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Sample records for venous hickman catheter

  1. Prolonged access to the venous system using the Hickman right atrial catheter.

    PubMed Central

    Sagor, G.; Mitchemere, P.; Layfield, J.; Prentice, H. G.; Kirk, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Seventy-one Hickman catheters were inserted into 63 patients for prolonged access to the venous system. The mean catheter life was 98 days, but despite the long life in situ provided by these catheters only 5 (7%) had to be removed for septic complications. The technique of insertion is described and the subsequent management of these catheters discussed. The management of patients receiving parental nutrition, those undergoing bone marrow transplantation for acute leukaemia, and those having cytotoxic chemotherapy was greatly facilitated by the use of the catheter. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6401969

  2. A standardised approach to the insertion of Hickman catheters.

    PubMed Central

    Ebbs, S. R.; Cameron, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    A standardised technique for the insertion of Hickman catheters under local anaesthetic is described. The external jugular vein is to be preferred, but if this proves too small the catheter may be introduced via the internal jugular vein using a Seldinger technique. A total of 44 Hickman catheters were inserted into 44 patients using this approach without major complication. Images fig. 1 PMID:3190127

  3. The use of Hickman-Broviac catheters for paediatric radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, C. A.; Filshie, J.

    1986-01-01

    We describe the first use of Hickman-Broviac catheters in 20 children under the age of 4 years for repeated daily general anaesthesia for radiotherapy. These children received a total of four hundred and eighty two general anaesthetics. The advantages and disadvantages of using Hickman-Broviac lines are discussed. PMID:3813441

  4. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePLUS

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  5. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters. Low-risk alternatives for ongoing venous access.

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, S W; Peatross, B G; Grossman, M D; Sullivan, J J; Harker, W G

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the use of peripherally inserted central venous catheters to provide ongoing venous access in general medical and surgical patients in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. Between 1985 and 1988 trained nurses successfully inserted 393 catheters in 460 suitable patients (an 85.4% success rate). Correct catheter tip placement in the superior vena cava was documented in 359 of the 393 (91.3%) catheter insertions, but an additional 30 catheters were in a position deemed adequate for the intended use. The mean duration of catheter use was 27.6 +/- 5.2 (1 standard deviation) days (median 20 days, range 1 to 370 days). A total of 65 patients left the hospital with catheters in place, with the mean length of catheter use at home being 36.2 +/- 6.0 days (range 2 to 266). In all, 79% of the catheters were in use until the successful completion of therapy or patient death; catheter-related complications led to premature catheter removal in the remaining 21%. Catheter-related complications included bland phlebitis (8.2%), occlusion (8.2%), local infection (3.6%), bacteremia or fungemia (2.1%), mechanical failure or rupture (2.6%), venous thrombosis (0.7%), and other (3.3%). One patient required vein excision for the management of suppurative phlebitis, but no deaths were attributed to catheter use. This study illustrates the use and safety of peripherally inserted central venous catheters to provide reliable vascular access over prolonged periods in an elderly veteran population. At our facility, percutaneous central venous catheters and surgically implanted (Hickman or Broviac) catheters are now reserved for use in patients in whom peripherally inserted catheters cannot be placed. Images PMID:8128698

  6. Complications associated with central venous catheters in a haematology unit.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, P. C.; Morris, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters in patients suffering from haematological disorders has brought enormous benefits, but has been associated with an increase in septicaemia. We have reviewed septic and other complications in 43 patients who received one of three different forms of central venous catheters (type A-Hickman, type B-Portacath, type C-Pasport) during 1991. All complications were reviewed up to 18 months following insertion. The total complication rate was 31% (0.97 per 100 catheter days), and the total sepsis complication rate was 18.8% (0.49 per 100 catheter days). Type A catheters had the greatest sepsis complication rate of 29.5% (0.84 per 100 catheter days), with type B 15% (0.39 per 100 catheter days) and type C 9.9% (0.32 per 100 catheter days). Prophylactic antibiotics on the day of catheter insertion did not reduce the sepsis rate or prolong catheter survival. PMID:8650826

  7. Complications associated with central venous catheters in a haematology unit.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, P C; Morris, T C

    1994-10-01

    The use of central venous catheters in patients suffering from haematological disorders has brought enormous benefits, but has been associated with an increase in septicaemia. We have reviewed septic and other complications in 43 patients who received one of three different forms of central venous catheters (type A-Hickman, type B-Portacath, type C-Pasport) during 1991. All complications were reviewed up to 18 months following insertion. The total complication rate was 31% (0.97 per 100 catheter days), and the total sepsis complication rate was 18.8% (0.49 per 100 catheter days). Type A catheters had the greatest sepsis complication rate of 29.5% (0.84 per 100 catheter days), with type B 15% (0.39 per 100 catheter days) and type C 9.9% (0.32 per 100 catheter days). Prophylactic antibiotics on the day of catheter insertion did not reduce the sepsis rate or prolong catheter survival. PMID:8650826

  8. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  9. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  10. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  11. A retrospective study of central venous catheters GCRI experience

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin A.; Shukla, Shilin N.; Talati, Shailesh S.; Parikh, Sonia K.; Bhatt, Shivani J.; Maka, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) has greatly improved the quality-of-care in cancer patients, yet these catheters may cause serious infectious and thrombotic complications. The aim of this retrospective study was to study the various types of CVCs and their complications. Materials and Methods: We studied retrospectively 213 cases of CVCs in our institute with their indications, type and complications from August 2010 to July 2011. Results: A total of 213 CVCs were inserted in patients with hematological (62%) and solid organ malignancies (38%). Ninety-eight patients (46%) had peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC), 90 (42%) patients had Hickman catheters and 25 (12%) had a port. The median duration of retention of Hickman catheters was 104 days (3-365 days), for the peripherally inserted central catheters was 59 days (3-100 days) and for the port it was 280 days (45-365 days). Non-infective complications were more than infective (12% vs. 7%). The most common complication was non-infective occlusion and thrombophlebitis. In one patient with PICC thrombosis occurred in the cephalic, radial and ulnar vein and in one patient with port thrombosis occurred in the superior vena cava. Organisms were isolated in 60% (12 out of 20) of cultures. Common organisms isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 5 (42%), Staphylococcus aureus in 2 (16%), Escherichia coli in 2 (16%) and Aspergillus in 3 (25%) patients. 7 out of 12 infected patients had negative blood cultures within 7 days of antibiotic treatment, 5 patients remained positive for more than 7 days with antibiotics. In 155 patients (73%), the desired treatment protocol was completed and at present there are still 28 patients (13%) with catheters. 5 patients (2.3%) died of febrile neutropenia and septicemia with multi-organ failure. In 5 patients (2.3%), the catheters (1 Port, 1 Hickman and 3 PICC) were prematurely removed because of thrombosis. Conclusion: CVCs are better options to facilitate the long-term vascular access provided infection is prevented with meticulous care and treated promptly with proper antibiotics. Most CVCs is acceptable to patients. PMID:24604950

  12. Thrombolytic therapy for central venous catheter occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters have improved the quality of care for patients with chronic illnesses, but are complicated by obstructions which can result in delay of treatment or catheter removal. Design and Methods This paper reviews thrombolytic treatment for catheter obstruction. Literature from Medline searches using the terms “central venous catheter”, “central venous access device” OR “central venous line” associated with the terms “obstruction”, “occlusion” OR “thrombolytic” was reviewed. Efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, central venous catheter clearance rates and time to clearance were assessed. Results Alteplase, one of the current therapies, clears 52% of obstructed catheters within 30 min with 86% overall clearance (after 2 doses, when necessary). However, newer medications may have higher efficacy or shorter time to clearance. Reteplase cleared 67–74% within 30–40 min and 95% of catheters overall. Occlusions were resolved in 70 and 83% of patients with one and 2 doses of tenecteplase, respectively. Recombinant urokinase cleared 60% of catheters at 30 min and 73% overall. Alfimeprase demonstrated rapid catheter clearance with resolution in 40% of subjects within 5 min, 60% within 30 min, and 80% within 2 h. Additionally, urokinase prophylaxis decreased the incidence of catheter occlusions from 16–68% in the control group to 4–23% in the treatment group; in some studies, rates of catheter infections were also decreased in the urokinase group. Conclusions Thrombolytic agents successfully clear central venous catheter occlusions in most cases. Newer agents may act more rapidly and effectively than currently utilized therapies, but randomized studies with direct comparisons of these agents are needed to determine optimal management for catheter obstruction. PMID:22180420

  13. Complex central venous catheter insertion for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Powell, Steven; Belfield, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction of payment by results in the UK, there has been no decrease in central venous catheter (CVC) use. In part, this may relate to a requirement to dialyse through a CVC while autogenous access matures. Mortality data have improved in parallel and patients on hemodialysis live longer, which may lead to an increased exposure to CVCs.Exposure to CVCs carries a significant risk of infection and occlusion requiring their repositioning or exchange. The mid to long-term sequelae of CVC use is central venous occlusion leaving clinical teams with an ever increasing challenge to find adequate venous access.In this article, we will discuss the challenges faced by operators inserting CVCs into the hemodialysis-dependent patient who has exhausted more tradition insertion sites. These include translumbar caval catheters, transocclusion and transcollateral catheters, transjugular Inferior Vena Cava catheter positioning, and transhepatic catheters. We will demonstrate the techniques employed, complications, and anticipated longevity of function. PMID:24817471

  14. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Geerts, William

    2014-12-01

    Thrombotic complications associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVCs) are common and lead to distressing patient symptoms, catheter dysfunction, increased risk of infections, long-term central venous stenosis, and considerable costs of care. Risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis include use of larger, multilumen, and peripherally inserted catheters in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Symptomatic catheter-related thrombosis is treated with anticoagulation, generally without removing the catheter. The intensity and duration of anticoagulation depend on the extent of thrombosis, risk of bleeding, and need for continued use of a CVC. To date, the clinical benefit of prophylactic doses of anticoagulant has been disappointing and these agents are not used routinely for this purpose. This chapter focuses on recent evidence, remaining controversies, and practical approaches to reducing the burden of thrombosis associated with CVCs. PMID:25696870

  15. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  16. Ultrasound assessment of thrombotic complications in pediatric patients with tunneled central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kosiak, Wojciech; Irga, Ninela; Po?czy?ska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Central venous access consists in inserting a vascular catheter to the vena cava and placing its tip in the vicinity of the opening to the right atrium. In the patients of the Clinic of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology at the Academic Clinical Centre of the Medical University in Gda?sk, such implantation procedures are conducted 40–50 times in a year using Broviac/Hickman catheters that are placed in the subclavian vein. In the Ultrasound and Biopsy Laboratory at the clinic mentioned above, approximately 200–250 examinations have been conducted since 2005 to assess the central venous access. Implantation of a catheter considerably increases the comfort of patients who require a long-term venous access. Nevertheless, it is an invasive procedure, burdened with a risk of numerous, early and late complications. The late complications are associated with implanted catheters and include catheter-related thrombosis. The aim of this paper was to present three patients of the Clinic of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology at the Academic Clinical Centre of the Medical University in Gda?sk, in whom thrombotic complications occurred as a result of long-term central venous catheters. The paper also discusses the possibilities of using sonography in the assessment of such complications. In the presented patients, it was possible to determine the size and localization of a thrombus which enabled effective treatment in two cases. The pathomechanism of catheter-related thrombosis was explained and the risk factors of such complications were discussed. The attention was paid to the necessity of conducting ultrasound examinations in pediatric patients with inserted catheters as soon as the first symptoms of thrombosis appear. Based on own observations and despite the lack of validation of ultrasound imaging in the assessment of central catheters, we believe that this method is highly promising and can be recommended for the assessment of thrombotic complications in pediatric patients with central venous catheters. PMID:26673005

  17. A comparative analysis of radiological and surgical placement of central venous catheters

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Kieran D.; Fisher, Ross; Warnock, Neil; Winfield, David A.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Gaines, Peter A.

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To compare the differences in practice and outcome of all radiologically and surgically placed central venous catheters retrospectively over a 2-year period simultaneously, at a single institution. Methods.A total of 253 Hickman catheters were inserted in 209 patients; 120 were placed radiologically in 102 patients and 133 were placed surgically in 107 patients. The indication was chemotherapy in 76% of radiological and in 47% of surgical cases; the remainder were for total parenteral nutrition and venous access. Results. There were 6 (4.5%) primary surgical failures and a further 17 (13%) surgical cases requiring multiple placement attempts. Pneumothorax occurred once (0.8%) surgically and four times (3.3%) radiologically. There were no radiological primary misplacements but there were five (3.7%) surgical ones. Catheter or central vein thrombosis occurred in four (3.3%) radiological and five (3.7%) surgical cases. The rate of infection per 1000 catheter-days was 1.9 in radiologically placed catheters and 4.0 in surgically placed ones (p<0.001). Average catheter life-span was similar for the two placement methods (100{+-}23 days). Conclusion. Radiological placement is consistently more reliable than surgical placement. There are fewer placement complications and fewer catheter infections overall.

  18. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will change your dressings in a sterile (very clean) way. Follow these steps: Wash your hands for 30 ... any bleeding or other drainage around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place a new Biopatch over ...

  19. Central venous catheters: incidence and predictive factors of venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Mary; Desai, Amishi; Pasupneti, Shravani; Kress, John; Funaki, Brian; Watson, Sydeaka; Herlitz, Jean; Hines, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Central venous catheter access in an acute setting can be a challenge given underlying disease and risk for venous thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed but limit sites for fistula creation in patients with chronic renal failure (CKD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of venous thrombosis from small bore internal jugular (SBIJ) and PICC line placement. This investigation identifies populations of patients who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC and highlights the importance of peripheral vein preservation in patients with renal failure. Materials and methods: A venous Doppler ultrasound was performed at the time of SBIJ insertion and removal to evaluate for thrombosis in the internal jugular vein. Data was collected pre- and post-intervention to ascertain if increased vein preservation knowledge amongst the healthcare team led to less use of PICCs. Demographic factors were collected in the SBIJ and PICC groups and risk factor analysis was completed. Results: 1,122 subjects had PICC placement and 23 had SBIJ placement. The incidence of thrombosis in the PICC group was 10%. One patient with an SBIJ had evidence of central vein thrombosis when the catheter was removed. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a history of transplant, and the indication of total parenteral nutrition was associated with thrombosis (p < 0.001). The decrease in PICCs placed in patients with CKD 6 months before and after intervention was significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There are subsets of patients with high risk for thrombosis who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC. PMID:25997503

  20. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings. Midlines have been associated with lower rates of phlebitis than short peripheral IVs, and less infections in contrast to central lines. There are different implantation techniques, which have evolved in terms of materials (silicone and polyurethane) and technological advances (ultrasound): Seldinger technique with micropuncture and Ultrasound-guided Seldinger technique. At present where scientific evidence, clinical needs, efficiency and costs are influential parameters, Midlines should be considered as an alternative peripheral venous access. Unlike PICC lines, Midline catheters offer peripheral, not central venous access. Midlines should be considered early in treatment instead of serial short peripheral IVs. These devices permit the infusion of most or all infusates that are appropriate for short peripheral IVs with the added advantage that Midlines can last much longer; at least six weeks and perhaps for months. PMID:24624619

  1. Dialysis central venous catheter types and performance.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Brenna, Irene; Brunini, Francesca; Mezzina, Nicoletta; Pasho, Sabina; Giordano, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The choice of both short-term (nontunneled) and long-term (tunneled) central venous catheters (CVCs) for hemodialysis is a difficult one, due to the large number of available catheters, with very different characteristics and cost.CVC-related complications (in particular infections, thrombosis and inefficient dialysis) can determine ominous consequences and death, with extremely elevated costs due to prolonged hospitalization and expensive procedures. Thus, the correct balance between cost and quality of CVC is required when deciding which kind of CVC should be adopted.In this regard, the design of CVCs has become a very active area of industrial and clinical research, with the ultimate goal of improving the long-term function of the catheter and of reducing complication rates, because even small improvements in the complication or reintervention rates have a positive impact on individual patient care and cost to society. In this article we review the general features of CVCs, including differences between tunneled and nontunneled CVCs, materials and their compatibility with lock solutions, the implications of straight versus precurved design in nontunneled CVCs, lumen and tip features with their clinical implications, catheter coatings and their effect on infection and thrombosis. PMID:24817472

  2. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or ‘linogram’ technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. PMID:17932667

  3. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  4. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Patient Section Who Are Interventional Radiologists? Multimedia Insurance Coverage IR Treatments Abdominal aortic aneurysms Angiography ... radiology Interventional radiology case studies Developed by ACR Multimedia gallery Multimedia Archive Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) ...

  5. [Insertion and maintenance of peripheral venous catheters in neonates].

    PubMed

    Pastor Rodríguez, Jesús David; Serrano Matás, Encarnación; Muñoz Escolar, Dolores Angeles

    2008-01-01

    Insertion of peripheral venous catheters in premature and term newborns is a common practice in neonatology units and neonatal intensive care units. Nurses are responsible for the insertion and maintenance of peripheral venous catheters and for the prevention of complications. Although this technique is routine, a series of recommendations, supported by evidence-based practice, should be bourne in mind when inserting these catheters. Following these recommendations guarantees successful insertion, and the absence of risks and complications. To achieve this aim, the following steps should be carried out: preparing the material, selecting the vein, selecting the catheter, cleaning and disinfecting the area, inserting the catheter, fixing the catheter, and restoring intravenous therapy. In addition, attention must be paid to potential risks in order to resolve them as quickly as possible, thereby avoiding complications. PMID:18724919

  6. [PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER THROUGH DRUM SYSTEM].

    PubMed

    Salas Campos, Luis

    2015-11-01

    It described a one lumen central venous catheter peripherally inserted drum system whose insertion into the vein is performed through a plastic splittable cannula by braunula technique. The braunula technique is particularly important in certain urgent or emergency situations, where speed and aseptic conditions of which the procedure is performed represent a further improvement over other insertion techniques. The catheter mantains the advantages, in terms of easy placement, that all devices equipped with a drum system have but at the same time eliminates the complications presented by other similar catheters whose insertion to the venous circulation used to be performed through a needle. These catheters allow quick, simple and safe access to the central venous circulation and reduce risks associated with the procedure, improving patient safety. PMID:26749753

  7. [Calcification of thrombus associated with central venous catheter: unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Dounas, M; Yamami, A; Peillon, P; Martinais, P; Angenard, F

    2000-11-01

    Thrombosis originating from the tip of central venous catheter is a well known complication. The calcification of such a thrombus is very rare. Until now, only two cases had been described with long-term indwelling central venous catheters used for total parenteral nutrition. We report the first case of a calcified thrombus occurred during a short-term central venous catheterisation. The presumptive mechanism of thrombus calcification is precipitation of calcium salts and its deposition on a pre-existent thrombus. In total parenteral nutrition the mechanism of calcification seems to be multifactorial. Thus, the precipitation of calcium phosphate is increased by the following factors: higher calcium and phosphate concentrations, the use of calcium chloride instead of calcium gluconate, lower pH solutions, slow infusion rate. PMID:11244709

  8. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter. PMID:25278411

  9. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for “Central line malposition” and then for “Central venous catheters intravascular malposition,” we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient’s body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition. PMID:26587087

  10. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Carlos J; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for "Central line malposition" and then for "Central venous catheters intravascular malposition," we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient's body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition. PMID:26587087

  11. The Malposition of Central Venous Catheters in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzega, Maria; Ossowska, Magdalena; Chmiel, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Aleksandra; Balwierz, Walentyna

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Contemporary medical care, especially in the field of pediatrics often requires central venous line (CVC – Central Venous Catheter) implantation for carrying out treatment. Some conditions are treated intravenously for several months, other require long-term venous access due to periodical administration of medications or daily nutritional supplementation. Material/Methods A total number of 309 CVCs were implanted at Children’s University Hospital in Cracow between January 2011 and December 2012 (24 months). Malposition of the CVC is not common. The target of our article was to present two rare cases of malposition of catheters and two displacements of catheter due to chest tumors, and to enhance the importance of differential diagnostic imaging when difficulties occur. Results CVC malposition was detected with different imaging modalities followed by appropriate medical procedures. Conclusions In case of any difficulties with central lines, it is necessary to investigate the underlying cause. The central line team at hospital cooperating with other specialists is needed to detect complications and to prevent them. PMID:25177409

  12. Daptomycin antibiotic lock therapy in a rat model of staphylococcal central venous catheter biofilm infections.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, Andrew D G; Li, Tongchuan; Zhang, Shuxin; Arya, Anu; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Bertolami, Shellie; Mortin, Lawrence I

    2011-09-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) is an adjunctive procedure to prevent or treat central venous catheter infections, ensuing catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is rapidly bactericidal against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The efficacies of daptomycin against central venous catheter biofilms, catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections were evaluated by adapting a previously reported central venous catheter biofilm model in rats. Combined daptomycin ALT and systemic dosing resulted in the clearance of an established in vivo S. aureus central venous catheter biofilm after just two daily ALT treatments (30 min with daptomycin at 5 mg/ml) with concurrent systemic daptomycin dosing (40 mg/kg of body weight/day subcutaneously [s.c.]; equivalent exposure of 6 mg/kg/day in people). Daptomycin ALT solutions formulated in either saline or lactated Ringer's solution were equally fast in eradicating established in vivo methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) central venous catheter biofilms. However, the lactated Ringer's formulation was superior to that of saline in sustaining the bacterial clearance of treated central venous catheters (83% versus 50%). In MRSE-infected central venous catheter studies, 3 days of daptomycin or vancomycin ALT (18 h at 5 mg/ml) with systemic s.c. dosing (40 mg/kg/day daptomycin or 100 mg/kg/day vancomycin) was equally effective 1 week posttherapy in maintaining cleared central venous catheters (90% [n = 10] versus 100% [n = 8]). These results suggest that daptomycin ALT, along with systemic dosing, could be an effective treatment option for the prevention or eradication of staphylococcal central venous catheter biofilm infections, thereby reducing the occurrence of catheter-related bacteremia or catheter-related metastatic infections. PMID:21709082

  13. Malposition of central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch via external jugular vein -a case report-

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, SoWoon; Lee, Ju Ho; Park, Chunghyun; Hong, Yong-woo

    2015-01-01

    The central venous cannulation is commonly performed in the operating rooms and intensive care units for various purposes. Although the central venous catheter (CVC) is used in many ways, the malpositioning of the CVC is often associated with serious complications. We report a case of an unexpected malposition of a CVC in the jugular venous arch via external jugular vein. PMID:25844137

  14. Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava in Hematological Malignancy Requiring Central Venous Catheter Insertion for Intensive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Imataki, Osamu; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Hamasaki, Yukiko; Oku, Maki; Kida, Jun-ichiro; Uemura, Makiko; Matsuka, Harumi

    2015-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava is a congenital vascular anomaly, which is possibly arrhythmogenic and thrombogenic, rarely complicated with coronary sinus atresia. We treated a 42-year-old male with Hodgkin's lymphoma requiring central venous catheter placement for intensive chemotherapy. Persistent left superior vena cava was revealed after the insertion of the central venous catheter by the radiological finding of the catheter tip cannulated into the vena cava cavity. The relationship between coronary sinus atresia and persistent left superior vena cava induced by central venous catheterization remains unclear; however, the hematologist should pay attention to the malpositioning of the central venous catheter. PMID:26600783

  15. Malposition of a Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in the Graft Hepatic Vein.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Zeynep; Araz, Co?kun; Ta?k?n, Duygu; Moray, Gökhan; Torgay, Adnan

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters are used for delivering medications and parenteral nutrition, measuring hemodynamic variations, and providing long-term intravenous access. In our clinic, during liver transection using a living-liver donor, peripherally inserted central venous catheters are generally preferred because they involve a less invasive technique with a lower risk of complications. In this report, we present the case of a 36-year-old male liver donor into whom we peripherally inserted a central venous catheter from his left basilic vein. After transecting the hepatic vein, the surgeon found foreign material inside the venous lumen, which turned out to be the distal segment of the catheter. PMID:26640920

  16. JUGULAR CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT THROUGH A MODIFIED SELDINGER TECHNIQUE FOR LONG-TERM VENOUS ACCESS IN CHELONIANS.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Mariana A; Divers, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Long-term or repeated venous access in chelonians is difficult to obtain and manage, but can be critically important for administration of medications and blood sampling in hospitalized patients. Jugular catheterization provides the most rapid and secure route for vascular access, but catheters can be difficult to place, and maintaining catheter patency may be challenging. Long multilumen polyurethane catheters provide flexibility and sampling access, and minimize difficulties, such as catheter displacement, that have been encountered with traditional over-the-needle catheters. We describe placement of 4 Fr. 13-cm polyurethane catheters in three chelonians with the use of a modified Seldinger technique. Venous access was obtained with the use of an over-the-needle catheter, which allowed placement of a 0.018-in.-diameter wire, over which the polyurethane catheter was placed. Indwelling time has ranged between 1 and 4 mo currently. All tortoises were sedated for this procedure. Polyurethane central catheters provide safe, long-term venous access that allows clinicians to perform serial blood sampling as well as intravenous administration of medications, anesthetic agents, and fluids. A jugular catheter can also allow central venous pressure measurement. Utilization of central line catheters was associated with improvements in diagnostic efficiency and therapeutic case management, with minimal risks and complications. PMID:27010289

  17. Hemodynamics of Central Venous Catheters: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Clark, Alicia; Ng, Chin Hei; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are used to provide vascular access during hemodialysis in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Despite several advantages and widespread use, CVCs have a high incidence rate of clot formation during the interdialytic phase (48 hrs). In an attempt the prevent clot formation, hospitals routinely administer heparin, an anticoagulant, into the catheter after a dialysis session. It has been reported, however, that up to 40% of the heparin solution will leak into the blood stream during the interdialytic phase, placing the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences. The aim of this study is to determine the role that advective-diffusive transport plays in the heparin leaking process. Numerical simulations of heparin convective mass transfer have been conducted, showing that while advective losses may be significant at the tip, previous studies may be overestimating the total amount of heparin leakage. To validate the quantitative prediction from the simulations, P.L.I.F. is used to experimentally measure heparin transport from CVCs placed in an idealized Superior Vena Cava with physically accurate pulsatile flow conditions. Improved understanding of flow near the catheter tip is applied to improve catheter design and heparin locking procedures.

  18. Risk factors for venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Longfang; Zhao, Qianru; Yang, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors associated with an increased risk of symptomatic peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC)-related venous thrombosis. Retrospective analyses identified 2313 patients who received PICCs from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013. All 11 patients with symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis (thrombosis group) and 148 who did not have thromboses (non-thrombosis group) were selected randomly. The medical information of 159 patients (age, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, smoking history, nutritional risk score, platelet count, leucocyte count as well as levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and degradation products of fibrin) were collected. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine the risk factors for thrombosis. Of 2313 patients, 11 (0.47%) were found to have symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis by color Doppler ultrasound. Being bedridden for a long time (odds ratio [(OR]), 17.774; P=0.0017), D-dimer >5 mg/L (36.651; 0.0025) and suffering from one comorbidity (8.39; 0.0265) or more comorbidities (13.705; 0.0083) were the major risk factors for PICC-catheter related venous thrombosis by stepwise logistic regression analysis. Among 159 patients, the prevalence of PICC-associated venous thrombosis in those with ?1 risk factor was 10.34% (12/116), in those with ?2 risk factors was 20.41% (10/49), and in those with >3 risk factors was 26.67% (4/15). Being bedridden >72 h, having increased levels of D-dimer (>5 mg/L) and suffering from comorbidities were independent risk factors of PICC-related venous thrombosis. PMID:25664112

  19. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing. PMID:22059378

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of a Central Venous Catheter Care Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Halton, Kate A.; Cook, David; Paterson, David L.; Safdar, Nasia; Graves, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Background A bundled approach to central venous catheter care is currently being promoted as an effective way of preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). Consumables used in the bundled approach are relatively inexpensive which may lead to the conclusion that the bundle is cost-effective. However, this fails to consider the nontrivial costs of the monitoring and education activities required to implement the bundle, or that alternative strategies are available to prevent CR-BSI. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a bundle to prevent CR-BSI in Australian intensive care patients. Methods and Findings A Markov decision model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the bundle relative to remaining with current practice (a non-bundled approach to catheter care and uncoated catheters), or use of antimicrobial catheters. We assumed the bundle reduced relative risk of CR-BSI to 0.34. Given uncertainty about the cost of the bundle, threshold analyses were used to determine the maximum cost at which the bundle remained cost-effective relative to the other approaches to infection control. Sensitivity analyses explored how this threshold alters under different assumptions about the economic value placed on bed-days and health benefits gained by preventing infection. If clinicians are prepared to use antimicrobial catheters, the bundle is cost-effective if national 18-month implementation costs are below $1.1 million. If antimicrobial catheters are not an option the bundle must cost less than $4.3 million. If decision makers are only interested in obtaining cash-savings for the unit, and place no economic value on either the bed-days or the health benefits gained through preventing infection, these cost thresholds are reduced by two-thirds. Conclusions A catheter care bundle has the potential to be cost-effective in the Australian intensive care setting. Rather than anticipating cash-savings from this intervention, decision makers must be prepared to invest resources in infection control to see efficiency improvements. PMID:20862246

  1. Therapy Insight: venous-catheter-related thrombosis in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Verso, Melina

    2006-04-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) have improved the management of patients with cancer substantially, by facilitating chemotherapy and supportive therapy. The use of CVCs is associated with complications such as infection and upper-limb deep vein thrombosis (UL-DVT). The incidence of clinically overt UL-DVT related to the use of CVCs ranges between 2% and 4%. In the most recent study, the incidence of CVC-related thrombosis, as screened by venography, was approximately 18% in the absence of prophylaxis. In cancer patients with CVC-related UL-DVT, the incidence of clinically overt pulmonary embolism was between 15% and 25%, and the incidence of autopsy-proven pulmonary embolism was up to 50%. Pathogenic factors for CVC-related thrombosis include vessel injury caused by the CVC insertion procedure, venous stasis because of the indwelling CVC, and hypercoagulability associated with cancer. Recent studies have not confirmed a benefit for prophylaxis with antithrombotic agents for CVC-related thrombosis. The recommended treatment for CVC-related thrombosis is based on long-term anticoagulant therapy, with or without catheter removal. PMID:16596145

  2. Study of in vivo catheter biofilm infections using pediatric central venous catheter implanted in rat.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashwini; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Venous access catheters used in clinics are prone to biofilm contamination, contributing to chronic and nosocomial infections. Although several animal models for studying device-associated biofilms were previously described, only a few detailed protocols are currently available. Here we provide a protocol using totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) implanted in rats. This model recapitulates all phenomena observed in the clinic, and it allows bacterial biofilm development and physiology to be studied. After TIVAP implantation and inoculation with luminescent pathogens, in vivo biofilm formation can be monitored in situ, and biofilm biomass can be recovered from contaminated TIVAP and organs. We used this protocol to study host responses to biofilm infection, to evaluate preventive and curative antibiofilm strategies and to study fundamental biofilm properties. For this procedure, one should expect ∼3 h of hands-on time, including the implantation in one rat followed by in situ luminescence monitoring and bacterial load estimation. PMID:26890680

  3. Comparison between peripherally implanted ports and externally sited catheters for long-term venous access.

    PubMed Central

    Pullyblank, A. M.; Carey, P. D.; Pearce, S. Z.; Tanner, A. G.; Guillou, P. J.; Monson, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    In a comparative study, we examined the use of a peripherally implantable venous access system which does not require either central venous cannulation or radiological screening. We compared the complication rate in 85 patients receiving this system with that in 112 similar patients receiving Hickman lines. In addition, we examined the safety and cost implications of using a ward setting instead of full operating facilities for port insertion. There was a 10.7% incidence of early and 37.6% incidence of late complications in the group receiving Hickman lines compared with only 2.4% early complications and 10.6% late complications in those receiving peripherally implantable ports. There was no difference in complication rates between those patients who had the ports inserted in a ward side room compared with those who had their procedure performed in the operating theatre. We have demonstrated the ease and reliability of port insertion in the absence of screening radiology and we therefore suggest the peripheral port as a safe, cost-effective alternative to existing venous access systems. PMID:8117017

  4. Transmedullary Venous Anastomoses: Anatomy and Angiographic Visualization Using Flat Panel Catheter Angiotomography.

    PubMed

    Gregg, L; Gailloud, P

    2015-07-01

    Flat panel catheter angiotomography, a recently developed angiographic technique, offers a spinal equivalent to the venous phase obtained during cerebral angiography. This report of 8 clinical cases discusses the flat panel catheter angiotomography appearance of a type of spinal venous structure until now principally known through the analysis of postmortem material, transmedullary venous anastomosis. The illustrated configurations include centrodorsolateral, median anteroposterior, median anteroposterior with duplicated origin, and combined centrodorsolateral/median anteroposterior transmedullary venous anastomoses, while a pathologic example documents the potential role of transmedullary venous anastomoses as collateral venous pathways. Two of the reported configurations have not been previously documented. Transmedullary venous anastomoses are normal venous structures that need to be differentiated from spinal cord anomalies, such as intramedullary vascular malformations. PMID:25953764

  5. How to remove a non-tunnelled central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Lisa

    2015-12-16

    Rationale and key points This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of non-tunnelled central venous catheters (CVCs) in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. A non-tunnelled CVC is inserted directly into a central vein with its tip usually located in the vena cava or right atrium. ? Insertion of a CVC can increase the risk of pneumothorax, haemorrhage, air embolism and infection. Air embolism is a potentially catastrophic, although uncommon, event that occurs as a consequence of air entering the venous system. This can be avoided if the CVC is removed correctly. ? CVCs may remain in situ for 10-14 days, and are removed when therapy is completed or as a result of complications. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice when removing a non-tunnelled CVC. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26669405

  6. Repositioning of Misplaced Central Venous Catheter with Saline Injection Under C-Arm Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam Lal; Jain, Krishan; Monga, Hitika

    2015-01-01

    Malposition of central venous catheter is a well known technical complication. Misplaced catheter often requires reinsertion for proper placement of the catheter in the superior vena cava (SVC) to support safe delivery of care and minimize complications. But reinsertion exposes the patient once again to risks of complications related to the procedure including potential of misplacement. Literature describes only a few techniques for repositioning a misplaced central venous catheter (CVC). We tried old simple method of saline injection with force under image intensifier using hydrostatic force of intravenous fluid to straighten the CVC. We could successfully reposition two misplaced CVC’s using this method. PMID:26816974

  7. The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view for central venous catheter placement and catheter change over guidewire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Chan; Klebach, Christian; Heinze, Ingo; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view can be useful for central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Venipuncture of the internal jugular veins (IJV) or subclavian veins is performed with a micro-convex ultrasound probe, using a neonatal abdominal preset with a probe frequency of 10 Mhz at a depth of 10-12 cm. Following insertion of the guidewire into the vein, the probe is shifted to the right supraclavicular fossa to obtain a view of the superior vena cava (SVC), right pulmonary artery and ascending aorta. Under real-time ultrasound view, the guidewire and its J-tip is visualized and pushed forward to the lower SVC. Insertion depth is read from guidewire marks using central venous catheter. CVC is then inserted following skin and venous dilation. The supraclavicular fossa view is most suitable for right IJV CVC insertion. If other insertion sites are chosen the right supraclavicular fossa should be within the sterile field. Scanning of the IJVs, brachiocephalic veins and SVC can reveal significant thrombosis before venipuncture. Misplaced CVCs can be corrected with a change over guidewire technique under real-time ultrasound guidance. In conjunction with a diagnostic lung ultrasound scan, this technique has a potential to replace chest radiograph for confirmation of CVC tip position and exclusion of pneumothorax. Moreover, this view is of advantage in patients with a non-p-wave cardiac rhythm were an intra-cardiac electrocardiography (ECG) is not feasible for CVC tip position confirmation. Limitations of the method are lack of availability of a micro-convex probe and the need for training. PMID:25548874

  8. [Venous thromboembolism associated with long-term use of central venous catheters in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Debourdeau, P; Chahmi, D Kassab; Zammit, C; Farge-Bancel, D

    2008-06-01

    Increased incidence of cancers and the development of totally implanted venous access devices that contain their own port to deliver chemotherapy will lead to a greater than before numbers of central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CVCT). Medical consequences include catheter dysfunction and pulmonary embolism. Vessel injury caused by the procedure of CVC insertion is the most important risk factor for development of CVCT. This event could cause the formation of a fresh thrombus, which is reversible in the large majority of patients. In some cases, thrombus formation is not related to catheter insertion. The incidence of CVC-related DVT assessed by venography has been reported to vary from 30 to 60% but catheter-related DVT in adult patients is symptomatic in only 5% of cases. The majority of patients with CVC-related DVT is asymptomatic or has nonspecific symptoms: arm or neck swelling or pain, distal paresthesias, headache, congestion of subcutaneous collateral veins. In the case of clinical suspicion of CVC-related deep venous thrombosis (DVT), compressive ultrasonography (US), especially with doppler and color imaging, currently is first used to confirm the diagnosis. Consequently, contrast venography is reserved for clinical trials and difficult diagnostic situations. There is no consensus on the optimal management of patients with CVC-related DVT. Treatment of CVC-related VTE requires a five- to seven-day course of adjusted-dose unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) followed by oral anticoagulants. Long-term LMWH that has been shown to be more effective than oral anticoagulant in cancer patients with lower limb DVT, could be used in these patients. The efficacy and safety of pharmacologic prophylaxis for CVC related thrombosis is not established and the last recommendations suggest that clinicians not routinely use prophylaxis to try to prevent thrombosis related to long-term indwelling CVCs in cancer patients. Additional studies performed in high risk populations with appropriate dosage and timing will help to define which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. PMID:18395994

  9. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  10. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Central Venous Catheter Sutured to the Wall of the Right Atrium

    SciTech Connect

    Neuerburg, Joerg-M.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Chalabi, Khaled; Hunter, David

    1999-01-15

    A transjugular central venous catheter was inadvertently sutured to the wall of the right atrium in a 63-year-old female during coronary bypass surgery. Using two nitinol Goose Neck snares via a transfemoral and a transjugular approach the catheter was severed into two pieces and retrieved percutaneously.

  11. The chest tube: a simple device for the tunneling of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, D J; Tuggle, D W; Judd, A T; Smith, E I

    1987-01-01

    The chest tube is presented as a device for the tunneling of central venous catheters. It offers several advantages over currently recommended tunneling devices. It is readily available in multiple sizes to accommodate different diameter catheters, produces lengthy atraumatic tunnels, and can be bent into various shapes to facilitate passage through the subcutaneous tissues. PMID:3110453

  12. Central venous catheters for out-patient management of malignant disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, M; Adams, M; Andrew, M; Cameron, G; Pai, K

    1983-01-01

    The use of tunnelled central venous catheters in children with malignant disorders is an effective and safe way of giving out-patient chemotherapy and supportive care. The benefits include ready venous access, ease of administration of chemotherapy, decreased time spent in the out-patient clinic, and less anticipatory vomiting and emotional trauma for patients, parents, and staff. PMID:6614981

  13. Heparinized and Saline Solutions in the Maintenance of Arterial and Central Venous Catheters After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Alizadehasl, Azin; Aghdaii, Nahid; Sadeghi, Ali; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Masoumi, Gholamreza; Golbargian, Ghodrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heparinized saline solution is used to prevent occlusion in the arterial catheters and central venous pressure monitoring catheters. Even at low dose, heparin administration can be associated with serious complications. Normal saline solution can maintain patency of arterial catheters and central venous pressure monitoring catheters. Objectives: The current study aimed to compare the efficacy of normal saline with that of heparinized one to maintain patency of arterial and central venous catheters after cardiac surgery. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized controlled trial, 100 patients, with an age range of 18 - 65 years of valve and coronary artery surgery were studied in Rajaie heart center, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomized to receive either heparinized saline (n = 50) or normal saline flush solutions (n = 50). In the study, arterial catheters and central venous pressure monitoring catheters were daily checked for any signs of occlusion in three postoperative days as primary end-point of the study. Results: According to the information obtained from the study, four (8%) arterial catheters in the saline group (P value: 0.135) and three (6%) arterial catheters in the heparin group (P value = 0.097) were obstructed. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of obstruction and changes in all other parameters between the two groups during the three-day follow-up was not significant (all P values > 0.05). Conclusions: It seems that there is no difference in the use of heparinized and normal saline solutions to prevent catheter occlusion of arterial and central venous pressure. PMID:26478866

  14. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Brennan, Rachel C.; Shook, David R.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J.; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. Methods We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as “non-laminar.” Results Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–21.5; p <0.01; sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 67%). A combined prediction model comprising either change in resistance greater than 8.8% or a non-laminar result predicted subsequent occlusion (odds ratio = 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–22.8; p = 0.002; sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 63%). Participants rated catheter-resistance monitoring as highly acceptable. Conclusions In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate these findings, assess the predictive value for other clinical outcomes, and determine the impact of pre-emptive therapy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01737554 PMID:26322512

  15. Comparison of NHSN-defined central venous catheter day counts with a method that accounts for concurrent catheters.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Thomas R; Johnson, James G; Anders, Theodore; Hayes, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) day definitions do not consider concurrent CVCs. We examined traditional CVC day counts and resultant central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates with a CVC day definition that included concurrent CVCs. Accounting for concurrent CVCs increased device day counts by 8.5% but only mildly impacted CLABSI rates. PMID:25627768

  16. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in patients with chronic venous catheters: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sy, John; Nast, Cynthia C; Pham, Phuong-Thu T; Pham, Phuong-Chi T

    2014-01-01

    Chronic indwelling catheters have been reported to be associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) via the activation of the classical complement pathway in association with bacterial infections such as coagulase negative staphylococcus. We herein provide supporting evidence for the direct causal relationship between chronic catheter infections and MPGN via a case of recurrent MPGN associated with recurrent catheter infections used for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in a man with short gut syndrome. We also present a literature review of similar cases and identify common clinical manifestations that may serve to aid clinicians in the early identification of MPGN associated with infected central venous catheterization or vice versa. The importance of routine monitoring of kidney function and urinalysis among patients with chronic central venous catheterization is highlighted as kidney injury may herald or coincide with overtly infected chronic indwelling central venous catheters. PMID:24592339

  17. Utility of the routine chest X-ray after "over-wire" venous catheter changes.

    PubMed

    Riblet, J L; Shillinglaw, W; Goldberg, A J; Mitchell, K; Sedani, K H; Davis, F E; Reynolds, H N

    1996-12-01

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used to change central venous access catheters in the Intensive Care Unit. These catheters are routinely being changed to prevent septic complications. Some of these changes are performed by an "over-wire" technique. To assess the utility of postprocedural chest X-rays on critically ill patients after an over-wire catheter change, we followed 68 patients after they had 80 catheter changes. This study assesses catheter position by use of a postprocedural X-ray. During the study, we found no misplaced catheters and minimum symptomatology in 80 patients. The trauma/critical care fellows performing the procedures rated them as easy in 97.5 percent of the changes. The conclusion of the study is that, if the catheter change is technically easy and the patient has no symptoms, a postprocedural X-ray is not necessary. PMID:8955250

  18. A stuck haemodialysis central venous catheter: not quite open and shut!

    PubMed Central

    Jafferbhoy, Sadaf F.; Asquith, John R.; Jeeji, Ravish; Levine, Adrian; Menon, Madhavan; Pherwani, Arun D.

