perhaps too advanced for the average American to fully comprehend. The quality of these education resources may be improved via website revisions, which might be beneficial for improved patient utilization. PMID:24718059

  19. Effect of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on recovery from spinal cord injury in rats given uncontrollable stimulation 

    E-print Network

    Petrich, Christine

    2006-08-16

    The eventual outcome of spinal cord injury is largely influenced by damage that occurs after the injury. Damaged connections between spinal cord cells and the brain allow a positive feedback mechanism to go unchecked when activated by ascending pain...

  20. Surgical treatments to restore function control in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Keith, Michael W; Peljovich, Allan

    2012-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) have a profound loss of control of their lives and abilities. Surgical procedures are of significant benefit in improving autonomy, self-care, and body function. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is useful at higher levels of paralysis such as ASIA C5 or C6 where there are no remaining voluntary muscles for tendon transfer and can partially replace respiration, balance, and ambulation. Outcomes studies show that surgical care improves independence, strength of grasp, and measured quality of life. Those with tetraplegia should be referred for consultation for surgical reconstruction, release of contractures, consideration for neuroprostheses, and reconstruction. PMID:23098712

  1. Spinal cord injury-induced pain: mechanisms and treatments.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Philip J; Middleton, James W

    2015-11-01

    Pain is a common consequence of a spinal cord injury (SCI) and has a major impact on quality of life through its impact on physical function, mood and participation in work, recreational and social activities. Several types of pain typically present following SCI with central neuropathic pain being a frequent and difficult to manage occurrence. Despite advances in our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to this type of pain and an increasing number of trials examining treatment efficacy, our ability to relieve neuropathic SCI pain is still very limited. Optimal management relies upon an integrated approach that uses a combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological options. PMID:26402151

  2. Religiosity and Spirituality among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; Glover-Graf, Noreen M.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 157 persons with spinal cord injury completed the "Spirituality and Spinal Cord Injury Survey" in relation to their spiritual and/or religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices in terms of adapting to their disability. Factor analysis accounting for 69% of the variance revealed four factors related to Spiritual Help and Improvement…

  3. Body composition of active persons with spinal cord injury and with poliomyelitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to evaluate the body composition of subjects with active spinal cord injuries and polio. Two groups of males and females, active, free-living, of similar ages and body mass index (BMI), were distributed according to the source of deficiency: SCI – low spinal cord injury (T5-T12) an...

  4. Influence of Alcohol Intake on the Course and Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiwerski, J. E.; Krasuski, M.

    1992-01-01

    This study compared the neurological state and results of treatment for patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who were intoxicated (n=424) or sober (n=769) on admission to a Warsaw (Poland) hospital. In the intoxicated group, the number of patients with symptoms of complete spinal cord injury was much greater than that of the sober group. (DB)

  5. A 20-year Longitudinal Perspective on the Vocational Experiences of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crewe, Nancy M.

    2000-01-01

    Uses interviews conducted in 1974 and 1994 to investigate the vocational experiences of individuals with spinal cord injuries. Participants had received a spinal cord injury 22-45 years previously. Results revealed that all but seven of the participants had been in remunerative employment. Work experiences, comprehensive rehabilitation service,…

  6. Respiratory Management in the Patient with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras Vázquez, Rita; Rascado Sedes, Pedro; Montoto Marqués, Antonio; Ferreiro Velasco, M. Elena

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often lead to impairment of the respiratory system and, consequently, restrictive respiratory changes. Paresis or paralysis of the respiratory muscles can lead to respiratory insufficiency, which is dependent on the level and completeness of the injury. Respiratory complications include hypoventilation, a reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Vital capacity (VC) is an indicator of overall pulmonary function; patients with severely impaired VC may require assisted ventilation. It is best to proceed with intubation under controlled circumstances rather than waiting until the condition becomes an emergency. Mechanical ventilation can adversely affect the structure and function of the diaphragm. Early tracheostomy following short orotracheal intubation is probably beneficial in selected patients. Weaning should start as soon as possible, and the best modality is progressive ventilator-free breathing (PVFB). Appropriate candidates can sometimes be freed from mechanical ventilation by electrical stimulation. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve patients' inspiratory function following a SCI. PMID:24089664

  7. 76 FR 33734 - Applications for New Awards; Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) Centers and SCIMS Multi...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Applications for New Awards; Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) Centers and SCIMS Multi-Site... Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRPs) and Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injury Program--Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) Centers and SCIMS Multi-Site Collaborative Research...

  8. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  9. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  10. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  11. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  12. Cellular Transplantation Strategies for Spinal Cord Injury and Translational Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Reier, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Basic science advances in spinal cord injury and regeneration research have led to a variety of novel experimental therapeutics designed to promote functionally effective axonal regrowth and sprouting. Among these interventions are cell-based approaches involving transplantation of neural and non-neural tissue elements that have potential for restoring damaged neural pathways or reconstructing intraspinal synaptic circuitries by either regeneration or neuronal/glial replacement. Notably, some of these strategies (e.g., grafts of peripheral nerve tissue, olfactory ensheathing glia, activated macrophages, marrow stromal cells, myelin-forming oligodendrocyte precursors or stem cells, and fetal spinal cord tissue) have already been translated to the clinical arena, whereas others have imminent likelihood of bench-to-bedside application. Although this progress has generated considerable enthusiasm about treating what once was thought to be a totally incurable condition, there are many issues to be considered relative to treatment safety and efficacy. The following review reflects on different experimental applications of intraspinal transplantation with consideration of the underlying pathological, pathophysiological, functional, and neuroplastic responses to spinal trauma that such treatments may target along with related issues of procedural and biological safety. The discussion then moves to an overview of ongoing and completed clinical trials to date. The pros and cons of these endeavors are considered, as well as what has been learned from them. Attention is primarily directed at preclinical animal modeling and the importance of patterning clinical trials, as much as possible, according to laboratory experiences. PMID:15717046

  13. Autonomic Dysreflexia Causes Chronic Immune Suppression after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Guan, Zhen; Reader, Brenda; Shawler, Todd; Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Huang, Kun; Weil, Zachary; Bratasz, Anna; Wells, Jonathan; Powell, Nicole D.; Sheridan, John F.; Whitacre, Caroline C.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.; Nash, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia (AD), a potentially dangerous complication of high-level spinal cord injury (SCI) characterized by exaggerated activation of spinal autonomic (sympathetic) reflexes, can cause pulmonary embolism, stroke, and, in severe cases, death. People with high-level SCI also are immune compromised, rendering them more susceptible to infectious morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms underlying postinjury immune suppression are not known. Data presented herein indicate that AD causes immune suppression. Using in vivo telemetry, we show that AD develops spontaneously in SCI mice with the frequency of dysreflexic episodes increasing as a function of time postinjury. As the frequency of AD increases, there is a corresponding increase in splenic leucopenia and immune suppression. Experimental activation of spinal sympathetic reflexes in SCI mice (e.g., via colorectal distension) elicits AD and exacerbates immune suppression via a mechanism that involves aberrant accumulation of norepinephrine and glucocorticoids. Reversal of postinjury immune suppression in SCI mice can be achieved by pharmacological inhibition of receptors for norepinephrine and glucocorticoids during the onset and progression of AD. In a human subject with C5 SCI, stimulating the micturition reflex caused AD with exaggerated catecholamine release and impaired immune function, thus confirming the relevance of the mouse data. These data implicate AD as a cause of secondary immune deficiency after SCI and reveal novel therapeutic targets for overcoming infectious complications that arise due to deficits in immune function. PMID:23926252

  14. Musculoskeletal Deterioration and Hemicorporectomy After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The long-term management following an hemicorporectomy (HCP) is not well documented in the scientific literature. The purpose of this case report is to describe the 25-year history of a man with a spinal cord injury who experienced severe musculoskeletal deterioration and hemicorporectomy. Case Description The client sustained T10 complete paraplegia at age 18 years, developed severe decubitus ulcers, and required an HCP as a lifesaving measure 13 years later. The authors describe the chronology of several rehabilitation and prosthetic strategies and speculate on factors that may have contributed to their successes and failures. Outcomes The client survived 12 years after the HCP and returned to independent mobility, self-care, and schooling despite complications with continued skin breakdown. Over the 12 years following discharge from the hospital after the spinal cord injury, he spent 749 days in the hospital. During the 12 years he lived after discharge from the hospital following the HCP, he was hospitalized 190 days. Discussion The authors discuss factors contributing to the client’s musculoskeletal deterioration including chronic wounds, postural deviations, and incomplete adherence to pressure-relief recommendations and raise considerations for physical therapists who treat patients after HCP. PMID:12620090

  15. Hydrogels and Cell Based Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C.; Gomes, Eduardo D.; Silva, Nuno A.; Salgado, António J.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a central nervous system- (CNS-) related disorder for which there is yet no successful treatment. Within the past several years, cell-based therapies have been explored for SCI repair, including the use of pluripotent human stem cells, and a number of adult-derived stem and mature cells such as mesenchymal stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and Schwann cells. Although promising, cell transplantation is often overturned by the poor cell survival in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Alternatively, the therapeutic role of different cells has been used in tissue engineering approaches by engrafting cells with biomaterials. The latter have the advantages of physically mimicking the CNS tissue, while promoting a more permissive environment for cell survival, growth, and differentiation. The roles of both cell- and biomaterial-based therapies as single therapeutic approaches for SCI repair will be discussed in this review. Moreover, as the multifactorial inhibitory environment of a SCI suggests that combinatorial approaches would be more effective, the importance of using biomaterials as cell carriers will be herein highlighted, as well as the recent advances and achievements of these promising tools for neural tissue regeneration. PMID:26124844

  16. Referred sensations and neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Soler, M.D.; Kumru, H.; Vidal, J.; Pelayo, R.; Tormos, J.M.; Fregni, F.; Navarro, X.; Pascual-Leone, A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that painful and non-painful referred sensations (RSs) are associated with reorganization of sensory pathways in patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to investigate the referred sensation (RS) phenomenon and its correlation with neuropathic pain (NP) 48 patients with complete SCI, 24 with chronic NP and 24 without pain or paraesthesias were studied using clinical examination and neurophysiological tests. Patients reporting RSs were re-examined at 2 and 10 weeks after the first examination. We defined the presence of RS as sensations perceived below the injury level in response to touch and pinprick stimuli in various body points above the injury level. The examination was carried out by one researcher applying the stimuli to the patient under two visual conditions (open and closed eyes), and then asking the patient to make tactile self-stimulation. Seven patients with SCI and NP (29%) reported RS below the injury level. RS were well located and consistently evoked at repeated examinations. Touch and pinprick stimulation elicited similar RS that were non-painful in six patients and painful in one. Visual feedback did not change RS perception and characteristics. None of the patients in the SCI group without NP presented RS. In conclusion, our results indicate that RS is relatively frequent in patients with complete SCI and NP. The common occurrence of RS in patients with NP and the location of the sensations in the same area as NP suggest that pain and RS share common pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:20471171

  17. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Hee; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to the exercise protocol and was stopped when the subject was exhausted or when VO2 reached an equilibriu Results Among the 40 subjects, there were 10 subjects with cervical cord injury, 27 with thoracic cord injury, and 3 with lumbar cord injury. Twenty-five subjects who were exercised regularly showed statistically higher results of VO2max than those who did not exercise regularly. Subjects with cervical injury showed statistically lower VO2max than the subjects with thoracic or lumbar injury out of the 40 subjects with neurologic injury. In addition, higher age showed a statistically lower VO2max. Lastly, the regularly exercising paraplegic group showed higher VO2max than the non-exercising paraplegic group. Conclusion There are differences in VO2max of subjects with spinal cord injury according to the degree of neurologic injury, age, and whether the subject participates in regular exercise. We found that regular exercise increased the VO2max in individuals with spinal cord injury. PMID:25750877

  18. Optical stimulation for restoration of motor function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Grant W; Grahn, Peter J; Hachmann, Jan T; Lujan, J Luis; Lee, Kendall H

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury can be defined as a loss of communication between the brain and the body due to disrupted pathways within the spinal cord. Although many promising molecular strategies have emerged to reduce secondary injury and promote axonal regrowth, there is still no effective cure, and recovery of function remains limited. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) represents a strategy developed to restore motor function without the need for regenerating severed spinal pathways. Despite its technological success, however, FES has not been widely integrated into the lives of spinal cord injury survivors. In this review, we briefly discuss the limitations of existing FES technologies. Additionally, we discuss how optogenetics, a rapidly evolving technique used primarily to investigate select neuronal populations within the brain, may eventually be used to replace FES as a form of therapy for functional restoration after spinal cord injury. PMID:25659246

  19. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-01

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25578260

  20. Serum Lipid Profile in Subjects with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Laclaustra, Martin; Van Den Berg, Elizabeth Louise Maayken; Hurtado-Roca, Yamilée; Castellote, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Few large studies have examined the relationship between spinal cord injury (SCI) and lipid profile. We studied serum lipid concentrations in subjects with traumatic SCI in relation to the degree of neurological involvement and time since injury, and compared them with values from a reference sample for the Spanish population (DRECE study). Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort was built from 177 consecutive cases with traumatic SCI admitted to the SCI unit of the Miguel Servet Hospital in Aragon (Spain). Outcome measures (cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-c and LDL-c levels) were analyzed according to the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), neurological level of injury (involvement of all limbs vs. only lower limbs), and time since injury. All analyses were adjusted for age and sex. Results Cases without preserved motor function (AIS A or B) had lower total and HDL cholesterol than the others (-11.4 [-21.5, -1.4] mg/dL total cholesterol and -5.1 [-8.8, -1.4] mg/dL HDL-c), and cases with all-limb involvement had lower total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol than those with only lower-limb involvement (-14.0 [-24.6, -3.4] mg/dL total cholesterol, -4.1 [-8.0, -0.2] mg/dL HDL-c, and -10.0 [-19.7, -0.3] mg/dL LDL-c) (all p<0.05). No association was found between lipid concentrations and time since injury. Concentrations of lipid subfractions and triglycerides in SCI subjects were lower than in sex- and age-stratified values from the reference sample. Conclusion A high degree of neurological involvement in SCI (anatomically higher lesions and AIS A or B) is associated with lower total cholesterol and HDL-c. PMID:25706982

  1. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White-Schenk, Désirée.; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F.

    2013-02-01

    An estimated 12,000 new cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) occur every year in the United States. A small oxidative molecule responsible for secondary injury, acrolein, is an important target in SCI. Acrolein attacks essential proteins and lipids, creating a feed-forward loop of oxidative stress in both the primary injury area and the surrounding areas. A small molecule used and FDA-approved for hypertension, hydralazine, has been found to "scavenge" acrolein after injury, but its delivery and short half-life, as well as its hypertension effects, hinder its application for SCI. Nanomedical systems broaden the range of therapeutic availability and efficacy over conventional medicine. They allow for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to tissues of interest, reducing side effects of untargeted therapies in unwanted areas. Nanoparticles made from silica form porous networks that can carry therapeutic molecules throughout the body. To attenuate the acrolein cascade and improve therapeutic availability, we have used a one-step, modified Stober method to synthesize two types of silica nanoparticles. Both particles are "stealth-coated" with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) (to minimize interactions with the immune system and to increase circulation time), which is also a therapeutic agent for SCI by facilitating membrane repair. One nanoparticle type contains an amine-terminal PEG (SiNP-mPEG-Am) and the other possesses a terminal hydrazide group (SiNP-mPEG-Hz). The former allows for exploration of hydralazine delivery, loading, and controlled release. The latter group has the ability to react with acrolein, allowing the nanoparticle to scavenge directly. The nanoparticles have been characterized and are being explored using neuronal PC-12 cells in vitro, demonstrating the potential of novel silica nanoparticles for use in attenuating secondary injury after SCI.

  2. Respiratory Dysfunction and Management in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert; DiMarco, Anthony F; Hoit, Jeannette D; Garshick, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in spinal cord injury (SCI), which causes impairment of respiratory muscles, reduced vital capacity, ineffective cough, reduction in lung and chest wall compliance, and excess oxygen cost of breathing due to distortion of the respiratory system. Severely affected individuals may require assisted ventilation, which can cause problems with speech production. Appropriate candidates can sometimes be liberated from mechanical ventilation by phrenic-nerve pacing and pacing of the external intercostal muscles. Partial recovery of respiratory-muscle performance occurs spontaneously. The eventual vital capacity depends on the extent of spontaneous recovery, years since injury, smoking, a history of chest injury or surgery, and maximum inspiratory pressure. Also, respiratory-muscle training and abdominal binders improve performance of the respiratory muscles. For patients on long-term ventilation, speech production is difficult. Often, practitioners are reluctant to deflate the tracheostomy tube cuff to allow speech production. Yet cuff-deflation can be done safely. Standard ventilator settings produce poor speech quality. Recent studies demonstrated vast improvement with long inspiratory time and positive end-expiratory pressure. Abdominal binders improve speech quality in patients with phrenic-nerve pacers. Recent data show that the level and completeness of injury and older age at the time of injury may not be related directly to mortality in SCI, which suggests that the care of SCI has improved. The data indicate that independent predictors of all-cause mortality include diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cigarette smoking, and percent-of-predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second. An important clinical problem in SCI is weak cough, which causes retention of secretions during infections. Methods for secretion clearance include chest physical therapy, spontaneous cough, suctioning, cough assistance by forced compression of the abdomen (“quad cough”), and mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. Recently described but not yet available for general use is activation of the abdominal muscles via an epidural electrode placed at spinal cord level T9-L1. PMID:16867197

  3. Nanocarrier-mediated inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor attenuates secondary injury after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Tarun; Loomis, Kristin H; Pai, S Balakrishna; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Gaupp, Eric; Patil, Ketki; Patkar, Radhika; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2015-02-24

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can lead to permanent motor and sensory deficits. Following the initial traumatic insult, secondary injury mechanisms characterized by persistent heightened inflammation are initiated and lead to continued and pervasive cell death and tissue damage. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as methylprednisolone (MP) used clinically have ambiguous benefits with debilitating side effects. Typically, these drugs are administered systemically at high doses, resulting in toxicity and paradoxically increased inflammation. Furthermore, these drugs have a small time window postinjury (few hours) during which they need to be infused to be effective. As an alternative to MP, we investigated the effect of a small molecule inhibitor (Chicago sky blue, CSB) of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) for treating SCI. The pleiotropic cytokine MIF is known to contribute to upregulation of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in various disease and injury states. In vitro, CSB administration alleviated endotoxin-mediated inflammation in primary microglia and macrophages. Nanocarriers such as liposomes can potentially alleviate systemic side effects of high-dose therapy by enabling site-specific drug delivery to the spinal cord. However, the therapeutic window of 100 nm scale nanoparticle localization to the spinal cord after contusion injury is not fully known. Thus, we first investigated the ability of nanocarriers of different sizes to localize to the injured spinal cord up to 2 weeks postinjury. Results from the study showed that nanocarriers as large as 200 nm in diameter could extravasate into the injured spinal cord up to 96 h postinjury. We then formulated nanocarriers (liposomes) encapsulating CSB and administered them intravenously 48 h postinjury, within the previously determined 96 h therapeutic window. In vivo, in this clinically relevant contusion injury model in rats, CSB administration led to preservation of vascular and white matter integrity, improved wound healing, and an increase in levels of arginase and other transcripts indicative of a resolution phase of wound healing. This study demonstrates the potential of MIF inhibition in SCI and the utility of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery selectively to the injured cord. PMID:25587936

  4. Quantifying the internal deformation of the rodent spinal cord during acute spinal cord injury - the validation of a method.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Visualization and analysis of the rodent spinal cord subject to experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has almost completely been limited to naked-eye observations, and a single measure of gross spinal cord motion due to injury. This study introduces a novel method which utilizes MRI to quantify the deformation of the rodent spinal cord due to imposed, clinically-relevant injuries - specifically, cervical contusion and dislocation mechanisms. The image registration methods were developed using the Advanced Normalization Tools package, which incorporate rigid, affine and deformable registration steps. The proposed method is validated against a fiducial-based, 'gold-standard' measure of spinal cord tissue motion. The validation analysis yielded accuracy (and precision) values of 62 ?m (49 ?m), 73 ?m (79 ?m) and 112 ?m (110 ?m), for the medio-lateral, dorso-ventral and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. The internal morphological change of the spinal cord has never before been quantified, experimentally. This study demonstrates the capability of this method and its potential for future application to in vivo rodent models of SCI. PMID:25894327

  5. Locomotor training improves premotoneuronal control after chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Knikou, Maria; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K

    2014-06-01

    Spinal inhibition is significantly reduced after spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. In this work, we examined if locomotor training can improve spinal inhibition exerted at a presynaptic level. Sixteen people with chronic SCI received an average of 45 training sessions, 5 days/wk, 1 h/day. The soleus H-reflex depression in response to low-frequency stimulation, presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferent terminals following stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, and bilateral EMG recovery patterns were assessed before and after locomotor training. The soleus H reflexes evoked at 1.0, 0.33, 0.20, 0.14, and 0.11 Hz were normalized to the H reflex evoked at 0.09 Hz. Conditioned H reflexes were normalized to the associated unconditioned H reflex evoked with subjects seated, while during stepping both H reflexes were normalized to the maximal M wave evoked after the test H reflex at each bin of the step cycle. Locomotor training potentiated homosynaptic depression in all participants regardless the type of the SCI. Presynaptic facilitation of soleus Ia afferents remained unaltered in motor complete SCI patients. In motor incomplete SCIs, locomotor training either reduced presynaptic facilitation or replaced presynaptic facilitation with presynaptic inhibition at rest. During stepping, presynaptic inhibition was modulated in a phase-dependent manner. Locomotor training changed the amplitude of locomotor EMG excitability, promoted intralimb and interlimb coordination, and altered cocontraction between knee and ankle antagonistic muscles differently in the more impaired leg compared with the less impaired leg. The results provide strong evidence that locomotor training improves premotoneuronal control after SCI in humans at rest and during walking. PMID:24598526

  6. [Spinal cord injury (SCI) - Aspects of intensive medical care].

    PubMed

    Leyk, Gesa; Hirschfeld, Sven; Böthig, Ralf; Willenbrock, Ute; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Stuhr, Markus

    2014-09-01

    With 2000 new cases/year in Germany spinal cord injury (SCI) is quantitatively less important for intensive care medicine than, e.g., sepsis. But, due to the consequences for the patient, the intricacy of treatment and the enormous costs, it is a significant clinical picture. Outside of specialized centers, routine experience with SCI is largely lacking, particularly in cases of tetraplegia. Dependent on the level of the paralysis, complications in the acute situation, the hospitalization and the rehabilitation are common and need intensive medical care. Lifelong mechanical ventilation is needed in some cases of cervical SCI, for which experience has since grown. New therapeutic options have become implemented (e.g., electrophrenic/diaphragm pacing), have a need to be examined, and extend lifespan in cases of SCI. As a result more patients have a chance for rehabilitation today than in previous decades." PMID:25238008

  7. Exercise awareness and barriers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is an essential element in managing several of the non-communicable diseases after spinal cord injury (SCI). Awareness of the importance of prescribing a customized exercise program that meets the goals of persons with SCI should be highly considered in the rehabilitation community. The barriers of implementing specific exercise program as well as the factors that may mask the outcomes of regular exercise regimen need to be continuously addressed as a part of patients’ rehabilitation care. The focus of this editorial is to encourage the medical community to consider routine physical activity as one of the necessary vital signs that needs to be routinely checked in patients with SCI. Providing education tips, nutritional counseling and engaging in recreational programs may provide motivational route to the community of SCI. This may result in reinforcing active lifestyle in survivors with SCI as well as to reduce the impact of chronic life threatening medical disorders. PMID:25035817

  8. Exercise awareness and barriers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2014-07-18

    Exercise is an essential element in managing several of the non-communicable diseases after spinal cord injury (SCI). Awareness of the importance of prescribing a customized exercise program that meets the goals of persons with SCI should be highly considered in the rehabilitation community. The barriers of implementing specific exercise program as well as the factors that may mask the outcomes of regular exercise regimen need to be continuously addressed as a part of patients' rehabilitation care. The focus of this editorial is to encourage the medical community to consider routine physical activity as one of the necessary vital signs that needs to be routinely checked in patients with SCI. Providing education tips, nutritional counseling and engaging in recreational programs may provide motivational route to the community of SCI. This may result in reinforcing active lifestyle in survivors with SCI as well as to reduce the impact of chronic life threatening medical disorders. PMID:25035817

  9. When narratives matter: men, sport, and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, A C; Smith, B

    2005-12-01

    Experiencing a spinal cord injury (SCI) and becoming disabled through sport is a major disruptive life event that instigates a multiplicity of difficult and complex issues that the person has to deal with. One of these problems is how to restory a life and construct new body/self relationships and identities over time. To explore this process, we focus on the life stories of a small group of men (n?=?14) who have suffered SCI and become disabled through playing rugby football. We illustrate the ways in which certain metaphors, notions of time, and kinds of hope, congregate and coalesce within three specific narrative types and how these operate to shape the individual experiences of these men following SCI. The implications of this dynamic process for the storied body/self and identity construction are highlighted throughout. PMID:23674665

  10. Recommendations for Mobility in Children with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mobility is an important aspect of the rehabilitation of children with spinal cord injury (SCI), is a necessary component of life, and is critical in a child’s development. Depending upon the individual’s age and degree of neurological impairment, the nature of mobility may vary. Objectives: The objective of this article is to establish recommendations surrounding the selection of mobility for children with SCI. Methods: Extensive literature review and multidisciplinary peer review. Results: Types of mobility including power, manual, upright, and community are discussed, and recommendations are made based on medical necessity, neurological level, ASIA Impairment Scale score, and developmental considerations and challenges. Conclusion: Mobility is critical for proper development to occur in the pediatric population, and it may be challenging to make recommendations for mobility in children with SCI. It is essential for clinicians providing care to children with SCI to address mobility in a comprehensive and longitudinal manner across the children’s environments. PMID:23671384

  11. Spinal cord injury: overview of experimental approaches used to restore locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide and can lead to paraplegia and quadriplegia. Anatomical discontinuity in the spinal cord results in disruption of the impulse conduction that causes temporary or permanent changes in the cord's normal functions. Although axonal regeneration is limited, damage to the spinal cord is often accompanied by spontaneous plasticity and axon regeneration that help improve sensory and motor skills. The recovery process depends mainly on synaptic plasticity in the preexisting circuits and on the formation of new pathways through collateral sprouting into neighboring denervated territories. However, spontaneous recovery after spinal cord injury can go on for several years, and the degree of recovery is very limited. Therefore, the development of new approaches that could accelerate the gain of motor function is of high priority to patients with damaged spinal cord. Although there are no fully restorative treatments for spinal injury, various rehabilitative approaches have been tested in animal models and have reached clinical trials. In this paper, a closer look will be given at the potential therapies that could facilitate axonal regeneration and improve locomotor recovery after injury to the spinal cord. This article highlights the application of several interventions including locomotor training, molecular and cellular treatments, and spinal cord stimulation in the field of rehabilitation research. Studies investigating therapeutic approaches in both animal models and individuals with injured spinal cords will be presented. PMID:25870961

  12. Chemokine-Ligands/Receptors: Multiplayers in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in complex posttraumatic sequelae affecting the whole neuraxis. Due to its involvement in varied neuromodulatory processes, the chemokine-ligand/receptor-network is a key element of secondary lesion cascades induced by SCI. This review will provide a synopsis of chemokine-ligand/receptor-expression along the whole neuraxis after traumatic spinal cord (sc) insults on basis of recent in vivo and in vitro findings in a SCI paradigm of thoracic force-defined impact lesions (Infinite Horizon Impactor) in adult rats. Analyses of chemokine-ligand/receptor-expression at defined time points after sc lesion of different severity grades or sham operation revealed that these inflammatory mediators are induced in distinct anatomical sc regions and in thalamic nuclei, periaqueductal grey, and hippocampal structures in the brain. Cellular and anatomical expression profiles together with colocalization/expression of neural stem/progenitor cell markers in adult sc stem cells niches or with pain-related receptors and mediators in dorsal horns, dorsal columns, and pain-processing brain areas support the notion that chemokines are involved in distinct cascades underlying clinical posttraumatic impairments and syndromes. These aspects and their implication in concepts of tailored SCI treatment are reviewed in the context of the recent literature on chemokine-ligand/receptor involvement in complex secondary lesion cascades. PMID:25977600

  13. Psychological Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury as Related to Manner of Onset of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athelstan, Gary T.; Crewe, Nancy M.

    1979-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury have behavioral tendencies that place them at-risk of such injuries. This study investigated the relationship between personality characteristics as suggested by manner of onset of injury and long-term medical, vocational, and psychological adjustment. Imprudent subjects tended to be better adjusted at follow-up than…

  14. Inosine Improves Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yeun Goo; Seth, Abhishek; Doyle, Claire; Franck, Debra; Kim, Daniel; Cristofaro, Vivian; Benowitz, Larry I; Tu, Duong D; Estrada, Carlos R; Mauney, Joshua R; Sullivan, Maryrose P; Adam, Rosalyn M

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the associated loss of bladder control are among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay for medical treatment of detrusor overactivity. However, their use is limited by significant side effects such that a search for new treatments is warranted. Inosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside with neuroprotective, neurotrophic and antioxidant effects that is known to improve motor function in preclinical models of SCI. However, its effect on lower urinary tract function has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of systemic administration of inosine on voiding function following SCI and to delineate potential mechanisms of action. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection, or cord compression by application of an aneurysm clip at T8 for 30 sec. Inosine (225 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered daily via intraperitoneal injection either immediately after injury or after a delay of 8 wk. At the end of treatment, voiding behavior was assessed by cystometry. Levels of synaptophysin (SYP), neurofilament 200 (NF200) and TRPV1 in bladder tissues were measured by immunofluorescence imaging. Inosine administration decreased overactivity in both SCI models, with a significant decrease in the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions during filling, compared to vehicle-treated SCI rats (p<0.05), including under conditions of delayed treatment. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated increased levels of the pan-neuronal marker SYP and the Adelta fiber marker NF200, but decreased staining for the C-fiber marker, TRPV1 in bladder tissues from inosine-treated rats compared to those from vehicle-treated animals, including after delayed treatment. These findings demonstrate that inosine prevents the development of detrusor overactivity and attenuates existing overactivity following SCI, and may achieve its effects through modulation of sensory neurotransmission. PMID:26529505

  15. Predicting health preference in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittmann, Nicole; Hitzig, Sander L.; Catharine Craven, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context/Objective Health preference values relate to a person's state of well-being, and is a single metric anchored at 0 (death) and 1 (perfect health). Health preference plays a key role in health economics and health policy, particularly in interpreting the results of cost-effectiveness studies, and supports the allocation of healthcare resources. The current study used elements of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework to predict health preference in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Data were collected by telephone survey on (1) demographics, (2) impairment (etiology, neurological level of injury, and ASIA impairment scale), (3) secondary health conditions (SHCs) using the SCI-Secondary Conditions Scale-Modified, (4) functional abilities using the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM), and (5) health preference using the Health Utilities Index-Mark III (HUI-Mark III) among adults with chronic SCI. Variables were categorized according to ICF headings and hierarchical regression analyses were used to predict HUI-Mark III scores. Results Adults with chronic traumatic or non-traumatic SCI (N = 357) reported a mean health preference score of 0.27 (±0.27). In predicting health preference, our model accounted for 55.1% of the variance with “body functions and structure”, and “activity and participation”, significantly contributing to the model (P < 0.0001). In particular, older age, being employed, and having higher SCIM scores were positively associated with health preference. Conversely, a higher SHC impact score was associated with poorer health preference. Conclusions Variables representative of “activity and participation” largely influence health preference among persons with chronic SCI, which may be amenable to intervention. These findings could be applied to advocate for health promotion and employment support programs to maximize well-being in persons aging with chronic SCI in the community. PMID:25055719

  16. Inosine Improves Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Claire; Franck, Debra; Kim, Daniel; Cristofaro, Vivian; Benowitz, Larry I.; Tu, Duong D.; Estrada, Carlos R.; Mauney, Joshua R.; Sullivan, Maryrose P.; Adam, Rosalyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the associated loss of bladder control are among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay for medical treatment of detrusor overactivity. However, their use is limited by significant side effects such that a search for new treatments is warranted. Inosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside with neuroprotective, neurotrophic and antioxidant effects that is known to improve motor function in preclinical models of SCI. However, its effect on lower urinary tract function has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of systemic administration of inosine on voiding function following SCI and to delineate potential mechanisms of action. Sprague?Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection, or cord compression by application of an aneurysm clip at T8 for 30 sec. Inosine (225 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered daily via intraperitoneal injection either immediately after injury or after a delay of 8 wk. At the end of treatment, voiding behavior was assessed by cystometry. Levels of synaptophysin (SYP), neurofilament 200 (NF200) and TRPV1 in bladder tissues were measured by immunofluorescence imaging. Inosine administration decreased overactivity in both SCI models, with a significant decrease in the frequency of spontaneous non?voiding contractions during filling, compared to vehicle?treated SCI rats (p<0.05), including under conditions of delayed treatment. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated increased levels of the pan-neuronal marker SYP and the Adelta fiber marker NF200, but decreased staining for the C-fiber marker, TRPV1 in bladder tissues from inosine-treated rats compared to those from vehicle-treated animals, including after delayed treatment. These findings demonstrate that inosine prevents the development of detrusor overactivity and attenuates existing overactivity following SCI, and may achieve its effects through modulation of sensory neurotransmission. PMID:26529505

  17. Psychosocial outcomes following spinal cord injury in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khazaeipour, Zahra; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Kaveh, Mahboobeh; Khanzadeh Mehrabani, Fatemeh; Kazazi, Elham; Emami-Razavi, Seyed-Hasan

    2014-05-01

    Objective/background In patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), SCI causes psychosocial complications that vary based on culture, conditions, and the amenities of each community. Health planners and social services should have full knowledge of these issues in order to plan schedules that address them. In this study, we aimed to understand the psychosocial problems of persons with SCI in Iran and to explore the requirements for minimizing these difficulties. Design This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research (BASIR) Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Participants One hundred nineteen persons with SCI referred to BASIR clinic to receive outpatient rehabilitation. Methods In this study, trained interviewers administered a questionnaire to the participants. The questionnaire consisted of socio-demographic variables and psychosocial questions about finances, employment, housing, education, and social communication problems. Results Psychosocial problems for persons with SCI are mainly associated with financial hardship due to unemployment and the high cost of living, followed by difficulties with transportation, house modification, education, marriage, social communication, sports, and entertainment. Psychological problems include sadness, depression, irritability/anger, suicidal thoughts, and a lack of self-confidence. The levels of the aforementioned problems differ with respect to sex. Conclusion Persons suffering from SCI can face some serious psychosocial problems that may vary according to sex. For example, transportation difficulties can lead to problems such as unsociability. After recognizing these problems, the next step would be providing services to facilitate a productive lifestyle, enhancing social communication and psychological health, and ultimately creating a higher quality of life. PMID:24621045

  18. Phrenic motoneuron discharge patterns following chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Dougherty, Brendan J; Sandhu, Milapjit S; Lane, Michael A; Reier, Paul J; Fuller, David D

    2013-11-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) dramatically disrupts synaptic inputs and triggers biochemical, as well as morphological, plasticity in relation to the phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) pool. Accordingly, our primary purpose was to determine if chronic SCI induces fundamental changes in the recruitment profile and discharge patterns of PhMNs. Individual PhMN action potentials were recorded from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to lateral cervical (C2) hemisection injury (C2Hx) in anesthetized adult male rats at 2, 4 or 8 wks post-injury and in uninjured controls. PhMNs were phenotypically classified as early (Early-I) or late inspiratory (Late-I), or silent according to discharge patterns. Following C2Hx, the distribution of PhMNs was dominated by Late-I and silent cells. Late-I burst parameters (e.g., spikes per breath, burst frequency and duration) were initially reduced but returned towards control values by 8wks post-injury. In addition, a unique PhMN burst pattern emerged after C2Hx in which Early-I cells burst tonically during hypocapnic inspiratory apnea. We also quantified the impact of gradual reductions in end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) on bilateral phrenic nerve activity. Compared to control rats, as PETCO2 declined, the C2Hx animals had greater inspiratory frequencies (breaths?min(-1)) and more substantial decreases in ipsilateral phrenic burst amplitude. We conclude that the primary physiological impact of C2Hx on ipsilateral PhMN burst patterns is a persistent delay in burst onset, transient reductions in burst frequency, and the emergence of tonic burst patterns. The inspiratory frequency data suggest that plasticity in brainstem networks is likely to play an important role in phrenic motor output after cervical SCI. PMID:23954215

  19. G-CSF promotes autophagy and reduces neural tissue damage after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuji; Liu, Shangming; Zhang, Xianghong; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Jiangang; Han, Aiqing; Hao, Aijun

    2015-12-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was investigated for its capacity to induce autophagy and related neuroprotective mechanisms in an acute spinal cord injury model. To accomplish this goal, we established a mouse spinal cord hemisection model to test the effects of recombinant human G-CSF. The results showed that autophagy was activated after spinal cord injury and G-CSF appears to induce a more rapid activation of autophagy within injured spinal cords as compared with that of non-treated animals. Apoptosis as induced in mechanically injured neurons with G-CSF treatment was enhanced after inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which partially blocked the neuroprotective effect of autophagy as induced by G-CSF. In addition, G-CSF inhibited the activity of the NF-?B signal pathway in neurons after mechanical injury. We conclude that G-CSF promotes autophagy by inhibiting the NF-?B signal pathway and protects neuronal structure after spinal cord injury. We therefore suggest that G-CSF, which rapidly induces autophagy after spinal cord injury to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, may thus provide an effective auxiliary therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury. PMID:26524416

  20. Changes in Body Temperature in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury by Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun-Gyu; Won, Yu Hui; Park, Sung-Hee; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes in the core temperature and body surface temperature in patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries (SCI). In incomplete SCI, the temperature change is difficult to see compared with complete spinal cord injuries. The goal of this study was to better understand thermal regulation in patients with incomplete SCI. Methods Fifty-six SCI patients were enrolled, and the control group consisted of 20 healthy persons. The spinal cord injuries were classified according to International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury. The patients were classified into two groups: upper (neurological injury level T6 or above) and lower (neurological injury level T7 or below) SCIs. Body core temperature was measured using an oral thermometer, and body surface temperature was measured using digital infrared thermographic imaging. Results Twenty-nine patients had upper spinal cord injuries, 27 patients had lower SCIs, and 20 persons served as the normal healthy persons. Comparing the skin temperatures of the three groups, the temperatures at the lower abdomen, anterior thigh and anterior tibia in the patients with upper SCIs were lower than those of the normal healthy persons and the patients with lower SCIs. No significant temperature differences were observed between the normal healthy persons and the patients with lower SCIs. Conclusion In our study, we found thermal dysregulation in patients with incomplete SCI. In particular, body surface temperature regulation was worse in upper SCIs than in lower injuries. Moreover, cord injury severity affected body surface temperature regulation in SCI patients. PMID:26605167

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with Schwann cell transplantation promotes spinal cord injury recovery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chuan-gang; Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Lv, Yang; Wu, Dan-kai; Yang, Qi; Gu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cell transplantation and hyperbaric oxygen therapy each promote recovery from spinal cord injury, but it remains unclear whether their combination improves therapeutic results more than monotherapy. To investigate this, we used Schwann cell transplantation via the tail vein, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, or their combination, in rat models of spinal cord contusion injury. The combined treatment was more effective in improving hindlimb motor function than either treatment alone; injured spinal tissue showed a greater number of neurite-like structures in the injured spinal tissue, somatosensory and motor evoked potential latencies were notably shorter, and their amplitudes greater, after combination therapy than after monotherapy. These findings indicate that Schwann cell transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy is more effective than either treatment alone in promoting the recovery of spinal cord in rats after injury. PMID:26604910

  2. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Summary The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved. PMID:25505497

  3. Differences in Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Depression between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Rehabilitated Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who were successfully rehabilitated differed from those who were not with regard to positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and depression. An ex post facto research design compared persons with spinal cord injuries who were previously employed with persons with spinal cord…

  4. Arrested development of the dorsal column following neonatal spinal cord injury in the opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Benjamin J; Noor, Natassya M; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Whish, Sophie; Saunders, Norman R

    2015-03-01

    Developmental studies of spinal cord injury in which regrowth of axons occurs across the site of transection rarely distinguish between the recovery of motor-controlling pathways and that of ascending axons carrying sensory information. We describe the morphological changes that occur in the dorsal column (DC) of the grey short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, following spinal cord injury at two early developmental ages. The spinal cords of opossums that had had their mid-thoracic spinal cords completely transected at postnatal day 7 (P7) or P28 were analysed. Profiles of neurofilament immunoreactivity in transected cords showing DC development were differentially affected by the injury compared with the rest of the cord and cytoarchitecture was modified in an age- and site-dependent manner. The ability of DC neurites to grow across the site of transection was confirmed by injection of fluorescent tracer below the injury. P7 transected cords showed labelling in the DC above the site of original transection indicating that neurites of this sensory tract were able to span the injury. No growth of any neuronal processes was seen after P28 transection. Thus, DC is affected by spinal injury in a differential manner depending on the age at which the transection occurs. This age-differential response, together with other facets of remodelling that occur after neonatal spinal injury, might explain the locomotor adaptations and recovery observed in these animals. PMID:25487408

  5. A new minimally invasive experimental spinal cord injury model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Baydin, A; Cokluk, C; Aydin, K

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effectivity of epidural microballoon inflation into the unroofed spinal column for the creation of a new experimental spinal cord injury model in rabbits. 10 New Zealand white rabbits were used for this study. Before operation and after anasthesia with 50 mg/kg ketamine and 8 mg/kg xylazine, spinal evoked potentials (SEP) were recorded in all rabbits. A midline skin incision was done on the lomber skin at the level of L1-L4. Paravertebral muscles were dissected bilaterally. A microhemilaminotomy was done in the right L3 lamina close to the midline by using Midas-rex micro-diamond drill instruments. The ligamentum flavum was opened and removed with microscissors. A microballoon was inserted into the spinal column between the bone and dura mater to the level of T12. The microballoon was inflated by using a pressure- and volume-controlled microballoon inflation device. Pre-injury and post-injury SEPs were recorded. The microballoon was deflated 15 minutes later and removed completely from the epidural space. 24 hours later the SEP study was repeated. Following microballoon inflation the SEP waves dropped to the basal level. All rabbits were paraplegic after the operation. In conclusion, this experimental study demonstrated that the microballoon inflation technique is a very successful method for the evaluation of spinal cord injury in rabbits. Unroofing of the spinal column is extremely important because decompression may be an effective treatment in spinal cord injury. Also the traumatic effect of aneurysm clips represents a different type of injury to the spinal cord. This new model may be used in experimental studies of spinal cord injury in rabbits. PMID:17882754

  6. Injectable hydrogels for the improved delivery of treatments in spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    O'shea, Timothy Mark

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in sudden life-altering paralysis with chronic medical consequences. Although no clinical therapy is currently available to reverse paralysis, a number of biomacromolecule drug candidates ...