    2015-01-01

    Removal of tunnelled central venous catheters can become complex if left in situ for a prolonged period. We report a challenging case of a stuck tunnelled haemodialysis catheter, which required sternotomy with cardio-pulmonary bypass for retrieval. A 47-year-old female had failed attempts to remove the venous limb of a Tessio line on the ward. A cut down on the internal jugular vein and division of the fibrin sheath failed to release it. Synchronous traction was applied via a snare inserted through a femoral approach. On table trans-oesophageal echocardiogram showed the tip of the catheter traversing the tricuspid valve. At sternotomy with cardio-pulmonary bypass, the tip of the catheter was found attached to the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve requiring release and repair. The management of stuck line has potential serious complications. Prophylactic catheter exchange should be considered to avoid complications. PMID:25848086

  19. Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava and Left Brachiocephalic Vein with Preserving the Central Venous Catheter in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2011-01-01

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein. PMID:21927566

  20. Thrombolytic Therapy Using Urokinase for Management of Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Tack; Min, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Pyong Wha; Heo, Tae Gil; Lee, Myung Soo; Kim, Chul-Nam; Kim, Hong-Yong; Yi, Seong Yoon; Lee, Hye Ran; Roh, Young-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The management of central venous catheters (CVCs) and catheter thrombosis vary among centers, and the efficacy of the methods of management of catheter thrombosis in CVCs is rarely reported. We investigated the efficacy of bedside thrombolysis with urokinase for the management of catheter thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who had undergone CVC insertion by a single surgeon in a single center between April 2012 and June 2014. We used a protocol for the management of CVCs and when catheter thrombosis was confirmed, 5,000 U urokinase was infused into the catheter. Results: A total of 137 CVCs were inserted in 126 patients. The most common catheter-related complication was thrombosis (12, 8.8%) followed by infection (8, 5.8%). Nine of the 12 patients (75%) with catheter thrombosis were recanalized successfully with urokinase. The rate of CVC recanalization was higher in the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) group (87.5%) than the chemoport group (50%). Reintervention for catheter-related thrombosis was needed in only 2.2% of patients when thrombolytic therapy using urokinase was applied. Age <60 years (P=0.035), PICC group (P=0.037) and location of the catheter tip above the superior vena cava (P=0.044) were confirmed as independent risk factors for catheter thrombosis. Conclusion: Thrombolysis therapy using urokinase could successfully manage CVC thrombosis. Reintervention was rarely needed when a protocol using urokinase was applied for the management of CVC thromboses. PMID:26217634

  1. [Acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis should be treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Broholm, Rikke; Just, Sven; Jørgensen, Maja; Bækgaard, Niels

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) has been performed in Denmark since 1999. The purpose of CDT is to dissolve thrombus and to restore the venous lumen as fast as possible and thereby save venous valve function and prevent postthrombotic syndrome. Danish studies have shown that treatment of acute iliofemoral DVT using CDT results in good patency, preserves venous valve function, reduces the frequency of PTS, and is associated with a higher quality of life. PMID:22469160

  2. Implementation of a children’s hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation requires changes in the hospital system as well as in healthcare professionals’ behaviour. The aim of the study is to evaluate process and outcome of implementation of a state-of-the-art central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle in a large university children’s hospital. Methods/design An interrupted time series design will be used; the study will encompass all children who need a central venous catheter. New state-of-the-art central venous catheter bundles will be developed. The Pronovost-model will guide the implementation process. We developed a tailored multifaceted implementation strategy consisting of reminders, feedback, management support, local opinion leaders, and education. Primary outcome measure is the number of catheter-associated infections per 1000 line-days. The process outcome is degree of adherence to use of these central venous catheter bundles is the secondary outcome. A cost-effectiveness analysis is part of the study. Outcomes will be monitored during three periods: baseline, pre-intervention, and post-intervention for over 48 months. Discussion This model-based implementation strategy will reveal the challenges of implementing a hospital-wide safety program. This work will add to the body of knowledge in the field of implementation. We postulate that healthcare workers’ willingness to shift from providing habitual care to state-of-the-art care may reflect the need for consistent care improvement. Trial registration: Dutch trials registry, trial # 3635. Trial registration Dutch trials registry (http://www.trialregister.nl), trial # 3635 PMID:24125520

  3. A case report of abdominal compartment syndrome caused by malposition of a femoral venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    Pafitanis, Georgios; Spyridon, Koulas; Theodorakopoulou, Evgenia; Mason, Katrina; Ygropoulou, Olga; Mousafiri, Ourania

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Venous catheter malposition is a rare event with potential catastrophic consequences. To our knowledge we describe one of the first case reports of an adult presenting with a rare late complication of femoral venous catheter malposition: abdominal compartment syndrome. Presentation of case A 39 year-old female sustained severe cerebral injury in a road traffic accident. During initial resuscitation a femoral venous catheter was inserted without ultrasound guidance with no immediate concerns. After 48 h whilst in intensive care unit the patient developed progressive abdominal distension. Bedside investigations revealed raised intra-abdominal pressures associated with new organ failure. Subsequent an emergency laparotomy and on-table intravenous contrast radiographs revealed extravasation of contrast into the peritoneal space from the malposition of the catheter into the abdominal cavity. Discussion Complications of central venous catheterization are associated with adverse events with significant morbidity to the patient as well as having cost implications. Mechanical complications are underreported but are potentially preventable through ultrasound-guided insertion, in accordance with international guidelines. Conclusion This case report highlights the importance of safe methods of catheter insertion, the need for increased awareness of late femoral catheter malposition and its potential catastrophic consequences. PMID:26036458

  4. Flushing and Locking of Venous Catheters: Available Evidence and Evidence Deficit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flushing and locking of intravenous catheters are thought to be essential in the prevention of occlusion. The clinical sign of an occlusion is catheter malfunction and flushing is strongly recommended to ensure a well-functioning catheter. Therefore fluid dynamics, flushing techniques, and sufficient flushing volumes are important matters in adequate flushing in all catheter types. If a catheter is not in use, it is locked. For years, it has been thought that the catheter has to be filled with an anticoagulant to prevent catheter occlusion. Heparin has played a key role in locking venous catheters. However, the high number of risks associated with heparin forces us to look for alternatives. A long time ago, 0.9% sodium chloride was already introduced as locking solution in peripheral cannulas. More recently, a 0.9% sodium chloride lock has also been investigated in other types of catheters. Thrombolytic agents have also been studied as a locking solution because their antithrombotic effect was suggested as superior to heparin. Other catheter lock solutions focus on the anti-infective properties of the locks such as antibiotics and chelating agents. Still, the most effective locking solution will depend on the catheter type and the patient's condition. PMID:26075094

  5. Feasibility of the use of a reliable and valid central venous catheter blood draw bundle checklist.

    PubMed

    Secola, Rita; Lewis, Mary Ann; Pike, Nancy; Needleman, Jack; Doering, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the feasibility of creating a central venous catheter blood draw bundle checklist to ensure adherence to the evidence-based blood draw procedure. This study included establishing checklist reliability and validity and periodic observations in 2 inpatient pediatric oncology units. The findings provided support for the reliability and validity of this checklist based on content validity, test-retest reliability, interrater agreement, and internal consistency and reinforced the need for periodic observations to ensure consistency in proper central venous catheter blood draw procedures. PMID:22269906

  6. Rhodococcus equi venous catheter infection: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that was initially isolated from horses and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans with impaired cellular immunity. However, this pathogen is underestimated as a challenging antagonist and is frequently considered to be a mere contaminant despite the potential for life-threatening infections. Most case reports have occurred in immunocompromised patients who have received organ transplants (for example kidney, heart, bone marrow) or those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Infections often manifest as pulmonary involvement or soft tissue abscesses. Bacteremia related to R. equi infections of tunneled central venous catheters has rarely been described. Case presentation We report the case of a 63-year-old non-transplant recipient, non-HIV infected Caucasian woman with endometrial carcinoma who developed recurrent bloodstream infections and septic shock due to R. equi and ultimately required the removal of her port catheter, a subcutaneous implantable central venous catheter. We also review the medical literature related to human infections with R. equi. Conclusion R. equi should be considered a serious pathogen, not a contaminant, particularly in an immunocompromised patient who presents with a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. Counseling patients with central venous catheters who participate in activities involving exposure to domesticated animals is recommended. PMID:21827681

  7. Use of sodium hypochlorite for skin antisepsis before inserting a peripheral venous catheter: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Forni, Cristiana; Sabattini, Tania; D'Alessandro, Fabio; Fiorani, Ambra; Gamberini, Simonetta; Maso, Alessandra; Curci, Rosa; Zanotti, Enrichetta; Chiari, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Although it can be prevented, catheter-related bacteremia is common and dangerous. The antiseptics most widely used during insertion of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) include povidone iodine, alcohol, and chlorhexidine. Another widely used antiseptic is a solution of 0.057 g sodium hypochlorite. This pilot study explored the contamination rate of the PVC tip inserted after skin decontamination with sodium hypochlorite. Culture analysis of the tips of the PVCs inserted into the 42 participants showed 7 (16.7%) colonized catheters. The results of this pilot study suggest taking into serious consideration the assessment of this antiseptic in randomized experimental studies. PMID:25230748

  8. When one port does not return blood: two case reports of rare causes for misplaced central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Preto, César; Pinho, Carla; Vasconcelos, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases of misplaced central venous catheters having in common the absence of free blood return from one lumen immediately after placement. The former is a case of right hydrothorax associated with central venous catheterization with the catheter tip in intra-pleural location. In this case the distal port was never patent. In the latter case there was an increased aspiration pressure through the middle port due to a catheter looping. The absence of free flow on aspiration from one lumen of a central catheter should not be undervalued. In these circumstances the catheter should not be used and needs to be removed. PMID:26768935

  9. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  10. Protocol for Detection of Biofilms on Needleless Connectors Attached to Central Venous Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, R. M.; Murga, R.; Bell, M.; Toscano, C. M.; Carr, J. H.; Novicki, T. J.; Zuckerman, C.; Corey, L. C.; Miller, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  11. Protocol for detection of biofilms on needleless connectors attached to central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Donlan, R M; Murga, R; Bell, M; Toscano, C M; Carr, J H; Novicki, T J; Zuckerman, C; Corey, L C; Miller, J M

    2001-02-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  12. Long-term indwelling silastic central venous catheters: clinical audit leading to improved surgical technique.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M J; Hunter, A E; Ryan, J J

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective audit of the surgical insertion and clinical outcome of silastic venous catheters on our Haematology Unit was performed for the period 1985 to 1988. Twenty-three (58%) of the 40 lines had complications, and analysis showed that many were due to problems related to the surgical technique used. This altered our clinical practice, and over a 12 month period (January 1989 to January 1990) 26 central venous catheters have been placed in 24 patients by a dedicated surgical team using a standardized, altered technique. This has been to place all catheters via the right internal jugular vein and to confirm line position by on-table radiographic screening. A significant improvement in results is presented. PMID:1962822

  13. Cohort Study: Central Venous Catheter-Related Complications in Children with Hematologic Diseases at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Pekta?, Ayhan; Kara, Ate?; Gurgey, Aytemiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to document and analyze the central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with hematological diseases who were treated within a single institution. Materials and Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 106 pediatric patients in whom 203 CVCs were inserted. A total of 175 catheter-related complications occurred in 5 years. Results: The rates of clinical catheter infections, local catheter infections, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, and mechanical complications were 2.6, 1.1, 0.2, 0.2, and 0.2 per 1000 catheter days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant infectious organism in blood and catheter cultures. The children with leukemia had a significantly higher frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.046). The children who underwent bone marrow transplantation had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.043) and higher frequency of local catheter infections (p=0.003). The children with implanted catheters had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.048). The children with thrombocytopenia had significantly fewer local catheter infections and significantly more clinical catheter infections and catheter-related bleeding (respectively p=0.001, p=0.042, and p=0.024). Conclusion: Leukemia, bone marrow transplantation, and thrombocytopenia are risk factors for CVC-associated complications. The relatively higher number of interventions performed via permanent catheters may be responsible for the significantly increased incidence of systemic infections and mechanical injury. PMID:26316482

  14. Benefit of heparin in peripheral venous and arterial catheters: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Adrienne G; Cook, Deborah J; Gonzales, Calle A; Andrew, Maureen

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of heparin on duration of catheter patency and on prevention of complications associated with use of peripheral venous and arterial catheters. Design: Critical appraisal and meta-analysis of 26 randomised controlled trials that evaluated infusion of heparin intermittently or continuously. Thirteen trials of peripheral venous catheters and two of peripheral arterial catheters met criteria for inclusion. Main outcome measures: Data on the populations, interventions, outcomes, and methodological quality. Results: For peripheral venous catheters locked between use flushing with 10?U/ml of heparin instead of normal saline did not reduce the incidence of catheter clotting and phlebitis or improve catheter patency. When heparin was given as a continuous infusion at 1?U/ml the risk of phlebitis decreased (relative risk 0.55; 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.77), the duration of patency increased, and infusion failure was reduced (0.88; 0.72 to 1.07). Heparin significantly prolonged duration of patency of radial artery catheters and decreased the risk of clot formation (0.51; 0.42 to 0.61). Conclusions: Use of intermittent heparin flushes at doses of 10?U/ml in peripheral venous catheters locked between use had no benefit over normal saline flush. Infusion of low dose heparin through a peripheral arterial catheter prolonged the duration of patency but further study is needed to establish its benefit for peripheral venous catheters. Key messages Despite almost universal use, agreement has not been reached on the need to administer heparin through peripheral intravascular catheters The results of 13 trials on peripheral venous catheters and two trials on peripheral arterial catheters were critically appraised to clarify what evidence supports the use of heparin Flushing peripheral venous catheters locked between use with heparinised saline at 10?U/ml is no more beneficial than flushing with normal saline Heparin significantly prolongs the duration of peripheral arterial catheter patency and decreases the risk of clot formation In peripheral venous catheters heparin added to the infusion at 1?U/ml decreases phlebitis and may prolong duration of catheter patency and decrease infusion failure PMID:9550955

  15. Transbrachial Access for Radiologic Manipulation of Problematic Central Venous Catheters in a Pediatric Population

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Sandeep Hogan, Mark J.

    2010-08-15

    A transfemoral venous approach is the current standard for accessing malpositioned and fractured central venous catheters (CVCs). The purpose of this study was (1) to describe a transbrachial approach for correction and (2) to assess the success and failure of this method in a pediatric population. A 12-year retrospective review of all patients referred for correction of malpositioned, retained, and fractured CVCs was conducted. Based on the performing interventionalist's preference, transbrachial or transfemoral venous sheaths where placed under ultrasonographic guidance. Diagnostic angiographic catheters and snares were used to manipulate the catheters. Patients who underwent the transfemoral approach received postprocedural monitoring for 4 hours, whereas patients who underwent the transbrachial approach were allowed unrestricted activity immediately after hemostasis was obtained. Technical success of malpositioned lines was defined (1) by final position in the superior vena cava or at the cavoatrial junction on postprocedural imaging or (2) by successful removal of retained catheter fragments, if present. Transbrachial approach was used for access in 11 patients. Problematic lines included malpositioned (n = 10) and retained (n = 1) lines. The ipsilateral arm was used for transbrachial entry in 7 patients. Initial use of angiographic catheters was attempted in 7 cases, of which 4 were successful. All 3 unsuccessful cases had tips positioned in the contralateral brachiocephalic vein, and these were successfully repositioned using snares. A combination of snares and angiographic catheters was used in 2 cases. Snares were used for all other cases. Technical success by way of the transbrachial approach was observed in all cases. Periprocedural follow-up demonstrated no immediate complications. We conclude that the transbrachial approach is a suitable alternative to the transfemoral approach for catheter tip position correction. Tip malposition in the contralateral brachiocephalic vein suggests higher rate of conversion to use of snare devices.

  16. Cultures of Needleless Connectors Are Useful for Ruling Out Central Venous Catheter Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Granda, María Jesús; Cruces, Raquel; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Semiquantitative cultures of skin surrounding intravascular catheter entry sites and catheter hubs have high negative predictive values for catheter tip colonization. However, culturing samples from the inner side of the hub requires the catheter to be manipulated, thus increasing the risk of migration of microorganisms into the bloodstream. Today, hubs are closed using needleless connectors (NCs). Cultures of NCs could predict catheter colonization. Our objective was to compare the yield of NC sonicate cultures for prediction of catheter colonization with that of hub cultures. For 6 months, we prospectively collected all short-term central lines and systems removed from patients admitted to the cardiac surgery postoperative care unit, irrespective of the reason for withdrawal. Hub cultures were obtained immediately before withdrawal and were cultured using a semiquantitative method. Catheter tips were cultured using the roll-plate technique and sonication, and NCs were cultured using a semiquantitative technique after sonication. We considered NCs to be colonized when ?1 culture was positive. We collected a total of 75 central systems. The catheter colonization rate was 10.7%. The rates for hub and NC colonization were 6.7% and 12.0%, respectively. The validity values for hubs and NCs for prediction of catheter colonization were as follows: sensitivity, 25.0% and 87.5%; specificity, 95.5% and 97.0%; positive predictive value, 40.0% and 77.8%; negative predictive value, 91.4% and 98.5%; validity index, 88.0% and 96.0%, respectively. Cultures of closed NCs can be used to rule out catheter tip colonization and are superior to hub cultures in ruling out short-term central venous catheter colonization. PMID:25878353

  17. Percutaneously inserted long-term central venous catheters in pigs of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Larsson, N; Claesson Lingehall, H; Al Zaidi, N; Claesson, J; Jensen-Waern, M; Lehtipalo, S

    2015-07-01

    Pigs are used for long-term biomedical experiments requiring repeated injections, infusions and collections of blood samples. Thus, it is necessary for vascular catheters to be indwelling to avoid undue stress to the animals and the use of restraints. We propose a refined model of percutaneous insertion of long-term central venous catheters to minimize the surgical trauma and postoperative complications associated with catheter insertion. Different sizes of needles (18 Ga versus 21 Ga) for initial puncture of the veins were compared. In conventional pigs weighing less than 30 kg, catheter insertion may be facilitated by using a microintroducer set with a 21 Ga needle. In pigs weighing 50 kg, a standard 18 Ga needle may be preferable. PMID:25732575

  18. [Life threatening embolism caused by central venous catheter fragments in psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Nau, R; Thiel, A; Prange, H W

    1994-05-01

    Central venous catheters are sometimes the cause of life-threatening complications. In two patients with underlying psychiatric disorders we observed an embolism as a result of catheter fragments. The first patient was a 30-year-old woman with a borderline personality disorder and several previous episodes of self-mutilation, psychogenic seizures and disturbances of consciousness. She cut her central venous line positioned in the external jugular vein when she was unattended. The intravasal fragment dislocated into the right ventricle and had to be removed by a forceps used for myocardial biopsies. The second patients was a 34-year-old mentally retarded male with a history of psychomotoric and grand mal seizures who suffered from a prolonged disturbance of consciousness with uncontrolled motor activity after four grand mal seizures. Despite physical restraint, the tip of his central venous catheter inserted through the subclavian vein broke and embolized in the right atrium. The embolus was removed by thoracotomy. To avoid these complications central venous lines should be used only when critically needed in uncooperative patients or those who display disturbance of consciousness and uncontrolled motor activity. PMID:8052339

  19. Safety and Complications of Double-Lumen Tunnelled Cuffed Central Venous Dialysis Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Rana S.; Kakaria, Anupam K.; Khan, Saif A.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Sukaiti, Rashid; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the technical success, safety and immediate and delayed complications of double-lumen tunnelled cuffed central venous catheters (TVCs) at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January 2012 and October 2013. The clinical records and radiological data of all patients who underwent ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided TVC placement at SQUH during the study period were reviewed. Demographic data and information regarding catheter placement, technical success and peri- and post-procedure complications (such as catheter-related infections or thrombosis) were collected. Results: A total of 204 TVCs were placed in 161 patients. Of these, 68 were female (42.2%) and 93 were male (57.8%). The mean age of the patients was 54.4 ± 17.3 years. The most common reason for catheter placement was the initiation of dialysis (63.4%). A total of 203 procedures were technically successful (99.5%). The right internal jugular vein was the most common site of catheter placement (74.9%). Mild haemorrhage which resolved spontaneously occurred in 11 cases (5.4%). No other complications were observed. Subsequent follow-up data was available for 132 catheters (65.0%); of these, thrombosis-related catheter malfunction was observed in 22 cases (16.7%) and catheter-related infection in 29 cases (22.0%). Conclusion: Radiological-guided placement of tunnelled haemodialysis catheters can be performed safely with excellent technical success. The success rate of catheter insertion at SQUH was favourable in comparison with other studies reported in the literature. PMID:26629377

  20. Bacterial contamination of central venous catheters during insertion: a double blind randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hall, N J; Hartley, J; Ade-Ajayi, N; Laughlan, K; Roebuck, D; Kleidon, T; Powis, D; Pierro, A

    2005-07-01

    Static electricity within sterile packaging may result in bacterial contamination of central venous catheters (CVCs) prior to insertion. To prevent this, some surgeons inject saline into the pack before opening it. This trial was designed to determine the effect of this procedure. A double blind randomised controlled trial of 47 CVCs comparing injection of 2 ml of sterile saline into the pack prior to opening with no injection was performed. Five centimetre lengths cut from the tip of the catheter before and after subcutaneous tunnelling were sent for microbiological culture. Eight catheters (17%) showed evidence of bacterial contamination prior to insertion into the vein. Two (4.2%) were contaminated prior to tunnelling and seven (14.9%) afterwards. One catheter was contaminated before and after tunnelling. All but one of the contaminating bacteria were coagulase negative staphylococci. There was no significant difference in the contamination rate between catheters from packs that had been injected (5/25) and those that had not (3/22), P = 0.56. Just under one-fifth of the catheters were contaminated with bacteria prior to insertion into the vein but this was not influenced by prior injection of saline into the pack. We conclude that there is no evidence to support the practice of injecting the catheter pack prior to opening. PMID:16010547

  1. Endovascular Technique for Revision of Excess Catheter Length in Subcutaneous Implanted Venous Access Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Ravi; Arbabzadeh, Massoud; Richard III, Howard; Levitin, Abraham; Lund, Gunnar; Stainken, Brian

    2004-06-15

    To describe the implementation of a technique to trim the excess length of a central venous catheter via a process of endovascular snaring without exposing or changing the device. We report on the outcome of this technique in 3 patients. The technique was successful in two cases and successful with a modification in the remaining case. The technique is useful to salvage an implanted venous access device. It appears to be less invasive with reduced procedure time and less patient discomfort than other techniques.

  2. Large Cohort Study of Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis during Intravenous Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Stéphanie; Zeller, Valérie; Dubée, Vincent; Ducroquet, Françoise; Desplaces, Nicole; Horellou, Marie Hélène; Marmor, Simon; Ziza, Jean Marc

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) during prolonged intravenous (i.v.) antibiotic therapy have rarely been reported. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency, incidence, and risk factors for CRT among patients being treated with prolonged i.v. antibiotic therapy. The secondary objective was to describe the clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and clinical management. This cohort study was conducted between August 2004 and May 2010 in a French referral center for osteoarticular infections. All patients treated for bone and joint infections with i.v. antimicrobial therapy through a central venous catheter (CVC) for ?2 weeks were included. Risk factors were identified using nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A case-control study investigated the role of vancomycin and catheter malposition. A total of 892 patients matched the inclusion criteria. CRT developed in 16 infections occurring in 16 patients (incidence, 0.39/1,000 catheter days). The median time to a CRT was 29 days (range, 12 to 48 days). Local clinical signs, fever, and secondary complications of CRT were present in 15, 8, and 4 patients, respectively. The median C-reactive protein level was 95 mg/liter. The treatment combined catheter removal and a median of 3 months (1.5 to 6 months) of anticoagulation therapy. The outcome was good in all patients, with no recurrence of CRT. Three risk factors were identified by multivariate analysis: male sex (odds ratio [OR], 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 26.6), catheter malposition (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 17.9), and use of vancomycin (OR, 22.9; 95% CI, 2.8 to 188). Catheter-related thrombosis is a rare but severe complication in patients treated with prolonged antimicrobial therapy. Vancomycin use was the most important risk factor identified. PMID:26459894

  3. Lights, camera and action in the implementation of central venous catheter dressing1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Maria Verônica Ferrareze; de Godoy, Simone; de Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira; Rossini, Fernanda de Paula; de Andrade, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to develop and validate an educational digital video on changing the dressing of short-term, non-cuffed, non-tunneled central venous catheters in hospitalized adult patients. Method: this is a descriptive, methodological study based on Paulo Freire's assumptions. The development of the script and video storyboard were based on scientific evidence, on the researchers' experience, and that of nurse experts, as well as on a virtual learning environment. Results: the items related to the script were approved by 97.2% of the nurses and the video was approved by 96.1%. Conclusion: the educational instrument was considered to be appropriate and we believe it will contribute to professional training in the nursing field, the updating of human resources, focusing on the educational process, including distance education. We believe it will consequently improve the quality of care provided to patients with central venous catheters. PMID:26626011

  4. Inadvertent Puncture of the Thoracic Duct During Attempted Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraber, Ulf K.M. Nibbe, Lutz; Gebauer, Bernhard; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2003-11-15

    We report a case of puncture of the thoracic duct during left subclavian vein catheterization on the intensive care unit. Computed tomography and measurement of the triglyceride levels in the aspirated fluid proved the inadvertent penetration of the guidewire into the thoracic duct. Early recognition of central line misplacement avoided serious complications. Inadvertent central venous catheter placement into the thoracic duct may have the potential complications of infusion mediastinum and chylothorax.

  5. [A Case of Delayed Vascular Injury as a Complication Related to Implanted Central Venous Port Catheter].

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Tomohiro; Fujii, Ryoji; Minagawa, Takeyoshi; Fujie, Shinya; Kimura, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideyuki; Yoshizaki, Naohito; Kondo, Hitoshi; Kitayama, Hiromitsu; Sugiyama, Junko; Hirayama, Michiaki; Tsuji, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawarada, You; Okushiba, Shunichi; Nishioka, Noriko; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    A 74-year-old woman with advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital. A central venous (CV) port catheter was implanted into the right subclavian vein for preoperative chemotherapy and parenteral nutritional management. On the 35th day after implantation, she complained of diarrhea, fever and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed a right-sided massive pleural effusion. As the patient progressively fell into severe respiratory distress, endotracheal intubation was performed for management of respiration by mechanical ventilation. Initially, given the patient's symptoms, she was diagnosed with septic shock. Therefore, after placement of a CV catheter through the right femoral vein, in consideration of the possibility of a port infection, she was treated with thoracentesis and infusion of antibiotics. The patient gradually recovered, and again received parenteral nutrition through the CV port catheter. After the infusion was administered, she complained of dyspnea. A CT scan of the chest revealed a right pleural effusion and displacement of the tip of the CV port catheter out of the wall of the superior vena cava. We diagnosed delayed vascular injury (DVI), and the CV port catheter was removed. She soon recovered with conservative treatment. We speculated that the initial respiratory symptoms such as the pleural effusion were caused by DVI. DVI should therefore be recognized as a complication related to implanted CV port catheters. PMID:26809313

  6. [Failure to Remove Long-Term Indwelling Central Venous Catheters in Two Patients].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Kazuya; Kato, Kenichi; Suzuki, Michiko; Nakayama, Manabu; Tamura, Akio; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Tomabechi, Makiko; Matsuo, Mikaru; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2015-09-01

    The use ofa central venous(CV)port system has become common for the treatment of patients with tumors. We report on the failure to remove CV catheters in 2 patients. The first patient was a 50 years woman with acute myeloid leukemia. She underwent CV port implantation via the left brachial approach 11 years previously. The second patient was an 80 years man with a lower gingival carcinoma. He underwent CV port implantation via the left brachial approach 6 years previously. CV catheter removal was attempted in both patients, but was unsuccessful because of strong adhesion to the vessel wall. Based on our experience, if catheter removal is impossible, its retention is more suitable. PMID:26469175

  7. Factors Influencing Intracavitary Electrocardiographic P-Wave Changes during Central Venous Catheter Placement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guorong; Guo, Ling; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Min; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude changes in the P-wave of intracavitary electrocardiography have been used to assess the tip placement of central venous catheters. The research assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this sign in comparison with standard radiographic techniques for tip location, focusing on factors influencing its clinical utility. Both intracavitary electrocardiography guided tip location and X-ray positioning were used to verify catheter tip locations in patients undergoing central venous catheter insertion. Intracavitary electrocardiograms from 1119 patients (of a total 1160 subjects) showed specific amplitude changes in the P-wave. As the results show, compared with X-ray positioning, the sensitivity of electrocardiography-guided tip location was 97.3%, with false negative rate of 2.7%; the specificity was 1, with false positive rate of zero. Univariate analyses indicated that features including age, gender, height, body weight, and heart rate have no statistically significant influence on P-wave amplitude changes (P>0.05). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that catheter insertion routes (OR = 2.280, P = 0.003) and basal P-wave amplitude (OR = 0.553, P = 0.003) have statistically significant impacts on P-wave amplitude changes. As a reliable indicator of tip location, amplitude change in the P-wave has proved of good sensitivity and excellent specificity, and the minor, zero, false positive rate supports the clinical utility of this technique in early recognition of malpositioned tips. A better sensitivity was achieved in placement of centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs) than that of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). In clinical practice, a combination of intracavitary electrocardiography, ultrasonic inspection and the anthropometric measurement method would further improve the accuracy. PMID:25915758

  8. Improving patient safety during insertion of peripheral venous catheters: an observational intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Reise, Gesche; James, Claudia; Gittelbauer, Kirsten; Gosch, Jutta; Alpers, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peripheral venous catheters are frequently used in hospitalized patients but increase the risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Evidence-based guidelines describe specific steps that are known to reduce infection risk. However, the degree of guideline implementation in clinical practice is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the use of specific steps for insertion of peripheral venous catheters in clinical practice and to implement a multimodal intervention aimed at improving both compliance and the optimum order of the steps. Methods: The study was conducted at University Hospital Hamburg. An optimum procedure for inserting a peripheral venous catheter was defined based on three evidence-based guidelines (WHO, CDC, RKI) including five steps with 1A or 1B level of evidence: hand disinfection before patient contact, skin antisepsis of the puncture site, no palpation of treated puncture site, hand disinfection before aseptic procedure, and sterile dressing on the puncture site. A research nurse observed and recorded procedures for peripheral venous catheter insertion for healthcare workers in four different departments (endoscopy, central emergency admissions, pediatrics, and dermatology). A multimodal intervention with 5 elements was established (teaching session, dummy training, e-learning tool, tablet and poster, and direct feedback), followed by a second observation period. During the last observation week, participants evaluated the intervention. Results: In the control period, 207 insertions were observed, and 202 in the intervention period. Compliance improved significantly for four of five steps (e.g., from 11.6% to 57.9% for hand disinfection before patient contact; p<0.001, chi-square test). Compliance with skin antisepsis of the puncture site was high before and after intervention (99.5% before and 99.0% after). Performance of specific steps in the correct order also improved (e.g., from 7.7% to 68.6% when three of five steps were done; p<0.001). The intervention was described as helpful by 46.8% of the participants, as neutral by 46.8%, and as disruptive by 6.4%. Conclusions: A multimodal strategy to improve both compliance with safety steps for peripheral venous catheter insertion and performance of an optimum procedure was effective and was regarded helpful by healthcare workers. PMID:24327944

  9. We still go for the jugular: implications of the 3SITES central venous catheter study for nephrology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The 3SITES study randomly assigned a nontunneled central venous catheter site in over 3000 adults treated in intensive care units. The subclavian site was associated with a lower rate of short-term complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection and deep venous thrombosis, compared to the femoral or internal jugular site. Nephrologists should be aware of this study and should continue to advocate for alternatives to subclavian vein catheter placement in patients with chronic kidney disease who are expected to require arteriovenous access for dialysis in the future. PMID:26880443

  10. Correction of malposition of central venous catheter with 9-Fr introducer sheath assisted by mobile type diagnostic X-ray apparatus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jaekyu; Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Joon; Lee, Chia An; Woo, Seong Chang

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters provide long-term available vascular access. They are useful for central venous pressure monitoring, rapid fluid management, massive transfusion and direct cardiovascular medication, especially in operation. Central venous catheterization is usually performed by the landmark bedside technique without imaging guidance. The complications of central venous catheterization are frequent, which include malposition, pneumothorax, hemothorax, chylothorax, arterial puncture, hematoma, air embolism and infection. Malposition of a central venous catheter is not rare and may cause several complications such as malfunction of the catheter, default measurement of central venous pressure, catheter erosion, thrombophlebitis and cardiac tamponade. In this case, we report a malposition of central venous catheter with 9-Fr introducer sheath which is located in the right subclavian vein via ipsilateral internal jugular vein and the correction of this misplacement assisted by mobile type diagnostic X-ray apparatus (C-arm fluoroscope). PMID:26257855

  11. Efficacy and Safety of a New Technique of Conversion from Temporary to Tunneled Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Carlo; Libutti, Pasquale; Casucci, Francesco; Lisi, Piero; Basile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The usually applied conversion technique from temporary to tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) using the same venous insertion site requires a peel-away sheath. We propose a conversion technique without peel-away sheath: a guide wire is advanced through the existing temporary CVC; then, a subcutaneous tunnel is created from the exit to the venotomy site. After removing the temporary CVC, the tunneled one is advanced along the guide wire. The study group included all patients requiring a catheter conversion from January 2012 to June 2014; the control group included incident patients who had received de novo placement of tunneled CVCs from January 2010 to December 2011. The main outcome measures were technical success and immediate complications. Seventy-two tunneled catheters (40 with our conversion technique and 32 with the traditional one) were placed in 72 patients. The technical success was 95% in the study group and 75% in the controls (p = 0.019). The immediate complications were one bleeding in the study group (2.5%) and one air embolism, one pneumothorax, and four bleedings (18.7%) in the controls (p = 0.039). Conversion from temporary to tunneled CVC using a guide wire and without a peel-away sheath is an effective and safe procedure. PMID:25580678

  12. Catheter rupture and distal embolisation: a rare complication of central venous ports.

    PubMed

    Biffi, R; Orsi, F; Grasso, F; De Braud, F; Cenciarelli, S; Andreoni, B

    2000-01-01

    Central venous access devices placed through a percutaneous subclavian approach may be compressed by neighbouring bony structures, leading to biomaterial fatigue, catheter fracture at the compression site, and possible embolisation of distal fragment into the central veins. The aim of this paper is to review the experience of the authors, including more than 1300 subclavian port placements, carried out during a five-year period, discussing possible causes and therapeutic options of this rare complication. Nine patients out of 1320 (0.68%) experienced this complication during the five-year period of this study. Two patients only showed a retrospective radiologic evidence of the 'pinch-off sign' (e.g. initial compression of the catheter at the costo-clavicular junction). No patients had symptoms from the embolised catheter fragment; the most frequent symptom (8 out of 9 cases) was a painful swelling around the port area during infusion, related to the extravasation of medications or fluids into the subcutaneous tissue. The site of embolised segment varied from azygos vein to right pulmonary artery; however, these findings did not affect the outcome, and all the embolised fragments were successfully retrieved through a transfemoral approach using a radiologic interventional technique. No fatality occurred. The catheter fracture and embolisation of the distal fragment are a well-known complication of subclavian central venous long-term cannulation, whose estimated overall incidence is 0.5-1%. Diagnosis is usually based on the radiologic appearance of the catheter compression (so called 'pinch-off sign'), which is far from being constant; a clinical suspicion can derive from intermittent malfunction, which claims differential diagnosis with the pres-ence of a fibrin sleeve around the tip of the catheter. Once diagnosed, the treatment is always an interventional radiologic approach, which has a very high success rate. When it fails, the possibility to leave the fragment embolised in the central veins, heart or pulmonary arteries, should be considered, being the thoracotomy and open catheter retraction questionable, at present time, in patients who have no symptoms and limited life-expectancy. PMID:17638217

  13. A role for peripherally inserted central venous catheters in the prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Toshiro; Kohda, Kyuhei; Konuma, Yuichi; Hiraoka, Yasuko; Ichikawa, Yukari; Ono, Kaoru; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Takada, Kouichi; Iyama, Satoshi; Kato, Junji

    2014-12-01

    Central venous catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSIs) are a serious complication in patients with hematological malignancies. However, it remains unclear whether there is a difference in the rate of CR-BSI associated with the conventional type of central venous catheters (cCVCs) and peripherally inserted CVCs (PICCs) in such patients. To address this question, we retrospectively investigated the incidence of CR-BSIs associated with PICCs versus cCVCs in patients with hematological malignancies. We used PICCs in all consecutive patients requiring CVC placement between February 2009 and February 2013. We compared the CR-BSI rate in patients with PICCs with that in patients with cCVCs treated between September 2006 and January 2009 (control group). Eighty-four patients received PICCs and 85 received cCVCs. The most common reason for removal due to catheter-related complications was CR-BSI. The CR-BSI rate in the PICC group was significantly lower than that in the cCVC group (PICCs: 1.23/1000 catheter days; cCVCs: 5.30/1000 catheter days; P < 0.01). Catheter-related complications other than CR-BSIs occurred at an extremely low rate in the PICC group. The median catheter-related complication-free survival duration was significantly longer in the PICC group than in the cCVC group. Our study shows that PICCs are useful in patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:25248408

  14. The role of routine chest radiography for detecting complications after central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Morteza Kavanin; Shirvani, Amir

    2014-09-01

    Chest radiographs are obtained routinely after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion in many institutions, although it consumes time and money. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of post-procedural chest X-ray in detecting complications of CVC insertion; we performed CVC insertion without using ultrasonography guidance. A total of 454 patients who required an emergency vascular access for hemodialysis between February 2008 and March 2010 were included in this study. In cases where three to five unsuccessful attempts were encountered to place the CVC or pierce the artery, we used another site for CVC placement or we placed the CVC under ultrasonographic guidance. Both the internal jugular and the subclavian veins were used as routes for catheter insertion. All the catheters were dual lumen and were inserted by the same vascular access surgeon. All the catheters were inserted using the same protocol. This protocol consists of five stages including position, percutaneous anesthesia, puncture, pull out and placement. Chest radiography was obtained after the procedure and patients were interviewed for the presence of any unusual symptoms. The X-rays were reviewed by a radiologist who was unaware of the patients' symptoms. Complications occurred in two patients who had unusual symptoms after the placement of the catheter. Although immediate postprocedural chest radiography is recommended for tip position confirmation, it should not be considered a reliable procedure for detecting complications in the absence of clinical symptoms. It is recommended to monitor patients after catheter insertion and perform delayed chest X-ray in the presence of any unusual symptoms. PMID:25193899

  15. Three-Dimensional Imaging of a Central Venous Dialysis Catheter Related Infected Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Diana Yuan Yng; Green, Darren; Kalra, Philip A.; Abidin, Nik

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography is becoming widely available and with novel applications. We report an interesting case of a 68-year-old lady with a central venous thrombosis coincident with both a dialysis catheter infection and a recent pacemaker insertion. Two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography was unable to delineate whether the thrombosis was involved with the pacemaker wire or due to the tunneled catheter infection. The use of 3D echocardiography was able to produce distinct images aiding diagnosis. This circumvented the need for invasive investigations and inappropriate, high-risk removal of the pacing wire. This case highlights the emerging application of 3D echocardiography in routine nephrology practice. PMID:26688761

  16. [Cardiac tamponade with anterior interventricular vein thrombosis complicating central venous catheter insertion in a neonate].