  7. U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  8. Barriers to Providing Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Services to Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Leslie R.; Geller, Andrew; Stolzmann, Kelly L.; Matthess, Kirby; Lazzari, Antonio A.; Garshick, Eric

    2008-01-01

    To assess barriers to bone mineral density testing in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury, a cross-sectional study of 20 individuals with spinal cord injury was conducted with assessment of physical and logistical barriers to dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning. We identified several barriers including scanner design and configuration in the scanning room that limited accessibility, increased typical scanning time, and made additional staff necessary. In order for dual energy x-ray absorptiometry to become a routine component of ongoing care in spinal cord injury medicine, we recommend the following changes: (1) install ceiling-mounted hydraulic lifts and grab bars to facilitate transfers in the scanning room; (2) increase staffing during scans; (3) increase time allotment for scans, (4) install the scanner in an adequately-sized room, and (5) partner with administrators and staff to raise awareness of access issues faced by individuals with spinal cord injury. PMID:18824888

  9. Spinal injury in a U.S. Army light observation helicopter.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, D F; Mastroianni, G R

    1984-01-01

    All accident reports involving U.S. Army OH-58 series helicopters were analyzed to determine vertical and horizontal velocity change at impact and the relationship of this kinematic data to the production of spinal injury. This analysis determined that spinal injury is related primarily to vertical velocity change at impact and is relatively independent of horizontal velocity change. The dramatic increase in the rate of spinal injury occurring just above the design sink speed of the aircraft landing gear (3.7 m/s) suggests that the fuselage and seat provide little additional impact attenuation capability above that of the gear alone. It is concluded that if this aircraft were modified to provide protection to the occupants for impacts up to 9.1 m/s (30 ft/s), approximately 80% of all spinal injury incurred in survivable accidents could be substantially mitigated. The incorporation of energy absorbing seats is recommended. PMID:6696693

  10. Psychological Well-Being and Spinal Cord Injury Recovery: A Two-Way Street? 

    E-print Network

    Maldonado, Sioui

    2014-08-26

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to increased anxiety and depression in as many as 60% of patients. Yet despite extensive clinical research focused on understanding the variables influencing psychological well-being following SCI, risk factors...

  11. Charcot Arthropathy of the Lumbosacral Spine Mimicking a Vertebral Tumor after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Son, Soo-Bum; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2013-01-01

    Charcot spinal arthropathy is a rare, progressive type of vertebral joint degeneration that occurs in the setting of any preexisting condition characterized by decreased afferent innervation to the extent that normal protective joint sensation in the vertebral column is impaired. The authors report on a case of Charcot arthropathy of the lower lumbar spine mimicking a spinal tumor following cervical cord injury. PMID:24527202

  12. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  13. Behavioral and anatomical consequences of repetitive mild thoracic spinal cord contusion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Bouyer, Julien; Haas, Christopher; Fischer, Itzhak

    2014-07-01

    Moderate and severe spinal cord contusion injuries have been extensively studied, yet much less is known about mild injuries. Mild contusions result in transient functional deficits, proceeding to near-complete recovery, but they may render the spinal cord vulnerable to future injuries. However, to date there have been no appropriate models to study the behavioral consequences, anatomical changes, and susceptibility of a mild contusion to repeated injuries, which may occur in children as well as adults during competitive sport activities. We have developed a novel mild spinal cord contusion injury model characterized by a sequence of transient functional deficits after the first injury and restoration to near-complete motor and sensory function, which is then followed up by a second injury. This model can serve not only to study the effects of repeated injuries on behavioral and anatomical changes, but also to examine the relationship between successive tissue damage and recovery of function. In the present study, we confirmed that mild thoracic spinal cord contusion, utilizing the NYU impactor device, resulted in localized tissue damage, characterized by a cystic cavity and peripheral rim of spared white matter at the injury epicenter, and rapid functional recovery to near-normal levels utilizing several behavioral tests. Repeated injury after 3weeks, when functional recovery has been completed, resulted in worsening of both motor and sensory function, which did not recover to prior levels. Anatomical analyses showed no differences in the volumes of spared white matter, lesion, or cyst, but revealed modest extension of lesion area rostral to the injury epicenter as well as an increase in inflammation and apoptosis. These studies demonstrate that a mild injury model can be used to test efficacy of treatments for repeated injuries and may serve to assist in the formulation of policies and clinical practice regarding mild SCI injury and spinal concussion. PMID:24786492

  14. Targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation produces long-lasting motor recovery in chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Jacob G; Miller, Robert R; Perlmutter, Steve I

    2015-09-29

    Use-dependent movement therapies can lead to partial recovery of motor function after neurological injury. We attempted to improve recovery by developing a neuroprosthetic intervention that enhances movement therapy by directing spike timing-dependent plasticity in spared motor pathways. Using a recurrent neural-computer interface in rats with a cervical contusion of the spinal cord, we synchronized intraspinal microstimulation below the injury with the arrival of functionally related volitional motor commands signaled by muscle activity in the impaired forelimb. Stimulation was delivered during physical retraining of a forelimb behavior and throughout the day for 3 mo. Rats receiving this targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation (TADSS) exhibited markedly enhanced recovery compared with animals receiving targeted but open-loop spinal stimulation and rats receiving physical retraining alone. On a forelimb reach and grasp task, TADSS animals recovered 63% of their preinjury ability, more than two times the performance level achieved by the other therapy groups. Therapeutic gains were maintained for 3 additional wk without stimulation. The results suggest that activity-dependent spinal stimulation can induce neural plasticity that improves behavioral recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:26371306

  15. Autograft-derived spinal cord mass following olfactory mucosal cell transplantation in a spinal cord injury patient: Case report.

    PubMed

    Dlouhy, Brian J; Awe, Olatilewa; Rao, Rajesh C; Kirby, Patricia A; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, human cell transplantation and neural stem cell trials have examined the feasibility and safety of these potential therapies for treatment of a variety of neurological disorders. However, significant safety concerns have surrounded these trials due to the possibility of ectopic, uncontrolled cellular growth and tumor formation. The authors present the case of an 18-year-old woman who sustained a complete spinal cord injury at T10-11. Three years after injury, she remained paraplegic and underwent olfactory mucosal cell implantation at the site of injury. She developed back pain 8 years later, and imaging revealed an intramedullary spinal cord mass at the site of cell implantation, which required resection. Intraoperative findings revealed an expanded spinal cord with a multicystic mass containing large amounts of thick mucus-like material. Histological examination and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the mass was composed mostly of cysts lined by respiratory epithelium, submucosal glands with goblet cells, and intervening nerve twigs. This is the first report of a human spinal cord mass complicating spinal cord cell transplantation and neural stem cell therapy. Given the prolonged time to presentation, safety monitoring of all patients with cell transplantation and neural stem cell implantation should be maintained for many years. PMID:25002238

  16. Rat hair follicle stem cells differentiate and promote recovery following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Nowruz; Nobakht, Maliheh; Pourheydar, Bagher; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem

    2013-12-25

    Emerging studies of treating spinal cord injury (SCI) with adult stem cells led us to evaluate the effects of transplantation of hair follicle stem cells in rats with a compression-induced spinal cord lesion. Here, we proposed a hypothesis that rat hair follicle stem cell transplantation can promote the recovery of injured spinal cord. Compression-induced spinal cord injury was induced in Wistar rats in this study. The bulge area of the rat vibrissa follicles was isolated, cultivated and characterized with nestin as a stem cell marker. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled bulge stem cells were transplanted into rats with spinal cord injury. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that some of the grafted cells could survive and differentiate into oligodendrocytes (receptor-interacting protein positive cells) and neuronal-like cells (?III-tubulin positive cells) at 3 weeks after transplantation. In addition, recovery of hind limb locomotor function in spinal cord injury rats at 8 weeks following cell transplantation was assessed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale. The results demonstrate that the grafted hair follicle stem cells can survive for a long time period in vivo and differentiate into neuronal- and glial-like cells. These results suggest that hair follicle stem cells can promote the recovery of spinal cord injury. PMID:25206658

  17. Rat hair follicle stem cells differentiate and promote recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Najafzadeh, Nowruz; Nobakht, Maliheh; Pourheydar, Bagher; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem

    2013-01-01

    Emerging studies of treating spinal cord injury (SCI) with adult stem cells led us to evaluate the effects of transplantation of hair follicle stem cells in rats with a compression-induced spinal cord lesion. Here, we proposed a hypothesis that rat hair follicle stem cell transplantation can promote the recovery of injured spinal cord. Compression-induced spinal cord injury was induced in Wistar rats in this study. The bulge area of the rat vibrissa follicles was isolated, cultivated and characterized with nestin as a stem cell marker. 5-Bromo-2?-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled bulge stem cells were transplanted into rats with spinal cord injury. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that some of the grafted cells could survive and differentiate into oligodendrocytes (receptor-interacting protein positive cells) and neuronal-like cells (?III-tubulin positive cells) at 3 weeks after transplantation. In addition, recovery of hind limb locomotor function in spinal cord injury rats at 8 weeks following cell transplantation was assessed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale. The results demonstrate that the grafted hair follicle stem cells can survive for a long time period in vivo and differentiate into neuronal- and glial-like cells. These results suggest that hair follicle stem cells can promote the recovery of spinal cord injury. PMID:25206658

  18. Three-dimensional imaging of microvasculature in the rat spinal cord following injury

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yong; Wu, Tianding; yuan, Zhou; Li, Dongzhe; Ni, Shuangfei; Hu, Jianzhong; Lu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Research studies on the three-dimensional (3D) morphological alterations of the spinal cord microvasculature after injury provide insight into the pathology of spinal cord injury (SCI). Knowledge in this field has been hampered in the past by imaging technologies that provided only two-dimensional (2D) information on the vascular reactions to trauma. The aim of our study is to investigate the 3D microstructural changes of the rat spinal cord microvasculature on day 1 post-injury using synchrotron radiation micro-tomography (SR?CT). This technology provides high-resolution 3D images of microvasculature in both normal and injured spinal cords, and the smallest vessel detected is approximately 7.4??m. Moreover, we optimized the 3D vascular visualization with color coding and accurately calculated quantitative changes in vascular architecture after SCI. Compared to the control spinal cord, the damaged spinal cord vessel numbers decreased significantly following injury. Furthermore, the area of injury did not remain concentrated at the epicenter; rather, the signs of damage expanded rostrally and caudally along the spinal cord in 3D. The observed pathological changes were also confirmed by histological tests. These results demonstrate that SR?CT is an effective technology platform for imaging pathological changes in small arteries in neurovascular disease and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. PMID:26220842

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of microvasculature in the rat spinal cord following injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Wu, Tianding; Yuan, Zhou; Li, Dongzhe; Ni, Shuangfei; Hu, Jianzhong; Lu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Research studies on the three-dimensional (3D) morphological alterations of the spinal cord microvasculature after injury provide insight into the pathology of spinal cord injury (SCI). Knowledge in this field has been hampered in the past by imaging technologies that provided only two-dimensional (2D) information on the vascular reactions to trauma. The aim of our study is to investigate the 3D microstructural changes of the rat spinal cord microvasculature on day 1 post-injury using synchrotron radiation micro-tomography (SR?CT). This technology provides high-resolution 3D images of microvasculature in both normal and injured spinal cords, and the smallest vessel detected is approximately 7.4??m. Moreover, we optimized the 3D vascular visualization with color coding and accurately calculated quantitative changes in vascular architecture after SCI. Compared to the control spinal cord, the damaged spinal cord vessel numbers decreased significantly following injury. Furthermore, the area of injury did not remain concentrated at the epicenter; rather, the signs of damage expanded rostrally and caudally along the spinal cord in 3D. The observed pathological changes were also confirmed by histological tests. These results demonstrate that SR?CT is an effective technology platform for imaging pathological changes in small arteries in neurovascular disease and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. PMID:26220842

  20. Neural stem cell transplantation in experimental contusive model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Stephana; Giallongo, Toniella; Gerace, Claudio; De Angelis, Anthea; Basso, Michele D; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating clinical condition, characterized by a complex of neurological dysfunctions. Animal models of spinal cord injury can be used both to investigate the biological responses to injury and to test potential therapies. Contusion or compression injury delivered to the surgically exposed spinal cord are the most widely used models of the pathology. In this report the experimental contusion is performed by using the Infinite Horizon (IH) Impactor device, which allows the creation of a reproducible injury animal model through definition of specific injury parameters. Stem cell transplantation is commonly considered a potentially useful strategy for curing this debilitating condition. Numerous studies have evaluated the effects of transplanting a variety of stem cells. Here we demonstrate an adapted method for spinal cord injury followed by tail vein injection of cells in CD1 mice. In short, we provide procedures for: i) cell labeling with a vital tracer, ii) pre-operative care of mice, iii) execution of a contusive spinal cord injury, and iv) intravenous administration of post mortem neural precursors. This contusion model can be utilized to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stem cell transplantation in a regenerative medicine approach. PMID:25548937

  1. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  2. Licofelone modulates neuroinflammation and attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the chronic phase of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, Jennifer N.; Karoly, Edward D.; Wang, Ying; Strobel, Henry W.; Grill, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a major factor shaping outcome during the early, acute phase of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). It is known that pro-inflammatory signaling within the injured spinal cord drives pathological alterations in neurosensory processing and shapes functional outcome early after injury. However, it is unclear whether inflammation persists into the chronic phase of injury or shapes sensory processing long after injury. In order to investigate these possibilities, we have performed biochemical and behavioral assessments 9 months after moderate thoracic spinal contusion injury in the rat. We have found that levels of the pro-inflammatory lipid mediators leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin E2 are elevated in the chronic spinal cord lesion site. Additionally, using metabolomic profiling, we have detected elevated levels of pro-oxidative and inflammatory metabolites, along with alterations in multiple biological pathways within the chronic lesion site. We found that 28-day treatment of chronically-injured rats with the dual COX/5-LOX inhibitor licofelone elevated levels of endogenous anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory metabolites within the lesion site. Furthermore, licofelone treatment reduced hypersensitivity of hindpaws to mechanical, but not thermal, stimulation, indicating that mechanical sensitivity is modulated by pro-inflammatory signaling in the chronic phase of injury. Together, these findings provide novel evidence of inflammation and oxidative stress within spinal cord tissue far into the chronic phase of SCI, and demonstrate a role for inflammatory modulation of mechanical sensitivity in the chronic phase of injury. PMID:23303944

  3. In vivo imaging of spinal cord in contusion injury model mice by multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Y.; Horiuchi, H.; Ogata, T.; Hikita, A.; Miura, H.; Imamura, T.

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent imaging technique is a promising method and has been developed for in vivo applications in cellular biology. In particular, nonlinear optical imaging technique, multi-photon microscopy has make it possible to analyze deep portion of tissues in living animals such as axons of spinal code. Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are usually caused by contusion damages. Therefore, observation of spinal cord tissue after the contusion injury is necessary for understanding cellular dynamics in response to traumatic SCI and development of the treatment for traumatic SCI. Our goal is elucidation of mechanism for degeneration of axons after contusion injuries by establishing SCI model and chronic observation of injured axons in the living animals. Firstly we generated and observed acute SCI model by contusion injury. By using a multi-photon microscope, axons in dorsal cord were visualized approximately 140 micron in depth from the surface. Immediately after injury, minimal morphological change of spinal cord was observed. At 3 days after injury, spinal cord was swelling and the axons seem to be fragmented. At 7 days after injury, increased degradation of axons could be observed, although the image was blurred due to accumulation of the connective tissue. In the present study, we successfully observed axon degeneration after the contusion SCI in a living animal in vivo. Our final goal is to understand molecular mechanisms and cellular dynamics in response to traumatic SCIs in acute and chronic stage.

  4. Gunshot wound causing complete spinal cord injury without mechanical violation of spinal axis: Case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rahul; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Gupta, Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating spine injury (PSI) forms the third most common cause of spine injury, only next to road traffic accidents and fall. Gunshot wound (GSW) forms the major bulk of PSI. Due to easy availability of firearms and antisocial behavior, GSW which were predominant in military population is now increasingly seen in civilized society. Here, we present a detail case review of unique case of civilian GSW indirectly causing complete spinal cord injury due to shock wave generated by the bullet, along with its systematic management. PMID:26692690

  5. Gunshot wound causing complete spinal cord injury without mechanical violation of spinal axis: Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rahul; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Gupta, Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating spine injury (PSI) forms the third most common cause of spine injury, only next to road traffic accidents and fall. Gunshot wound (GSW) forms the major bulk of PSI. Due to easy availability of firearms and antisocial behavior, GSW which were predominant in military population is now increasingly seen in civilized society. Here, we present a detail case review of unique case of civilian GSW indirectly causing complete spinal cord injury due to shock wave generated by the bullet, along with its systematic management. PMID:26692690

  6. Molecular Architecture of Spinal Cord Injury Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Alawieh, Ali; Sabra, Mohammed; Sabra, Zahraa; Tomlinson, Stephen; Zaraket, Fadi A

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with complex pathophysiological processes that follow the primary traumatic event and determine the extent of secondary damage and functional recovery. Numerous reports have used global and hypothesis-driven approaches to identify protein changes that contribute to the overall pathology of SCI in an effort to identify potential therapeutic interventions. In this study, we use a semi-automatic annotation approach to detect terms referring to genes or proteins dysregulated in the SCI literature and develop a curated SCI interactome. Network analysis of the SCI interactome revealed the presence of a rich-club organization corresponding to a "powerhouse" of highly interacting hub-proteins. Studying the modular organization of the network have shown that rich-club proteins cluster into modules that are specifically enriched for biological processes that fall under the categories of cell death, inflammation, injury recognition and systems development. Pathway analysis of the interactome and the rich-club revealed high similarity indicating the role of the rich-club proteins as hubs of the most prominent pathways in disease pathophysiology and illustrating the centrality of pro-and anti-survival signal competition in the pathology of SCI. In addition, evaluation of centrality measures of single nodes within the rich-club have revealed that neuronal growth factor (NGF), caspase 3, and H-Ras are the most central nodes and potentially an interesting targets for therapy. Our integrative approach uncovers the molecular architecture of SCI interactome, and provide an essential resource for evaluating significant therapeutic candidates. PMID:26241741

  7. Molecular Architecture of Spinal Cord Injury Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Alawieh, Ali; Sabra, Mohammed; Sabra, Zahraa; Tomlinson, Stephen; Zaraket, Fadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with complex pathophysiological processes that follow the primary traumatic event and determine the extent of secondary damage and functional recovery. Numerous reports have used global and hypothesis-driven approaches to identify protein changes that contribute to the overall pathology of SCI in an effort to identify potential therapeutic interventions. In this study, we use a semi-automatic annotation approach to detect terms referring to genes or proteins dysregulated in the SCI literature and develop a curated SCI interactome. Network analysis of the SCI interactome revealed the presence of a rich-club organization corresponding to a “powerhouse” of highly interacting hub-proteins. Studying the modular organization of the network have shown that rich-club proteins cluster into modules that are specifically enriched for biological processes that fall under the categories of cell death, inflammation, injury recognition and systems development. Pathway analysis of the interactome and the rich-club revealed high similarity indicating the role of the rich-club proteins as hubs of the most prominent pathways in disease pathophysiology and illustrating the centrality of pro-and anti-survival signal competition in the pathology of SCI. In addition, evaluation of centrality measures of single nodes within the rich-club have revealed that neuronal growth factor (NGF), caspase 3, and H-Ras are the most central nodes and potentially an interesting targets for therapy. Our integrative approach uncovers the molecular architecture of SCI interactome, and provide an essential resource for evaluating significant therapeutic candidates. PMID:26241741

  8. Spinal injury hospitalizations among U.S. Army soldiers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Barbara E; Curley, Kenneth C; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Stein, Catherine R; Humphrey, Rebecca J

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study examined spinal-related hospitalizations of U.S. Army soldiers deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. Spinal cord injuries (SCI) and vertebral column injuries (VCI) were identified using International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. In our study, spinal hospitalizations represented 8.2% of total injury admissions. Risk factors for SCI and VCI incidences were determined using Poisson regression. Lack of previous deployment experience increased risk of having SCI by 33% and VCI by 24% in Iraq (similar increases, but not statistically significant in Afghanistan). Male soldiers had 4.85 times higher risk for SCI in Iraq and 69% higher risk in Afghanistan than female soldiers. In Afghanistan, almost 60% of spinal episodes included traumatic brain injury (TBI), compared to about 40% in Iraq. In both theaters, mild TBI accounted for more than 50% of all TBI-spinal episodes. Sixteen percent of SCI inpatient episodes in Afghanistan and 13% in Iraq were associated with paralysis, with median bed days of 46 and 33 days compared to a median of 6 days in both theaters for nonparalysis spinal injuries. The mortality rate was 2.5 times lower in Afghanistan than in Iraq. PMID:25643390

  9. Edaravone combined with Schwann cell transplantation may repair spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Quan; Wu, Min-Fei; Piao, Zhe; Yao, Jin; Li, Ji-Hai; Wang, Xin-Gang; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Edaravone has been shown to delay neuronal apoptosis, thereby improving nerve function and the microenvironment after spinal cord injury. Edaravone can provide a favorable environment for the treatment of spinal cord injury using Schwann cell transplantation. This study used rat models of complete spinal cord transection at T9. Six hours later, Schwann cells were transplanted in the head and tail ends of the injury site. Simultaneously, edaravone was injected through the caudal vein. Eight weeks later, the PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells had survived and migrated to the center of the spinal cord injury region in rats after combined treatment with edaravone and Schwann cells. Moreover, the number of PKH-26-labeled Schwann cells in the rat spinal cord was more than that in rats undergoing Schwann cell transplantation alone or rats without any treatment. Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing revealed that the number of horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers was greater in rats treated with edaravone combined withSchwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation alone. The results demonstrated that lower extremity motor function and neurophysiological function were better in rats treated with edaravone and Schwann cells than in rats with Schwann cell transplantation only. These data confirmed that Schwann cell transplantation combined with edaravone injection promoted the regeneration of nerve fibers of rats with spinal cord injury and improved neurological function. PMID:25883621

  10. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brackett, Nancy L; Lynne, Charles M; Ibrahim, Emad; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses, and vacuum constriction devices. In anejaculatory patients who wish to father children, semen retrieval is necessary. Penile vibratory stimulation is recommended as the first line of treatment. Patients who fail penile vibratory stimulation can be referred for electroejaculation. If this approach is not possible, prostate massage is an alternative. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort when other methods fail. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm count but abnormally low sperm motility. Scientific investigations indicate that accessory gland dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male factor infertility. PMID:20157304

  11. Gastrointestinal involvement in spinal cord injury: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen

    2012-03-01

    Bowel problems occur in 27% to 62% of patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI), most commonly constipation, distention, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, hemorrhoids, bowel accidents, and autonomic hyperreflexia. The acute abdomen, with a mortality of 9.5%, does not present with rigidity or absent bowel sounds but rather with dull/poorly-localized pain, vomiting, or restlessness, with tenderness, fever, and leukocytosis in up to 50% of patients. Fecal impaction may present with anorexia and nausea. Methods used for bowel care include laxatives, anal massage, manual evacuation, and enemas. Randomized, double-blind studies demonstrated the effectiveness of neostigmine, which increases cholinergic tone, combined with glycopyrrolate, an anticholinergic agent with minimal activity in the colon that reduces extracolonic side-effects. Improved bowel function occurs with anterior sacral root stimulators which may be combined with an S2 to S4 posterior sacral rhizotomy which interrupts the reflex arc by cutting the posterior roots carrying the spasticity-causing sensory nerves. For severe constipation, a colostomy reduces time for bowel care, providing a clean environment so decubitus ulcers may heal. Gallstones occur in 17% to 31% of patients, and acalculous cholecystitis in 3.7% of patients with acute SCI. A high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose bowel problems in SCI. PMID:22457863

  12. Minimizing Errors in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Trials by Acknowledging the Heterogeneity of Spinal Cord Anatomy and Injury Severity: An Observational Canadian Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Tsai, Eve C.; Linassi, A.G.; Christie, Sean D.; Attabib, Najmedden; Hurlbert, R. John; Fourney, Daryl R.; Johnson, Michael G.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Drew, Brian; Bailey, Christopher S.; Paquet, Jérôme; Parent, Stefan; Townson, Andrea; Ho, Chester; Craven, B.C.; Gagnon, Dany; Tsui, Deborah; Fox, Richard; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Kwon, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials of therapies for acute traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) have failed to convincingly demonstrate efficacy in improving neurologic function. Failing to acknowledge the heterogeneity of these injuries and under-appreciating the impact of the most important baseline prognostic variables likely contributes to this translational failure. Our hypothesis was that neurological level and severity of initial injury (measured by the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale [AIS]) act jointly and are the major determinants of motor recovery. Our objective was to quantify the influence of these variables when considered together on early motor score recovery following acute tSCI. Eight hundred thirty-six participants from the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry were analyzed for motor score improvement from baseline to follow-up. In AIS A, B, and C patients, cervical and thoracic injuries displayed significantly different motor score recovery. AIS A patients with thoracic (T2-T10) and thoracolumbar (T11-L2) injuries had significantly different motor improvement. High (C1-C4) and low (C5-T1) cervical injuries demonstrated differences in upper extremity motor recovery in AIS B, C, and D. A hypothetical clinical trial example demonstrated the benefits of stratifying on neurological level and severity of injury. Clinically meaningful motor score recovery is predictably related to the neurological level of injury and the severity of the baseline neurological impairment. Stratifying clinical trial cohorts using a joint distribution of these two variables will enhance a study's chance of identifying a true treatment effect and minimize the risk of misattributed treatment effects. Clinical studies should stratify participants based on these factors and record the number of participants and their mean baseline motor scores for each category of this joint distribution as part of the reporting of participant characteristics. Improved clinical trial design is a high priority as new therapies and interventions for tSCI emerge. PMID:24811484

  13. Minimizing errors in acute traumatic spinal cord injury trials by acknowledging the heterogeneity of spinal cord anatomy and injury severity: an observational Canadian cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Tsai, Eve C; Linassi, A G; Christie, Sean D; Attabib, Najmedden; Hurlbert, R John; Fourney, Daryl R; Johnson, Michael G; Fehlings, Michael G; Drew, Brian; Bailey, Christopher S; Paquet, Jérôme; Parent, Stefan; Townson, Andrea; Ho, Chester; Craven, B C; Gagnon, Dany; Tsui, Deborah; Fox, Richard; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Kwon, Brian K

    2014-09-15

    Clinical trials of therapies for acute traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) have failed to convincingly demonstrate efficacy in improving neurologic function. Failing to acknowledge the heterogeneity of these injuries and under-appreciating the impact of the most important baseline prognostic variables likely contributes to this translational failure. Our hypothesis was that neurological level and severity of initial injury (measured by the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale [AIS]) act jointly and are the major determinants of motor recovery. Our objective was to quantify the influence of these variables when considered together on early motor score recovery following acute tSCI. Eight hundred thirty-six participants from the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry were analyzed for motor score improvement from baseline to follow-up. In AIS A, B, and C patients, cervical and thoracic injuries displayed significantly different motor score recovery. AIS A patients with thoracic (T2-T10) and thoracolumbar (T11-L2) injuries had significantly different motor improvement. High (C1-C4) and low (C5-T1) cervical injuries demonstrated differences in upper extremity motor recovery in AIS B, C, and D. A hypothetical clinical trial example demonstrated the benefits of stratifying on neurological level and severity of injury. Clinically meaningful motor score recovery is predictably related to the neurological level of injury and the severity of the baseline neurological impairment. Stratifying clinical trial cohorts using a joint distribution of these two variables will enhance a study's chance of identifying a true treatment effect and minimize the risk of misattributed treatment effects. Clinical studies should stratify participants based on these factors and record the number of participants and their mean baseline motor scores for each category of this joint distribution as part of the reporting of participant characteristics. Improved clinical trial design is a high priority as new therapies and interventions for tSCI emerge. PMID:24811484

  14. Wheelchair Tai Chi as a Therapeutic Exercise for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yong Tai; Chang, Li-Shan; Chen, Shihui; Zhong, Yaping; Yang, Yi; Li, Zhanghua; Madison, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) rarely participate in health-promotion programs or wellness screenings due to the lack of accessibility, adaptations, and tertiary healthcare providers. An unconditioned body is more prone to suffer injury and is at risk for more severe health problems than a conditioned one. As is common in individuals…

  15. Intrathecal Morphine Attenuates Recovery of Function after a Spinal Cord Injury

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    Intrathecal Morphine Attenuates Recovery of Function after a Spinal Cord Injury Michelle A. Hook work has shown that a high dose (20 mg=kg) of systemic morphine, required to produce significant and increases lesion size. Moreover, a single dose of systemic morphine in the early stage of injury (24 h post

  16. Germline ablation of dermatan-4O-sulfotransferase1 reduces regeneration after mouse spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rost, S; Akyüz, N; Martinovic, T; Huckhagel, T; Jakovcevski, I; Schachner, M

    2016-01-15

    Chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs/DSPGs) are major components of the extracellular matrix. Their expression is generally upregulated after injuries to the adult mammalian central nervous system, which is known for its low ability to restore function after injury. Several studies support the view that CSPGs inhibit regeneration after injury, whereas the functions of DSPGs in injury paradigms are less certain. To characterize the functions of DSPGs in the presence of CSPGs, we studied young adult dermatan-4O-sulfotransferase1-deficient (Chst14(-/-)) mice, which express chondroitin sulfates (CSs), but not dermatan sulfates (DSs), to characterize the functional outcome after severe compression injury of the spinal cord. In comparison to their wild-type (Chst14(+/+)) littermates, regeneration was reduced in Chst14(-/-) mice. No differences between genotypes were seen in the size of spinal cords, numbers of microglia and astrocytes neither in intact nor injured spinal cords after injury. Monoaminergic innervation and re-innervation of the spinal cord caudal to the lesion site as well as expression levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and myelin basic protein (MBP) were similar in both genotypes, independent of whether they were injured and examined 6weeks after injury or not injured. These results suggest that, in contrast to CSPGs, DSPGs, being the products of Chst14 enzymatic activity, promote regeneration after injury of the adult mouse central nervous system. PMID:26586562

  17. Spouse Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: Long-Term Medical and Psychosocial Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Barbara L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined female's adjustment (N=25) to a partner's spinal cord injury (SCI) as a function of time since injury. Found that spouse adjustment to the effects of living with a partner who had a SCI was a highly stressful process with major medical and psychosocial consequences. (Author/ABL)

  18. The Virginia Community Cadre Network: Community Reintegration of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Walter C.; Thompson, Donald D.

    1983-01-01

    The Community Cadre Network in Virginia is a local support network for helping individuals with spinal cord injuries make the transition from an institutional setting to home and community life. Cadre members are people who have been through the experience of traumatic injury, rehabilitation, and return home. (SEW)

  19. Relationship of Personality and Locus of Control With Employment Outcomes among Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Broderick, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    We investigated relationships among personality, locus of control, and current post-injury employment status for 1,391 participants with spinal cord injury. Participants with higher internality locus-of-control scores and activity scores (personality) reported more favorable employment outcomes. Higher scores on chance and powerful others (locus…

  20. Death Anxiety as a Predictor of Posttraumatic Stress Levels among Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Because the onset of a spinal cord injury may involve a brush with death and because serious injury and disability can act as a reminder of death, death anxiety was examined as a predictor of posttraumatic stress levels among individuals with disabilities. This cross-sectional study used multiple regression and multivariate multiple regression to…

  1. Vocationally Orientated Rehabilitation Service Requests: The Case of Employed Persons Experiencing a Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda E.; Murphy, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 168 employed people who suffered spinal cord injuries found that 50% were employed after injury; 61% thought they could have benefitted from additional services such as discussion of options and follow-up on vocational issues. Dissatisfaction with employment status was related to perceived need for more services. (Contains 20…

  2. Spinal Cord Injury as a Permanent Consequence of Victimization in Random Violence: A Public Health Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James F.; Dyson, Laronistine; Grandison, Terry

    1998-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries resulting from criminal violence is a growing public health concern. Citing the criminal justice system's failure to reduce violence and the costs of treating injuries, a public health-education approach is advocated. Approaches to prevention, gun control, and a comprehensive family policy are discussed. (Author/EMK)

  3. Biomaterial Approaches to Enhancing Neurorestoration after Spinal Cord Injury: Strategies for Overcoming Inherent Biological Obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Justin R.; Eade, Amber M.; Osterhout, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    While advances in technology and medicine have improved both longevity and quality of life in patients living with a spinal cord injury, restoration of full motor function is not often achieved. This is due to the failure of repair and regeneration of neuronal connections in the spinal cord after injury. In this review, the complicated nature of spinal cord injury is described, noting the numerous cellular and molecular events that occur in the central nervous system following a traumatic lesion. In short, postinjury tissue changes create a complex and dynamic environment that is highly inhibitory to the process of neural regeneration. Strategies for repair are outlined with a particular focus on the important role of biomaterials in designing a therapeutic treatment that can overcome this inhibitory environment. The importance of considering the inherent biological response of the central nervous system to both injury and subsequent therapeutic interventions is highlighted as a key consideration for all attempts at improving functional recovery. PMID:26491685

  4. Minimum information about a spinal cord injury experiment: a proposed reporting standard for spinal cord injury experiments.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Vance P; Ferguson, Adam R; Popovich, Phillip G; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Snow, Diane M; Igarashi, Michihiro; Beattie, Christine E; Bixby, John L

    2014-08-01

    The lack of reproducibility in many areas of experimental science has a number of causes, including a lack of transparency and precision in the description of experimental approaches. This has far-reaching consequences, including wasted resources and slowing of progress. Additionally, the large number of laboratories around the world publishing articles on a given topic make it difficult, if not impossible, for individual researchers to read all of the relevant literature. Consequently, centralized databases are needed to facilitate the generation of new hypotheses for testing. One strategy to improve transparency in experimental description, and to allow the development of frameworks for computer-readable knowledge repositories, is the adoption of uniform reporting standards, such as common data elements (data elements used in multiple clinical studies) and minimum information standards. This article describes a minimum information standard for spinal cord injury (SCI) experiments, its major elements, and the approaches used to develop it. Transparent reporting standards for experiments using animal models of human SCI aim to reduce inherent bias and increase experimental value. PMID:24870067

  5. Minimum Information about a Spinal Cord Injury Experiment: A Proposed Reporting Standard for Spinal Cord Injury Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Snow, Diane M.; Igarashi, Michihiro; Beattie, Christine E.; Bixby, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The lack of reproducibility in many areas of experimental science has a number of causes, including a lack of transparency and precision in the description of experimental approaches. This has far-reaching consequences, including wasted resources and slowing of progress. Additionally, the large number of laboratories around the world publishing articles on a given topic make it difficult, if not impossible, for individual researchers to read all of the relevant literature. Consequently, centralized databases are needed to facilitate the generation of new hypotheses for testing. One strategy to improve transparency in experimental description, and to allow the development of frameworks for computer-readable knowledge repositories, is the adoption of uniform reporting standards, such as common data elements (data elements used in multiple clinical studies) and minimum information standards. This article describes a minimum information standard for spinal cord injury (SCI) experiments, its major elements, and the approaches used to develop it. Transparent reporting standards for experiments using animal models of human SCI aim to reduce inherent bias and increase experimental value. PMID:24870067

  6. The Sir Ludwig Guttmann lecture 2012: the contribution of Stoke Mandeville Hospital to spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Frankel, H L

    2012-11-01

    This Ludwig Guttmann Lecture was presented at the 2012 meeting of the International Spinal Cord Society in London. It describes the contribution of Stoke Mandeville Hospital to the field of spinal cord injuries. Dr Ludwig Guttmann started the Spinal Unit at Stoke Mandeville Hospital in 1944 and introduced a novel, comprehensive method of care, which included early admission, prevention and treatment of spinal cord injury related complications, active rehabilitation and social reintegration. Soon a dedicated specialist team was assembled and training of visitors was encouraged, some of whom went on to start their own spinal units. Research went hand in hand with clinical work, and over the years more than 500 scientific contributions from Stoke Mandeville have been published in peer reviewed journals and books. Guttmann introduced sport as a means of physical therapy, which soon lead to organised Stoke Mandeville Games, first national in 1948, then international in 1952 and finally the Paralympic Games in 1960. Stoke Mandeville is regarded as the birthplace of the Paralympic movement, and Guttmann was knighted in 1966. Stoke Mandeville is also the birthplace of the International Medical Society of Paraplegia, later International Spinal Cord Society, which was formed during the International Stoke Mandeville Games in 1961, and of the Society's medical journal Paraplegia, later Spinal Cord, first published in 1963. Guttmann's followers have continued his philosophy and, with some new developments and advances, the present day National Spinal Injuries Centre at Stoke Mandeville Hospital provides comprehensive, multidisciplinary acute care, rehabilitation and life-long follow-up for patient with spinal cord injuries of all ages. PMID:23045299

  7. A model of acute compressive spinal cord injury with a minimally invasive balloon in goats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Zheng, Yuhuang; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Changwei; Lu, Jiong; Rickett, Todd; Shi, Riyi

    2014-02-15

    Research into spinal cord injury depends upon animal models of trauma. While investigations using small animals have yielded critical insights into the cellular mechanisms of neurotrauma, no effective therapies have been translated to human clinical treatments. There are considerable differences in pathophysiology, scale, and anatomical organization between rodents and primates. Here, the established method of inflating balloons to compress the cord within the spinal canal was adapted for use in goats. By using surgical techniques to insert a kyphoplasty balloon, spinal cord injury was accomplished with minimal trauma to the surrounding tissues, as is common in other traumatic models. Dye volumes of 0, 1.26 ± 0.18, and 2.82 ± 0.20 mL were injected into the balloon to produce spinal occupancies of 0%, 33 ± 2%, and 89 ± 4%, as evaluated by X-ray and computerized tomography imaging. A significant dose response was observed for the different levels of trauma, with reduced conduction of somatosensory evoked potentials and impaired mobility 7 days after injury. From the strong correlations between injection volume, balloon pressure, spinal occupancy, nerve function, and animal behavior, we conclude that hydraulic compression in goats is a useful model of spinal cord injury. PMID:24332594

  8. Assessing limb apraxia in traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Cristin; Thakur, Uma; Marcus, Bradley; Barrett, Anna Mariya

    2013-01-01

    People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) may demonstrate action planning disorders and limb apraxia. Many patients, who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI), sustain a co-occurring TBI (11-29 percent of people with SCI) and therefore are at risk for limb apraxia. People with SCI and TBI (SCI/TBI) rely on powered assistive devices which amplify movement. Their ability to learn complex motor compensatory strategies, that is, limb praxis, is critical to function. We wished to identify methods of screening for apraxia in patients with SCI/TBI. We reviewed instruments available for limb praxis assessment, presenting information on psychometric development, patient groups tested, commercial/clinical availability, and appropriateness for administration to people with motor weakness. Our review revealed that insufficient normative information exists for apraxia assessment in populations comparable to SCI/TBI patients who are typically young adults at the time of injury. There are few apraxia assessment instruments which do not require a motor response. Non-motoric apraxia assessments would be optimal for patients with an underlying motor weakness. PMID:23277082

  9. The effect of football helmet energy absorption mechanisms on the mitigation of cervical spinal injuries: a mathematical model 

    E-print Network

    Yung, Adelino

    1995-01-01

    A model was developed to examine the effect of different football helmet designs on energy dissipation and injury mitigation during head-on impacts which approach, but do not exceed, critical cervical spinal cord injury threshold levels. Based upon...

  10. MicroRNA Dysregulation in the Spinal Cord following Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yunta, Mónica; Nieto-Díaz, Manuel; Esteban, Francisco J.; Caballero-López, Marcos; Navarro-Ruíz, Rosa; Reigada, David; Pita-Thomas, D. Wolfgang; del Águila, Ángela; Muñoz-Galdeano, Teresa; Maza, Rodrigo M.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers a multitude of pathophysiological events that are tightly regulated by the expression levels of specific genes. Recent studies suggest that changes in gene expression following neural injury can result from the dysregulation of microRNAs, short non-coding RNA molecules that repress the translation of target mRNA. To understand the mechanisms underlying gene alterations following SCI, we analyzed the microRNA expression patterns at different time points following rat spinal cord injury. The microarray data reveal the induction of a specific microRNA expression pattern following moderate contusive SCI that is characterized by a marked increase in the number of down-regulated microRNAs, especially at 7 days after injury. MicroRNA downregulation is paralleled by mRNA upregulation, strongly suggesting that microRNAs regulate transcriptional changes following injury. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that changes in microRNA expression affect key processes in SCI physiopathology, including inflammation and apoptosis. MicroRNA expression changes appear to be influenced by an invasion of immune cells at the injury area and, more importantly, by changes in microRNA expression specific to spinal cord cells. Comparisons with previous data suggest that although microRNA expression patterns in the spinal cord are broadly similar among vertebrates, the results of studies assessing SCI are much less congruent and may depend on injury severity. The results of the present study demonstrate that moderate spinal cord injury induces an extended microRNA downregulation paralleled by an increase in mRNA expression that affects key processes in the pathophysiology of this injury. PMID:22511948

  11. Sleep onset hypoventilation in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bascom, Amy T; Sankari, Abdulghani; Goshgarian, Harry G; Badr, M Safwan

    2015-01-01

    A high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been reported in the literature; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We sought to determine the effect of the withdrawal of the wakefulness drive to breathe on the degree of hypoventilation in SCI patients and able-bodied controls. We studied 18 subjects with chronic cervical and thoracic SCI (10 cervical, 8 thoracic SCI; 11 males; age 42.4 ± 17.1 years; body mass index 26.3 ± 4.8 kg/m2) and 17 matched able-bodied subjects. Subjects underwent polysomnography, which included quantitative measurement of ventilation, timing, and upper airway resistance (RUA) on a breath-by-breath basis during transitions from wake to stage N1 sleep. Compared to able-bodied controls, SCI subjects had a significantly greater reduction in tidal volume during the transition from wake to N1 sleep (from 0.51 ± 0.21 to 0.32 ± 0.10 L vs. 0.47 ± 0.13 to 0.43 ± 0.12 L; respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, end-tidal CO2 and end-tidal O2 were significantly altered from wake to sleep in SCI (38.9 ± 2.7 mmHg vs. 40.6 ± 3.4 mmHg; 94.1 ± 7.1 mmHg vs. 91.2 ± 8.3 mmHg; respectively, P < 0.05), but not in able-bodied controls (39.5 ± 3.2 mmHg vs. 39.9 ± 3.2 mmHg; 99.4 ± 5.4 mmHg vs. 98.9 ± 6.1 mmHg; respectively, P = ns). RUA was not significantly altered in either group. In conclusion, individuals with SCI experience hypoventilation at sleep onset, which cannot be explained by upper airway mechanics. Sleep onset hypoventilation may contribute to the development SDB in the SCI population. PMID:26290534

  12. Development of a Database for Translational Spinal Cord Injury Research

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Jessica L.; Guandique, Cristian F.; Liu, Aiwen W.; Burke, Darlene A.; Lash, A. Todd; Moseanko, Rod; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Strand, Sarah C.; Zdunowski, Sharon; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Brock, John H.; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Gensel, John C.; Anderson, Kim D.; Segal, Mark R.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Magnuson, David S.K.; Whittemore, Scott R.; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Steward, Oswald; Courtine, Grégoire; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tuszynski, Mark H.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Efforts to understand spinal cord injury (SCI) and other complex neurotrauma disorders at the pre-clinical level have shown progress in recent years. However, successful translation of basic research into clinical practice has been slow, partly because of the large, heterogeneous data sets involved. In this sense, translational neurological research represents a “big data” problem. In an effort to expedite translation of pre-clinical knowledge into standards of patient care for SCI, we describe the development of a novel database for translational neurotrauma research known as Visualized Syndromic Information and Outcomes for Neurotrauma-SCI (VISION-SCI). We present demographics, descriptive statistics, and translational syndromic outcomes derived from our ongoing efforts to build a multi-center, multi-species pre-clinical database for SCI models. We leveraged archived surgical records, postoperative care logs, behavioral outcome measures, and histopathology from approximately 3000 mice, rats, and monkeys from pre-clinical SCI studies published between 1993 and 2013. The majority of animals in the database have measures collected for health monitoring, such as weight loss/gain, heart rate, blood pressure, postoperative monitoring of bladder function and drug/fluid administration, behavioral outcome measures of locomotion, and tissue sparing postmortem. Attempts to align these variables with currently accepted common data elements highlighted the need for more translational outcomes to be identified as clinical endpoints for therapeutic testing. Last, we use syndromic analysis to identify conserved biological mechanisms of recovery after cervical SCI between rats and monkeys that will allow for more-efficient testing of therapeutics that will need to be translated toward future clinical trials. PMID:25077610

  13. Development of a database for translational spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Jessica L; Guandique, Cristian F; Liu, Aiwen W; Burke, Darlene A; Lash, A Todd; Moseanko, Rod; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Strand, Sarah C; Zdunowski, Sharon; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Brock, John H; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S; Gensel, John C; Anderson, Kim D; Segal, Mark R; Rosenzweig, Ephron S; Magnuson, David S K; Whittemore, Scott R; McTigue, Dana M; Popovich, Phillip G; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Scheff, Stephen W; Steward, Oswald; Courtine, Grégoire; Edgerton, V Reggie; Tuszynski, Mark H; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Ferguson, Adam R

    2014-11-01

    Efforts to understand spinal cord injury (SCI) and other complex neurotrauma disorders at the pre-clinical level have shown progress in recent years. However, successful translation of basic research into clinical practice has been slow, partly because of the large, heterogeneous data sets involved. In this sense, translational neurological research represents a "big data" problem. In an effort to expedite translation of pre-clinical knowledge into standards of patient care for SCI, we describe the development of a novel database for translational neurotrauma research known as Visualized Syndromic Information and Outcomes for Neurotrauma-SCI (VISION-SCI). We present demographics, descriptive statistics, and translational syndromic outcomes derived from our ongoing efforts to build a multi-center, multi-species pre-clinical database for SCI models. We leveraged archived surgical records, postoperative care logs, behavioral outcome measures, and histopathology from approximately 3000 mice, rats, and monkeys from pre-clinical SCI studies published between 1993 and 2013. The majority of animals in the database have measures collected for health monitoring, such as weight loss/gain, heart rate, blood pressure, postoperative monitoring of bladder function and drug/fluid administration, behavioral outcome measures of locomotion, and tissue sparing postmortem. Attempts to align these variables with currently accepted common data elements highlighted the need for more translational outcomes to be identified as clinical endpoints for therapeutic testing. Last, we use syndromic analysis to identify conserved biological mechanisms of recovery after cervical SCI between rats and monkeys that will allow for more-efficient testing of therapeutics that will need to be translated toward future clinical trials. PMID:25077610

  14. Feasibility and efficacy of upper limb robotic rehabilitation in a1 sub-acute cervical spinal cord injury population2

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    Feasibility and efficacy of upper limb robotic rehabilitation in a1 sub-acute cervical spinal cord and Rehabilitation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver12 5. Spinal Cord Injury Center, University Hospital Spinal Cord Centre26 Vancouver General Hospital27 818 West 10th Avenue28 Vancouver, V5Z 1M9, Canada29 Tel

  15. Brain-Computer Interface Driven Functional Electrical Stimulation System for Overground Walking in Spinal Cord Injury Participant

    E-print Network

    Nenadic, Zoran

    in Spinal Cord Injury Participant Christine E. King1, Po T. Wang1, Colin M. McCrimmon1, Cathy C.Y. Chou2, An H. Do3, and Zoran Nenadic1,4 Abstract-- The current treatment for ambulation after spinal cord for the restoration of overground walking after SCI. I. INTRODUCTION The current treatment for ambulation after spinal

  16. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on MMP9/2 expression and motor function in rats with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ying-Nuo; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of hyperbaric oxygen intervention on the microenvironment of nerve regeneration after spinal cord injury modeling and to explore the possible mechanism of nerve regeneration and functional recovery in rats with spinal cord injury. In 98 adult female SD rats, 90 successful models were obtained, which were divided into sham group, spinal cord injury group and hyperbaric oxygen group using randomized block method, 30/group. Spinal cord injury rat model was established in accordance with the modified Allen method. Motor function was assessed at the time points of before modeling, one day, three days, one week, two weeks, three weeks and four weeks after modeling respectively by BBB rating, inclined plane test and improved Tarlov score. At 3 days after modeling, apoptosis of neuronal cells in spinal cord injury region in experimental group was detected by TUNEL method; gene and protein expression of MMP9/2 in spinal cord injury and surrounding tissues was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot assay. At 4 weeks after modeling, histopathological morphological changes in spinal cord injury were observed by HE staining; fluorogold retrograde tracing was used to observe the regeneration and distribution of spinal cord nerve fibers and axon regeneration was observed by TEM. The three motor function scores in hyperbaric oxygen group at each time point after two weeks of treatment were significantly increased compared with spinal cord injury group (P < 0.05). At 3 d after modeling, apoptosis index in hyperbaric oxygen group were significantly lower than those in spinal cord injury group (P < 0.05). At 72 h after modeling, compared with spinal cord injury group, MMP9/2 gene and protein expression in hyperbaric oxygen group was significantly lower (P < 0.05). At four weeks after modeling, fluorogold positive nerve fibers were the most sham group, followed by hyperbaric oxygen group and spinal cord injury group in order; the differences among the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Under TEM, newborn unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers could be observed in the middle cross-section in the sham group and hyperbaric oxygen group; unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers in hyperbaric oxygen group were more than those in spinal cord injury group. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy played a protective effect on spinal cord injury through reducing apoptosis of neuronal cells and expression of MMP9/2 gene and protein in rats with spinal cord injury. PMID:26628974

  17. Connexin43 mimetic peptide is neuroprotective and improves function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Simon J; Gorrie, Catherine A; Velamoor, Sailakshmi; Green, Colin R; Nicholson, Louise F B

    2013-03-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is a gap junction protein up-regulated after spinal cord injury and is involved in the on-going spread of secondary tissue damage. To test whether a connexin43 mimetic peptide (Peptide5) reduces inflammation and tissue damage and improves function in an in vivo model of spinal cord injury, rats were subjected to a 10g, 12.5mm weight drop injury at the vertebral level T10 using a MASCIS impactor. Vehicle or connexin43 mimetic peptide was delivered directly to the lesion via intrathecal catheter and osmotic mini-pump for up to 24h after injury. Treatment with Peptide5 led to significant improvements in hindlimb function as assessed using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scale. Peptide5 caused a reduction in Cx43 protein, increased Cx43 phosphorylation and decreased levels of TNF-? and IL-1? as assessed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry of tissue sections 5 weeks after injury showed reductions in astrocytosis and activated microglia as well as an increase in motor neuron survival. These results show that administration of a connexin mimetic peptide reduces secondary tissue damage after spinal cord injury by reducing gliosis and cytokine release and indicate the clinical potential for mimetic peptides in the treatment of spinal cord patients. PMID:23403365

  18. Polysialic acid glycomimetic promotes functional recovery and plasticity after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Ali; Jakovcevski, Igor; Acar, Ay?e; Xiao, Meifang; Loers, Gabriele; Rougon, Geneviève; Irintchev, Andrey; Schachner, Melitta

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration after injury of the central nervous system is poor due to the abundance of molecules inhibiting axonal growth. Here we pursued to promote regeneration after thoracic spinal cord injury in young adult C57BL/6J mice using peptides which functionally mimic polysialic acid (PSA) and human natural killer cell-1 (HNK-1) glycan, carbohydrate epitopes known to promote neurite outgrowth in vitro. Subdural infusions were performed with an osmotic pump, over 2 weeks. When applied immediately after injury, the PSA mimetic and the combination of PSA and HNK-1 mimetics, but not the HNK-1 mimetic alone, improved functional recovery as assessed by locomotor rating and video-based motion analysis over a 6-week observation period. Better outcome in PSA mimetic-treated mice was associated with higher, as compared with control mice, numbers of cholinergic and glutamatergic terminals and monaminergic axons in the lumbar spinal cord, and better axonal myelination proximal to the injury site. In contrast to immediate post-traumatic application, the PSA mimetic treatment was ineffective when initiated 3 weeks after spinal cord injury. Our data suggest that PSA mimetic peptides can be efficient therapeutic tools improving, by augmenting plasticity, functional recovery when applied during the acute phase of spinal cord injury. PMID:19826404

  19. Motoneuron Intrinsic Properties, but Not Their Receptive Fields, Recover in Chronic Spinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kajtaz, Elma; Cain, Charlette M.; Heckman, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Proper movement execution relies on precise input processing by spinal motoneurons (MNs). Spinal MNs are activated by limb joint rotations. Typically, their movement-related receptive fields (MRRFs) are sharply focused and joint-specific. After acute spinal transection MRRFs become wide, but their manifestation is not apparent, as intrinsic excitability, primarily resulting from the loss of persistent inward currents (PICs), dramatically decreases. PICs undergo a remarkable recovery with time after injury. Here we investigate whether MRRFs undergo a recovery that parallels that of the PIC. Using the chronic spinal cat in acute terminal decerebrate preparations, we found that MRRFs remain expanded 1 month after spinal transaction, whereas PICs recovered to >80% of their preinjury amplitudes. These recovered PICs substantially amplified the expanded inputs underlying the MRRFs. As a result, we show that single joint rotations lead to the activation of muscles across the entire limb. These results provide a potential mechanism for the propagation of spasms throughout the limb. PMID:24285887

  20. Motoneuron intrinsic properties, but not their receptive fields, recover in chronic spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael D; Kajtaz, Elma; Cain, Charlette M; Heckman, C J

    2013-11-27

    Proper movement execution relies on precise input processing by spinal motoneurons (MNs). Spinal MNs are activated by limb joint rotations. Typically, their movement-related receptive fields (MRRFs) are sharply focused and joint-specific. After acute spinal transection MRRFs become wide, but their manifestation is not apparent, as intrinsic excitability, primarily resulting from the loss of persistent inward currents (PICs), dramatically decreases. PICs undergo a remarkable recovery with time after injury. Here we investigate whether MRRFs undergo a recovery that parallels that of the PIC. Using the chronic spinal cat in acute terminal decerebrate preparations, we found that MRRFs remain expanded 1 month after spinal transaction, whereas PICs recovered to >80% of their preinjury amplitudes. These recovered PICs substantially amplified the expanded inputs underlying the MRRFs. As a result, we show that single joint rotations lead to the activation of muscles across the entire limb. These results provide a potential mechanism for the propagation of spasms throughout the limb. PMID:24285887

  1. Advances in regenerative therapies for spinal cord injury: a biomaterials approach

    PubMed Central

    Tsintou, Magdalini; Dalamagkas, Kyriakos; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in the permanent loss of function, causing enormous personal, social and economic problems. Even though neural regeneration has been proven to be a natural mechanism, central nervous system repair mechanisms are ineffective due to the imbalance of the inhibitory and excitatory factors implicated in neuroregeneration. Therefore, there is growing research interest on discovering a novel therapeutic strategy for effective spinal cord injury repair. To this direction, cell-based delivery strategies, biomolecule delivery strategies as well as scaffold-based therapeutic strategies have been developed with a tendency to seek for the answer to a combinatorial approach of all the above. Here we review the recent advances on regenerative/neural engineering therapies for spinal cord injury, aiming at providing an insight to the most promising repair strategies, in order to facilitate future research conduction. PMID:26109946

  2. The process of confrontation with disability in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Gholamhossein; Kouchaki, Anahita; Malekian, Azadeh; Aminorro’aya, Mahin; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal injury can establish severe psychological outcomes for the patient and his/her family which requires high adjustment. Health system staff would be able to play their roles well in caring these patients provided with knowing what steps spinal injured people should pass to handle their disability and also what assistance they need in what stages from what sources. This study aimed to explain the process of confrontation with disability in spinal cord injured patients. METHODS: This was a qualitative study with grounded theory approach which was performed in Strauss and Corbin proposed method on twenty people with spinal cord injury who had past at least three months from their spinal injury. Sampling was done in purposive and theoretical method, and analysis of the results was also performed during constant comparative process. RESULTS: Central concept in the data was support which was associated with other concepts and affected them. The patients, with the help of internal and external support could overcome their main problem that was disability feeling and dependency on others and find a new definition for the self, and ultimately achieve the sense of independence and autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: Knowing the process of confrontation with disability along with better understanding of spinal cord injured people would help health system staff to actualize and support their potentials much better through strengthening internal resources and providing appropriate supportive services of each individual. PMID:22069411

  3. Outcome in patients undergoing surgery for spinal injury in an Ethiopian hospital.

    PubMed

    Lehre, Martin Andreas; Eriksen, Lars Magnus; Tirsit, Abenezer; Bekele, Segni; Petros, Saba; Park, Kee B; Bøthun, Marianne Lundervik; Wester, Knut

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to investigate epidemiology and outcome after surgical treatment for spinal injuries in Ethiopia. METHODS Medical records of patients who underwent surgery for spine injuries at Myungsung Christian Medical Center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, between January 2008 and September 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Assessment of outcome and complications was determined from patient consultations and phone interviews. RESULTS A total of 146 patients were included (129 males, 17 females). Their mean age was 31.7 years (range 15-81 years). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents (54.1%), and this was followed by falls (26.7%). The most common injury sites were lumbar (41.1%) and cervical (34.2%) regions of the spine. In 21.2% of patients, no neurological deficit was present before surgery, 46.6% had incomplete spinal cord injury (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS] Grade B-D), and 32.2% had complete spinal cord injury (AIS Grade A). Follow-up was hampered by suboptimal infrastructure, but information regarding outcome was successfully obtained for 110 patients (75.3%). At follow-up (mean 22.9 months; range 2-57 months), 25 patients (17.1%) were confirmed dead and 85 patients (58.2%) were alive; 49 patients (33.6%) underwent physical examination. At least 8 of the 47 patients (17.0%) with a complete injury and 29 of the 68 patients (42.6%) with an incomplete injury showed neurological improvement. The reported incidences of pressure wounds, recurrent urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and thromboembolic events were 22.5%, 13.5%, 5.6%, and 1.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Patients showed surprisingly good recovery considering the limited resources. Surgical treatment for spine injuries in Ethiopia is considered beneficial. PMID:26340379

  4. Spinal Cord Injury Community Survey: A National, Comprehensive Study to Portray the Lives of Canadians with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Cobb, John; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To better understand service-related needs and the current situation of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) living in the community, a more comprehensive approach for studying their interrelationships (needs vs community living outcomes) is greatly needed. Objective: To describe the development, design, and findings of a Canadian survey portraying the life situation of people with SCI. Method: The SCI Community Survey covers demographics, health, SCI-specific needs, community participation, employment, quality of life, health care utilization, and overall health rating. A total of 1,549 persons with SCI completed the survey (Web or phone) between May 2011 and August 2012. Results: Some major expressed needs for services to support community living are met to a great extent for a substantial proportion of people with SCI. Complications remain highly prevalent for some health issues, including pain, sexual dysfunction, and musculoskeletal disorders. The extent of community participation based on values and preferences varies tremendously among daily activities and social roles. Some dimensions of quality of life are rated positively (eg, family life) while others are greatly disrupted (eg, sex life and physical health). Most of these findings vary significantly between people with traumatic and nontraumatic lesions. Conclusion: This survey is the first in Canada and among the first worldwide to draw a comprehensive picture of major aspects of the lives of people with SCI including service needs. The results will help to determine the links between various aspects of community living and guide service providers and policy makers in focusing on major issues to enhance quality of life after SCI. PMID:25477739

  5. The Adjustment Process for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: The Effect of Perceived Premorbid Sense of Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Daniel C.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between perceived changes in sense of coherence from pre- to postinjury and adjustment for a group of individuals with spinal cord injury. It was hypothesized that after a spinal cord injury, an individual's belief that he or she had significantly reduced his or her sense of coherence would be associated…

  6. Attachment Style, Social Support, and Coping as Psychosocial Correlates of Happiness in Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lisa; Catalano, Denise; Sung, Connie; Phillips, Brian; Chou, Chih-Chin; Chan, Jacob Yui Chung; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the roles of attachment, social support, and coping as psychosocial correlates in predicting happiness in people with spinal cord injuries. Design: Quantitative descriptive research design using multiple regression and correlation techniques. Participants: 274 individuals with spinal cord injuries. Outcome Measures: Happiness…

  7. Measurement Structure of the Trait Hope Scale in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph; Moser, Erin; Tu, Wei-Mo; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the measurement structure of the Trait Hope Scale (THS) among individuals with spinal cord injury. Design: Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability and validity analyses were performed. Participants: 242 individuals with spinal cord injury. Results: Results support the two-factor measurement model for the THS with agency…

  8. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a significantly higher rate of total complications in the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group. These findings support guideline recommendations against routine administration of methylprednisolone in acute TSCI. PMID:26065706

  9. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Fourney, Daryl R; Hurlbert, R John; Linassi, A G; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2015-11-01

    In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1-T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2-L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a significantly higher rate of total complications in the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group. These findings support guideline recommendations against routine administration of methylprednisolone in acute TSCI. PMID:26065706

  10. Induction of MMP-9 Expression and Endothelial Injury by Oxidative Stress after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    YU, FENGSHAN; KAMADA, HIROSHI; NIIZUMA, KUNIYASU; ENDO, HIDENORI; CHAN, PAK H.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activation plays an important role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction after central nervous system injury. Oxidative stress is also implicated in the pathogenesis after cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury (SCI), but the relationship between MMP-9 activation and oxidative stress after SCI has not yet been clarified. We examined MMP-9 expression after SCI using copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) transgenic (Tg) rats. Our results show that MMP-9 activity significantly increased after SCI in both SOD1 Tg rats and their wild-type (Wt) littermates, although the increase was less in the SOD1 Tg rats. This pattern of MMP-9 expression was further confirmed by immunostaining and Western blot analysis. In situ zymography showed that gelatinolytic activity increased after SCI in the Wt rats, while the increase was less in the Tg rats. Evans blue extravasation increased in both the Wt and Tg rats, but was less in the SOD1 Tg rats. Inhibitor studies showed that with an intrathecal injection of SB-3CT, a selective MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor, MMP activity, Evans blue extravasation, and apoptotic cell death decreased after SCI. We conclude that increased oxidative stress after SCI leads to MMP-9 upregulation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and apoptosis, and that overexpression of SOD1 in Tg rats decreases oxidative stress and further attenuates MMP-9 mediated blood-brain barrier disruption. PMID:18352832

  11. Topological data analysis for discovery in preclinical spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Jessica L.; Paquette, Jesse; Liu, Aiwen W.; Guandique, Cristian F.; Tovar, C. Amy; Inoue, Tomoo; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Gensel, John C.; Kloke, Jennifer; Petrossian, Tanya C.; Lum, Pek Y.; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Young, Wise; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Ferguson, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Data-driven discovery in complex neurological disorders has potential to extract meaningful syndromic knowledge from large, heterogeneous data sets to enhance potential for precision medicine. Here we describe the application of topological data analysis (TDA) for data-driven discovery in preclinical traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) data sets mined from the Visualized Syndromic Information and Outcomes for Neurotrauma-SCI (VISION-SCI) repository. Through direct visualization of inter-related histopathological, functional and health outcomes, TDA detected novel patterns across the syndromic network, uncovering interactions between SCI and co-occurring TBI, as well as detrimental drug effects in unpublished multicentre preclinical drug trial data in SCI. TDA also revealed that perioperative hypertension predicted long-term recovery better than any tested drug after thoracic SCI in rats. TDA-based data-driven discovery has great potential application for decision-support for basic research and clinical problems such as outcome assessment, neurocritical care, treatment planning and rapid, precision-diagnosis. PMID:26466022

  12. Risk of Fall-Related Injuries among Ambulatory Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: With medical and rehabilitation advances, many people are able to regain or maintain ambulation after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, those who are ambulatory may be at increased risk for falls. Objective: To assess the relationships between walking devices and behaviors, including alcohol use, prescription medication use, and exercise, with falls among persons with SCI who are ambulatory. Methods: A total of 515 adults with chronic SCI who were able to ambulate provided self-report of their use of assistive devices for ambulation, prescription medication use, alcohol use, exercise, and falls resulting in injury (FRI). Results: At least 1 FRI was reported by 20.3% of participants in the past year. Ambulatory participants who reported using a wheelchair as their primary mode of mobility were less likely to have an FRI than those who reported walking more than using a wheelchair. Those with perceived poor balance were 2.41 times more likely to have an FRI than those without poor balance. Those who reported less exercise than other persons with a comparable SCI severity were 2.77 times more likely to have an FRI than those reporting the same or more amount of exercise. Pain medication misuse also was associated with higher odds of an FRI. Conclusions: Health care providers should be aware of the risk for FRI among those who are ambulatory. They should assess and consider not only ambulatory ability, but also behaviors, including prescription medication use and exercise, when recommending ambulation techniques. PMID:24244091

  13. Acute effects of whole body vibration during passive standing on soleus H-reflex in subjects with and without spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    with and without spinal cord injury Dimitry G. Sayenko1 , Kei Masani1 , Milad Alizadeh-Meghrazi1,2 , Milos R in a standing frame on the soleus H-reflex among men with and without spinal cord injury (SCI). In spinal cord cord injuries, whole body vibration, neuromuscular plasticity, motoneuronal excitability, soleus H

  14. Below is a brief listing of the most frequently asked for research categories for training applications: Bioengineering Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Channels, Synapses and Circuits

    E-print Network

    applications: Bioengineering Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cognitive, nanotechnology Top Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Ramona Hicks (hicksra@ninds.nih.gov) ­ Basic, translation@ninds.nih.gov) ­ Spinal Cord Injury Top Channels, Synapses and Circuits Shai Silberberg (silberbs@ninds.nih.gov)­ Channels

  15. Upper limb kinematics after cervical spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Sébastien; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Reilly, Karen T; Rossetti, Yves; Collet, Christian; Rode, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Although a number of upper limb kinematic studies have been conducted, no review actually addresses the key-features of open-chain upper limb movements after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this literature review is to provide a clear understanding of motor control and kinematic changes during open-chain upper limb reaching, reach-to-grasp, overhead movements, and fast elbow flexion movements after tetraplegia. Using data from MEDLINE between 1966 and December 2014, we examined temporal and spatial kinematic measures and when available electromyographic recordings. We included fifteen control case and three series case studies with a total of 164 SCI participants and 131 healthy control participants. SCI participants efficiently performed a broad range of tasks with their upper limb and movements were planned and executed with strong kinematic invariants like movement endpoint accuracy and minimal cost. Our review revealed that elbow extension without triceps brachii relies on increased scapulothoracic and glenohumeral movements providing a dynamic coupling between shoulder and elbow. Furthermore, contrary to normal grasping patterns where grasping is prepared during the transport phase, reaching and grasping are performed successively after SCI. The prolonged transport phase ensures correct hand placement while the grasping relies on wrist extension eliciting either whole hand or lateral grip. One of the main kinematic characteristics observed after tetraplegia is motor slowing attested by increased movement time. This could be caused by (i) decreased strength, (ii) triceps brachii paralysis which disrupts normal agonist-antagonist co-contractions, (iii) accuracy preservation at movement endpoint, and/or (iv) grasping relying on tenodesis. Another feature is a reduction of maximal superior reaching during overhead movements which could be caused by i) strength deficit in agonist muscles like pectoralis major, ii) strength deficit in proximal synergic muscles responsible for scapulothoracic and glenohumeral joint stability, iii) strength deficit in distal synergic muscles preventing the maintenance of elbow extension by shoulder elbow dynamic coupling, iv) shoulder joint ankyloses, and/or v) shoulder pain. Further studies on open chain movements are needed to identify the contribution of each of these factors in order to tailor upper limb rehabilitation programs for SCI individuals. PMID:25637224

  16. Effects of polarization in low-level laser therapy of spinal cord injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Obara, Minoru

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a promising approach to treat the spinal cord injury (SCI). Since nerve fibers have optical anisotropy, propagation of light in the spinal tissue might be affected by its polarization direction. However, the effect of polarization on the efficacy of LLLT has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared LLLT for SCI. Rat spinal cord was injured with a weight-drop device. The lesion site was irradiated with an 808-nm diode laser beam that was transmitted through a polarizing filter immediately after injury and daily for five consecutive days. The laser power at the injured spinal cord surface was 25 mW, and the dosage per day was 9.6 J/cm2 (spot diameter, 2 cm; irradiation duration, 1200 s). Functional recovery was assessed daily by an open-field test. The results showed that the functional scores of the SCI rats that were treated with 808-nm laser irradiation were significantly higher than those of the SCI alone group (Group 1) from day 5 after injury, regardless of the polarization direction. Importantly, as compared to the locomotive function of the SCI rats that were treated with the perpendicularly-polarized laser parallel to the spinal column (Group 2), that of the SCI rats that were irradiated with the linearly aligned polarization (Group 3) was significantly improved from day 10 after injury. In addition, the ATP contents in the injured spinal tissue of Group 3, which were measured immediately after laser irradiation, were moderately higher than those of Group 2. These observations are attributable to the deeper penetration of the parallelpolarized light in the anisotropic spinal tissue, suggesting that polarization direction significantly affects the efficacy of LLLT for SCI.

  17. Global prevalence and incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anoushka; Tetreault, Lindsay; Kalsi-Ryan, Suhkvinder; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic event that impacts a patient’s physical, psychological, and social well-being and places substantial financial burden on health care systems. To determine the true impact of SCI, this systematic review aims to summarize literature reporting on either the incidence or prevalence of SCI. Methods A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant literature published through June 2013. We sought studies that provided regional, provincial/state, or national data on the incidence of SCI or reported estimates of disease prevalence. The level of evidence of each study was rated using a scale that evaluated study design, methodology, sampling bias, and precision of estimates. Results The initial search yielded 5,874 articles, 48 of which met the inclusion criteria. Forty-four studies estimated the incidence of SCI and nine reported the prevalence, with five discussing both. Of the incidence studies, 14 provided figures at a regional, ten at a state or provincial level and 21 at a national level. The prevalence of SCI was highest in the United States of America (906 per million) and lowest in the Rhone-Alpes region, France (250 per million) and Helsinki, Finland (280 per million). With respect to states and provinces in North America, the crude annual incidence of SCI was highest in Alaska (83 per million) and Mississippi (77 per million) and lowest in Alabama (29.4 per million), despite a large percentage of violence injuries (21.2%). Annual incidences were above 50 per million in the Hualien County in Taiwan (56.1 per million), the central Portugal region (58 per million), and Olmsted County in Minnesota (54.8 per million) and were lower than 20 per million in Taipei, Taiwan (14.6 per million), the Rhone-Alpes region in France (12.7 per million), Aragon, Spain (12.1 per million), Southeast Turkey (16.9 per million), and Stockholm, Sweden (19.5 per million). The highest national incidence was 49.1 per million in New Zealand, and the lowest incidences were in Fiji (10.0 per million) and Spain (8.0 per million). The majority of studies showed a high male-to-female ratio and an age of peak incidence of younger than 30 years old. Traffic accidents were typically the most common cause of SCI, followed by falls in the elderly population. Conclusion This review demonstrates that the incidence, prevalence, and causation of SCI differs between developing and developed countries and suggests that management and preventative strategies need to be tailored to regional trends. The rising aging population in westernized countries also indicates that traumatic SCI secondary to falls may become an increasing public health challenge and that incidence among the elderly may rise with increasing life expectancy. PMID:25278785

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in veterans with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, W A; Zhong, Y G; Schwartz, E

    1995-12-01

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with osteopenia, increasing the prevalence of long-bone fractures. Although disuse may be the primary cause of osteopenia, identification of any additional mechanisms of bone loss may lead to potential therapeutic interventions. We investigated the relationships of serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus (PO4), albumin, alkaline phosphatase (Alk P), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in 100 subjects with chronic SCI and 50 control subjects. in a subgroup of 50 subjects with SCI and 50 control subjects, we correlated these parameters with serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. Mean ages for the group with SCI and the controls were the same. In subjects with SCI, the duration of injury was 20 +/- 1 years (mean +/- SD). Thirty-two of 100 subjects with SCI, as compared with eight of 50 controls, had serum 25(OH)D levels less than the normal range (chi2 = 4.36, P < .05). In subjects with SCI, a negative correlation was demonstrated between serum 25(OH)D and PTH (r = .29, P < .005). Mean serum 1.25(OH)2D levels were significantly elevated in subjects with SCI as compared with controls (61 +/- 21 v 46 +/- 18 pg/mL, P < .0005). Twenty of 50 subjects with SCI had serum 1.25(OH)2D levels greater than 62 pg/mL, as compared with 10 of 50 controls (chi2 = 4.76 P < .05). A positive correlation was found between serum PTH and 1,25(OH)2D in subjects with SCI and controls (r = .41, P < .005 and r = .30, P < .05, respectively). Twelve subjects with SCI had serum PTH levels greater than the normal range. In this high-serum PTH subgroup, serum 15(OH)D concentration was significantly lower (P < .05) and serum 1,25(OH)2D and Alk P concentrations were significantly higher (P < .005 and P < .05, respectively) as compared with the subgroup with serum PTH values within the normal range. In subjects with SCI, 17 had a serum Ca concentration less than 8.5 mg/dL. In persons with SCI, depressed levels of serum 25(OH)D, as well as other factors, may result in forces inclined to reduce the serum calcium concentration. A state of mild secondary hyperparathyroidism may result, thus increasing the conversion of serum 25(OH)D to 1.25(OH)2D. These data suggest that in chronic SCI subjects, as in the general population, secretion of PTH and the increase of circulating 1.25(OH)2D are subject to control by negative-feedback mechanisms. Higher levels of serum PTH would be expected to accelerate bone resorption of a skeleton already regionally osteoporotic as a consequence of the bone mineral loss due to acute immobilization. PMID:8786732

  19. ProNGF Induces p75-Mediated Death of Oligodendrocytes following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Michael S.; Harrington, Anthony W.; Lee, Ramee; Kim, Ju Young; Boyce, Sheri L.; Longo, Frank M.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Yoon, Sung Ok

    2009-01-01

    Summary The neurotrophin receptor p75 is induced by various injuries to the nervous system, but its role after injury has remained unclear. Here, we report that p75 is required for the death of oligodendrocytes following spinal cord injury, and its action is mediated mainly by proNGF. Oligodendrocytes undergoing apoptosis expressed p75, and the absence of p75 resulted in a decrease in the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes and increased survival of oligodendrocytes. ProNGF is likely responsible for activating p75 in vivo, since the proNGF from the injured spinal cord induced apoptosis among p75+/+, but not among p75-/-, oligodendrocytes in culture, and its action was blocked by proNGF-specific antibody. Together, these data suggest that the role of proNGF is to eliminate damaged cells by activating the apoptotic machinery of p75 after injury. PMID:12408842

  20. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Asia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Guang-Zhi; Wu, Qiang; Li, Yu-Lin; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Study design A systematic review. Background The number of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) reports grows annually, especially in China and Korea. The epidemiological characteristics of TSCI in Asia differ from those in other countries. Thus, we compiled epidemiological factors from Asia to compare with those from other countries. Method We searched articles published in any language between January 1980 to December 2011 using the terms “spinal cord injury”, “traumatic spinal cord injury”, “epidemiology”, and “Asia”. The articles were reviewed for information regarding TSCI incidence, total cases, case criteria, case source, causes of injury, male/female ratio, mean age, prospective or retrospective, neurological level of injury, extent of injury, and America Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS)/grade. Results Epidemiological data were extracted from 39 reports in the published literature that met the inclusion criteria. Only two studies reported prevalence rates. Incidence rates ranged from 12.06 to 61.6 per million. The average age ranged from 26.8 to 56.6 years old. Men were at higher risk than women. Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) and falls were the main causes of TSCI. However, several countries reported war wounds as the major cause. The neurological level and extent of injury were mixed, and most patients were categorized as AIS/Frankel grade A. Conclusion TSCI is an important public health problem and a major cause of paralysis. We must understand the epidemiology to implement appropriate preventative measures. Asian epidemiology is different from that in other regions, so intervention measures must be established according to population-specific characteristics. PMID:22925749

  1. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-ping; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yin; Li, Jian-ding; Xie, Jun

    2015-01-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7-8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:25878588

  2. Lipoxin A4 ameliorates ischemia/reperfusion induced spinal cord injury in rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jian; Xia, Li-Jian; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced spinal cord injury is an important pathologic mechanism leading to the paraplegia observed after surgery to repairaortic aneurysms. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Lipoxin A4 and its potential mechanism in a rabbit model with I/R spinal cord injury. Forty-five rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, I/R group and Lipoxin A4 group. Rabbits were subject to 30 min aortic occlusion to induce transient spinal cord ischemia. All animals were sacrificed after neurological evaluation with modified Tarlov criteria at the 48th hour after reperfusion, and the spinal cord segments (L4-6) were harvested for histopathological examination, as well as local malondialdehyde (MDA) and total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity analysis. All animals in the I/R group became paraplegic. While after 48-hour treatment, compared with I/R group, Lipoxin A4 significantly improved neurological function, reduced cell apoptosis and MDA levels as well as increased SOD activity (P < 0.05). These results suggest that Lipoxin A4 can ameliorate I/R induced spinal cord injury in Rabbit through its antiapoptosis and antioxidant activity. PMID:26550197

  3. Wnt/ß-catenin signaling is required for radial glial neurogenesis following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Briona, Lisa K; Poulain, Fabienne E; Mosimann, Christian; Dorsky, Richard I

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord injury results in permanent sensorimotor loss in mammals, in part due to a lack of injury-induced neurogenesis. The regeneration of neurons depends upon resident neural progenitors, which in zebrafish persist throughout the central nervous system as radial glia. However the molecular mechanisms regulating spinal cord progenitors remain uncharacterized. Wnt/ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the regenerative response of multiple tissues in zebrafish as well as other vertebrates, but it is not known whether the pathway has a role in spinal cord regeneration. Here we show that spinal radial glia exhibit Wnt/ß-catenin activity as they undergo neurogenesis following transection. We then use Cre-mediated lineage tracing to label the progeny of radial glia and show that Wnt/ß-catenin signaling is required for progenitors to differentiate into neurons. Finally, we show that axonal regrowth after injury also requires Wnt/ß-catenin signaling, suggesting coordinated roles for the pathway in functional recovery. Our data thus establish Wnt/ß-catenin pathway activation as a necessary step in spinal cord regeneration. PMID:25888075

  4. Neuroprotective effect of atorvastatin in spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Nazli, Yunus; Colak, Necmettin; Alpay, Mehmet Fatih; Uysal, Sema; Uzunlar, Ali Kemal; Cakir, Omer

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prevention of the development of paraplegia during the repair of the damage caused by descending thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms remains an important issue. Therefore, we investigated the protective effect of atorvastatin on ischemia-induced spinal cord injury in a rabbit model. METHOD: Thirty-two rabbits were divided into the following four equally sized groups: group I (control), group II (ischemia-reperfusion), group III (atorvastatin treatment) and group IV (atorvastatin withdrawal). Spinal cord ischemia was induced by clamping the aorta both below the left renal artery and above the iliac bifurcation. Seventy-two hours postoperatively, the motor function of the lower limbs of each animal was evaluated according to the Tarlov score. Spinal cord and blood samples were obtained for histopathological and biochemical analyses. RESULTS: All of the rabbits in group II exhibited severe neurological deficits. Atorvastatin treatment (groups III and IV) significantly reduced the level of motor dysfunction. No significant differences were observed between the motor function scores of groups III and IV at the evaluated time points. Light microscopic examination of spinal cord tissue samples obtained at the 72nd hour of reperfusion indicated greater tissue preservation in groups III and IV than in group II. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the considerable neuroprotective effect of atorvastatin on the neurological, biochemical and histopathological status of rabbits with ischemia-induced spinal cord injury. Moreover, the acute withdrawal of atorvastatin therapy following the induction of spinal cord ischemia did not increase the neuronal damage in this rabbit model. PMID:25672430

  5. Neuroprotective effects of electroacupuncture on early- and late-stage spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-fei; Zhang, Shu-quan; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Gu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the neurite growth inhibitor Nogo-A can cause secondary neural damage by activating RhoA. In the present study, we hypothesized that electroacupuncture promotes neurological functional recovery after spinal cord injury by inhibiting RhoA expression. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using a modification of Allen's method. The rats were given electroacupuncture treatment at Dazhui (Du14), Mingmen (Du4), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Huantiao (GB30), Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints with a sparse-dense wave at a frequency of 4 Hz for 30 minutes, once a day, for a total of 7 days. Seven days after injury, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and inclined plane test scores were significantly increased, the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord tissue was significantly reduced, and RhoA and Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression levels were decreased in rats given electroacupuncture compared with rats not given electroacupuncture. Four weeks after injury, pathological tissue damage in the spinal cord at the site of injury was alleviated, the numbers of glial fibrillary acidic protein- and neurofilament 200-positive fibers were increased, the latencies of somatosensory-evoked and motor-evoked potentials were shortened, and their amplitudes were increased in rats given electroacupuncture. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture treatment reduces neuronal apoptosis and decreases RhoA and Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression at the site of spinal cord injury, thereby promoting tissue repair and neurological functional recovery. PMID:26692861

  6. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cell-induced neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Ye; Jia, Jingqiao; Yang, Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    Because of their strong proliferative capacity and multi-potency, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have gained interest as a cell source in the field of nerve damage repair. In the present study, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neural stem cells, which were then transplanted into the spinal cord after local spinal cord injury in rats. The motor functional recovery and pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were observed for 3 successive weeks. The results showed that human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neuron-like cells and that induced neural stem cells contribute to the restoration of injured spinal cord without causing transplant rejection. Thus, these cells promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Therefore, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells may be useful as seed cells during the repair of spinal cord injury. PMID:25657742

  7. Critical Role of Connexin 43 in Secondary Expansion of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunlan; Han, Xiaoning; Li, Xi; Lam, Eric; Peng, Weiguo; Lou, Nanhong; Torres, Arnulfo; Yang, Meixiang; Garre, Juan Mauricio; Tian, Guo-Feng; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Takano, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often complicated by secondary injury as a result of the innate inflammatory response to tissue trauma and swelling. Previous studies have shown that excessive ATP release from peritraumatic regions contributes to the inflammatory response to SCI by activation of low-affinity P2X7 receptors. Because connexin hemichannels constitute an important route for astrocytic ATP release, we here evaluated the impact on post-traumatic ATP release of deletion of connexins (Cx30/Cx43) in astrocytes. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a significant reduction in ATP release after weight-drop injury in mice with deletion of Cx43 compared with Cx43-expressing littermates, both on a Cx30 knockout background. Moreover, astrogliosis and microglia activation were reduced in peritraumatic areas of those mice lacking Cx43; motor recovery was also significantly improved, and the traumatic lesion was smaller. Combined, these observations are consistent with a contribution by astrocytic hemichannels to post-traumatic ATP release that aggravates secondary injury and restrains functional recovery after experimental spinal cord injury. Connexins may thereby constitute a new therapeutic target in spinal cord injury. PMID:22399755

  8. Temporal Profile of Endogenous Anatomical Repair and Functional Recovery following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Vajn, Katarina; Suler, Denis; Plunkett, Jeffery A.; Oudega, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Regenerated cerebrospinal axons are considered to be involved in the spontaneous recovery of swimming ability following a spinal cord injury in adult zebrafish. We employed behavioral analysis, neuronal tracing, and immunocytochemistry to determine the exact temporal relationship between swimming ability and regenerated cerebrospinal axon number in adult zebrafish with a complete spinal cord transection. Between two and eight weeks post-lesion, swimming gradually improved to 44% of sham-injured zebrafish. Neurons within the reticular formation, magnocellular octaval nucleus, and nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle grew their axon across and at least four millimeters beyond the lesion. The largest increases in swimming ability and number of regenerated cerebrospinal axons were observed between two and four weeks post-lesion. Regression analyses revealed a significant correlation between swimming ability and the number of regenerated axons. Our results indicate the involvement of cerebrospinal axons in swimming recovery after spinal cord injury in adult zebrafish. PMID:25157957

  9. NT3-chitosan elicits robust endogenous neurogenesis to enable functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Aifeng; Duan, Hongmei; Zhang, Sa; Hao, Peng; Ye, Keqiang; Sun, Yi E; Li, Xiaoguang

    2015-10-27

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) hold the key to neural regeneration through proper activation, differentiation, and maturation, to establish nascent neural networks, which can be integrated into damaged neural circuits to repair function. However, the CNS injury microenvironment is often inhibitory and inflammatory, limiting the ability of activated NSCs to differentiate into neurons and form nascent circuits. Here we report that neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-coupled chitosan biomaterial, when inserted into a 5-mm gap of completely transected and excised rat thoracic spinal cord, elicited robust activation of endogenous NSCs in the injured spinal cord. Through slow release of NT3, the biomaterial attracted NSCs to migrate into the lesion area, differentiate into neurons, and form functional neural networks, which interconnected severed ascending and descending axons, resulting in sensory and motor behavioral recovery. Our study suggests that enhancing endogenous neurogenesis could be a novel strategy for treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:26460015

  10. Crmp4 deletion promotes recovery from spinal cord injury by neuroprotection and limited scar formation

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Jun; Kitamura, Yoshiteru; Owada, Kazuki; Yamashita, Naoya; Takei, Kohtaro; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth inhibitors and scar formation are two major obstacles to central nervous system (CNS) repair. No target molecule that regulates both axonal growth and scarring has been identified. Here we identified collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4), a common mediator of inhibitory signals after neural injury, as a crucial factor that contributes to both axonal growth inhibition and scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI). We found increases in the inhibitory and toxic forms of CRMP4 in injured spinal cord. Notably, CRMP4 expression was evident in inflammatory cells as well as in neurons after spinal cord transection. Crmp4?/? mice displayed neuroprotection against SCI and reductions in inflammatory response and scar formation. This permissive environment for axonal growth due to CRMP4 deletion restored locomotor activity at an unusually early phase of healing. These results suggest that deletion of CRMP4 is a unique therapeutic strategy that overcomes two obstacles to CNS repair after SCI. PMID:25652774

  11. Work, Non-Work and Consequent Satisfaction after Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ville, I.; Ravaud, J-F.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a number of socioeconomic variables on resumption of work after a spinal cord injury. A self-completed questionnaire by 277 people of working age found that high educational level and early impairment increased probability of employment. Unemployed people tended to be dissatisfied, while more highly educated,…

  12. Prevention Practice Differences Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Who Rarely Versus Frequently Sustain Pressure Ulcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael L.; Marini, Irmo; Slate, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and not only are costly to treat but also affect the quality of life of those affected by them. Despite a plethora of literature on prevention, there are few wellness studies focusing on the practices of people who do not develop pressure ulcers. This preliminary study sought to…

  13. Methylprednisolone in the management of spinal cord injuries: Lessons from randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent; Hoshide, Reid; Bansal, Vishal; Kasper, Ekkehard; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of glucocorticoid for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries remains a controversial topic. Differing medical societies have issued conflicting recommendations in this regard. Here we review the available randomized, controlled trial (RCT) data on this subject and offer a synthesis of these data sets. PMID:26392918

  14. Life Stories of People with Long-Term Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crewe, Nancy M.

    1997-01-01

    Conducted life story interviews with and administered psychometric inventories to 50 individuals who had lived with spinal cord injury for more than 22 years. Transcripts of the life story interviews were then categorized into one of four classic forms: comedy, romance, tragedy, and irony. A sample of each narrative category is provided. (RJM)

  15. Correlates of Life Satisfaction, Residential Satisfaction, and Locus of Control among Adults with Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boschen, Kathryn A.