    PubMed

    Carles, Dominique; Boucard, Christian; Baudoin, Béatrice; Pelluard, Fanny; André, Gwenaëlle; Naudion, Sophie; Legendre, Marine

    2012-06-01

    Tamponade is a rare but particularly serious complication of central venous catheters in the newborn. Tamponade can be due to the endocardic aggression caused by the continuous flow of a hyperosmotic solution or by a mechanical injury that can result in perforation of the atrial wall. The risk of tamponade is present whatever is the position of the tip of the catheter, although it has been shown that this risk is increased when this tip is in the right auricle. The originality of our observation is the discovery at the post-mortem examination of an anterior interventricular vein thrombosis, without any lesion of the atrial wall. In the event of the diagnosis of tamponade in living newborn, this etiology must be required because of its therapeutic implications. PMID:22748341

  17. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the neonatal unit: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jacqueline E; McDonald, Susan J; Tan, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter infections are the leading cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections and contribute significantly to mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Moreover, infection poses significant economic consequence which increased hospital costs and increased length of hospital stay. Prevention strategies are detailed in guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States; nevertheless, recent surveys in neonatal units in the United States, and Australia and New Zealand demonstrate these are not always followed. This review discusses the numerous evidence-based strategies to prevent catheter infections including hand hygiene, maximal sterile barriers during insertion, skin disinfection, selection of insertion site, dressings, aseptic non-touch technique, disinfection of catheter hubs/ports, administration set management, prompt removal of catheter, antibiotic locks, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and chlorhexidine bathing. Furthermore, it will describe different strategies that can be implemented into clinical practice to reduce infection rates. These include the use of care bundles including checklists, education and the use of CVC teams. PMID:25076387

  18. Management of complications related to central venous catheters in cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are important for the treatment of patients with cancer, especially in the perioperative and palliative care settings. These devices not only allow for the administration of chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and other intravenous therapies, but they may also improve the patients' quality of life by reducing the need for repeated peripheral venipunctures. Thrombotic and infectious complications are common, especially in the long-term use of CVCs. There are different types of thrombotic complications associated with CVCs, that is, a thrombotic occlusion of the catheter, a mural thrombus at the catheter tip and classical deep vein thrombosis, which occurs most frequently in the upper extremity where the majority of long-term catheters are inserted. Infections are common complications associated with CVCs. Patients with cancer who receive intensive chemotherapy and those patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have a markedly increased risk for insertion site and bloodstream infections. In this review, the epidemiology and risk factors that predispose patients to CVC-related thrombosis and infection are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic options according to the published data and the current guidelines are summarized and data for establishing primary and secondary preventative strategies are provided. PMID:24595880

  19. Positioning artifact causing retained foreign object appearance in a radiograph of a venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Abcejo, Arnoley S; Smith, Hugh M; Hebl, James R

    2015-04-15

    In preparation for an abdominal tumor debulking procedure, a patient had a right internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC) inserted. A radiologist interpreted a postoperative chest radiograph as containing a 7-cm foreign body in the distal lumen of the CVC. After removal, dissection of the CVC revealed a polyurethane plug in the distal lumen. The manufacturer (Arrow®) states that the synthetic plug is part of standard CVC construction that may produce a radiopaque signal with specific patient positioning during radiography. This report is intended to raise awareness of the potential for this radiographic finding and prevent the unnecessary removal of clinically indicated CVCs. PMID:25867192

  20. Intraperitoneal extravasation of total parental nutrition infusate from an umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Shareena, I; Khu, Y S; Cheah, F C

    2008-02-01

    A preterm male infant who had an umbilical venous catheter (UVC) in situ for infusion of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) subsequently developed abdominal distension. He was initially diagnosed to have necrotising enterocolitis. However, a diagnostic abdominal paracentesis yielded fluid which biochemical analysis found to be consistent with TPN. TPN is often infused through a UVC, in the first few days of life, for the nutritional support of a premature infant. Various complications have been reported to be associated with this path of delivery, one of which will be illustrated in this case report. PMID:18301823

  1. A retrospective analysis of trabectedin infusion by peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a multicentric Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Martella, Francesca; Salutari, Vanda; Marchetti, Claudia; Pisano, Carmela; Di Napoli, Marilena; Pietta, Francesca; Centineo, Dina; Caringella, Anna M; Musella, Angela; Fioretto, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    The European Medicines Agency strongly recommends administration of trabectedin through a central venous catheter (CVC) to minimize the risk of extravasation. However, CVCs place patients at risk of catheter-related complications and have a significant budgetary impact for oncology departments. The most frequently used CVCs are subcutaneously implanted PORT-chamber catheters (PORTs); peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are relatively new. We reviewed data of trabectedin-treated patients to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of the use of PORTs and PICCs in six Italian centres. Data on 102 trabectedin-treated patients (20 with sarcoma, 80 with ovarian cancer and two with cervical cancer) were evaluated. Forty-five patients received trabectedin by a PICC, inserted by trained nurses using an ultrasound-guided technique at the bedside, whereas 57 patients received trabectedin infusion by a PORT, requiring a day surgery procedure in the hospital by a surgeon. Device dislocation and infections were reported in four patients, equally distributed between PORT or PICC users. Thrombosis occurred in a single patient with a PORT. Complications requiring devices removal were not reported during any of the 509 cycles of therapy (median 5; range 1-20). PICC misplacement or early malfunctions were not reported during trabectedin infusion. The cost-efficiency ratio favours PORT over PICC only when the device is used for more than 1 year. Our data suggest that trabectedin infusion by PICC is safe and well accepted, with a preferable cost-efficiency ratio compared with PORT in patients requiring short-term use of the device (?1 year). PMID:26241804

  2. Innominate vein repair after iatrogenic perforation with central venous catheter via mini-sternotomy—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Siordia, Juan A.; Ayers, Georganne R.; Garlish, Amanda; Subramanian, Sreekumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Iatrogenic damage of the innominate vein is a possible complication with extracorporeal central venous line catheter insertion techniques. When perforation occurs, the catheter is left in place and surgery is required for careful removal and repair of other possible complications, including hemothorax and cardiac tamponade. The traditional approach for innominate vein repair is via a complete median sternotomy. Presentation of case A 75-year-old female patient with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type two and end stage renal failure, coronary artery disease presenting with iatrogenic innominate vein perforation and pulmonary effusion status post placement of a tunneled hemodialysis catheter through the left subclavian vein. Discussion The patient underwent a partial upper sternotomy into the right fourth intercostal space. Ministernotomy and endovascular techniques provide similar outcomes to those of traditional surgical approaches. However, with minimal access and trauma, these new methods provide better post-operative outcomes for patients. Conclusion The case presented in this report suggests a new approach to replace the traditional complete median sternotomy in attempts to repair the innominate vein. The mini-sternotomy approach provides sufficient visualization of the vessel and surrounding structures with minimal post-operative complications and healing time. PMID:25956040

  3. Primary thromboprophylaxis for cancer patients with central venous catheters – a reappraisal of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, M S; White, B; Hollywood, D; O'Donnell, J

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is responsible for an estimated 25?000 deaths per annum in UK hospital practice. It is well established that many of these deaths could be prevented through the use of appropriate thromboprophylaxis. This issue is of particular relevance in oncology practice, where the risks of VTE and bleeding are both significantly higher than those observed in general medical patients. Cancer patients with in-dwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) are at particularly high risk of developing thrombotic complications. However, the literature has produced conflicting conclusions regarding the efficacy of using routine primary thromboprophylaxis in these patients. Indeed such is the level of confusion around this topic, that the most recent version of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines published in 2004 actually reversed their previous recommendation (published in 2001). Nevertheless, minidose warfarin continues to be routinely used in many oncology centres in the UK. In this article, we have performed a systematic review of the published literature regarding the efficacy and the risks, associated with using thromboprophylaxis (either minidose warfarin or low-dose LMWH) in cancer patients with CVC. On the basis of this evidence, we conclude that there is no proven role for using such thromboprophylaxis. However, asymptomatic CVC-related venous thrombosis remains common, and further more highly powered studies of better design are needed in order to define whether specific subgroups of cancer patients might benefit from receiving thromboprophylaxis. PMID:16404436

  4. Lessons from French National Guidelines on the treatment of venous thrombosis and central venous catheter thrombosis in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Farge, Dominique; Durant, Cecile; Villiers, Stéphane; Long, Anne; Mahr, Alfred; Marty, Michel; Debourdeau, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Increased prevalence of Venous thromboembolism (VTE), as defined by deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), central venous catheter (CVC) related thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (PE) in cancer patients has become a major therapeutic issue. Considering the epidemiology and each national recommendations on the treatment of VTE in cancer patients, we analysed guidelines implementation in clinical practice. Thrombosis is the second-leading cause of death in cancer patients and cancer is a major risk factor of VTE, due to activation of coagulation, use of long-term CVC, the thrombogenic effects of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic drugs. Three pivotal trials (CANTHANOX, LITE and CLOT) and several meta-analysis led to recommend the long term (3 to 6 months) use of LMWH during for treating VTE in cancer patients with a high level of evidence. The Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the French "Institut National du Cancer" (INCa), the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCCP) have published specific guidelines for health care providers regarding the prevention and treatment of cancer-associated VTE. Critical appraisal of these guidelines, difficulties in implementation of prophylaxis regimen, tolerance and cost effectiveness of long term use of LMWH may account for large heterogenity in daily clinical practice. Homogenization of these guidelines in international consensus using an adapted independent methodological approach followed by educational and active implementation strategies at each national level would be very valuable to improve the care of VTE in cancer patients. PMID:20433988

  5. Hospital-wide multidisciplinary, multimodal intervention programme to reduce central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Zingg, Walter; Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Touveneau, Sylvie; Theriault, Michel; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Clergue, François; Pittet, Didier; Walder, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is the major complication of central venous catheters (CVC). The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of a hospital-wide strategy on CLABSI reduction. Between 2008 and 2011, all CVCs were observed individually and hospital-wide at a large university-affiliated, tertiary care hospital. CVC insertion training started from the 3rd quarter and a total of 146 physicians employed or newly entering the hospital were trained in simulator workshops. CVC care started from quarter 7 and a total of 1274 nurses were trained by their supervisors using a web-based, modular, e-learning programme. The study included 3952 patients with 6353 CVCs accumulating 61,366 catheter-days. Hospital-wide, 106 patients had 114 CLABSIs with a cumulative incidence of 1.79 infections per 100 catheters. We observed a significant quarterly reduction of the incidence density (incidence rate ratios [95% confidence interval]: 0.92 [0.88-0.96]; P<0.001) after adjusting for multiple confounders. The incidence densities (n/1000 catheter-days) in the first and last study year were 2.3/1000 and 0.7/1000 hospital-wide, 1.7/1000 and 0.4/1000 in the intensive care units, and 2.7/1000 and 0.9/1000 in non-intensive care settings, respectively. Median time-to-infection was 15 days (Interquartile range, 8-22). Our findings suggest that clinically relevant reduction of hospital-wide CLABSI was reached with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and multimodal quality improvement programme including aspects of behavioural change and key principles of good implementation practice. This is one of the first multimodal, multidisciplinary, hospital-wide training strategies successfully reducing CLABSI. PMID:24714418

  6. Hospital-Wide Multidisciplinary, Multimodal Intervention Programme to Reduce Central Venous Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, Walter; Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Touveneau, Sylvie; Theriault, Michel; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Clergue, François; Pittet, Didier; Walder, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is the major complication of central venous catheters (CVC). The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of a hospital-wide strategy on CLABSI reduction. Between 2008 and 2011, all CVCs were observed individually and hospital-wide at a large university-affiliated, tertiary care hospital. CVC insertion training started from the 3rd quarter and a total of 146 physicians employed or newly entering the hospital were trained in simulator workshops. CVC care started from quarter 7 and a total of 1274 nurses were trained by their supervisors using a web-based, modular, e-learning programme. The study included 3952 patients with 6353 CVCs accumulating 61,366 catheter-days. Hospital-wide, 106 patients had 114 CLABSIs with a cumulative incidence of 1.79 infections per 100 catheters. We observed a significant quarterly reduction of the incidence density (incidence rate ratios [95% confidence interval]: 0.92 [0.88–0.96]; P<0.001) after adjusting for multiple confounders. The incidence densities (n/1000 catheter-days) in the first and last study year were 2.3/1000 and 0.7/1000 hospital-wide, 1.7/1000 and 0.4/1000 in the intensive care units, and 2.7/1000 and 0.9/1000 in non-intensive care settings, respectively. Median time-to-infection was 15 days (Interquartile range, 8-22). Our findings suggest that clinically relevant reduction of hospital-wide CLABSI was reached with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and multimodal quality improvement programme including aspects of behavioural change and key principles of good implementation practice. This is one of the first multimodal, multidisciplinary, hospital-wide training strategies successfully reducing CLABSI. PMID:24714418

  7. Incidence of thrombotic complications in patients with haematological malignancies with central venous catheters: a prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Cortelezzi, Agostino; Moia, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Pogliani, Enrico M; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Gussoni, Gualberto; Barbui, Tiziano; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2005-06-01

    This prospective, observational and multicentre study assessed the incidence of, and risk factors for, symptomatic venous thrombotic complications after central venous catheter (CVC) positioning in patients with haematological malignancies. A total of 458 consecutive CVC insertions were registered in 416 patients (81.2% of whom had severe thrombocytopenia). Over the observation period (3 months or up to catheter removal), the incidence of events was: CVC-related deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 1.5%; lower limb DVT, 0.4%; pulmonary embolism (PE), 1.3%; fatal PE, 0.6%; CVC-related superficial thrombophlebitis, 3.9%; CVC-occlusion/malfunction of thrombotic origin, 6.1%; major arterial events, 1.1%. Severe bleeding and CVC-related infections were observed in 3.5% and 4.6% of cases respectively. A composite end point (any venous thromboembolism or superficial thrombophlebitis or CVC occlusion/malfunction) was defined in order to consider venous thrombotic events with a significant impact on clinical practice. With this criterion, the overall incidence was 12.0% (2.54 cases/1000 catheter days). No factor helped to predict venous thrombotic complications: only thrombocytopenia was associated with a weak trend for a reduced risk (odds ratio 0.52; 95% confidence interval 0.26-1.07). No severe bleeding was observed in those patients who received antithrombotic prophylaxis. This study shows that the impact on clinical practice of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications is not negligible in patients with haematological malignancies. PMID:15953009

  8. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Suresh Babu; Raghavan, Jagannathan

    2013-01-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve. PMID:24163455

  9. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection.

    PubMed

    Kale, Suresh Babu; Raghavan, Jagannathan

    2013-07-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve. PMID:24163455

  10. Internal mammary artery injury during central venous catheter insertion for TPN: rare but fatal.

    PubMed

    Mazeh, Haggi; Alaiyan, Bilal; Vald, Ori; Mizrahi, Ido; Klimov, Alexander; Eid, Ahmed; Freund, Herbert R

    2010-01-01

    Vascular injuries caused by subclavian central venous catheter (CVC) insertion can be associated with major complications. Such injuries differ in clinical presentation as well as optimal management, which ranges from observation only to surgical or endovascular repair. We report an injury to a branch of the internal mammary artery following an attempt to introduce a subclavian CVC, resulting in a massive hemothorax. This very rare injury was diagnosed and treated by angiography and embolization; however, the patient later succumbed to multi-organ failure. Suspicion of such an injury in a similar clinical setting should result in immediate angiography that can be lifesaving. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only report of such an adverse event in an adult. PMID:20392598

  11. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  12. Safety of Central Venous Catheter Placement at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, G.; Davidoff, A.M.; Howard, S.C.; Pui, C-H.; Rao, B.N.; Shenep, J. L.; Wozniak, A.; Shochat, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Central venous catheters (CVC) facilitate the management of patients with cancer. Optimal timing for placement of a CVC is controversial. We sought to determine whether early placement in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a group at high risk for infection and thrombosis, was associated with an increased rate of surgical complications. Procedure We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for early surgical complications in children with ALL diagnosed between 2004 and 2009 at a single pediatric cancer center. Results One hundred seventy-two patients were studied. There were 17 episodes of bloodstream infection, for a 30-day incidence of 9.8% (95% CI, 5.9–15%). There were no surgical site infections and no CVC was removed due to infection. Early thrombosis occurred in only one patient, 3 days after CVC placement. Infection was not influenced by catheter type, patient age, body mass index, or fever at the time of placement. The infection rate was not statistically higher when the ANC was <500/mm3 at the time of CVC placement (14.2% vs. 6.8%; P = 0.12). Conclusion Early CVC placement at the time of diagnosis of ALL was associated with a low surgical complication rate with no catheters requiring removal due to infection. Utilizing our current methods of preoperative preparation, surgical management and postoperative CVC care, early placement of a CVC is safe in children with ALL even when their ANC is <500/mm3, but larger cohort studies would be helpful to further clarify this issue. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2012;58:498–502. PMID:22162460

  13. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction after living donor liver transplantation managed with ectopic placement of a foley catheter: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Mohamed Abdel; Shehta, Ahmed; Hamed, Hosam; Elshobary, Mohamed; Salah, Tarek; Sultan, Ahmed Mohamed; Fathy, Omar; Elghawalby, Ahmed; Yassen, Amr; Shiha, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The early hepatic venous outflow obstruction (HVOO) is a rare but serious complication after liver transplantation, which may result in graft loss. We report a case of early HVOO after living donor liver transplantation, which was managed by ectopic placement of foley catheter. Presentation A 51 years old male patient with end stage liver disease received a right hemi-liver graft. On the first postoperative day the patient developed impairment of the liver functions. Doppler ultrasound (US) showed absence of blood flow in the right hepatic vein without thrombosis. The decision was to re-explore the patient, which showed torsion of the graft upward and to the right side causing HVOO. This was managed by ectopic placement of a foley catheter between the graft and the diaphragm and the chest wall. Gradual deflation of the catheter was gradually done guided by Doppler US and the patient was discharged without complications. Discussion Mechanical HVOO results from kinking or twisting of the venous anastomosis due to anatomical mismatch between the graft and the recipient abdomen. It should be managed surgically by repositioning of the graft or redo of venous anastomosis. Several ideas had been suggested for repositioning and fixation of the graft by the use of Sengstaken–Blakemore tubes, tissue expanders, and surgical glove expander. Conclusion We report the use of foley catheter to temporary fix the graft and correct the HVOO. It is a simple and safe way, and could be easily monitored and removed under Doppler US without any complications. PMID:25805611

  14. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad Chakraverty, Sam Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-15

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  15. Five-Lumen Antibiotic-Impregnated Femoral Central Venous Catheters in Severely Burned Patients: An Investigation of Device Utility and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce C; Mian, Mohammad A H; Mullins, Robert F; Hassan, Zaheed; Shaver, Joseph R; Johnston, Krystal K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate in a severely burned patient population, many of whom required prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Between January 2008 and June 2012, 151 patients underwent placement of 455 five-lumen minocycline/rifampin-impregnated CVCs. CRBSI was defined as at least one blood culture (>100,000 colonies) and one simultaneous roll-plate CVC tip culture (>15 colony forming units) positive for the same organism. Most patients had accidental burns (81.5%) with a mean TBSA of 50%. A mean of three catheters were inserted per patient (range, 1-25). CVCs were inserted in the femoral vein (91.2%), subclavian vein (5.3%), and internal jugular vein (3.3%). Mean overall catheter indwell time was 8 days (range, 0-39 days). The overall rate of CRBSI per 1000 catheter days was 11.2; patients with a TBSA >60% experienced significantly higher rates of CRBSI than patients with a TBSA ?60% (16.2 vs 7.3, P = .01). CVCs placed through burned skin were four times more likely to be associated with CRBSI than CVCs placed through intact skin. The most common infectious organism was Acinetobacter baumannii. Deep venous thrombosis developed in eleven patients (7%). The overall rate of CRBSI was 11.2, consistent with published rates of CRBSI in burn patients. Thus, femoral placement of 5-lumen CVCs did not result in increased CRBSI rates. These data support the safety of femoral CVC placement in burn patients, contrary to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to avoid femoral CVC insertion. PMID:25407386

  16. Adverse events and technical complaints related to central venous catheters marketed in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Luciene de Oliveira; Friedrich, Karen; Melchior, Stela Candioto; Silva, Michele Feitoza; Gemal, Andre Luis; Delgado, Isabella Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to critically analyze data of the National Notification System for Adverse Events and Technical Complaints (Notivisa) related to central venous catheters, through an evaluation of the description of notifications recorded between 2006 and 2009. Methods Notifications were categorized and evaluated to: (i) determine the number of adverse events and technical complaints, (ii) verify compliance with the classification criteria defined by the legislation, (iii) reclassify notifications, when necessary, in order for them to fit in with the legal definitions, (iv) verify registered companies in Brazil, (v) quantify the notifications according to the registered company and product lot, and (vi) identify the country of original of the notified product. Microsoft Excel(r) 2010 was used to categorize and systematize the data. Results Some conceptual errors and incomplete records were found. Altogether, 228 notifications of technical complaints and 119 of adverse events were identified. Some notifications on guidewires and broken catheters were reported which led to the necessity of duplicating some medical procedures and to the occurrence of lesions/lacerations of vessels and tissue injury. Forty-seven percent of companies presented at least one notification in Notivisa and in all, 38 product lots had more than one notification. Conclusion These data support a necessity for cooperation between all entities of the National Health Surveillance System to check compliance of this type of product and to properly report adverse events and technical complaints. It is also important to incorporate minimum standards for the management of technologies in health services, including in the acquisition of products and training of staff. PMID:23904810

  17. Management of traumatic hemothorax by closed thoracic drainage using a central venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jian-hua; Liu, Hua-bo; Zhang, Mao; Wu, Jun-song; Yang, Jian-xin; Chen, Jin-ming; Xu, Shan-xiang; Wang, Jian-an

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of traumatic hemothorax by closed pleural drainage using a central venous catheter (CVC), compared with using a conventional chest tube. Methods: A prospective controlled study with the Ethics Committee approval was undertaken. A total of 407 patients with traumatic hemothorax were involved and they were randomly assigned to undergo closed pleural drainage with CVCs (n=214) or conventional chest tubes (n=193). The Seldinger technique was used for drainage by CVC, and the conventional technique for drainage by chest tube. If the residual volume of the hemothorax was less than 200 ml after the daily volume of drainage decreased to below 100 ml for two consecutive days, the treatment was considered successful. The correlative data of efficacy and safety between the two groups were analyzed using t or chi-squared tests with SPSS 13.0. A P value of less than 0.05 was taken as indicating statistical significance. Results: Compared with the chest tube group, the operation time, fraction of analgesic treatment, time of surgical wound healing, and infection rate of surgical wounds were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the CVC group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the success rate of treatment and the incidence of serious complications (P>0.05), or in the mean catheter/tube indwelling time and mean medical costs of patients treated successfully (P>0.05). Conclusions: Management of medium or large traumatic hemothoraxes by closed thoracic drainage using CVC is minimally invasive and as effective as using a conventional large-bore chest tube. Its complications can be prevented and it has the potential to replace the large-bore chest tube. PMID:22205619

  18. Antibiotics Before Removal of Percutaneously Inserted Central Venous Catheters Reduces Clinical Sepsis in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gail E.; Tierney, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluate the incidence of postcatheter removal clinical sepsis when antibiotics were infused prior to the removal of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters (PICCs). METHODS: A retrospective chart review of premature neonates (n = 196) weighing ?1250 g at birth with 218 PICC line removals in the presence or absence of antibiotics at a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) between January 1, 2010, and May 31, 2012. Charts were reviewed looking for the presence of clinical sepsis defined as a sepsis workup including white blood cell count, differential, C-reactive protein, blood and/or cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and urine cultures along with at least 48 hours of antibiotic therapy given within 72 hours after removal of a PICC line. Antibiotics were considered present at line removal if given within 12 hours before catheter removal either electively or at completion of a planned course. RESULTS: When antibiotics were given within 12 hours before PICC line removal, only 2% of the line removal episodes (1/48) resulted in a neonate developing clinical sepsis versus 13% (21/165) when no antibiotics were given prior to removal (p = 0.03, Fisher's exact test). Despite the increased use of elective antibiotics with line removal, there was no increase in total antibiotic usage due to the overall decrease in episodes of clinical sepsis or changes in antibiogram susceptibility patterns. CONCLUSIONS: There was an 11% absolute decrease and a 6-fold relative decrease in postcatheter removal clinical sepsis events in premature neonates who received antibiotics prior to PICC line removal. PMID:26170772

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Vik, Anders; Holme, Pal Andre; Singh, Kulbir; Dorenberg, Eric; Nordhus, Kare Christian; Kumar, Satish; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-09-15

    Traditional anticoagulant treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities (UEDVT) is associated with a relatively high incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for UEDVT would provide efficient thrombolysis with less subsequent PTS than during traditional anticoagulation. Primary efficacy, complications, and long-term results after CDT are reported in a retrospective cohort (2002-2007) of patients (n = 30) with DVT in the upper extremities. PTS was assessed by a modified Villalta scale. UEDVT was unprovoked in 11 (37%) cases and effort related in 9 (30%) cases. The median duration of symptoms prior to CDT was 7.0 days (range, 1-30); median duration of thrombolysis treatment, 70 h (range, 24-264 h); and the median amount of rt-PA infused during CDT, 52 mg (range, 19-225 mg). Major bleeding was registered in three (9%) patients, and CDT was stopped prematurely in three patients due to local hematoma. No intracerebral bleeding, clinical pulmonary embolism, or deaths occurred during treatment. Grade II (>50%) or III (>90%) lysis was present in 29 patients (97%) at the end of CDT. Bleeding complications increased by each day of delay from the debut of symptoms to the start of treatment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). At follow-up (n = 29; median, 21 months; range, 5-58 months), 11 (38%) patients had occluded veins, whereas 18 (62%) had patent veins. However, stenosis of varying severity was present in eight of those with a patent vein. No patients had severe PTS, whereas six (21%) experienced mild PTS. In conclusion, our retrospective cohort study of patients with UEDVT showed that treatment restored venous drainage, with a subsequent low frequency of mild PTS at follow-up. Early intervention with CDT prevented bleeding complications.

  20. Long-Term Central Venous Catheter Use and Risk of Infection in Older Adults With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Sepkowitz, Kent A.; Elkin, Elena B.; Pinheiro, Laura C.; Sima, Camelia S.; Son, Crystal H.; Atoria, Coral L.; Bach, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used in patients with cancer to facilitate venous access to administer intravenous fluids and chemotherapy. CVCs can also be a source of bloodstream infections, although this risk is not well understood. We examined the impact of long-term CVC use on infection risk, independent of other risk factors such as chemotherapy, in a population-based cohort of patients with cancer. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using SEER-Medicare data for patients age > 65 years diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 with invasive colorectal, head and neck, lung, or pancreatic cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or invasive or noninvasive breast cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between CVC use and infections, with CVC exposure as a time-dependent predictor. We used multivariable analysis and propensity score methods to control for patient characteristics. Results CVC exposure was associated with a significantly elevated infection risk, adjusting for demographic and disease characteristics. For patients with pancreatic cancer, risk of infections during the exposure period was three-fold greater (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 2.93; 95% CI, 2.58 to 3.33); for those with breast cancer, it was six-fold greater (AHR, 6.19; 95% CI, 5.42 to 7.07). Findings were similar when we accounted for propensity to receive a CVC and limited the cohort to individuals at high risk of infections. Conclusion Long-term CVC use was associated with an increased risk of infections for older adults with cancer. Careful assessment of the need for long-term CVCs and targeted strategies for reducing infections are critical to improving cancer care quality. PMID:24982458

  1. Convective Leakage Makes Heparin Locking of Central Venous Catheters Ineffective Within Seconds: Experimental Measurements in a Model Superior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Michael C; McGah, Patrick M; Ng, Chin H; Clark, Alicia M; Gow, Kenneth W; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava (SVC) for hemodialysis or chemotherapy, are routinely filled while not in use with heparin, an anticoagulant, to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. The heparin-locking procedure, however, places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding, as heparin is known to leak from the catheter into the blood stream. We provide evidence from detailed in vitro experiments that shows the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage to be convective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile flow surrounding the catheter. This novel mechanism is supported by experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow velocity and heparin transport from a CVC placed inside a model SVC inside a pulsatile flow loop. The results predict an initial, fast (<10 s), convection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region, the region of the catheter with side holes. This is followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where the concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin concentration in the near-tip region. The results presented here, which are consistent with previous in vivo estimates of 24 hour leakage rates, predict that the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region is essentially zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin locking procedure ineffective. PMID:26418203

  2. Complete heart block during central venous catheter placement in a patient with pre-existing left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, D; Idris, N; Varshneya, N

    2003-11-01

    Heart block and arrhythmia are complications of pulmonary artery and cardiac catheterization. Injury to the conducting system of the heart often involves the right bundle causing right bundle branch block (RBBB). If patients already have left bundle branch block (LBBB), complete heart block (CHB) may result. After trauma, impairment of the right bundle is usually transient with recovery in hours, but complete heart block can lead to symptoms requiring invasive treatment. Similar complications are rare with insertion of central venous catheters, as they should not enter the heart. Injury to the right bundle during central venous catheter insertion can be by trauma from the guide wire or from the catheter itself. The function of the AV node and bundle of His in these patients has not been studied before. We report a patient with LBBB who developed CHB during insertion of a central venous cannula. Conduction through the AV node and His-Purkinje system was intact, showing that the transient RBBB was caused by traumatic injury rather than by other disease of the conduction system. PMID:14570803

  3. Sonothrombolysis of Intra-Catheter Aged Venous Thrombi Using Microbubble Enhancement and Guided Three Dimensional Ultrasound Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Shelby; Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Drvol, Lucas K; Lof, John; Fletcher, Scott E; Radio, Stanley J; Danford, David A; Hammel, James M; Porter, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    Central venous and arterial catheters are a major source of thrombo-embolic disease in children. We hypothesized that guided high mechanical index (MI) impulses from diagnostic three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound during an intravenous microbubble infusion could dissolve these thrombi. An in vitro system simulating intra-catheter thrombi was created and then treated with guided high MI impulses from 3D ultrasound, utilizing low MI microbubble sensitive imaging pulse sequence schemes to detect the microbubbles (Perflutren Lipid Microsphere, Definity®, Lantheus). Ten aged thrombi over 24 hours old were tested using 3D ultrasound coupled with a continuous diluted microbubble infusion (Group A), and ten with 3D ultrasound alone (Group B). Mean thrombus age was 28.6 hours (range 26.6–30.3). Groups A exhibited a 55 ± 19 % reduction in venous thrombus size, compared to 31±10 % for Group B (p=0.008). Feasibility testing was performed in 4 pigs, establishing a model to further investigate the efficacy. Sonothrombolysis of aged intra-catheter venous thrombi can be achieved with commercially available microbubbles and guided high MI ultrasound from a diagnostic 3D transducer. PMID:20696549

  4. Central venous catheter malposition in the azygos vein and difficult endotracheal intubation in severe ankylosing spondylitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjin; Jeong, Hyungmo; Chung, Junyoung; Yi, Jaewoo

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can be challenging for anesthesiologists because central venous access can be difficult, and the airway can be blocked due to the fixed flexion deformity of the spine. In this case, we attempted central access via the right subclavian vein, but the catheter was repeatedly inserted into the azygos vein, which was confirmed by radiology. After several attempts, the catheter position was corrected at the superior vena cava-atrial junction. Although several useful devices have been developed to address difficult intubation, in this case, fiberoptic bronchoscopy was the only applicable safe alternative because of the patient’s extremely severe chin on chest deformity and temporomandibular joint disease. We report a successful awake fiberoptic bronchoscopic intubation in a patient with extremely severe AS and recommend that the catheter placement should be confirmed with radiology to ensure proper positioning for severe AS patients. PMID:26885138

  5. CT evaluation of pulmonary venous anatomy variation in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Thorning, Chandani; Hamady, Mohamad; Liaw, Jonathan Voon Ping; Juli, Christoph; Lim, Phang Boon; Dhawan, Ranju; Peters, Nicholas S; Davies, D Wyn; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; O'Neill, Mark D; Wright, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    To characterize pulmonary vein (PV) anatomy and the relative position of the PV ostia to the adjacent thoracic vertebral bodies, two readers reviewed 176 computed tomography pulmonary venous studies. PV ostial dimensions were measured and PV ovality assessed. Anatomical variations in PV drainage were noted. The position of the PV ostium relative to the nearest vertebral body edge was recorded. Right PV ostia were significantly more circular than the left (p<.001). Anatomical variability was greater for right PVs: 82% of patients had 2 ostia, 17% had 3 ostia, 0.5% had 4 ostia and 0.5% a common ostium. For left PVs, 91% of patients had 2 ostia, 8.5% a common ostium and 0.5% 3 ostia. Mean ostial distances from vertebral margin were: right PVs 3.62±7.48 mm; left PVs 3.84±8.46 mm (p=.72). 65% of right upper PV, 60.5% of right lower PV, 51% of left upper PV and 57% of left lower PV ostia were positioned lateral to vertebral bodies. Right PV ostia are rounder than left-sided and right PV drainage is more variable. As a significant proportion of PV ostia overlap the vertebral bodies, prior anatomical evaluation by CT can assist catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF), especially when performed under fluoroscopy. PMID:21237413

  6. Factors affecting survival in pediatric cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric central venous catheter (CVC) placement is useful but associated with complications such as cardiac tamponade. We aimed to identify risk factors for death in cardiac tamponade. Published articles on pediatric CVC-associated cardiac tamponade were obtained by searching PubMed and Google and retrospectively reviewed to analyze risk factors for death. Factors examined for their effect on mortality risk included patient age, weight, CVC size, days from CVC insertion to tamponade occurrence, substances administered, insertion site, treatment, CVC material, and initial CVC tip position. Of 110 patients reported in 62 articles, 69 survived and 41 died. Among survivors, 55 of 69 patients were treated; among deaths, only 7 of 38 (OR 537.9, 95 % CI 29.3-9,877, p < 0.0001). Multiple regression analysis in 44 cases showed that treatment (p < 0.0001) and initial CVC tip position (p = 0.020) were independent predictive factors related to improved cardiac tamponade survival. Past studies have mainly discussed how to avoid pediatric cardiac tamponade; by contrast, the present study focused on how to avoid deaths. The findings of this review suggest that cardiac tamponade survival is better when tamponade is detected early and treated promptly and might be affected by initial CVC tip position. PMID:26160591

  7. Bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and peripherally inserted central catheters: reappraising the evidence.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Krein, Sarah L; Chenoweth, Carol; Saint, Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has transformed the care of medical and surgical patients. Whereas intravenous antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and administration of chemotherapy once necessitated prolonged hospitalization, PICCs have eliminated the need for such practice. However, PICCs may not be as innocuous as once thought; a growing body of evidence suggests that these devices also have important risks. This review discusses the origin of PICCs and highlights reasons behind their rapid adoption in medical practice. We evaluate the evidence behind 2 important PICC-related complications--venous thrombosis and bloodstream infections--and describe how initial studies may have led to a false sense of security with respect to these outcomes. In this context, we introduce a conceptual model to understand the risk of PICC-related complications and guide the use of these devices. Through this model, we outline recommendations that clinicians may use to prevent PICC-related adverse events. We conclude by highlighting important knowledge gaps and identifying avenues for future research in this area. PMID:22840660

  8. A Rare Case of Jejunal Arterio-Venous Fistula: Treatment with Superselective Catheter Embolization with a Tracker-18 Catheter and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Martin J. Anderson, Suzanne E.; Lourens, Steven; Triller, Juergen

    2004-11-15

    Arterio-venous fistulas may develop spontaneously, following trauma or infection, or be iatrogenic in nature. We present a rare case of a jejunal arterio- venous fistula in a 35-year-old man with a history of pancreatic head resection that had been performed two years previously because of chronic pancreatitis. The patient was admitted with acute upper abdominal pain, vomiting and an abdominal machinery-type bruit. The diagnosis of a jejunal arterio-venous fistula was established by MR imaging. Transfemoral angiography was performed to assess the possibility of catheter embolization. The angiographic study revealed a small aneurysm of the third jejunal artery, abnormal early filling of dilated jejunal veins and marked filling of the slightly dilated portal vein (13-14 mm). We considered the presence of segmental portal hypertension. The patient was treated with coil embolization in the same angiographic session. This case report demonstrates the importance of auscultation of the abdomen in the initial clinical examination. MR imaging and color Doppler ultrasound are excellent noninvasive tools in establishing the diagnosis. The role of interventional radiological techniques in the treatment of early portal hypertension secondary to jejunal arterio-venous fistula is discussed at a time when this condition is still asymptomatic. A review of the current literature is included.

  9. The Effect of Interdisciplinary Team Rounds on Urinary Catheter and Central Venous Catheter Days and Rates of Infection.

    PubMed

    Arora, Navneet; Patel, Killol; Engell, Christian A; LaRosa, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team (IDT) rounds were initiated in the intensive care unit (ICU) in June 2010. All catheters were identified by location, duration, and indication. Catheters with no indication were removed. Data were collected retrospectively on catheter days and associated infections in a 20-month period before and after intervention with an aggregate of 19 207 ICU days before and 23 576 ICU days after institution of rounds. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in the number of indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) days (5304 vs 4541 days, P = .05) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates (4.71 vs 1.98 infections/1000 ICU days, P < .05). Central line days statistically increased after IDT rounds (3986 vs 4305 days, P < .05) but the catheter-related bloodstream infection rate trended down (3.5 vs 1.6 infections/1000 ICU days, P = .62). This analysis suggests that IDT rounds may have an impact on reducing the number of IUC days and associated infections. PMID:24006027

  10. Evaluation of routine postoperative chest roentgenogram for determination of the correct position of permanent central venous catheters tip

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Fereshteh; Hekmatnia, Ali; Shahabi, Javad; Keshavarzian, Amir; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Jazi, Amir Hosein Davarpanah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proper placement of central venous catheter (CVC) tip could reduce early and late catheter-related complications. Although the live fluoroscopy is standard of care for placement of the catheter, it is not available in many centers. Therefore, the present study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of bedside chest X-ray (CXR) for proper positioning of the catheter tip. Materials and Methods: A total of 82 adult patients undergoing elective placement of tunneled CVC were enrolled in this study during 2010-2012. The catheter tip position was evaluated by postoperative bedside chest radiographs as well as trans-thoracic echocardiogram as definite diagnostic tool. The catheter position was considered correct if the tip was positioned in the right atrium both in CXR or echocardiography. Finally, CXRs interpreted by expert radiologist. Thus findings were compared by echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values were calculated. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL), and P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: The patients were 57.37 ± 18.91 years of age, weighed 65.79 ± 15.58 kg and were 166.36 ± 9.91 cm tall. Sensitivity and specificity of CXR for proper catheter tip position were 74.3% and 58.3%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 91.2% and 28%. In addition accuracy, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were 71.9%, 1.78, and 2.27 respectively. Conclusion: Bedside CXR alone does not reliably predict malpositioning after CVC placement. PMID:25767527

  11. PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER SAFETYIN BURN CARE: A SINGLE CENTRE RETROSPECTIVE COHORT REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Ryan E.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective PICC line use for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC associated complication rates to existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. Methods A single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008–2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. Results The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and 3 cases of central line associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days [range 1–49 days]. Conclusions We suggest that PICC line associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to CVC associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant, and potentially fatal risks. PMID:25501778

  12. On-demand antimicrobial release from a temperature-sensitive polymer - comparison with ad libitum release from central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Jelmer; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Abeln, Caroline; van der Mei, Henny C; van Asseldonk, Dirk; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-28

    Antimicrobial releasing biomaterial coatings have found application for instance in the fixation of orthopedic joint prostheses and central venous catheters. Most frequently, the release kinetics is such that antimicrobially-effective concentrations are only reached within the first days to weeks after implantation, leaving no local antimicrobial release available when a biomaterial-associated infection occurs later. Here we compare the ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a central venous catheter with their release from a new, on-demand release coating consisting of a temperature-sensitive copolymer of styrene and n-butyl (meth)acrylate. The copolymer can be loaded with an antimicrobial, which is released when the temperature is raised above its glass transition temperature. Ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a commercially-purchased catheter and associated antimicrobial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was limited to 16days. Consecutive temperature-triggers of our on-demand coating yielded little or no antimicrobial efficacy of silver-acetate release, but antimicrobially-effective chlorhexidine concentrations were observed over a time period of 60-80days. This attests to the clear advantage of on-demand coatings above ad libitum releasing coatings, that may have released their antimicrobial content before it is actually needed. Importantly, glass transition temperature of chlorhexidine loaded copolymers was lower (48°C) than of silver loaded ones (61°C), facilitating their clinical use. PMID:24950430

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Heparin and 0.9% Sodium Chloride Solutions in Maintenance of Patency of Central Venous Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Heidari Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Jafari, Hedayat; Yazdani Cherati, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background Occlusion of central venous catheters is one of the limiting factors in using them. Heparinized saline solution is the standard solution used for keeping the catheters open. Objectives This study aimed to determine the effect of heparin saline solution and normal saline in maintenance of patency of central venous catheters. Patients and Methods This double-blind study was performed on 84 patients of intensive care unit who had central venous catheters. The patients were randomly divided into two groups of heparin saline receivers and normal saline receivers. In the heparin group after each drug injection into the lumen, 3 mL of heparin saline solution was injected in the catheter as well. The other group only received 10 mL of normal saline instead. The catheters were examined for blood return and flushing every eight hours for 21 days. Data was analyzed using SPSS software version 20 and descriptive and analytic statistics were studied. Results There was no significant difference in the rate of flushing (P = 0.872) and possibility of taking blood samples from catheters (P = 0.745) in the two groups of heparin and normal saline receivers. Furthermore, using heparin had no effect on prolonging the survival of catheters. Conclusions Considering possible side effects of heparin and the increase in treatment charges and the fact that using heparin did not have a significant effect on patency and survival of catheters in the studied patients, it is recommended to use normal saline solution to maintain the patency of central venous catheters. PMID:25866710

  14. Infection of a subclavian venous stent in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Guest, S S; Kirsch, C M; Baxter, R; Sorooshian, M; Young, J

    1995-08-01

    Endovascular stent placement to prevent restenosis after angioplasty is being increasingly employed. A 63-year-old hemodialysis patient with a right forearm gortex graft developed ipsilateral arm edema, and a right subclavian vein stenosis was diagnosed. This vascular stenosis was presumably secondary to previous placement of temporary access catheters. The subclavian vein stenosis was treated with angioplasty, endovascular stenting, and warfarin, which resulted in resolution of the arm edema. Three weeks after stenting, the patient developed fever to 104 degrees F, chills, and right arm and shoulder edema. All blood cultures grew Staphylococcus aureus, and an Indium-labeled white blood cell scan was positive at the sight of the subclavian stent. Infectious disease consultants recommended urgent removal of the infected stent, but the extensive surgery required posed considerable risk of major morbidity. We elected to conservatively treat the patient. With loss of all upper-extremity access sites, the patient was converted to peritoneal dialysis. Despite the patient's ambulatory status, a femoral venous Hickman catheter was placed and tunneled through the abdominal subcutaneous soft tissue. The patient received 9 weeks of antibiotics by the Hickman catheter with an infusion pump, and warfarin was continued. There has been complete clinical resolution of infection and subclavian thrombosis. Endovascular stents are being used more commonly, and this is the first description, to our knowledge, of a stent infection. The stent infection was successfully managed without surgical removal. PMID:7645545

  15. Detection of viable but non-culturable staphylococci in biofilms from central venous catheters negative on standard microbiological assays.

    PubMed

    Zandri, G; Pasquaroli, S; Vignaroli, C; Talevi, S; Manso, E; Donelli, G; Biavasco, F

    2012-07-01

    Viable bacteria were sought in 44 Maki-negative biofilms from central venous catheters (CVCs) using epifluorescence microscopy after live/dead staining. Thirty (77%) samples contained viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells; the majority were positive on real-time PCR specific for Staphylococcus epidermidis (one also for Staphylococcus aureus). Viable cells were significantly (p<0.01) associated with CVCs from febrile patients, three of whom showed S. epidermidis-positive blood cultures, suggesting that CVC-associated biofilms can be reservoirs for staphylococci in the VBNC state. The possible role of VBNC staphylococci in persistent infections related to medical devices requires further investigation. PMID:22578149

  16. A community collaborative to develop consensus guidelines to standardize out-of-hospital maintenance care of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Nailon, Regina; Rupp, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) maintenance is integral to preventing complications and improving outcomes. This process is made more challenging when patients transition from hospital to home care or to an outpatient infusion setting, because different CVC maintenance practices and care parameters confuse patients and care providers alike. Through collaboration and consensus building, a group of metropolitan home health and home infusion agencies developed a standardized approach to CVC maintenance care. This article discusses the multiagency collaborative and resulting guideline and other educational materials that better enable providers, patients, and families to maintain CVC integrity and achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:25723833

  17. Endovascular thrombolysis to salvage central venous access in children with catheter-associated upper extremity deep vein thrombosis: technique and initial results.

    PubMed

    Lungren, Matthew P; Ward, Thomas J; Patel, Manish N; Racadio, John M; Kukreja, Kamlesh

    2015-10-01

    Nine patients (average age 8.3 years, range 20 days to 17 years; average weight 31 kg, range 2.7-79 kg) with catheter-associated UE-DVT underwent upper extremity venous thrombolysis with the goal of access salvage. Catheter directed therapy with alteplase (tPA), balloon angioplasty, and mechanical thrombectomy was used in all cases. The mean total dose of TPA was 15 mg (range 1-40 mg). Venous access was ultimately preserved in all patients. No stents or superior vena cava filters were used. There was one episode of symptomatic clinically suspected pulmonary embolism managed by systemic tPA and heparin without long term sequaele. Mean imaging and clinical follow-up was 351 ± 208 and 613 ± 498 days respectively. Endovenous thrombolysis for catheter-associated upper-extremity DVT in children may be safe and effective and could be considered particularly in patients in whom long-term venous access is needed. PMID:25894473

  18. Candidaemia in a paediatric centre and importance of central venous catheter removal.

    PubMed

    Karadag-Oncel, Eda; Kara, Ates; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Arikan-Akdagli, Sevtap; Cengiz, Ali Bulent; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Gur, Deniz; Celik, Melda; Ozkaya-Parlakay, Aslinur

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to identify differences in distribution of Candida species, resistance to antifungals and clinical outcome, as well as the identification of potential risk factors associated with candidaemia in children. We conducted a retrospective analysis in children ?18 years with blood culture proven candidaemia identified between 2004 and 2012. Patients were divided into two groups (Group 1, <3 months, n = 51; Group 2, ?3 months, n = 197) to identify any potential difference between the neonatal and early infantile periods in terms of risk factors and distribution of Candida species. A total of 248 distinct episodes of candidaemia were identified over the study period. The most frequently isolated Candida species were C. albicans (53.2%), followed by C. parapsilosis (26.2%), C. tropicalis (8.1%). Of the 248 episodes, 71 episodes (28.6%) resulted in death within 30 days from the onset of candidaemia. In Group 1, failure of central venous catheter (CVC) removal was found to be associated with a 20.5-fold increase in mortality [95% CI (3.9, 106.5); P < 0.001], compared to a 5.9-fold increased risk with hypoalbuminaemia [95% CI (1.03, 34.1); P = 0.046]. For Group 2, the increased risk was 23-fold for failure of CVC removal [95% CI (7.48, 70.77); P < 0.001], 7.4-fold for mechanical ventilation [95% CI (2.64, 21.08); P < 0.001], 4.4-fold for hypoalbuminaemia [95% CI (1.56, 12.56); P = 0.005], 3.1-fold for neutropaenia [95% CI (1.31, 7.69); P = 0.010] and 2.2-fold for male gender [95% CI (1.02, 4.71); P = 0.043]. Therapeutic choices should be guided by sound knowledge of local epidemiological trends in candidaemia. Removal of CVC significantly reduces mortality and is an essential step in the management of candidaemia. PMID:25678411

  19. Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of an Antibiotic-Lock Technique for Prevention of Gram-Positive Central Venous Catheter-Related Infection in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carratalà, Jordi; Niubó, Jordi; Fernández-Sevilla, Alberto; Juvé, Eulalia; Castellsagué, Xavier; Berlanga, Juan; Liñares, Josefina; Gudiol, Francesc

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of an antibiotic-lock technique in preventing endoluminal catheter-related infection with gram-positive bacteria in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients with nontunneled, multilumen central venous catheters were assigned in a randomized, double-blinded manner to receive either 10 U of heparin per ml (57 patients) or 10 U of heparin per ml and 25 ?g of vancomycin per ml (60 patients), which were instilled in the catheter lumen and which were allowed to dwell in the catheter lumen for 1 h every 2 days. Insertion-site and hub swabs were taken twice weekly. The primary and secondary end points of the trial were significant colonization of the catheter hub and catheter-related bacteremia, respectively. Significant colonization of the catheter hub occurred in nine (15.8%) patients receiving heparin (seven patients were colonized with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one patient was colonized with Staphylococcus capitis, and one patient was colonized with Corynebacterium sp.), whereas the catheter hubs of none of the patients receiving heparin and vancomycin were colonized (P = 0.001). Catheter-related bacteremia developed in four (7%) patients receiving heparin (three patients had S. epidermidis bacteremia and one patient had S. capitis bacteremia), whereas none of the patients in the heparin and vancomycin group had catheter-related bacteremia (P = 0.05). The times to catheter hub colonization and to catheter-related bacteremia by the Kaplan-Meier method were longer in patients receiving heparin and vancomycin than in patients receiving heparin alone (P = 0.004 and P = 0.06, respectively). Our study shows that a solution containing heparin and vancomycin administered by using an antibiotic-lock technique effectively prevents catheter hub colonization with gram-positive bacteria and subsequent bacteremia during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with hematologic malignancy. PMID:10471564

  20. CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER-RELATED THROMBOSIS AND THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, E.; Sharathkumar, A.; Glover, J.; Faustino, E. V. S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVES In preparation for a pediatric randomized controlled trial on thromboprophylaxis, we determined the frequency of catheter-related thrombosis in children. We also systematically reviewed the pediatric trials on thromboprophylaxis to evaluate its efficacy and to identify possible pitfalls in the conduct of these trials. PATIENTS/METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials for articles published until December 2013. We included cohort studies and trials on patients 0–18 years old with central venous catheter actively surveilled for thrombosis with radiologic imaging. We estimated the pooled frequency of thrombosis and the pooled risk ratio (RR) with thromboprophylaxis using random effects model. RESULTS Of 2,651 articles identified, we analyzed 37 articles with 3,128 patients. The pooled frequency of thrombosis was 0.20 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16–0.24). Of 10 trials, we did not find evidence that heparin-bonded catheter (RR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.01–7.68), unfractionated heparin (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.57–1.51), low molecular weight heparin (RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 0.51–2.50), warfarin (RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.34–2.17), antithrombin concentrate (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.38–1.55) and nitroglycerin (RR: 1.53; 95% CI: 0.57–4.10) reduced the risk for thrombosis. Most of the trials were either not powered for thrombosis or powered to detect large, likely unachievable, reductions in thrombosis. Missing data on thrombosis also limited these trials. CONCLUSIONS Catheter-related thrombosis is common in children. An adequately powered multicenter trial that can detect a modest, clinically significant, reduction in thrombosis is critically needed. Missing outcome data should be minimized in this trial. PMID:24801495

  1. Recanalization of Acute and Subacute Venous and Synthetic Bypass-Graft Occlusions With a Mechanical Rotational Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Wissgott, Christian Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2013-08-01

    PurposePercutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) is now established as an alternative treatment of acute arterial occlusions in addition to fibrinolysis and surgical thrombectomy. The objective of this retrospective study was the investigation of a rotational atherothrombectomy catheter in terms of safety and efficacy in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions.Materials and MethodsForty-two patients (average age 65.8 {+-} 9.1 years) with acute (<14 days [n = 31]) and subacute (14-42 days [n = 11]) femoropopliteal bypass occlusions were treated consecutively with a rotational debulking and removal catheter (Straub Rotarex). The average occlusion length was 28.4 {+-} 2.9 (24-34) cm. Thirty-four (81 %) patients underwent venous bypass, and 8 (19 %) patients underwent polytetrafluoroethylene bypass.ResultsThe technical success rate was 97.6 % (41 of 42). In 1 patient, blood flow could not be restored despite the use of the atherothrombectomy system. The average catheter intervention time was 6.9 {+-} 2.1 (4-9) min. Ankle-brachial index increased from 0.39 {+-} 0.13 to 0.83 {+-} 0.11 at discharge and to 0.82 {+-} 0.17 after 1 month (p < 0.05). There were a total of 2 (4.8 %) peri-interventional complications: One patient developed a distal embolism, which was successfully treated with local lysis, and another patient had a small perforation at the distal anastomosis, which was successfully treated with a stent.ConclusionPMT with the Rotarex atherothrombectomy catheter represents a safe and effective option in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions because it can quickly restore blood flow.

  2. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  3. Human infection with Delftia tsuruhatensis isolated from a central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Preiswerk, Benjamin; Ullrich, Silvia; Speich, Rudolf; Bloemberg, Guido V; Hombach, Michael

    2011-02-01

    We present the case of a patient with catheter-related infection caused by Delftia tsuruhatensis, a newly described species closely related to Delftia acidovorans (formerly Comamonas acidovorans). To date, D. tsuruhatensis has not been described as a pathogen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing D. tsuruhatensis as the causative agent of a human infection. PMID:20965913

  4. Implementation of central venous catheter bundle in an intensive care unit in Kuwait: Effect on central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa; Al Mousa, Haifa; Rotimi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSIs) is an important healthcare-associated infection in the critical care units. It causes substantial morbidity, mortality and incurs high costs. The use of central venous line (CVL) insertion bundle has been shown to decrease the incidence of CLABSIs. Our aim was to study the impact of CVL insertion bundle on incidence of CLABSI and study the causative microbial agents in an intensive care unit in Kuwait. Surveillance for CLABSI was conducted by trained infection control team using National Health Safety Network (NHSN) case definitions and device days measurement methods. During the intervention period, nursing staff used central line care bundle consisting of (1) hand hygiene by inserter (2) maximal barrier precautions upon insertion by the physician inserting the catheter and sterile drape from head to toe to the patient (3) use of a 2% chlorohexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% ethanol scrub for the insertion site (4) optimum catheter site selection. (5) Examination of the daily necessity of the central line. During the pre-intervention period, there were 5367 documented catheter-days and 80 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 14.9 CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days. After implementation of the interventions, there were 5052 catheter-days and 56 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 11.08 per 1000 catheter-days. The reduction in the CLABSI/1000 catheter days was not statistically significant (P=0.0859). This study demonstrates that implementation of a central venous catheter post-insertion care bundle was associated with a reduction in CLABSI in an intensive care area setting. PMID:26138518

  5. Minimally Invasive Monitoring of Chronic Central Venous Catheter Patency in Mice Using Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA)

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Giovanna; Fiebig, Teresa; Kirschner, Stefanie; Nikoubashman, Omid; Kabelitz, Lisa; Othman, Ahmed; Nonn, Andrea; Kramer, Martin; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Repetitive administration of medication or contrast agents is frequently performed in mice. The introduction of vascular access mini-ports (VAMP) for mice allows long-term vascular catheterization, hereby eliminating the need for repeated vessel puncture. With catheter occlusion being the most commonly reported complication of chronic jugular vein catheterization, we tested whether digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can be utilized to evaluate VAMP patency in mice. Methods Twenty-three mice underwent catheterization of the jugular vein and subcutaneous implantation of a VAMP. The VAMP was flushed every second day with 50 ?L of heparinized saline solution (25 IU/ml). DSA was performed during injection of 100 ?L of an iodine based contrast agent using an industrial X-ray inspection system intraoperatively, as well as 7±2 and 14±2 days post implantation. Results DSA allowed localization of catheter tip position, to rule out dislocation, kinking or occlusion of a microcatheter, and to evaluate parent vessel patency. In addition, we observed different ante- and retrograde collateral flow patterns in case of jugular vein occlusion. More exactly, 30% of animals showed parent vessel occlusion after 7±2 days in our setting. At this time point, nevertheless, all VAMPs verified intravascular contrast administration. After 14±2 days, intravascular contrast injection was verified in 70% of the implanted VAMPs, whereas at this point of time 5 animals had died or were sacrificed and in 2 mice parent vessel occlusion hampered intravascular contrast injection. Notably, no occlusion of the catheter itself was observed. Conclusion From our observations we conclude DSA to be a fast and valuable minimally invasive tool for investigation of catheter and parent vessel patency and for anatomical studies of collateral blood flow in animals as small as mice. PMID:26098622

  6. [Less pain during puncture by a peripheral venous catheter; a bibliographical review on adults].

    PubMed

    Prat González, Irene; Fuentes i Pumarola, Concepció; Bertran Noguer, Carme; Ballester Ferrando, David; Juvinyà Canal, Dolors; Vila Vidal, Dalmau

    2010-06-01

    Canalizing veins is a habitual technique carried out by nurses. Inserting a catheter in a peripheral vein causes pain. The importance of fine quality in nursing treatment implicitly bears on a person's well-being. In daily practice, health professionals do not use any method to reduce pain when inserting a catheter. The authors observations led them to believe in the need to carry out a bibliographical review whose objective was to discover all the methods used to reduce pain caused by puncturing a peripheral vein. Six randomly assigned clinical tests and a meta-analysis evaluate the effectiveness of: The use of Valsalva, an analgesic cream which contains two local amino-amide anesthetics; lidocaine and prylocaine (EMLA) compared to another analgesic cream, Myolaxin; a meta-analysis of twenty studies evaluates the degree by which pain is diminished by one such method: an EMLA cream; an anti-inflammatory skin dressing (diclofenaco), a diclofenaco dressing versus an EMLA anesthetic dressing, 0.25 ml subcutaneous injection of 1% mepivaína, an amida type local anesthetic; and direct photography moments before puncture occurs to use the effects of a flash of light. All these methods studied proved effective in reducing pain. Creams and dressing prove to be unaggressive methods but require some time for application prior to puncture. Using a camera flash, subcutaneous injection of mepivacaine and the application of Valsalva can be effective alternatives to reduce pain when puncturing veins in patients who require emergency care. PMID:20672715

  7. Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children Receiving Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT).

    PubMed

    Kovacich, Amanda; Tamma, Pranita D; Advani, Sonali; Popoola, Victor O; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the frequency of and risk factors associated with complications necessitating removal of the peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients receiving outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) and to determine the appropriateness of OPAT in children with OPAT-related complications. METHODS A retrospective cohort of children who had a PICC inserted at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, and were discharged from the hospital on OPAT was assembled. RESULTS A total of 1,465 PICCs were used to provide antibiotic therapy for 955 children after hospital discharge. Among these, 117 PICCs (8%) required removal due to a complication (4.6 of 1,000 catheter days). Children discharged to a long-term care facility were at increased risk of adverse PICC events (incidence risk ratio [IRR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-6.17). For children receiving OPAT, age of the child (adjusted IRR [aIRR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), noncentral PICC tip location (aIRR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.66-4.82), and public insurance (aIRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40) were associated with adverse PICC events. In addition, 34 patients (32%) with adverse events may not have required intravenous antibiotics at the time of hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS Of children discharged with PICCs on OPAT during the study period, 8% developed a complication necessitating PICC removal. Children discharged to a long-term care facility had an increased rate of complication compared with children who were discharged home. With improved education regarding appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy and situations in which early conversion to enteral therapy should be considered, PICC-related complications may have been avoided in 32% of children. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):420-424. PMID:26961677

  8. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients: factors associated with catheter removal and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Yaniv, Isaac; Solter, Ester; Freud, Enrique; Samra, Zmira; Stein, Jerry; Fisher, Salvador; Levy, Itzhak

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the factors associated with antibiotic failure leading to tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) removal during catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CABSIs) and with recurrence and reinfection in children with cancer. All cases of CABSI in patients attending the Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology between November 2000 and November 2003 were reviewed. A total of 207 episodes of CABSI, including multiple episodes involving the same catheter, were identified in 146 of 410 tunneled CVCs (167 Hickman, 243 implantable ports). The most common organism isolated was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS). The CVC was removed in 96 (46%) episodes. Hypotension, persistent bacteremia, previous stem cell transplantation, multiple CABSIs in the same CVC, exit-site infection, inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy, and Candida infection were all significantly associated with increased risk of catheter removal (P < 0.05, odds ratios 7.81, 1.14, 2.22, 1.93, 3.04, 2.04 and 24.53, respectively). There were 12 episodes of recurrent infection, all except 1 caused by CONS (odds ratio 20.5, P = 0.006). Inappropriate empiric therapy, especially in implantable ports, was the only mutable risk factor for antibiotic failure. Because CONS was the predominant isolate in these devices, adding glycopeptides to the empiric therapy for suspected implantable-port CABSI might decrease the removal rate. This issue should be explored in future controlled trials. PMID:16394888

  9. Early and Late Complications Related to Central Venous Catheters in Hematological Malignancies: a Retrospective Analysis of 1102 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 – 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  10. Human serum potentiates the expression of genes associated with antifungal drug resistance in C. albicans biofilms on central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; Anil, S; Hashem, M; Vellappally, S; Cheung, B P K

    2015-04-01

    Candida albicans is a major agent of fungaemias and frequently causes systemic disease through seeded, blood stream dissemination. These infections, particularly common in hospitalized patients with central venous catheters (CVCs), appear to persevere due to biofilm reservoirs of the yeast that tend to develop on the device. Although it is known that candidal biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antifungals compared with their planktonic counterparts, there is a paucity of data on the expression of antifungal drug resistance genes (DRGs) in candidal biofilms in CVC reservoirs. Furthermore, notwithstanding the fact that CVCs are constantly bathed in human serum, there are no studies on the effect of the latter on the DRG expression in candidal biofilms. Hence, we developed in vitro biofilms of three different C. albicans strains on silicone CVC discs immersed in human serum and evaluated the temporal expression of nine antifungal DRGs. In an attempt to evaluate the effect of hyphal elements on DRG expression, we incorporated a hyphal mutant (HM) and its wild-type (WT) counterpart, as well as a fresh clinical isolate in the studies. Human serum significantly up-regulated DRG transcripts in Candida biofilms on CVCs, at different stages of biofilm growth, while the WT strain over-expressed more DRGs than the HM strain. Here, we report, for the first time, that both human serum and the hyphal elements of the yeast have a profound modulatory effect on DRG expression in C. albicans biofilms on CVCs. PMID:25515243

  11. Early and late complications related to central venous catheters in hematological malignancies: a retrospective analysis of 1102 patients.

    PubMed

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 - 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  12. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  13. "Scrub the hub": cleaning duration and reduction in bacterial load on central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sarah; Bryson, Celestina; Porter, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study on the effect of alcohol disinfection duration on bacterial load on catheter hubs. Three different levels of disinfection (3, 10, and 15 seconds) were analyzed as well as a positive and negative control. All hubs with the exception of the negative controls were contaminated with a 10 bacterial solution and allowed to dry for 24 hours. Through each hub, 1 mL of sterile saline was flushed; a 10-?L calibrated loop was used to plate the flush onto blood agar. Colony counts were performed on the plates after a 24-hour incubation period. Results revealed that the 3 different levels of disinfection duration were not found to differ significantly in reduction in bacterial load. The duration of disinfection did not significantly change the bacterial load on the hub. However, any disinfection duration significantly decreased the bacterial load as compared to the positive control. A larger study would likely detect a significant result among the disinfections. PMID:21160298

  14. Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter-Related Problems in the Early Phase of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Effects on Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yeral, Mahmut; Bo?a, Can; O?uzkurt, Levent; Al??kan, Hikmet Eda; Özdo?u, Hakan; Demiro?lu, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haematopoietic stem cell recipients need central venous catheters (CVCs) for easy administration of intravenous fluid, medications, apheresis, or dialysis procedures. However, CVCs may lead to infectious or non-infectious complications such as thrombosis. The effect of these complications on transplantation outcome is not clear. This manuscript presents the complication rates of double-lumen tunnelled CVCs and their effect on transplantation outcome. Materials and Methods: Data from 111 consecutive patients, of whom 75 received autologous and 36 received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, were collected retrospectively. The data were validated by the Record Inspection Group of the related JACIE-accredited transplantation centre. Results: Thrombosis developed in 2.7% of recipients (0.9 per 1000 catheter days). Catheter-related infection was identified in 14 (12.6%) patients (3.6 per 1000 catheter days). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common causative agent. Engraftment time, rate of 100-day mortality, and development of grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease were not found to be associated with catheter-related complications. Conclusion: These results indicate that adverse events related with tunnelled CVCs are manageable and have no negative effects on transplant outcome. PMID:25805675

  15. Wound healing and catheter thrombosis after implantable venous access device placement in 266 breast cancers treated with bevacizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Irène; Cottu, Paul H; Fourchotte, Virginie; Sanchez, Sebastian; Fromantin, Isabelle; Kirov, Krassen; Guillaume, Alain; Pelloquin, Anne; Esteve, Marc; Salmon, Remy J

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, in a population with metastatic breast cancer treated with bevacizumab therapy, the incidence of wound dehiscence after placement of an implantable venous access device (VAD) and to study the risk of catheter thrombosis. This study enrolled all VADs placed by 14 anesthetists between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2009: 273 VADs in patients treated with bevacizumab therapy and 4196 VADs in patients not treated with bevacizumab therapy. In the bevacizumab therapy group, 13 cases of wound dehiscence occurred in 12 patients requiring removal of the VAD (4.76%). All cases of dehiscence occurred when bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement. Bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement in 150 cases (13 of 150: 8.6%). The risk of dehiscence was the same from 0 to 7 days. In parallel, the VAD wound dehiscence rate in patients not receiving bevacizumab therapy was eight of 4197 cases (0.19%) (Fisher's test significant, P<0.001). No risk factors of dehiscence were identified: anesthetists, learning curves, and irradiated patients. VAD thrombosis occurred in four patients (1.5%). In parallel, VAD thrombosis occurred in 51 of 4197 patients (1.2%) not receiving bevacizumab therapy (Fisher's test not significant; P=0.43). Bevacizumab therapy was permanently discontinued in five patients related to wound dehiscence and in one patient due to extensive skin necrosis. These data suggest the need to observe an interval of at least 7 days between VAD placement and initiation of bevacizumab therapy to avoid the risk of a wound dehiscence requiring chest wall port explant. The risk of VAD thrombosis does not require any particular primary prevention. PMID:21970853

  16. Development of bacteraemia or fungaemia after removal of colonized central venous catheters in patients with negative concomitant blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Park, K-H; Kim, S-H; Song, E H; Jang, E-Y; Lee, E J; Chong, Y P; Choi, S-H; Lee, S-O; Woo, J H; Kim, Y S

    2010-06-01

    There are limited data on the clinical significance of positive central venous catheter (CVC) tip cultures associated with concomitant negative blood cultures performed at the time of CVC removal. A retrospective cohort study of all patients who yielded isolated positive CVC tip cultures was conducted in a tertiary-care hospital with 2200 beds during a 10-year period. All patients with isolated positive CVC tip cultures were observed for the development of subsequent bacteraemia or fungaemia between 2 and 28 days after CVC removal. An isolated positive CVC tip culture was defined as a case in which (i) a CVC tip culture yielded > or = 15 colonies using a semiquantitative culture method and (ii) at least two sets of blood samples revealed no organism at, or close to, the time of CVC removal (48 h before to 48 h after CVC removal). During the study period, 312 patients with isolated positive CVC cultures were enrolled. Eight (2.6%; 95% CI 1.2-5.1) of the 312 patients yielding isolated bacterial or fungal CVC tip cultures developed subsequent bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by the same species as that isolated from the tip culture (Staphylococcus aureus, 1: Enterococcus spp.; 2: Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and 3: Candida spp.). Among 125 patients from whose CVC tips the above four organisms were grown, seven (12.3%) of 57 patients who did not receive appropriate antibiotic therapy within 48 h after CVC removal subsequently developed BSI, but only one (1.5%) of 68 patients who did receive appropriate therapy developed BSI (OR 0.11, p 0.02). PMID:19747217

  17. Efficacy of 1.0% chlorhexidine-gluconate ethanol compared with 10% povidone-iodine for long-term central venous catheter care in hematology departments: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Natsuo; Kimura, Hideo; Misao, Hanako; Matsumoto, Hayato; Imafuku, Yuji; Watanabe, Akemi; Mori, Hiroko; Yoshida, Akiko; Miura, Saori; Abe, Yoshinobu; Toba, Mamoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Kanemitsu, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of 1% chlorhexidine-gluconate ethanol and 10% povidone-iodine for skin antisepsis of central venous catheter (CVC) sites were compared among hematology patients. The CVC site colonization rates of those groups were 11.9% and 29.2%, respectively, and the catheter-associated blood stream infections were 0.75 and 3.62 per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively. One percent chlorhexidine-gluconate ethanol was superior to povidone-iodine to reduce skin colonizers at CVC sites even when catheters were used for long duration. PMID:24655901

  18. Cerebral air embolism following the removal of a central venous catheter in the absence of intracardiac right-to-left shunting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eum, Da Hae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyung Won; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2015-04-01

    Air embolism following central venous catheter (CVC) removal is a relatively uncommon complication. Despite its rare occurrence, an air embolism can lead to serious outcomes. One of the most fatal complications is cerebral air embolism. We report a case of cerebral air embolism that occurred after the removal of a CVC in a patient with an underlying idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and a possible intrapulmonary shunt. Although the patient had a brief period of recovery, his condition deteriorated again, and retention of carbon dioxide was sustained due to aggravation of pneumonia. Despite full coverage of antibiotics and maximum care with the ventilator, the patient died about 5 weeks after the removal of the CVC. We suggest that strict compliance to protocols is required even while removing the catheter. Furthermore, additional caution to avoid air embolism is demanded in high-risk patients, such as in this case. PMID:25837752

  19. Cerebral Air Embolism Following the Removal of a Central Venous Catheter in the Absence of Intracardiac Right-to-Left Shunting

    PubMed Central

    Eum, Da Hae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyung Won; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Air embolism following central venous catheter (CVC) removal is a relatively uncommon complication. Despite its rare occurrence, an air embolism can lead to serious outcomes. One of the most fatal complications is cerebral air embolism. We report a case of cerebral air embolism that occurred after the removal of a CVC in a patient with an underlying idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and a possible intrapulmonary shunt. Although the patient had a brief period of recovery, his condition deteriorated again, and retention of carbon dioxide was sustained due to aggravation of pneumonia. Despite full coverage of antibiotics and maximum care with the ventilator, the patient died about 5 weeks after the removal of the CVC. We suggest that strict compliance to protocols is required even while removing the catheter. Furthermore, additional caution to avoid air embolism is demanded in high-risk patients, such as in this case. PMID:25837752

  20. [A case of persistent left superior vena cava with absent right superior vena cava found on the insertion of central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Nami; Kai, Tetsuya; Kandabashi, Tadashi; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hoka, Sumio

    2013-07-01

    A 77-year-old man was scheduled to undergo the resection of hepatoma. After the induction of general anesthesia, a central venous (CV) catheter was inserted from the right internal jugular vein under the echographic observation. Then, we noticed that the size of the vein was smaller than usual, which caused a little difficulty in the insertion. The post-insertion chest X-ray showed unusual placement of the catheter's tip toward the left side of the trachea. Re-evaluation of preoperative CT revealed the persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with absent right superior vena cava. Post-operative examination with echography of the neck showed that the left internal jugular vein was much greater than the right. When noticing a small right internal jugular vein in pre-procedure echography, existence of PLSVC should be considered, and meticulous CV catheterization is necessary for safety. PMID:23905415

  1. Failure of a poster-based educational programme to improve compliance with peripheral venous catheter care in a tertiary hospital. A clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Morse, L; McDonald, M

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine the prevalence of recording the date and time of insertion of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in a tertiary hospital setting, and whether this could be improved by a simple poster-based educational programme. The two-phase point prevalence audit covered 1109 adult inpatients at the Royal Darwin Hospital, Australia. The presence or otherwise of a PVC was recorded, along with whether the date and time of insertion of the device was recorded in situ, in the bedside chart or in the clinical notes. Background demographic data were collected along with any identifiable risk factors for catheter-associated bacteraemia. The process was then repeated in the same hospital units following implementation of a simple poster-based educational programme. The prevalence of any dating method (in situ, in the bedside chart or in the clinical notes) was low, at 13.4% and 16.1% in the pre- and post-intervention groups respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (P=0.27). Independent of the poster campaign, patients with risk factors for catheter-associated bacteraemia were more likely to have the insertion date recorded compared to those without (P=0.03). Given the potential cost of catheter-associated bacteraemia to the patient, hospital and community, it is surprising that compliance with an in-house infection control recommendation was so poor. A poster-based education programme alone had little effect in improving the situation. PMID:19464755

  2. Successful catheter directed thrombolysis in postpartum deep venous thrombosis complicated by nicoumalone-induced skin necrosis and failure in retrieval of inferior vena caval filter

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Agrawal, Navin; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is an important cause for maternal morbidity and mortality in postpartum period. Though catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is now considered as a safe and effective therapy for the management of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) but still it is not indicated in postpartum DVT. We are presenting a case of 22-year-old female patient who presented with post-partum lower limb DVT and managed successfully with CDT by using injection streptokinase and temporary inferior vena caval filter was inserted as prophylactic for pulmonary embolism as she had extensive DVT extending into inferior vena cava (IVC). During follow-up, she developed large skin necrosis in left lower limb which was managed by adding injection low-molecular-weight heparin. IVC filter also could not be retrieved even after trying all manoeuvres during follow-up after 2?weeks. PMID:23887994

  3. Hyperintensity in the subarachnoid space on contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery magnetic resonance imaging after central venous catheter removal.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Sehoon

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare complication of central venous catheterization. A 61-year-old man developed a left-sided hemiparesis immediately after his right jugular venous catheter removal. A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained 2 h after the symptom onset was normal. However, postgadolinium cerebral spinal fluid enhancement was seen on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MRI. A repeat diffusion-weighted MRI, 18 h later, showed restricted diffusion in the bilateral hemispheres. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier caused by the air bubbles might lead to accumulation of gadolinium in the subarachnoid space. Postgadolinium cerebral spinal fluid enhancement may be an early, sensitive predictor of blood-brain barrier disruption and impending cerebral infarct after air embolism. PMID:23733105

  4. Heparin Saline Versus Normal Saline for Flushing and Locking Peripheral Venous Catheters in Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Luo, Ou; He, Liu; Li, Jia-Xin; Tang, Yun-Jing; Luo, Yan-Li; Zhou, Min; Tang, Li; Zhang, Zong-Xia; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A prospective randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of heparin saline (HS) to those of normal saline (NS) as flushing and locking solutions for peripheral venous catheter (PVC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) patients. Patients with DLC at our institution between April 2012 and March 2013 were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the NS group received preservative-free 0.9% sodium chloride as the flushing and locking solution, while the HS group received HS (50?U/mL). PVC-related events and the duration of PVC maintenance were compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, the preinfusion and postinfusion levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and platelet (PLT) were also compared. A total of 32 and 36 DLC patients in the NS (125 PVCs) and HS (65 PVCs) groups, respectively, were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, including gender, age, Child–Pugh grade, PVC type and administration of anticoagulant, and irritant agents, were comparable between the 2 groups (P?>?0.05). The maintenance times of the HS and NS groups were 80.27?±?26.47 and 84.19?±?29.32?hours, respectively (P?=?0.397). Removal of PVC for abnormal reasons occurred in 30.7% and 22.4% of patients in the HS and NS groups (P?=?0.208). The PVC occlusion rates were 6.2% and 5.6% in the HS and NS groups, respectively (OR?=?1.11, 95% CI 0.31–3.92). The PT, APTT, and PLT levels were comparable between the 2 groups both before and after infusion (P?>?0.05). Incremental analyses showed that Child–Pugh grade C might be a risk factor for the suppression of PLT in the HS group. We consider NS to be as effective as and safer than conventional HS for flushing and locking PVC in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:26252305

  5. Early onset versus late onset peripherally inserted central venous catheter infections: an analysis of risk factors and microbiology.

    PubMed

    Chittick, Paul; Azhar, Sobia; Movva, Kalyani; Keller, Paula; Boura, Judith A; Band, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    The risks and microbiology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are less well described than those for traditional central catheters, particularly as they pertain to duration of catheterization. We compared patients with early- and late-onset PICC bloodstream infections at our institution and found significant differences in microbiologic etiologies. PMID:23917915

  6. [Occlusion of central venous port catheters after simultaneous 24 h infusions of 5-FU and calcium-folinic acid in patients with gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fackler-Schwalbe, I; Schwalbe, B; Epple, M; Becker, A; Prügl, L; Gassel, W D; Stoffels, D; Südhoff, T

    2004-05-01

    Folinic acid-modulated 5-FU regimens are standard elements in several chemotherapy combinations like FOLFIRI, FOLFOX or AIO-regimen in the palliative treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. When the simultaneous mixed infusion of 5-FU and calcium-folinic acid (Leucovorin) was authorized by the BfArM in 2002, we introduced this application regimen in the treatment of our cancer patients. 19 patients (AIO-regimen [5], FOLFIRI [12] and FOLFOX [2]) received a simultaneously mixed infusion of calcium-folinic acid and 5-FU over 24 hours with a total of 110 applications. 5-FU doses varied between 2000 and 2600 mg/m2, calcium-folinic acid was given with 500 mg/m2, infusion rate was 10 ml/hour using a 24 h pump. Central venous catheters employed included single Barth-Port in 18 cases, 1 patient had a Viggon-Port. In 3 out of the 19 patients catheter occlusion was noticed after 8-10 weekly applications of the mixed infusion. Heparine and subsequently urokinase were not successful in reversing the obstruction. All three catheters had to be explanted. Catheter tips in all cases showed a yellow cristalline precipitation. The crystallographic analysis exhibited calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in its polymorphic form (calcite). Thus, we confirmed calcite formation causing catheter occlusion as a frequent complication during a continuous 24 h-infusion of mixed high dose 5-FU and calcium-folinic acid. This reaction could not be avoided by increasing infusion volume and the application flow rate. As a result of our findings, recommending using calcium-folinic acid mixed with 5-FU has been withdrawn in the meantime. PMID:15244042

  7. Catheter-directed continuous thrombolysis following aspiration thrombectomy via the ileocolic route for acute portal venous thrombosis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kohei; Sato, Yoshinobu; Nakatsuka, Hideki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Oya, Hiroshi; Hara, Yoshiaki; Kokai, Hidenaka; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Although acute portal venous thrombosis (PVT) is a potentially life-threatening complication that occurs after hepatobiliary surgery with portal vein (PV) reconstruction or splenectomy, no effective or universal treatments have yet been established. Transjugular or transhepatic catheter-directed thrombolysis has recently been reported to be effective for treating acute PVT. However, the efficiency of this treatment for complete PV occlusion might be limited because a poor portal venous flow prevents thrombolytic agents from reaching and dissolving thrombi. Moreover, the use of the transjugular or transhepatic route might not be suitable in patients who have undergone major hepatectomy or in those with ascites due to an increased risk of residual liver injury or intra-abdominal bleeding following puncture to the residual liver. We herein describe the cases of two patients with almost total PV occlusion caused by massive thrombi that formed after hepatobiliary surgery, who were successfully treated with catheter-directed continuous thrombolysis following aspiration thrombectomy via the ileocolic route. This treatment should be considered beneficial for treating selected patients such as the two patients described herein. PMID:23007968

  8. CATheter Infections in CHildren (CATCH): a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation comparing impregnated and standard central venous catheters in children.

    PubMed Central

    Harron, Katie; Mok, Quen; Dwan, Kerry; Ridyard, Colin H; Moitt, Tracy; Millar, Michael; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Tibby, Shane M; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) are recommended for adults to reduce bloodstream infection (BSI) but not for children. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of impregnated compared with standard CVCs for reducing BSI in children admitted for intensive care. DESIGN Multicentre randomised controlled trial, cost-effectiveness analysis from a NHS perspective and a generalisability analysis and cost impact analysis. SETTING 14 English paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England. PARTICIPANTS Children aged < 16 years admitted to a PICU and expected to require a CVC for ≥ 3 days. INTERVENTIONS Heparin-bonded, antibiotic-impregnated (rifampicin and minocycline) or standard polyurethane CVCs, allocated randomly (1 : 1 : 1). The intervention was blinded to all but inserting clinicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Time to first BSI sampled between 48 hours after randomisation and 48 hours after CVC removal. The following data were used in the trial: trial case report forms; hospital administrative data for 6 months pre and post randomisation; and national-linked PICU audit and laboratory data. RESULTS In total, 1859 children were randomised, of whom 501 were randomised prospectively and 1358 were randomised as an emergency; of these, 984 subsequently provided deferred consent for follow-up. Clinical effectiveness - BSIs occurred in 3.59% (18/502) of children randomised to standard CVCs, 1.44% (7/486) of children randomised to antibiotic CVCs and 3.42% (17/497) of children randomised to heparin CVCs. Primary analyses comparing impregnated (antibiotic and heparin CVCs) with standard CVCs showed no effect of impregnated CVCs [hazard ratio (HR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 1.34]. Secondary analyses showed that antibiotic CVCs were superior to standard CVCs (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.96) but heparin CVCs were not (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.03). Time to thrombosis, mortality by 30 days and minocycline/rifampicin resistance did not differ by CVC. Cost-effectiveness - heparin CVCs were not clinically effective and therefore were not cost-effective. The incremental cost of antibiotic CVCs compared with standard CVCs over a 6-month time horizon was £1160 (95% CI -£4743 to £6962), with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £54,057 per BSI avoided. There was considerable uncertainty in costs: antibiotic CVCs had a probability of 0.35 of being dominant. Based on index hospital stay costs only, antibiotic CVCs were associated with a saving of £97,543 per BSI averted. The estimated value of health-care resources associated with each BSI was £10,975 (95% CI -£2801 to £24,751). Generalisability and cost-impact - the baseline risk of BSI in 2012 for PICUs in England was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42 to 4.74) per 1000 bed-days. An estimated 232 BSIs could have been averted in 2012 using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic CVCs for all children who require them (£36 per CVC) would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSIs in PICUs with standard BSI rates of > 1.2 per 1000 CVC-days. CONCLUSIONS The primary outcome did not differ between impregnated and standard CVCs. However, antibiotic-impregnated CVCs significantly reduced the risk of BSI compared with standard and heparin CVCs. Adoption of antibiotic-impregnated CVCs could be beneficial even for PICUs with low BSI rates, although uncertainty remains whether or not they represent value for money to the NHS. Limitations - inserting clinicians were not blinded to allocation and a lower than expected event rate meant that there was limited power for head-to-head comparisons of each type of impregnation. Future work - adoption of impregnated CVCs in PICUs should be considered and could be monitored through linkage of electronic health-care data and clinical data on CVC use with laboratory surveillance data on BSI. TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01029717. FUNDING This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 18. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:26935961

  9. Phase I Study of Hepatic Arterial Melphalan Infusion and Hepatic Venous Hemofiltration Using Percutaneously Placed Catheters in Patients With Unresectable Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pingpank, James F.; Libutti, Steven K.; Chang, Richard; Wood, Bradford J.; Neeman, Ziv; Kam, Anthony W.; Figg, William D.; Zhai, Souping; Beresneva, Tatiana; Seidel, Geoffrey D.; Alexander, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of a 30-minute hepatic artery infusion of melphalan via a percutaneously placed catheter and hepatic venous hemofiltration using a double balloon catheter positioned in the retrohepatic inferior vena cava to shunt hepatic venous effluent through an activated charcoal filter and then to the systemic circulation. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate feasibility in an initial cohort and subsequently determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of melphalan. Patients and Methods The initial cohort (n = 12) was treated with 2.0 mg/kg of melphalan before dose escalation to 3.5 mg/kg (n = 16). Total hepatic drug delivery, systemic levels, and percent filter efficiency were determined. Patients were assessed for hepatic and systemic toxicity and response. Results A total of 74 treatments were administered to 28 patients. Twelve patients with primary and metastatic hepatic tumors received 30 treatments (mean, 2.5 per patient) at an initial melphalan dose of 2.0 mg/kg. At 3.5 mg/kg, a dose-limiting toxicity (neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia) was observed in two of six patients. Transient grade 3/4 hepatic and systemic toxicity was seen after 19% and 66% of treatments, respectively. An overall radiographic response rate of 30% was observed in treated patients. In the 10 patients with ocular melanoma, a 50% overall response rate was observed, including two complete responses. Conclusion Delivery of melphalan via this system is feasible, with limited, manageable toxicity and evidence of substantial antitumor activity; 3 mg/kg is the maximum safe tolerated dose of melphalan administered via this technique. PMID:15908655

  10. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Ryan; Bares, Sara; David, Michael Z

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  11. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  12. Tegaderm CHG IV Securement Dressing for Central Venous and Arterial Catheter Insertion Sites: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    PubMed

    Jenks, Michelle; Craig, Joyce; Green, William; Hewitt, Neil; Arber, Mick; Sims, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Catheters are widely used for vascular access and for the administration of drugs or fluids in critically ill patients. This exposes patients to an infection risk. Tegaderm chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) (developed by 3M)-a transparent securement dressing-covers and protects catheter sites and secures devices to the skin. It comprises a transparent adhesive dressing to act as a barrier against external contamination and an integrated gel pad containing an antiseptic agent. The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee (MTAC) at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected Tegaderm CHG for evaluation. One study was identified by the sponsor as relevant to the decision problem. From this, the sponsor concluded that compared with standard dressings, Tegaderm CHG is associated with lower rates of catheter-related infection, but increased dermatitis incidence. The External Assessment Centre (EAC) identified four paired comparative studies between Tegaderm CHG, other CHG dressings or standard dressings. The EAC agreed with the sponsor's conclusion, finding that CHG dressings reduce infections compared with standard dressings. The sponsor constructed a de novo costing model. Tegaderm CHG generated cost savings of £77.26 per patient compared with standard dressings and was cost saving in 98.5 % of a sample of sets of inputs (2013 prices). The EAC critiqued and updated the model's inputs, yielding similar results to those the sponsor estimate. The MTAC reviewed the evidence and decided to support the case for adoption, issuing a positive draft recommendation. After a public consultation, NICE published this as Medical Technology Guidance 25. PMID:26458938

  13. Prediction of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified Infection Probability Score (mIPS).

    PubMed

    Schalk, Enrico; Hanus, Lynn; Färber, Jacqueline; Fischer, Thomas; Heidel, Florian H

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the probability of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified version of the Infection Probability Score (mIPS). In order to perform a prospective, mono-centric surveillance of complications in clinical routine due to short-term central venous catheters (CVCs) in consecutive patients receiving chemotherapy from March 2013 to September 2014, IPS was calculated at CVC insertion and removal (mIPSin and mIPSex, respectively). We used the 2012 Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Haematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO/DGHO) criteria to define CRBSI. In total, 143 patients (mean 59.5 years, 61.4 % male) with 267 triple-lumen CVCs (4044 CVC days; mean 15.1 days, range 1-60 days) were analysed. CVCs were inserted for therapy of acute leukaemia (53.2 %), multiple myeloma (24.3 %) or lymphoma (11.2 %), and 93.6 % were inserted in the jugular vein. A total of 66 CRBSI cases (24.7 %) were documented (12 definite/13 probable/41 possible). The incidence was 16.3/1000 CVC days (2.9/3.1/10.1 per 1000 CVC days for definite/probable/possible CRBSI, respectively). In CRBSI cases, the mIPSex was higher as compared to cases without CRBSI (13.1 vs. 7.1; p?

  14. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Transparent Antimicrobial Dressing for Managing Central Venous and Arterial Catheters in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Ruckly, Stéphane; Timsit, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness impact of routine use of an antimicrobial chlorhexidine gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings for the protection of central vascular lines in intensive care unit patients. Design This study uses a novel health economic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using the chlorhexidine gluconate dressing versus transparent dressings in a French intensive care unit scenario. The 30-day time non-homogeneous markovian model comprises eight health states. The probabilities of events derive from a multicentre (12 French intensive care units) randomized controlled trial. 1,000 Monte Carlo simulations of 1,000 patients per dressing strategy are used for probabilistic sensitivity analysis and 95% confidence intervals calculations. The outcome is the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. Costs of intensive care unit stay are based on a recent French multicentre study and the cost-effectiveness criterion is the cost per catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. The incremental net monetary benefit per patient is also estimated. Patients 1000 patients per group simulated based on the source randomized controlled trial involving 1,879 adults expected to require intravascular catheterization for 48 hours. Intervention Chlorhexidine Gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings. Results The chlorhexidine gluconate dressing prevents 11.8 infections /1,000 patients (95% confidence interval: [3.85; 19.64]) with a number needed to treat of 85 patients. The mean cost difference per patient of €141 is not statistically significant (95% confidence interval: [€-975; €1,258]). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is of €12,046 per catheter-related bloodstream infection prevented, and the incremental net monetary benefit per patient is of €344.88. Conclusions According to the base case scenario, the chlorhexidine gluconate dressing is more cost-effective than the reference dressing. Trial Registration This model is based on the data from the RCT registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01189682). PMID:26086783

  16. Central venous catheterisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Walls, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-one central venous catheter placements have been carried out with a serious-complication rate of 3.7%. Major long-term complications occurred in 5 patients. Malplacement of the catheter was more common when the infraclavicular subclavian route was used. Inadvertent removal occurred on 10 occasions and a new design of catheter hub is expected to eliminate this problem. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 PMID:6776868

  17. Pulmonary and coronary foreign particle embolism after central venous injection of liquid nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Benno; Gahr, Britta; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2015-02-01

    A man was found dead in his nursing bed. The responsible assistant nurse explained that she had administered liquid nutrition (Isosource Energy Fibre 500 ml) via perfusion pump into the Hickman catheter, insisting that the Hickman catheter was a percutaneous endoscopic gastric tube. Autopsy findings were unspecific and could not reveal the cause of death. Histopathological examinations showed severe pulmonary foreign particle emboli, partially even emboli of the small coronary arteries. We present the pathological findings of the case in regard to the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:25563518

  18. The impact of staffing on central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in preterm neonates – results of nation-wide cohort study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Very low birthweight (VLBW) newborns on neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are at increased risk for developing central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC BSI). In addition to the established intrinsic risk factors of VLBW newborns, it is still not clear which process and structure parameters within NICUs influence the prevalence of CVC BSI. Methods The study population consisted of VLBW newborns from NICUs that participated in the German nosocomial infection surveillance system for preterm infants (NEO-KISS) from January 2008 to June 2009. Structure and process parameters of NICUs were obtained by a questionnaire-based enquiry. Patient based date and the occurrence of BSI derived from the NEO-KISS database. The association between the requested parameters and the occurrance of CVC BSI and laboratory-confirmed BSI was analyzed by generalized estimating equations. Results We analyzed data on 5,586 VLBW infants from 108 NICUs and found 954 BSI cases in 847 infants. Of all BSI cases, 414 (43%) were CVC-associated. The pooled incidence density of CVC BSI was 8.3 per 1,000 CVC days. The pooled CVC utilization ratio was 24.3 CVC-days per 100 patient days. A low realized staffing rate lead to an increased risk of CVC BSI (OR 1.47; p=0.008) and also of laboratory-confirmed CVC BSI (OR 1.78; p=0.028). Conclusions Our findings show that low levels of realized staffing are associated with increased rates of CVC BSI on NICUs. Further studies are necessary to determine a threshold that should not be undercut. PMID:23557510

  19. Long-term, totally implantable central venous access ports connected to a Groshong catheter for chemotherapy of solid tumours: experience from 178 cases using a single type of device.

    PubMed

    Biffi, R; Corrado, F; de Braud, F; de Lucia, F; Scarpa, D; Testori, A; Orsi, F; Bellomi, M; Mauri, S; Aapro, M; Andreoni, B

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the early and late complications rate of central venous access ports connected to the Groshong catheter for long-term chemotherapy delivering. All patients suffering from a neoplastic disease, who required long-term chemotherapy and underwent insertion of implantable ports during a 21-month period (1 October 1994-30 June 1996) were prospectively studied. A single type of port was used, constructed of titanium and silicone rubber (Dome Port, Bard Inc., Salt Lake City, U.S.A), connected to an 8 F silastic Groshong catheter tubing (Bard Inc.). A team of different operators (two general surgeons, one interventional radiologist and four anaesthesiologists) was involved in inserting the port. All devices were placed in the operating room under fluoroscopic control. A central venous access form was filled in by the operator after the procedure and all ports were followed prospectively for device-related and overall complications. Data from the follow-up of these patients were entered in the form and collected in a database. Follow-up continued until the device was removed, the patient died or the study was closed. 178 devices, comprising a total of 32,089 days in situ, were placed in 175 patients. Three patients received a second device after removal of the first. Adequate follow-up was obtained in all cases (median 180 days, range 4-559). 138 devices (77.5%) were still in situ when the study was closed. Early complications included six pneumothoraxes, three arterial punctures and two revisions for port and/or catheter malfunction (overall early complications in 8 patients). Late complications included 3 cases (1.68% of devices) of catheter rupture and embolisation (0.093 episodes/1000 days of use), 2 cases (1.12% of devices) of venous thrombosis (0.062 episodes/1000 days of use), 1 case (0.56% of devices) of pocket infection (0.031 episodes/1000 days of use), and 4 cases (2.24% of devices) of port-related bacteraemias (0.124 episodes/1000 days of use). Infections were caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (4 cases) and Bacillus subtilis (1 case); they required port removal in 3 out of 5 cases. This study represents the largest published series of patients with totally implantable access ports connected to Groshong catheters; this device is a good option for long-term access to central veins and delivery of chemotherapeutic regimens, including continuous intravenous infusions. The low incidence of major complications related to implantation and management of these devices support increased use in oncology patients. PMID:9301441

  20. [Radiographic assessment of catheters in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)].