    1996-01-01

    Examined life satisfaction, residential satisfaction, locus of control, and their correlates among a sample of 82 urban-dwelling individuals with spinal cord injuries. Results indicated that life satisfaction was virtually synonymous with self-concept. Residential satisfaction was tied to perceived residential choice and to issues surrounding…

  16. Adjustment after Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship to Participation in Employment or Educational Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, J. Stuart; Anson, Carol A.

    1997-01-01

    Compares the life adjustment of participants with spinal cord injury (SCI) who were either employed; unemployed, but attending school; or unemployed. Results show that the employed and student participants reported superior adjustment scores compared to the unemployed/nonstudents. Findings reveal the importance of work and education following SCI.…

  17. Counseling the Client on Wheels: A Primer for Mental Health Counselors New to Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Richard L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    As people with disabilities gain greater access to the broader community, mental health counselors will be called on to differentiate between related and marginally related services. Using the example of spinal cord injury (SCI), dynamics of loss are discussed, illustrating how mental health counselors might work with clients with disabilities.…

  18. Sensation Seeking as a Psychological Trait of Drug Abuse among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    Conceptualization of the role of personality constructs in the drug usage behavior of individuals with disabilities has both preventive and treatment relevance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between sensation seeking and drug usage pattern of persons with spinal cord injury. Implications for rehabilitation research…

  19. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: A Comprehensive Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel; And Others

    This document reports a comprehensive followup study to describe postservice life status of former vocational rehabilitation clients and to develop an empirical index of postservice adjustment to spinal cord injury. Significant findings, conclusions, and implications are found at the beginning. The introduction section summarizes followup studies…

  20. Institutional Impact on Self Concept among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Karen K.

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses how experiences during rehabilitation may influence self-concept among individuals who have sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Experiences are illustrated by personal accounts of 35 individuals (28 men and 7 women) with SCI. Data suggest that aspects of the rehabilitation process may need to be restructured.…

  1. Vocational Status of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury Living in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mary Ellen; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined data from 140 persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) to determine vocational status of persons with SCI living in the community. Of participants, 27% were employed, with 35% in unpaid productive activities, and 38% unemployed. Sex, ethnicity, education, and disability were statistically significant correlates of vocational status.…

  2. Changes in sensory-evoked synaptic activation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury in man

    E-print Network

    Gorassini, Monica

    stimuli that trigger the PICs and muscle spasms in chronically spinalized animals evoke excitatory post injury (SCI), prolonged muscle spasms are readily triggered by brief sensory stimuli. Animal and indirect spasm comes from the activation of persistent inward currents (PICs). The brief (single pulse) sensory

  3. Cognitive Training Program for Youths/Young Adults Having a Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirling, Gloria; And Others

    The pilot study determined the effectiveness of a cognitive skills training program on both the vocational retraining of five young adults with traumatic spinal cord injuries and learning difficulties and the adaptation process to an altered lifestyle required by permanent paralysis. After a 40-hour Instrumental Enrichment (IE) program, Ss showed…

  4. Pregnancy in Women with Spinal Cord Injury by Dr. Karen Ethans

    E-print Network

    Manitoba, University of

    MEDICAL Pregnancy in Women with Spinal Cord Injury by Dr. Karen Ethans R eally? Is it possible should know about pregnancy: Fertility 1) First of all, many women experience a delay in return within a year or a bit later. During Pregnancy 1) DVT - Women with SCI are at higher risk of getting

  5. Reversal of Peripheral Nerve Injury-induced Hypersensitivity in the Postpartum Period: Role of Spinal Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Liu, Baogang; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Houle, Timothy T.; Eisenach, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical injury, including surgery, can result in chronic pain; yet chronic pain following childbirth, including cesarean delivery in women, is rare. The mechanisms involved in this protection by pregnancy or delivery have not been explored. Methods We examined the effect of pregnancy and delivery on hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli of the rat hindpaw induced by peripheral nerve injury (spinal nerve ligation) and after intrathecal oxytocin, atosiban and naloxone. Additionally, oxytocin concentration in lumbar spinal cerebrospinal fluid was determined. Results Spinal nerve ligation performed at mid-pregnancy resulted in similar hypersensitivity to nonpregnant controls, but hypersensitivity partially resolved beginning after delivery. Removal of pups after delivery prevented this partial resolution. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of oxytocin were greater in normal postpartum rats prior to weaning. To examine the effect of injury at the time of delivery rather than during pregnancy, spinal nerve ligation was performed within 24 h of delivery. This resulted in acute hypersensitivity that partially resolved over the next 2–3 weeks. Weaning of pups resulted only in a temporary return of hypersensitivity. Intrathecal oxytocin effectively reversed the hypersensitivity following separation of the pups. Postpartum resolution of hypersensitivity was transiently abolished by intrathecal injection of the oxytocin receptor antagonist, atosiban. Conclusions These results suggest that the postpartum period rather than pregnancy protects against chronic hypersensitivity from peripheral nerve injury and that this protection may reflect sustained oxytocin signaling in the central nervous system during this period. PMID:23249932

  6. The Prevention and Management of Urinary Tract Infection among People with Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIDRR Consensus Statement, 1992

    1992-01-01

    A 1992 Urinary Tract Infection Consensus Validation Conference brought together researchers, clinicians, and consumers to arrive at consensus on the best practices for preventing and treating urinary tract infections (UBI) in people with spinal cord injuries; the risk factors and diagnostic studies that should be done; indications for antibiotic…

  7. Longitudinal study of bone loss in chronic spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Karapolat, Inanc; Karapolat, Hale Uzumcugil; Kirazli, Yesim; Capaci, Kazim; Akkoc, Yesim; Kumanlioglu, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This prospective longitudinal study evaluated the changes in bone metabolism markers and bone mineral density of spinal cord injury patients over 3?years. We also assessed the relationships among the bone mineral density, bone metabolism, and clinical data of spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] We assessed the clinical data (i.e., immobilization due to surgery, neurological status, neurological level, and extent of lesion) in 20 spinal cord injury patients. Bone mineral density, and hormonal and biochemical markers of the patients were measured at 0, 6, 12, and 36 months. [Results] Femoral neck T score decreased significantly at 36 months (p < 0.05). Among the hormonal markers, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D were significantly elevated, while bone turnover markers (i.e., deoxypyridinoline and osteocalcin) were significantly decreased at 12 and 36 months (p < 0.05). [Conclusion] Bone mineral density of the femoral neck decreases significantly during the long-term follow-up of patients with spinal cord injury due to osteoporosis. This could be due to changes in hormonal and bone turnover markers. PMID:26157234

  8. Obtaining Employment after Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship with Pre- and Postinjury Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Reed, Karla S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors identify the association of educational milestones obtained before and after spinal cord injury (SCI) with postinjury employment (PIE). Survey data were collected from 1,362 adults younger than 65, with traumatic SCI of at least 1 year duration who were not currently attending school. The sole outcome was obtaining PIE--whether the…

  9. Exploration of Quality-of-Life Goals in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kullmann, Lajos; Toth, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the applicability of structured interviews for exploration of quality-of-life goals using an established instrument. Structured interviews were performed using WHOQOL-BREF and Disabilities Module as guideline with 35 clients admitted for first rehabilitation intervention after spinal cord injury. Although…

  10. Couple Support Schemata in Couples with and without Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilad, Dvorit; Lavee, Yoav

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the cognitive schemata of couples' support relationships among 65 couples in which the husband had a long-term spinal cord injury and 65 couples without disability. The structure of the support relations schemata were examined by means of smallest-space analysis. Similarities between men and women in couples with and without…

  11. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury: A Review of Diagnostic Methods for Depression, 1985 to 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Amy L.; Armstrong, Kevin J.; Rich, John

    2003-01-01

    Studies of depression in individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) over a 15-year period were examined to determine if researchers used consistent diagnostic measures. The Beck Depression Inventory was the most frequently used instrument, but there was inconsistency among methods employed and disagreement regarding the inclusion of somatic…

  12. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies: Concepts and Applications in Spinal Cord Injury-Related Neurorehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowsky, Cristina L.; McDonald, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following spinal cord injury-related paralysis has traditionally focused on teaching compensatory techniques, thus enabling the individual to achieve day-to-day function despite significant neurological deficits. But the concept of an irreparable central nervous system (CNS) is slowly being replaced with evidence related to…

  13. Self-Awareness of the Male Sexual Response after Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso, Fernando Luiz; Savall, Ana Carolina R.; Mendes, Aline K.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of spinal cord injury on men's sexual motivation, through the sexual desire self-assessment, and the sexual arousal and orgasm physiological responses. This research consisted of a descriptive, nonprobabilistic and comparative study, designed to outline the target population characteristics to compare…

  14. Shoulder Pain in Cases of Spinal Injury: Influence of the Position of the Wheelchair Seat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giner-Pascual, Manuel; Alcanyis-Alberola, Modesto; Millan Gonzalez, Luis; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Marta; Querol, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between shoulder pain and the position of the seat of a wheelchair relative to the ground and to determine the relationship between shoulder pain and structural damage. A transversal study of a patient cohort of 140 patients with grade A and B spinal cord injuries below the T1 vertebra,…

  15. Locus of Control and Life Adjustment: Relationship Among People with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, J. Stuart; Stanwyck, Carol Anson; Maides, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Identifies the relationship of life adjustment after spinal cord injury with three components of locus of control (LOC): internality, chance, and powerful others. Internality was positively correlated with subjective well-being and powerful others was negatively correlated with health indicators. States that rehabilitation counseling will be…

  16. Vocational Rehabilitation Service Patterns and Employment Outcomes for Hispanics with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Cardoso, Elizabeth da Silva; Wilson, Lisa M.; Romero, Maria G.; Chan, Fong; Sung, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined demographic and rehabilitation service variables affecting employment outcomes of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) receiving services from state vocational rehabilitation agencies. A secondary purpose was to determine whether there are disparities in services and outcomes between European American and Hispanic…

  17. Self-Efficacy and Quality of Life in People with Spinal Cord Injuries in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Explores the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and the quality of life in Chinese individuals with spinal cord injuries. Also examines whether health status and demographic variables correlated with the quality of life in this population. Results are discussed in line with the Chinese culture and its influences on the psychosocial…

  18. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  19. Raman spectroscopic investigation of spinal cord injury in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Tarun; Deng, Bin; Stelzner, Dennis; Hasenwinkel, Julie; Chaiken, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study temporal molecular changes associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Raman spectra of saline-perfused, injured, and healthy rat spinal cords were obtained and compared. Two injury models, a lateral hemisection and a moderate contusion were investigated. The net fluorescence and the Raman spectra showed clear differences between the injured and healthy spinal cords. Based on extensive histological and biochemical characterization of SCI available in the literature, these differences were hypothesized to be due to cell death, demyelination, and changes in the extracellular matrix composition, such as increased expression of proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid, at the site of injury where the glial scar forms. Further, analysis of difference spectra indicated the presence of carbonyl containing compounds, hypothesized to be products of lipid peroxidation and acid catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosaminoglycan moieties. These results compared well with in vitro experiments conducted on chondroitin sulfate sugars. Since the glial scar is thought to be a potent biochemical barrier to nerve regeneration, this observation suggests the possibility of using near infrared Raman spectroscopy to study injury progression and explore potential treatments ex vivo, and ultimately monitor potential remedial treatments within the spinal cord in vivo.

  20. Modulation of Inflammatory Responses by a Cannabinoid-2–Selective Agonist after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Sabina; Li, Hongbo; Heller, Joshua; Skarica, Mario; Zhang, Ming; Ganea, Doina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The goal of the current investigation was to evaluate the mechanisms through which administration of a selective cannabinoid-2 (CB2) agonist (O-1966) modifies inflammatory responses and helps to improve function following spinal cord injury. A comparison of motor function, autonomic function, and inflammatory responses was made between animals treated with O-1966 (5?mg/kg IP) and animals treated with vehicle 1?h and 24?h following contusion injury to the spinal cord. Motor function was significantly improved in the treated animals at each time point during the 14 days of evaluation. The percentage of animals able to spontaneously void their bladder was also greater over the entire study period in the group treated with the selective CB2 agonist. Seven days following injury there was a significant reduction in both hematopoietic and myeloid cell invasion of the spinal cord, and a reduction in the number of immunoreactive microglia. The results of the evaluation of chemokine/cytokine expression and inflammatory cell invasion also demonstrated a significant effect of treatment on inflammatory reactions following injury. Two days after injury, animals treated with O-1966 had significant reductions in CXCL-9 and CXCL-11, and dramatic reductions in IL-23p19 expression and its receptor IL-23r. Treatment with O-1966 also caused inhibition of toll-like receptor expression (TLR1, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR7) following injury. These results demonstrate that the improvement in motor and autonomic function resulting from treatment with a selective CB2 agonist is associated with a significant effect on inflammatory responses in the spinal cord following injury. PMID:21970496

  1. Preventive Effect of Intrathecal Paracetamol on Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Murat; Sayar, Ilyas; Peker, Kemal; Gullu, Huriye; Yildiz, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ischemic injury of the spinal cord during the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms might lead to paraplegia. Although a number of different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact cause of paraplegia has remained unknown, hampering the development of effective pharmacologic or other strategies for prevention of this condition. A number of studies suggested that cyclooxygenases (COX) contribute to neural breakdown; thus, COX inhibitors might reduce injury. Objectives: We aimed to assess the preventive effect of intrathecal (IT) pretreatment with paracetamol on spinal cord injury in a rat model. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed in Ataturk University Animal Research Laboratory Center, Erzurum, Turkey. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three experimental groups (n = 6) to receive IT physiologic saline (controls), 50 µg of paracetamol, or 100 µg paracetamol one hour before induction of spinal cord ischemia. Six other rats were considered as the sham group. For the assessment of ischemic injury, motor functions of the hind limbs and histopathologic changes of the lumbar spinal cord were evaluated. Additional 20 rats were divided into two equal groups for the second part of the study where the survival rates were recorded in controls and in animals receiving 100 µg of paracetamol during the 28-day observation period. Results: Pretreatment with 100 µg of paracetamol resulted in a significant improvement in motor functions and histopathologic findings (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of survival in 100 µg of paracetamol group (70%) at day 28, the difference was not statistically significant in comparison with controls. Conclusions: Our results suggest a protective effect of pretreatment with IT paracetamol on ischemic spinal cord injury during thoracolumbar aortic aneurysm surgery. PMID:25763224

  2. Independent evaluation of the anatomical and behavioral effects of Taxol in rat models of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Phillip G; Tovar, C Amy; Lemeshow, Stanley; Yin, Qin; Jakeman, Lyn B

    2014-11-01

    The goal of the current manuscript was to replicate published data that show intrathecal infusions of Taxol® (paclitaxel), an anti-neoplastic microtubule stabilizing agent, reduce fibrogliotic scarring caused by a dorsal spinal hemisection (DHx) injury and increase functional recovery and growth of serotonergic axons after moderate spinal contusion injury. These experiments were completed as part of an NIH-NINDS contract entitled "Facilities of Research Excellence in Spinal Cord Injury (FORE-SCI) - Replication". Here, data are presented that confirm the anti-scarring effects of Taxol after DHx injury; however, Taxol did not confer neuroprotection or promote serotonergic axon growth nor did it improve functional recovery in a model of moderate spinal contusion injury. Thus, only partial replication was achieved. Possible explanations for disparate results in our studies and published data are discussed. PMID:24999028

  3. Independent evaluation of the anatomical and behavioral effects of Taxol in rat models of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Phillip G.; Tovar, C. Amy; Lemeshow, Stanley; Yin, Qin; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current manuscript was to replicate published data that show intrathecal infusions of Taxol ® (paclitaxel), an anti-neoplastic microtubule stabilizing agent, reduce fibrogliotic scarring caused by a dorsal spinal hemisection (DHx) injury and increase functional recovery and growth of serotonergic axons after moderate spinal contusion injury. These experiments were completed as part of an NIH-NINDS contract entitled “Facilities of Research Excellence – Spinal Cord Injury (FORE-SCI) – Replication”. Here, data are presented that confirm the anti-scarring effects of Taxol after DHx injury; however, Taxol did not confer neuroprotection or promote serotonergic axon growth nor did it improve functional recovery in a model of moderate spinal contusion injury. Thus, only partial replication was achieved. Possible explanations for disparate results in our studies and published data are discussed. PMID:24999028

  4. Role of Sonography in Surgical Decision Making for Iatrogenic Spinal Accessory Nerve Injuries: A Paradigm Shift.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Smith, Jay; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The spinal accessory nerve (SAN) is susceptible to iatrogenic injury in the posterior cervical triangle. Early diagnosis and management of suspected SAN transection injuries are crucial in the restoration of shoulder stability and function. Although neurologic examination and electrodiagnostic testing can assess SAN function, they cannot assess nerve continuity. We report the use of sonography to prospectively evaluate the SAN in 6 patients with suspected iatrogenic SAN injury. Sonography directly visualized SAN transection in 4 cases, whereas sonographic findings were reported as "probable" transection in the fifth case and was nondiagnostic in the sixth case in the setting of extensive scarring. PMID:26543166

  5. Physical Activity and Quality of Life in Adults With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Sandy L; Caputo, Jennifer L; Fuller, Dana K; Morgan, Don W

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: To document the relationship between level of physical activity and quality of life in persons with spinal cord injury. Design: Cross-sectional investigation. Participants/Methods: Men (n = 32) and women (n = 30) with complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions below C6 volunteered to participate in this study. The average length of time since the onset of disability was 9 years (range, 1.5–40 years). Using an interview-formatted survey (Quality of Well-Being Scale), a measure of quality of life was obtained for each participant. Physical activity levels were determined using the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities. Results: A strong positive association (r = 0.75; P < 0.05) was observed between level of physical activity and quality of life. Multiple regression analysis also showed that when level of physical activity, anatomical location of the injury, completeness of injury, and time since injury were used as explanatory variables, level of physical activity was the only significant predictor of quality of life, accounting for 56% of the total variation in quality of life. Conclusions: Results from this study show that a significant and moderately strong positive relationship exists between level of physical activity and quality of life in adults with spinal cord injury. From a clinical perspective, these findings suggest that interventions aimed at promoting physical activity may be effective in improving quality of life in this population. PMID:18959354

  6. Evaluation of the calcium channel antagonist nimodipine after experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, S S; Stiens, T; Oro, J J; Madsen, R

    1993-05-01

    The cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (CSEPs) were recorded to determine if the administration of nimodipine improves axonal function after spinal cord injury. Animals receiving a 52 g compression injury (a moderately severe injury) for 5 minutes were randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups. Each group was given an infusion of one of the following nimodipine regiments over 2 hours, commencing 1 hour before compression: placebo (n = 20), 0.5 micrograms/kg (n = 10), 0.25 micrograms/kg (n = 20), 0.125 micrograms/kg (n = 10), and 0.25 micrograms/kg + Hetstarch (n = 10). In the control group, 65% of animals lost the CSEPs immediately after the injury with almost all (95%) of these regaining the CSEPs within 15 minutes after decompression of the spinal cord. In the treated groups, the rate of the CSEP loss was highest in the 0.5 micrograms/kg group. This group also had the lowest CSEP recovery. The proportion of the CSEP loss was essentially the same for the other nimodipine-treated groups, although it seemed that there was an increasing number of nonresponses with increasing the nimodipine dose. Our data indicate lack of any beneficial effects of nimodipine on axonal function as measured by evoked activities in experimental spinal cord injury. PMID:8493602

  7. Tidal volume and diaphragm muscle activity in rats with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Imagita, Hidetaka; Nishikawa, Akira; Sakata, Susumu; Nishii, Yasue; Minematsu, Akira; Moriyama, Hideki; Kanemura, Naohiko; Shindo, Hanae

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to make an experimental model of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) using Wistar rats, in order to analyze the influence of CSCI on the respiratory function. [Subjects] Thirty-two male 12-week-old Wistar rats were used. [Methods] The CSCI was made at the levels from C3 to C7, and we performed pneumotachography and electromyography (EMG) on the diaphragm. Computed tomography was used to determine the level of spinal cord damage. [Results] After the operation, the tidal volume of the rats with a C3 level injury decreased to approximately 22.3% of its pre-injury value. In addition, in the same rats, the diaphragmatic electromyogram activity decreased remarkably. Compared with before CSCI, the tidal volume decreased to 78.6% of its pre-injury value in CSCI at the C5 level, and it decreased to 94.1% of its pre-injury value in CSCI at the C7 level. [Conclusion] In the rats that sustained a CSCI in this study, the group of respiratory muscles that receive innervation from the thoracic spinal cord was paralyzed. Therefore, the EMG signal of the diaphragm increased. These results demonstrate that there is a relationship between respiratory function and the level of CSCI. PMID:25931732

  8. Drug delivery, cell-based therapies, and tissue engineering approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kabu, Shushi; Gao, Yue; Kwon, Brian K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-12-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating neurological and pathological consequences, causing major dysfunction to the motor, sensory, and autonomic systems. The primary traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a cascade of acute and chronic degenerative events, leading to further secondary injury. Many therapeutic strategies have been developed to potentially intervene in these progressive neurodegenerative events and minimize secondary damage to the spinal cord. Additionally, significant efforts have been directed toward regenerative therapies that may facilitate neuronal repair and establish connectivity across the injury site. Despite the promise that these approaches have shown in preclinical animal models of SCI, challenges with respect to successful clinical translation still remain. The factors that could have contributed to failure include important biologic and physiologic differences between the preclinical models and the human condition, study designs that do not mirror clinical reality, discrepancies in dosing and the timing of therapeutic interventions, and dose-limiting toxicity. With a better understanding of the pathobiology of events following acute SCI, developing integrated approaches aimed at preventing secondary damage and also facilitating neuroregenerative recovery is possible and hopefully will lead to effective treatments for this devastating injury. The focus of this review is to highlight the progress that has been made in drug therapies and delivery systems, and also cell-based and tissue engineering approaches for SCI. PMID:26343846

  9. Role of electrical stimulation for rehabilitation and regeneration after spinal cord injury: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Structural discontinuity in the spinal cord after injury results in a disruption in the impulse conduction resulting in loss of various bodily functions depending upon the level of injury. This article presents a summary of the scientific research employing electrical stimulation as a means for anatomical or functional recovery for patients suffering from spinal cord injury. Electrical stimulation in the form of functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help facilitate and improve upper/lower limb mobility along with other body functions lost due to injury e.g. respiratory, sexual, bladder or bowel functions by applying a controlled electrical stimulus to generate contractions and functional movement in the paralysed muscles. The available rehabilitative techniques based on FES technology and various Food and Drug Administration, USA approved neuroprosthetic devices that are in use are discussed. The second part of the article summarises the experimental work done in the past 2 decades to study the effects of weakly applied direct current fields in promoting regeneration of neurites towards the cathode and the new emerging technique of oscillating field stimulation which has shown to promote bidirectional regeneration in the injured nerve fibres. The present article is not intended to be an exhaustive review but rather a summary aiming to highlight these two applications of electrical stimulation and the degree of anatomical/functional recovery associated with these in the field of spinal cord injury research. PMID:18677518

  10. An overview of tissue engineering approaches for management of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to devastating neurological deficits and disabilities, which necessitates spending a great deal of health budget for psychological and healthcare problems of these patients and their relatives. This justifies the cost of research into the new modalities for treatment of spinal cord injuries, even in developing countries. Apart from surgical management and nerve grafting, several other approaches have been adopted for management of this condition including pharmacologic and gene therapy, cell therapy, and use of different cell-free or cell-seeded bioscaffolds. In current paper, the recent developments for therapeutic delivery of stem and non-stem cells to the site of injury, and application of cell-free and cell-seeded natural and synthetic scaffolds have been reviewed. PMID:17501987

  11. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kjell, Jacob; Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew; Olson, Lars

    2015-11-01

    With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4?h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24?h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines-monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3?, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)-to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  12. Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Predictor of Locomotor Function after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brian J.; Harel, Noam Y.; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Papademetris, Xenophon; Coman, Daniel; Wang, Xingxing; Hasan, Omar; Kaufman, Adam; Globinsky, Ronen; Staib, Lawrence H.; Cafferty, William B.J.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-term disability with limited functional recovery linked to the extent of axonal connectivity. Quantitative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of axonal integrity has been suggested as a potential biomarker for prognostic and therapeutic evaluation after trauma, but its correlation with functional outcomes has not been clearly defined. To examine this application, female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent midthoracic laminectomy followed by traumatic spinal cord contusion of differing severities or laminectomy without contusion. Locomotor scores and hindlimb kinematic data were collected for 4 weeks post-injury. Ex vivo DTI was then performed to assess axonal integrity using tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA), a numerical measure of relative white matter integrity, at the injury epicenter and at specific intervals rostral and caudal to the injury site. Immunohistochemistry for tissue sparing was also performed. Statistical correlation between imaging data and functional performance was assessed as the primary outcome. All injured animals showed some recovery of locomotor function, while hindlimb kinematics revealed graded deficits consistent with injury severity. Standard T2 magnetic resonance sequences illustrated conventional spinal cord morphology adjacent to contusions while corresponding FA maps indicated graded white matter pathology within these adjacent regions. Positive correlations between locomotor (Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score and gait kinematics) and imaging (FA values) parameters were also observed within these adjacent regions, most strongly within caudal segments beyond the lesion. Evaluation of axonal injury by DTI provides a mechanism for functional recovery assessment in a rodent SCI model. These findings suggest that focused DTI analysis of caudal spinal cord should be studied in human cases in relationship to motor outcome to augment outcome biomarkers for clinical cases. PMID:24779685

  13. Management of bladder dysfunction and satisfaction of life after spinal cord injury in Norway.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete; Rekand, Tiina

    2014-05-01

    Background There is limited knowledge about bladder dysfunction and bladder management in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) after discharge from the hospital in Norway. The impact of bladder dysfunction on satisfaction of life has been rarely explored. Setting Community-based survey from Norway. Methods An anonymous cross-sectional postal survey. A questionnaire was sent to the registered members of the Norwegian Spinal Cord Injuries Association. A total of 400 participants, with traumatic or non-traumatic SCI, received the questionnaire. Results A total of 248 subjects (62%), 180 men and 68 women, answered the questionnaire. Mean age was 54 years and mean time since injury 13.4 years. A total of 164 participants (66.1%) used intermittent catheterization for bladder emptying (48.5% women versus 72.8% men); more paraplegics than tetraplegics (77.2% versus 55.7%). Recommendations given at the Spinal Cord Units were thoroughly followed by persons who had used catheters more than 5 years. Use of incontinence pads were associated with reduced satisfaction of life. Conclusions The most common method of management of bladder dysfunction is clean intermittent catheterization in Norway. Recommendations were followed more thoroughly by persons who have used intermittent catheterization for more than 5 years. Spinal Cord Units are important source for information and guidance. PMID:24621024

  14. Effect of Robotic-Assisted Gait Training in Patients With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Ji Yong; Park, Han Kyul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) compared to conventional overground training. Methods Sixty patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial by comparing RAGT to conventional overground training. The RAGT group received RAGT three sessions per week at duration of 40 minutes with regular physiotherapy in 4 weeks. The conventional group underwent regular physiotherapy twice a day, 5 times a week. Main outcomes were lower extremity motor score of American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (LEMS), ambulatory motor index (AMI), Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility section (SCIM3-M), and walking index for spinal cord injury version II (WISCI-II) scale. Results At the end of rehabilitation, both groups showed significant improvement in LEMS, AMI, SCIM3-M, and WISCI-II. Based on WISCI-II, statistically significant improvement was observed in the RAGT group. For the remaining variables, no difference was found. Conclusion RAGT combined with conventional physiotherapy could yield more improvement in ambulatory function than conventional therapy alone. RAGT should be considered as one additional tool to provide neuromuscular reeducation in patient with incomplete SCI. PMID:25566469

  15. New products tissue-engineering in the treatment of spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, I. N.; Sergienko, V. I.; Kiselev, S. L.; Lagarkova, M. A.; Remigaylo, A. A.; Mihaylov, A. A.; Prokopenko, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    In the treatment of patients with complicated spinal cord injury the Russian Health spends about one million rubles for each patient in the acute and the interim period after the injury. The number of complicated spinal cord injury is different in geographical areas Russian Federation from 30 to 50 people per 1 million that is affected by the year 5600. Applied to the present surgical and pharmacological techniques provide unsatisfactory results or minimally effective treatment. Transplantation of 100 thousand neuronal mouse predecessors (24 rats) or human neuronal predecessors (18 rats) in the anatomical gap rat spinal cord, followed by analysis of neurological deficit. The neuro-matrix implantation in the rat spinal cord containing 100 thousand neuronal precursors hESC, repeatable control neuro-matrix transplantation, non-cell mass, eliminating neurological deficit for 14 weeks after transplantation about 5-9 points on the scale of the BBB. The cultivation under conditions in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cells on collagen-chitosan matrix (hIPSC) showed that neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells grown on scaffolds as compact groups and has no neurites. Cells do not penetrate into the matrix during long-term cultivation and formed near the surface of the spherical structures resembling neurospheres. At least 90% of the cells were positive for the neuronal marker tubulin b3. Further studies should be performed to examine the compatibility of neuronal cultures and matrices.

  16. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Blocker Adalimumab in Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Çivi, Soner; Öcal, Özgür; Gülbahar, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Objective Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) have proven effects in pathogenesis of neuroinflammation after spinal cord injury (SCI). Current study is designed to evaluate the effects of an anti-TNF-? agent, adalimumab, on spinal cord clip compression injury in rats. Methods Thirty two male adult Wistar rats were divided into four groups (sham, trauma, infliximab, and adalimumab groups) and SCI was introduced using an aneurysm clip. Animals in treatment groups received 5 mg/kg subcutaneous adalimumab and infliximab right after the trauma. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were studied in traumatized spinal cord tissues 72 hours after the injury as a marker of lipid peroxidation. Results Animals that received anti-TNF-? agents are found to have significantly decreased MDA levels. MDA levels were significantly different between the trauma and infliximab groups (p<0.01) and trauma and adalimumab groups (p=0.022). There was no significant difference in neurological evaluation of the rats using Tarlov scale. Conclusion These results suggest that, like infliximab, adalimumab has favorable effects on lipid peroxidation induced by spinal cord trauma in rats. PMID:25733985

  17. Artificial Gravity as a Countermeasure of Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Spinal Cord Injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David

    1999-01-01

    An essential item in the development of this project was the availability of the artificial gravity simulator (AGS). At the termination of that grant in 1994, the AGS was dismantled and transferred to NASA Johnson Space Center. It took over two years for the AGS to be re-assembled and re-certified for use. As a consequence of the non-availability of the AGS for two years, there was a considerable delay in implementing the various phases of the project. The subjects involved in the study were eight healthy able bodied subjects and twelve with spinal cord injury. After analysis of the data collected on these subjects, six of the healthy able bodied subjects and three of the sub ects with spinal cord injury were found to qualify for the study. This report gives the results of four subjects only, two healthy able bodied and two spinal cord injured subjects because the period of the grant (1 year) and its extension (1 year) expired before additional subjects could be studied. The principal objective of the study was to conduct a series of experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing artificial gravity to assist in the physical rehabilitation of persons with spinal cord injuries.

  18. Peripheral nerve injury induces aquaporin-4 expression and astrocytic enlargement in spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Oklinski, M K; Choi, H-J; Kwon, T-H

    2015-12-17

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, is expressed mainly in the perivascular end-feet of astrocytes in the brain and spinal cord. Dysregulation of AQP4 is critically associated with abnormal water transport in the astrocytes. We aimed to examine whether peripheral nerve injury (PNI) could induce the changes of AQP4 expression and astrocytic morphology in the spinal cord. Two different PNI models [partial sciatic nerve transection (PST) and chronic constriction injury (CCI)] were established on the left sciatic nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats, which decreased the pain withdrawal threshold in the ipsilateral hind paws. Both PNI models were associated with a persistent up-regulation of AQP4 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn at the lower lumbar region over 3weeks, despite an absence of direct injury to the spinal cord. Three-dimensional reconstruction of astrocytes was made and morphometric analysis was done. Up-regulation of AQP4 was accompanied by a significant increase in the length and volume of astrocytic processes and the number of branch points. The most prominent changes were present in the distal processes of the astrocytes and the changes were maintained throughout the whole experimental period. Extravasation of systemically administered tracers Evans Blue and sodium fluorescein was not seen in both models. Taken together, PNI was associated with a long-lasting AQP4 up-regulation and enlargement of astrocytic processes in the spinal cord in rats, both of which were not related to the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier. The findings could provide novel insights on the understanding of pathophysiology of spinal cords after PNI. PMID:26480815

  19. A Novel Vertebral Stabilization Method for Producing Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. Ping; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Shields, Christopher B.; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Clinically-relevant animal cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) models are essential for developing and testing potential therapies; however, producing reliable cervical SCI is difficult due to lack of satisfactory methods of vertebral stabilization. The conventional method to stabilize the spine is to suspend the rostral and caudal cervical spine via clamps attached to cervical spinous processes.  However, this method of stabilization fails to prevent tissue yielding during the contusion as the cervical spinal processes are too short to be effectively secured by the clamps (Figure 1).  Here we introduce a new method to completely stabilize the cervical vertebra at the same level of the impact injury.  This method effectively minimizes movement of the spinal column at the site of impact, which greatly improves the production of consistent SCIs.  We provide visual description of the equipment (Figure 2-4), methods, and a step-by-step protocol for the stabilization of the cervical 5 vertebra (C5) of adult rats, to perform laminectomy (Figure 5) and produce a contusive SCI thereafter.  Although we only demonstrate a cervical hemi-contusion using the NYU/MASCIS impactor device, this vertebral stabilization technique can be applied to other regions of the spinal cord, or be adapted to other SCI devices.  Improving spinal cord exposure and fixation through vertebral stabilization may be valuable for producing consistent and reliable injuries to the spinal cord.  This vertebral stabilization method can also be used for stereotactic injections of cells and tracers, and for imaging using two-photon microscopy in various neurobiological studies. PMID:25590284

  20. Evidence-Based Practice in Primary Prevention of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) not only causes paralysis, but also has long-term impact on physical and mental health. There are between 236,000 to 327,000 individuals living with the consequences of SCI in the United States, and the economic burden on the individuals sustaining the injury, their support network, and society as a whole is significant. The consequences of SCI require that health care professionals begin thinking about primary prevention. Efforts are often focused on care and cure, but evidence-based prevention should have a greater role. Primary prevention efforts can offer significant cost benefits, and efforts to change behavior and improve safety can and should be emphasized. Primary prevention can be applied to various etiologies of injury, including motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and firearm misuse, with a clear goal of eliminating unnecessary injury and its life-changing impact. PMID:23678282

  1. Motor vehicle related injury on the bridges between Montreal and the South Shore of the St. Lawrence River, 1978-1982.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B P; Salmi, L R; Lecours, S; Battista, R N

    1985-01-01

    The injury experience related to motor vehicle crashes on four bridges and one tunnel in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from 1978 to 1982, are described. Particular attention is given to the Jacques Cartier Bridge, publicly perceived as being excessively dangerous. Data from the Quebec Automobile Insurance Board and police reports confirm an excess of deaths (19/34; rate ratio = 4.5) and severe injuries (69/109; rate ratio = 6.2) on the Jacques Cartier Bridge, and the association of 74 per cent of the fatalities and 64 per cent of the severe-injury cases on this bridge with a single curve. Crashes follow a consistent pattern; vehicles fail to negotiate the curve and strike vehicles moving in the opposite direction. The demonstrated association between crashes and design factors provides a basis for identifying effective remedial and preventive measures. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:4025647

  2. Plasticity of Corticospinal Neural Control after Locomotor Training in Human Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Knikou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Spinal lesions substantially impair ambulation, occur generally in young and otherwise healthy individuals, and result in devastating effects on quality of life. Restoration of locomotion after damage to the spinal cord is challenging because axons of the damaged neurons do not regenerate spontaneously. Body-weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) is a therapeutic approach in which a person with a spinal cord injury (SCI) steps on a motorized treadmill while some body weight is removed through an upper body harness. BWSTT improves temporal gait parameters, muscle activation patterns, and clinical outcome measures in persons with SCI. These changes are likely the result of reorganization that occurs simultaneously in supraspinal and spinal cord neural circuits. This paper will focus on the cortical control of human locomotion and motor output, spinal reflex circuits, and spinal interneuronal circuits and how corticospinal control is reorganized after locomotor training in people with SCI. Based on neurophysiological studies, it is apparent that corticospinal plasticity is involved in restoration of locomotion after training. However, the neural mechanisms underlying restoration of lost voluntary motor function are not well understood and translational neuroscience research is needed so patient-orientated rehabilitation protocols to be developed. PMID:22701805

  3. Recovery of neuronal and network excitability after spinal cord injury and implications for spasticity

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Jessica M.; Condliffe, Elizabeth G.; Martins, Karen J. B.; Bennett, David J.; Gorassini, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    The state of areflexia and muscle weakness that immediately follows a spinal cord injury (SCI) is gradually replaced by the recovery of neuronal and network excitability, leading to both improvements in residual motor function and the development of spasticity. In this review we summarize recent animal and human studies that describe how motoneurons and their activation by sensory pathways become hyperexcitable to compensate for the reduction of functional activation of the spinal cord and the eventual impact on the muscle. Specifically, decreases in the inhibitory control of sensory transmission and increases in intrinsic motoneuron excitability are described. We present the idea that replacing lost patterned activation of the spinal cord by activating synaptic inputs via assisted movements, pharmacology or electrical stimulation may help to recover lost spinal inhibition. This may lead to a reduction of uncontrolled activation of the spinal cord and thus, improve its controlled activation by synaptic inputs to ultimately normalize circuit function. Increasing the excitation of the spinal cord with spared descending and/or peripheral inputs by facilitating movement, instead of suppressing it pharmacologically, may provide the best avenue to improve residual motor function and manage spasticity after SCI. PMID:24860447

  4. Effect of older age on treatment decisions and outcomes among patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Rivers, Carly S.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Tsai, Eve C.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Attabib, Najmedden; Kwon, Brian K.; Christie, Sean D.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Hurlbert, R. John; Townson, Andrea; Parent, Stefan; Drew, Brian; Chen, Jason; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Older people are at increased risk of traumatic spinal cord injury from falls. We evaluated the impact of older age (? 70 yr) on treatment decisions and outcomes. Methods: We identified patients with traumatic spinal cord injury for whom consent and detailed data were available from among patients recruited (2004–2013) at any of the 31 acute care and rehabilitation hospitals participating in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry. Patients were assessed by age group (< 70 v. ? 70 yr). The primary outcome was the rate of acute surgical treatment. We used bivariate and multivariate regression models to assess patient and injury-related factors associated with receiving surgical treatment and with the timing of surgery after arrival to a participating centre. Results: Of the 1440 patients included in our study cohort, 167 (11.6%) were 70 years or older at the time of injury. Older patients were more likely than younger patients to be injured by falling (83.1% v. 37.4%; p < 0.001), to have a cervical injury (78.0% v. 61.6%; p = 0.001), to have less severe injuries on admission (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C or D: 70.5% v. 46.9%; p < 0.001), to have a longer stay in an acute care hospital (median 35 v. 28 d; p < 0.005) and to have a higher in-hospital mortality (4.2% v. 0.6%; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis did not show that age of 70 years or more at injury was associated with a decreased likelihood of surgical treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22–1.07). An unplanned sensitivity analysis with different age thresholds showed that a threshold of 65 years was associated with a decreased chance of surgical treatment (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19–0.80). Older patients who underwent surgical treatment had a significantly longer wait time from admission to surgery than younger patients (37 v. 19 h; p < 0.001). Interpretation: We found chronological age to be a factor influencing treatment decisions but not at the 70-year age threshold that we had hypothesized. Older patients waited longer for surgery and had a substantially higher in-hospital mortality despite having less severe injuries than younger patients. Further research into the link between treatment delays and outcomes among older patients could inform surgical guideline development. PMID:26149702

  5. Sexual Functioning in Men Living with a Spinal Cord Injury–A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunilkumar, MM; Boston, Patricia; Rajagopal, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for Indian men living with a spinal cord injury Objectives: To examine the literature related to sexuality traumatic cord injury and its impact on sexual functioning. Materials and Methods: Databases using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) 2000–2012, Medline 1989–2012, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA) 1989–2012 and Google Scholar were the search engines used used for literature review. Results: The search yielded a total of 457 articles and only 75 of them were found relevant. The minimum number of articles required to meet the inclusion criteria for this review was 25–30 articles. Out of the 75 articles, 33 were considered relevant or related to the topic of sexual functioning, spinal cord injury, and paraplegia. Six areas were identified: Sexual stigmatization, physiological barriers to sexual satisfaction, clinical aspects of sexual functioning, biomedical approaches to sexual dysfunction, partner satisfaction, and lack of accessibility to sexual education. Conclusion: Spinal cord injury and sexual functioning affects a large segment of the male Indian population, yet most current research focuses on quantitative measurement with the emphasis on ejaculatory dysfunction, orgasm impairment, incontinence, and other physiological dysfunction. Further research is needed to address the subjective accounts of patients themselves with respect to the emotional and social impact of sexual disability. This would help to identify the best possible outcomes for both treatment and rehabilitation. PMID:26600694

  6. Neuroprotective effect of ginseng against spinal cord injury induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Hao; Xie, Jing-Jing; Ling, Jian; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological effects of spinal cord injury (SCI) occur as a result of oxidative stress and inflammatory mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed the protective role of ginseng on spinal injury in wistar rats. To evaluate the redox status, we investigated various parameters including estimation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation content, protein carbonyl and sulphydryl content, myeloperoxidase activity, antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase). Expression of antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was determined through immunoblot. Inflammatory study was performed by evaluating the expression of nuclear factor-?B, cycloxygenase-2 by western blot analysis. Further the pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined through ELISA (IL-6, TNF-?, IL-1?). We observed a significant enhancement in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in rats with SCI injury. Ginseng treatment significantly down regulated the oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant status in SCI rats. Significant inhibition of inflammation was observed through down regulation of inflammatory proteins and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus our findings show that Ginseng significantly ameliorated spinal cord injury in wistar rats by modulating oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:26064243

  7. The Neuroprotective Effect of Kefir on Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Tarik; Yener, Ali Umit; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Yuksel, Yasemin; Cosar, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The main causes of spinal cord ischemia are a variety of vascular pathologies causing acute arterial occlusions. We investigated neuroprotective effects of kefir on spinal cord ischemia injury in rats. Methods Rats were divided into three groups : 1) sham operated control rats; 2) spinal cord ischemia group fed on a standard diet without kefir pretreatment; and 3) spinal cord ischemia group fed on a standard diet plus kefir. Spinal cord ischemia was performed by the infrarenal aorta cross-clamping model. The spinal cord was removed after the procedure. The biochemical and histopathological changes were observed within the samples. Functional assessment was performed for neurological deficit scores. Results The kefir group was compared with the ischemia group, a significant decrease in malondialdehyde levels was observed (p<0.05). Catalase and superoxide dismutase levels of the kefir group were significantly higher than ischemia group (p<0.05). In histopathological samples, the kefir group is compared with ischemia group, there was a significant decrease in numbers of dead and degenerated neurons (p<0.05). In immunohistochemical staining, hipoxia-inducible factor-1? and caspase 3 immunopositive neurons were significantly decreased in kefir group compared with ischemia group (p<0.05). The neurological deficit scores of kefir group were significantly higher than ischemia group at 24 h (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study revealed that kefir pretreatment in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion reduced oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration as a neuroprotective agent. Ultrastructural studies are required in order for kefir to be developed as a promising therapeutic agent to be utilized for human spinal cord ischemia in the future. PMID:26113960

  8. Function of microglia and macrophages in secondary damage after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; He, Xijing; Ren, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating type of neurological trauma with limited therapeutic opportunities. The pathophysiology of SCI involves primary and secondary mechanisms of injury. Among all the secondary injury mechanisms, the inflammatory response is the major contributor and results in expansion of the lesion and further loss of neurologic function. Meanwhile, the inflammation directly and indirectly dominates the outcomes of SCI, including not only pain and motor dysfunction, but also preventingneuronal regeneration. Microglia and macrophages play very important roles in secondary injury. Microglia reside in spinal parenchyma and survey the microenvironment through the signals of injury or infection. Macrophages are derived from monocytes recruited to injured sites from the peripheral circulation. Activated resident microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages induce and magnify immune and inflammatory responses not only by means of their secretory moleculesand phagocytosis, but also through their influence on astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and demyelination. In this review, we focus on the roles of microglia and macrophages in secondary injury and how they contribute to the sequelae of SCI. PMID:25422640

  9. Characterization of a novel bidirectional distraction spinal cord injury animal model.

    PubMed

    Seifert, J L; Bell, J E; Elmer, B B; Sucato, D J; Romero, M I

    2011-04-15

    Scoliosis corrective surgery requires the application of significant multidirectional stress forces, including distraction, for correction of the curved spine deformity and the application of fixation rods. If excessive, spine distraction may result in the development of new neurological deficits, some as severe as permanent paralysis. Current animal models of spinal cord injury, however, are limited to contusion, transection, or unidirectional distraction injuries, which fail to replicate the multidirectional forces that occur during spine corrective surgery. To address such limitation, we designed a novel device that relies on intervertebral grip fixation and linear actuators to induce controllable bidirectional distraction injuries to the spine. The device was tested in three (i.e., 3, 5, and 7 mm) distention paradigms of the rat T9-T11 vertebra, and the resulting injuries were evaluated through electrophysiological, behavioral, and histological analysis. As expected, 3mm bilateral spine distractions showed no neurological deficit. In contrast, those with 5 and 7 mm showed partial and complete paralysis, respectively. The relationship between the severity of the spine distraction and injury to the spinal cord tissue was determined using glial fibrillary acidic protein immunocytochemistry for visualization of reactive astrocytes and labeling of ED1-positive activated macrophages/microglia. Our results demonstrate that this device can produce bidirectional spine distraction injuries with high precision and control and, thus, may be valuable in contributing to the testing of neuroprotective strategies aimed at preventing unintended new neurological damage during corrective spine surgery. PMID:21334381

  10. Predicting Quality of Life Five Years Following Medical Discharge for a Traumatically-Acquired Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-print Network

    Erosa, Norma

    2012-10-19

    This dissertation presents the prediction of quality of life (QoL), composed of by life satisfaction and self-perceived health status, across 5 years post a spinal cord injury (SCI) hospital discharge. Predictor variables of functional independence...