    PubMed

    Fuentealba T, Isabel; Retamal C, Andrés; Ortiz C, Guillermo; Pérez R, Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Intravascular catheters are widely used in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The major types of intravascular access in the newborn are peripheral catheters, venous or arterial umbilical catheters, central venous catheters and peripherally-inserted central venous catheters (PICC). Anomalous positioning of catheters, especially umbilical catheters, is quite frequent as their installation is without imaging guidance. The radiographic assessment of the catheter performed by pediatricians and/or radiologists, who must be able to recognize those poorly positioned as they can cause serious complications, is essential. This article contains a sample of correct and misplaced catheter x-ray often used in a NICU. PMID:25697620

  1. ‘Matching Michigan’: a 2-year stepped interventional programme to minimise central venous catheter-blood stream infections in intensive care units in England

    PubMed Central

    Bion, Julian; Richardson, Annette; Hibbert, Peter; Beer, Jeanette; Abrusci, Tracy; McCutcheon, Martin; Cassidy, Jane; Eddleston, Jane; Gunning, Kevin; Bellingan, Geoff; Patten, Mark; Harrison, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections from central venous catheters (CVC-BSIs) increase morbidity and costs in intensive care units (ICUs). Substantial reductions in CVC-BSI rates have been reported using a combination of technical and non-technical interventions. Methods We conducted a 2-year, four-cluster, stepped non-randomised study of technical and non-technical (behavioural) interventions to prevent CVC-BSIs in adult and paediatric ICUs in England. Random-effects Poisson regression modelling was used to compare infection rates. A sample of ICUs participated in data verification. Results Of 223 ICUs in England, 215 (196 adult, 19 paediatric) submitted data on 2479 of 2787 possible months and 147 (66%) provided complete data. The exposure rate was 438 887 (404 252 adult and 34 635 paediatric) CVC-patient days. Over 20 months, 1092 CVC-BSIs were reported. Of these, 884 (81%) were ICU acquired. For adult ICUs, the mean CVC-BSI rate decreased over 20 months from 3.7 in the first cluster to 1.48 CVC-BSIs/1000 CVC-patient days (p<0.0001) for all clusters combined, and for paediatric ICUs from 5.65 to 2.89 (p=0.625). The trend for infection rate reduction did not accelerate following interventions training. CVC utilisation rates remained stable. Pre-ICU infections declined in parallel with ICU-acquired infections. Criterion-referenced case note review showed high agreement between adjudicators (κ 0.706) but wide variation in blood culture sampling rates and CVC utilisation. Generic infection control practices varied widely. Conclusions The marked reduction in CVC-BSI rates in English ICUs found in this study is likely part of a wider secular trend for a system-wide improvement in healthcare-associated infections. Opportunities exist for greater harmonisation of infection control practices. Future studies should investigate causal mechanisms and contextual factors influencing the impact of interventions directed at improving patient care. PMID:22996571

  2. Transhepatic Venous Approach for Balloon-assisted Cervical Collateral Venous Access

    SciTech Connect

    Eyheremendy, Eduardo P.; Malizia, Patricio; Sierre, Sergio

    2011-12-15

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in many situations, and an increasing number of patients require temporary and long-term central catheters. Frequently, patients who have undergone multiple central veins catheterizations develop complete and diffuse venous occlusion, and this constitutes a difficult-to-manage clinical problem. We report a case of a 20-year-old patient who was referred to our department for central venous line placement who manifested bilateral femoral, jugular, and subclavian veins occlusion. A central venous catheter was implanted through a cervical collateral vein, targeting on and puncturing an angioplasty balloon, and advanced into the collateral vein through a transhepatic venous access.

  3. Venous air embolism through central venous access

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J; Loimer, Thomas; Schmidts, Michael B; Rieger, Michael; Lederer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    An 25-year-old man was buried by an avalanche during off-slope skiing. He was rescued by his companions and resuscitated by mouth-to-mouth ventilation. The emergency physician from a helicopter based emergency medical service placed two venous lines in both external jugular veins and secured the airway with a tracheal tube. When transferred to the emergency department an additional central venous catheter was inserted via his right femoral vein. The subsequent computed tomography scan revealed several small air bubbles adjacent to the endothelium of the brachiocephalic vein. In an experimental setting, it was shown that air could enter the circulation via a central venous catheter within a few seconds, but measured values of embolising air were smaller than the calculated values when applying the law of Hagen-Poiseuille. Nevertheless, it is important to keep the lumens of a central venous catheter filled with saline before any manipulation in order to prevent or attenuate venous air embolism. PMID:21709833

  4. Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death in Candida albicans Yeast and Hyphal Cells, Preventing Biofilm Formation In Vitro and in a Rodent Central Venous Catheter Model.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mohammed S; Lee, Hiu Ham; Sanchez, David A; Friedman, Adam J; Tar, Moses T; Davies, Kelvin P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Martinez, Luis R

    2016-04-01

    Candida albicansis a leading nosocomial pathogen. Today, candidal biofilms are a significant cause of catheter infections, and such infections are becoming increasingly responsible for the failure of medical-implanted devices.C. albicansforms biofilms in which fungal cells are encased in an autoproduced extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Consequently, the enclosed fungi are protected from antimicrobial agents and host cells, providing a unique niche conducive to robust microbial growth and a harbor for recurring infections. Here we demonstrate that a recently developed platform comprised of nanoparticles that release therapeutic levels of nitric oxide (NO-np) inhibits candidal biofilm formation, destroys the extracellular polysaccharide matrices of mature fungal biofilms, and hinders biofilm development on surface biomaterials such as the lumen of catheters. We found NO-np to decrease both the metabolic activity of biofilms and the cell viability ofC. albicansin vitroandin vivo Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis found NO-np to induce apoptosis in biofilm yeast cellsin vitro Moreover, NO-np behave synergistically when used in combination with established antifungal drug therapies. Here we propose NO-np as a novel treatment modality, especially in combination with standard antifungals, for the prevention and/or remediation of fungal biofilms on central venous catheters and other medical devices. PMID:26810653

  5. Two Serious Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Indicating the Need to Formalize Training for Placing Central Venous Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Volker; Feenstra, Nico

    2016-02-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are being used in increasing numbers. Common (thrombosis, infection, phlebitis, malfunction, or disconnection) and rare complications (pericardial tamponade) have been well explored. We describe 2 serious complications that resolved without sequelae. Both complications occurred in the context of limited provider competence. We conclude that vascular access is more than "just" placing a catheter; it can have serious clinical impact and has evolved into a specialist skill. With increasing use of intravascular catheters, the need for a formalized training becomes urgent. PMID:26517231

  6. Jugular Venous Catheterization: A Case of Knotting

    PubMed Central

    Erk?l?ç, E.; Aksoy, M.; Gümü?, T.; Sar?, S.; Kesimci, E.

    2015-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman, diagnosed for cancer of the ovary, had a central catheter that was placed with difficulty through the right internal jugular vein intraoperatively. After oophorectomy, it was realized that the catheter was knotted. Thus, the central venous catheter was removed successfully using a traction technique in the operating room. Central venous catheter use may result in various complications, although it has been used as an invasive method for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid and drug infusion. Here, we present catheter knotting in a case with solutions for this complication, under literature review. PMID:26633975

  7. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  12. Chronic Venous Access in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of chronic venous catheters has become routine in the management of neoplastic disease. If an anticipated result of diagnosis related grouping (DRG) reimbursement to hospitals is earlier patient discharge and reliance on more intensive outpatient management, concern about the safety and maintenance of such catheters in the outpatient elderly will become a more common issue. With careful patient selection and emphasis on catheter care, insertion of these catheters in the elderly is safe and reliable. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:3735452

  13. Umbilical catheters

    MedlinePLUS

    A catheter is a long, soft, hollow tube. An umbilical artery catheter (UAC) allows blood to be taken from an ... monitor a baby’s blood pressure. An umbilical artery catheter is most often used if: The baby needs ...

  14. [Central venous access in adults].

    PubMed

    Thorup, Line; Frederiksen, Joachim Møller

    2014-12-15

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are most commonly used in patients undergoing major surgery, patients admitted to the intensive care unit and in haematological and oncological departments. The placement of a CVC allows life saving and life prolonging treatment. The choice of catheter depends on the disease of the patient, catheter requirement, intended treatment, local preferences and expected period of use. Complications associated with CVC can be severe and potentially life threatening. The incidence of infectious/thrombotic complications and catheter dysfunction increases with the number of indwelling days. PMID:25534225

  15. The pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2012-10-01

    The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) has been widely used for monitoring of critically ill patients over the years, but with advances in less invasive monitoring techniques, notably echocardiography, there are fewer indications for PAC insertion. Nevertheless, the PAC provides simultaneous monitoring of pulmonary artery pressures, cardiac filling, cardiac output and mixed venous oxygen saturation, and still has an important role in complex cases. Adequate and continued training are required to ensure that PAC-derived data are correctly interpreted and applied. PMID:22886686

  16. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or dementia Catheters come in many sizes, materials (latex, silicone, Teflon™), and types (Foley, straight, coude tip). ... of catheter use include: Allergy or sensitivity to latex Bladder stones Blood infections ( septicemia ) Blood in the ...

  17. [Encapsulated implantable venous access device: two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Guivarch, E; Kriegel, I; Bonnet, L; di Maria, S; Estève, M

    2009-03-01

    We report two cases of encapsulated indwelling central venous catheter in adults. The patients involved were treated by chemotherapy and their catheter had been implanted for 15 and 6 years. However, this complication is well-known in children and a similar problem is frequently observed with pacemaker leads removal. The difficulty to remove the device is due to fibrous encapsulation of indwelling catheters in the vein wall. In all cases reported, the catheter was left in place. The potential main complications not yet observed are infection of the catheter and venous thrombosis. PMID:19327941

  18. [Venous access devices in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ma?ásek, V; Soumarová, R; Kociánová, I; Ma?ásková, M

    2012-01-01

    Specific anti-cancer therapy is administered mainly via the parenteral route, Adequate venous access is, therefore, a topical issue in oncology In some patients on long-term therapy, the peripheral venous system is extensively burdened We present an overview of risk factors associated with parenteral application of medicins We provide a comparison of different types of venous access devices and discuss recommendations on general indications for permanent venous access devices We suggest an approach to the choice of the most appropriate venous access device for an oncology patient available to date We present our experience with PICC (peripherally implanted central catheters) implantations used in 30 oncology patients in our centre In addition to venous ports, PICCs represent another safe method of permanent venous access with low rate of complications Indications for the use of a specific permanent venous access device (PICC or port) partly overlap and evidenced-based recommendations are lacking However, we discuss the few suggestions that have been formulated on this issue. PMID:22348215

  19. Molecular-marker characterization of strawberry differential genotypes for race determination of isolates of Phytophthora fragariae var.fragariae Hickman

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten Fragaria L. (strawberry) differentials for race determination of isolates of Phytophthora fragariae C.J. Hickman var. fragariae, the causal organism of red stele root rot disease, were molecularly characterized with previously published polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based sequence-characterize...

  20. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. PMID:25480771

  1. Catheter thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Beathard, G A

    2001-01-01

    Catheter malfunction due to poor flow is a common problem. When it occurs early, the cause is generally technical. Late occurrences are most often related to thrombus formation. Several types of thrombus may be seen, differing by location and supposed mechanism of formation. The most common offender, however, is the fibrin sheath thrombus. Prevention of catheter malfunction is an endeavor that continues to beg many questions. Catheter malfunction should be treated early to avoid inadequate dialysis. In the past, urokinase was a highly valuable aid to the nephrologist in managing this problem. Since this agent became unavailable a suitable alternative has not emerged. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) seems to be the most likely candidate for this role; however, it is not currently available in a packaging form that is optimal for this purpose. Currently, catheter exchange appears to be the best available alternative for this problem, which cannot yet be resolved by simpler means. PMID:11851930

  2. [Tunnelled central venous line-associated infections in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with intravenous prostacyclin].

    PubMed

    Boucly, Athénaïs; O'Connell, Caroline; Savale, Laurent; O'Callaghan, Dermot S; Jaïs, Xavier; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous prostacyclins are a valuable treatment for patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, leading to improved exercise capacity, haemodynamics, quality of life and survival. Unfortunately, due to the short half-life of these drugs, they need to be administered continuously through central venous catheters. Despite aseptic technique, regular dressing changes, tunneled central venous catheters and patient education, patients are exposed to central venous catheter associated infections. These infections cause significant morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation, microbiology, consequences and management of these central venous catheter associated infections in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with intravenous prostacyclins are discussed. PMID:26547673

  3. Delayed massive hydrothorax following subclavian catheter insertion: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Richa; Soni, Kapil Dev

    2015-01-01

    Complications of central venous catheter can become life threatening if not managed timely. We present a case of massive hydrothorax that developed few hours after placement of the central venous pressure line. The diagnosis was little delayed because the catheter was normally placed initially and later got displaced within few hours of shifting to the intensive care unit. However, the patient was managed timely. Our case report suggests that the position of the catheter should be checked frequently in the intensive care unit and particularly so after shifting and positioning of the patient and the associated complications should be kept in mind. PMID:26335220

  4. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  5. Recommendations for the use of long-term central venous catheter (CVC) in children with hemato-oncological disorders: management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis. On behalf of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Giordano, Paola; Saracco, Paola; Grassi, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Banov, Laura; Carraro, Francesca; Crocoli, Alessandro; Cesaro, Simone; Zanazzo, Giulio Andrea; Molinari, Angelo Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), used for the management of children with hemato-oncological disorders, are burdened by a significant incidence of mechanical, infective, or thrombotic complications. These complications favor an increasing risk in prolongation of hospitalization, extra costs of care, and sometimes severe life-threatening events. No guidelines for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis are available for children. To this aim, members of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP) reviewed the pediatric and adult literature to propose the first recommendations for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis in children with hemato-oncological disorders. PMID:26300457

  6. Venous insufficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood clot in the legs. Risk factors for venous insufficiency include: Age Family history of this condition Female gender (related to levels of the hormone progesterone) History of deep vein thrombosis in the legs Obesity Pregnancy Sitting or standing ...

  7. [Venous aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Ritter, H; Weber, J; Loose, D A

    1993-01-01

    Incidence, etiology, diagnostic procedures and therapy of venous aneurysms, basing on 152 own cases, are discussed. The main procedure for diagnosis is phlebography. It must be distinguished between aneurysms of epi- and subfascial veins. The localization determines the surgical procedure which represents the only successful therapy. Without proper treatment, venous aneurysms may be responsible for complications such as thrombophlebitis, thrombosis with pulmonary embolism, aneurysm rupture and compression of adjacent structures. The results of surgical treatment are excellent. PMID:8322498

  8. How to remove a pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Scales, Katie

    2016-02-24

    Rationale and key points This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of pulmonary artery (PA) catheters in a safe manner. ▶ PA catheter removal is associated with several risks and complications, and nurses should be cognisant of these and take appropriate action to ensure patient safety and optimum outcomes. ▶ When PA catheters are no longer required, the temporary central venous catheter and its wide-bore introducer must be removed. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Your knowledge of cardiac anatomy and physiology. Label a diagram of the heart, including pressure values for all four chambers. 2. A comparison of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Explain why entanglement occurs in the tricuspid valve. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26907147

  9. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access].

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Régis; Rougé, Pierre; Pierre, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    International guidelines advocate the use of first-line ultrasound for central venous catheter, particularly for the internal jugular vein. The role of ultrasound in peripheral venous access remains questionable. In some specific situations, such as pediatrics, obesity and patients with poor venous network, problems to cannulate peripheral vein may occur. Success rate of peripheral intravenous access increases with the diameter of the vein and for a depth of the vein between 0.3 and 1.5cm. The type of puncture (long-axis or short-axis) and the type of catheters have little influence on the success rate. Specific considerations have to be taken concerning infection control. PMID:26632089

  10. Catheter-related thrombosis: risks, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Linenberger, Michael L

    2006-10-01

    Symptomatic thromboembolic complications of central venous catheters (CVCs) occur in 5% or less of general oncology patients. Asymptomatic CVC-related thrombi are more common, but their clinical significance is unclear. Thrombotic risk may be increased by primary thrombophilic disorders, especially the factor V G1691A (Leiden) mutation, thrombogenic catheter material, larger catheter diameter and greater number of lumens, catheter tip malposition, left-sided placement, percutaneous or multiple insertion attempts, a previous CVC or preexisting venous obstruction, prothrombotic therapeutic agents, catheter-associated infections, and fibrinous catheter lumen occlusion. Three recent randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled trials observed no benefit of routine low-dose warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin in preventing catheter-associated thrombosis. Nevertheless, thromboprophylaxis may be appropriate and safe for selected high-risk patients. Duplex ultrasound can accurately detect CVC-related thrombi involving the jugular, axillary, distal subclavian, and arm veins. Contrast venographic imaging is required for indeterminate duplex findings and to evaluate the deep central veins and pulmonary arteries. Therapeutic anticoagulation, with or without catheter removal, is indicated for patients with acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism who have no contraindications. Catheter removal alone, with close follow-up, may be sufficient when bleeding risk precludes safe anticoagulation. Approaches to managing catheter-associated thrombosis, including the use of thrombolytic agents, are guided by limited published experience and extrapolation from practices used for lower-extremity DVT. Prospective, randomized, controlled trials are needed to identify the safest and most effective anticoagulant agents, treatment durations, and alternative venous access strategies for cancer patients who develop catheter-associated thrombosis. PMID:17020667

  11. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolic Events Associated with Central Venous Port Insertion in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hohl Moinat, Christine; Périard, Daniel; Hayoz, Daniel; André, Pascal; Kung, Marc; Betticher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Insertion of central venous port (CVP) catheter in the cancer population is associated with increased incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE). However, trials have shown limited benefit of antithrombotic treatment to prevent catheter-related venous thrombosis. This prospective observational cohort study was designed to assess the incidence of VTE closely related to CVP implantation in patients with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy, and to identify a high risk subgroup of patients. Between February 2006 and December 2011, 1097 consecutive cancer patients with first CVP implantation were included. Catheter-related VTE were defined as deep venous thrombosis in the arm, with or without pulmonary embolism (PE), or isolated PE. The incidence of CVP-associated VTE was 5.9% (IC95 4.4–7.3%) at 3 months, and 11.3% (IC95 9.4–13.2%) at 12 months. The incidence of any VTE was 7.6% (IC95 6.0–9.3%) at 3 months, and 15.3% (IC95 13.1–17.6%) at 12 months. High Khorana risk score and lung cancer were significant predictors of 3 month VTE. In conclusion, this large cohort study of patients with first CVP catheter implantation confirms the high incidence of VTE associated with the CVP implantation and allow identifying high risk patients who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis. PMID:24665264

  12. Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) include umbilical venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and tunneled catheters. CRBSI is defined as a laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI) with either a positive catheter tip culture or a positive blood culture drawn from the CVC. BSIs most frequently result from pathogens such as gram-positive cocci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and sometimes gram-negative organisms. CRBSIs are usually associated with several risk factors, including prolonged catheter placement, femoral access, low birth weight, and young gestational age. Most NICUs have a strategy for catheter insertion and maintenance designed to decrease CRBSIs. Specific interventions slightly differ between NICUs, particularly with regard to the types of disinfectants used for hand hygiene and appropriate skin care for the infant. In conclusion, infection rates can be reduced by the application of strict protocols for the placement and maintenance of CVCs and the education of NICU physicians and nurses. PMID:22232628

  13. Complications of 1303 central venous cannulations.

    PubMed

    Yilmazlar, A; Bilgin, H; Korfali, G; Eren, A; Ozkan, U

    1997-06-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC), now a common procedure, has several major complications. We assessed their incidence in a prospective study of 1303 cannulations done in the intensive care unit or operating theatre. Chest radiographs were obtained to verify proper catheter placement and to detect pneumothorax. Complications were arterial puncture in 68 (5.2%) patients, arrhythmias in 21 (1.6%), cardiopulmonary arrest in 1 (0.1%), and pneumothorax in 5 (0.5%). The tip of the CVC was incorrectly located in 149 (11.2%). The chest radiograph was a valuable method for detecting complications of central venous catheterization. PMID:9227379

  14. Complications of 1303 central venous cannulations.

    PubMed Central

    Yilmazlar, A; Bilgin, H; Korfali, G; Eren, A; Ozkan, U

    1997-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC), now a common procedure, has several major complications. We assessed their incidence in a prospective study of 1303 cannulations done in the intensive care unit or operating theatre. Chest radiographs were obtained to verify proper catheter placement and to detect pneumothorax. Complications were arterial puncture in 68 (5.2%) patients, arrhythmias in 21 (1.6%), cardiopulmonary arrest in 1 (0.1%), and pneumothorax in 5 (0.5%). The tip of the CVC was incorrectly located in 149 (11.2%). The chest radiograph was a valuable method for detecting complications of central venous catheterization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9227379

  15. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  16. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Banks, Jennifer; Abraham, Breanna; Capati, Gian; Pretorius, Casper

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%). The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis.

  17. Advances in venous access devices and nursing management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wickham, R S

    1990-06-01

    VADs are indicated for many persons who require reliable long-term venous access. Nontunneled, tunneled, and venous access ports are constructed of silicone or polyurethane, the most biocompatible materials identified thus far. These devices are inserted in a similar fashion and are extremely versatile. Although VADs represent a major advance in catheter technology, they are not without problems. The most serious and frequently reported complications include infection, thrombosis, and extravasation. Catheter occlusions are another frequent problem, and may be caused by clotted blood or precipitated drug within the catheter. Nursing care centers on prevention and intervention to remove the occlusion. Catheter-related infections may occur at one or more points along the catheter. The most serious are those occurring in the tunnel or as a result of a mural or catheter-tip thrombus. Normal skin flora are most commonly cultured with catheter-related infections. These organisms may be introduced into the body through the catheter hub or less often by migrating along the external catheter. Infections differ in their severity, prognosis, and treatment. Actions to minimize risk (scrupulous care and patient teaching), prompt recognition, and appropriate interventions are crucial. Thrombotic events include fibrin sheaths, patchy thrombotic plaques on the cannulated venous intima, and totally occlusive mural thromboses. Problems associated with these can range from withdrawal occlusion to obstruction of the great vessels and symptoms of superior vena cava syndrome. Mural thrombosis, which probably occurs more frequently than previously suspected, is the most significant risk factor for infection and may also potentiate extravasation. Prompt initiation of therapy will resolve symptoms and maintain the functioning of the catheter. Extravasation can result in transient discomfort or major tissue damage, pain, and functional loss. Needle dislodgment from ports is the most frequent cause. Adequate stabilization of needles and use of nonsiliconized needles are recommended to decrease this risk. Thrombosis at the catheter tip with back tracking of infusate out of the vein to subcutaneous tissues is the second most frequent cause of extravasation and has been reported with tunneled catheters as well as ports. It should be noted that catheter-tip displacement and catheter damage infrequently lead to extravasation. When extravasation is suspected, the infusion is stopped, and the nurse notifies the physician so diagnostic procedures and treatment can be initiated. Other complications occur infrequently but may contribute to patient discomfort, morbidity, and mortality. These include phlebitis, which resolves with conservative management in most instances, and pneumothorax, which occurs in a small percentage of patients within a short period after catheter placement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2110664

  18. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  19. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  20. Catheter-related complications in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, C R; Witzke, D J; Beart, R W

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients (22 adults, five adolescents, and one child) were treated with home parenteral nutrition (HPN) for 662 patient-months. A Broviac Silastic right atrial catheter which is tunnelled subcutaneously down the anterior chest wall served as a venous access. Thirty-four catheters were used in 27 patients, and the mean catheter life spans to date for adults and adolescents have been 21 and 14 months, respectively. There were no deaths attributable to the catheters. Infections and damaged external catheter segments were clustered in adult patients, whereas serious mechanical problems occurred in adolescents. Five of 27 patients (19%) experienced septicemia and one patient had two episodes. These six episodes (five of Staphylococcus aureus, one of Candida parapsilosis) in 662 patient-months represented only one case of sepsis every 9.1 patient-years on HPN. The external segments of 12 catheters were damaged and all were repaired in the outpatient setting. Eight of nine major mechanical problems occurred in five adolescents and one child; the most serious being four intravascular displacements, one extravascular displacement with mediastinitis, and a fractured catheter with a retained intravascular catheter segment. Although the HPN catheter is associated with definite risks, there has been a very acceptable incidence of complications resulting in a high benefit-to-risk ratio for HPN. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 2. PMID:6776916

  1. Venous thrombosis - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Blood clot formation in the veins is called venous thrombosis. Venous thrombosis most commonly forms in the veins of the legs. Risk factors for venous thrombosis include prolonged bed rest or immobility, as can ...

  2. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Of Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry Tachycardia In A Patient With Inferior Vena Cava Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Karthigesan, Murugesan; Jayaprakash, Shenthar

    2009-01-01

    Curative radiofrequency catheter modification of the slow pathway is the recommended therapy for patients suffering from recurrent symptomatic atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia. This is usually performed via femoral vein and the inferior vena cava (IVC). Presence of venous occlusion or complex venous anomaly involving the IVC may preclude this approach. Here, we report a case with a complex venous anomaly involving the inferior vena cava, who underwent electrophysiological study and successful radiofrequency ablation by an alternative approach. PMID:19652733

  3. Superfund record of decision amendment (EPA Region 4): Wrigley Charcoal Superfund Site, Hickman County, Wrigley, TN, February 2, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected Interim Remedial Action (IRA) for the Wrigley Charcoal Site, in Wrigley, Hickman County, Tennessee. The U.S. EPA has modified a wide variety of items that require immediate response action for the first step of cleanup activities to be taken at the Wrigley Charcoal Site. The major goal of these cleanup activities is to address the most serious threats at the Wrigley Charcoal Site by removing contaminated media from the Primary Site flood plain, remediating wastes at the Storage Basin, and through limited access restrictions at the Primary Site and the Storage Basin. The cleanup activities as presented in this IRA Record of Decision (ROD) Amendment will achieve significant risk reduction and will prepare the Site for future remedial activities.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Wrigley Charcoal Site, Hickman County, Wrigley, TN. (First remedial action), September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The 81-acre Wrigley Charcoal site is a former multi-use industrial operations area in the town of Wrigley, Hickman County, Tennessee. Land use in the area is industrial and residential, improper disposal procedures have resulted in soil, sediment, and debris contamination by semi-volatile organic compounds in coal-tars (mainly PAHs and phenols), VOCs, metals, and asbestos. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses interim remediation of remaining contaminated soil, sediment, and debris. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating, stabilizing, and disposing of offsite approximately 15 cubic yards of metallic wastes from the burn pit; consolidating and securing onsite approximately 120 drums of transformers; excavating, incinerating, stabilizing, and disposing of offsite 14 waste drums.

  5. Health assessment for Wrigley Charcoal, Wrigley, Hickman County, Tennessee, Region 4. CERCLIS No. TND980844781. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-09

    The Wrigley Charcoal Site (WCS) has been proposed for the National Priorities List (NPL) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). WCS is located in Wrigley, Hickman County, Tennessee, about 50 miles southwest of Nashville. Approximately 300 persons reside within a 1-mile radius of the site. About 4,250 persons are supplied with potable water from Mill Creek, located about 1 mile downstream of the site. From information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that could result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to phenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol (2,4-DMP), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene could occur via ingestion of, inhalation of, and dermal contact with surface water, sediments, soils, ground water, air, and food chain entities.

  6. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  7. Biopsy catheter (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... examination, a heart biopsy can be performed. A catheter is carefully threaded into an artery or vein to gain access into the heart. A bioptome (catheter with jaws in its tip) is then introduced. ...

  8. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePLUS

    A suprapubic catheter (tube) drains urine from your bladder. It is inserted into your bladder through a small hole in your belly. You may need a catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention ( ...

  9. Endovascular Removal of Long-Term Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Peter T.; Carter, Ranjana M.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-09-15

    Central venous catheters that have been in place for a long time can become fixed to the vein wall, making them impossible to pull out. Leaving them in situ is undesirable because of the risk that they could act as a nidus for thrombosis. Moreover, inserting new catheters alongside the old ones might compromise flow in the superior vena cava, further predisposing to thrombosis. Surgical removal is likewise undesirable, as this would necessitate thoracotomy with the attendant risks. We describe a novel technique, which we were able to use to remove retained long-term hemodialysis catheters in a patient who needed new catheters and who would have been a high-risk candidate for surgery. The right internal jugular vein was punctured adjacent to the site of insertion and a guide wire was used to form a snare, which was passed around the catheters and used to saw through the fibrous attachments to the vein wall. The midsection of one catheter could not be freed but the snare was used to cut off the proximal and distal ends, which could then be removed, the latter via the femoral vein. New catheters were then inserted via the left internal jugular vein. This technique enabled successful catheter extraction and replacement in a patient who would have been a poor candidate for cardiothoracic surgery.

  10. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  11. In vitro activity and durability of a combination of an antibiofilm and an antibiotic against vascular catheter colonization.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad D; Hull, Richard A; Stager, Charles E; Cadle, Richard M; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2013-01-01

    Catheter-associated infections can cause severe complications and even death. Effective antimicrobial modification of catheters that can prevent device colonization has the potential of preventing clinical infection. We studied in vitro the antimicrobial activities of central venous catheters impregnated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antibiofilm agent, and a broad-spectrum antibiotic against a range of important clinical pathogens. NAC-levofloxacin-impregnated (NACLEV) catheters were also evaluated for their antiadherence activity. NACLEV catheters produced the most active and durable antimicrobial effect against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates and significantly reduced colonization (P < 0.0001) by all tested pathogens compared to control catheters. These in vitro results suggest that this antimicrobial combination can potentially be used to combat catheter colonization and catheter-associated infection. PMID:23114776

  12. In Vitro Activity and Durability of a Combination of an Antibiofilm and an Antibiotic against Vascular Catheter Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Richard A.; Stager, Charles E.; Cadle, Richard M.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2013-01-01

    Catheter-associated infections can cause severe complications and even death. Effective antimicrobial modification of catheters that can prevent device colonization has the potential of preventing clinical infection. We studied in vitro the antimicrobial activities of central venous catheters impregnated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antibiofilm agent, and a broad-spectrum antibiotic against a range of important clinical pathogens. NAC-levofloxacin-impregnated (NACLEV) catheters were also evaluated for their antiadherence activity. NACLEV catheters produced the most active and durable antimicrobial effect against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates and significantly reduced colonization (P < 0.0001) by all tested pathogens compared to control catheters. These in vitro results suggest that this antimicrobial combination can potentially be used to combat catheter colonization and catheter-associated infection. PMID:23114776

  13. Urgent peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis catheter dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, there is a steady incident rate of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who require renal replacement therapy. Of these patients, approximately one-third have an "unplanned" or "urgent" start to dialysis. This can be a very challenging situation where patients have either not had adequate time for education and decision making regarding dialysis modality and appropriate dialysis access, or a decision was made and plans were altered due to unforeseen circumstances. Despite such unplanned starts, clinicians must still consider the patient's ESKD "life-plan", which includes the best initial dialysis modality and access to suit the patient's individual goals and their medical, social, logistic, and facility circumstances. This paper will discuss the considerations of peritoneal dialysis and a peritoneal dialysis catheter access and hemodialysis and central venous catheter access in patients who require an urgent start to dialysis. PMID:26951906

  14. [Catheter- associated bacteremia caused by Ochrobactrum anthropi].

    PubMed

    Soloaga, Rolando; Carrion, Natalia; Pidone, Juan; Guelfand, Liliana; Margari, Alejandra; Altieri, Roxana

    2009-01-01

    Ochrobactrum anthropi is a non-glucose fermentative, aerobic gram-negative bacillus, formerly known as Achromobacter sp or CDC group Vd. It has been isolated from the environment and from infections in usually immunocompromised human beings. The documented infections frequently involved catheter related bacteremia whereas endophthalmitis, urinary infections, meningitis, endocarditis, hepatic abscess, osteochondritis, pelvic abscess and pancreatic abscess were rarely involved. Here it is presented the case of a male patient aged 69 years with sustained hypotension, four day febrile syndrome, chill, lavish perspiration and sensorium deterioration. He had type 2 diabetes and antecedent of cerebrovascular accident. A double-lumen dialysis catheter was present due to chronic renal insufficiency. An episode of catheter-related bloodstream infection was documented by using Bact-Alert Blood Culture System and Differential-Time-to-Positivity Method for central venous catheter versus peripheral blood cultures (>120 min). Once removed, it was confirmed through Maki semi quantitative technique (>15 FCU). The microorganism was identified by API 20NE and Vitek 1 as Ochrobactrum anthropi. PMID:20053608

  15. Care of the central venous catheterization site: the use of a transparent polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, R M; Jarrard, M M

    1984-01-01

    Studies of care of patients with central venous catheters report a 3-7% incidence of catheter-induced sepsis when sterile gauze and tape are used as an occlusive dressing. The technique requires that the dressing be changed three times each week for catheterization site inspection. From June 1979 to September 1980, a noncomparative evaluation of a transparent, self-adhesive, polyurethane dressing which is permeable to water vapor but not bacteria was performed. This dressing was used for the care of 100 consecutive patients with central venous catheters. Dressing life averaged 5.3 days with silicone rubber catheters and 4.3 days for polyvinyl chloride catheters. One patient developed catheter induced sepsis (incidence 1%). This dressing material: (1) is acceptable for use as a dressing of central venous catheters; (2) continuously permits inspection of the insertion sites; (3) decreases nursing hours; (4) provides a comfortable dressing which secures the catheter to the patient; and (5) is durable even when exposed to high humidity therapy devices, or when possible permits the patient to take showers. PMID:6425522

  16. Body surface infrared thermometry in patients with central venous cateter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Silvah, José Henrique; Lima, Cristiane Maria Mártires de; Unamuno, Maria do Rosário Del Lama de; Schetino, Marco Antônio Alves; Schetino, Luana Pereira Leite; Fassini, Priscila Giácomo; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Costa E Cunha Moraes; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Cunha, Selma Freire Carvalho da; Marchini, Julio Sergio

    2015-09-01

    Objective To evaluate if body surface temperature close to the central venous catheter insertion area is different when patients develop catheter-related bloodstream infections.Methods Observational cross-sectional study. Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, 3 consecutive measurements of body surface temperature were collected from 39 patients with central venous catheter on the following sites: nearby the catheter insertion area or totally implantable catheter reservoir, the equivalent contralateral region (without catheter), and forehead of the same subject.Results A total of 323 observations were collected. Respectively, both in male and female patients, disregarding the occurrence of infection, the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the contralateral region (mean ± standard deviation: -0.3±0.6°C versus-0.2±0.5ºC; p=0.36), and the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the forehead (mean ± standard deviation: -0.2±0.5°C versus-0.1±0.5ºC; p=0.3) resulted in negative values. Moreover, in infected patients, higher values were obtained on the catheter area (95%CI: 36.6-37.5ºC versus 36.3-36.5ºC; p<0.01) and by temperature subtractions: catheter area minus contralateral region (95%CI: -0.17 - +0.33ºC versus -0.33 - -0.20ºC; p=0.02) and catheter area minus forehead (95%CI: -0.02 - +0.55ºC versus-0.22 - -0.10ºC; p<0.01).Conclusion Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections had higher temperature values both around catheter insertion area and in the subtraction of the temperatures on the contralateral and forehead regions from those on the catheter area. PMID:26466058

  17. Transhepatic venous approach to permanent pacemaker placement in a patient with limited central venous access

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Adeel M; Harris, Gregory S; Movahed, Assad; Chiang, Karl S; Chelu, Mihail G; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar

    2015-01-01

    The end-stage renal disease population poses a challenge for obtaining venous access required for life-saving invasive cardiac procedures. In this case report, we describe an adult patient with end-stage renal disease in whom the hepatic vein was the only available access to implant a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. A 63-year-old male with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis and permanent atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter presented with symptomatic bradycardia. Imaging studies revealed all traditional central venous access sites to be occluded/non-accessible. With the assistance of vascular interventional radiology, a trans-hepatic venous catheter was placed. This was then used to place a right ventricular pacing lead with close attention to numerous technical aspects. The procedure was completed successfully with placement of a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:26380831

  18. Transhepatic venous approach to permanent pacemaker placement in a patient with limited central venous access.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Adeel M; Harris, Gregory S; Movahed, Assad; Chiang, Karl S; Chelu, Mihail G; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar

    2015-09-16

    The end-stage renal disease population poses a challenge for obtaining venous access required for life-saving invasive cardiac procedures. In this case report, we describe an adult patient with end-stage renal disease in whom the hepatic vein was the only available access to implant a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. A 63-year-old male with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis and permanent atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter presented with symptomatic bradycardia. Imaging studies revealed all traditional central venous access sites to be occluded/non-accessible. With the assistance of vascular interventional radiology, a trans-hepatic venous catheter was placed. This was then used to place a right ventricular pacing lead with close attention to numerous technical aspects. The procedure was completed successfully with placement of a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:26380831

  19. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.6). Aspiration occlusion occurred in 13 patients (11.7%). Intracatheter urokinase was infused in eight of these patients and successfully restored catheter function in all but two instances. These complication rates are comparable to or better than those reported with chest ports.Conclusion: Peripheral ports for long-term central venous access placed by interventional radiologists in the interventional radiology suite are as safe and as effective as chest ports.

  20. Deep venous thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Deep venous thrombosis is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part ... C, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Venous ... and deep vein thrombosis. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls ...

  1. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a blood clot in one or more of the major veins that drain blood from the ... Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a clot that blocks blood flow in a mesenteric vein. There are two such veins through ...

  2. Chronic performance of polyurethane catheters covalently coated with ATH complex: a rabbit jugular vein model.

    PubMed

    Klement, Petr; Du, Ying Jun; Berry, Leslie R; Tressel, Paul; Chan, Anthony K C

    2006-10-01

    Covalent complexes of antithrombin (AT) and heparin (ATH) have superb anticoagulant activity towards thrombin and factor Xa. Stability of polyurethane central venous catheters covalently modified with radiolabeled ATH was studied using a roller pump with saline or protease P-5147. Saline wash removed loosely bound ATH molecules to decrease graft density from 26 to 12 pmol/cm2. However, only slightly more ATH was removed by strong protease (from 12 to 7 pmol/cm2). To evaluate ATH-coated, heparin-coated, and uncoated catheters, a chronic rabbit jugular vein model was developed with catheters maintained for up to 30-106 days. Lumen occlusion was tested by drawing blood twice daily. Although unmodified or heparin-coated catheters occluded within 5-7 days after insertion, all ATH catheters remained patent throughout the experiment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of heparin and uncoated catheters revealed extensive thrombosis (lumen+mural) while ATH catheters were unaffected. Visual observation showed significant deposition of protein and cells on control and heparin-modified catheters and, to a lesser degree, on ATH-coated surfaces. SEM showed no fibrin inside or outside of ATH catheters, which remained patent in extended studies out to 106 days. Although atomic force microscopy showed ATH coatings to be rough, 6-fold higher anti-factor Xa activity likely contributed to increased patency. Our data confirm that ATH-modified catheters are stable and have superior potency compared to heparin or control catheters. PMID:16781768

  3. Coronary venous oximetry using MRI.

    PubMed

    Foltz, W D; Merchant, N; Downar, E; Stainsby, J A; Wright, G A

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Fick law, coronary venous blood oxygen measurements have value for assessing functional parameters such as the coronary flow reserve. At present, the application of this measure is restricted by its invasive nature. This report describes the design and testing of a noninvasive coronary venous blood oxygen measurement using MRI, with a preliminary focus on the coronary sinus. After design optimization including a four-coil phased array and an optimal set of data acquisition parameters, quality tests indicate measurement precision on the order of the gold standard optical measurement (3%O(2)). Comparative studies using catheter sampling suggest reasonable accuracy (3 subjects), with variability dominated by sampling location uncertainty ( approximately 7%O(2)). Intravenous dipyridamole (5 subjects) induces significant changes in sinus blood oxygenation (22 +/- 9% O(2)), corresponding to flow reserves of 1.8 +/- 0.4, suggesting the potential for clinical utility. Underestimation of flow reserve is dominated by right atrial mixing and the systemic effects of dipyridamole. Magn Reson Med 42:837-848, 1999. PMID:10542342

  4. Deep Venous Thrombosis in Teen With Crouzon Syndrome Post-Le Fort III Osteotomy With Rigid External Distraction.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lauren O; Myers, Rene P; Girotto, John A

    2015-11-01

    Venous thromboembolic events are rare in pediatric patients. Risk factors associated with the development of venous thromboembolic events in pediatric patients include the use of central venous catheters, hospitalization, cancer, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and congenital prothrombotic disorders.The authors present the case of a 14-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome who required Le Fort III osteotomy with rigid external distraction for significant midface hypoplasia who presented postoperatively with an extensive deep venous thrombosis. This is the first reported case of symptomatic venous thrombosis post-Le Fort III osteotomy and rigid external distraction. Although rare, surgeons should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:26595005

  5. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You will also need to know how to clean the tube and the area where it attaches ... You will need these supplies for cleaning your skin around your catheter and for cleaning your catheter: 2 clean washcloths 2 clean hand towels Mild soap Warm water A ...

  6. Placement of Hemodialysis Catheters Through Stenotic or Occluded Central Thoracic Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Claude Deglise, Sebastien; Saucy, Francois; Mathieu, Claudine; Haesler, Erik; Doenz, Francesco; Corpataux, Jean Marc; Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2009-07-15

    A method for hemodialysis catheter placement in patients with central thoracic venous stenosis or occlusion is described and initial results are analyzed. Twelve patients, with a mean age of 63.2 years (42-80 years), with central venous stenosis or occlusion, and who required a hemodialysis catheter were reviewed. All lesions were confirmed by helical CT or phlebography. Five patients had stenosis while seven patients were diagnosed with an occlusion of thoracic central veins. All patients were asymptomatic, without sign of superior vena cava syndrome. After percutaneous transstenotic catheterization or guidewire-based recannalization in occlusions, a balloon dilatation was performed and a stent was placed, when necessary, prior to catheter placement. Technical success was 92%. Three patients had angioplasty alone and nine patients had angioplasty with stent placement. Dialysis catheters were successfully inserted through all recannalized accesses. No immediate complication occurred, nor did any patient develop superior vena cava syndrome after the procedure. The mean follow-up was 21.8 months (range, 8-48 months). Three patients developed a catheter dysfunction with fibrin sheath formation (at 7, 11, and 12 months after catheter placement, respectively). Two were successfully managed by percutaneous endovascular approach and one catheter was removed. In conclusion, for patients with central venous stenosis or occlusion and those who need a hemodialysis catheter, catheter insertion can be reliably achieved immediately after endovascular recannalization with acceptable technical and long-term success rates. This technique should be considered as an alternative procedure for placing a new hemodialysis catheter through a patent vein.

  7. Reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections in critically ill patients through a multiple system intervention.

    PubMed

    Peredo, R; Sabatier, C; Villagrá, A; González, J; Hernández, C; Pérez, F; Suárez, D; Vallés, J

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the utility of a multiple system intervention to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) in our intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective cohort study was undertaken in the medical and surgical ICU at a university hospital. We applied five measures: educational sessions about inserting and maintaining central venous catheters, skin cleaning with chlorhexidine, a checklist during catheter insertion, subclavian vein insertion and avoiding femoral insertion whenever possible, and removing unnecessary catheters. We determined the rate of CR-BSI per 1,000 catheter-days during the intervention (March to December 2007) and compared it with the rate during the same period in 2006 in which we applied only conventional preventive measures. CR-BSI was defined as the recovery of the same organism (same species, same antibiotic susceptibility profile) from catheter tip and blood cultures. We registered 4,289 patient-days and 3,572 catheter-days in the control period and 4,174 patient-days and 3,296 catheter-days in the intervention period. No significant differences in the number of patients with central venous catheters during the two periods were observed: catheters were used in 81.5% of patients during the control period and in 80.6% of patients during the intervention period. During the control period, 24 CR-BSI were diagnosed (6.7/1,000 catheter-days); during the intervention period, 8 CR-BSI were diagnosed (2.4/1,000 catheter-days) (relative risk 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16 to 0.80; p = 0.015). Nurses interrupted the procedure to correct at least one aspect when completing the checklist in 17.7% of insertions. In conclusion, a multiple system intervention applying evidence-based measures reduced the incidence of CR-BSI in our ICU. PMID:20533071

  8. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  9. [Deep venous thrombosis and severe burns].

    PubMed

    Cracowski, J L; Bosson, J L; Cracowski, C; Bouchut, J C

    1998-02-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a frequent and potentially serious complication in severely burned patients. We report the case of a burned patient (40% of total body surface burned), who had right femoral deep venous thrombosis and severe pulmonary embolism, although a prophylaxis was conducted with low molecular weight heparin, graduated compression stockings and rotating bed. This case shows that DVT early diagnosis and prophylaxis is difficult in severely burned patients. Systematic screening of DVT by duplex scan is possible only for femoral veins, which renders duplex scan more suitable for femoral catheter follow up than for systematic DVT screening. Computed tomography venography seems to be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of proximal thrombosis. Prophylaxis is best achieved with the use of preventive low molecular weight heparins, graduated compression stockings, and early mobilisation when possible. However, the place of low molecular weight heparins at high doses and external pneumatic calf compression needs to be evaluated by prospective studies. PMID:9551347

  10. Management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kolluri, Raghu

    2014-06-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) results from venous hypertension secondary to superficial or deep venous valvular reflux, as well as venous obstruction. The most severe clinical manifestation of CVI is venous leg ulceration that can result in significant morbidity, including venous gangrene and amputation, albeit rare. Treatment modalities are aimed at reducing venous hypertension. Diuretic therapy, although widely used, only provides short-term improvement of the edema but provides no long-term benefit. Compression therapy is the cornerstone in the management of CVI. Compression can be achieved using compression bandaging, compression pumps, or graduated compression stockings. Topical steroid creams may reduce inflammation, venous eczema, and pain in the short term, but they can be detrimental in the long run. Apligraf (a living, bilayered, cell-based product) in conjunction with compression therapy was noted to be more effective in healing venous leg ulcerations, when compared with treatment with compression therapy and zinc paste. Endovascular and surgical techniques that minimize valvular reflux and relieve venous obstruction improve venous hemodynamics, promoting wound healing. PMID:24840970

  11. The Incidence of Central Line–Associated Bacteremia After the Introduction of Midline Catheters in a Ventilator Unit Population

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rahul; Patel, Anish; Enuh, Hilary; Adekunle, Oluwaseyi; Shrisgantharajah, Vasanthy; Diaz, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Our objective was to evaluate whether the use of midline venous catheters in place of central line venous catheters, when appropriate, decreased the overall incidence of central line–associated bacteremia in a ventilator unit. Methods The time interval between February 2012 and February 2013 was divided into 2 periods. Group A was the first half of the year, before the introduction of midline catheters, and group B was the second half of the year, 6 months after their introduction. Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) was calculated using the equation: (total number of CLABSI/total number of catheter days) × 1000. The Z test was used for proportions between independent groups to compare the significance in the difference in CLABSI between groups A and B. Results There was a significant decrease in the total number of catheter days on the ventilator unit in group A from 2408 catheter days in 1 year (August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012) before the introduction of midline catheters to 1521 catheter days in group B in the following year (November 1, 2012, to October 31, 2013; P < 0.05 for both groups). Conclusions Midline catheters in place of central lines decrease the rate of CLABSI in a ventilator unit. In addition, no bloodstream infections were associated with midline catheters. PMID:25972725

  12. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  13. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required. PMID:24847039

  14. Persistent Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria rhizophila Related to a Damaged Central Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Karsten; Mérens, Audrey; Ferroni, Agnès; Dubern, Béatrice; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    A case of persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central venous catheter in a 3-year-old girl with Hirschsprung's disease is reported. The strain was identified as K. rhizophila by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Arbitrarily primed PCR analysis showed a clonal strain. The repeated septic episodes were resolved with the catheter repair. PMID:22259211

  15. Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Arrhythmias Arising from the Distal Great Cardiac Vein.

    PubMed

    Letsas, Konstantinos P; Efremidis, Michael; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Xydonas, Sotirios; Valkanas, Kosmas; Sideris, Antonios

    2016-03-01

    Catheter ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias arising from the distal great cardiac vein represents a great challenge. We report data regarding the electrocardiographic and electrophysiologic characteristics in two patients with ventricular arrhythmias arising from the distal great cardiac vein. The technical difficulties to advance and navigate the ablation catheter within the coronary venous system as well as the close proximity to the major coronary vessels are discussed. PMID:26559008

  16. Dose Intraoperative Fluoroscopy Precisely Predict Catheter Tip Location via Superior Vena Cava Route?

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Fu, Jui-Ying; Wu, Ching-Feng; Ko, Po-Jen; Liu, Yun-Hen; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Yu, Shang-Yueh

    2015-12-01

    Adequate catheter tip location is crucial for functional intravenous port and central venous catheter. Numerous complications were reported because of catheter migration that caused by inadequate tip location. Different guidelines recommend different ideal locations without consensus. Another debate is actual movement of intravascular portion of implanted catheter. From literature review, the catheter migrated peripherally an average of 20?mm on the erect chest radiographs. In this study, we want to verify the actual presentation of catheter movement within a vessel and try to find a quantitative catheter length model to recommend.From March 2012 to March 2013, 346 patients were included into this prospective cohort study. We collect clinical data from medical record and utilized picture archiving and communication system to measure all image parameters. Statistical analysis was utilized to identify the risk factors for catheter migration.The nonmigration group had 221 patients (63.9%); 67 (19.4%) patients were classified into the peripheral migration group; and 58 (16.8%) patients were classified into the central migration group. Patients with short height (P?=?0.03), larger superior vena cava (SVC) diameters at the brachiocephalic vein confluence site (P?=?0.02), and longer implanted catheter length (P?=?0.0004) had greater risks for central migration. We utilized regression curve for further analysis and height (centimeters)/10 had moderate correlation distances from the entry vessel to the carina.Although intravascular movement of catheter was exist in implanted catheter, the intraoperative fluoroscopy could provide accurate catheter tip location in 63.9% patients. Additional length of catheter implantation seems unnecessary in 80.6% patients. Patients with short height, larger SVC diameters at the brachiocephalic vein confluence site had greater risk for catheter central movement. Height/10 may be consider as reference length of implantation for inexperience surgeon and precise implantation length could be adjust under guidance of fluoroscopy. PMID:26656351

  17. Ethanol Causes Protein Precipitation—New Safety Issues for Catheter Locking Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Schilcher, Gernot; Schlagenhauf, Axel; Schneditz, Daniel; Scharnagl, Hubert; Ribitsch, Werner; Krause, Robert; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Horina, Joerg H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The ethanol lock technique has shown great potential to eradicate organisms in biofilms and to treat or prevent central venous catheter related infections. Following instillation of ethanol lock solution, however, the inherent density gradient between blood and ethanol causes gravity induced seepage of ethanol out of the catheter and blood influx into the catheter. Plasma proteins so are exposed to highly concentrated ethanol, which is a classic agent for protein precipitation. We aimed to investigate the precipitating effect of ethanol locks on plasma proteins as a possible cause for reported catheter occlusions. Methods Plasma samples were exposed in-vitro to ethanol (concentrations ranging from 7 to 70 v/v%) and heparin lock solutions. In catheter studies designed to mimic different in-vivo situations, the catheter tip was placed in a plasma reservoir and the material contained within the catheter was analyzed after ethanol lock instillation. The samples underwent standardized investigation for protein precipitation. Results Protein precipitation was observed in plasma samples containing ethanol solutions above a concentration of 28%, as well as in material retrieved from vertically positioned femoral catheters and jugular (subclavian) catheters simulating recumbent or head down tilt body positions. Precipitates could not be re-dissolved by dilution with plasma, urokinase or alteplase. Plasma samples containing heparin lock solutions showed no signs of precipitation. Conclusions Our in-vitro results demonstrate that ethanol locks may be associated with plasma protein precipitation in central venous catheters. This phenomenon could be related to occlusion of vascular access devices locked with ethanol, as has been reported. Concerns should be raised regarding possible complications upon injection or spontaneous gravity induced leakage of such irreversibly precipitated protein particles into the systemic circulation. We suggest limiting the maximum advisable concentration of ethanol to 28 v/v% in catheter lock solutions. PMID:24391979

  18. Urinary Catheter Management

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    After colorectal resection surgery, early urinary catheter removal has been promoted as a part of the national Surgical Care Improvement Project. However, the decrease in urinary tract infection expected with this strategy must be balanced against an increased risk for urinary retention. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to summarize the evidence for and against early postoperative urinary catheter removal. For nonpelvic colorectal resection, the evidence supports removal of the catheter on postoperative day 1 for patients who are not at high risk for urinary retention, including patients with thoracic epidurals. For mid-to-low rectal surgery, the risk of urinary retention is increased, and catheter removal on day 3 to day 6 is recommended; however, the exact timing of removal cannot be recommended based on current studies. PMID:24436671

  19. Association Between Disruption of Fibrin Sheaths Using Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Balloons and Late Onset of Central Venous Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Nina Mojibian, Hamid; Pollak, Jeffrey; Tal, Michael

    2011-02-15

    To compare the rates of central venous stenosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis who underwent disruption of fibrin sheath with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloons and those who underwent over-the-wire catheter exchange. This study is a retrospective review of 209 percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption and 1304 over-the-wire catheter exchange procedures performed in 753 patients. Approval from the Human Investigations Committee was obtained for this study. Up to 10-year follow-up was performed. A {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare the rates of central venous stenosis after balloon disruption versus catheter exchange. A t-test was used to compare time to central venous stenosis development. Of the 753 patients in the study, 127 patients underwent balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and 626 had catheter exchange. Within the balloon disruption group, 18 (14.2%) of 127 patients subsequently developed central venous stenosis, compared with 44 (7.0%) of 626 in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). Time to central venous stenosis development was approximately 3 years in both groups and not significantly different (1371 and 1010 days, P = 0.20). A total of 25.2% of patients in the balloon disruption group had four or more subsequent catheter exchanges, versus 12.6% in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). In conclusions, there is a possible association between percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and late-onset central venous stenosis. Because venography was not routinely performed in catheter exchange patients, future randomized studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  20. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  1. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  2. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  3. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  4. Transhepatic Guidance of Translumbar Hemodialysis Catheter Placement in the Setting of Chronic Infrarenal IVC Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Regalado, Sidney; Navuluri, Rakesh Zangan, Steven; Thuong Van Ha; Funaki, Brian

    2010-06-15

    When patients with end-stage renal disease have exhausted both conventional and unconventional venous access options, creative solutions must be sought for hemodialysis catheter placement in order to ensure survival. This case describes a patient in urgent need of a dialysis catheter despite total occlusion of the jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. Occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right renal vein resulted in failed attempts at translumbar catheter placement. A gooseneck snare was temporarily advanced through the liver to the IVC for use as a fluoroscopic target to facilitate successful single-puncture, translumbar catheterization.

  5. Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Catheter-Related Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jouvenot, Marie; Willoteaux, Serge; Meslier, Nicole; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that fluid accumulation in the neck contributes to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case of catheter-related superior v ena cava (SVC) thrombosis revealed by rapid onset of typical symptoms of OSA. A marked improvement in OSA severity was observed after central venous catheter removal, anticoagulant therapy, and SVC angioplasty Citation: Jouvenot M, Willoteaux S, Meslier N, Gagnadoux F. Worsening of obstructive sleep apnea associated with catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):681–682. PMID:25766698

  6. [Evaluation of peripherally inserted central catheters in a pediatric population].

    PubMed

    Baudin, G; Occelli, A; Boyer, C; Geoffray, A; Chevallier, P

    2013-10-01

    A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a central venous access mostly used in France in the adult population, whereas it is only rarely used in the pediatric population. The main objective of this study was to analyze a cohort of children treated with PICCs inserted under radiological guidance. We conducted a single-center study in the Radiology department of Nice University Hospital and the Lenval Foundation Children's Hospital. During a 43-month period between November 2008 and June 2012, a total of 67 catheter placement attempts were performed in 57 pediatric patients aged from 7 months to 18 years. We achieved 95.5% technical success with a median procedure duration of 17min. Only 6% of the PICC placements required light intravenous sedation; all the others were performed using a combination of local anesthesia, EMLA cream, and equimolar mixture of oxygen and nitrous oxide (EMONO). Subjective scale analysis of pain during catheter insertion showed a median score of 2.1. Catheter life ranged from 1 to 210 days (median, 38.3 days) with the treatment fully completed in 75% of the cases. The overall complication rate was 18.7% (4.9 per 1000 catheter-days), largely dominated by mechanical complications (9.4%) such as accidental removal (6.2%) or catheter obstruction (3.1%). Infectious complications occurred in 7.8% of the patients. The duration of catheterization and the use of tape to secure the catheter significantly affected the occurrence of complications. Peripheral insertion of central catheters was highly feasible in infants and children. It is a simple, safe, and effective alternative to intravenous central devices in the pediatric population. The occurrence of complications, typically mechanical, must be reduced and prevented by strict management of this type of central line by the nursing team. PMID:23953872

  7. Intra-atrial Reentrant Tachycardia in Complete Transposition of the Great Arteries Without Femoral Venous Access.

    PubMed

    Borne, Ryan T; Kay, Joseph; Fagan, Thomas; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    Catheter ablation for patients with transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) requires multiple considerations and careful preprocedural planning. Knowledge of the patient's anatomy and surgical correction, in addition to electroanatomic mapping and entrainment maneuvers, are important to identify and successfully treat arrhythmias. This case was unique in that the lack of femoral venous access required transhepatic venous access and bidirectional block was attained with ablation lesions along the cavotricuspid isthmus on both sides of the baffle. PMID:26920194

  8. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Philip J. Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G.

    2011-02-15

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71-3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  9. Prevention of Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms during Catheter Exchange using Antimicrobial Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Joel; Jiang, Ying; Hachem, Ray; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2014-01-01

    Exchanging a central venous catheter (CVC) over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated CVC in the presence of bacteremia can result in cross-infection of the newly exchanged CVC. A recent retrospective clinical study showed that exchanging a catheter over a guide wire in the presence of bacteremia using an antimicrobial minocycline-rifampin (M/R) catheter may improve outcomes. To expand on this, we developed an in vitro cross-contamination model of exchange to evaluate the efficacy of different antimicrobial CVCs in preventing cross-contamination of multidrug-resistant organisms during exchange. Uncoated CVCs were allowed to form biofilm by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 h, the biofilm-colonized CVCs were placed in a glass tube containing bovine calf serum plus Mueller-Hinton broth, and each catheter was exchanged over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated or an M/R-, chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHX/SS)-, or chlorhexidine-M/R (CHX-M/R)-coated CVC. Cross-contamination of exchanged catheters was enumerated by sonication and quantitative plating methods. The exchange of M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA biofilms compared to control exchanged CVCs (P < 0.0001). Exchange with CHX/SS CVCs reduced but did not completely prevent cross-contamination by MRSA (P = 0.005). Exchange with CHX-M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans biofilms (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, CHX-M/R CVCs were superior to M/R CVCs against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans (P = 0.003) and were superior to CHX/SS CVCs against MRSA and P. aeruginosa (P = 0.01). In conclusion, exchange with the novel CHX-M/R CVC was the only exchange effective in completely and concurrently preventing cross-contamination from bacteria and Candida. PMID:24957841

  10. Prevention of transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms during catheter exchange using antimicrobial catheters.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mohamed A; Rosenblatt, Joel; Jiang, Ying; Hachem, Ray; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I

    2014-09-01

    Exchanging a central venous catheter (CVC) over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated CVC in the presence of bacteremia can result in cross-infection of the newly exchanged CVC. A recent retrospective clinical study showed that exchanging a catheter over a guide wire in the presence of bacteremia using an antimicrobial minocycline-rifampin (M/R) catheter may improve outcomes. To expand on this, we developed an in vitro cross-contamination model of exchange to evaluate the efficacy of different antimicrobial CVCs in preventing cross-contamination of multidrug-resistant organisms during exchange. Uncoated CVCs were allowed to form biofilm by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 h, the biofilm-colonized CVCs were placed in a glass tube containing bovine calf serum plus Mueller-Hinton broth, and each catheter was exchanged over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated or an M/R-, chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHX/SS)-, or chlorhexidine-M/R (CHX-M/R)-coated CVC. Cross-contamination of exchanged catheters was enumerated by sonication and quantitative plating methods. The exchange of M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA biofilms compared to control exchanged CVCs (P<0.0001). Exchange with CHX/SS CVCs reduced but did not completely prevent cross-contamination by MRSA (P=0.005). Exchange with CHX-M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans biofilms (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CHX-M/R CVCs were superior to M/R CVCs against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans (P=0.003) and were superior to CHX/SS CVCs against MRSA and P. aeruginosa (P=0.01). In conclusion, exchange with the novel CHX-M/R CVC was the only exchange effective in completely and concurrently preventing cross-contamination from bacteria and Candida. PMID:24957841

  11. Peritoneal catheter development. Currently used catheters--advantages/disadvantages/complications, and catheter tunnel morphology in humans.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Z J

    1988-01-01

    Original Tenckhoff catheters are still the most commonly used catheters, and catheter survival rates are still unsatisfactory. Preliminary results with Swan Neck catheters, the catheters with a permanently bent intramural segment, are encouraging since these catheters are associated with low complication rates. The role of the external cuff in prevention of exit and tunnel infections is still controversial. Animal experiments indicate that collagen ingrowth into the external cuff is crucial in the inhibition of epidermal downgrowth. The author's recent preliminary observations on four catheter tunnels removed 1 month to 5.5 years after catheter implantations, indicate that 1) epidermal cells in humans do not spread deeper than a few millimeters from the skin exit and 2) the external cuff does not participate in the epidermal cell downgrowth inhibition. This is unlike animal studies. The difference in epidermal biology between humans and animals may render animal experiments difficult to apply to catheter technology in humans. PMID:2975497

  12. Antibiofilm activity of Cobetia marina filtrate upon Staphylococcus epidermidis catheter-related isolates

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, D.S.; Gorziza, D. F.; Abraham, W.R.; Antunes, A.L.S.; Lerner, C.; Mothes, B.; Termignoni, C.; Macedo, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the antibiofilm activity by the sponge-associated bacterium Cobetia marina upon Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical isolates obtained from central venous catheters. Antibiofilm activity/antimicrobial susceptibility correlation might predict the action of the metabolite(s) upon Staphylococcus epidermidis in the clinic, making it a possible adjuvant in therapies against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24031760

  13. STS-40 MS Bagian removes catheter from Payload Specialist Gaffney's arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian (left) removes the central venous system catheter from Payload Specialist F. Drew Gaffney's right arm. The two crewmembers are in front of Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS-1) module Rack 10 as they conduct this procedure associated with Experiment No. 294, Cardiovascular Adaptation to Zero Gravity.

  14. How to deal with dialysis catheters in the ICU setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney insufficiency (AKI) occurs frequently in intensive care units (ICU). In the management of vascular access for renal replacement therapy (RRT), several factors need to be taken into consideration to achieve an optimal RRT dose and to limit complications. In the medium and long term, some individuals may become chronic dialysis patients and so preserving the vascular network is of major importance. Few studies have focused on the use of dialysis catheters (DC) in ICUs, and clinical practice is driven by the knowledge and management of long-term dialysis catheter in chronic dialysis patients and of central venous catheter in ICU patients. This review describes the appropriate use and management of DCs required to obtain an accurate RRT dose and to reduce mechanical and infectious complications in the ICU setting. To deliver the best RRT dose, the length and diameter of the catheter need to be sufficient. In patients on intermittent hemodialysis, the right internal jugular insertion is associated with a higher delivered dialysis dose if the prescribed extracorporeal blood flow is higher than 200 ml/min. To prevent DC colonization, the physician has to be vigilant for the jugular position when BMI < 24 and the femoral position when BMI > 28. Subclavian sites should be excluded. Ultrasound guidance should be used especially in jugular sites. Antibiotic-impregnated dialysis catheters and antibiotic locks are not recommended in routine practice. The efficacy of ethanol and citrate locks has yet to be demonstrated. Hygiene procedures must be respected during DC insertion and manipulation. PMID:23174157

  15. Microbial diversity on intravascular catheters from paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Marsh, N; Long, D; Wei, M; Morrison, M; Rickard, C M

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms play important roles in intravascular catheter (IVC)-related infections, which are the most serious complications in children with IVCs, leading to increased hospitalisation, intensive care admissions, extensive antibiotic treatment and mortality. A greater understanding of bacterial communities is needed in order to improve the management of infections. We describe here the systematic culture-independent evaluation of IVC bacteriology in IVC biofilms. Twenty-four IVC samples (six peripherally inserted central catheters, eight central venous catheters and ten arterial catheters) were collected from 24 paediatric patients aged 0 to 14 years old. Barcoded amplicon libraries produced from genes coding 16S rRNA and roll-plate culture methods were used to determine the microbial composition of these samples. From a total of 1,043,406 high-quality sequence reads, eight microbial phyla and 136 diverse microbial genera were detected, separated into 12,224 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Three phyla (Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria) predominate the microorganism on the IVC surfaces, with Firmicutes representing nearly half of the OTUs found. Among the Firmicutes, Staphylococcus (15.0% of 16S rRNA reads), Streptococcus (9.6%) and Bacillus (6.1%) were the most common. Community composition did not appear to be affected by patients' age, gender, antibiotic treatment or IVC type. Differences in IVC microbiota were more likely associated with events arising from catheter dwell time, rather than the type of IVC used. PMID:26515578

  16. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  17. Recanalization of Aged Venous Thrombotic Occlusions with the Aid of a Rheolytic System: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vicol, Calin; Dalichau, Harald

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: The suitability of a rheolytic system for recanalization of aged venous thrombotic occlusions was tested in an animal experiment. Methods: The system consists of a flush-suction catheter and a high-pressure liquid pump. Thrombosis was experimentally induced in 13 venous segments of 10 adult goats. Results: After a mean period of 12 days, a complete thrombectomy using the flush-suction system was achieved in 12 cases. No complications such as perforation or dissection were observed. Conclusion: This system seems to be an appropriate device for percutaneous transluminal venous thrombectomy, even in older occlusions.

  18. Mobility therapy and central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in an ICU in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Natália Pontes; da Silva, Gregório Marques Cardim; Park, Marcelo; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether mobility therapy is associated with central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in critically ill patients in an ICU in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the daily medical records of patients admitted to the Clinical Emergency ICU of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas Central Institute between December of 2009 and April of 2011. In addition to the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, we collected data related to central venous catheters (CVCs), hemodialysis (HD) catheters and indwelling arterial catheters (IACs): insertion site; number of catheter days; and types of adverse events. We also characterized the mobility therapy provided. RESULTS: Among the 275 patients evaluated, CVCs were used in 49%, HD catheters were used in 26%, and IACs were used in 29%. A total of 1,268 mobility therapy sessions were provided to patients while they had a catheter in place. Catheter-related adverse events occurred in 20 patients (a total of 22 adverse events): 32%, infection; 32%, obstruction; and 32%, accidental dislodgement. We found that mobility therapy was not significantly associated with any catheter-related adverse event, regardless of the type of catheter employed: CVC-OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.7-1.0; p = 0.14; HD catheter-OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.89-1.21; p = 0.56; or IAC-OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 0.94-3.23; p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients, mobility therapy is not associated with the incidence of adverse events involving CVCs, HD catheters, or IACs. PMID:26176520

  19. Feasibility and Safety of Endovascular Stripping of Totally Implantable Venous Access Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heye, Sam Maleux, Geert; Goossens, G. A.; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Jerome, M.; Stas, M.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous stripping of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) in case of catheter-related sleeve and to report a technique to free the catheter tip from vessel wall adherence. Materials and Methods: A total of 37 stripping procedures in 35 patients (14 men, 40%, and 21 women, 60%, mean age 53 {+-} 14 years) were reviewed. Totally implantable venous access devices were implanted because of malignancy in most cases (85.7%). Catheter-related sleeve was confirmed as cause of persistent catheter dysfunction despite instillation of thrombolytics. A technique to mobilize the catheter tip from the vessel wall was used when stripping with the snare catheter was impossible. Technical success, complication rate, and outcome were noted. Results: A total of 55.9% (n = 19) of the 34 technically successful procedures (91.9%) could be done with the snare catheter. In 15 cases (44.1%), additional maneuvers to free the TIVAD's tip from the vessel wall were needed. Success rate was not significantly lower before (72.4%) than after (96.7%) implementation of the new technique (P = 0.09). No complications were observed. Follow-up was available in 67.6% of cases. Recurrent catheter dysfunction was found in 17 TIVADs (78.3%) at a mean of 137.7 days and a median of 105 days. Conclusions: Stripping of TIVADs is technically feasible and safe, with an overall success rate of 91.9%. Additional endovascular techniques to mobilize the distal catheter tip from the wall of the superior vena cava or right atrium to allow encircling the TIVAD tip with the snare catheter may be needed in 44.1% of cases.

  20. Postintervention duration of anticoagulation in venous surgery.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate-Hoek, A J; Prins, M H; Wittens, C H A; ten Cate, H

    2013-03-01

    For a substantial proportion of patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), current treatment strategies are suboptimal and new treatment options are needed. Especially for the group of patients who are at the highest risk for post-thrombotic syndrome, new treatment modalities such as catheter-directed thrombolysis and additional stenting are being investigated. With current clinical studies addressing new technical options, the medical management of patients following these interventions deserves attention. The duration of anticoagulant treatment following surgical or radiological interventions for DVT seems not to be influenced by the presence of a venous stent. According to recent ACCP 2012 guidelines the anticoagulant management in patients who have had any method of thrombus removal performed, the same intensity and duration of anticoagulant therapy as in comparable patients who do not undergo thrombosis removal is recommended (Grade 1B). In the acute phase of thrombosis, irrespective of the technique and whether or not stenting is applied, immediate anticoagulation following the procedure is pertinent to reduce the risk of recurrent thrombosis and thrombus propagation. The long-term treatment duration after venous interventions therefore may be tailored based on common risk factors for recurrent thrombosis and the individual risk for bleeding. Selected thrombophilia factors, d-dimer assessment and residual venous thrombosis provide markers for recurrent DVT. Currently, vitamin K antagonists) provide the main anticoagulants for (prolonged) anticoagulation, while the new oral anticoagulants emerge as promising alternatives. In case prolonged anticoagulation after unprovoked DVT is not indicated, cardiovascular risk management is warranted because of an increased rate of arterial thrombotic events after DVT; aspirin may be indicated as secondary prevention against recurrent thrombosis (while providing primary prevention against arterial thrombosis). PMID:23482544

  1. Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hmoud, Bashar; Singal, Ashwani K.; Kamath, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of mesenteric ischemia. Acute thrombosis commonly presents with abdominal pain and chronic type with features of portal hypertension. Contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen is quite accurate for diagnosing and differentiating two types of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Prothrombotic state, hematological malignancy, and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common predisposing conditions. Over the last decade, JAK-2 (janus kinase 2) mutation has emerged as an accurate biomarker for diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm, an important cause for mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation is the treatment of choice for acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. Thrombolysis using systemic or transcatheter route is another option. Patients with peritoneal signs or refractory to initial measures require surgical exploration. Increasing recognition of mesenteric venous thrombosis and use of anticoagulation for treatment has resulted in reduction in the need for surgery with improvement in survival. PMID:25755568

  2. Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... aid of a hand-held instrument called a Doppler. This allows the examiner to listen to the blood flow. The most accurate and detailed test, however, is a venous duplex ultrasound exam. This provides an ultra - sound image or ...

  3. Symptomatic Central Venous Stenosis in a Hemodialysis Patient Leading to Loss of Arteriovenous Access: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tatapudi, Vasishta S.; Spinowitz, Noam; Goldfarb, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Central venous stenosis is a well-described sequel to the placement of hemodialysis catheters in the central venous system. The presence of an ipsilateral arteriovenous fistula or graft often leads to severe venous dilatation, arm edema and recurrent infections. Vascular access thrombosis, compromised blood flow and inadequate dialysis delivery are dreaded complications that eventually render the access unusable. We report the case of a 58-year-old male hemodialysis patient who developed symptomatic central venous stenosis to illustrate the problem and review the pertinent literature. This patient developed severe enlargement of upper extremity veins due to central venous stenosis. The symptoms were refractory to multiple endovascular interventions and eventually necessitated ligation of his arteriovenous fistula. Central venous stenosis remains a pervasive problem despite advances in our understanding of its etiology and recognition of the enormity of its consequences. Due to the lack of effective therapeutic options, prevention is better than cure. PMID:24803921

  4. Central venous access with occlusive superior central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Torosian, M H; Meranze, S; McLean, G; Mullen, J L

    1986-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the entire superior central venous system is a rare complication of central venous catheterization. Three patients are presented with complete occlusion of the superior vena cava secondary to prolonged central venous catheterization. Thrombotic occlusion of the superior vena cava precludes central venous access by conventional techniques. Thoracotomy with direct catheterization of the right atrium and inferior vena cava cannulation represent alternative approaches but may be associated with significant morbidity. The present report describes a unique combined angiographic/operative technique designed to obtain central venous access with low morbidity in patients with occlusive thrombosis of the superior central venous system. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. PMID:3942419

  5. Preliminary clinical investigations of a new noninvasive venous pulse oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Daniel; Smith, Peter R.; Caine, Michael P.; Spyt, Tomasz; Boehm, Maria; Machin, David

    2003-10-01

    For decades, the monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation, SvO2 has been performed invasively using fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterisation. The group has devised a new non-invasive venous oximetry method which involves inducing regular modulations of the venous blood volume and associated measurement of those modulations using optical means. A clinical investigation was conducted in Glenfield Hospital, UK to evaluate the sensitivity of the new technique to haemodynamic changes such as Cardiac Output (CO) in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac patients. Preliminary trials on patients recovering from cardiac surgery yielded an average correlation of r = 0.72 between CO at different Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) augmentation levels and SvO2 measured by the new venous oximeter. In intraoperative patients undergoing off-pump cardiac surgery, SvO2 recorded by the new technique responded to unplanned events such as a cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: The new venous oximetry technique is a promising technique which responds to haemodynamic changes such as CO and with further development might offer an alternative means of monitoring SvO2 non-invasively.

  6. Injection From Side Holes on a Generic Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jason; Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), typically positioned within the superior vena cava (SVC), play an important role in the process of hemodialysis. Simultaneous extraction and injection of blood typically occur through one or more side holes at the catheter tip. High-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed, in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, to characterize the structure of single and multiple jets. The injection jets that penetrate the steady crossflow generate complex, but deterministic, flow patterns. Significant interaction between multiple jets generates flow features that are more pronounced than those of a single jet, including increased jet penetration and elevated levels of turbulent shear stresses. In addition, the effects of a pulsatile throughflow on the structure of an isolated, single jet are determined as a function of phase of the systole-diastole cycle, corresponding to actual blood flow in a normal adult.

  7. Characterization of catheter dynamics during percutaneous transluminal catheter procedures.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Yogesh; Holdsworth, David W; Drangova, Maria

    2009-08-01

    Remote catheter navigation systems are being developed to reduce the occupational risk of the intervening physician. Despite the success of such systems, development has occurred with little fundamental knowledge of the catheter dynamics applied by the interventionalist. This paper characterizes the kinematics of a catheter during manipulation, the minimum applied force/torque during interventional procedures, and the maximum force/torque applied by an operator to overcome vasculature friction. Ten operators manipulated a 6F catheter inside a specialized catheter movement sensor to determine the velocities and accelerations of catheter motion. A mass-spring apparatus was constructed to measure the forces and torques required to overcome introducer sheath and vasculature friction. Results showed the catheter was manipulated at peak velocities and accelerations of (mu +/- sigma): 360 +/-180 mm x s(-1) and 22200 +/-14000 mm x s(- 2), and 19 +/-7 rad x s(- 1) and 900 +/-510 rad x s(- 2), for axial and radial directions of motion, respectively. A minimum force of 0.29 +/- 0.06 N and a torque of 1.15 +/-0.3 mN x m was required to move the catheter through the introducer sheath; while the observed maximum applied torque was 15 mN x m to overcome vasculature friction. The implications of these results for future design optimization of an intuitive remote catheter navigation system are considered. PMID:19605309

  8. Comparison of arterial and venous whole blood clot initiation, formation, and strength by thromboelastography in anesthetized swine.

    PubMed

    Doering, Clinton J; Wagg, Catherine R; Caulkett, Nigel A; McAllister, Russell K; Brookfield, Caroline E; Paterson, Jessica M; Warren, Amy L; Smith, Barbara L; Boysen, Søren R

    2014-01-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) analysis was used to determine if differences exist between venous and arterial samples in anesthetized swine, using identical sampling techniques for each of the samples. We hypothesized that TEG parameters would not differ between native whole blood venous and arterial samples. Thirty male Landrace swines were included in the study. Both the femoral artery and vein were catheterized using standard cut-down techniques and with identically sized catheters to rule out any catheter size effects on the results. Standard TEG parameters for native whole venous and arterial blood samples (r, K, ?, MA, G, and coagulation index) were measured or calculated, and t-test or Mann-Whitney rank-sum test used for comparison when appropriate. Significant differences were detected for r (venous < arterial), K (venous < arterial), ? (venous > arterial), and coagulation index (venous > arterial) TEG parameters. No significant differences were measured for MA or G. These differences are important, especially when temporal changes in TEG are utilized to monitor patient stability and fluid therapy protocols using trends in coagulation properties. Taken together, these results suggest that clots are more likely to form at a faster rate in venous samples compared to arterial samples, but the overall clot strength does not differ. Therefore, if TEG analysis is being used to monitor coagulation profiles in a patient, care should be taken to use the same site and technique if results are to be used for comparative purposes. PMID:24126246

  9. Advanced management of acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis: emergency department and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Charles V

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to the increasing incidence of venous thromboembolism has included a call to action from the surgeon general and new guidelines from various specialty organizations. The standard of care for treatment of deep venous thrombosis in the emergency department (ED), supported by the 2008 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines, involves initiation of anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin, pentasaccharide, or unfractionated heparin. For selected appropriate patients with extensive acute proximal deep venous thrombosis, the ACCP guidelines now recommend thrombolysis in addition to anticoagulation to reduce not only the risk of pulmonary embolism but also the risk of subsequent postthrombotic syndrome and recurrent deep venous thrombosis. Postthrombotic syndrome is a potentially debilitating chronic cluster of lower-extremity symptoms occurring in 20% to 50% of deep venous thrombosis patients subsequent to the acute insult, sometimes not until years later. A strategy of early thrombus burden reduction or frank removal might reduce the incidence of postthrombotic syndrome, as per natural history studies, venous thrombectomy data, observations after systemic and catheter-directed thrombolysis, and the still-limited number of randomized trials of catheter-directed thrombolysis (with anticoagulation) versus anticoagulation alone. Contemporary invasive (endovascular) treatments mitigate the drawbacks historically associated with thrombolytic approaches by means of intrathrombus delivery of drugs with greater fibrin specificity and lower allergenicity, followed by mechanical dispersion to accelerate lysis and then aspiration of remaining drug and clot debris. With a 2016 target completion date, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Acute Venous Thrombosis: Thrombus Removal With Adjunctive Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis trial is comparing the safety and efficacy, in terms of both deep venous thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome parameters, of the most evolved pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis devices versus standard anticoagulation therapy alone. This article reviews the grounds for use of adjunctive thrombolysis in patients with acute proximal deep venous thrombosis and begins to identify types of deep venous thrombosis patients encountered in the ED who might benefit most from multidisciplinary consideration of early referral for possible endovascular therapy. PMID:21306786

  10. Effect of External Pressure and Catheter Gauge on Flow Rate, Kinetic Energy, and Endothelial Injury During Intravenous Fluid Administration in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Chan, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chou, Yu-Ching; Huang, Go-Shine

    2016-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) catheter gauge and pressurization of IV fluid (IVF) bags on fluid flow rate have been studied. However, the pressure needed to achieve a flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 gauge (G) catheter through smaller G catheters and the potential for endothelial damage from the increased kinetic energy produced by higher pressurization are unclear. Constant pressure on an IVF bag was maintained by an automatic adjustable pneumatic pressure regulator of our own design. Fluids running through 16 G, 18 G, 20 G, and 22 G catheters were assessed while using IV bag pressurization to achieve the flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 G catheter. We assessed flow rates, kinetic energy, and flow injury to rabbit inferior vena cava endothelium. By applying sufficient external constant pressure to an IVF bag, all fluids could be run through smaller (G) catheters at the flow rate in a 16 G catheter. However, the kinetic energy increased significantly as the catheter G increased. Damage to the venous endothelium was negligible or minimal/patchy cell loss. We designed a new rapid infusion system, which provides a constant pressure that compresses the fluid volume until it is free from visible residual fluid. When large-bore venous access cannot be obtained, multiple smaller catheters, external pressure, or both should be considered. However, caution should be exercised when fluid pressurized to reach a flow rate equivalent to that in a 16 G catheter is run through a smaller G catheter because of the profound increase in kinetic energy that can lead to venous endothelium injury. PMID:26674456

  11. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks associated with each type of CVAD (CICCs or PICCs). Second, an inappropriate CVAD choice and, particularly, an inadequate insertion technique are relevant-and often not recognized-potential risk factors for complications in critically ill patients. We strongly believe that all healthcare professionals involved in the choice, insertion or management of CVADs in critically ill patients should know all potential risk factors of complications. This knowledge may minimize complications and guarantee longevity to the CVAD optimizing the risk/benefit ratio of CVAD insertion and use. Proper management of CVADs in critical care saves lines and lives. Much evidence from the medical literature and from the clinical practice supports our belief that, compared to CICCs, the so-called power-injectable peripherally inserted central catheters are a good alternative choice in critical care. PMID:25374804

  12. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks associated with each type of CVAD (CICCs or PICCs). Second, an inappropriate CVAD choice and, particularly, an inadequate insertion technique are relevant-and often not recognized-potential risk factors for complications in critically ill patients. We strongly believe that all healthcare professionals involved in the choice, insertion or management of CVADs in critically ill patients should know all potential risk factors of complications. This knowledge may minimize complications and guarantee longevity to the CVAD optimizing the risk/benefit ratio of CVAD insertion and use. Proper management of CVADs in critical care saves lines and lives. Much evidence from the medical literature and from the clinical practice supports our belief that, compared to CICCs, the so-called power-injectable peripherally inserted central catheters are a good alternative choice in critical care. PMID:25374804

  13. Venous dynamics in leg lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Kim, D I; Huh, S; Hwang, J H; Kim, Y I; Lee, B B

    1999-03-01

    To determine whether there is anatomical and/or functional impairment to venous return in patients with lymphedema, we examined venous dynamics in 41 patients with unilateral leg lymphedema. A Volometer was used for computer analysis of leg volume, a color Duplex Doppler scanner was used to determine deep vein patency and skin thickness, and Air-plethysmography was used to assess ambulatory venous pressure, venous volume, venous filling index and the ejection fraction. In the lymphedematous leg, volume and skin thickness were uniformly increased (126.4 +/- 21.3% and 156.9 +/- 44.5%) (mean +/- S.D.), respectively. The ambulatory venous pressure was also increased (134 +/- 60.7%) as was the venous volume (124.5 +/- 37.5%), and the venous filling index (134.5 +/- 50.5%). The ejection fraction was decreased (94.9 +/- 26.1%). Greater leg volume correlated with increased venous volume and venous filling index (values = 0.327, 0.241, respectively) and decreased ejection fraction (r = -0.133). Increased subcutaneous thickness correlated with increased venous filling index and venous volume (r = 0.307, 0.126, respectively) and decreased ejection fraction (r = -0.202). These findings suggest that soft tissue edema from lymphatic stasis gradually impedes venous return which in turn aggravates the underlying lymphedema. PMID:10197322

  14. Pathophysiology of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, D D

    2015-03-01

    In this chapter, an overview of some of the prominent risk factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis will be discussed. In 1856, Dr Rudolf Virchow developed the concept outlining the genesis of intravascular thrombosis. Dr Virchow hypothesized that circulatory stasis due to interrupted blood flow, changes in the blood leading to blood coagulation, and irritation or damage to the vascular endothelium would initiate acute venous thrombus generation. Presently, it is known that these above-mentioned risk factors are influenced by increasing age, gender, and obesity. The current chapter will focus on recent preclinical and clinical investigations that will give the reader insight into the prothrombotic mechanisms that lead to acute venous thrombosis. PMID:25729062

  15. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  16. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias.

  17. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goltz, Jan P. Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O.; Wittenberg, Guenther; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  18. Interventional treatment of venous thromboembolism: a review.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Ageno, Walter; Manfredini, Roberto; Fabbian, Fabio; Salmi, Raffaella; Duce, Rita; Gallerani, Massimo

    2012-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is the third most common cardiovascular disease after coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in the general population. Full dose anticoagulation is the standard therapy for VTE, both for the acute and the long-term phase. The latest guidelines of the American College of Chest Physicians recommend treatment with a full-dose of unfractioned heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight-heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux, vitamin K antagonist (VKA) or thrombolysis for most patients with objectively confirmed VTE. Catheter-guided thrombolysis and trombosuction are interventional approaches that should be used only in selected populations; interruption of the inferior vena cava (IVC) with a filter can be performed to prevent life-threatening PE in patients with VTE and contraindications to anticoagulant treatment, bleeding complications during antithrombotic treatment, or VTE recurrences despite optimal anticoagulation. In this review we summarize the currently available literature regarding interventional approaches for VTE treatment (vena cava filters, catheter-guided thrombolysis, thrombosuction) and we discuss current evidences on their efficacy and safety. Moreover, the appropriate indications for their use in daily clinical practice are reviewed. PMID:22119500

  19. Venous ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePLUS

    Risk factors for venous ulcers include: Varicose veins History of blood clots in the legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) Leg swelling Age Being female (related to levels of the hormone progesterone) Being tall Family history of venous insufficiency ...

  20. Endovascular treatments for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongming; Sang, Hongfei; Dai, Qiliang; Xu, Gelin

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an uncommon but potentially fatal condition. CVST usually occurs young adults with a female predominance. The current mainstay for treating CVST is anticoagulation with heparin. However, more aggressive interventions, endovascular treatment as an example, may be indicated in selected patients who are non-responsive to heparin and other anticoagulants. Endovascular approaches include catheter-based local chemical thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty and mechanical thrombectomy, all of which may rapidly recanalize the occluded venous sinus, restore the blood flow, reduce the increased intracranial pressure, and subsequently relieve the corresponding symptoms. However, as an invasive strategy, endovascular procedures per se may cause complications, such as intracranial hemorrhage, vessel dissection and pulmonary embolization, which may substantially decrease the benefit-risk ratio of the treatment. Due to the rareness of the condition and the limited indication of this invasive strategy, safety and efficacy of endovascular procedures in treating CVST are less feasible to be evaluated in large randomized clinical trails. Therefore, the evidences for justifying this treatment strategy are largely derived from case reports, cohort studies and clinical observations. PMID:25771984

  1. Indwelling catheters and medical implants with FXIIIa inhibitors: a novel approach to the treatment of catheter and medical device-related infections

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Nooshin; Collighan, Russell; Perrie, Yvonne; Lambert, Peter; Rathbone, Dan; Lowry, Deborah; Griffin, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are being utilized with increasing frequency in intensive care and general medical wards. In spite of the extensive experience gained in their application, CVCs are related to the long-term risks of catheter sheath formation, infection and thrombosis (of the catheter or vessel itself) during catheterisation. Such CVC-related-complications are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, duration of hospitalisation and medical care cost [1]. The present study incorporates a novel group of Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa, plasma transglutaminase) inhibitors into a lubricious silicone elastomer in order to generate an optimized drug delivery system whereby a secondary sustained drug release profile occurs following an initial burst release for catheters and other medical devices. We propose that the incorporation of FXIIIa inhibitors into catheters, stents and other medical implant devices would reduce the incidence of catheter sheath formation, thrombotic occlusion and associated staphylococcal infection. This technique could be used as a local delivery system for extended release with an immediate onset of action for other poorly aqueous soluble compounds. PMID:23022540

  2. The venous anatomy of the abdominal wall for Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery (DIEP) flaps in breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite improving outcomes, venous problems in the harvest of deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps remain the more common vascular complications. However, it is apparent that the venous anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall has not been described to the same extent as the arterial anatomy. Cadaveric dissection studies of venous anatomy frequently lack the detail of their arterial counterparts. Venous valves complicate retrograde injection, resulting in poor quality studies with limited anatomical information. Methods The current manuscript comprises a review of the literature, highlighting key features of the anatomy of the venous drainage of the abdominal wall integument, with particular pertinence to DIEP flaps. Both cadaveric and clinical studies are included in this review. Our own cadaveric and in-vivo studies were undertaken and included in detail in this manuscript, with the cadaveric component utilizing direct catheter venography and the in-vivo studies were undertaken using preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA), mapping in-vivo venous flow. Results Several key features of the venous anatomy of the abdominal wall render it different to other regions, and are of particular importance to DIEP flap transfer. Conclusions The cause of venous compromise is multi-factorial, with perforator diameter, midline crossover, and deep-superficial venous communications all important. Venous cadaveric studies as well as clinical CTA preoperatively can identify these anomalies. PMID:25083432

  3. The Role of Echinocandins in Candida Biofilm-Related Vascular Catheter Infections: In Vitro and In Vivo Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Roilides, Emmanuel; Katragkou, Aspasia; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Candida biofilm-associated infections of central venous catheters are a challenging therapeutic problem. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies of the structure, formation, pathogenesis, and treatment establish a rationale for new approaches to management of these tenacious infections. PMID:26567279

  4. Microbiological and clinical features of four cases of catheter-related infection by Methylobacterium radiotolerans.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Han, Xiang Y

    2015-04-01

    Four cases of central venous catheter-related Methylobacterium radiotolerans infection are presented here. The patients were all long-term catheter carriers with an underlying diagnosis of leukemia, and they mostly manifested fevers. The isolated bacterial strains all showed far better growth on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar during the initial isolation and/or subcultures than they did on sheep blood or chocolate agar. This microbiological feature may improve the culture recovery of this fastidious pink Gram-negative bacillus that has rarely been isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:25631797

  5. Catheter-Malposition-Induced Cardiac Tamponade via Contrast Media Leakage During Computed Tomography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.-D. Ko, S.-F.; Huang, C.-F.; Chien, S.J.; Tiao, M.M.

    2005-12-15

    We present a rare case of a central venous catheter-malposition-induced life-threatening cardiac tamponade as a result of computed tomography (CT) with contrast enhancement in an infant with a ventricular septal defect and pulmonary atresia after a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. The diagnosis was confirmed by chest radiographs and CT study with catheter perforation through the right atrial wall and extravasation of the contrast medium into the pericardium, leading to cardiac tamponade and subsequent circulatory collapse. Two hours after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the patient gradually resumed normal hemodynamic status.