  11. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Denyer, Gareth S.; Keay, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four ‘disability-specific’ genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular structure, transcription or translation). We suggest that these patterns of gene expression lead to either the expression of disability, or to resilience and recovery, by modifying local spinal circuitry at the origin of ascending supraspinal pathways. PMID:25905723

  12. Long-Distance Axonal Growth from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Paul; Woodruff, Grace; Wang, Yaozhi; Graham, Lori; Hunt, Matt; Wu, Di; Boehle, Eileen; Ahmad, Ruhel; Poplawski, Gunnar; Brock, John; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a healthy 86 year-old male were differentiated into neural stem cells and grafted into adult immunodeficient rats after spinal cord injury. Three months after C5 lateral hemisections, iPSCs survived and differentiated into neurons and glia, and extended tens of thousands of axons from the lesion site over virtually the entire length of the rat central nervous system. These iPSC-derived axons extended through adult white matter of the injured spinal cord, frequently penetrating gray matter and forming synapses with rat neurons. In turn, host supraspinal motor axons penetrated human iPSC grafts and formed synapses. These findings indicate that intrinsic neuronal mechanisms readily overcome the inhibitory milieu of the adult injured spinal cord to extend many axons over very long distances; these capabilities persist even in neurons reprogrammed from very aged human cells. PMID:25123310

  13. Aberrant Crossed Corticospinal Facilitation in Muscles Distant from a Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bunday, Karen L.; Oudega, Martin; Perez, Monica A.

    2013-01-01

    Crossed facilitatory interactions in the corticospinal pathway are impaired in humans with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The extent to which crossed facilitation is affected in muscles above and below the injury remains unknown. To address this question we tested 51 patients with neurological injuries between C2-T12 and 17 age-matched healthy controls. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation we elicited motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the resting first dorsal interosseous, biceps brachii, and tibialis anterior muscles when the contralateral side remained at rest or performed 70% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) into index finger abduction, elbow flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion, respectively. By testing MEPs in muscles with motoneurons located at different spinal cord segments we were able to relate the neurological level of injury to be above, at, or below the location of the motoneurons of the muscle tested. We demonstrate that in patients the size of MEPs was increased to a similar extent as in controls in muscles above the injury during 70% of MVC compared to rest. MEPs remained unchanged in muscles at and within 5 segments below the injury during 70% of MVC compared to rest. However, in muscles beyond 5 segments below the injury the size of MEPs increased similar to controls and was aberrantly high, 2-fold above controls, in muscles distant (>15 segments) from the injury. These aberrantly large MEPs were accompanied by larger F-wave amplitudes compared to controls. Thus, our findings support the view that corticospinal degeneration does not spread rostral to the lesion, and highlights the potential of caudal regions distant from an injury to facilitate residual corticospinal output after SCI. PMID:24146921

  14. Psychosocial outcomes among youth with spinal cord injury by neurological impairment.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Anne; Kelly, Erin H; Klaas, Sara J; Vogel, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine psychosocial outcomes of youth with spinal cord injury (SCI) as a function of neurological level (paraplegia/tetraplegia) and severity (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS)). Design Survey research. Setting Three pediatric SCI specialty centers in the USA. Participants Youth with SCI ages 5-18 with neurological impairment classifications of: tetraplegia AIS ABC (tetraplegia ABC), paraplegia AIS ABC (paraplegia ABC), or AIS D. Outcome Measures Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, and Children's Depression Inventory. Results Three hundred and forty youth participated; 57% were male; 60% were Caucasian, 21% Hispanic, 7% African-American, 2% Native American, and 3% reported "other". Their mean age was 8.15 years (standard deviation (SD) = 5.84) at injury and 13.18 years (SD = 3.87) at interview. Ninety-six youth (28%) had tetraplegia ABC injuries, 191 (56%) paraplegia ABC injuries, and 53 (16%) AIS D injuries. Neurological impairment was significantly related to participation and quality of life (QOL). Specifically, youth with paraplegia ABC and AIS D injuries participated in more activities than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.002; P = 0.018, respectively) and youth with paraplegia ABC participated more often than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.006). Youth with paraplegia ABC reported higher social QOL than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.001) and AIS D injuries (P = 0.002). Groups did not differ regarding mental health. Conclusion Interventions should target youth with tetraplegia ABC, as they may need support in terms of participation, and both youth with tetraplegia ABC and AIS D injuries in terms of social integration. PMID:24621027

  15. Purinergic Modulation of Spinal Neuroglial Maladaptive Plasticity Following Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Berbenni, Miluscia; Ippolito, Vita Maria; De Luca, Ciro; Verdesca, Francesco; Savarese, Leonilde; Alberghina, Lilia; Maggio, Nicola; Papa, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Modulation of spinal reactive gliosis following peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a promising strategy to restore synaptic homeostasis. Oxidized ATP (OxATP), a nonselective antagonist of purinergic P2X receptors, was found to recover a neuropathic behavior following PNI. We investigated the role of intraperitoneal (i.p.) OxATP treatment in restoring the expression of neuronal and glial markers in the mouse spinal cord after sciatic spared nerve injury (SNI). Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we imaged Ca(2+) transients in neurons and astrocytes of the dorsal horn of spinal cord at rest and upon right hind paw electrical stimulation in sham, SNI, and OxATP-treated mice. Neuropathic behavior was investigated by von Frey and thermal plantar test. Glial [glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1)] and GABAergic [vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65/76 (GAD65/67)] markers and glial [glutamate transporter (GLT1) and GLAST] and neuronal amino acid [EAAC1, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGLUT1)] transporters have been evaluated. In SNI mice, we found (i) increased glial response, (ii) decreased glial amino acid transporters, and (iii) increased levels of neuronal amino acid transporters, and (iv) in vivo analysis of spinal neurons and astrocytes showed a persistent increase of Ca(2+) levels. OxATP administration reduced glial activation, modulated the expression of glial and neuronal glutamate/GABA transporters, restored neuronal and astrocytic Ca(2+) levels, and prevented neuropathic behavior. In vitro studies validated that OxATP (i) reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) reduced astrocytic proliferation, (iii) increase vGLUT expression. All together, these data support the correlation between reactive gliosis and perturbation of the spinal synaptic homeostasis and the role played by the purinergic system in modulating spinal plasticity following PNI. PMID:25352445

  16. Serum leptin, bone mineral density and the healing of long bone fractures in men with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Linjuan; Pan, Zhanpeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2015-01-01

    Previously reported fracture rates in patients with spinal cord injury range from 1% to 20%. However, the exact role of spinal cord injury in bone metabolism has not yet been clarified. In order to investigate the effects of serum leptin and bone mineral density on the healing of long bone fractures in men with spinal cord injury, 15 male SCI patients and 15 matched controls were involved in our study. The outcome indicated that at 4 and 8 weeks after bone fracture, callus production in patients with spinal cord injury was lower than that in controls. Besides, bone mineral density was significantly reduced at 2, 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, it was found that at each time point, patients with spinal cord injury had significantly higher serum leptin levels than controls and no association was found between serum leptin level and bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae. Moreover, bone mineral density was positively correlated with bone formation in both of the groups. These findings suggest that in early phases i.e. week 4 and 8, fracture healing was impaired in patients with spinal cord injury and that various factors participated in the complicated healing process, such as hormonal and mechanical factors. PMID:26614856

  17. [Activation of microglia and astrocytes in different spinal segments after peripheral nerve injury in mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Zang, Kai-Kai; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2015-12-25

    Spinal microglia and astrocytes play an important role in mediating behavioral hypersensitive state following peripheral nerve injury. However, little is known about the expression patterns of activated microglia and astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. The aim of the present study was to investigate the spatial distribution of microglial and astrocytic activation in cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral segments of spinal dorsal horn following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve. The hind paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) of wild type (WT), CX3CR1(YFP) and GFAP(YFP) transgenic mice to mechanical stimulation was determined by von Frey test. Immunofluorescence staining was used to examine the spatial distribution of microglial and astrocytic activation in the spinal dorsal horn. Following CCI, all the WT, CX3CR1(YFP) and GFAP(YFP) mice developed robust allodynia in the ipsilateral paw on day 3 after CCI, and the allodynia was observed to last for 14 days. In comparison with sham groups, the PWTs of CCI group animals were significantly decreased (P < 0.01, n = 6). On day 14 after CCI, CX3CR1(YFP)-GFP immunofluorescence intensity was significantly increased in the ipsilateral lumbar spinal dorsal horn of the CX3CR1(YFP) mice (P < 0.01, n = 6), but no detectable changes were observed in other spinal segments. Increased GFAP(YFP)-GFP immunofluorescence intensity was observed in the ipsilateral thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal segments of the GFAP(YFP) mice on day 14 after CCI. Iba-1 and GFAP immunofluorescence staining in WT mice showed the same result of microglia and astrocyte activation on day 14 after CCI. CX3CR1(YFP)-GFP and GFAP(YFP)-GFP immunofluorescence signal was colocalized with microglial marker Iba-1 and astrocytic marker GFAP, respectively. Interestingly, on day 3 after CCI, Iba-1-immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the ipsilateral thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal segments of WT mice, whereas the significant upregulation of GFAP-immunoreactivity restrictedly occurred in the ipsilateral lumbar spinal segment. These results suggest that microglial and astrocytic activation may be involved in the development and maintenance of secondary allodynia in mice with neuropathic pain. PMID:26701632

  18. Radiographic assessment of hips in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Grynwald, Jean; Bastos, Juliana de Melo Lafaiete; Costa, Vinicius Basañez Aleluia; Rimkus, Carolina de Medeiros; Júnior, Alberto Cliquet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The spinal cord-injured patients begin to present a new configuration of forces on the joints. The hip joint is one of the most affected, because these patients generally use a wheelchair as a means of locomotion. Osteoarticular changes, such as heterotopic ossification, can be found in these patients, as evidenced by radiographic studies. This study aims to identify radiographic changes in hips of spinal cord-injured patients. Methods 15 patients (30 hips) were evaluated and followed up at the Laboratory of Biomechanical Rehabilitation of the Musculoskeletal System of HC-Unicamp, through the analysis of radiographs of the pelvis in anterior-posterior and Lowenstein lateral positions. Results Of the total hips, only seven (23%) had no evidence of articular damage. The prevalence of heterotopic ossification found (16.6%) was similar to the literature. Conclusion The radiographic assessment of these patient's hips is justified by the prevalence of joint changes found. Level of Evidence II, Development of diagnostic criteria in consecutive patients (with universally applied reference "gold" standard). PMID:24453577

  19. Shock induces a deficit in the recovery of function after a contusion injury: identifying the relative contributions of the brain and spinal cord 

    E-print Network

    Bopp, Anne Caroline

    2006-10-30

    and the recovery of locomotor function following spinal cord injury (SCI). Whereas evidence suggests that the disruption of instrumental learning depends on maladaptive plasticity within spinal cord neurons, it is still unknown whether the disruptive effects...

  20. Physical activity, quality of life, and functional autonomy of adults with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Camilla Yuri; Greguol, Márcia

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to perform a systematic review of studies that address the influence of physical activity on the quality of life and functional independence of adult individuals with spinal cord injury. The review was performed using data obtained from the MEDLINE, CINAHL, SciELO, LILACS, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Academic Search Premier, and PEDro databases using the following keywords: quality of life; functional independence; autonomy; independence; physical activity; activities of daily living; physical exercise; tetraplegia; paraplegia; spinal cord injury; physical disabilities; and wheelchair. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Although there was a lack of consensus among the selected studies, the majority of them presented a strong correlation between physical activity and variables of quality of life and/or functional independence. Thus, physical activity appears to have an important influence on social relationships, functional independence, psychological factors, and physical aspects, which can enhance quality of life and independence in the performance of daily activities. PMID:24197622

  1. BDNF: the career of a multifaceted neurotrophin in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, N; Blesch, A; Fouad, K

    2012-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been identified as a potent promoter of neurite growth, a finding that has led to an ongoing exploration of this neurotrophin as a potential treatment for spinal cord injury. BDNF's many effects in the nervous system make it an excellent candidate for neuroprotective strategies as well as for promoting axonal regeneration, plasticity and re-myelination. In addition, neuronal activity and physical exercise can modulate the expression of BDNF, suggesting that non-invasive means to increase BDNF levels might exist. Nonetheless, depending on the location, amount and duration of BDNF delivery, this potent neurotrophin can also have adverse effects, such as modulation of nociceptive pathways or contribution to spasticity. Taken together, the benefits and possible risks require careful assessment when considering this multifaceted neurotrophin as a treatment option for spinal cord injury. PMID:22982152

  2. Managing pressure ulcers in patients with a spinal cord injury: a case study.

    PubMed

    Warren, Diana V

    Grade 4 pressure ulceration is a common and often unavoidable secondary complication for patients who have sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury. Pressure ulcer management involves treating infection, providing a moist wound-healing environment and choosing the appropriate dressing. However, the case of Mr M highlights other issues such as pain, a poor appetite and sleep disturbance, which all delay wound healing. This article discusses ulcer prevention, from the initial assessment of the spinal injury to patient repositioning using the 'log-rolling' technique. Although this technique is not effective in providing prolonged pressure relief, it did reduce Mr M's pain. This article also suggests recommendations for future practice, including the need to relate to patients on a personal level, which should reduce mental health deterioration and increase the patient's quality of life, and to take a multidisciplinary approach to managing and treating pressure ulceration. PMID:20335929

  3. Vascular health toolbox for spinal cord injury: Recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Lee; Credeur, Daniel; Dolbow, David R; Gater, David R

    2015-12-01

    Over the last half century, the life expectancy for persons with spinal cord injury has increased drastically. Associated with the increased life expectancy, renal, metabolic and respiratory complications have given way to cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians have at their disposal non-invasive and practical techniques for tracking cardiovascular disease risk amongst individual patients. This review provides an overview of non-invasive, widely available, and relatively inexpensive technologies for assessing cardiovascular health in persons with spinal cord injury. These technologies include ultrasound, pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis. A number of assessments can be conducted using these technologies, which confer acceptable reliability and validity, and are relatively simple to administer. Assessment recommendations for use in clinical practice are provided, and there is sufficient evidence to encourage the use of these techniques as a component of routine serial assessments. PMID:26520889

  4. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  5. Assessing pain intensity following spinal cord injury: should rating scales measure 'overall' or 'maximal' values?

    PubMed

    Frank, Andrew O; Spyridonis, Fotios; Ghinea, Gheorghita

    2015-03-01

    Rating scales (RSs) are important for the assessment of pain intensity (PI) following a spinal cord injury (SCI). Using a Graphic Rating Scale, this pilot study measured an 'overall' level of PI repeated about every 2?h over 1 day and compared it with maximal PI scores reported previously. Patients were categorized into severity groups according to the overall Graphic Rating Scale score at initial assessment (T0). Eight men and six women (mean age 53.1; range 28-75) participated. Comparison of the overall PI scores and their changes over time with the maximal PI scores reported previously showed loss of patients in the severe group and less pronounced PI changes over time. Rating scales used in spinal cord injury services should measure maximal pain experienced 'right now' to eliminate potential averaging out of pain over time, which might allow physicians to assist patients in understanding their pain and begin their adjustment. PMID:25419691

  6. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 4. Individual experience, personal adaptation, and social perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stiens, S A; Bergman, S B; Formal, C S

    1997-03-01

    This learner-directed module highlights contemporary perspectives on personal success in the adjustment and adaptation of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). It is the fourth in a series of five modules within the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This module explores models of the multisystem effects on a person after SCI, disablement, theories of adjustment, patient autonomy, quality of life, community experience, adaptations enhancing sexuality, and minimization of pain after SCI. Perspectives of the patient's experience in disablement, interdisciplinary person-centered rehabilitation, and success of the individual in chosen life roles are emphasized. The module is designed to update SCI issues reviewed in past syllabi. PMID:9084370

  7. Hollow-organ perforation following thoracolumbar spinal injuries of fall from height

    PubMed Central

    Yudoyono, Farid; Dahlan, Rully Hanafi; Tjahjono, Firman Priguna; Imron, Akhmad; Arifin, Muhammad Zafrullah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spinal trauma is the cause of high mortality and morbidity, the fall from height as mechanism that can cause a wide variety of lesions, associated both with the direct impact on the ground and with the deceleration. In such fall cases greater heights and higher mortality are involved. Presentation of case We report the successful management of life-threatening hollow-organ perforation following thoracolumbar spinal injury. Discussion Perforation of the hollow-organ in the setting of thoracolumbar trauma may delay the diagnosis and can have devastating consequences. Conclusions This case supports the recommendation for neurosurgeon in the setting of thoracolumbar injury that perforation of the hollow-organ can have devastating consequences. It is vital to achieve an early diagnosis to improve survival rate. PMID:25967553

  8. Reticulospinal plasticity after cervical spinal cord injury in the rat involves withdrawal of projections below the injury.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, N; Hurd, C; Wei, D Z; Fouad, K

    2013-09-01

    Restoring voluntary fine motor control of the arm and hand is one of the main goals following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Although the functional improvement achievable with rehabilitative training in rat models is frequently accompanied by corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity, CST rewiring alone seems insufficient to account for the observed recovery. Recent investigations in animal models of SCI have suggested that the reticulospinal tract (RtST) might contribute to mediating improved motor performance of the forelimb. Here we investigate whether the spared RtST can compensate for the loss of CST input and whether RtST projections rearrange in response to cervical SCI. Animals underwent unilateral ablation of the dorsal CST and rubrospinal tract at spinal level C4, while the ventral RtST projections were spared. At the end of the six-week recovery period, injured animals had made significant improvements in single pellet reaching. This was not accompanied by increased sprouting of the injured CST above the injury compared to uninjured control animals. Injury-induced changes in RtST fiber density within the gray matter, as well as in the number of RtST collaterals entering the gray matter or crossing the cord midline were minor above the injury. However, all analyses directly below the injured spinal level consistently point to a significant decrease of RtST projections. The mechanism and the functional relevance behind this new finding warrant further study. Our results also suggest that mechanisms other than anatomical plasticity, such as plastic changes on a cellular level, might be responsible for the observed spontaneous recovery. PMID:23684634

  9. Laminin distribution during corticospinal tract development and after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sosale, A; Robson, J A; Stelzner, D J

    1988-10-01

    The glycoprotein laminin is a prominent constituent of basal laminae and has been suggested to play an important role in axonal growth. We have tested this hypothesis, by examining the temporal and spatial distribution of laminin in the rat spinal cord, relative to elongating corticospinal tract (CST) axons, during normal development and after newborn and adult spinal lesions. The distribution of laminin was demonstrated in spinal cord sections from animals ranging in age from 14 days embryonic to adult using immunocytochemistry. Anti-laminin immunolabeling was seen around blood vessels and meninges in all the animals examined. However, within the grey and white matter its distribution was age-dependent. In the normal cord, immunostaining appeared in small amounts in early embryos, but was absent from all postnatal animals even at ages when the CST was growing down the cord. Following injury, intense immunostaining was associated with lesions in both newborn and adult operates at all postoperative periods examined. Within the matrix of the lesion laminin immunostaining was especially prominent. In the intact cord it was prominent only around blood vessels near the lesion site. Our results indicate that the distribution of laminin does not closely correlate with axonal growth of the CST either during normal development or after spinal injury. PMID:3053227

  10. Oral mucosa stem cells alleviates spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder symptoms in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) deteriorates various physical functions, in particular, bladder problems occur as a result of damage to the spinal cord. Stem cell therapy for SCI has been focused as the new strategy to treat the injuries and to restore the lost functions. The oral mucosa cells are considered as the stem cells-like progenitor cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of oral mucosa stem cells on the SCI-induced neurogenic bladder in relation with apoptotic neuronal cell death and cell proliferation. Results The contraction pressure and the contraction time in the urinary bladder were increased after induction of SCI, in contrast, transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells decreased the contraction pressure and the contraction time in the SCI-induced rats. Induction of SCI initiated apoptosis in the spinal cord tissues, whereas treatment with the oral mucosa stem cells suppressed the SCI-induced apoptosis. Disrupted spinal cord by SCI was improved by transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells, and new tissues were increased around the damaged tissues. In addition, transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells suppressed SCI-induced neuronal activation in the voiding centers. Conclusions Transplantation of oral mucosa stem cells ameliorates the SCI-induced neurogenic bladder symptoms by inhibiting apoptosis and by enhancing cell proliferation. As the results, SCI-induced neuronal activation in the neuronal voiding centers was suppressed, showing the normalization of voiding function. PMID:24884998

  11. Characterization of Proliferating Neural Progenitors after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Subhra Prakash; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Ghosh, Sukla

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish can repair their injured brain and spinal cord after injury unlike adult mammalian central nervous system. Any injury to zebrafish spinal cord would lead to increased proliferation and neurogenesis. There are presences of proliferating progenitors from which both neuronal and glial loss can be reversed by appropriately generating new neurons and glia. We have demonstrated the presence of multiple progenitors, which are different types of proliferating populations like Sox2+ neural progenitor, A2B5+ astrocyte/ glial progenitor, NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor, radial glia and Schwann cell like progenitor. We analyzed the expression levels of two common markers of dedifferentiation like msx-b and vimentin during regeneration along with some of the pluripotency associated factors to explore the possible role of these two processes. Among the several key factors related to pluripotency, pou5f1 and sox2 are upregulated during regeneration and associated with activation of neural progenitor cells. Uncovering the molecular mechanism for endogenous regeneration of adult zebrafish spinal cord would give us more clues on important targets for future therapeutic approach in mammalian spinal cord repair and regeneration. PMID:26630262

  12. Leveraging biomedical informatics for assessing plasticity and repair in primate spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Jessica L; Haefeli, Jenny; Salegio, Ernesto A; Liu, Aiwen W; Guandique, Cristian F; Stück, Ellen D; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah C; Zdunowski, Sharon; Brock, John H; Roy, Roland R; Rosenzweig, Ephron S; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S; Courtine, Gregoire; Havton, Leif A; Steward, Oswald; Reggie Edgerton, V; Tuszynski, Mark H; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Ferguson, Adam R

    2015-09-01

    Recent preclinical advances highlight the therapeutic potential of treatments aimed at boosting regeneration and plasticity of spinal circuitry damaged by spinal cord injury (SCI). With several promising candidates being considered for translation into clinical trials, the SCI community has called for a non-human primate model as a crucial validation step to test efficacy and validity of these therapies prior to human testing. The present paper reviews the previous and ongoing efforts of the California Spinal Cord Consortium (CSCC), a multidisciplinary team of experts from 5 University of California medical and research centers, to develop this crucial translational SCI model. We focus on the growing volumes of high resolution data collected by the CSCC, and our efforts to develop a biomedical informatics framework aimed at leveraging multidimensional data to monitor plasticity and repair targeting recovery of hand and arm function. Although the main focus of many researchers is the restoration of voluntary motor control, we also describe our ongoing efforts to add assessments of sensory function, including pain, vital signs during surgery, and recovery of bladder and bowel function. By pooling our multidimensional data resources and building a unified database infrastructure for this clinically relevant translational model of SCI, we are now in a unique position to test promising therapeutic strategies' efficacy on the entire syndrome of SCI. We review analyses highlighting the intersection between motor, sensory, autonomic and pathological contributions to the overall restoration of function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25451131

  13. Selective alpha adrenergic antagonist reduces severity of transient hypertension during sexual stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Elliott, Stacy L; Zheng, Mei M Z; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2015-03-15

    On a daily basis, the majority of those with high-level spinal cord injury have autonomic dysreflexia, which describes a life-threatening episode of transient extreme hypertension (i.e., as high as 300?mm Hg) as many as 90% of people living with this condition. Unfortunately, ejaculation is a major initiating factor for autonomic dysreflexia, which discourages sexual activity. In order to obtain a sperm specimen, or for initial assessment of fertility, penile vibrostimulation is clinically performed. Nifedipine, a selective calcium channel blocker, is the most commonly prescribed pharmaceutical for a priori management of autonomic dysreflexia secondary to ejaculation or other causes; however, it is limited because of its potential exacerbation of low resting pressure, which also affects this population. The present study examined the effect of a short-acting selective ?1 antagonist (prazosin) on autonomic dysreflexia severity using a randomized placebo trial during medically supervised penile vibrostimulation in six males with cervical spinal cord injury. Beat-by-beat blood pressure and heart rate were recorded throughout penile vibrostimulation during placebo and prazosin-treated days. The increase in systolic blood pressure was mitigated during vibrostimulation in subjects administered prazosin as compared with those administered placebo (+140±19?mm Hg vs. +96±14 mmHg; p<0.05). On average, the peak in systolic blood pressure was 46?mm Hg lower during penile vibrostimulation when patients were administered prazosin (p<0.05), whereas resting blood pressure was not affected. Prazosin appears to be effective at reducing the severity of autonomic dysreflexia during sexual stimulation in patients with spinal cord injury, without exacerbating resting hypotension in high-level spinal cord injury. PMID:25093677

  14. Gait scoring in dogs with thoracolumbar spinal cord injuries when walking on a treadmill

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An inexpensive method of generating continuous data on hind limb function in dogs with spinal cord injury is needed to facilitate multicentre clinical trials. This study aimed to define normal fore limb, hind limb coordination in dogs walking on a treadmill and then to determine whether reliable data could be generated on the frequency of hind limb stepping and the frequency of coordinated stepping in dogs with a wide range of severities of thoracolumbar spinal cord injury. Results Sixty-nine neurologically normal dogs of different body sizes including seven lame dogs were videotaped walking on the treadmill without prior training and all used the lateral gait of right fore, left hind, left fore, right hind (RF-LH-LF-RH). Severely paraparetic dogs were able to walk on the treadmill for a minimum of 75?seconds, scoring of which generated data representative of function in animals with extremely variable gaits. Fifty consecutive stepping cycles were scored by three observers in 18 dogs with a wide range of disability due to acute thoracolumbar spinal cord injury using a stepping score (hind limb steps/fore limb steps ×100), and a coordination score (coordinated hind limb steps/total hind limb steps ×100). Dogs were also scored using a previously validated ordinal open field score (OFS). Inter- and intraobserver agreement was high as assessed with Cronbach’s alpha test for internal reliability. The stepping and coordination scores were significantly correlated to each other and to the OFS. Conclusions Dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injury can walk on a treadmill without prior training and their hind limb function can be scored reliably using a stepping score and coordination score. The only requirements for data acquisition are a treadmill and appropriately positioned video camera and so the system can be used in multicentre clinical trials to generate continuous data on neurologic recovery in dogs. PMID:24597771

  15. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spasticity decreased and his ambulatory function improved. This case illustrates that lumbar radiculopathy concomitant with a cervical SCI can produce severe spasticity and it can be dramatically improved by ESI. PMID:26361605

  16. Bone remodeling and calcium homeostasis in patients with spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Maïmoun, Laurent; Fattal, Charles; Sultan, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury exhibit early and acute bone loss with the major functional consequence being a high incidence of pathological fractures. The bone status of these patients is generally investigated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, but this technique does not reveal the pathophysiological mechanism underlying the bone loss. Bone cell activity can be indirectly evaluated by noninvasive techniques, including measurement of specific biochemical markers of bone formation (such as osteocalcin or bone-alkaline phosphatase) and resorption (such as procollagen type I N- or C-terminal propeptide). The bone loss in spinal cord injury is clearly due to an uncoupling of bone remodeling in favor of bone resorption, which starts just after the injury and peaks at about 1 to 4 months. Beyond 6 months, bone resorption activity decreases progressively but remains elevated for many years after injury. Conversely, bone formation is less affected. Antiresorptive treatment induces an early and acute reduction in bone resorption markers. Level of injury and health-related complications do not seem to be implicated in the intensity of bone resorption. During the acute phase, the hypercalcemic status is associated with the suppression of parathyroid hormone and vitamin D metabolites. The high sensitivity of these markers after treatment suggests that they can be used for monitoring treatment efficacy and patient compliance. The concomitant use of bone markers and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry may improve the physician's ability to detect patients at risk of severe bone loss and subsequent fractures. PMID:21632079

  17. The PPAR gamma agonist Pioglitazone improves anatomical and locomotor recovery after rodent spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    McTigue, Dana M.; Tripathi, Richa; Wei, Ping; Lash, A. Todd

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by a dramatic inflammatory response, which escalates over the first week post-injury and is thought to contribute to secondary pathology after SCI. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are widely expressed nuclear receptors whose activation has led to diminished pro-inflammatory cascades in several CNS disorders. Therefore, we examined the efficacy of the PPAR? agonist Pioglitazone in a rodent SCI model. Rats received a moderate mid-thoracic contusion and were randomly placed into groups receiving vehicle, low dose or high dose Pioglitazone. Drug or vehicle was injected i.p. at 15 min post-injury and then every 12h for the first 7d post-injury. Locomotor function was followed for 5 weeks using the BBB scale. BBB scores were greater in treated animals at 7d post-injury and significant improvements in BBB subscores were noted, including better toe clearance, earlier stepping and more parallel paw position. Stereological measurements throughout the lesion revealed a significant increase in rostral spared white matter in both Pioglitazone treatment groups. Spinal cords from the high dose group also had significantly more gray matter sparing and motor neurons rostral and caudal to epicenter. Thus, our results reveal that clinical treatment with Pioglitazone, an FDA-approved drug used currently for diabetes, may be a feasible and promising strategy for promoting anatomical and functional repair after SCI. PMID:17433295

  18. An Up-regulation of IRF-1 After a Spinal Cord Injury: Implications for Neuronal Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Jian-Ru; Wei, Hai-Feng; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Mao, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Qian, Rong; Chen, Xin-Lei; He, Ming-Qing; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Jian

    2015-12-01

    IRF-1, a kind of transcription factor, is expressed in many cell types, except in early embryonal cells. IRF-1 has played an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes, including tumor immune surveillance, viral infection, development of immunity system and pro-inflammatory injury. However, the expression and function of IRF-1 in spinal cord injury (SCI) are still unknown. In this study, we have performed an acute SCI model in adult rats and investigated the dynamic changes of IRF-1 expression in the spinal cord. Western blot have shown that IRF-1 protein levels gradually increased, reaching a peak at day 3 and then gradually declined to a normal level at day 14 after SCI. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that IRF-1 immunoreactivity was found in neurons, but not in astrocytes and microglia. Additionally, colocalization of IRF-1/active caspase-3 was detected in neurons. In vitro, IRF-1 depletion, by short interfering RNA, obviously decreases neuronal apoptosis. In conclusion, this is the first description of IRF-1 expression in spinal cord injury. Our results suggested that IRF-1 might play crucial roles in CNS pathophysiology after SCI. PMID:26342280

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Quality of Life Index Spinal Cord Injury - Version III.

    PubMed

    Reis, Priscila Alencar Mendes; Carvalho, Zuila Maria de Figueiredo; Tirado Darder, Juan José; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Studart, Rita Mônica Borges; Maniva, Samia Jardelle Costa de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To translate and culturally adapt to Portuguese the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index Spinal Cord Injury - Version III and characterize the sample in relation to sociodemographic and clinical aspects. METHOD A methodological study with view to cross-cultural adaptation, following the particular steps of this method: initial translation, translation synthesis, back-translation (translation back to the original language), review by a committee of judges and pretest of the final version. The pretest was carried out with 30 patients with spinal cord injury. RESULTS An index of 74 items divided into two parts (satisfaction/importance) was obtained. The criteria of semantic equivalence were evaluated as very adequate translation, higher than 87%, and vocabulary and were grammar higher than 86%. Idiomatic equivalence was higher than 74%, experimental greater than 78% and conceptual was greater than 70%. CONCLUSION After cross-cultural adaptation, the instrument proved semantic, idiomatic, experimental and conceptual adequacy, in addition to helping the evaluation of the quality of life of people with spinal cord injury. PMID:26107700

  20. Effects of serotonergic agents on respiratory recovery after cervical spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hui; Lee, Kun-Ze

    2015-11-15

    Unilateral cervical spinal cord hemisection (i.e., C2Hx) usually interrupts the bulbospinal respiratory pathways and results in respiratory impairment. It has been demonstrated that activation of the serotonin system can promote locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury. The present study was designed to investigate whether serotonergic activation can improve respiratory function during the chronic injury state. Bilateral diaphragm electromyogram and tidal volume were measured in anesthetized and spontaneously breathing adult rats at 8 wk post-C2Hx or C2 laminectomy. A bolus intravenous injection of a serotonin precursor [5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), 10 mg/kg], a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, 10 mg/kg), or a potent agonist for serotonin 2A receptors (TCB-2, 0.05 mg/kg) was used to activate the serotonergic system. Present results demonstrated that 5-HTP and TCB-2, but not fluoxetine, significantly increased the inspiratory activity of the diaphragm electromyogram ipsilateral to the lesion for at least 30 min in C2Hx animals, but not in animals that received sham surgery. However, the tidal volume was not increased after administration of 5-HTP or TCB-2, indicating that the enhancement of ipsilateral diaphragm activity is not associated with improvement of the tidal volume. These results suggest that exogenous activation of the serotonergic system can specifically enhance the ipsilateral diaphragmatic motor outputs, but this approach may not be sufficient to improve respiratory functional recovery following chronic cervical spinal injury. PMID:26359482

  1. Usability assessment of ASIBOT: a portable robot to aid patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jardón, Alberto; Gil, Ángel M; de la Peña, Ana I; Monje, Concepción A; Balaguer, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The usability concept refers to aspects related to the use of products that are closely linked to the user's degree of satisfaction. Our goal is to present a functional evaluation methodology for assessing the usability of sophisticated technical aids, such as a portable robot for helping disabled patients with severe spinal cord injuries. The specific manipulator used for this task is ASIBOT, a personal assistance robot totally developed by RoboticsLab at the University Carlos III of Madrid. Our purpose is also to improve some aspects of the manipulator according to the user's perception. For our case study, a population of six patients with spinal cord injury is considered. These patients have been suffering spinal cord injuries for a period of time longer than 1 year before the tests are carried out. The methodology followed for the information gathering is based on the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST). Different daily functions, such as drinking, brushing one's teeth and washing one's face, are considered to assess the user's perception when using ASIBOT as a technical aid. The human factor in this procedure is the main base to establish the specific needs and tools to make the end product more suitable and usable. PMID:20969432

  2. TCTP Expression After Rat Spinal Cord Injury: Implications for Astrocyte Proliferation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianbing; Mao, Xingxing; Chen, Minghao; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Yang; Duan, Chengwei; Zhang, Haiyan; Sun, Chi; Wu, Weijie; Zhu, Xinjian; Ge, Jianbing; Tao, Weidong; Wang, Youhua; Lu, Hongjian

    2015-11-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein which plays a role in cell proliferation and growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. However, its expression and function in spinal cord injury (SCI) are still unknown. Here, we demonstrated that expression of TCTP was dynamic changed after acute spinal cord injury. Our results showed that TCTP gradually increased, reached a peak at 3 day, and then declined to basal levels at 14 days after spinal cord injury. Upregulation of TCTP was accompanied with an increase in the levels of proliferation proteins such as PCNA. Immunofluorescent labeling also showed that TCTP located in astrocytes and traumatic SCI induced TCTP colocalizated with PCNA. These results indicated that TCTP might play an important role in astrocyte proliferation. To further probe the role of TCTP, TCTP-specific siRNA-transfected astrocytes showed significant decrease of primary astrocyte proliferation. Surprisingly, TCTP knockdown also reduced primary astrocyte migration, as the reorganization of microtubules and F-actin was disturbed after siRNA transfection. All above indicated that TCTP might play a crucial role in astrocyte proliferation and migration. Collectively, our data suggested that TCTP might play important roles in CNS pathophysiology after SCI. PMID:26266488

  3. Motor imagery in spinal cord injury patients: moving makes the difference.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Federico; Sedda, Anna; Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Toraldo, Alessio; Querzola, Matteo; Pasotti, Fabrizio; Ovadia, Daniela; Piroddi, Chiara; Dell'Aquila, Roberta; Redaelli, Tiziana; Bottini, Gabriella

    2014-09-01

    Both real action control and execution and motor imagery abilities require knowledge of the spatial location of body parts, in other words efference copy information and feedbacks from the sensory system (Frith et al., 2000, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B. Biol. Sci., 355, 1771). Spinal cord injuries induce severe motor disability, due to a damage of the descending motor pathways (Cramer et al., 2007, Exp. Brain. Res., 177, 233). Patients' motor imagery competences are variably reported as either normal or defective (Decety & Boisson, 1990, Eur. Arch. Psychiatry Clin. Neurosci., 240, 39; Lacourse et al., 1999, Behav. Brain Sci., 104, 73). We explored biomechanical constraint effects in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients, as they are considered the most reliable indexes of motor imagery abilities (Parsons, 1987b, Cogn. Psychol., 19, 178). Sixteen spinal cord injuries patients and 16 neurologically unimpaired subjects have been administered with (1) the Hand Laterality Task (HLT), in which subjects were asked to judge the laterality of a rotated hand; and (2) the Mirror Letter Discrimination Task (MLD), in which subjects were asked to judge if a rotated character was in its correct upright position or mirror-reversed form. Our patients did not present the effect of stimulus orientation, neither did they show any effect related to biomechanical constraints. Based on these data, the hypothesis is that SCI patients' performance may be ascribed to the use of a different strategy to solve the tasks, based on memory rather than on mental rotation. PMID:23672438

  4. Transgenic inhibition of Nogo-66 receptor function allows axonal sprouting and improved locomotion after spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuxin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Budel, Stephane; Hampton, Thomas G.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Axon growth after spinal injury is thought to be limited in part by myelin-derived proteins that act via the Nogo-66 Receptor (NgR). To test this hypothesis, we sought to study recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) after inhibiting NgR transgenically with a soluble function-blocking NgR fragment. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (gfap) gene regulatory elements were used to generate mice that secrete NgR(310)ecto from astrocytes. After mid-thoracic dorsal over-hemisection injury, gfap?ngr(310)ecto mice exhibit enhanced raphespinal and corticospinal axonal sprouting into the lumbar spinal cord. Recovery of locomotion is improved in the gfap?ngr(310)ecto mice. These data indicate that the NgR ligands, Nogo-66, MAG, and OMgp, play a role in limiting axonal growth in the injured adult CNS and that NgR(310)ecto might provide a therapeutic means to promote recovery from SCI. PMID:15866044

  5. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ozisler, Zuhal; Koklu, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26330842

  6. Functional Priorities, Assistive Technology, and Brain-Computer Interfaces after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Collinger, Jennifer L.; Boninger, Michael L.; Bruns, Tim M.; Curley, Kenneth; Wang, Wei; Weber, Douglas J.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury often impacts a person’s ability to perform critical activities of daily living and can have a negative impact on their quality of life. Assistive technology aims to bridge this gap to augment function and increase independence. It is critical to involve consumers in the design and evaluation process as new technologies, like brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), are developed. In a survey study of fifty-seven veterans with spinal cord injury who were participating in the National Veterans Wheelchair Games, we found that restoration of bladder/bowel control, walking, and arm/hand function (tetraplegia only) were all high priorities for improving quality of life. Many of the participants had not used or heard of some currently available technologies designed to improve function or the ability to interact with their environment. The majority of individuals in this study were interested in using a BCI, particularly for controlling functional electrical stimulation to restore lost function. Independent operation was considered to be the most important design criteria. Interestingly, many participants reported that they would be willing to consider surgery to implant a BCI even though non-invasiveness was a high priority design requirement. This survey demonstrates the interest of individuals with spinal cord injury in receiving and contributing to the design of BCI. PMID:23760996

  7. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ozisler, Zuhal; Koklu, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26330842

  8. Squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles provide neuroprotection after stroke and spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Alice; Yemisci, Müge; Eroglu, Hakan; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Turkoglu, Omer Faruk; Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Caban, Seçil; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Pieters, Grégory; Loreau, Olivier; Rousseau, Bernard; Tagit, Oya; Hildebrandt, Niko; Le Dantec, Yannick; Mougin, Julie; Valetti, Sabrina; Chacun, Hélène; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Andrieux, Karine; Capan, Yilmaz; Dalkara, Turgay; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of severe neurological trauma, such as stroke and spinal cord injuries. However, many drugs with potential neuropharmacological activity, such as adenosine, are inefficient upon systemic administration because of their fast metabolization and rapid clearance from the bloodstream. Here, we show that conjugation of adenosine to the lipid squalene and the subsequent formation of nanoassemblies allows prolonged circulation of this nucleoside, providing neuroprotection in mouse stroke and rat spinal cord injury models. The animals receiving systemic administration of squalenoyl adenosine nanoassemblies showed a significant improvement of their neurologic deficit score in the case of cerebral ischaemia, and an early motor recovery of the hindlimbs in the case of spinal cord injury. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the nanoassemblies were able to extend adenosine circulation and its interaction with the neurovascular unit. This Article shows, for the first time, that a hydrophilic and rapidly metabolized molecule such as adenosine may become pharmacologically efficient owing to a single conjugation with the lipid squalene.

  9. Potential Long Term Benefits of Acute Hypothermia after Spinal Cord Injury: Assessments with Somatosensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Maybhate, Anil; Hu, Charles; Bazley, Faith A.; Yu, Qilu; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.; All, Angelo H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neuroprotection by hypothermia has been an important research topic over last two decades. In animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI), the primary focus has been assessing effects of hypothermia on behavioral and histological outcomes. While a few studies have investigated electrophysiological changes in descending motor pathways with motor evoked potentials recorded during cooling, we report here, hypothermia induced increased electrical conduction in the ascending spinal cord pathways with somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in injured rats. In our experiments these effects lasted long after the acute hypothermia and were accompanied with potential long term improvements in motor movement. Design Laboratory Investigation. Setting University Medical School. Subjects 21 Female Lewis Rats. Interventions Hypothermia. Measurements and Main Results All animals underwent spinal cord contusion, with the NYU-Impactor, by a 12.5mm weight drop at thoracic vertebra T8. A group (n=10) was randomly assigned for a systemic 2hr. hypothermia episode (32±0.5°C) initiated ~2.0hrs post-injury. 11 rats were controls with post-injury temperature maintained at 37±0.5°C for 2hrs. The two groups underwent pre-injury, weekly post-injury (up to 4wks) SSEP recordings and standard motor behavioral tests (BBB). Three randomly selected rats from each group were euthanized for histological analysis at post-injury Day 3 and Day 28. Compared to controls, the hypothermia group showed significantly higher SSEP amplitudes post-injury; with longer latencies. The BBB scores were also higher immediately after injury and 4 weeks later in the hypothermia group. Importantly, specific changes in the BBB scores in hypothermia group (not seen in controls) indicated regained functions critical for motor control. Histological evaluations showed more tissue preservation in hypothermia group. Conclusions Post-SCI, early systemic hypothermia provided significant neuroprotection weeks after injury via improved sensory electrophysiological signals in rats. This was accompanied by higher motor behavioral scores and more spared tissue in acute and post-acute periods after injury. PMID:22001581

  10. Biomarkers of spinal cord injury and ensuing bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Célia Duarte; Coelho, Ana; Antunes-Lopes, Tiago; Cruz, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    During the acute phase of SCI, the extension and residual neurological deficits that will persist after the waning of the spinal shock period are difficult to estimate on clinical grounds. Therefore, objective biomarkers able to estimate the extension of the lesion and the degree of neurological recovery are of great importance. Research has been focused on the detection of structural neuronal and glial proteins that leak from damaged cells, inflammatory proteins recruited to remove necrotic debris and more accurate neuroimaging methods that are able to discriminate the extension and functional consequences of the SCI. Urinary biomarkers are also being investigated to estimate functional changes that typically affect bladder function following SCI which can endanger patient's life in the long run. Future studies are needed to precisely characterize the composition and function of the glial scar that appears in the area of SCI and repeals axonal growth, therefore preventing axonal rewiring. PMID:25446137

  11. Lower extremity functional electrical stimulation cycling promotes physical and functional recovery in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, Cristina L.; Hammond, Edward R.; Strohl, Adam B.; Commean, Paul K.; Eby, Sarah A.; Damiano, Diane L.; Wingert, Jason R.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; McDonald, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of long-term lower extremity functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling on the physical integrity and functional recovery in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Retrospective cohort, mean follow-up 29.1 months, and cross-sectional evaluation. Setting Washington University Spinal Cord Injury Neurorehabilitation Center, referral center. Participants Twenty-five people with chronic SCI who received FES during cycling were matched by age, gender, injury level, and severity, and duration of injury to 20 people with SCI who received range of motion and stretching. Intervention Lower extremity FES during cycling as part of an activity-based restorative treatment regimen. Main outcome measure Change in neurological function: motor, sensory, and combined motor–sensory scores (CMSS) assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment scale. Response was defined as ?1 point improvement. Results FES was associated with an 80% CMSS responder rate compared to 40% in controls. An average 9.6 CMSS point loss among controls was offset by an average 20-point gain among FES subjects. Quadriceps muscle mass was on average 36% higher and intra/inter-muscular fat 44% lower, in the FES group. Hamstring and quadriceps muscle strength was 30 and 35% greater, respectively, in the FES group. Quality of life and daily function measures were significantly higher in FES group. Conclusion FES during cycling in chronic SCI may provide substantial physical integrity benefits, including enhanced neurological and functional performance, increased muscle size and force-generation potential, reduced spasticity, and improved quality of life. PMID:24094120

  12. Does Improvised Waterbed Reduce the Incidence of Pressure Ulcers in Patients with Spinal Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Emejulu, Jude-Kennedy C; Nwadi, Uchenna V; Obiegbu, Henry O

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers are lesions caused by unrelieved pressure over bony prominences, resulting in damage to underlying tissues. The etiology is multifactorial including prolonged immobility. They usually complicate spinal cord injuries with long periods of bed confinement. The use of bed replacements markedly reduces the incidence of pressure ulcers, but the unaffordability of these replacements in low-income countries has necessitated the need to explore cheaper alternatives. Aim and Objective: The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the use of our cheap and locally improvised waterbeds would reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in patients on prolonged bed confinement due to spinal injury. Methodology: Over a 16-month period, 51 patients (age range 1-80 years) with spinal injuries were managed conservatively in our service using improvised waterbeds in 21 (41.2%), while using the regular hospital bed/foam in 30 (58.8%). Biodata, the time interval between injury and presentation to the hospital, nature of the injury, use of improvised waterbed and development of pressure ulcer, were collected, collated, and analyzed. Statistical significance was calculated with the Chi-square test. Results: Most were males (98%), in the age range of 21–30 years (25.5%), and due to fall from heights (35.3%). Of 21 patients who were managed on improvised waterbeds, 6 (28.6%) had pressure ulcers, and of the 30 who did not use the waterbed, 17 (56.7%) developed ulcers. The ?2 = 3.9381, while P = 0.0472. This difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: The improvised waterbed, which is much cheaper than the standard waterbed, was observed to have significantly reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers among our patients. Nonetheless, further studies would still be needed to confirm this observation. PMID:26425065

  13. MicroRNA dysregulation in spinal cord injury: causes, consequences and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Diaz, Manuel; Esteban, Francisco J.; Reigada, David; Muñoz-Galdeano, Teresa; Yunta, Mónica; Caballero-López, Marcos; Navarro-Ruiz, Rosa; del Águila, Ángela; Maza, Rodrigo M.

    2014-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord causes permanent disability to more than 180,000 people every year worldwide. The initial mechanical damage triggers a complex set of secondary events involving the neural, vascular, and immune systems that largely determine the functional outcome of the spinal cord injury (SCI). Cellular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for this secondary injury largely depend on activation and inactivation of specific gene programs. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs function as gene expression switches in key processes of the SCI. Microarray data from rodent contusion models reveal that SCI induces changes in the global microRNA expression patterns. Variations in microRNA abundance largely result from alterations in the expression of the cells at the damaged spinal cord. However, microRNA expression levels after SCI are also influenced by the infiltration of immune cells to the injury site and the death and migration of specific neural cells after injury. Evidences on the role of microRNAs in the SCI pathophysiology have come from different sources. Bioinformatic analysis of microarray data has been used to identify specific variations in microRNA expression underlying transcriptional changes in target genes, which are involved in key processes in the SCI. Direct evidences on the role of microRNAs in SCI are scarcer, although recent studies have identified several microRNAs (miR-21, miR-486, miR-20) involved in key mechanisms of the SCI such as cell death or astrogliosis, among others. From a clinical perspective, different evidences make clear that microRNAs can be potent therapeutic tools to manipulate cell state and molecular processes in order to enhance functional recovery. The present article reviews the actual knowledge on how injury affects microRNA expression and the meaning of these changes in the SCI pathophysiology, to finally explore the clinical potential of microRNAs in the SCI. PMID:24701199

  14. An efficient device to experimentally model compression injury of mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Zeng, Xiang; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Han, InBo; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Teng, Yang D

    2015-09-01

    We report an efficient and effective device to reproducibly model clinically relevant spinal cord injury (SCI) via controlled mechanical compression. In the present study, following skin incision, dorsal laminectomy was performed to expose T10 spinal cord of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-250g). The vertebral column was suspended and stabilized by Allis clamps at T8 and 12 spinous processes. A metal impounder was then gently loaded onto T10 dura (20, 35 or 50g×5min; n=7/group), resulting in acute mild, moderate, or severe standing weight compression, respectively. Neurobehavioral outcomes were evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale and inclined plane test for coordinated hindlimb function, and a battery of spinal reflex tests for sensorimotor functions, at 1day following SCI and weekly thereafter for 7weeks. Quantitative histopathology was used to assess injury-triggered loss of white matter, gray matter and ventral horn motor neurons. Immunocytochemical levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ?-amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the cervical and lumbar regions were measured to determine the distal segment impact of T10 compression. The data demonstrates that the standardized protocol generates weight-dependent hindlimb motosensory deficits and neurodegeneration primarily at and near the lesion epicenter. Importantly, there are significantly increased GFAP and APP expressions in spinal cord segments involved in eliciting post-SCI allodynia. Therefore, the described system reliably produces compression trauma in manners partially emulating clinical quasi-static insults to the spinal cord, providing a pragmatic model to investigate pathophysiological events and potential therapeutics for compression SCI. PMID:26210871

  15. Cardiovascular control, autonomic function, and elite endurance performance in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Gee, C M; Voss, C; Hubli, M; Currie, K D; Schmid, J; Krassioukov, A V

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to determine the relationship between level of injury, completeness of injury, resting as well as exercise hemodynamics, and endurance performance in athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Twenty-three elite male paracycling athletes (C3-T8) were assessed for neurological level/completeness of injury, autonomic completeness of injury, resting cardiovascular function, and time to complete a 17.3-km World Championship time-trial test. A subset were also fitted with heart rate (HR) monitors and their cycles were fitted with a global positioning systems device (n?=?15). Thoracic SCI exhibited higher seated systolic blood pressure along with superior time-trial performance compared with cervical SCI (all P?injury, the four athletes with cervical autonomic incomplete SCI exhibited a faster time-trial time and a higher average speed compared with cervical autonomic complete SCI (all P?injury and the consequent ability of the cardiovascular system to respond to exercise appear to be a critical determinant of endurance performance in elite athletes with cervical SCI. PMID:25175825

  16. Descriptions of Community by People with Spinal Cord Injuries: Concepts to Inform Community Integration and Community Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuipers, Pim; Kendall, Melissa B.; Amsters, Delena; Pershouse, Kiley; Schuurs, Sarita

    2011-01-01

    Effective measurement and optimization of re-entry into the community after injury depends on a degree of understanding of how those injured persons actually perceive their community. In light of the limited research about foundational concepts regarding community integration after spinal cord injury, this study investigated how a large number of…

  17. Optimizing Speech Production in the Ventilator-Assisted Individual Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBean, Naomi; Ward, Elizabeth; Murdoch, Bruce; Cahill, Louise; Solley, Maura; Geraghty, Timothy; Hukins, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation is commonly used during the acute management of cervical spinal cord injury, and is required on an ongoing basis in the majority of patients with injuries at or above C3. However, to date there have been limited systematic investigations of the options available to improve speech while ventilator-assisted…

  18. This two day symposium highlights progress in the rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord injury and honours the contributions of more than $700,000 for spinal cord research in Winnipeg.

    E-print Network

    Manitoba, University of

    This two day symposium highlights progress in the rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord injury and honours the contributions of more than $700,000 for spinal cord research in Winnipeg. We Cord Research Centre The Spinal Cord Research Centre and the Manitoba Paraplegia Foundation cordially

  19. Evolution of EEG Motor Rhythms after Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    López-Larraz, Eduardo; Montesano, Luis; Gil-Agudo, Ángel; Minguez, Javier; Oliviero, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) does not only produce a lack of sensory and motor function caudal to the level of injury, but it also leads to a progressive brain reorganization. Chronic SCI patients attempting to move their affected limbs present a significant reduction of brain activation in the motor cortex, which has been linked to the deafferentation. The aim of this work is to study the evolution of the motor-related brain activity during the first months after SCI. Eighteen subacute SCI patients were recruited to participate in bi-weekly experimental sessions during at least two months. Their EEG was recorded to analyze the temporal evolution of the event-related desynchronization (ERD) over the motor cortex, both during motor attempt and motor imagery of their paralyzed hands. The results show that the ? and ? ERD evolution after SCI is negatively correlated with the clinical progression of the patients during the first months after the injury. This work provides the first longitudinal study of the event-related desynchronization during the subacute phase of spinal cord injury. Furthermore, our findings reveal a strong association between the ERD changes and the clinical evolution of the patients. These results help to better understand the brain transformation after SCI, which is important to characterize the neuroplasticity mechanisms involved after this lesion and may lead to new strategies for rehabilitation and motor restoration of these patients. PMID:26177457

  20. The Initial Systolic Time Interval in patients with spinal cord injury measured with impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Martinsen, Ørjan G.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2012-12-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay is influenced by the sympathetic nerve system. Therefore, an observational study was performed in a group of patients (SCI) with spinal cord injuries. The relationship between the ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was established by varying the RR-interval using an exercise stimulus to increase the heart rate. The slope of this relationship was observed to be significantly higher in the SCI-group as compared with a control group, although there was no difference in ISTI in the range of common heart rates during the test between the groups. This slope and the ISTI was observed to be significantly different in an acute patient having a recent spinal cord injury at a high level. Because of the variety in injury levels and incompleteness of the injuries further, more specific research is necessary to draw decisive conclusions with respect to the contribution of autonomic nervous control on the ISTI in SCI, although the present observations are notable.

  1. Benefits of early admission to a comprehensive trauma center for patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Oakes, D D; Wilmot, C B; Hall, K M; Sherck, J P

    1990-08-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury may be admitted directly to a trauma center with a dedicated rehabilitation unit or transferred there days or weeks later. This study analyzed the relationship between time of transfer to a Level I Trauma Center with a spinal cord injury service and efficacy of subsequent rehabilitation. We examined the records of all patients admitted to the service between September 1981 and August 1983 and followed at least one year. There were 197 patients, 102 quadriplegics and 95 paraplegics, aged 15 to 77 years (average = 29.4 years). Median time from injury to admission was 11 days for quadriplegics and 21 days for paraplegics; this was used to define early and late groups. The early quadriplegic group began rehabilitation 2.94 days postinjury; the late quadriplegic group, 74.87 days (p less than .01). Time in rehabilitation did not differ (128.22 days, early; 122.61, late), but total hospitalization--from injury to discharge--was 131.16 days for the early quadriplegic group and 197.27 for the late quadriplegic group (p less than .01). Average duration of prerehabilitation care for the paraplegic groups was 6.19 days (early) and 58.58 days (late) (p less than .01). Time in rehabilitation was the same for both paraplegic groups, but total hospitalization was shorter for early admissions (82.91 days vs 125.90 days, p less than .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2115765

  2. A murine model of cervical spinal cord injury to study post-lesional respiratory neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Keomani, Emilie; Deramaudt, Thérèse B; Petitjean, Michel; Bonay, Marcel; Lofaso, Frédéric; Vinit, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A cervical spinal cord injury induces permanent paralysis, and often leads to respiratory distress. To date, no efficient therapeutics have been developed to improve/ameliorate the respiratory failure following high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we propose a murine pre-clinical model of high SCI at the cervical 2 (C2) metameric level to study diverse post-lesional respiratory neuroplasticity. The technique consists of a surgical partial injury at the C2 level, which will induce a hemiparalysis of the diaphragm due to a deafferentation of the phrenic motoneurons from the respiratory centers located in the brainstem. The contralateral side of the injury remains intact and allows the animal recovery. Unlike other SCIs which affect the locomotor function (at the thoracic and lumbar level), the respiratory function does not require animal motivation and the quantification of the deficit/recovery can be easily performed (diaphragm and phrenic nerve recordings, whole body ventilation). This pre-clinical C2 SCI model is a powerful, useful, and reliable pre-clinical model to study various respiratory and non-respiratory neuroplasticity events at different levels (molecular to physiology) and to test diverse putative therapeutic strategies which might improve the respiration in SCI patients. PMID:24894020

  3. Neuromuscular stimulation therapy after incomplete spinal cord injury promotes recovery of interlimb coordination during locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, R.; Belanger, A.; Kanchiku, T.; Fairchild, M.; Abbas, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) induced repetitive limb movement therapy after incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) are unknown. This study establishes the capability of using therapeutic NMES in rodents with iSCI and evaluates its ability to promote recovery of interlimb control during locomotion. Ten adult female Long Evans rats received thoracic spinal contusion injuries (T9; 156 ± 9.52 Kdyne). 7 days post-recovery, 6/10 animals received NMES therapy for 15 min/day for 5 days, via electrodes implanted bilaterally into hip flexors and extensors. Six intact animals served as controls. Motor function was evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale for the first 6 days and on 14th day post-injury. 3D kinematic analysis of treadmill walking was performed on day 14 post-injury. Rodents receiving NMES therapy exhibited improved interlimb coordination in control of the hip joint, which was the specific NMES target. Symmetry indices improved significantly in the therapy group. Additionally, injured rodents receiving therapy more consistently displayed a high percentage of 1:1 coordinated steps, and more consistently achieved proper hindlimb touchdown timing. These results suggest that NMES techniques could provide an effective therapeutic tool for neuromotor treatment following iSCI.

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25374587

  5. Ptena, but not Ptenb, reduces regeneration after spinal cord injury in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Yu, Yong; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-11-01

    Based on the observation that the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) reduces regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) as evidenced in the PTEN knockout mouse, we have investigated the function of Ptena and Ptenb, the two zebrafish homologs of mammalian PTEN, in adult zebrafish after spinal cord injury with the aim to assess the contribution of the two zebrafish genes to functional recovery in an animal species that spontaneously recovers from central nervous system injury. The inhibition of Ptena expression by antisense morpholino (MO) application improved spinal cord regeneration through 4 to 5weeks after injury. Retrograde tracing showed regrowth of axons from neurons of the regeneration-competent nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle in the brainstem in the Ptena MO-treated fish. Ptenb MO-treated fish recovered as well as control MO-treated fish at 4 and 5weeks after SCI, with their locomotion being similar to that of sham-injured and non-injured fish. The mRNA levels of Ptena were upregulated after SCI at the early stage after injury (12h and 6days) caudal to the lesion site, compared to the non-injured control, while the levels of Ptenb were upregulated only at 12h after injury. In situ hybridization experiments were in agreement with the qPCR measurements. At the protein level, Ptena was found to be expressed in spinal motoneurons and immature neurons. These results indicate that Ptena, but not Ptenb, inhibits regeneration in zebrafish, thus sharing this feature with PTEN in mammals. The fact that zebrafish regenerate better than mammals despite the inhibitory presence of Ptena is likely due to regeneration-conducive molecules that tip the balance from inhibition to enhancement. Interestingly, although Ptena and Ptenb have been shown to be functionally redundant in promoting the development of the fish larval central nervous system, they are not functionally redundant in the adult, suggesting that regeneration in fish is not predominantly due to the overall recapitulation of development. PMID:24929056

  6. Changes in pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide expression in urinary bladder pathways after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zvarova, Katarina; Dunleavy, J Dana; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2005-03-01

    These studies examined changes in the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) expression in micturition reflex pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI) of various durations. In spinal-intact animals, PACAP immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed in fibers in the superficial dorsal horn in all segmental levels examined (L1, L2, L4-S1). Bladder-afferent cells (35-45%) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG; L1, L2, L6, S1) from spinal-intact animals also exhibited PACAP-IR. After SCI (6 weeks), PACAP-IR was dramatically increased in spinal segments and DRG (L1, L2, L6, S1) involved in micturition reflexes. The density of PACAP-IR was increased in the superficial laminae (I-II) of the L1, L2, L6, and S1 spinal segments. No changes in PACAP-IR were observed in the L4-L5 segments. Staining was also dramatically increased in a fiber bundle extending ventrally from Lissauer's tract (LT) in lamina I along the lateral edge of the dorsal horn to the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN) in the L6-S1 spinal segments (lateral collateral pathway of Lissauer, LCP). After SCI (range 48 h to 6 weeks), PACAP-IR in cells in the L1, L2, L6, and S1 DRG significantly (P < or = 0.001) increased and the percentage of bladder-afferent cells expressing PACAP-IR also significantly (P < or = 0.001) increased (70-92%). No changes were observed in the L4-L5 DRG. PACAP-IR was reduced throughout the urothelium and detrusor smooth muscle whole mounts after SCI. These studies demonstrate changes in PACAP expression in micturition reflex pathways after SCI that may contribute to urinary bladder dysfunction or reemergence of primitive voiding reflexes after SCI. PMID:15698618

  7. Locomotor behavior of bonnet monkeys after spinal contusion injury: footprint study.

    PubMed

    Suresh Babu, R; Sunandhini, R L; Sridevi, D; Periasamy, P; Namasivayam, A

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of gait functions following spinal cord injury has been widely studied in rats, mice but limited in primates. This investigation was performed to quantitatively analyze the degree of functional recovery in bipedal locomotion in bonnet monkeys after induced spinal cord contusion. The degree of locomotor recovery was examined by measuring four gait variables, viz., tip of opposite foot (TOF), print-length (PL), toe-spread (TS), and intermediary toe-spread (IT) from the recorded hindlimb prints of monkeys using ink and paper technique. Contusion was induced in spinal cord at T12-L1 level in anaesthetized monkeys by using the Allen's weight drop technique. Postoperatively, all spinal contused animals initially showed a significant decrease in TOF, which then gradually increased for longer duration and attained the near normal values by the sixth month. On the other hand, PL, TS, and IT variables in hindlimb prints of contused animals were found to dramatically increase initially and then slowly decrease subsequently. Later there was a recovery to insignificant levels which differed from the corresponding preoperative values by the fifth month. The observations of this study suggest that the functional contributions of the spared fibers, especially in ventral and ventrolateral funiculi, through collateral sprouts or synaptic plasticity that were formed in the contused spinal cord may be responsible for substantial recovery of hindlimb movements. Moreover, based on analysis of footprint variables observed in locomotion in these subjected monkeys, we understand that spinal automatism and development of responses by afferent stimuli from outside the cord could possibly contribute to recovery of the paralyzed hindlimbs. PMID:22237918

  8. Immunosuppressant FK506: focusing on neuroprotective effects following brain and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saganová, Kamila; Gálik, Ján; Blaško, Juraj; Korimová, Andrea; Ra?eková, Eniko; Vanický, Ivo

    2012-08-21

    The secondary damage that follows central nervous system (CNS) injury is a target for neuroprotective agents aimed at tissue and function sparing. FK506, a clinically used immunosuppressant, acts neuroprotectively in rat models of brain and spinal cord injury and ischemia. Evidence of in vivo experimental studies highlights the neuroprotective role of FK506 by its direct impact on various cell populations within the CNS. The participation of FK506 in modulation of post-traumatic inflammatory processes is a further potential aspect involved in CNS neuroprotection. In this review we provide an overview of the current laboratory research focusing on the multiple effects of FK506 on neuroprotection following CNS injury. PMID:22771695

  9. Quality of Life and Related Factors Among People With Spinal Cord Injuries in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghimian, Maryam; Kashani, Fahimeh; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is one of the biggest health problems. Disabilities resulting from injuries such as spinal disability requires special attention because of their potential reduced to cause adverse effects in different systems of the body. Today, improving the Quality of Life (QOL) in patients with SCIs is an important goal of treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the QOL and related factors among people with SCIs. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 106 patients with SCI were selected through sampling based on census. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and a Short-Form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire for measuring the QOL among patients. Data were analyzed using SPSS 14 software and descriptive and inferential statistics. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean QOL in these patients was 37.1 ± 1.7 years (21 - 65 years) and mean disease duration was 7.3±6 years. The most common injury was paraplegia. Most of the patients have moderate QOL (54.7 %). The results showed a significant relationship between QOL and marital status and employment status (P < 0.05). Also, results showed a significant relationship between QOL and education levels (P = 0.002), age (P = 0.001), and duration of illness (P = 0.001).The highest and lowest scores were 64 ± 7.1 and 36 ± 5.3 for understanding General Health (GH) and role physical, respectively. Conclusions: The results show that patients with SCI have a moderate health-related QOL Determining the QOL is needed to focus on the strengths and weaknesses of patients with spinal cord injuries. Planning principles is recommended in order to reform the disability. PMID:26557639

  10. Modulation of the proteoglycan receptor PTP? promotes recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lang, BT; Cregg, JM; DePaul, MA; Tran, A; Xu, K; Dyck, SM; Madalena, KM; Brown, BP; Weng, YL; Li, S; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, S; Busch, SA; Shen, Y; Silver, J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a variety of disabilities due to limited neuronal regeneration and functional plasticity. It is well established that an upregulation of glial derived chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) within the glial scar and perineuronal net (PNN) creates a barrier to axonal regrowth and sprouting1–5. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ? (PTP?), along with its sister phosphatase Leukocyte common Antigen-Related (LAR), and the Nogo Receptors 1 and 3 (NgR) have recently been identified as receptors for the inhibitory glycosylated side chains of CSPGs6–8. We found that PTP? plays a critical role in converting growth cones into a dystrophic state by tightly stabilizing them within CSPG-rich substrates. We generated a membrane-permeable peptide mimetic of the PTP? wedge domain that binds to PTP? and relieves CSPG-mediated inhibition. Systemic delivery of this peptide over weeks restored substantial serotonergic innervation to the spinal cord below the level of injury and facilitated functional recovery of both locomotor and urinary systems. Our results add a new layer of understanding to the critical role of PTP? in mediating the growth-inhibited state of neurons due to CSPGs within the injured adult spinal cord. PMID:25470046

  11. The impact of discrete modes of spinal cord injury on bladder muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have compared the effect of spinal cord injury elicited using distinct approaches on motor and visceral function. However, the impact of such discrete modes of injury specifically on bladder muscle contractility has not been explored in detail. The goal of this study is to compare the impact of complete spinal cord transection versus clip compression at thoracic vertebra eight (T8) on bladder muscle contractility. Methods Rats underwent no treatment (Control), laminectomy (Sham, SH); complete extradural transection (TX); or cord compression with an aneurysm clip (CX). Bladders and spinal cords were harvested at 6 wk for contractility studies or histological analysis. Results Detrusor strips from TX and CX rats showed higher spontaneous activity than those from SH rats. Furthermore, the duration of the neurally-mediated contractile response was longer in TX and CX rats compared to controls and showed attenuated relaxation. No significant differences were observed between muscle strips from SH, TX or CX rats in response to KCl, ATP or phenylephrine. However, tissues from TX and CX rats showed a higher sensitivity to carbachol compared to that from SH animals. Conclusions Complete SCI in rats either by cord transection or compression elicits qualitatively similar changes in bladder muscle contractility. Whereas cord transection is arguably easier to perform experimentally, cord compression better models the situation observed clinically, such that each approach has clear advantages and limitations. PMID:23668225

  12. Compensatory muscle activation during forced respiratory tasks in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Terson de Paleville, Daniela; Lorenz, Douglas

    2015-10-01

    When lesions in the spinal cord occur, the neural activation of respiratory muscles is compromised (De Troyer and Heilporn, 1980; De Troyer et al., 1986, 1990; Estenne et al., 2000a) resulting in significant respiratory dysfunction (De Troyer and Heilporn, 1980; Linn et al., 2000, 2001; Yokoba et al., 2003). However the underlying mechanisms that contribute to this dysfunction remain unclear. The aims of this study were: (1) to investigate whether a correlation exists between pulmonary function and the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) examination scores for sensory and motor function; (2) to evaluate whether compensatory muscle activation plays a role in pulmonary function after spinal cord injury (SCI). We recorded Forced Vital Capacity (FVC); Forced Expiratory Volume in 1s (FEV1); and electromyography (EMG) of respiratory muscles during maximum respiratory tasks in 36 with SCI and 15 neurologically intact participants. Results indicate that pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1) was strongly correlated with motor and sensory scores from the ISNCSCI exam and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) was also significantly related to ISNCSCI sensory scores (?=0.73, p<.001) and moderately, but significantly correlated to motor scores (?=0.41, p=.04). After SCI, there is a compensatory recruitment of accessory muscles upper trapezius during maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and pectoralis and latissimus dorsi during MEP that is significantly higher than in non-injured (p<.001). PMID:26169572

  13. Schwann cell transplantation and descending propriospinal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ling-Xiao; Walker, Chandler; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor ability of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) to regenerate causes very limited functional recovery. Schwann cells (SCs) have been widely explored as promising donors for transplantation to promote axonal regeneration in the CNS including the spinal cord. Compared with other CNS axonal pathways, injured propriospinal tracts display the strongest regenerative response to SC transplantation. Even without providing additional neurotrophic factors, propriospinal axons can grow into the SC environment which is rarely seen in supraspinal tracts. Propriospinal tract has been found to respond to several important neurotrophic factors secreted by SCs. Therefore, the SC is considered to be one of the most promising candidates for cell-based therapies for SCI. Since many reviews have already appeared on topics of SC transplantation in SCI repair, this review will focus particularly on the rationale of SC transplantation in mediating descending propriospinal axonal regeneration as well as optimizing such regeneration by using different combinatorial strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25257034

  14. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just promises?

    PubMed Central

    Pêgo, Ana Paula; Kubinova, Sarka; Cizkova, Dasa; Vanicky, Ivo; Mar, Fernando Milhazes; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Sykova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury triggers a complex set of events that lead to tissue healing without the restoration of normal function due to the poor regenerative capacity of the spinal cord. Nevertheless, current knowledge about the intrinsic regenerative ability of central nervous system axons, when in a supportive environment, has made the prospect of treating spinal cord injury a reality. Among the range of strategies under investigation, cell-based therapies offer the most promising results, due to the multifactorial roles that these cells can fulfil. However, the best cell source is still a matter of debate, as are clinical issues that include the optimal cell dose as well as the timing and route of administration. In this context, the role of biomaterials is gaining importance. These can not only act as vehicles for the administered cells but also, in the case of chronic lesions, can be used to fill the permanent cyst, thus creating a more favourable and conducive environment for axonal regeneration in addition to serving as local delivery systems of therapeutic agents to improve the regenerative milieu. Some of the candidate molecules for the future are discussed in view of the knowledge derived from studying the mechanisms that facilitate the intrinsic regenerative capacity of central nervous system neurons. The future challenge for the multidisciplinary teams working in the field is to translate the knowledge acquired in basic research into effective combinatorial therapies to be applied in the clinic. PMID:22805417

  15. Estimation of Resting Energy Expenditure in Children With Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Pamela L; Agena, Sarah M; Vogel, Lawrence C; Foley, Sharon; Anderson, Caroline J

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Resting energy expenditure (REE) is the amount of energy needed to maintain energy balance. Prediction equations exist to estimate REE for adults. Recommended dietary allowances (RDA) can be used to estimate energy needs for children but may not be suitable for children with spinal cord injury (SCI). Limited information is available on energy expenditure of children with SCI. Research is needed to determine a method to estimate energy needs for children with SCI. This research project was designed to determine REE in children with SCI who attended an SCI clinic at a children's hospital, determine variables that are correlated to REE in children with SCI, and determine a regression equation to estimate REE in children with SCI. Methods: A sample of convenience was obtained from children attending the SCI clinic at Shriners Hospitals for Children–Chicago. The REE was measured after a 4-hour fast using a portable hand-held MedGem device to perform indirect calorimetry. Data including height, weight, age, months since injury, level of injury, gender, race, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Motor Score, ASIA Impairment Score, and body mass index were obtained as covariates. Results: Regression equations to predict REE were developed for boys and girls. The REE varied significantly from results obtained using both RDA and the Harris-Benedict equation. Height and level of injury were the only variables that correlated with REE in this sample. Conclusions: Measured REE was lower than the results of prediction equations. A regression equation was developed to estimate REE in children with SCI based on height and level of injury. Further validation studies are needed. PMID:17874692

  16. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation. PMID:18057503

  17. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation.

  18. Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stimulation of the spinal cord has been shown to have great potential for improving function after motor deficits caused by injury or pathological conditions. Using a wide range of animal models, many studies have shown that stimulation applied to the neural networks intrinsic to the spinal cord can result in a dramatic improvement of motor ability, even allowing an animal to step and stand after a complete spinal cord transection. Clinical use of this technology, however, has been slow to develop due to the invasive nature of the implantation procedures, the lack of versatility in conventional stimulation technology, and the difficulty of ascertaining specific sites of stimulation that would provide optimal amelioration of the motor deficits. Moreover, the development of tools available to control precise stimulation chronically via biocompatible electrodes has been limited. In this paper, we outline the development of this technology and its use in the spinal rat model, demonstrating the ability to identify and stimulate specific sites of the spinal cord to produce discrete motor behaviors in spinal rats using this array. Methods We have designed a chronically implantable, rapidly switchable, high-density platinum based multi-electrode array that can be used to stimulate at 1–100 Hz and 1–10 V in both monopolar and bipolar configurations to examine the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of spinal cord epidural stimulation in complete spinal cord transected rats. Results In this paper, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of using high-resolution stimulation parameters in the context of improving motor recovery after a spinal cord injury. We observed that rats whose hindlimbs were paralyzed can stand and step when specific sets of electrodes of the array are stimulated tonically (40 Hz). Distinct patterns of stepping and standing were produced by stimulation of different combinations of electrodes on the array located at specific spinal cord levels and by specific stimulation parameters, i.e., stimulation frequency and intensity, and cathode/anode orientation. The array also was used to assess functional connectivity between the cord dorsum to interneuronal circuits and specific motor pools via evoked potentials induced at 1 Hz stimulation in the absence of any anesthesia. Conclusions Therefore the high density electrode array allows high spatial resolution and the ability to selectively activate different neural pathways within the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord to facilitate standing and stepping in adult spinal rats and provides the capability to evoke motor potentials and thus a means for assessing connectivity between sensory circuits and specific motor pools and muscles. PMID:23336733

  19. A nutrient combination designed to enhance synapse formation and function improves outcome in experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Pallier, Patrick N; Poddighe, Laura; Zbarsky, Virginia; Kostusiak, Milosz; Choudhury, Rasall; Hart, Thomas; Burguillos, Miguel A; Musbahi, Omar; Groenendijk, Martine; Sijben, John W; deWilde, Martijn C; Quartu, Marina; Priestley, John V; Michael-Titus, Adina T

    2015-10-01

    Spinal cord injury leads to major neurological impairment for which there is currently no effective treatment. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of Fortasyn® Connect in Alzheimer's disease. Fortasyn® Connect is a specific multi-nutrient combination containing DHA, EPA, choline, uridine monophosphate, phospholipids, and various vitamins. We examined the effect of Fortasyn® Connect in a rat compression model of spinal cord injury. For 4 or 9weeks following the injury, rats were fed either a control diet or a diet enriched with low, medium, or high doses of Fortasyn® Connect. The medium-dose Fortasyn® Connect-enriched diet showed significant efficacy in locomotor recovery after 9weeks of supplementation, along with protection of spinal cord tissue (increased neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival, decreased microglial activation, and preserved axonal integrity). Rats fed the high-dose Fortasyn® Connect-enriched diet for 4weeks showed a much greater enhancement of locomotor recovery, with a faster onset, than rats fed the medium dose. Bladder function recovered quicker in these rats than in rats fed the control diet. Their spinal cord tissues showed a smaller lesion, reduced neuronal and oligodendrocyte loss, decreased neuroinflammatory response, reduced astrocytosis and levels of inhibitory chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, and better preservation of serotonergic axons than those of rats fed the control diet. These results suggest that this multi-nutrient preparation has a marked therapeutic potential in spinal cord injury, and raise the possibility that this original approach could be used to support spinal cord injured patients. PMID:26388399

  20. A Case Report of Spinal Cord Injury Patient From a High Velocity Gunshot Wound to the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyong; Kim, Je Ho

    2013-01-01

    We report on operational and rehabilitation management, as well as the outcome, of a patient who with sustained spinal cord injury from a high velocity gunshot wound to the lumbar spine. More specifically, a patient with a gunshot wound to the spine is more likely to sustain a complete injury and have a poor prognosis. As such, there should be concerns regarding associated and extended injuries related to bullet fragmentation as well as the possibility of long-term sequelae. PMID:23526072

  1. Function of the nucleus accumbens in motor control during recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Masahiro; Kato, Kenji; Kunieda, Takeharu; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Onoe, Hirotaka; Isa, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yukio

    2015-10-01

    Motivation facilitates recovery after neuronal damage, but its mechanism is elusive. It is generally thought that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) regulates motivation-driven effort but is not involved in the direct control of movement. Using causality analysis, we identified the flow of activity from the NAc to the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) during the recovery of dexterous finger movements after spinal cord injury at the cervical level in macaque monkeys. Furthermore, reversible pharmacological inactivation of the NAc during the early recovery period diminished high-frequency oscillatory activity in the SMC, which was accompanied by a transient deficit of amelioration in finger dexterity obtained by rehabilitation. These results demonstrate that during recovery after spinal damage, the NAc up-regulates the high-frequency activity of the SMC and is directly involved in the control of finger movements. PMID:26430122

  2. Review of transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2013-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition often resulting in paralysis, yet currently there is no effective treatment. Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for promoting tissue repair after SCI. Stem cells offer a renewable source of cells with inherent plasticity for tissue regeneration. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) are multipotent cells that self-renew and are committed to the neural lineage, and thus, they are especially suited to SCI repair. NSPCs may differentiate into neural cells after transplantation into the injured spinal cord, replacing lost or damaged cells, providing trophic support, restoring connectivity, and facilitating regeneration. Here, we review experimental studies and considerations for clinical translation of NSPC transplantation for SCI. PMID:23928260

  3. Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacokinetic Studies of a Synthetic Compound for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Lillo, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The studies of drugs that could constitute a palliative to spinal cord injury (SCI) are a continuous and increasing demand in biomedicine field from developed societies. Recently we described the chemical synthesis and antiglioma activity of synthetic glycosides. A synthetic sulfated glycolipid (here IG20) has shown chemical stability, solubility in polar solvents, and high inhibitory capacity over glioma growth. We have used mass spectrometry (MS) to monitor IG20 (m/z = 550.3) in cells and tissues of the central nervous system (CNS) that are involved in SCI recovery. IG20 was detected by MS in serum and homogenates from CNS tissue of rats, though in the latter a previous deproteinization step was required. The pharmacokinetic parameters of serum clearance at 24?h and half-life at 4?h were determined for synthetic glycoside in the adult rat using MS. A local administration of the drug near of spinal lesion site is proposed. PMID:26090386

  4. Expression and Cellular Distribution of Ubiquitin in Response to Injury in the Developing Spinal Cord of Monodelphis domestica

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Natassya M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Steer, David L.; Truettner, Jessie S.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Smith, A. Ian; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to postnatal day P35 in control opossums (Monodelphis domestica) and in response to complete spinal transection (T10) at P7, when axonal growth through site of injury occurs, and P28 when this is no longer possible. Cords were collected 1 or 7 days after injury, with age-matched controls and segments rostral to lesion were studied. Following spinal injury ubiquitin levels (western blotting) appeared reduced compared to controls especially one day after injury at P28. In contrast, after injury mRNA expression (qRT-PCR) was slightly increased at P7 but decreased at P28. Changes in isoelectric point of separated ubiquitin indicated possible post-translational modifications. Cellular distribution demonstrated a developmental shift between earliest (P8) and latest (P35) ages examined, from a predominantly cytoplasmic immunoreactivity to a nuclear expression; staining level and shift to nuclear staining was more pronounced following injury, except 7 days after transection at P28. After injury at P7 immunostaining increased in neurons and additionally in oligodendrocytes at P28. Mass spectrometry showed two ubiquitin bands; the heavier was identified as a fusion product, likely to be an ubiquitin precursor. Apparent changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23626776

  5. Connexin 50 Expression in Ependymal Stem Progenitor Cells after Spinal Cord Injury Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; Alastrue-Agudo, Ana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels included in the family of Connexins (Cx) help to control cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors. Here we explored the role of Connexin 50 (Cx50) in cell fate modulation of adult spinal cord derived neural precursors located in the ependymal canal (epSPC). epSPC from non-injured animals showed high expression levels of Cx50 compared to epSPC from animals with spinal cord injury (SCI) (epSPCi). When epSPC or epSPCi were induced to spontaneously differentiate in vitro we found that Cx50 favors glial cell fate, since higher expression levels, endogenous or by over-expression of Cx50, augmented the expression of the astrocyte marker GFAP and impaired the neuronal marker Tuj1. Cx50 was found in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of glial cells, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte-derived cells. Similar expression patterns were found in primary cultures of mature astrocytes. In addition, opposite expression profile for nuclear Cx50 was observed when epSPC and activated epSPCi were conducted to differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes, suggesting a different role for this ion channel in spinal cord beyond cell-to-cell communication. In vivo detection of Cx50 by immunohistochemistry showed a defined location in gray matter in non-injured tissues and at the epicenter of the injury after SCI. epSPCi transplantation, which accelerates locomotion regeneration by a neuroprotective effect after acute SCI is associated with a lower signal of Cx50 within the injured area, suggesting a minor or detrimental contribution of this ion channel in spinal cord regeneration by activated epSPCi. PMID:26561800

  6. Connexin 50 Expression in Ependymal Stem Progenitor Cells after Spinal Cord Injury Activation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; Alastrue-Agudo, Ana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels included in the family of Connexins (Cx) help to control cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors. Here we explored the role of Connexin 50 (Cx50) in cell fate modulation of adult spinal cord derived neural precursors located in the ependymal canal (epSPC). epSPC from non-injured animals showed high expression levels of Cx50 compared to epSPC from animals with spinal cord injury (SCI) (epSPCi). When epSPC or epSPCi were induced to spontaneously differentiate in vitro we found that Cx50 favors glial cell fate, since higher expression levels, endogenous or by over-expression of Cx50, augmented the expression of the astrocyte marker GFAP and impaired the neuronal marker Tuj1. Cx50 was found in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of glial cells, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte-derived cells. Similar expression patterns were found in primary cultures of mature astrocytes. In addition, opposite expression profile for nuclear Cx50 was observed when epSPC and activated epSPCi were conducted to differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes, suggesting a different role for this ion channel in spinal cord beyond cell-to-cell communication. In vivo detection of Cx50 by immunohistochemistry showed a defined location in gray matter in non-injured tissues and at the epicenter of the injury after SCI. epSPCi transplantation, which accelerates locomotion regeneration by a neuroprotective effect after acute SCI is associated with a lower signal of Cx50 within the injured area, suggesting a minor or detrimental contribution of this ion channel in spinal cord regeneration by activated epSPCi. PMID:26561800

  7. Wnts Are Expressed in the Spinal Cord of Adult Mice and Are Differentially Induced after Injury

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Carlos; Fernández-Martos, Carmen María; Shields, Shannon D.; Arenas, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Wnt family of proteins plays key roles during central nervous system development and has been involved in several neuropathologies during adulthood, including spinal cord injury (SCI). However, Wnts expression knowledge is relatively limited during adult stages. Here, we sought to define the Wnt family expression pattern after SCI in adult mice by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Under physiological conditions, the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of most Wnt ligands, inhibitors, receptors, and coreceptors are constitutively expressed in healthy adult mice. After dorsal hemisection, we found significant time-dependent variations, with a prominent up-regulation of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1). IHC against Frizzled (Fz) 1 and Fz4, as representatives of late and acute up-regulated receptors, showed a differential expression in the uninjured spinal cord of Fz1 by neurons and oligodendrocytes and Fz4 by astrocytes. After injury, both receptors were maintained in the same type of cells. Finally, by using BATgal reporter mice, our results revealed active ?-catenin signaling in neurons of the dorsal horn and cells of the central canal of uninjured spinal cords, besides a lack of additional SCI-induced activation. In conclusion, we demonstrate Wnt expression in the adult spinal cord of mice that is modulated by SCI, which differs from that previously described in rats. Further, Fz receptors are differentially expressed by neurons and glial cells, suggestive for cell-specific patterns and thus diverse physiological roles. Further studies will help toward in-depth characterization of the role of all Wnt factors and receptors described and eventually allow for the design of novel therapies. PMID:24367909

  8. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosub E; Corcos, Daniel M; Hornby, T George

    2015-07-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-? motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P < 0.001). H-reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-? motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  9. Do risk perceptions explain sex differences in community integration and participation after spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Dillaway, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe how men and women with spinal cord injury (SCI) rate the risks posed by a set of everyday activities measured using the Risk Inventory for persons with Spinal Cord Injury (RISCI), and to examine whether sex differences are related to community integration and participation. Design Cohort study. Setting Metropolitan Detroit. Participants One hundred and forty community-dwelling white and African-American men and women with SCI. Outcome measures RISCI scores, community integration, and level of and satisfaction with community participation. Results Study participants were just over age 40 years, and had been living with SCI for 10.8 years. One-third were women and 40% were African-American. Results showed women with SCI had higher RISCI scores (perceived more dangers) on every item on the RISCI Scale (P < 0.001). The items perceived to hold greatest risk were revealing personal information to others, going on a blind date, and going for a roll (“walk”) alone after dark. Women with higher RISCI scores reported lower community integration (P < 0.05) and lower levels of and lower satisfaction with community participation (P < 0.01). For men, however, RISCI scores were mainly unrelated (except for community integration) to participation measures. Conclusion More research is needed to determine whether the levels of risk perceived by women are warranted and whether a sense of vulnerability for women with SCI is unnecessarily limiting their chances at “a good life” after injury. PMID:24090195

  10. Lessons for spinal cord injury rehabilitation taken from adult developmental psychology: 2011 Essie Morgan Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Background/objective Developmental phases affect how individuals cope with and challenge threats to self-concept, health and functioning. Understanding prominent models of adult psychological development can help spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D) rehabilitation professionals facilitate positive change and growth. Design Author's theoretical model informed by literature review and personal experience. Setting Veterans administration (VA) medical center interdisciplinary outpatient clinic providing primary and specialty care to veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders. Conclusion Threats to life expectations, health, well-being, identity, and other aspects of self create crises that can result in psychopathology or psychological growth. SCI/D can present multiple threats across the lifespan. For example, self-image, ability to perform various activities, ability to feel attractive, and even life itself may be challenged by SCI/D or its complications. Threats may be perceived at the time of injury or onset of symptoms. Also, as the injured body declines further over time, complications can cause significant temporary or permanent functional decline. Individuals interpret each of these threats in the context of current developmental needs. How people cope is influenced by developmental factors and personality traits. An integrated model of adult psychological development based on the works of Erikson, Gutmann, and Baltes is related to the literature on coping with SCI/D. This model provides insights that interdisciplinary rehabilitation teams may use to facilitate personal growth, optimal functioning, and physical health as adults with SCI negotiate normal developmental challenges throughout their lifetimes. PMID:22507022

  11. Decentralized cardiovascular autonomic control and cognitive deficits in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wecht, Jill M.; Bauman, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in motor and sensory impairments that can be identified with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS). Although, SCI may disrupt autonomic neural transmission, less is understood regarding the clinical impact of decentralized autonomic control. Cardiovascular regulation may be altered following SCI and the degree of impairment may or may not relate to the level of AIS injury classification. In general, persons with lesions above T1 present with bradycardia, hypotension, and orthostatic hypotension; functional changes which may interfere with rehabilitation efforts. Although many individuals with SCI above T1 remain overtly asymptomatic to hypotension, we have documented deficits in memory and attention processing speed in hypotensive individuals with SCI compared to a normotensive SCI cohort. Reduced resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and diminished CBF responses to cognitive testing relate to test performance in hypotensive non-SCI, and preliminary evidence suggests a similar association in individuals with SCI. Persons with paraplegia below T7 generally present with a normal cardiovascular profile; however, our group and others have documented persistently elevated heart rate and increased arterial stiffness. In the non-SCI literature there is evidence supporting a link between increased arterial stiffness and cognitive deficits. Preliminary evidence suggests increased incidence of cognitive impairment in individuals with paraplegia, which we believe may relate to adverse cardiovascular changes. This report reviews relevant literature and discusses findings related to the possible association between decentralized cardiovascular autonomic control and cognitive dysfunction in persons with SCI. PMID:23809520

  12. Neuroprotective Effect of Erythropoietin in Postoperation Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Nekoui, Alireza; Del Carmen Escalante Tresierra, Violeta; Abdolmohammadi, Sadegh; Shedid, Daniel; Blaise, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: New research shows shown that erythropoietin has neuro-protective effects. In preclinical trial and human clinical trials, it was demonstrated that erythropoietin is effective treatment for spinal cord injury. Early administration of medications after injury increases the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing an improved outcome. Case presentation: A 42-year-old female patient presented with gait instability and progressive weakness in her right leg over a 6-year period. She was diagnosed as myelomalacia and was candidate for cervical discectomy. After surgery, she suffered from right hemiplegia due to spinal cord injury that did not respond well to routine treatment. Darbepoetin alpha (Aranesp) 100 mcg, subcutaneous daily for three days, was added to the patient’s treatment seven days after trauma and resulted in rapid improvement. The patient recovered progressively and was discharged from the hospital ten days after erythropoietin therapy. Conclusions: This case report supports the beneficial role of erythropoietin in function, maintenance, and recovery of neurons. Erythropoietin is a double-edge sword, as long-term erythropoietin therapy has some complications, like thromboembolism and stroke. Recent studies suggested that erythropoietin should be given as single high dose to exert a rapid neuro-protective effect with minimal hematopoietic side effects. We believe that the effects and other adverse consequences of erythropoietin and its non-erythropoietic derivatives should be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26705520

  13. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  14. A novel closed-body model of spinal cord injury caused by high-pressure air blasts produces extensive axonal injury and motor impairments.