  6. Evaluation of prosthetic venous valves, fabricated by electrospinning, for percutaneous treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Masaki; Kubota, Shinichiro; Tashiro, Hideo; Tonami, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) remains a major health problem worldwide. Direct venous valve surgical repair and venous segment transplantation are clinical options; however, they are highly invasive procedures. The objectives of this study were to fabricate prosthetic venous valves (PVVs) by electrospinning, for percutaneous treatment of CVI, and evaluate their hydrodynamic characteristics in vitro at the same locations and under the same flow conditions. The PVVs consisted of polyurethane fiber scaffolds attached to a cobalt-chromium stent. PVVs with two different valve-leaflet configurations were compared: biomimetic PVV (bPVV) and open PVV (oPVV). A balloon catheter was used to implant the devices in a poly(vinyl chloride) tube and the column outlet was set at a height of 100 cm above the test valve to simulate the elevation of the heart above a distal vein valve while standing; 50 wt% glycerin solution was used as the test fluid. The devices were evaluated for antegrade flow, effect of ankle flexion, and stagnation zones around the valve leaflets. During sudden hydrostatic backpressure, little leakage and constant peripheral pressure were observed for the devices; under forward pulsatile pressure of 0-4 mmHg, to simulate the effect of breathing, the oPVV had a higher flow rate than the bPVV. With regard to the effect of ankle flexion, the oPVV was functionless. Moreover, the stagnation zone around the oPVV valve leaflets was larger than that around the bPVV valve leaflets. These results suggest that the bPVV would be clinically suitable for percutaneous treatment of CVI. PMID:21789716

  7. A numerical study of the effect of catheter angle on the blood flow characteristics in a graft during hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Hong Sun; Kim, Soyoon; Ro, Kyoungchul

    2013-02-01

    For patients with renal failure, renal replacement therapies are needed. Hemodialysis is a widely used renal replacement method to remove waste products. It is important to improve the patency rate of the vascular access for efficient dialysis. Since some complications such as an intimal hyperplasia are associated with the flow pattern, the hemodynamics in the vascular access must be considered to achieve a high patency rate. In addition, the blood flow from an artificial kidney affects the flow in the vascular access. Generally, the clinical techniques of hemodialysis such as the catheter angle or dialysis dose have been set up empirically. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed on the effect of the catheter angle on the flow in the graft. Blood is assumed to be a non-Newtonian fluid. According to the high average wall shear stress value, the leucocytes and platelets can be activated not only at the arterial anastomosis, but also at the bottom of the venous graft, when the catheter angle is not zero. For a catheter angle less than five degrees, there is a low shear and high oscillatory shear index region that appears at the venous graft and the venous anastomosis. Thus, a catheter angle less than five degrees should be avoided to prevent graft failure.

  8. Heart catheter cable and connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Cota, F. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraminiature catheter cables that are stiff enough for intravenous insertion yet flexible at the tip, sterilizable, and economical are fabricated entirely from commercially available parts. Assembly includes air passageway for reference pressures and coaxial cable for transmission of signals from the tip of catheter.

  9. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  10. The prevention, diagnosis and management of central venous line infections in children.

    PubMed

    Chesshyre, Emily; Goff, Zoy; Bowen, Asha; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    With advancing paediatric healthcare, the use of central venous lines has become a fundamental part of management of neonates and children. Uses include haemodynamic monitoring and the delivery of lifesaving treatments such as intravenous fluids, blood products, antibiotics, chemotherapy, haemodialysis and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite preventative measures, central venous catheter-related infections are common, with rates of 0.5-2.8/1000 catheter days in children and 0.6-2.5/1000 catheter days in neonates. Central line infections in children are associated with increased mortality, increased length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, treatment interruptions, and increased complications. Prevention is paramount, using a variety of measures including tunnelling of long-term devices, chlorhexidine antisepsis, maximum sterile barriers, aseptic non-touch technique, minimal line accessing, and evidence-based care bundles. Diagnosis of central line infections in children is challenging. Available samples are often limited to a single central line blood culture, as clinicians are reluctant to perform painful venepuncture on children with a central, pain-free, access device. With the advancing evidence basis for antibiotic lock therapy for treatment, paediatricians are pushing the boundaries of line retention if safe to do so, due to among other reasons, often limited venous access sites. This review evaluates the available paediatric studies on management of central venous line infections and refers to consensus guidelines such as those of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). PMID:25934326

  11. Thermal manipulator of medical catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Chastagner, P.

    1991-03-04

    This invention consists of a maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  12. Approaches to clear residual chemotherapeutics from indwelling catheters in children with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skolnik, Jeffrey M.; Zhang, Alena Y.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop a method for drug dosing and pharmacokinetic (PK) sampling in children with cancer from a single indwelling central venous catheter that minimized drug contamination. Methods A bench top system was designed to simulate dosing and clearing actinomycin-D (AMD) and vincristine (VCR) from central venous catheters. The authors evaluated the effects of flush volume, composition, and pH, timed drug instillation, and number of blood-draw return cycles on residual drug concentrations. A proof-of-principle study was conducted in three pediatric cancer patients with paired PK samples obtained via both central and peripheral catheters. Results Nearly complete removal of drug from catheter was obtained after five blood-draw return cycles consisting of 5 mL of whole blood. Residual concentration of AMD was 0.18 ± 0.02 ng/mL or 0.16% of the initial infusion concentration. VCR exhibited lower propensity for catheter adsorption than AMD with residual concentrations undetectable after three blood-draw return cycles. In patients in which the clearance procedure was utilized, higher drug concentrations were generally observed from centrally cleared samples at most time points, but differences relative to peripherally-obtained samples were not statistically significant for either AMD or VCR. Two out of three patients had higher exposure for AMD based on PK samples obtained from central catheter, whereas exposure for VCR was similar for both sampling catheters in all patients. Conclusions A reliable procedure to efficiently reduce AMD and VCR contamination during PK sampling has been established and is currently being used in a PK study being conducted by the Children’s Oncology Group. PMID:20962707

  13. A systematic review of patient-related risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2015-10-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We performed a systematic review of the literature assessing patient-related risk factors for thrombosis related to CVC or PICC. The databases PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library were searched for observational studies pertaining to patient-related risk factors for CVC and PICC-related thrombosis. The initial search through PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library yielded 516 results. After 71 duplicates were removed, 445 articles were assessed for eligibility based on title and abstract. Four hundred and eleven articles were then excluded and 33 full text articles were manually assessed for eligibility. Eight articles were eliminated as they did not contain content relevant to the review. Twenty-five studies were then selected to assess 20 risk factors. There were no consistent significant associations for catheter-related thrombosis across the twenty-five studies. Multiple studies identified age, malignancy, diabetes, obesity, chemotherapy, thrombophilia and a history of thrombosis as significant risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis. Inconsistent findings among studies make it difficult to establish which patient-related risk factors are associated with catheter-related thrombosis. Future studies could include larger sample sizes and more cases of catheter-related thrombosis to produce more significant results. Identification of patient-related risk factors could lead to early recognition of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in patients with catheters, thereby preventing complications. PMID:25680892

  14. Development of Needle Insertion Manipulator for Central Venous Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Hashizume, Makoto; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure, which a doctor insert a catheter into the patient’s vein for transfusion. Since there are risks of bleeding from arterial puncture or pneumothorax from pleural puncture. Physicians are strictly required to make needle reach up into the vein and to stop the needle in the middle of vein. We proposed a robot system for assisting the venous puncture, which can relieve the difficulties in conventional procedure, and the risks of complication. This paper reports the design structuring and experimental results of needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relationship between insertion force and angle into the vein. The results indicated that the judgment of perforation using the reaction force is possible in case where the needling angle is from 10 to 20 degree. The experiment to evaluate accuracy of the robot also revealed that it has beyond 0.5 mm accuracy. We also evaluated the positioning accuracy in the ultrasound images. The results displays that the accuracy is beyond 1.0 mm and it has enough for venous puncture. We also carried out the venous puncture experiment to the phantom and confirm our manipulator realized to make needle reach up into the vein.

  15. What went wrong? The flawed concept of cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Valdueza, José M; Doepp, Florian; Schreiber, Stephan J; van Oosten, Bob W; Schmierer, Klaus; Paul, Friedemann; Wattjes, Mike P

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Zamboni reintroduced the concept that chronic impaired venous outflow of the central nervous system is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), coining the term of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (‘CCSVI'). The diagnosis of ‘CCSVI' is based on sonographic criteria, which he found exclusively fulfilled in MS. The concept proposes that chronic venous outflow failure is associated with venous reflux and congestion and leads to iron deposition, thereby inducing neuroinflammation and degeneration. The revival of this concept has generated major interest in media and patient groups, mainly driven by the hope that endovascular treatment of ‘CCSVI' could alleviate MS. Many investigators tried to replicate Zamboni's results with duplex sonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography. The data obtained here do generally not support the ‘CCSVI' concept. Moreover, there are no methodologically adequate studies to prove or disprove beneficial effects of endovascular treatment in MS. This review not only gives a comprehensive overview of the methodological flaws and pathophysiologic implausibility of the ‘CCSVI' concept, but also summarizes the multimodality diagnostic validation studies and open-label trials of endovascular treatment. In our view, there is currently no basis to diagnose or treat ‘CCSVI' in the care of MS patients, outside of the setting of scientific research. PMID:23443168

  16. Evaluation of a new hydrocolloid occlusive dressing for central catheters used in total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Haffejee, A A; Moodley, J; Pillay, K; Singh, B; Thomson, S; Bhamjee, A

    1991-12-01

    Catheter-related sepsis still remains one of the most frequent and serious complication of total parenteral nutrition. Strategies for preventing contamination of central venous lines have focused on decreasing the number of micro-organisms around the exit site and inhibiting their entry into the catheter wound. This prospective study compares a new occlusive hydrocolloid dressing (Visiband; Convatec Squibb) with that of a polyurethane film dressing for nutritional catheters. Dressings were changed either on day 3 or day 5 after application. Swab smears of the catheter exit site at each dressing change were stained by Gram's method before inoculation onto a blood agar plate, a chocolate agar plate and a MacConkey agar plate. Significantly less colonisation occurred under the former dressing at day 3 and day 5 dressing changes. In addition, the polyurethane film dressing was associated with a significant increase in skin colonisation (P = 0.04) and the number of positive Gram-stain microbes if left unchanged for 5 days (P = 0.0018). Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related sepsis occurred in 1 patient on day 18 in the polyurethane film dressing group. In addition, Candida albicans colonisation was confined to patients with the polyurethane film dressing. While the type of dressing applied to the catheter exit site may influence the incidence of catheter colonisation and infection, it must be emphasised that strict adherence to aseptic technique during catheter insertion and manipulation of the dressing is vital in the prevention of catheter-related sepsis during total parenteral nutrition. PMID:1763392

  17. CHLORHEXIDINE-IMPREGNATED DRESSING FOR PREVENTION OF CATHETER-RELATED BLOODSTREAM INFECTION: A META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Nasia; O’Horo, John C.; Ghufran, Aiman; Bearden, Allison; Didier, Maria Eugenia; Chateau, Dan; Maki, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and effective methods for their prevention are needed. Objective To assess the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing for prevention of central venous catheter-related colonization and CRBSI using meta-analysis. Data Sources Multiple computerized database searches supplemented by manual searches including relevant conference proceedings. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing compared with conventional dressings for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI. Data Extraction Data were extracted on patient and catheter characteristics and outcomes. Data Synthesis Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and I2. Subgroup analyses were used to explore heterogeneity. Results Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Use of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing resulted in a reduced incidence of CRBSI (random effects RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.42–0.79, P=0.002). The incidence of catheter colonization was also markedly reduced in the chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing group (random effects RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67, P< 0.001). There was significant benefit for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI, including arterial catheters used for hemodynamic monitoring. Other than in low birth weight infants, adverse effects were rare and minor. Conclusions Our analysis shows that a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing is beneficial in preventing catheter colonization and, more importantly, CRBSI and warrants routine use in patients at high risk of CRBSI and CVC or arterial catheter colonization in ICUs. PMID:24674924

  18. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome. PMID:23475546

  19. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  20. Recurrent bilateral pleural effusions secondary to superior vena cava obstruction as a complication of central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Dhande, V; Kattwinkel, J; Alford, B

    1983-07-01

    Five babies (birth weight 730 to 1,120 g) who developed bilateral pleural effusions as a complication of the use of central venous catheters are described. The effusions occurred seven to 19 days after initial placement or change of a central venous catheter. All required repeated thoracenteses to remove fluid accumulation of up to 200 mL/kg/d. The fluid was a clear transudate, but it became chylous when feedings were given. Venograms and autopsies demonstrated obstruction of the superior vena cava with drainage occurring through collaterals to the azygous vein and inferior vena cava. Silastic gas-sterilized catheters implanted in animals for four and 24 hours showed fibrin deposition when scanned by electron microscopy. No deposition occurred on autoclaved catheters after four hours and there was minimal deposition after 24 hours. It may be concluded that the pleural effusions resulted from obstruction of thoracic lymph flow into the venous system. Vena caval thrombosis may have been enhanced by 2-chloroethanol or ethylene oxide residues from gas sterilization of Silastic catheters. PMID:6408592

  1. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  2. Case of Catheter Sepsis with Ralstonia gilardii in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wauters, Georges; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda; De Baere, Thierry; Vandecruys, Els; Van Simaey, Leen; De Ganck, Catharine; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2001-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia was diagnosed in a 7-year-old girl. Two months after insertion of a central venous catheter, she developed fever and complained of headache and abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed no focus of infection. A gram-negative nonfermenting bacillus was recurrently cultured from blood. Extensive biochemical testing and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing led to the identification of Ralstonia gilardii. PMID:11724891

  3. Catheter management of occluded superior baffle after atrial switch procedures for transposition of great vessels.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, Makram R; Gaymes, Charles H; McMullan, Michael R; Shores, Jennifer C; Smith, J Clinton; Joransen, James A

    2005-03-15

    We present successful catheter intervention in 4 patients with total occlusion of the superior baffle after an atrial switch procedure. A transseptal needle (in addition to the transhepatic route in 1 patient with known occluded femoral veins) was used to open the occluded segments and place stents. Additionally, we report the regression of multiple systemic-to-pulmonary venous fistulas that developed as a result of the occluded baffle. PMID:15757613

  4. Declotting a Thrombosed Brescia-Cimino Fistula by Manual Catheter-Directed Aspiration of the Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Turmel-Rodrigues, Luc A E-mail: cim.stgatien@wanadoo.fr

    2005-01-15

    Acute thrombosis of native fistulae for hemodialysis occurs more rarely than for prosthetic grafts. The vascular access should be reopened as soon as possible in order to resume regular dialysis and to avoid resorting to a temporary central line. Manual aspiration is one of the numerous methods described in this setting. Clinical examination is essential to rule out local infection, which is the only serious contraindication to percutaneous maneuvers. Two introducer-sheaths are placed in a criss-cross fashion in order to gain access to the venous outflow and to the anastomosis. Access to the venous outflow is performed first in order to check the proximal extent of the thrombosis. Heparin and antibiotics are injected systemically. A similar maneuver is then performed in the direction of the anastomosis. The aspiration phase is then initiated. A 7-9 Fr aspiration catheter is pushed through the 'venous' introducer. Manual aspiration is created through a 50 ml syringe while the catheter is progressively removed with back and forth movements. The catheter and the contents of the syringe are flushed through a gauze on the working table to evaluate the amount of thrombus which has been removed and the maneuver is repeated as often as necessary to remove all the thrombus. Once all the clots located downstream from the venous introducer have been removed, any unmasked underlying stenosis is NOT dilated at this stage since it provides protection against major embolism coming from the inflow. The aspiration catheter is then pushed through the 'arterial' introducer down to the anastomosis in order to aspirate the thrombus located between the tip of the introducer and the anastomosis. Dilatation of unmasked stenoses is finally performed using high-pressure balloons. The holes made by the two introducers are closed using a U-shaped suture with interposition of a short piece of plastic and the patient is sent back to the nephrologists for dialysis.

  5. [Catheter therapy of coronary disease].

    PubMed

    Vatne, K; Kløw, N E

    1994-11-30

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) with balloon catheters is a well established invasive treatment for coronary artery disease. The high frequency of restenosis has promoted the development of new catheters, with different techniques for removing the plaques from the coronary arteries. Until now the rate of restenosis using balloon angioplasty and new atherectomy catheters has not declined. Our experience of these techniques is discussed and compared with the experiences described in the literature. The use of stents seems to be a major step forward, leading to fewer restenoses and emergency bypass operations. PMID:7998050

  6. Encapsulation of an intrathecal catheter.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Jan; Sabatowski, Rainer; Elsner, Frank; Radbruch, Lukas

    2003-05-01

    A 47-year-old patient with cancer pain underwent implantation of an intrathecal drug delivery device. When the patient suffered from an infection with fever, pain on injection into the catheter and an elevated number of granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid 7 weeks later, radiologic examination showed an encapsulation of the catheter tip. Concentrations of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide in the cerebrospinal fluid suggested transport of morphine into the systemic circulation via the vascularisation of the encapsulating membrane. After antibiotic therapy and removal of the catheter, morphine was administered intravenously with a one to one conversion ratio. PMID:12749977

  7. 21 CFR 870.5150 - Embolectomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Embolectomy catheter. 870.5150 Section 870.5150...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5150 Embolectomy catheter. (a) Identification. An embolectomy catheter is a balloon-tipped catheter that is used to...

  8. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5175 Septostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A septostomy catheter is a special balloon catheter that is used to create...

  9. Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Associated With Leg Swelling 6 Months After Removal of a Hemodialysis Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lie; Wang, Jian; Wu, Chuifen; shao, Chuxiao; Yu, Xueping; Lei, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Double-lumen catheters have been used widely to obtain temporary access in patients who are in need of acute hemodialysis (HD) because of acute renal failure. Several complications are associated with the insertion of these catheters, including bleeding, infection, injuries to arteries, and deep venous thrombosis. An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a rare but significant complication following catheterization for temporary HD. Herein, we present a case of AVF associated with leg swelling 6 months after the removal of a double-lumen HD catheter. We describe a special case of a 42-year-old man who experienced acute renal failure secondary to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). A 12-Fr dialysis catheter was inserted in the right femoral vein. Six months after catheter removal, the patient was admitted for pain and swelling in the right leg. Color Doppler ultrasound and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) revealed an AVF between the right femoral vein and the right femoral superficial artery. The fistula was repaired successfully by vascular surgeons. This case highlights that an AVF is a rare but significant complication after catheterization for temporary HD. The nephrologist should be wary of the potential of this complication and perform clinical and medical examinations at the insertion and removal of temporary HD catheters. PMID:26448032

  10. Large eccentric laser angioplasty catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kevin D.; Reiser, Christopher

    1997-05-01

    In response to recent demand for increased debulking of large diameter coronary vascular segments, a large eccentric catheter for excimer laser coronary angioplasty has been developed. The outer tip diameter is 2.0 mm and incorporates approximately 300 fibers of 50 micron diameter in a monorail- type percutaneous catheter. The basic function of the device is to ablate a coronary atherosclerotic lesion with 308 nm excimer laser pulses, while passing the tip of the catheter through the lesion. By employing multiple passes through the lesion, rotating the catheter 90 degrees after each pass, we expect to create luminal diameters close to 3 mm with this device. Design characteristics, in-vitro testing, and initial clinical experience is presented.

  11. Improved ureteral stone fragmentation catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Catheter includes fiber optic viewer, more reliable ultrasonic probe, and better contact sensor. It is guided by four steering wires, and irrigation fluid is supplied through lumen to remove stone fragments.

  12. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  13. Supraventricular tachycardia precipitated by a peripherally inserted central catheter in an infant with gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Thyoka, Mandela; Haq, Iram; Hosie, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Gastroschisis is a common congenital abdominal wall defect requiring surgical correction in early neonatal life. The time to full enteral feeds among infants with gastroschisis is variable. Gastroschisis remains a common surgical cause of intestinal failure in neonates. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are commonly used to provide long-term venous access for parenteral nutrition during the time enteral feeds are being slowly established. The PICC is placed under fluoroscopic guidance with the distal end of the catheter usually placed at the junction of the superior vena cava with the right atrium. In rare circumstances, the catheter tip may advance into intracardiac chambers, precipitating supraventricular re-entrant tachycardia. We report a case of an infant who was antenatally diagnosed with uncomplicated gastroschisis in whom a supraventricular tachycardia was precipitated by the PICC in the right atrium. PMID:24569259

  14. Supraventricular tachycardia precipitated by a peripherally inserted central catheter in an infant with gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Thyoka, Mandela; Haq, Iram; Hosie, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Gastroschisis is a common congenital abdominal wall defect requiring surgical correction in early neonatal life. The time to full enteral feeds among infants with gastroschisis is variable. Gastroschisis remains a common surgical cause of intestinal failure in neonates. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are commonly used to provide long-term venous access for parenteral nutrition during the time enteral feeds are being slowly established. The PICC is placed under fluoroscopic guidance with the distal end of the catheter usually placed at the junction of the superior vena cava with the right atrium. In rare circumstances, the catheter tip may advance into intracardiac chambers, precipitating supraventricular re-entrant tachycardia. We report a case of an infant who was antenatally diagnosed with uncomplicated gastroschisis in whom a supraventricular tachycardia was precipitated by the PICC in the right atrium. PMID:24569259

  15. Novel applications in catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Thal, Sergio G; Marrouche, Nassir F

    2005-08-01

    Catheter based treatment of arrhythmia has gained significant attention during the last two decades. Due to the explosive development in ablation treatment of atrial fibrillation, huge interest in new tools was born to help in the atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. The aim of this review is to describe the role of these novel techniques and tools aimed at improving the implementation of catheter based ablations of atrial arrhythmias by focusing on the use of intra-cardiac echocardiogram and robotic navigation. PMID:16133851

  16. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  17. Treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, Suman W; Kirkpatrick, Angelia C

    2007-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) results from venous hypertension secondary to superficial or deep venous valvular reflux. Treatment modalities are aimed at reducing venous valvular reflux, thereby inhibiting the ensuing pathologic inflammatory process. Compression therapy using pumps, bandaging, and/or graded compression stockings is the mainstay of treatment for CVI. Compression therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing venous hypertension retarding the development of inflammation and pathologic skin changes. Pharmacologic agents such as diuretics and topical steroid creams reduce swelling and pain short term but offer no long-term treatment advantage. Herbal supplements may reduce the inflammatory response to venous hypertension, but are not licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration, and vary in their efficacy, quality, and safety. However, several randomized controlled trials using the herbal horse chestnut seed extract containing aescin have shown short-term improvement in signs and symptoms of CVI. Endovascular and surgical techniques aimed at treatment of primary and secondary venous valvular reflux have been shown to improve venous hemodynamics promoting healing of venous ulcers and improving quality of life. The newer endovascular treatments of varicose veins using laser, radiofrequency ablation, and chemical foam sclerotherapy show some promise. PMID:17484814

  18. Comparison of a new venous control device with a bladder box system for use in ECMO.

    PubMed

    Setz, K; Kesser, K; Kopotic, R J; Cornish, J D

    1992-01-01

    During extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), forward pump flow must not be allowed to exceed the rate of blood drainage from the patient so that excessive negative pressure does not develop within the ECMO circuit or in the patient's right atrium. A distensible reservoir ("bladder") and mechanically actuated electronic switch ("bladder box"), has typically been used for this purpose. If the rate of blood flow from the patient to the pump is insufficient to support the perfusion rate desired and adjustments in volume status and catheter position do not increase blood drainage, the only recourse is to increase the siphon pressure by elevating the patient. At the author's institution, a novel venous control module (VCM), without a reservoir, that can provide increased venous drainage without elevating the patient is used. Using an in vitro model of neonatal ECMO, the authors' compared their VCM to a commercially available "bladder box" system. Pressures were monitored in a collapsible chamber inside a water bath (simulating the right atrium), at the gravitational high point of the ECMO circuit ("neck site") and at the low point of the circuit ("venous site") at flow rates of 100, 450, 900, and 1,300 cc/min. Pump shut-off characteristics for both systems were also measured with either sudden interruption of venous drainage ("cross-clamping") or restriction of venous inflow ("hypovolemia"). Under continuous flow conditions, higher flows could be achieved with the VCM. With acute venous catheter occlusion, instantaneous ("trough") pressures at the neck site were lower, and venous monitoring site pressures were higher with the bladder box system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1450482

  19. Peripheral venous pressure as a reliable predictor for monitoring central venous pressure in patients with burns

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Lulu; Joshi, Vikas S.; Ollapally, Anjali; Jain, Prithi; Shetty, Kishan; Ribeiro, Karl Sa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimizing cardiovascular function to ensure adequate tissue oxygen delivery is a key objective in the care of critically ill patients with burns. Hemodynamic monitoring may be necessary to optimize resuscitation in serious burn patients with reasonable safety. Invasive central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring has become the corner stone of hemodynamic monitoring in patients with burns but is associated with inherent risks and technical difficulties. Previous studies on perioperative patients have shown that measurement of peripheral venous pressure (PVP) is a less invasive and cost-effective procedure and can reliably predict CVP. Objective: The aim of the present prospective clinical study was to determine whether a reliable association exists between changes in CVP and PVP over a long period in patients admitted to the Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU). Subjects and Methods: The CVP and PVP were measured simultaneously hourly in 30 burns patients in the BICU up to 10 consecutive hours. The predictability of CVP by monitoring PVP was tested by applying the linear regression formula and also using the Bland–Altman plots of repeated measures to evaluate the agreement between CVP and PVP. Results: The regression formula revealed a reliable and significant association between CVP and PVP. The overall mean difference between CVP and PVP was 1.628 ± 0.84 mmHg (P < 0.001). The Bland–Altman diagram also showed a perfect agreement between the two pressures throughout the 10 h period. Conclusion: Peripheral venous pressure measured from a peripheral intravenous catheter in burns patients is a reliable estimation of CVP, and its changes have good concordance with CVP over a long period of time. PMID:25878426

  20. Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, V V; Stringer, M D

    1990-01-01

    The objective of prophylaxis in venous thromboembolism is, first, to prevent fatal pulmonary embolism and, second, to reduce the morbidity associated with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the postphlebitic limb. This should now be standard practice for most patients over 40 years of age undergoing major surgery and for younger patients with a history of venous thromboembolism. Particularly high-risk groups include patients over 60 years of age undergoing major surgery, those with malignancy, and those requiring hip operations. Low-dose subcutaneous heparin 5,000 IU commencing 2 hours preoperatively and continuing 12 hourly until the patient is fully mobile is unequivocally effective in preventing DVT in medical and surgical patients and, most importantly, significantly reduces the incidence of fatal postoperative pulmonary embolism and total mortality. Such prophylaxis, in the presence of established DVT, also limits proximal clot propagation, which is the precursor of major pulmonary embolism. Low-dose heparin prophylaxis is associated with a small risk of bleeding complications, evidenced mostly by an increased frequency of wound hematoma rather than major clinical hemorrhage. Low molecular weight heparin fragments (e.g., Fragmin, Choay, Enoxaparine) are emerging as useful alternative agents, having the advantage of once daily administration and yet providing similar efficacy in the prevention of DVT. Mechanical methods of prevention which counteract venous stasis, such as graduated elastic compression stockings, are also useful in protecting against DVT but have not been shown to prevent fatal postoperative pulmonary embolism. They are recommended particularly for patients in whom heparin prophylaxis is best avoided (e.g., neurosurgery) and possibly in combination with heparin in very high-risk patients. PMID:2122604

  1. Radiofrequency Guide Wire Recanalization of Venous Occlusions in Patients with Malignant Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert M.; David, Elizabeth; Pugash, Robyn A.; Annamalai, Ganesan

    2012-06-15

    Fibrotic central venous occlusions in patients with thoracic malignancy and prior radiotherapy can be impassable with standard catheters and wires, including the trailing or stiff end of a hydrophilic wire. We report two patients with superior vena cava syndrome in whom we successfully utilized a radiofrequency guide wire (PowerWire, Baylis Medical, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) to perforate through the occlusion and recanalize the occluded segment to alleviate symptoms.

  2. Mechanical thrombectomy-assisted thrombolysis for acute symptomatic portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kang Woong; Kim, Mi Hyeong; Park, Keun Myoung; Chun, Ho Jong; Hong, Kee Chun; Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Jang Yong

    2014-06-01

    Acute portal vein and mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVMVT) can cause acute mesenteric ischemia and be fatal with mortality rate of 37%-76%. Therefore, early diagnosis and prompt venous revascularization are warranted in patients with acute symptomatic PVMVT. Due to advances in catheter-directed treatment, endovascular treatment has been used for revascularization of affected vessels in PVMVT. We report two cases of symptomatic PVMVT treated successfully by transhepatic percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy-assisted thrombolysis. PMID:24949327

  3. Prevention and management of hemodialysis catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Venkat; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2012-12-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are associated with blood stream infections, and catheter use continues to be high among incident and prevalent patients on maintenance HD. Migration of micro-organism along the external surface of the catheter is probably the most common route of infection, followed by the endoluminal route of contamination. Almost all HD catheters have biofilm formation on their surfaces and this serves as a good reservoir for micro-organisms. These active but protected microorganisms have been implicated in local and systemic infections associated with HD catheters. Good personal hygiene, exit-site care with topical antibiotics and antibiotic lock solution in the dialysis catheter reduce the incidence of catheter infection. In selected subgroup of patients, HD catheter is promptly removed after the diagnosis of blood stream infection. However, catheter guidewire exchange is an acceptable alternate strategy in some patients. The most important goal should be to increase the rate of incident arteriovenous fistula use in the HD population. PMID:23253322

  4. Catheter valves for indwelling urinary catheters: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van den Eijkel, Esther; Griffiths, Peter

    2006-03-01

    This mini-review aimed to systematically review the evidence on the effect of catheter valves compared to free drainage into a bag for patients with indwelling urinary catheters. Data sources used were Medline, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, Ahmed, EMBASE, EBM Reviews, the Cochrane Library and reference lists of relevant papers. Papers considered were controlled trials comparing the use of a catheter valve with the catheter bag that were published as a full report, or detailed abstract (containing sufficient information to critique) in Dutch, German or English. Two studies with a total of 122 subjects were identified. The main outcome measures considered were reduction of incidence of bladder spasm and urinary tract infection (UTI) and patient preference. No statistically difference in the incidence of bladder spasm or UTI was demonstrated but patients showed a clear preference for the valve. Further research into catheter valves is needed, with larger study groups, which include housebound male and female patients, and longer follow-up period. PMID:16607246

  5. Venous thrombosis in athletes.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Gregory; Whiteside, William K; Kanwisher, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Because deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can occur following orthopaedic procedures, knowledge of hereditary and acquired risk factors for DVT is essential. Hereditary forms of thrombophilia include factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, and deficiencies of antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Acquired risk factors include but are not limited to trauma, immobilization, and surgical procedures. In general, athletes have a low risk of venous thrombosis; however, this population is exposed to many acquired thrombogenic risk factors, including hemoconcentration, trauma, immobilization, long-distance travel, and the use of oral contraceptives. Thus, orthopaedic surgeons should consider screening athletes for thrombogenic risk factors, including history of venous thrombosis, hypercoagulable disorders, or high altitude exercise, during preparticipation physicals and preoperative examinations. If a patient is determined to be at high risk of DVT, preventive measures such as physical antithrombotic measures and/or low-molecular-weight heparin should be instituted. If an athlete develops a DVT, a risk factor assessment should be conducted along with anticoagulation treatment in accordance with the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. PMID:23378374

  6. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  7. Venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Samková, Aneta; Lejhancová, Katerina; Hak, Jirí; Lukes, Antonín

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) during childhood is low with two peaks - neonatal and adolescent age. This retrospective study is focused on clinical characteristics ofVTE during adolescence. The main goals are to assess the most frequent inherited and acquired risk factors and to evaluate the benefit of D-dimers in diagnostics of venous thromboemblism. The data of 18 adolescents were analysed--16 girls (88.9%), 2 boys (11.1%). In 9 patients (50%) thrombosis of the lower limb deep veins was diagnosed, six patients (33.3%) suffered from symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) and 3 patients (16.7%) from thrombosis at unusual sites. One patient had an idiopathic VTE, the mean number of the inherited and acquired risk factors was 2.6. The most frequent inherited risk factor was Leiden mutation of factor V (27.8%). The most frequent acquired risk factor was oral contraception (OC) in 12 out of 16 girls (75%). All of our patients on oral contraception had one or more additional risk factors. 10 out of 18 (55.6%) patients with VTE had elevated activity of factor VIII. The sensitivity of D-dimers was low (50%) in patients with distal lower limb thrombosis, but very high (100%) in patients with PE. PMID:23101270

  8. Venous air embolism and selective denervation for torticollis.

    PubMed

    Lobato, E B; Black, S; De Soto, H

    1997-03-01

    Selective denervation to relieve severe torticollis requires surgery with the patient in the sitting position. Nerve stimulation is used to guide the procedure; therefore, patients undergo general anesthesia without muscle relaxation. Because of the risk of venous air embolism (VAE), monitoring with precordial Doppler and a multiorifice right atrial catheter has been recommended. To document the incidence of VAE and, thus, the effectiveness of monitors to detect it, consecutive patients who underwent selective peripheral denervation for torticollis between June 1993 and July 1994 were studied retrospectively, and those who underwent the procedure between August 1994 and February 1996 were studied prospectively. No VAE was documented in the retrospective group (n = 31). In the prospective group (n = 69), precordial Doppler detected one episode of VAE that lasted < 20 s and had no clinical sequelae. The incidence of complications from right atrial catheter insertion was 8% (carotid puncture, hematoma, inability to cannulate) but with no permanent sequelae. We conclude that VAE is infrequent and self-limited in association with selective denervation for torticollis. While monitoring with precordial Doppler for patients undergoing denervation for torticollis is indicated, the use of a right atrial catheter is of limited value because of associated complications and increased operating room time and cost. PMID:9052299

  9. A Modified Metallic Coil Embolization Technique for Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations Using Coil Anchors and Occlusion Balloon Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kensaku Shiigai, Masanari; Saida, Tsukasa; Anno, Izumi; Wada, Mitsuyoshi; Minami, Manabu

    2008-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a modified metallic coil embolization technique for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) using coil anchors and occlusion balloon catheters. Methods. Five consecutive female patients with 6 PAVMs were included in the present study. One of the 6 PAVMs was of the complex type with four feeding arteries. An occlusion balloon catheter was inserted into the feeding artery as close to the venous sac as possible. The coil anchor, which was a simple W-shaped bent stainless steel wire with two markers at each end, was deployed prior to embolization to prevent the systemic migration of embolic materials. Then, metallic coils were deployed around the coil anchors under inflow stoppage using the inflated occlusion balloon catheter. In the complex-type PAVM, the main feeder was occluded by this technique and the other three small feeders were embolized with metallic coils only. Results. In all 5 cases, occlusion balloon catheters could be inserted into the feeding arteries just proximal to the venous sacs, coil anchors were easily deployed, and complete occlusion was achieved without any migration of metallic coils or paradoxical embolism during the procedure. Conclusions. The modified metallic coil embolization technique with coil anchors and occlusion balloon catheters was feasible and considered to be useful in preventing procedure-related complications.

  10. Urinary Retention: Catheter Drainage Bag or Catheter Valve?

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Gurnam; Hendry, David

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with intractable urinary incontinence presents as a challenging priority in the ageing population. To preserve the antibacterial mechanisms of the bladder, a urine collection that enables the bladder to fill and empty regularly and completely, should be used. This mimics the action of the healthy bladder. We compared the success rates of two widely used urinary-collection systems (catheter with drainage bag or a catheter valve) at our institution for those patients undergoing a trial of void. PMID:26989368

  11. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an infection can occur. If you have a urinary catheter, germs can travel along the catheter and cause ... tract infection (or “CA-UTI”). What is a urinary catheter? A urinary catheter is a thin tube placed ...

  12. Reductions in tissue plasminogen activator and thrombomodulin in blood draining veins damaged by venous access devices.

    PubMed

    Horne, M K; Merryman, P K; Mayo, D J; Gralnick, H R; Chang, R C; Alexander, H R

    1995-08-15

    A frequent complication of venous access devices (VADs) is axillary-subclavian venous thrombosis. To study this problem we have compared blood drawn through VADs with peripheral blood samples in a group of oncology patients with venographically demonstrated venous damage (N = 14) and a group with normal venograms (N = 21). The samples were assayed for a battery of proteins believed to be involved in thrombogenesis. After approximately six weeks of catheterization the venographically abnormal patients had significantly less thrombomodulin (P = 0.0055) and significantly higher PAI:tPA (P = 0.022) in catheter-drawn samples as compared with the venographically normal group. Although the data are inconclusive, it is hypothesized that these changes resulted from local endothelial injury. PMID:7482440

  13. The causes of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis in the children with cranial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Wei; Jia, Ge; Li, Na; Jia, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and to explore its possible reasons in children patients who received neurosurgery operation. Clinical data of 4958 cases children patients with lower-extremity DVT and without the thrombosis after the neurosurgery operation from 2010 January to 2014 December in department of neurosurgery of Tian Tan hospital were collected and analyzed. 18 cases children were diagnosed with lower-extremity DVT. All of them had invasive operation of lower-extremity deep venous catheterization. The mainly primary diseases of thrombosis children were craniopharyngioma. They have longer operation time compared with those without thrombosis (P<0.05). Therefore, the causes of DVT in neurosurgical children involve not only deep venous catheter-related but also neurological primary disease and operation time. PMID:26885175

  14. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  15. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  16. Multielectrode Pulmonary Vein Ablation Catheter (PVAC(®)): current data on results and risks.

    PubMed

    Mönnig, Gerold; Eckardt, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Electrical isolation of pulmonary veins is the cornerstone of catheter ablation for patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation. However, uncertainty surrounds the choice of energy source in pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Various alternative techniques such as the Pulmonary Vein Ablation Catheter (PVAC(®), Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) have been developed to facilitate PVI. This over-the-wire multielectrode catheter is delivering duty-cycled bipolar and unipolar radiofrequency (RF) energy at relatively low power.PVI with this "one-shot" PVACatheter can shorten the procedure duration and lower fluoroscopy time compared to irrigated RF. It enables mapping and ablation with the same array, but fails to show signals during RF energy delivery. The effectiveness of PVAC is comparable to other technologies in randomized studies. The overall complication rate of PVAC PVI is comparable to irrigated RF and possibly slightly higher for cryoballoon PVI. Special attention has to be paid to an effective anticoagulation throughout the ablation procedure, avoidance of embolic events and pulmonary venous stenosis.The novel catheter design of the PVAC Gold(®) array may improve safety by reducing embolic events through avoidance of electrode 1-to-10 interaction and by better tissue contact due to the 20° forward tilt. Although clinical data with this new array are lacking so far, the PVAC system has been shown to be a promising tool for PVI. However, prospective studies especially with the novel array are required to determine its true role for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in the future. PMID:25070931

  17. Microbial biofilms associated with intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infections in adult intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Gowardman, J; Morrison, M; Runnegar, N; Rickard, C M

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the most serious complications in hospitalised patients, leading to increased hospitalisation, intensive care admissions, extensive antibiotic treatment and mortality. A greater understanding of these bacterial infections is needed to improve the prevention and the management of CRBSIs. We describe here the systematic culture-independent evaluation of intravascular catheter (IVC) bacteriology. Twelve IVCs (6 central venous catheters and 6 arterial catheters) were collected from 6 patients. By using traditional culture methods, 3 patients were diagnosed with catheter colonisation including 1 patient who also had CRBSI, and 3 had no colonisation. From a total of 839,539 high-quality sequence reads from high-throughput sequencing, 8 microbial phyla and 76 diverse microbial genera were detected. All IVCs examined in this study were colonised with complex microbial communities including "non-colonised IVCs," as defined using traditional culture methods. Two main community types were observed: Enterobacteriaceae spp., dominant in patients without colonisation or CRBSI; and Staphylococcus spp., dominant in patients with colonisation and CRBSI. More diverse pathogens and a higher microbial diversity were present in patients with IVC colonisation and CRBSI. Community composition did not appear to be affected by patients' antibiotic treatment or IVC type. Characterisation of these communities is the first step in elucidating roles of these pathogens in disease progression, and to ultimately facilitate the improved prevention, refined diagnosis and management of CRBSI. PMID:26610337

  18. Overview of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Abad Rico, José Ignacio; Llau Pitarch, Juan Vicente; Rocha, Eduardo

    2010-12-14

    Thrombosis occurs at sites of injury to the vessel wall, by inflammatory processes leading to activation of platelets, platelet adherence to the vessel wall and the formation of a fibrin network. A thrombus that goes on to occlude a blood vessel is known as a thromboembolism. Venous thromboembolism begins with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which forms in the deep veins of the leg (calf) or pelvis. In some cases, the DVT becomes detached from the vein and is transported to the right-hand side of the heart, and from there to the pulmonary arteries, giving rise to a pulmonary embolism (PE). Certain factors predispose patients toward the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including surgery, trauma, hospitalization, immobilization, cancer, long-haul travel, increased age, obesity, major medical illness and previous VTE; in addition, there may also be a genetic component to VTE. VTE is responsible for a substantial number of deaths per annum in Europe. Anticoagulants are the mainstay of both VTE treatment and VTE prevention, and many professional organizations have published guidelines on the appropriate use of anticoagulant therapies for VTE. Treatment of VTE aims to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disease, and any long-term complications such as VTE recurrence or post-thrombotic syndrome. Generally, guidelines recommend the use of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH) or fondaparinux for the pharmacological prevention and treatment of VTE, with the duration of therapy varying according to the baseline characteristics and risk profile of the individual. Despite evidence showing that the use of anticoagulation prevents VTE, the availability of several convenient, effective anticoagulant therapies and the existence of clear guideline recommendations, thromboprophylaxis is underused, particularly in patients not undergoing surgery. Greater adherence to guideline-recommended therapies, such as LMWH, which can be administered on an outpatient basis, should reduce the mortality associated with this preventable disease. PMID:21162604

  19. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cleanser before putting in the catheter. • Clean their hands, wear gloves, and clean the catheter opening with an antiseptic ... or give medications. Healthcare providers also clean their hands and wear gloves when changing the bandage that covers the area ...

  20. Geochemistry of and radioactivity in ground water of the Highland Rim and Central Basin aquifer systems, Hickman and Maury counties, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hileman, G.E.; Lee, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    A reconnaissance of the geochemistry of and radioactivity in ground water from the Highland Rim and Central Basin aquifer systems in Hickman and Maury Counties, Tennessee, was conducted in 1989. Water in both aquifer systems typically is of the calcium or calcium magnesium bicarbonate type, but concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate are greater in water of the Central Basin system; differences in the concentrations are statistically significant. Dissolution of calcite, magnesium-calcite, dolomite, and gypsum are the primary geochemical processes controlling ground-water chemistry in both aquifer systems. Saturation-state calculations using the computer code WATEQF indicated that ground water from the Central Basin system is more saturated with respect to calcite, dolomite, and gypsum than water from the Highland Rim system. Geochemical environments within each aquifer system are somewhat different with respect to dissolution of magnesium-bearing minerals. Water samples from the Highland Rim system had a fairly constant calcium to magnesium molar ratio, implying congruent dissolution of magnesium-bearing minerals, whereas water samples from the Central Basin system had highly variable ratios, implying either incongruent dissolution or heterogeneity in soluble constituents of the aquifer matrix. Concentrations of radionuclides in water were low and not greatly different between aquifer systems. Median gross alpha activities were 0.54 picocuries per liter in water from each system; median gross beta activities were 1.1 and 2.3 picocuries per liter in water from the Highland Rim and Central Basin systems, respectively. Radon-222 concentrations were 559 and 422 picocuries per liter, respectively. Concentrations of gross alpha and radium in all samples were substantially less than Tennessee?s maximum permissible levels for community water-supply systems. The data indicated no relations between concentrations of dissolved radionuclides (uranium, radium-226, radium-228, radon-222, gross alpha, and gross beta) and any key indicators of water chemistry, except in water from the Highland Rim system, in which radon-222 was moderately related to pH and weakly related to dissolved magnesium. The only relation among radiochemical constituents indicated by the data was between radium-226 and gross alpha activity; this relation was indicated for water from both aquifer systems.

  1. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    SciTech Connect

    Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S. Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  2. 21 CFR 880.5200 - Intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intravascular catheter. 880.5200 Section 880.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5200 Intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. An intravascular catheter is a device...