    PubMed

    Del Mar, Nobel; von Buttlar, Xinyu; Yu, Angela S; Guley, Natalie H; Reiner, Anton; Honig, Marcia G

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is thought to be the basis of the functional impairments stemming from mild traumatic brain injury. To examine how axons are damaged by traumatic events, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports activities, or explosive blasts, we have taken advantage of the spinal cord with its extensive white matter tracts. We developed a closed-body model of spinal cord injury in mice whereby high-pressure air blasts targeted to lower thoracic vertebral levels produce tensile, compressive, and shear forces within the parenchyma of the spinal cord and thereby cause extensive axonal injury. Markers of cytoskeletal integrity showed that spinal cord axons exhibited three distinct pathologies: microtubule breakage, neurofilament compaction, and calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown. The dorsally situated axons of the corticospinal tract primarily exhibited microtubule breakage, whereas all three pathologies were common in the lateral and ventral white matter. Individual axons typically demonstrated only one of the three pathologies during the first 24h after blast injury, suggesting that the different perturbations are initiated independently of one another. For the first few days after blast, neurofilament compaction was frequently accompanied by autophagy, and subsequent to that, by the fragmentation of degenerating axons. TuJ1 immunolabeling and mice with YFP-reporter labeling each revealed more extensive microtubule breakage than did ?APP immunolabeling, raising doubts about the sensitivity of this standard approach for assessing axonal injury. Although motor deficits were mild and largely transient, some aspects of motor function gradually worsened over several weeks, suggesting that a low level of axonal degeneration continued past the initial wave. Our model can help provide further insight into how to intervene in the processes by which initial axonal damage culminates in axonal degeneration, to improve outcomes after traumatic injury. Importantly, our findings of extensive axonal injury also caution that repeated trauma is likely to have cumulative adverse consequences for both brain and spinal cord. PMID:25957630

  15. A novel closed-body model of spinal cord injury caused by high-pressure air blasts produces extensive axonal injury and motor impairments

    PubMed Central

    del Mar, Nobel; von Buttlar, Xinyu; Yu, Angela S.; Guley, Natalie H.; Reiner, Anton; Honig, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is thought to be the basis of the functional impairments stemming from mild traumatic brain injury. To examine how axons are damaged by traumatic events, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports activities, or explosive blasts, we have taken advantage of the spinal cord with its extensive white matter tracts. We developed a closed-body model of spinal cord injury in mice whereby high-pressure air blasts targeted to lower thoracic vertebral levels produce tensile, compressive, and shear forces within the parenchyma of the spinal cord and thereby cause extensive axonal injury. Markers of cytoskeletal integrity showed that spinal cord axons exhibited three distinct pathologies: microtubule breakage, neurofilament compaction, and calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown. The dorsally situated axons of the corticospinal tract primarily exhibited microtubule breakage, whereas all three pathologies were common in the lateral and ventral white matter. Individual axons typically demonstrated only one of the three pathologies during the first 24 h after blast injury, suggesting that the different perturbations are initiated independently of one another. For the first few days after blast, neurofilament compaction was frequently accompanied by autophagy, and subsequent to that, by the fragmentation of degenerating axons. TuJ1 immunolabeling and mice with YFP-reporter labeling each revealed more extensive microtubule breakage than did ?APP immunolabeling, raising doubts about the sensitivity of this standard approach for assessing axonal injury. Although motor deficits were mild and largely transient, some aspects of motor function gradually worsened over several weeks, suggesting that a low level of axonal degeneration continued past the initial wave. Our model can help provide further insight into how to intervene in the processes by which initial axonal damage culminates in axonal degeneration, to improve outcomes after traumatic injury. Importantly, our findings of extensive axonal injury also caution that repeated trauma is likely to have cumulative adverse consequences for both brain and spinal cord. PMID:25957630

  16. Alcohol intoxication and its effects on traumatic spinal cord injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Clifford L; Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Hodes, Jonathan E; Kong, Maiying; Boakye, Maxwell

    2014-05-01

    There are sparse data regarding the impact of alcohol on in-hospital complications associated with traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs). We set out to quantify the impact of alcohol on TSCI outcomes and its influence on health care cost and utilization. The National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Data Set version 7.2 (2000-2006) was utilized to gather data between 2007 and 2009. We extracted cases of TSCI (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 806.xx) without concurrent traumatic brain injury. Outcomes of interest were mortality, length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) days, ventilator days, and complications. Continuous outcomes such as LOS, ICU days, and ventilator days were analyzed using linear regression. Risk-adjusted analysis of risk factors for mortality and complication rates were performed using multiple logistic regression. Of the 10,611 persons identified in the NTDB, alcohol was present in approximately one fifth of all cases (20.76%). A majority of TSCI patients were young (mean age, 39 years) Caucasian (65.07%) males (75.93%). Blunt injury was the most common mechanism of injury. The presence of alcohol did not significantly affect mortality or neurological complications. Alcohol in the blood was associated with extended LOS, longer ICU stays, more days spent ventilated, and increased risk of all-type complications. Further, there was a statistically significant association with the presence alcohol and increased risk for pulmonary, pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, and ulcer/skin complications. Alcohol intoxication is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity. The significant association with in-hospital complications increases health resource utilization after spinal cord injury. PMID:24617326

  17. Delayed inflammatory mRNA and protein expression after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces secondary tissue damage that is associated with inflammation. We have previously demonstrated that inflammation-related gene expression after SCI occurs in two waves - an initial cluster that is acutely and transiently up-regulated within 24 hours, and a more delayed cluster that peaks between 72 hours and 7 days. Here we extend the microarray analysis of these gene clusters up to 6 months post-SCI. Methods Adult male rats were subjected to mild, moderate or severe spinal cord contusion injury at T9 using a well-characterized weight-drop model. Tissue from the lesion epicenter was obtained 4 hours, 24 hours, 7 days, 28 days, 3 months or 6 months post-injury and processed for microarray analysis and protein expression. Results Anchor gene analysis using C1qB revealed a cluster of genes that showed elevated expression through 6 months post-injury, including galectin-3, p22PHOX, gp91PHOX, CD53 and progranulin. The expression of these genes occurred primarily in microglia/macrophage cells and was confirmed at the protein level using both immunohistochemistry and western blotting. As p22PHOX and gp91PHOX are components of the NADPH oxidase enzyme, enzymatic activity and its role in SCI were assessed and NADPH oxidase activity was found to be significantly up-regulated through 6 months post-injury. Further, treating rats with the nonspecific, irreversible NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodinium (DPI) reduced both lesion volume and expression of chronic gene cluster proteins one month after trauma. Conclusions These data demonstrate that inflammation-related genes are chronically up-regulated after SCI and may contribute to further tissue loss. PMID:21975064

  18. Transforming growth factor ? transforms astrocytes to a growth-supportive phenotype after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    White, Robin E; Rao, Meghan; Gensel, John C; McTigue, Dana M; Kaspar, Brian K; Jakeman, Lyn B

    2011-10-19

    Astrocytes are both detrimental and beneficial for repair and recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). These dynamic cells are primary contributors to the growth-inhibitory glial scar, yet they are also neuroprotective and can form growth-supportive bridges on which axons traverse. We have shown that intrathecal administration of transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) to the contused mouse spinal cord can enhance astrocyte infiltration and axonal growth within the injury site, but the mechanisms of these effects are not well understood. The present studies demonstrate that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is upregulated primarily by astrocytes and glial progenitors early after SCI. TGF? directly activates the EGFR on these cells in vitro, inducing their proliferation, migration, and transformation to a phenotype that supports robust neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of TGF? in vivo by intraparenchymal adeno-associated virus injection adjacent to the injury site enhances cell proliferation, alters astrocyte distribution, and facilitates increased axonal penetration at the rostral lesion border. To determine whether endogenous EGFR activation is required after injury, SCI was also performed on Velvet (C57BL/6J-Egfr(Vel)/J) mice, a mutant strain with defective EGFR activity. The affected mice exhibited malformed glial borders, larger lesions, and impaired recovery of function, indicating that intrinsic EGFR activation is necessary for neuroprotection and normal glial scar formation after SCI. By further stimulating precursor proliferation and modifying glial activation to promote a growth-permissive environment, controlled stimulation of EGFR at the lesion border may be considered in the context of future strategies to enhance endogenous cellular repair after injury. PMID:22016551

  19. Transforming Growth Factor Alpha (TGF?) Transforms Astrocytes to a Growth Supportive Phenotype after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Robin E.; Rao, Meghan; Gensel, John C.; McTigue, Dana M.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes are both detrimental and beneficial for repair and recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). These dynamic cells are primary contributors to the growth-inhibitory glial scar, yet they are also neuroprotective and can form growth-supportive bridges upon which axons traverse. We have shown that intrathecal administration of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF?) to the contused mouse spinal cord can enhance astrocyte infiltration and axonal growth within the injury site, but the mechanisms of these effects are not well understood. The present studies demonstrate that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is upregulated primarily by astrocytes and glial progenitors early after SCI. TGF? directly activates the EGFR on these cells in vitro, inducing their proliferation, migration, and transformation to a phenotype that supports robust neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of TGF? in vivo by intraparenchymal adeno-associated virus injection adjacent to the injury site enhances cell proliferation, alters astrocyte distribution and facilitates increased axonal penetration at the rostral lesion border. To determine if endogenous EGFR activation is required after injury, SCI was also performed on Velvet (C57BL/6J-EgfrVel/J) mice, a mutant strain with defective EGFR activity. The affected mice exhibited malformed glial borders, larger lesions, and impaired recovery of function, indicating that intrinsic EGFR activation is necessary for neuroprotection and normal glial scar formation after SCI. By further stimulating precursor proliferation and modifying glial activation to promote a growth permissive environment, controlled stimulation of EGFR at the lesion border may be considered in the context of future strategies to enhance endogenous cellular repair following injury. PMID:22016551

  20. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing, Zin Z.; Milman, Brian D.; Vanscoy, Jennifer E.; Seidlits, Stephanie K.; Grill, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  1. Spinal cord injury causes plasticity in a subpopulation of lamina I GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kimberly J; Hochman, Shawn

    2008-07-01

    Dysfunction of the spinal GABAergic system has been implicated in pain syndromes following spinal cord injury (SCI). Since lamina I is involved in nociceptive and thermal signaling, we characterized the effects of chronic SCI on the cellular properties of its GABAergic neurons fluorescently identified in spinal slices from GAD67-GFP transgenic mice. Whole cell recordings were obtained from the lumbar cord of 13- to 17-day-old mice, including those having had a thoracic segment (T8-11) removed 6-9 days prior to experiments. Following chronic SCI, the distribution, incidence, and firing classes of GFP+ cells remained similar to controls, and there were minimal changes in membrane properties in cells that responded to current injection with a single spike. In contrast, cells displaying tonic/initial burst firing had more depolarized membrane potentials, increased steady-state outward currents, and increased spike heights. Moreover, higher firing frequencies and spontaneous plateau potentials were much more prevalent after chronic SCI, and these changes occurred predominantly in cells displaying a tonic firing pattern. Persistent inward currents (PICs) were observed in a similar fraction of cells from spinal transects and may have contributed to these plateaus. Persistent Na+ and L-type Ca2+ channels likely contributed to the currents as both were identified pharmacologically. In conclusion, chronic SCI induces a plastic response in a subpopulation of lamina I GABAergic interneurons. Alterations are directed toward amplifying neuronal responsiveness. How these changes alter spinal sensory integration and whether they contribute to sensory dysfunction remains to be elucidated. PMID:18480373

  2. Adrenergic receptors modulate motoneuron excitability, sensory synaptic transmission and muscle spasms after chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rank, M M; Murray, K C; Stephens, M J; D'Amico, J; Gorassini, M A; Bennett, D J

    2011-01-01

    The brain stem provides most of the noradrenaline (NA) present in the spinal cord, which functions to both increase spinal motoneuron excitability and inhibit sensory afferent transmission to motoneurons (excitatory postsynaptic potentials; EPSPs). NA increases motoneuron excitability by facilitating calcium-mediated persistent inward currents (Ca PICs) that are crucial for sustained motoneuron firing. Spinal cord transection eliminates most NA and accordingly causes an immediate loss of PICs and emergence of exaggerated EPSPs. However, with time PICs recover, and thus the exaggerated EPSPs can then readily trigger these PICs, which in turn produce muscle spasms. Here we examined the contribution of adrenergic receptors to spasms in chronic spinal rats. Selective activation of the ?(1A) adrenergic receptor with the agonists methoxamine or A61603 facilitated Ca PIC and spasm activity, recorded both in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, the ?(2) receptor agonists clonidine and UK14303 did not facilitate Ca PICs, but did decrease the EPSPs that trigger spasms. Moreover, in the absence of agonists, spasms recorded in vivo were inhibited by the ?(1) receptor antagonists WB4010, prazosin, and REC15/2739, and increased by the ?(2) receptor antagonist RX821001, suggesting that both adrenergic receptors were endogenously active. In contrast, spasm activity recorded in the isolated in vitro cord was inhibited only by the ?(1) antagonists that block constitutive receptor activity (activity in the absence of NA; inverse agonists, WB4010 and prazosin) and not by the neutral antagonist REC15/2739, which only blocks conventional NA-mediated receptor activity. RX821001 had no effect in vitro even though it is an ?(2) receptor inverse agonist. Our results suggest that after chronic spinal cord injury Ca PICs and spasms are facilitated, in part, by constitutive activity in ?(1) adrenergic receptors. Additionally, peripherally derived NA (or similar ligand) activates both ?(1) and ?(2) adrenergic receptors, controlling PICs and EPSPs, respectively. PMID:21047936

  3. Four weeks of functional electrical stimulated cycling after spinal cord injury: a clinical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Daniel; Leichtfried, Veronika; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and the effects of functional electrical stimulated cycling (FES cycling) in patients with spinal cord injury during their rehabilitation in a special acute care unit. Thirty patients [10 with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade A, three with AIS grade B, 15 with AIS grade C, two with AIS grade D] aged 44±15.5 years and 2 (median) (interquartile range, 1.0-4.25) months after spinal cord injury were included in the study. The patients participated in a 20-min FES-cycling program 2 days per week for 4 weeks during their acute inpatient rehabilitation. The influence on muscle cross-section, muscle and leg circumference, spasticity, and the walking ability parameter (distance, time, aids) was measured. Muscle stimulation intensity and output parameters (pedalling time and distance) were also recorded. Spasticity decreased during hip abduction and adduction (70 and 98.1%, respectively). Spasticity during knee flexion and knee extension decreased by 66.8 and 76.6%, and a decrease was found during dorsal foot extension (67.8%; for all, P<0.05). Presession-postsession comparisons showed that after 4 weeks of FES cycling, an increase in the circumference of the cross-sectional area of 15.3% on the left and of 17% on the right m. rectus femoris could be observed in group AIS A+B. In the AIS C+D group, the circumference of the left m. rectus femoris increased by 25% and that of the right m. rectus femoris by 21% (for all, P<0.05). The results of the study show that FES cycling in combination with function-oriented physiotherapy and occupational therapy can have a positive influence on spasticity, walking ability, and muscular reactivation. It seems to support circulatory processes within the rehabilitation of paraplegics already after a 4-week intervention. PMID:24802976

  4. Identifying and Classifying Quality of Life Tools for Assessing Spasticity After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hitzig, Sander L.; Flett, Heather; Noreau, Luc; Craven, B. Catharine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify and classify tools for assessing the influence of spasticity on quality of life (QOL) after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed CINAHL and PsycInfo) were searched for studies published between 1975 and 2012. Dijkers’s theoretical framework on QOL was used to classify tools as either objective or subjective measures of QOL. Results: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Identified objective measures that were used to assess the influence of spasticity on QOL included the Short Form-36 (SF-36) the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Health Utilities Index-III (HUI-III). Subjective measures included the Quality of Life Index–SCI Version III (QLI-SCI) Life Situation Questionnaire–Revised (LSQ-R) Reciprocal Support Scale (RSS) Profile of Mood States (POMS) Spinal Cord Injury Spasticity Evaluation Tool (SCI-SET) and the Patient Reported Impact of Spasticity Measure (PRISM). A number of tools proved either to be insensitive to the presence of spasticity (QLI-SCI) or yielded mixed (SF-36) or weak (RSS LSQ-R) results. Tools that were sensitive to spasticity had limited psychometric data for use in the SCI population (HUI-III SIP POMS) although 2 were developed specifically for assessing spasticity on daily life post SCI (SCI-SET PRISM). Conclusions: Two condition-specific subjective measures the SCI-SET and PRISM emerged as the most promising tools for the assessment of spasticity impact on QOL after SCI. Further research should focus on establishing the psychometric properties of these measures for use in the SCI population.Key words: outcome measurement quality of life spasticity spinal cord injury PMID:25484567

  5. Dexmedetomidine alleviates the spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury through blocking mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Zhi; Tao, Jie-Ru; Liu, Hua-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the neuro-protective effects of dexmedetomidine (dex) on I/R-induced spinal injury and potential mechanisms. Methods: sprague-Dawley rats in the treatment group received intraperitoneal injections of 25 mg/kg dexmedetomidine, MC stabilizer cromolyn (100 mg/kg), MCs stimuliser compound 48/80 (80 mg/kg), PBS at 24 h befor IR. Underwent 5 minutes of aortic occlusion via median sternotomy, functional scores were recorded at 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after reperfusion. Additionally, 3 mice underwent sham surgery with sternotomy and dissection of the aorta and subclavian artery with no occlusion. Spinal cords were examined for protein kinase B (AKT), CREB, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) following treatment alone or ischemia-reperfusion surgery. Collected the serum to observe the expression of pro-inflammation cytokines (TNF-?, INF-? and IL-1?) and anti-inflammation cytokines (TGF-?, IL-10 and IL-6). Then the MCs were harvested to test the expression surface molecular of Fc?R and MCs’ degranulation. Results: Pretreated the rats with dexmedetomidine has higher neurologic function at all time points after I/R injury. We collected the serum of rats then detected the pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-?, INF-? and IL-1? levels and anti-inflammation cytokinses TGF-?, IL-10 and IL-6 levels, found that the pro-inflammation cytokines of dexmedetomidine group was decreased whereas the anti-inflammation cytokinses was increased. At the same time the protect protein of AKT, CREB and mRNA BDNF were increased. They had the same results with cromolyn group, and opposite with the compound 48/80 group. We pretreated MCs with dexmedetomidine in vitro, and found that the activity surface molecular of MCs was down-regulation, and MCs degranulation was decreased. Conclusion: We thus demonstrate a possible mechanism by which dexmedetomidine alleviates spinal cord I/R injury through blocking the MCs degranulation. PMID:26628956

  6. Chronic oligodendrogenesis and remyelination after spinal cord injury in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Hesp, Zoe C; Goldstein, Evan Z; Goldstein, Evan A; Miranda, Carlos J; Kaspar, Brian K; Kaspar, Brain K; McTigue, Dana M

    2015-01-21

    Adult progenitor cells proliferate in the acutely injured spinal cord and their progeny differentiate into new oligodendrocytes (OLs) that remyelinate spared axons. Whether this endogenous repair continues beyond the first week postinjury (wpi), however, is unknown. Identifying the duration of this response is essential for guiding therapies targeting improved recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) by enhancing OL survival and/or remyelination. Here, we used two PDGFR?-reporter mouse lines and rats injected with a GFP-retrovirus to assess progenitor fate through 80 d after injury. Surprisingly, new OLs were generated as late as 3 months after injury and their processes ensheathed axons near and distal to the lesion, colocalized with MBP, and abutted Caspr+ profiles, suggesting newly formed myelin. Semithin sections confirmed stereotypical thin OL remyelination and few bare axons at 10 wpi, indicating that demyelination is relatively rare. Astrocytes in chronic tissue expressed the pro-OL differentiation and survival factors CNTF and FGF-2. In addition, pSTAT3+ NG2 cells were present through at least 5 wpi, revealing active signaling of the Jak/STAT pathway in these cells. The progenitor cell fate genes Sox11, Hes5, Id2, Id4, BMP2, and BMP4 were dynamically regulated for at least 4 wpi. Collectively, these data verify that the chronically injured spinal cord is highly dynamic. Endogenous repair, including oligodendrogenesis and remyelination, continues for several months after SCI, potentially in response to growth factors and/or transcription factor changes. Identifying and understanding spontaneous repair processes such as these is important so that beneficial plasticity is not inadvertently interrupted and effort is not exerted to needlessly duplicate ongoing spontaneous repair. PMID:25609641

  7. Chronic Oligodendrogenesis and Remyelination after Spinal Cord Injury in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hesp, Zoe C.; Goldstein, Evan A.; Miranda, Carlos J.; Kaspar, Brain K.

    2015-01-01

    Adult progenitor cells proliferate in the acutely injured spinal cord and their progeny differentiate into new oligodendrocytes (OLs) that remyelinate spared axons. Whether this endogenous repair continues beyond the first week postinjury (wpi), however, is unknown. Identifying the duration of this response is essential for guiding therapies targeting improved recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) by enhancing OL survival and/or remyelination. Here, we used two PDGFR?-reporter mouse lines and rats injected with a GFP-retrovirus to assess progenitor fate through 80 d after injury. Surprisingly, new OLs were generated as late as 3 months after injury and their processes ensheathed axons near and distal to the lesion, colocalized with MBP, and abutted Caspr+ profiles, suggesting newly formed myelin. Semithin sections confirmed stereotypical thin OL remyelination and few bare axons at 10 wpi, indicating that demyelination is relatively rare. Astrocytes in chronic tissue expressed the pro-OL differentiation and survival factors CNTF and FGF-2. In addition, pSTAT3+ NG2 cells were present through at least 5 wpi, revealing active signaling of the Jak/STAT pathway in these cells. The progenitor cell fate genes Sox11, Hes5, Id2, Id4, BMP2, and BMP4 were dynamically regulated for at least 4 wpi. Collectively, these data verify that the chronically injured spinal cord is highly dynamic. Endogenous repair, including oligodendrogenesis and remyelination, continues for several months after SCI, potentially in response to growth factors and/or transcription factor changes. Identifying and understanding spontaneous repair processes such as these is important so that beneficial plasticity is not inadvertently interrupted and effort is not exerted to needlessly duplicate ongoing spontaneous repair. PMID:25609641

  8. Electrophysiological characterization of spontaneous recovery in deep dorsal horn interneurons after incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rank, M M; Flynn, J R; Galea, M P; Callister, R; Callister, R J

    2015-09-01

    In the weeks and months following an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) significant spontaneous recovery of function occurs in the absence of any applied therapeutic intervention. The anatomical correlates of this spontaneous plasticity are well characterized, however, the functional changes that occur in spinal cord interneurons after injury are poorly understood. Here we use a T10 hemisection model of SCI in adult mice (9-10wks old) combined with whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology and a horizontal spinal cord slice preparation to examine changes in intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties of deep dorsal horn (DDH) interneurons. We made these measurements during short-term (4wks) and long-term (10wks) spontaneous recovery after SCI. Several important intrinsic membrane properties are altered in the short-term, but recover to values resembling those of uninjured controls in the longer term. AP discharge patterns are reorganized at both short-term and long-term recovery time points. This is matched by reorganization in the expression of voltage-activated potassium and calcium subthreshold-currents that shape AP discharge. Excitatory synaptic inputs onto DDH interneurons are significantly restructured in long-term SCI mice. Plots of sEPSC peak amplitude vs. rise times suggest considerable dendritic expansion or synaptic reorganization occurs especially during long-term recovery from SCI. Connectivity between descending dorsal column pathways and DDH interneurons is reduced in the short-term, but amplified in long-term recovery. Our results suggest considerable plasticity in both intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms occurs spontaneously in DDH interneurons following SCI and takes a minimum of 10wks after the initial injury to stabilize. PMID:26177044

  9. Spinal cord injury pressure ulcer treatment: an experience-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sunn, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to impact the lives of spinal cord injury patients severely. Pressure ulcers must be accurately staged according to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory recommendations before treatment design. The first priority in treatment of pressure ulcers is offloading. Intact skin ulcers may be treated with noncontact nonthermal low-frequency ultrasound. Superficial pressure ulcers may be treated with a combination of collagenase and foam dressings. Deeper pressure ulcers warrant negative-pressure wound therapy dressings along with biologic adjuncts to fill in wound depth. Discovery and treatment of osteomyelitis is a high priority when initially evaluating pressure ulcers. Surgical intervention must always be considered. PMID:25064794

  10. The person with a spinal cord injury: an evolving prototype for life care planning.

    PubMed

    Stiens, Steven A; Fawber, Heidi L; Yuhas, Steven A

    2013-08-01

    The sequela of spinal cord injury (SCI) can provide a prototype for life care planning because the segmental design of the vertebrate body allows assessments to be quantitative, repeatable, and predictive of the injured person's impairments, self-care capabilities, and required assistance. Life care planning for patients with SCI uses a standard method that is comparable between planner, yet individualizes assessment and seeks resources that meet unique patient-centered needs in their communities of choice. Clinical care and rehabilitation needs organized with an SCI problem list promotes collaboration by the interdisciplinary team, caregivers, and family in efficient achievement of patient-centered goals and completion of daily care plans. PMID:23910484

  11. Leisure repertoire among persons with a spinal cord injury: Interests, performance, and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Ulrica; Lilja, Margareta; Petersson, Ingela; Lexell, Jan; Isaksson, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore and describe the leisure repertoire of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and how the repertoire is related to interest, performance, and well-being. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A total of 97 persons with traumatic SCI were recruited from the non-profit national organization, RG Active Rehabilitation in Sweden. Outcome measure Data were collected through a two-part postal survey. The first comprised of questions investigating socio-demographic variables and injury characteristics; the second part included an interest checklist with 20 areas of leisure activities. Results The participants were mostly interested in, performed, and experienced well-being from social and culture activities and TV/DVD/movies. The areas of leisure activities in which they had most likely experienced changes after the SCI were outdoor activities, exercise, and gardening. Sex, age, and to some extent, time since injury were related to interest, performance, well-being, and changed performance. Conclusions The results provided an explanation and limited description of a changed leisure repertoire among persons after a traumatic SCI. The study showed that sex, age, and time since injury were more closely related to the choice of leisure activities to include in the leisure repertoire than the level of injury. This knowledge can be of importance when professionals in the field of rehabilitation are planning and implementing interventions concerning leisure activities for persons with SCI. PMID:24090284

  12. Factors That Influence Employment After Spinal Cord Injury in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eun-Na; Shin, Hyung-Ik

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate employment status after spinal cord injury (SCI) and identify personal, family, and injury characteristics those affect their employment in South Korea. Methods Participants were 334 community-dwelling persons 20-64 years of age who had sustained SCI for more than one year. Investigators visited each participant's home to carry out the survey. Bivariate and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify personal, family, and injury characteristics that influenced employment after SCI. Results Employment rate decreased significantly from 82.5% to 27.5% after SCI. Logistic regression showed that the probability of employment was higher in men than women, and in individuals older than 45 years at the time of injury than those aged 31-45 years of age. Moreover, employment was higher in individuals injured for longer than 20 years than those injured for 1-5 years and in individuals with incomplete tetraplegia than those with complete paraplegia. Employment was lower in individuals with SCI caused by industrial accidents than those injured in non-industrial accidents. Conclusion Injury characteristics are the most important predictors of employment in persons with SCI. For persons with lower employment rate, individualized vocational rehabilitation and employment-support systems are required. PMID:24639924

  13. Late recovery following spinal cord injury. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McDonald, John W; Becker, Daniel; Sadowsky, Cristina L; Jane, John A; Conturo, Thomas E; Schultz, Linda M

    2002-09-01

    The authors of this prospective, single-case study evaluated the potential for functional recovery from chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). The patient was motor complete with minimal and transient sensory perception in the left hemibody. His condition was classified as C-2 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Grade A and he had experienced no substantial recovery in the first 5 years after traumatic SCI. Clinical experience and evidence from the scientific literature suggest that further recovery would not take place. When the study began in 1999, the patient was tetraplegic and unable to breathe without assisted ventilation; his condition classification persisted as C-2 ASIA Grade A. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe injury at the C-2 level that had left a central fluid-filled cyst surrounded by a narrow donutlike rim of white matter. Five years after the injury a program known as "activity-based recovery" was instituted. The hypothesis was that patterned neural activity might stimulate the central nervous system to become more functional, as it does during development. Over a 3-year period (5-8 years after injury), the patient's condition improved from ASIA Grade A to ASIA Grade C, an improvement of two ASIA grades. Motor scores improved from 0/100 to 20/100, and sensory scores rose from 5-7/112 to 58-77/112. Using electromyography, the authors documented voluntary control over important muscle groups, including the right hemidiaphragm (C3-5), extensor carpi radialis (C-6), and vastus medialis (L2-4). Reversal of osteoporosis and an increase in muscle mass was associated with this recovery. Moreover, spasticity decreased, the incidence of medical complications fell dramatically, and the incidence of infections and use of antibiotic medications was reduced by over 90%. These improvements occurred despite the fact that less than 25 mm2 of tissue (approximately 25%) of the outer cord (presumably white matter) had survived at the injury level. The primary novelty of this report is the demonstration that substantial recovery of function (two ASIA grades) is possible in a patient with severe C-2 ASIA Grade A injury, long after the initial SCI. Less severely injured (lower injury level, clinically incomplete lesions) individuals might achieve even more meaningful recovery. The role of patterned neural activity in regeneration and recovery of function after SCI therefore appears a fruitful area for future investigation. PMID:12296690

  14. Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation Enhances Functional Recovery and Reduces Astrogliosis in Bilateral Compressive/Contusive Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Jared T.; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Zuccato, Jeffrey A.; Nassiri, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury has a significant societal and personal impact. Although the majority of injuries involve the cervical spinal cord, few studies of cell transplantation have used clinically relevant models of cervical spinal cord injury, limiting translation into clinical trials. Given this knowledge gap, we sought to examine the effects of neural stem/precursor cell (NPC) transplants in a rodent model of bilateral cervical contusion-compression spinal cord injury. Bilateral C6-level clip contusion-compression injuries were performed in rats, which were then blindly randomized at 2 weeks after injury into groups receiving adult brain-derived NPCs, vehicle, or sham operation. Long-term survival of NPCs was evident at 10 weeks after transplant. Cell grafts were localized rostrocaudally surrounding the lesion, throughout white and gray matter. Graft-derived cells were found within regions of gliotic scar and motor tracts and deposited myelin around endogenous axons. The majority of NPCs developed an oligodendroglial phenotype with greater neuronal profiles in rostral grafts. Following NPC transplantation, white matter was significantly increased compared with control. Astrogliosis and glial scar deposition, measured by GFAP-positive and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-positive volume, was significantly reduced. Forelimb grip strength, fine motor control during locomotion, and axonal conduction (by in vivo electrophysiology) was greater in cell-treated animals compared with vehicle controls. Transplantation of NPCs in the bilaterally injured cervical spinal cord results in significantly improved spinal cord tissue and forelimb function, warranting further study in preclinical cervical models to improve this treatment paradigm for clinical translation. PMID:25107585

  15. Assessing forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury: novel forelimb tasks predict lesion severity and recovery.

    PubMed

    Khaing, Zin Z; Geissler, Sydney A; Jiang, Shan; Milman, Brian D; Aguilar, Sandra V; Schmidt, Christine E; Schallert, Timothy

    2012-02-10

    Cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) can cause devastating neurological deficits, including impairment or loss of upper limb and hand function. Recently there has been increasing interest in cervical spinal cord injury models because the majority of spinal cord injuries are at cervical levels. Here we examined spontaneous functional recovery of adult rats with either laminectomy or lateral hemisection of the cervical spinal cord at C3-C4. Behavioral tests were carried out, including the forelimb locomotor scale (FLS), a postural instability test (PIT), a pasta-handling test that has been used to assess forepaw digit function and latency to eat, forelimb use during vertical-lateral wall exploration in a cylindrical enclosure, and vibrissae-elicited forelimb placing tests. In addition, a forelimb step-alternation test was developed to assess functional recovery at 12 weeks post-injury. All tests detected cSCI-induced deficits relative to laminectomy. Interestingly, the severity of deficits in the forelimb step-alternation test was associated with more extensive spinal damage, greater impairment, and less recovery in the FLS and other tests. For the pasta-handling test we found that rats with a milder cervical injury (alternators) were more likely to use both forepaws together compared to rats with a more severe injury (non-alternators). In addition, using the PIT, we detected enhanced function of the good limb, suggesting that neural plasticity on the unaffected side of the spinal cord may have occurred to compensate for deficits in the impaired forelimb. These outcome measures should be useful for investigating neural events associated with cSCI, and for developing novel treatment strategies. PMID:22022897

  16. Yoga therapy in an individual with spinal cord injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Moriello, Gabriele; Proper, Dacia; Cool, Sandtana; Fink, Sarah; Schock, Samantha; Mayack, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    No known research addresses the effects of yoga in those with spinal cord injury (SCI), yet yoga has the potential to improve many impairments commonly associated with SCI. This case report documents the outcomes of a yoga program in an individual with an SCI. The participant was a 59-year-old male who sustained an incomplete C3-C6 SCI. He practiced Hatha yoga for 60-min sessions, twice per week for 12 weeks and despite neurological injury, was able to complete a yoga program with modifications. Improvements were noted in balance; endurance; flexibility; posture; muscle strength of the hip extensors, hip abductors and knee extensors; and in performance of functional goals. No changes were noted in gait velocity, satisfaction in performance of goals or in overall quality of life. The participant was able to practice yoga even though he used an assistive device to walk. PMID:26592214

  17. Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Alex Pereira; Terrabuio Junior, Alberto Antonio; Pimenta, Ciro Jabur; Medina, Giovanna Ignácio Subirá; Rimkus, Carolina de Medeiros; Cliquet Júnior, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. Methods Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. Results Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the supraspinatus and acromioclavicular joint degeneration. Eighty percent of injured shoulders had combined lesions. Conclusion A great variety of causes of shoulder pain was identified in paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects. Routine clinical assessment and imaging studies of the shoulder may contribute to the evolution of rehabilitation and reduction of pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Level of Evidence II, Development of Diagnostic Criteria on Consecutive Patients, With Universally Applied Reference "Gold" Standard. PMID:24453620

  18. Sports prehospital-immediate care and spinal injury: not a car crash in sight.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jonathan R; Carlin, Brian

    2012-12-01

    The prehospital management of serious injury is a key skill required of pitch-side medical staff. Previously, specific training in sports prehospital-immediate care was lacking or not of a comparable standard to other aspects of emergency care. Many principles have been drawn from general prehospital care or in-hospital training courses. This article discusses sports prehospital-immediate care as a niche of general prehospital care, using spinal injury management as an illustration of the major differences. It highlights the need to develop the sport-specific prehospital evidence base, rather than relying exclusively on considerations relevant to prolonged immobilisation of multiply injured casualties from motor vehicle accidents, falls from height or burns. PMID:23080314

  19. Stimulation of autophagy promotes functional recovery in diabetic rats with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai-liang; Zhou, Yi-fei; Wu, Kai; Tian, Nai-feng; Wu, Yao-sen; Wang, Yong-li; Chen, De-heng; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Xiang-yang; Xu, Hua-zi; Zhang, Xiao-lei

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in diabetic rats after spinal cord injury (SCI), also we determined the role of autophagy in diabetes-aggravated neurological injury in vivo and in vitro. Our results showed that diabetes decreased the survival of neurons, promoted astrocytes proliferation, increased inflammatory cells infiltration and inhibited functional recovery after SCI. Diabetes was shown to confer increased activation of apoptotic pathways, along with an increase in autophagy; similar effects were also observed in vitro in neuronal PC12 cells. Treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy activator, partially abolished the adverse effect of diabetes, suggesting that diabetes may enhance neurological damage and suppress locomotor recovery after SCI, in addition to its effects on apoptosis and autophagy. In contrast, further stimulation of autophagy improved neurological function via inhibition of apoptosis. These results explained how diabetes exacerbates SCI in cellular level and suggested autophagy stimulation to be a new therapeutic strategy for diabetic SCI. PMID:26597839

  20. Effects of spinal cord injury on body composition and metabolic profile – Part I

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Dolbow, David R.; Dolbow, James D.; Khalil, Refka K.; Castillo, Camilo; Gater, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Several body composition and metabolic-associated disorders such as glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and lipid abnormalities occur prematurely after spinal cord injury (SCI) and at a higher prevalence compared to able-bodied populations. Within a few weeks to months of the injury, there is a significant decrease in total lean mass, particularly lower extremity muscle mass and an accompanying increase in fat mass. The infiltration of fat in intramuscular and visceral sites is associated with abnormal metabolic profiles. The current review will summarize the major changes in body composition and metabolic profiles that can lead to comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases after SCI. It is crucial for healthcare specialists to be aware of the magnitude of these changes. Such awareness may lead to earlier recognition and treatment of metabolic abnormalities that may reduce the co-morbidities seen over the lifetime of persons living with SCI. PMID:25001559

  1. Spinal Cord Injury: How Can We Improve the Classification and Quantification of Its Severity and Prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Vibhor; Andrews, Hampton; Varma, Abhay; Mintzer, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The preservation of functional neural tissue after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the basis for spontaneous neurological recovery. Some injured patients in the acute phase have more potential for recovery than others. This fact is problematic for the construction of clinical trials because enrollment of subjects with variable recovery potential makes it difficult to detect effects, requires large sample sizes, and risks Type II errors. In addition, the current methods to assess injury and recovery are non-quantitative and not sensitive. It is likely that therapeutic combinations will be necessary to cause substantially improved function after SCI, thus we need highly sensitive techniques to evaluate changes in motor, sensory, autonomic and other functions. We review several emerging neurophysiological techniques with high sensitivity. Quantitative methods to evaluate residual tissue sparing after severe acute SCI have not entered widespread clinical use. This reduces the ability to correlate structural preservation with clinical outcome following SCI resulting in enrollment of subjects with varying patterns of tissue preservation and injury into clinical trials. We propose that the inclusion of additional measures of injury severity, pattern, and individual genetic characteristics may enable stratification in clinical trials to make the testing of therapeutic interventions more effective and efficient. New imaging techniques to assess tract injury and demyelination and methods to quantify tissue injury, inflammatory markers, and neuroglial biochemical changes may improve the evaluation of injury severity, and the correlation with neurological outcome, and measure the effects of treatment more robustly than is currently possible. The ability to test such a multimodality approach will require a high degree of collaboration between clinical and research centers and government research support. When the most informative of these assessments is determined, it may be possible to identify patients with substantial recovery potential, improve selection criteria and conduct more efficient clinical trials. PMID:23895105

  2. Sonic hedgehog and neurotrophin-3 increase oligodendrocyte numbers and myelination after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aline M; Seidlits, Stephanie K; Goodman, Ashley G; Kukushliev, Todor V; Hassani, Donna M; Cummings, Brian J; Anderson, Aileen J; Shea, Lonnie D

    2014-07-24

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of sensory and motor function below the level of injury and has limited available therapies. Multiple channel bridges have been investigated as a means to create a permissive environment for regeneration, with channels supporting axonal growth through the injury. Bridges support robust axon growth and myelination. Here, we investigated the cell types that myelinate axons in the bridges and whether over-expression of trophic factors can enhance myelination. Lentivirus encoding for neurotrophin-3 (NT3), sonic hedgehog (SHH) and the combination of these factors was delivered from bridges implanted into a lateral hemisection defect at T9/T10 in mice, and the response of endogenous progenitor cells within the spinal cord was investigated. Relative to control, the localized, sustained expression of these factors significantly increased growth of regenerating axons into the bridge and enhanced axon myelination 8 weeks after injury. SHH decreased the number of Sox2(+) cells and increased the number of Olig2(+) cells, whereas NT3 alone or in combination with SHH enhanced the numbers of GFAP(+) and Olig2(+) cells relative to control. For delivery of lentivirus encoding for either factor, we identified cells at various stages of differentiation along the oligodendrocyte lineage (e.g., O4(+), GalC(+)). Expression of NT3 enhanced myelination primarily by infiltrating Schwann cells, whereas SHH over-expression substantially increased myelination by oligodendrocytes. These studies further establish biomaterial-mediated gene delivery as a promising tool to direct activation and differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells for applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:24873988

  3. An Injectable, Calcium Responsive Composite Hydrogel for the Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immediately following spinal cord injury, further injury can occur through several secondary injury cascades. As a consequence of cell lysis, an increase in extracellular Ca2+ results in additional neuronal loss by inducing apoptosis. Thus, hydrogels that reduce extracellular Ca2+ concentration may reduce secondary injury severity. The goal of this study was to develop composite hydrogels consisting of alginate, chitosan, and genipin that interact with extracellular Ca2+ to enable in situ gelation while maintaining an elastic modulus similar to native spinal cord (?1000 Pa). It was hypothesized that incorporation of genipin and chitosan would regulate hydrogel electrostatic characteristics and influence hydrogel porosity, degradation, and astrocyte behavior. Hydrogel composition was varied to create hydrogels with statistically similar mechanical properties (?1000 Pa) that demonstrated tunable charge characteristics (6-fold range in free amine concentration) and degradation rate (complete degradation between 7 and 28 days; some blends persist after 28 days). Hydrogels demonstrate high sensitivity to Ca2+ concentration, as a 1 mM change during fabrication induced a significant change in elastic modulus. Additionally, hydrogels incubated in a Ca2+-containing solution exhibited an increased linear viscoelastic limit (LVE) and an increased elastic modulus above the LVE limit in a time dependent manner. An extension of the LVE limit implies a change in hydrogel cross-linking structure. Attachment assays demonstrated that addition of chitosan/genipin to alginate hydrogels induced up to a 4-fold increase in the number of attached astrocytes and facilitated astrocyte clustering on the hydrogel surface in a composition dependent manner. Furthermore, Western blots demonstrated tunable glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes cultured on hydrogel blends, with some hydrogel compositions demonstrating no significant increase in GFAP expression compared to astrocytes cultured on glass. Thus, alginate/chitosan/genipin hydrogel composites show promise as scaffolds that regulate astrocyte behavior and for the prevention of Ca2+-related secondary neuron damage during acute SCI. PMID:24397537

  4. Ketogenic diet improves forelimb motor function after spinal cord injury in rodents.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Plunet, Ward T; Lee, Jae H T; Liu, Jie; Lam, Clarrie K; Park, Soeyun; Hilton, Brett J; Fransen, Bas L; Matheson, Keely A J; Assinck, Peggy; Kwon, Brian K; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    High fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) are validated non-pharmacological treatments for some forms of drug-resistant epilepsy. Ketones reduce neuronal excitation and promote neuroprotection. Here, we investigated the efficacy of KD as a treatment for acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Starting 4 hours following C5 hemi-contusion injury animals were fed either a standard carbohydrate based diet or a KD formulation with lipid to carbohydrate plus protein ratio of 3:1. The forelimb functional recovery was evaluated for 14 weeks, followed by quantitative histopathology. Post-injury 3:1 KD treatment resulted in increased usage and range of motion of the affected forepaw. Furthermore, KD improved pellet retrieval with recovery of wrist and digit movements. Importantly, after returning to a standard diet after 12 weeks of KD treatment, the improved forelimb function remained stable. Histologically, the spinal cords of KD treated animals displayed smaller lesion areas and more grey matter sparing. In addition, KD treatment increased the number of glucose transporter-1 positive blood vessels in the lesion penumbra and monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) expression. Pharmacological inhibition of MCTs with 4-CIN (?-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate) prevented the KD-induced neuroprotection after SCI, In conclusion, post-injury KD effectively promotes functional recovery and is neuroprotective after cervical SCI. These beneficial effects require the function of monocarboxylate transporters responsible for ketone uptake and link the observed neuroprotection directly to the function of ketones, which are known to exert neuroprotection by multiple mechanisms. Our data suggest that current clinical nutritional guidelines, which include relatively high carbohydrate contents, should be revisited. PMID:24223849

  5. Predictors of intramedullary lesion expansion rate on MR images of patients with subaxial spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Le, Elizabeth; Aarabi, Bizhan; Hersh, David S; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanthan; Diaz, Cara; Massetti, Jennifer; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Studies of preclinical spinal cord injury (SCI) in rodents indicate that expansion of intramedullary lesions (IMLs) seen on MR images may be amenable to neuroprotection. In patients with subaxial SCI and motor-complete American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) Grade A or B, IML expansion has been shown to be approximately 900 ?m/hour. In this study, the authors investigated IML expansion in a cohort of patients with subaxial SCI and AIS Grade A, B, C, or D. METHODS Seventy-eight patients who had at least 2 MRI scans within 6 days of SCI were enrolled. Data were analyzed by regression analysis. RESULTS In this cohort, the mean age was 45.3 years (SD 18.3 years), 73 patients were injured in a motor vehicle crash, from a fall, or in sport activities, and 77% of them were men. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 26.7 (SD 16.7), and the AIS grade was A in 23 patients, B in 7, C in 7, and D in 41. The mechanism of injury was distraction in 26 patients, compression in 22, disc/osteophyte complex in 29, and Chance fracture in 1. The mean time between injury onset and the first MRI scan (Interval 1) was 10 hours (SD 8.7 hours), and the mean time to the second MRI scan (Interval 2) was 60 hours (SD 29.6 hours). The mean IML lengths of the first and second MR images were 38.8 mm (SD 20.4 mm) and 51 mm (SD 36.5 mm), respectively. The mean time from the first to the second MRI scan (Interval 3) was 49.9 hours (SD 28.4 hours), and the difference in IML lengths was 12.6 mm (SD 20.7 mm), reflecting an expansion rate of 366 ?m/ hour (SD 710 ?m/hour). IML expansion in patients with AIS Grades A and B was 918 ?m/hour (SD 828 ?m/hour), and for those with AIS Grades C and D, it was 21 ?m/hour (SD 304 ?m/hour). Univariate analysis indicated that AIS Grade A or B versus Grades C or D (p < 0.0001), traction (p= 0.0005), injury morphology (p < 0.005), the surgical approach (p= 0.009), vertebral artery injury (p= 0.02), age (p < 0.05), ISS (p < 0.05), ASIA motor score (p < 0.05), and time to decompression (p < 0.05) were all predictors of lesion expansion. In multiple regression analysis, however, the sole determinant of IML expansion was AIS grade (p < 0.005). CONCLUSIONS After traumatic subaxial cervical spine or spinal cord injury, patients with motor-complete injury (AIS Grade A or B) had a significantly higher rate of IML expansion than those with motor-incomplete injury (AIS Grade C or D). PMID:25746115

  6. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinal cord injury: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with consequences such as full loss of spinal movements, incontinence of bladder functions, bed sores, etc. There is no satisfactory treatment available in biomedicine with only limited treatments only for enhancement of spinal cord function. These treatments have many limitations. Ayurvedic drugs and Pancakarma procedures have been in use to treat such conditions since a long time. We present a case of SCI with lesion at C4 level which was treated for 2 months with an Ayurvedic combined intervention. The combined treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications (Brhadv?tacint?ma?i rasa - 125 mg, Ardhan?gav?t?ri rasa - 125 mg, Da?am?la kv?tha - 40 ml, A?vagandh?c?r?a [powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL] - 3 g, Am?t? [Tinospora cordifolia WILLD] - 500 mg, Mukt??ukti pi??i - 500 mg and Trayoda???ga guggulu - 500 mg) twice daily. Combined procedures involved such as ??li?a??ika pi??asvedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) every day for 2 months and M?tr? basti (enema) for first 15 days with A?vagandh? oil. From 16th day, Must?di y?pana basti (MYB, enema with medicated milk) was given for 16 days. After an interval of 7 days, MYB was further repeated for next 16 days. Substantial clinical improvement was reported after 2 months of the Ayurvedic treatment in existing neurological deficits and in quality of life. PMID:26283809

  7. Peripheral olfactory ensheathing cells reduce scar and cavity formation and promote regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Leanne M; Au, Edmund; Richter, Miranda W; Liu, Jie; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Roskams, A Jane

    2004-05-17

    Bridging of a lesion site and minimizing local damage to create an environment permissive for regeneration are both primary components of a successful strategy to repair spinal cord injury (SCI). Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are prime candidates for autologous transplantation to bridge this gap, but little is known currently about their mechanism of action. In addition, OECs from the accessible lamina propria (LP) of the olfactory mucosa are a more viable source in humans but have yet to be tested for their ability to promote regeneration in established SCI models. Here, mouse LP-OECs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) transplanted directly into both rat and mouse dorsolateral spinal cord lesion sites demonstrate limited migration but interact with host astrocytes to develop a new transitional zone at the lesion border. LP-OECs also promote extensive migration of host Schwann cells into the central nervous system repair zone and stimulate angiogenesis to provide a biological scaffold for repair. This novel environment created by transplanted and host glia within the spinal cord inhibits cavity and scar formation and promotes extensive sprouting of multiple sensory and motor axons into and through the lesion site. Sixty days after rat SCI, serotonin- and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons sprouted across the lesion into the distal cord, although axotomized rubrospinal axons did not. Thus, even in a xenotransplant paradigm, LP-OECs work collaboratively with host glial cells to create an environment to ameliorate local damage and simultaneously promote a regenerative response in multiple axonal populations. PMID:15067714

  8. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  9. Modeling the functional repair of nervous tissue in spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantila, Sara M.; Camp, Jon J.; Krych, Aaron J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2004-05-01

    Functional repair of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most challenging goals in modern medicine. The annual incidence of SCI in the United States is approximately 11,000 new cases. The prevalence of people in the U.S. currently living with SCI is approximately 200,000. Exploring and understanding nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is a critical first step in attempting to reverse the devastating consequences of SCI. At Mayo Clinic, a preliminary study of implants in the transected rat spinal cord model demonstrates potential for promoting axon regeneration. In collaborative research between neuroscientists and bioengineers, this procedure holds promise for solving two critical aspects of axon repair-providing a resorbable structural scaffold to direct focused axon repair, and delivery of relevant signaling molecules necessary to facilitate regeneration. In our preliminary study, regeneration in the rat's spinal cord was modeled in three dimensions utilizing an image processing software system developed in the Biomedical Imaging Resource at Mayo Clinic. Advanced methods for image registration, segmentation, and rendering were used. The raw images were collected at three different magnifications. After image processing the individual channels in the scaffold, axon bundles, and macrophages could be identified. Several axon bundles could be visualized and traced through the entire volume, suggesting axonal growth throughout the length of the scaffold. Such information could potentially allow researchers and physicians to better understand and improve the nerve regeneration process for individuals with SCI.

  10. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury: clinical evaluation and rehabilitative management.

    PubMed

    Stiens, S A; Bergman, S B; Goetz, L L

    1997-03-01

    Neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) is one of many impairments that result from spinal cord injury (SCI). The experience of persons with SCI reveals that the risk and occurrence of fecal incontinence and difficulty with evacuation are particularly significant life-limiting problems. This review relates the anatomy and physiology of colon function to the specific pathophysiology that detracts from the quality of life of persons after SCI. There are two patterns of NBD after SCI: the upper motor neuron bowel, which results from a spinal cord lesion above the sacral level, and the lower motor neuron bowel, which results from a lesion to the sacral spinal cord, roots, or peripheral nerve innervation of the colon. Rehabilitation evaluation consists of a comprehensive history and examination to define impairments, disabilities, and handicaps pertinent to NBD. Rehabilitation goals include continence of stool, simple willful independent defecation, and prevention of gastrointestinal complications. Intervention consists of derivation and implementation of an individualized person-centered bowel program, which may include diet, oral/rectal medications, equipment, and scheduling of bowel care. Bowel care is a procedure devised to initiate defecation and accomplish fecal evacuation. Digital-rectal stimulation is a technique utilized during bowel care to open the anal sphincter and facilitate reflex peristalsis. Recent advances in rehabilitation practices, equipment, pharmacology, and surgery have offered patients new bowel program alternatives. Interdisciplinary development of solutions for problems of NBD are evolving rapidly. PMID:9084372

  11. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A.; Deans, Robert J.; Mays, Robert W.; Busch, Sarah A.; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  12. Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Protein as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Zhang, Yi Ping; Lu, Qing-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Hu, Jian-Guo; Oakes, Eddie; Bonventre, Joseph V; Shields, Christopher B; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an important isoform of PLA2 that mediates the release of arachidonic acid, plays a role in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods A combination of molecular, histological, immunohistochemical, and behavioral assessments were used to test whether blocking cPLA2 activation pharmacologically or genetically reduced cell death, protected spinal cord tissue, and improved behavioral recovery after a contusive SCI performed at the 10th thoracic level in adult mice. Results SCI significantly increased cPLA2 expression and activation. Activated cPLA2 was localized mainly in neurons and oligodendrocytes. Notably, the SCI-induced cPLA2 activation was mediated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. In vitro, activation of cPLA2 by ceramide-1-phosphate or A23187 induced spinal neuronal death, which was substantially reversed by arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone, a cPLA2 inhibitor. Remarkably, blocking cPLA2 pharmacologically at 30 minutes postinjury or genetically deleting cPLA2 in mice ameliorated motor deficits, and reduced cell loss and tissue damage after SCI. Interpretation cPLA2 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of SCI, at least in the C57BL/6 mouse, and as such could be an attractive therapeutic target for ameliorating secondary tissue damage and promoting recovery of function after SCI. PMID:24623140

  13. Association of pain and CNS structural changes after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jutzeler, Catherine R; Huber, Eveline; Callaghan, Martina F; Luechinger, Roger; Curt, Armin; Kramer, John L K; Freund, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has been shown to trigger structural atrophic changes within the spinal cord and brain. However, the relationship between structural changes and magnitude of neuropathic pain (NP) remains incompletely understood. Voxel-wise analysis of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging data provided information on cross-sectional cervical cord area and volumetric brain changes in 30 individuals with chronic traumatic SCI and 31 healthy controls. Participants were clinically assessed including neurological examination and pain questionnaire. Compared to controls, individuals with SCI exhibited decreased cord area, reduced grey matter (GM) volumes in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left insula, left secondary somatosensory cortex, bilateral thalamus, and decreased white matter volumes in pyramids and left internal capsule. The presence of NP was related with smaller cord area, increased GM in left ACC and right M1, and decreased GM in right primary somatosensory cortex and thalamus. Greater GM volume in M1 was associated with amount of NP. Below-level NP-associated structural changes in the spinal cord and brain can be discerned from trauma-induced consequences of SCI. The directionality of these relationships reveals specific changes across the neuroaxis (i.e., atrophic changes versus increases in volume) and may provide substrates of underlying neural mechanisms in the development of NP. PMID:26732942

  14. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    DePaul, Marc A; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P; Madalena, Kathryn M; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A; Deans, Robert J; Mays, Robert W; Busch, Sarah A; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  15. Attenuation of the pulmonary chemoreflex following acute cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Lun; Lee, Kun-Ze

    2014-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary C fibers are the primary chemosensitive afferents in the lung. The activation of bronchopulmonary C fibers evokes the pulmonary chemoreflex, which is characterized by apnea, hypotension, and bradycardia and is a critical reflex that modulates cardiorespiratory responses under physiological and pathological conditions. The present study was designed to investigate whether the pulmonary chemoreflex is altered following acute cervical spinal injury. A unilateral hemisection (Hx) or laminectomy (uninjured) in the second cervical spinal cord was performed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The pulmonary chemoreflex induced by intrajugular capsaicin administration was evaluated by measuring respiratory airflow in spontaneously breathing rats and phrenic nerve activity in mechanically ventilated rats. Capsaicin treatment evoked a cessation of respiratory airflow and phrenic bursting in uninjured animals, but not in C2Hx animals. To clarify whether the attenuation of the pulmonary chemoreflex in C2Hx animals is restricted to capsaicin-induced stimuli, or generally applied to other stimuli that excite bronchopulmonary C fibers, another bronchopulmonary C-fiber stimulant (phenylbiguanide) was used to evoke the pulmonary chemoreflex in spontaneously breathing rats. We observed that phenylbiguanide-induced apnea was also blunted in C2Hx animals, suggesting that the respiratory response induced by bronchopulmonary C-fiber activation was attenuated following acute cervical spinal Hx. The blunted inhibitory respiratory response may represent a compensatory respiratory plasticity to preserve the breathing capacity and may also reduce the capability of preventing inhaled irritants in this injured condition. PMID:24557796

  16. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinal cord injury: A case study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with consequences such as full loss of spinal movements, incontinence of bladder functions, bed sores, etc. There is no satisfactory treatment available in biomedicine with only limited treatments only for enhancement of spinal cord function. These treatments have many limitations. Ayurvedic drugs and Pancakarma procedures have been in use to treat such conditions since a long time. We present a case of SCI with lesion at C4 level which was treated for 2 months with an Ayurvedic combined intervention. The combined treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications (Brhadv?tacint?ma?i rasa - 125 mg, Ardhan?gav?t?ri rasa - 125 mg, Da?am?la kv?tha - 40 ml, A?vagandh?c?r?a [powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL] - 3 g, Am?t? [Tinospora cordifolia WILLD] - 500 mg, Mukt??ukti pi??i - 500 mg and Trayoda???ga guggulu - 500 mg) twice daily. Combined procedures involved such as ??li?a??ika pi??asvedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) every day for 2 months and M?tr? basti (enema) for first 15 days with A?vagandh? oil. From 16(th) day, Must?di y?pana basti (MYB, enema with medicated milk) was given for 16 days. After an interval of 7 days, MYB was further repeated for next 16 days. Substantial clinical improvement was reported after 2 months of the Ayurvedic treatment in existing neurological deficits and in quality of life. PMID:26283809

  17. The Anti-Inflammatory Compound Curcumin Enhances Locomotor and Sensory Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats by Immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Machova Urdzikova, Lucia; Karova, Kristyna; Ruzicka, Jiri; Kloudova, Anna; Shannon, Craig; Dubisova, Jana; Murali, Raj; Kubinova, Sarka; Sykova, Eva; Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena; Jendelova, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Well known for its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammation properties, curcumin is a polyphenol found in the rhizome of Curcuma longa. In this study, we evaluated the effects of curcumin on behavioral recovery, glial scar formation, tissue preservation, axonal sprouting, and inflammation after spinal cord injury (SCI) in male Wistar rats. The rats were randomized into two groups following a balloon compression injury at the level of T9-T10 of the spinal cord, namely vehicle- or curcumin-treated. Curcumin was applied locally on the surface of the injured spinal cord immediately following injury and then given intraperitoneally daily; the control rats were treated with vehicle in the same manner. Curcumin treatment improved behavioral recovery within the first week following SCI as evidenced by improved Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) test and plantar scores, representing locomotor and sensory performance, respectively. Furthermore, curcumin treatment decreased glial scar formation by decreasing the levels of MIP1?, IL-2, and RANTES production and by decreasing NF-?B activity. These results, therefore, demonstrate that curcumin has a profound anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential in the treatment of spinal cord injury, especially when given immediately after the injury. PMID:26729105

  18. Road Collisions as a Cause of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in Ireland, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Brosnan, Michael; Comiskey, Catherine; Synnott, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background: Road collisions remain the leading cause of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in the world. Half of all TSCIs in Ireland in 2000 were caused by road collisions. Since then, there has been a downward trend in road fatalities coincident with implemented road safety strategies. Objective: To examine the incidence of TSCI resulting from road collisions from 2001 to 2010. Method: This is a retrospective study using the hospital inpatient enquiry database of the tertiary referral center, which houses the national spinal injuries unit. Information retrieved included total numbers of patients with TSCI and number of TSCIs due to road collisions from 2001 through 2010, age groups affected, and the gender balance. Results: Over the 10-year period studied, the incidence rate of TSCI due to road collisions declined, although this did not reach statistical significance. The largest numbers of all TSCIs and TSCIs due to road collisions were in the 20- to 29-year age category and the male gender. Conclusions: As mortality due to road collisions declined, so did the number of TSCIs from the same etiology. An impactful road safety campaign is likely to have influenced these trends. PMID:25477738

  19. Therapeutic Hypothermia in Spinal Cord Injury: The Status of Its Use and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaqiong; Pearse, Damien D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health problem and is associated with a diversity of neurological symptoms. Pathophysiologically, dysfunction after SCI results from the culmination of tissue damage produced both by the primary insult and a range of secondary injury mechanisms. The application of hypothermia has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective after SCI in both experimental and human studies. The myriad of protective mechanisms of hypothermia include the slowing down of metabolism, decreasing free radical generation, inhibiting excitotoxicity and apoptosis, ameliorating inflammation, preserving the blood spinal cord barrier, inhibiting astrogliosis, promoting angiogenesis, as well as decreasing axonal damage and encouraging neurogenesis. Hypothermia has also been combined with other interventions, such as antioxidants, anesthetics, alkalinization and cell transplantation for additional benefit. Although a large body of work has reported on the effectiveness of hypothermia as a neuroprotective approach after SCI and its application has been translated to the clinic, a number of questions still remain regarding its use, including the identification of hypothermia’s therapeutic window, optimal duration and the most appropriate rewarming rate. In addition, it is necessary to investigate the neuroprotective effect of combining therapeutic hypothermia with other treatment strategies for putative synergies, particularly those involving neurorepair. PMID:26213924

  20. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Recio, Albert C.; Stiens, Steven A.; Curry, Amanda C.; Sadowsky, Cristina L.; Gater, David R.; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  1. Posttraumatic Inflammation as a Key to Neuroregeneration after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Child, Christopher; Bruckner, Thomas; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Daniel, Volker; Biglari, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines might have a large impact on the secondary phase and on the neurological outcome of patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). We measured the serum levels of different cytokines (Interferon-?, Tumor Necrosis Factor-?, Interleukin-1?, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) over a 12-week period in 40 acute traumatic SCI patients: at admission on average one hour after initial trauma; at four, nine, 12, and 24 h; Three, and seven days after admission; and two, four, eight, and twelve weeks after admission. This was done using a Luminex Performance Human High Sensitivity Cytokine Panel. SCI was classified using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) at time of admission and after 12 weeks. TNF?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in patients without neurological remission and in patients with an initial AIS A (p < 0.05). This study shows significant differences in cytokine concentrations shown in traumatic SCI patients with different neurological impairments and within a 12-week period. IL-8 and IL-10 are potential peripheral markers for neurological remission and rehabilitation after traumatic SCI. Furthermore our cytokine expression pattern of the acute, subacute, and intermediate phase of SCI establishes a possible basis for future studies to develop standardized monitoring, prognostic, and tracking techniques. PMID:25860946

  2. Spinal Cord Injury and Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Using Functional Activity in Pressure Relief

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, May; Gillan, Cathy; Morton, Julie; Gardner, Evie; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background. People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of pressure ulcers due to prolonged periods of sitting. Concordance with pressure relieving movements is poor amongst this population, and one potential alternative to improve this would be to integrate pressure relieving movements into everyday functional activities. Objectives. To investigate both the current pressure relieving behaviours of SCI individuals during computer use and the application of an ergonomically adapted computer-based activity to reduce interface pressure. Design. Observational and repeated measures design. Setting. Regional Spinal Cord Injury Unit. Participants. Fourteen subjects diagnosed with SCI (12 male, 2 female). Intervention.Comparing normal sitting to seated movements and induced forward reaching positions. Main Outcome Measures. Interface pressure measurements: dispersion index (DI), peak pressure index (PPI), and total contact area (CA). The angle of trunk tilt was also measured. Results. The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting. Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting. Conclusion. Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting. PMID:23691301

  3. Respiratory muscle training in persons with spinal cord injury: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Van Houtte, Siska; Vanlandewijck, Yves; Gosselink, Rik

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the effectiveness of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on respiratory muscle strength and endurance, pulmonary function, quality of life, respiratory complications and exercise performance in persons with spinal cord injury. A MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA) database was used for selection of the literature (from 1980 to November 2004), and relevant references from peer-reviewed articles were retrieved as well. Studies investigating the effects of RMT (i.e. resistive breathing weight lifting or normocapnic hyperpnea) in persons with spinal cord injury were selected. Two independent reviewers investigated controlled studies for methodological quality by using a modification of the framework for methodological quality. Methodological quality ranged between 15 and 29 (maximal feasible score=40). Twenty-three papers were retrieved and six controlled trials were kept for further analysis. A meta-analysis and calculation of effect-size of each individual study and weighted summary effect-size was intended. However, unreported data and heterogeneity in outcome variables did not allow performing a meta-analysis. From the systematic review it is concluded that RMT tended to improve expiratory muscle strength, vital capacity and residual volume. Insufficient data was available to make conclusions concerning the effects on inspiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, quality of life, exercise performance and respiratory complications. PMID:16626951

  4. Identification of autoantibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Hergenroeder, Georgene W; Moore, Anthony N; Schmitt, Karl M; Redell, John B; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-20

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating injury causing significant morbidity and mortality. Experimental studies have demonstrated that SCI induced cellular damage and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier can initiate an autoimmune response. This response is thought to be pathogenic and contribute to poor outcome. The objective of this research was to investigate whether human SCI mounts an autoimmune response to self-antigens. Plasma samples were collected longitudinally from SCI patients (n=18) at acute (T1, <48?h) and subacute (T2, 2-4 weeks) time points to probe western blots of human brain homogenates in order to screen patients for the presence of putative autoantibodies. To identify the corresponding antigens, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, western blot and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses were performed. We found that four of 18 patients (22%) had novel immunoreactive bands ranging in size from 36 to 42?kDa present in subacute, but not in acute, plasma samples suggesting postinjury production. To identify the cross-reacting antigens, we separated brain proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified nine immunoreactive spots. Amino acid sequence analysis of these spots identified peptides that mapped to glial fibrillary acidic protein. Our results suggest that ?22% of SCI patients generated autoantibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein. Future studies will be required to determine whether these autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenic sequelae of SCI. PMID:26629661

  5. Resveratrol attenuates spinal cord injury-induced inflammatory damage in rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Yi, Long; Xiang, Zimin; Zhong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Tiansheng

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced systemic inflammatory response affects multiple organs outside the spinal cord. Treatment options for such complications are lacking. We studied the potential protective effects of resveratrol on SCI-induced inflammatory damage in rat lungs. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to weight-drop impact at the T10 vertebral level with administration of resveratrol (100 mg/kg) or vehicle (via the intraperitoneal route) immediately after trauma. Lung injury was studied by measuring: vascular permeability-related pulmonary edema; histopathologic scores, neutrophil infiltration and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid; expression of inflammatory enzymes and sirtuin (SIRT) 1 as well as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) activity in pulmonary tissues. Resveratrol treatment significantly alleviated SCI-induced pulmonary edema as indicated by the ratio of the wet weight to dry weight of lung tissue and pulmonary permeability index. Resveratrol significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators. Resveratrol treatment was accompanied by up-regulation of expression of SIRT1 and suppression of NF-?B activity in pulmonary tissues. These data suggest that resveratrol may protect the lungs from SCI-induced inflammatory damage, and could be used as a therapeutic option against pulmonary problems after SCI. PMID:25973008

  6. Does being female provide a neuroprotective advantage following spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Datto, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Jackie; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Pearse, Damien D.

    2015-01-01

    It has been controversial whether gender has any effect on recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). Past experimental and clinical research aimed at addressing this subject has led to constrasting findings on whether females hold any advantage in locomotor recovery. Additionally, for studies supporting the notion of a female gender related advantage, a definite cause has not been explained. In a recent study, using large sample sizes for comparative male and female spinal cord injury cohorts, we reported that a significant gender advantage favoring females existed in both tissue preservation and functional recovery after taking into consideration discrepancies in age and weight of the animals across sexes. Prior animal research frequently used sample sizes that were too small to determine significance with certainty and also did not account for two other factors that influence locomotor performance: age and weight. Our finding is important in light of controversy surrounding the effect of gender on outcome and the fact that SCI affects more than ten thousand new individuals annually, a population that is disproportionately male. By deepening our understanding of why a gender advantage exists, potential new therapeutics can be designed to improve recovery for the male population following the initial trauma or putatively augment the neuroprotective privilege in females for enhanced outcomes. PMID:26692831

  7. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Rau, Kristofer K; Hubscher, Charles H

    2015-06-15

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  8. Restorative respiratory pathways after partial cervical spinal cord injury: role of ipsilateral phrenic afferents.

    PubMed

    Vinit, Stéphane; Stamegna, Jean-Claude; Boulenguez, Pascale; Gauthier, Patrick; Kastner, Anne

    2007-06-01

    After disruption of the descending respiratory pathways induced by unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats, the inactivated ipsilateral (ipsi) phrenic nerve (PN) discharge may partially recover following some specific experimental procedures [such as contralateral (contra) phrenicotomy (Phx)]. This phrenic reactivation involves normally silent contra pathways decussating at the level of the phrenic nucleus, but the mechanisms of this crossed phrenic activation are still poorly understood. The present study investigates the contribution of sensory phrenic afferents to this process by comparing the acute effects of ipsi and contra Phx. We show that the phrenic discharge (recorded on intact PNs) was almost completely suppressed 0 h and 3 h after a lateral cervical SCI, but was already spontaneously reactivated after 1 week. This ipsi phrenic activity was enhanced immediately after contra Phx and was completely suppressed by an acute contra cervical section, indicating that it is triggered by crossed phrenic pathways located laterally in the contra spinal cord. Ipsi phrenic activity was also abolished immediately after ipsi Phx that interrupts phrenic sensory afferents, an effect prevented by prior acute ablation of the cervical dorsal root ganglia, indicating that crossed phrenic activation depends on excitatory phrenic sensory afferents but also putatively on inhibitory non-phrenic afferents. On the basis of these data, we propose a new model for crossed phrenic activation after partial cervical injury, with an essential role played by ipsi-activating phrenic sensory afferents. PMID:17610574

  9. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dolbow, David R; Gorgey, Ashraf S; Recio, Albert C; Stiens, Steven A; Curry, Amanda C; Sadowsky, Cristina L; Gater, David R; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W

    2015-08-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  10. Oct4-induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cells enhance functional recovery in spinal cord injury model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Lee, Hyunah; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Hwang, Kyujin; Nam, Donggyu; Park, Myung Rae; Zaehres, Holm; Park, Kook In; Lee, Seok-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The generation of patient-specific oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) holds great potential as an expandable cell source for cell replacement therapy as well as drug screening in spinal cord injury or demyelinating diseases. Here, we demonstrate that induced OPCs (iOPCs) can be directly derived from adult mouse fibroblasts by Oct4-mediated direct reprogramming, using anchorage-independent growth to ensure high purity. Homogeneous iOPCs exhibit typical small-bipolar morphology, maintain their self-renewal capacity and OPC marker expression for more than 31 passages, share high similarity in the global gene expression profile to wild-type OPCs, and give rise to mature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Notably, transplanted iOPCs contribute to functional recovery in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model without tumor formation. This study provides a simple strategy to generate functional self-renewing iOPCs and yields insights for the in-depth study of demyelination and regenerative medicine. PMID:26497893

  11. Loss of microRNA-124 expression in neurons in the peri-lesion area in mice with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Cai-yong; Zhao, Xiang-hui; Liu, Fang-fang; Bian, Gan-lan; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-124 (miR-124) is abundantly expressed in neurons in the mammalian central nervous system, and plays critical roles in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic neurogenesis and postnatal neural differentiation. However, the expression profile of miR-124 after spinal cord injury and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we examined the expression of miR-124 in mouse brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury using in situ hybridization. Furthermore, the expression of miR-124 was examined with quantitative RT-PCR at 1, 3 and 7 days after spinal cord injury. The miR-124 expression in neurons at the site of injury was evaluated by in situ hybridization combined with NeuN immunohistochemical staining. The miR-124 was mainly expressed in neurons throughout the brain and spinal cord. The expression of miR-124 in neurons significantly decreased within 7 days after spinal cord injury. Some of the neurons in the peri-lesion area were NeuN+/miR-124?. Moreover, the neurons distal to the peri-lesion site were NeuN+/miR-124+. These findings indicate that miR-124 expression in neurons is reduced after spinal cord injury, and may reflect the severity of spinal cord injury. PMID:26330841

  12. Rosuvastatin may have neuroprotective effect on spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Celal; Demirtas, Sinan; Guclu, Orkut; Karahan, Oguz; Caliskan, Ahmet; Yazici, Suleyman; Mavitas, Binali

    2013-11-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injuries can be threatening to end organ viability and can progress, with mortal and morbid outcomes. In particular, neural tissues are highly sensitive to hypoxia and reperfusion stress. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of rosuvastatin on spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury. Forty male Sprague- Dawley rats were divided into four equal groups: group I (control), group II (sham with simple laparotomy), group III (ischemia-reperfusion), group IV (ischemia-reperfusion group with continuous rosuvastatin utilization), and group V (ischemia-reperfusion group with rosuvastatin-withdrawal after reperfusion). Spinal cord ischemia was induced by clamping the aorta below the left renal artery and above the aortic bifurcation. Reperfusion was provided after 72(nd) hours of ischemia. After reperfusion, blood samples and spinal cord tissue samples were taken from all the rats. Oxidative and antioxidant markers from both serum and tissue samples were evaluated, and tissues were examined histopathologically. There were no significant differences between the control and sham groups. A notable increase in oxidative markers was observed in group III compared to group I. In addition, a significant decrease in antioxidant markers was detected in group III. However, there was a marked preservation in the tissue and blood samples of groups IV and V compared to group III in terms of oxidative damage. Additionally, definitive prophylaxes were seen in the histopathological examination of the tissue samples in groups IV and V compared with group III. These significant findings show that rosuvastatin has a considerable protective effect on neural tissue against oxidative damage. Likewise, the early withdrawal of rosuvastatin has a clear neuroprotective effect similar to that of continuous therapy. Nevertheless, other systematic effects and beneficial neural effects of statins should be investigated in further clinical trials. PMID:23844682

  13. The Effects of Difumarate Salt S-15176 after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tunçdemir, Matem; Kelten, Bilal; Akdemir, Osman; Karao?lan, Alper; Ta?demiro?lu, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the present study we analyzed neuroprotective and antiapoptotic effect of the difumarate salt S-15176, as an anti-ischemic, an antioxidant and a stabilizer of mitochondrial membrane in secondary damage following spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Methods Three groups were performed with 30 Wistar rats; control (1), trauma (2), and a trauma+S-15176 (10 mg/kg i.p., dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment (3). SCI was performed at the thoracic level using the weight-drop technique. Spinal cord tissues were collected following intracardiac perfusion in 3rd and 7th days of posttrauma. Hematoxylin and eosin staining for histopatology, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay for apoptotic cells and immunohistochemistry for proapoptotic cytochrome-c, Bax and caspase 9 were performed to all groups. Functional recovery test were applied to each group in 3rd and 7th days following SCI. Results In trauma group, edematous regions, diffuse hemorrhage, necrosis, leukocyte infiltration and severe degeneration in motor neurons were observed prominently in gray matter. The number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher (p<0.05) than control group. In the S-15176-treated groups, apoptotic cell number in 3rd and 7th days (p<0.001), also cytochrome-c (p<0.001), Bax (p<0.001) and caspase 9 immunoreactive cells (p<0.001) were significantly decreased in number compared to trauma groups. Hemorrhage and edema in the focal areas were also noticed in gray matter of treatment groups. Results of the locomotor test were significantly increased in treatment group (p<0.05) when compared to trauma groups. Conclusion We suggest that difumarate salt S-15176 prevents mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis and protects spinal cord from secondary injury and helps to preserve motor function following SCI in rats. PMID:26180614

  14. Transduced Schwann cells promote axon growth and myelination after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Golden, Kevin L; Pearse, Damien D; Blits, Bas; Garg, Maneesh S; Oudega, Martin; Wood, Patrick M; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2007-10-01

    We sought to directly compare growth and myelination of local and supraspinal axons by implanting into the injured spinal cord Schwann cells (SCs) transduced ex vivo with adenoviral (AdV) or lentiviral (LV) vectors encoding a bifunctional neurotrophin molecule (D15A). D15A mimics actions of both neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Transduced SCs were injected into the injury center 1 week after a moderate thoracic (T8) adult rat spinal cord contusion. D15A expression and bioactivity in vitro; D15A levels in vivo; and graft volume, SC number, implant axon number and cortico-, reticulo-, raphe-, coerulo-spinal and sensory axon growth were determined for both types of vectors employed to transduce SCs. ELISAs revealed that D15A-secreting SC implants contained significantly higher levels of neurotrophin than non-transduced SC and AdV/GFP and LV/GFP SC controls early after implantation. At 6 weeks post-implantation, D15A-secreting SC grafts exhibited 5-fold increases in graft volume, SC number and myelinated axon counts and a 3-fold increase in myelinated to unmyelinated (ensheathed) axon ratios. The total number of axons within grafts of LV/GFP/D15A SCs was estimated to be over 70,000. Also 5-HT, DbetaH, and CGRP axon length was increased up to 5-fold within D15A grafts. In sum, despite qualitative differences using the two vectors, increased neurotrophin secretion by the implanted D15A SCs led to the presence of a significantly increased number of axons in the contusion site. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential for utilizing neurotrophin-transduced SCs to repair the injured spinal cord. PMID:17719577

  15. Persistent inward currents in spinal motoneurons: important for normal function but potentially harmful after spinal cord injury and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    ElBasiouny, S M; Schuster, J E; Heckman, C J

    2010-10-01

    Meaningful body movements depend on the interplay between synaptic inputs to motoneurons and their intrinsic properties. Injury and disease often alter either or both of these factors and cause motoneuron and movement dysfunction. The ability of the motoneuronal membrane to generate persistent inward currents (PICs) is especially potent in setting the intrinsic excitability of motoneurons and can drastically change the motoneuron output to a given input. In this article, we review the role of PICs in modulating the excitability of spinal motoneurons during health, and their contribution to motoneuron excitability after spinal cord injury (SCI) and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) leading to exaggerated long-lasting reflexes and muscle spasms, and contributing to neuronal degeneration, respectively. PMID:20462789

  16. The influence of time from injury to surgery on motor recovery and length of hospital stay in acute traumatic spinal cord injury: an observational Canadian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R John; Johnson, Michael G; Linassi, A G; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24?h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72?h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24?h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24?h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24?h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS. PMID:25333195

  17. The Influence of Time from Injury to Surgery on Motor Recovery and Length of Hospital Stay in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Observational Canadian Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C.; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R.; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R. John; Johnson, Michael G.; Linassi, A.G.; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24?h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72?h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24?h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24?h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24?h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS. PMID:25333195

  18. Intra-Spinal Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Transplantation Inhibits the Expression of Nuclear Factor-?B in Acute Transection Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajiv Prasad; Qiao, Jian min; Shen, Fu guo; Bista, Krishna bahadur; Zhao, Zhong nan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) transplantation in the expression of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Methods BMMNCs were isolated from tibia and femur by a density gradient centrifugation. After establishment of acute transection SCI, rats were divided into experiment (BMMNCs), experiment control (0.1 M PBS infused) and sham surgery groups (laminectomy without any SCI). Locomotor function was assessed weekly for 5 weeks post-injury using BBB locomotor score and urinary bladder function daily for 4 weeks post-injury. Activity of NF-?B in spinal cord was assessed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results At each time point post-injury, sham surgery group had significantly higher Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan locomotor and urinary bladder function scores than experiment and experiment control group (p<0.05). At subsequent time interval there were gradual improvement in both experiment and experiment control group, but experiment group had higher score in comparison to experiment control group (p<0.05). Comparisons were also made for expression of activated NF-?B positive cells and level of NF-?B messenger RNA in spinal cord at various time points between the groups. Activated NF-?B immunoreactivity and level of NF-?B mRNA expression were significantly higher in control group in comparison to experiment and sham surgery group (p<0.05). Conclusion BMMNCs transplantation attenuates the expression of NF-?B in injured spinal cord tissue and thus helps in recovery of neurological function in rat models with SCI. PMID:25535513

  19. Self-Perceived Reasons for Unemployment Cited by Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship to Gender, Race, Age, and Level of Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, J. Stuart; Anson, Carol A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose of study was to identify reasons persons with spinal cord injury attribute to their unemployment status, and determine if different demographic categories hold different beliefs in this regard. Participants (n=231) completed the Multidimensional Adjustment Profile. Inability to physically perform same type of work was primary reason cited.…

  20. Neuroprotective effects of allicin on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury via improvement of mitochondrial function in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin-Wen; Chen, Tao; Guan, Jianzhong; Liu, Wen-Bo; Liu, Jian

    2012-10-01

    Allicin, the active substance of garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have potential therapeutic applications. The present study was designed to investigate the beneficial effects of allicin against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and its associated mechanisms. Male New Zealand white rabbits were pretreated with allicin (1, 10 and 50 mg/kg) for two weeks, and exposed to infrarenal aortic occlusion-induced spinal cord I/R injury. We found that allicin significantly reduced the volume of the spinal cord infarctions, improved the histopathologic features and increased the number of motor neurons in a dose-dependent manner. This protection was associated with an improvement in neurological function, which was measured by the hind-limb motor function scores. Furthermore, allicin also significantly suppressed the accumulations of protein and lipid peroxidation products, and increased the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). In addition, allicin treatment preserved the function of mitochondria respiratory chain complexes and inhibited the production of ROS and the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in the spinal cord of this model. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that allicin exerts neuroprotection against spinal cord I/R injury in rabbits, which may be associated with the improvement of mitochondrial function. PMID:22750272