  3. A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes with Regular- and Low-Profile Totally Implanted Central Venous Port Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Steitparth, Florian; Cho, Chie Hee; Benter, Thomas; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether low-profile totally implanted central venous port systems can reduce the late complication of skin perforation. Forty patients (age, 57 {+-} 13 years; 22 females, 18 males) were randomized for the implantation of a low-profile port system, and another 40 patients (age, 61 {+-} 14 years; 24 females, 16 males) received a regular port system as control group. Indications for port catheter implantation were malignant disease requiring chemotherapy. All port implantations were performed in the angiography suite using sonographically guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance of the catheter placement. Procedure time, number of complications (procedure-related immediate, early, and late complications), and number of explantations were assessed. Follow-up was performed for 6 months. All port implantations were successfully completed in both study groups. There were two incidents of skin perforation observed in the control group. One skin perforation occurred 13 weeks and the other 16 weeks after port implantation (incidence, 5%) in patients with regular-profile port systems. Two infections were observed, one port infection in each study group. Both infections were characterized as catheter-related infections (infection rate: 0.15 catheter-related infections per 1000 catheter days). In conclusion, low-profile port systems can be placed as safely as traditional chest ports and reduce the risk of developing skin perforations, which occurs when the port system is too tight within the port pocket.

  4. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products. PMID:23775628

  5. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  6. Stability of Trisodium Citrate and Gentamicin Solution for Catheter Locks after Storage in Plastic Syringes at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Dennis; Lok, Charmaine E; Battistella, Marisa; Vercaigne, Lavern

    2010-01-01

    Background: Catheter-related infections are a major problem for hemodialysis patients with central venous catheters for vascular access. Catheter lock solutions containing an anticoagulant are used to maintain the patency of the catheter between hemodialysis sessions. There is evidence that the use of lock solutions containing an antibiotic is associated with lower rates of infection but also that these solutions can kill microbes in colonized catheters and thus avoid the risks and costs associated with replacing the catheter. Objective: This stability study was conducted to determine whether an extemporaneously prepared gentamicin–citrate catheter lock solution would retain its potency over time, thus allowing for advance preparation of the solution. Methods: Catheter lock solutions containing gentamicin alone, citrate alone, and the combination of gentamicin and citrate were prepared aseptically and packaged in polyethylene syringes. The syringes were stored at room temperature. At timed intervals over 112 days, samples were withdrawn for analysis by means of validated high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: None of the 3 lock solutions showed any evidence of degradation during the 112-day observation period. In the formulation containing both gentamicin 2.5 mg/mL and sodium citrate 40 mg/mL (4%), there was no change in the concentration of either gentamicin (p = 0.34) or citrate (p = 0.55). Linear regression analysis of the concentration–time data for the combined formulation showed that 99.97% of the labelled amount of gentamicin and 101.30% of the labelled amount of citrate remained at day 112. The lower limit of the 95% confidence intervals indicated that more than 98.17% of the gentamicin and more than 99.57% of the citrate remained on day 112. Conclusion: The results of this study will allow pharmacies to extemporaneously compound the combined gentamicin–citrate catheter lock solution in advance of use. The method described here will yield a stable product for use in clinical applications. PMID:22478993

  7. Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sign In Cardiology Patient Page Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes Claire M. Hull , PhD ; Julia A. Harris , ... general adult population are indisputable. However, for the marathon athlete who trains intensively and for long periods ...

  8. Varicose Veins and Venous Insufficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Patient Section Who Are Interventional Radiologists? Multimedia Insurance Coverage IR Treatments Abdominal aortic aneurysms Angiography ... radiology Interventional radiology case studies Developed by ACR Multimedia gallery Multimedia Archive Varicose Veins and Venous Insufficiency ...

  9. Catheter-directed thrombectomy and thrombolysis for symptomatic lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis: review of current interventional treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter H; Ochoa, Lyssa N; Duffy, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Deep vein thromboses (DVT) along with its clinical sequelae represent a major health care challenge in our society. An acute massive DVT can result in pulmonary embolism resulting in sudden death. Although oral or systemic anticoagulation therapy may minimize thrombus propagation, it remains ineffective in removing thrombus burden and consequently does not prevent postthrombotic syndrome. Recent advances in catheter-based interventions have led to the development of a variety of minimally invasive endovascular strategies to remove venous thrombi. These technologies use various principles, including catheter-directed thrombolytic infusion, rheolytic thrombectomy, mechanical fragmentation, or ultrasound energy to remove intraluminal thrombi. This article reviews the current advances in this technology and discusses the techniques of percutaneous treatment strategies of venous thrombotic conditions using various devices, including the AngioJet Power Pulse system, Trellis, and ultrasound-accelerated EkoSonic system. Finally, the authors' institutional experiences using these interventional treatment strategies in patients with acute and chronic DVT are discussed. PMID:21098496

  10. Smart central venous port for early detection of bacterial biofilm related infections.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J; Alonso-Arce, M; Schmidt, C; Valderas, D; Sedano, B; Legarda, J; Arizti, F; Gómez, E; Aguinaga, A; Del Pozo, J L; Arana, S

    2014-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are commonly used in clinical practice to improve a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic risk of acquiring an infection related to microbial biofilm formation inside the catheter lumen. It has been estimated that 80 % of all human bacterial infections are biofilm-associated. Additionally, 50 % of all nosocomial infections are associated with indwelling devices. Bloodstream infections account for 30-40 % of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock, and are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of bloodstream infections must be performed promptly so that adequate antimicrobial therapy can be started and patient outcome improved. An ideal diagnostic technology would identify the infecting organism(s) in a timely manner, so that appropriate pathogen-driven therapy could begin promptly. Unfortunately, despite the essential information it provides, blood culture, the gold standard, largely fails in this purpose because time is lost waiting for bacterial or fungal growth. This work presents a new design of a venous access port that allows the monitoring of the inner reservoir surface by means of an impedimetric biosensor. An ad-hoc electronic system was designed to manage the sensor and to allow communication with the external receiver. Historic data recorded and stored in the device was used as the reference value for the detection of bacterial biofilm. The RF communication system sends an alarm signal to the external receiver when a microbial colonization of the port occurs. The successful in vitro analysis of the biosensor, the electronics and the antenna of the new indwelling device prototype are shown. The experimental conditions were selected in each case as the closest to the clinical working conditions for the smart central venous catheter (SCVC) testing. The results of this work allow a new generation of this kind of device that could potentially provide more efficient treatments for catheter-related infections. PMID:24515846

  11. Inaccuracy of Venous Point-of-Care Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Adriano José; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; de Almeida, Francisca Pereira; Deliberato, Rodrigo Octávio; Lobato, Michelle dos Santos; Akamine, Nelson; Silva, Eliézer; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current guidelines and consensus recommend arterial and venous samples as equally acceptable for blood glucose assessment in point-of-care devices, but there is limited evidence to support this recommendation. We evaluated the accuracy of two devices for bedside point-of-care blood glucose measurements using arterial, fingerstick and catheter venous blood samples in ICU patients, and assessed which factors could impair their accuracy. Methods 145 patients from a 41-bed adult mixed-ICU, in a tertiary care hospital were prospectively enrolled. Fingerstick, central venous (catheter) and arterial blood (indwelling catheter) samples were simultaneously collected, once per patient. Arterial measurements obtained with Precision PCx, and arterial, fingerstick and venous measurements obtained with Accu-chek Advantage II were compared to arterial central lab measurements. Agreement between point-of-care and laboratory measurements were evaluated with Bland-Altman, and multiple linear regression models were used to investigate interference of associated factors. Results Mean difference between Accu-chek arterial samples versus central lab was 10.7 mg/dL (95% LA -21.3 to 42.7 mg/dL), and between Precision PCx versus central lab was 18.6 mg/dL (95% LA -12.6 to 49.5 mg/dL). Accu-chek fingerstick versus central lab arterial samples presented a similar bias (10.0 mg/dL) but a wider 95% LA (-31.8 to 51.8 mg/dL). Agreement between venous samples with arterial central lab was the poorest (mean bias 15.1 mg/dL; 95% LA -51.7 to 81.9). Hyperglycemia, low hematocrit, and acidosis were associated with larger differences between arterial and venous blood measurements with the two glucometers and central lab. Vasopressor administration was associated with increased error for fingerstick measurements. Conclusions Sampling from central venous catheters should not be used for glycemic control in ICU patients. In addition, reliability of the two evaluated glucometers was insufficient. Error with Accu-chek Advantage II increases mostly with central venous samples. Hyperglycemia, lower hematocrit, acidosis, and vasopressor administration increase measurement error. PMID:26067093

  12. Doppler catheter tip localization using color enhancement.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Vonesh, M J; Yaacoub, A S; Kane, B J; Greene, R; Kemper, W S; Guberek, M; McPherson, D D

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if the ultrasound emissions of the Doppler catheter can be used to locate its position in 3 dimensions by conventional echocardiography. A Doppler catheter has previously been shown to permit nonfluoroscopic retrograde catheterization of the aortic root and left ventricular chamber by using velocity waveform polarity for directional guidance. A significant difficulty in providing ultrasound catheter guidance, however, has been the inability to recognize the Doppler catheter tip, because each point at which a flexible catheter crosses the image plane can be misinterpreted as the catheter tip. Initial in vitro water bath trials were performed using the Doppler catheter attached to a standard velocimeter. Using a 5 MHz imaging transducer and color Doppler methods, the presence or absence of a banded color pattern which could demarcate the Doppler catheter tip was recorded at various angles in and out of the scanning plane. Using Doppler retrograde guidance and transesophageal echocardiography, color Doppler banded patterns, which could identify the Doppler catheter tip, were investigated in the dog aorta. In order to understand the physical mechanisms involved, a series of water bath trials were then conducted using the Doppler catheter attached to a velocimeter which was synchronized to the echo machine. Initial nonsynchronized water bath trials revealed distinct banded color patterns demarcating the Doppler catheter tip when it pointed in any direction within the beam width, except for a 40 degrees blind cone directly away from the imaging transducer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8039223

  13. [Thromboprophylaxis of venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2014-07-01

    Recently in Japan, venous thromboembolism (VTE) [deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE)] has increased with the Westernization of eating habits and the aging of society. In the West, prophylactic guidelines have been discussed for many years, and, unfortunately, Japan falls far behind the West in this area. We developed Japanese Guidelines for VTE prophylaxis based on the 6th ACCP guidelines in 2004. The incidence of perioperative PTE in Japan has been investigated by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists since 2002. The rate of perioperative PTE was estimated to be 4.76 per 10,000 operations in 2003. As we expected, it significantly decreased after the guidelines for thromboprophylaxis were issued and the management fee for PTE prophylaxis was covered by health insurance in April 2004. However, mechanical prophylaxis is not sufficient to prevent mortality rates, and advanced prophylaxis by anticoagulants, such as low-molecular-weight heparin/Xa inhibitors along with unfractionated heparin/vitamin K antagonists will be essential. As a result of use of anticoagulants, mortality rates have been significantly decreased recently. PMID:25163326

  14. Systematic review of anticoagulant treatment of catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa; Onwuemene, Oluwatoyosi; Kolesar, Emma; Crowther, Mark; Lim, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    Central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) is a complication seen in patients requiring long-term intravenous access. Treatment of CRT is not standardized and international guidelines for treatment are based on extrapolation of evidence from lower extremity thrombosis. We performed a systematic review of the literature to evaluate if duration of anticoagulation affects the risk of recurrent venous thrombosis, post-thrombotic syndrome, or major hemorrhage. We searched PubMed, Embase, Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane, and ACP Journal club for studies of CRT treated with anticoagulation. Of 1648 titles and abstracts, 23 studies met our inclusion criteria. No randomized trials were identified. Duration of anticoagulation varied from 8days to more than 6months. Outcomes of patients with upper extremity thrombosis due to CRT or other etiologies were often combined. The incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome varied between 0 and 75% depending on the definition used. Seven percent of patients with upper extremity thrombosis treated with anticoagulation experienced recurrent deep vein thrombosis and 2.8% experienced pulmonary embolism. Major hemorrhage was reported in 2.8-4.9% of anticoagulated patients. Prospective studies evaluating the optimal duration of anticoagulation in patients with CRT are needed. PMID:26342400

  15. Cutting peripherally inserted central catheters may lead to increased rates of catheter-related deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Steele, Denise; Norris, Colleen M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between cutting or trimming peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and the development of deep vein thromboses (DVTs). An observational, retrospective study was conducted on 634 patients who had a PICC inserted between 2011 and 2012. Patients who had a reverse-taper PICC inserted were assigned into 1 of 2 groups. The first group included patients with a reverse-taper PICC that was cut/trimmed (PC) before insertion (n = 224). The second group was made up of patients whose PICC was not cut/trimmed (PNC) before insertion (n = 410). All PICC-associated DVTs were confirmed by a positive venous Doppler result and recorded. A statistically significant difference (P < .001) was found between patients in the PC group who developed a DVT (9.82%) and patients in the PNC group in which PICCs were not trimmed (1.95%). There is evidence to suggest that altering the reverse-taper PICC by cutting or trimming the tip before insertion may be associated with increased DVTs. Further study is required to determine whether PICCs should be reduced in length or whether there is an appropriate method of trimming the catheter to ensure its stability after insertion. PMID:25376324

  16. Venous thromboembolism in pediatric patients: epidemiologic data from a pediatric tertiary care center in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jordan M; Watts, Raymond G

    2011-05-01

    Venous thrombosis is an infrequent but serious cause of hospitalization in children. The epidemiology and natural history remains incompletely defined, especially in geographically distinct regions of the United States. We thus evaluated thrombosis in a single children's hospital over a 3-year period. Of 41,906 hospitalizations, 92 children were identified for review. The incidence of thrombosis was 21.9 per 10,000 admissions (0.22%). Venous thrombosis was of equal incidence in African-American and white patients. Locations of thrombosis included deep venous (51%), pulmonary (21%), renal vein (8%), intrahepatic (8%), and intracranial (12%). Risk factors for thrombosis included central catheter (32%), malignancy (18%), systemic infection (21%), neurologic disability (9%), cardiac (4%), nephrotic syndrome (3%), and autoimmune (6%). Six of 92 patients (7%) had thrombophilia. Positive family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or thrombophilic disorder predicted an abnormal test. Treatment included low-molecular-weight heparin (n=53), coumadin (n=12), heparin (n=10), tissue plasminogen activator (n=6), argatroban (n=1), thrombectomy (n=2), inferior vena cava filter (n=2), and no treatment (n=23). Seventy-seven percent demonstrated resolution of the VTE, 14% had persistent or recurrent VTE, and 9% died. Causes of death were malignancy, prematurity, septicemia, and congenital heart disease. Venous thrombosis is a serious comorbidity in hospitalized children. In our population, African-Americans had an equal incidence of VTE as whites. Positive family history predicted thrombophilia. PMID:21516021

  17. [Assessment of diagnostic methods for the catheter-related bloodstream infections in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Ataman Hatipo?lu, Ci?dem; Ipekkan, Korhan; Oral, Behiç; Onde, Ufuk; Bulut, Cemal; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2011-01-01

    The majority of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are associated with central venous catheters (CVCs) and most of them develop in patients staying at intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to assess the performance of different methods for the diagnosis of CR-BSI in neurology and neurosurgery ICUs of our hospital. This prospective study was carried out between January 2007 and January 2008 and all of the patients were followed daily for CR-BSI after the insertion of CVCs. Blood cultures were taken simultaneously from the catheter lumen and from at least one peripheral vein when there was a suspicion of CR-BSI. Additionally, from patients whose CVCs were removed, catheter tip cultures were taken and from patients with exit site infection, cultures of the skin surrounding the catheter entrance were taken. Catheter tip cultures were done by using quantitative and semiquantitative culture methods. Blood cultures taken from the catheter lumen and peripheral vein were incubated in the BACTEC 9050 (Becton Dickinson, USA) automated blood culture system. Gram and acridine orange (AO) staining were used for the smears prepared from the catheter tips and blood cultures. To evaluate the value of culture and staining methods in the diagnosis of CR-BSI; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) of each method were determined. A total of 148 patients (66 male, 82 female; age range: 1-94 years, mean age: 58.7 ± 21.8 years) were included in the study, of whom 67 (45.3%) were from neurology and 81 (54.7%) were from neurosurgery ICUs. One hundred ninety-nine CVC application performed in 148 patients were evaluated. Mean duration of catheterization was 8.5 ± 5.2 days. Thirty-two episodes of CR-BSI among 199 catheterizations (16%) in 29 patients among a total of 148 patients (19.6%) were determined. The most frequently isolated microorganisms were methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (8/32; 25%), penicillin-resistant Enterococcus spp. (8/32; 25%) and Candida albicans (4/32; 12.5%). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPVs of the quantitative and semiquantitative culture methods of the catheter tip and the differential time to positivity (positive result obtained at least two hours earlier in blood cultures drawn through the catheter than the peripheral blood cultures which were taken simultaneously) between blood cultures drawn through the catheter and those drawn from the peripheral vein were 100% for the diagnosis of CR-BSI. Sensitivity and NPV of the isolation method of the same microorganism from blood culture drawn through the catheter and drawn from the peripheral vein were 100%, specificity was 85% and PPV was 88% for the diagnosis of CR-BSI. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPVs of Gram and drawn simultaneously from the peripheral vein and quantitative and semiquantitative cultures of the catheter tip in patients with removed catheter, were important factors in terms of diagnosis of CR-BSI. It was also concluded that AO staining could provide additional benefit in the diagnosis of CR-BSI since it has higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPVs for peripheral blood cultures and catheter tip cultures compared to Gram staining. PMID:21341162

  18. Cerebral venous hypertension and blindness: a reversible complication.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, Salvador A; Padberg, Frank T; Turbin, Roger E; Farkas, Jeffrey; Frohman, Larry P

    2005-10-01

    A 57-year-old woman developed blindness during treatment for sarcoidosis-induced end-stage renal disease. An initial renal transplantation failed, and hemoaccess was maintained with multiple central catheters and upper extremity prosthetic arteriovenous grafts. A successful second transplantation eliminated her need for hemodialysis, but a right brachial to internal jugular graft remained patent. Progressive visual loss 2 years after transplantation prompted ophthalmic evaluation which initially revealed unilateral left optic nerve edema and visual loss, ultimately worsening over several months to no light perception in the left eye, 20/60 vision in the right eye, and bilateral papilledema. Arteriography demonstrated cerebral venous hypertension attributed to the functioning hemoaccess graft. Permanent graft occlusion normalized the papilledema, and visual field defects in the right eye and visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye. PMID:16242571

  19. Playing games with a thrombus: a dangerous match. Paradoxical embolism from a huge central venous cathether thrombus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cardim, Nuno; Toste, Júlia; Carvalho, Vanessa; Nunes, Igor; Ferreira, Daniel; Carmelo, Vanda; Oliveira, Ana S N; Ferro, José; Mariana, Sylvie; Almeida, Adelaide; Machado, Francisco P; Roquette, José

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolism is a major cause of death in cancer patients. The association between paraneoplastic hypercoagulability of oncological patients and long-term central venous catheters (CVC) may result in CVC associated thrombosis. Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO), especially when associated with atrial septal aneurysm (ASA) is a risk factor for paradoxical embolism. We report a case of paradoxical embolism with stroke in an oncological patient with a huge CVC thrombus playing "ping-pong" with an hypermobile ASA with a PFO. We review the management of hypercoagulability in oncologic patients and discuss the potential role of routine transthoracic echocardiography before the implantation of long term central venous catheters to identify predisposing conditions to paradoxical embolism and select patients for anticoagulant therapy. PMID:20233431

  20. Catheter lubrication and fixation: interventions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary

    This article looks at the indications for catheterisation, the anatomy of the urethra, the importance of asepsis and the rationale for the use of urethral lubrication for catheter insertion. The variations of lubrication available are discussed, including the use of products containing lidocaine and chlorhexidine. It then considers the problems caused by traction to the catheter and discusses the securement devices available for preventing tissue damage at the bladder neck, within the urethra and also at the meatus. The variation of devices is examined along with the potential problems associated with their use. Finally, it discusses the importance of clinicians being knowledgeable about the problems looked at and how to resolve them. PMID:23752454

  1. Detection of emetic activity in the cat by monitoring venous pressure and audio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, A.; Fox, Robert A.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Elfar, S.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the use of audio signals as a simple, noninvasive measure of emetic activity, the relationship between the somatic events and sounds associated with retching and vomiting was studied. Thoracic venous pressure obtained from an implanted external jugular catheter was shown to provide a precise measure of the somatic events associated with retching and vomiting. Changes in thoracic venous pressure monitored through an indwelling external jugular catheter with audio signals, obtained from a microphone located above the animal in a test chamber, were compared. In addition, two independent observers visually monitored emetic episodes. Retching and vomiting were induced by injection of xylazine (0.66mg/kg s.c.), or by motion. A unique audio signal at a frequency of approximately 250 Hz is produced at the time of the negative thoracic venous pressure change associated with retching. Sounds with higher frequencies (around 2500 Hz) occur in conjunction with the positive pressure changes associated with vomiting. These specific signals could be discriminated reliably by individuals reviewing the audio recordings of the sessions. Retching and those emetic episodes associated with positive venous pressure changes were detected accurately by audio monitoring, with 90 percent of retches and 100 percent of emetic episodes correctly identified. Retching was detected more accurately (p is less than .05) by audio monitoring than by direct visual observation. However, with visual observation a few incidents in which stomach contents were expelled in the absence of positive pressure changes or detectable sounds were identified. These data suggest that in emetic situations, the expulsion of stomach contents may be accomplished by more than one neuromuscular system and that audio signals can be used to detect emetic episodes associated with thoracic venous pressure changes.

  2. A Life-Threatening Mediastinal Hematoma After Central Venous Port System Implantation.

    PubMed

    Sarach, Janine; Zschokke, Irin; Melcher, Gian A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We report a case of surgical central venous port system implantation using Seldinger's technique with a life-threatening mediastinal hematoma due to the perforation of the superior vena cava. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for port implantation. Open access to the cephalic vein and 2 punctures of the right subclavian vein were unsuccessful. Finally, the port catheter could be placed into the superior vena cava using Seldinger's technique. As blood aspiration via the port catheter was not possible, fluoroscopy was performed, revealing mediastinal contrast extravasation without contrasting the venous system. A new port system could be placed in the correct position without difficulties. After extubation, the patient presented with severe respiratory distress and required consecutive cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reintubation. The CT scan showed a significant hematoma in the lower neck and posterior mediastinum with tracheal compression. We assumed a perforation of the superior vena cava with the tip of the guidewire using Seldinger's technique. Long-term intensive treatment with prolonged ventilation and tracheotomy was necessary. The port system had to be subsequently explanted due to infection. CONCLUSIONS Mediastinal hematoma is a rare but life-threatening complication associated with central venous catheterization using Seldinger's technique. Perforation occurs most often during central venous catheterization in critical care. Mediastinal hematoma is an example of a mechanical complication occurring after central venous catheterization, which has been described only a few times in the literature to date. This case highlights the importance of awareness of possible, rare, life-threatening complications during port implantation, mostly performed in multimorbid patients by surgeons in training. PMID:26703924

  3. A Life-Threatening Mediastinal Hematoma After Central Venous Port System Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, Janine; Zschokke, Irin; Melcher, Gian A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Mediastinal hematoma Symptoms: Agitation • severe hemodynamic instability • severe respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation • reintubation • thoracic drain Specialty: Surgery Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: We report a case of surgical central venous port system implantation using Seldinger’s technique with a life-threatening mediastinal hematoma due to the perforation of the superior vena cava. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for port implantation. Open access to the cephalic vein and 2 punctures of the right subclavian vein were unsuccessful. Finally, the port catheter could be placed into the superior vena cava using Seldinger’s technique. As blood aspiration via the port catheter was not possible, fluoroscopy was performed, revealing mediastinal contrast extravasation without contrasting the venous system. A new port system could be placed in the correct position without difficulties. After extubation, the patient presented with severe respiratory distress and required consecutive cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reintubation. The CT scan showed a significant hematoma in the lower neck and posterior mediastinum with tracheal compression. We assumed a perforation of the superior vena cava with the tip of the guidewire using Seldinger’s technique. Long-term intensive treatment with prolonged ventilation and tracheotomy was necessary. The port system had to be subsequently explanted due to infection. Conclusions: Mediastinal hematoma is a rare but life-threatening complication associated with central venous catheterization using Seldinger’s technique. Perforation occurs most often during central venous catheterization in critical care. Mediastinal hematoma is an example of a mechanical complication occurring after central venous catheterization, which has been described only a few times in the literature to date. This case highlights the importance of awareness of possible, rare, life-threatening complications during port implantation, mostly performed in multimorbid patients by surgeons in training. PMID:26703924

  4. A Modified Open Surgery Technique for Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement Decreases Catheter Malfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunming; Xu, Linfeng; Chen, Yun; Yan, Xiang; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    ? Background: This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a new, modified open surgery technique on catheter-related malfunction. ? Methods: During the period from January 1997 to June 2009, 216 patients received initial peritoneal catheters. For the present study, patients were divided into four groups according to the catheter types and the surgery techniques: TO-S: traditional open surgery, straight Tenckhoff catheter TO-C: traditional open surgery, coiled Tenckhoff catheter TO-SN: traditional open surgery, swan-neck catheter MO-S: modified open surgery, straight Tenckhoff catheter The modified surgery was characterized by a low incision site, a short intra-abdominal catheter segment and an additional upward straight subcutaneous tunnel. All patients were followed up for 2 years or until death. Survival rates, complications caused by catheter placement, and the probability of malfunction-free catheter survival were compared between the groups. ? Results: Catheter malfunction was the most frequent mechanical complication, found in 31 patients (14.4%), who experienced 38 malfunctions. Only 2 episodes of catheter malfunction were found in the MO-S group, representing a rate significantly less than those in the TO-S and TO-C groups (both p < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier curves for malfunction-free PD catheter survival showed a significantly different malfunction-free probability for the various groups (p = 0.009). After 2 years of follow-up, 136 patients (63.0%) survived with their initial PD catheter. The initial catheter survival rate was 76.8% in the MO-S group. Kaplan-Meier curves for initial catheter survival showed that the highest survival rate was found in the MO-S group (p = 0.001). ? Conclusions: The modified open surgery technique is a reliable method for catheter placement. PMID:24991051

  5. The Impact of Implementation of Bundle to Reduce Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Ardison, Kym Marcel Martins; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Puga, Marcelo Lourencini; Laus, Ana Maria; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate how control bundles reduce the rate of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs) rates in critically ill patients. Methods This is a prospective before-and-after study designed to evaluate whether a set of control measures (bundle) can help prevent CVC-BSI. The bundles included a checklist that aimed to correct practices related to CVC insertion, manipulation, and maintenance based on guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results We examined 123 checklists before and 155 checklists after implementation of the training program. Compared with the pre-intervention period, CVC-BSI rates decreased. Hand hygiene techniques were used correctly. CVC-BSI incidence was 9.3 and 5.1 per 1,000 catheter-days before and after the training program, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of a bundle and training program effectively reduces CVC-BSI rates. PMID:26491498

  6. Which is the easiest and safest technique for central venous access? A retrospective survey of more than 5,400 cases.

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, M; Malerba, M; Carriero, C; Tazza, L; Gui, D

    2000-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the technique for central venous catheterization associated with the lowest complication rate and the highest success rate. In an attempt to better define the easiest and safest venous approach, we have reviewed our 7-year experience with 5479 central venous percutaneous punctures (by Seldinger's technique) for the insertion of short-term (n=2109), medium/long-term (n=2627) catheters, as well as double-lumen, large-bore catheters for hemodialysis and/or hemapheresis (n=743). We have analyzed the incidence of the most frequent in-sertion-related complications by comparing seven different venous approaches: jugular vein, low lateral approach; jugular vein, high lateral approach; jugular vein, low axial approach; subclavian vein, infraclavicular approach; subclavian vein, supraclavicular approach; external jugular vein; femoral vein. The results of our retrospective study suggest that the 'low lateral' approach to the internal jugular vein, as described by Jernigan and modified according to our protocol, appears to be the easiest and safest technique for percutaneous insertion of central venous access, being characterized by the lowest incidence of accidental arte-rial puncture (1.2%) and malposition (0.8%), no pneumothorax, and an extremely low rate of repeated attempts (i.e. more than two punctures before successful cannulation) (3.3%). We advocate the 'low lateral' approach to the internal jugular vein as first-choice technique for venipuncture in both adults and children, for both short-term and long-term central venous percutaneous cannulation. PMID:17638235

  7. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton. PMID:17336540

  8. Intravenous Catheter-Associated Candidemia due to Candida membranaefaciens: The First Iranian Case.

    PubMed

    Aghili, Seyed Reza; Shokohi, Tahereh; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi Fesharaki, Shirinsadat; Salmanian, Bahar

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of candidemia due to the uncommon non-albicans Candida species appears to be increasing, and certain species such as Candida (C.) membranaefaciens have been reported in some clinical researches. Vascular catheters are considered the likely culprit for the sudden emergence of hospital-acquired candidemia. The identification of C. membranaefaciens can be problematic in clinical practice owing to its phenotypic resemblance to C. guilliermondii. We report the first case of C. membranaefaciens in Iran, which occurred in a 70-year-old woman, who had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We isolated germ-tube negative yeast from both blood culture and central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture on brain-heart infusion agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar plates, and biphasic brain-heart infusion media bottle; it developed smooth, pink colonies on CHROMagar Candida. By using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of theinternal transcribed spacer region of rDNA, we identified C. membranaefaciens. After the removal of the CVC and initiation of Fluconazole treatment, the patient's condition gradually improved and she was discharged from the hospital. The early detection of organisms in the catheter, removal of the catheter, and treatment with anti-fungal antibiotics have an important role in controlling disease and preventing septicemia after CABG. As C. membranaefaciens is an opportunistic Candida species, both clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the factors that confer fast diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:26110010

  9. Intravenous Catheter-Associated Candidemia due to Candida membranaefaciens: The First Iranian Case

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Seyed Reza; Shokohi, Tahereh; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi Fesharaki, Shirinsadat; Salmanian, Bahar

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of candidemia due to the uncommon non-albicans Candida species appears to be increasing, and certain species such as Candida (C.) membranaefaciens have been reported in some clinical researches. Vascular catheters are considered the likely culprit for the sudden emergence of hospital-acquired candidemia. The identification of C. membranaefaciens can be problematic in clinical practice owing to its phenotypic resemblance to C. guilliermondii. We report the first case of C. membranaefaciens in Iran, which occurred in a 70-year-old woman, who had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We isolated germ-tube negative yeast from both blood culture and central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture on brain-heart infusion agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar plates, and biphasic brain-heart infusion media bottle; it developed smooth, pink colonies on CHROMagar Candida. By using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of theinternal transcribed spacer region of rDNA, we identified C. membranaefaciens. After the removal of the CVC and initiation of Fluconazole treatment, the patient's condition gradually improved and she was discharged from the hospital. The early detection of organisms in the catheter, removal of the catheter, and treatment with anti-fungal antibiotics have an important role in controlling disease and preventing septicemia after CABG. As C. membranaefaciens is an opportunistic Candida species, both clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the factors that confer fast diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:26110010

  10. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intravascular occluding catheter. 882.5150 Section... occluding catheter. (a) Identification. An intravascular occluding catheter is a catheter with an inflatable... December 26, 1996 for any intravascular occluding catheter that was in commercial distribution before...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological catheter and accessories. 876.5130... catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A urological catheter and accessories is a flexible tubular... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral...

  12. Translumbar placement of paired hemodialysis catheters (Tesio Catheters) and follow-up in 10 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Rajiv; Nosher, John L.; Siegel, Randall L.; Bodner, Leonard J.

    2000-01-15

    For lack of other suitable access, 10 consecutive patients received paired hemodialysis catheters for long-term hemodialysis using a translumbar approach to the inferior vena cava (IVC). All attempts were successful. Five paired catheters were placed using the single-puncture technique, and five using the dual-puncture technique. Catheters were in place for a total of 2252 catheter days. The average duration of catheter placement was 250 days (range 30-580 days). All catheters were functioning up to the time the study was completed or the patient died. The most common complication was partial dislodgment of the catheter in 3 of 23 catheters (13%), all occurring in obese patients. One episode of retroperitoneal hemorrhage was noted in a patient having the single-access technique. There were no episodes of infection or IVC thrombosis.

  13. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage using a ligated catheter for recurrent catheter obstruction: antireflux technique.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hakuta, Ryunosuke; Ito, Yukiko; Nakata, Ryo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an established procedure for biliary obstruction. However, duodenobiliary or jejunobiliary reflux of the intestinal contents through a PTBD catheter sometimes causes recurrent catheter obstruction or cholangitis. A 64-year-old female patient with a history of choledochojejunostomy was referred to our department with acute cholangitis due to choledochojejunal anastomotic obstruction. Emergent PTBD was performed, but frequent obstructions of the catheter due to the reflux of intestinal contents complicated the post-PTBD course. We therefore introduced a catheter with an antireflux mechanism to prevent jejunobiliary reflux. A commercially available catheter was modified; side holes were made at 1 cm and 5 to 10 cm (1 cm apart) from the tip of the catheter, and the catheter was ligated with a nylon thread just proximal to the first side hole. Using this novel "antireflux PTBD technique," jejunobiliary reflux was prevented successfully, resulting in a longer patency of the catheter. PMID:23560165

  14. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Iain Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  15. Measurement of Vein Diameter for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) Insertion: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Rebecca; Cummings, Melita; Childs, Jessie; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Grech, Carol; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Choosing an appropriately sized vein reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters. This observational study described the diameters of the brachial, basilic, and cephalic veins and determined the effect of patient factors on vein size. Ultrasound was used to measure the veins of 176 participants. Vein diameter was similar in both arms regardless of hand dominance and side. Patient factors-including greater age, height, and weight, as well as male gender-were associated with increased vein diameter. The basilic vein tended to have the largest diameter statistically. However, this was the case in only 55% of patients. PMID:26339941

  16. Assessment of infants with peripherally inserted central catheters: Part 1. Detecting the most frequently occurring complications.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Janet

    2002-12-01

    Inserting, maintaining, and monitoring vascular access are integral components of neonatal care. Advances in vascular access technology have led to the insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) to provide stable venous access for early and aggressive parenteral nutrition. Medications that are irritating or damaging, or those with a high osmolality or a nonphysiologic pH, can also be safely administered into the central venous system. The need for repeated peripheral intravenous attempts, as well as the associated pain and physiologic instability, are virtually eliminated once a PICC line is placed. Complications related to PICCs may occur at any phase of therapy: during insertion, while indwelling, or after discontinuing the line. The risk factors associated with PICCs are distinctly different from peripheral intravenous lines because of their long dwell time, central placement, and potential to migrate. Part 1 of Focus on the Physical offers a review of the relevant anatomy of the vascular system and a discussion of the appropriate sites for catheter tip placement. Guidelines for a systematic physical assessment, along with recommendations for standardized PICC documentation, are provided. A review of the signs and symptoms of more frequently occurring complications, such as catheter occlusion and bloodstream infections, is presented to enhance awareness of PICC-specific complications in the neonate and to expedite early detection and treatment. Part 2 of this series will focus on systematic assessment for less common complications such as catheter migration, dislodgement, breakage, and thrombosis, as well as the life-threatening complications of pleural and pericardial effusion. PMID:12881943

  17. Preventing Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medicine. The full reports are titled “Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hospitalized Patients: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians” and “Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hospitalized Medical Patients and Those With Stroke: ...

  18. Chronic Venous Disease (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... preventing recurrence of venous ulcers. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2000; :CD002303. Mani R, Vowden K, Nelson EA. ... for treating venous leg ulcers. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2001; :CD001899. Callam MJ. Epidemiology of varicose veins. ...

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis: diagnosis dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Chiewvit, Pipat; Piyapittayanan, Siriwan; Poungvarin, Niphon

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is increasing common disease in daily practice with sharing clinical nonspecific symptoms. This disorder is potentially lethal but treatable, oftenly it was overlooked in both clinical and radiologic in routine practice. Whenever, clinical suspected, prompt investigation by noninvasive imaging Magnetic resonance (MR) or advanced modilities such as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), MRV (MR Venography) will helpful in prompt diagnosis and treatment. These imaging modalities may reveal either direct sign (visualization of intraluminal clot) and indirect signs (paranchymatous change, intracranial hemorrhage). By using of effective treatment will improve the prognosis of the patient. This review summarizes insights into etiology, incidence, imaging modalities and current of the treatment. PMID:22368772

  20. Distended Bladder Presenting with Altered Mental Status and Venous Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Washco, Vaughan; Engel, Lee; Smith, David L.; McCarron, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background New onset or acute worsening of bilateral lower extremity swelling is commonly caused by venous congestion from decompensated heart failure, pulmonary disease, liver dysfunction, or kidney insufficiency. A thromboembolic event, lymphatic obstruction, or even external compression of venous flow can also be the culprit. Case Report We report the case of an 83-year-old male with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome that progressed to acute myeloid leukemia, bipolar disorder, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. He presented with altered mental status and new onset lower extremity edema caused by acute bladder outflow obstruction. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed the patient's distended bladder compressing bilateral external iliac veins. Conclusion Insertion of a Foley catheter resulted in several liters of urine output and marked improvement in his lower extremity edema and mental status a few hours later. Our extensive workup failed to reveal a cause of the patient's acute change in mental status, and we attributed it to a concept known as cystocerebral syndrome. PMID:25829883

  1. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization by Means of a TIPS Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Honnef, Dagmar Wingen, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.; Haage, Patrick

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to perform an alternative technique for recanalization of a chronic occlusion of the left brachiocephalic vein that could not be traversed with a guidewire. Restoration of a completely thrombosed left brachiocephalic vein was attempted in a 76-year-old male hemodialysis patient with massive upper inflow obstruction, massive edema of the face, neck, shoulder, and arm, and occlusion of the stented right brachiocephalic vein/superior vena cava. Vessel negotiation with several guidewires and multipurpose catheters proved unsuccessful. The procedure was also non-viable using a long, 21G puncture needle. Puncture of the superior vena cava (SVC) at the distal circumference of the stent in the right brachiocephalic vein/superior vena cava, however, was feasible with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) set under biplanar fluoroscopy using the distal end of the right brachiocephalic vein as a target, followed by balloon dilatation and partial extraction of thrombotic material of the left brachiocephalic vein with a wire basket. Finally, two overlapping stents were deployed to avoid early re-occlusion. Venography demonstrated complete vessel patency with free contrast media flow via the stents into the SVC, which was reconfirmed in follow-up examinations. Immediate clinical improvement was observed. Venous vascular recanalization of chronic venous occlusion by means of a TIPS needle is feasible as a last resort under certain precautions.

  2. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration

    PubMed Central

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. Methods: This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. Conclusion: The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance. PMID:25097505

  3. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch instrument, suprapubic drainage tube, and the suprapubic cannula and trocar. (b) Classification. (1) Class...

  9. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Latchamsetty, Rakesh; Morady, Fred

    2016-04-01

    Strategies and technology related to catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) continue to advance since its inception nearly 20 years ago. Broader selections of patients are now offered ablation with a similar level of procedural outcome and safety standards. It is hoped that improved understanding of the pathophysiologic processes of the initiation and maintenance of AF will refine target selection during ablation and improve long-term procedural efficacy, particularly in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent AF. PMID:26968667

  10. Multiple venous aneurysms of neck

    PubMed Central

    Swaika, Sweta; Basu, Sudipta; Bhadra, Ram C.; Maitra, Sujay

    2013-01-01

    Venous aneurysm of neck is a rare anomaly, usually presenting as a painless mass which increases in size on valsalva maneuver. A child with multiple aneurysms of the right common facial and external jugular veins diagnosed on Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance venography is reported. PMID:23599580

  11. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  12. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  13. Analysis of risk factors for central venous port failure in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Huang, Wen-Shih; Wang, Wen-Ke; Kao, Chiung-Lun; Lu, Ming-Shian; Wang, Chia-Siu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the risk factors for central port failure in cancer patients administered chemotherapy, using univariate and multivariate analyses. METHODS: A total of 1348 totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) were implanted into 1280 cancer patients in this cohort study. A Cox proportional hazard model was applied to analyze risk factors for failure of TIVADs. Log-rank test was used to compare actuarial survival rates. Infection, thrombosis, and surgical complication rates (?2 test or Fisher’s exact test) were compared in relation to the risk factors. RESULTS: Increasing age, male gender and open-ended catheter use were significant risk factors reducing survival of TIVADs as determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Hematogenous malignancy decreased the survival time of TIVADs; this reduction was not statistically significant by univariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.336, 95% CI: 0.966-1.849, P = 0.080)]. However, it became a significant risk factor by multivariate analysis (HR = 1.499, 95% CI: 1.079-2.083, P = 0.016) when correlated with variables of age, sex and catheter type. Close-ended (Groshong) catheters had a lower thrombosis rate than open-ended catheters (2.5% vs 5%, P = 0.015). Hematogenous malignancy had higher infection rates than solid malignancy (10.5% vs 2.5%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Increasing age, male gender, open-ended catheters and hematogenous malignancy were risk factors for TIVAD failure. Close-ended catheters had lower thrombosis rates and hematogenous malignancy had higher infection rates. PMID:19787834

  14. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To carry out a retrospective analysis of patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, and the role of cerebral venous congestion in patient management. Methods. Twenty-five patients were identified with the clinical and imaging diagnosis of acute dural sinus thrombosis. The imaging diagnosis was by magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computed tomography (CT) venography. There was a female predominance with a female to male ratio of 1.5 to 1 (16 women, 9 men). The age range was from 19 to 64 years old with an average age of 37 years. The first 10 patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 64 years old (average 37 years), received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. The remaining 15 patients ranged in age from 19 to 57 years old (average 38 years). They either underwent subsequent thrombectomy after a trial of anticoagulation therapy, or went straight to thrombectomy. These latter 15 patients had initial evidence of cerebral venous congestion, either clinically by severe or worsening symptoms despite anticoagulation therapy, or on initial or subsequent CT or MR imaging. In our experience, the cerebral venous congestion imaging findings included intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. The thrombolytic treatment technique consisted of the advancement of a 6 Fr guiding catheter to the jugular bulb or sigmoid sinus from a transfemoral approach. A microcatheter was then advanced to the proximal portion of the thrombus and then either tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase was injected to prevent clot propagation. A balloon catheter was used to perform thrombectomy since the thrombolytic agents can be injected via the inner lumen with an inflated balloon. The inflated balloon helped to keep the venous flow from washing out the thrombolytic agent, thus facilitating the agent's effect. Results. The first 10 patients received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. Eight of these were diagnosed with dural sinus thrombosis only, and had a stable hospital course without worsening of symptoms. These patients also did not have imaging evidence of cerebral venous congestion. The remaining 2 patients had cerebral edema on the CT scan. One had only a small amount of edema in the right cerebellum, but the other had severe edema in the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic areas. Nine of these patients had a stable hospitalization course and experienced a symptom-free recovery, but 1 died with severe cerebral edema and hemorrhage. Seven of the remaining 15 patients were initially treated with anticoagulation therapy for periods ranging from 2 days to 2 months (average 11 days). These 7 patients were considered to have failed anticoagulation therapy since they had worsening symptoms, and 5 of these had developed hemorrhage on subsequent CT or MR imaging scans. Five of the 7 then underwent thrombectomy with the administration of tPA. Of the remaining 2, 1 underwent thrombectomy alone without the administration of tPA, and the other was given 1 million units of urokinase instead of tPA. Three of these patients had a symptom-free recovery, but 2 had residual left-sided weakness, 1 patient had a minimal gait disturbance, and another patient developed a transverse sinus arteriovenous fistula 7 months after thrombolytic therapy. The remaining 8 patients did not receive anticoagulation therapy, and went straight to treatment with thrombectomy and administration of tPA. All of these presented with worsening clinical symptoms. Six had hemorrhage on their imaging studies, 1 had new edema on a subsequent CT scan, and 1 had edema along with the dural sinus thrombosis, but experienced worsening clinical symptoms consisting of headache and atypical dystonia. Five of these 8 patients experienced a symptom-free recovery, and 3 patients had mild residual weakness. Conclusion. In patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, an indication for thrombectomy or thrombolytic therapy may be the development of cerebral venous congestion which appears to include (1) worsening or severe clinical symptoms, and/or (2) CT or MR imaging findings including intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. It appears that anticoagulation therapy alone is not adequate in patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis when they develop cerebral venous congestion. This may be due to a lack of sufficient collateral flow. Those patients who went straight to thrombectomy because of worsening symptoms, or the imaging findings of cerebral vascular congestion, survived with either a symptom-free recovery or only mild residual neurologic deficit. The patient with evidence of cerebral venous congestion died while on anticoagulation therapy. Thus, the presence of cerebral venous congestion in patients with dural sinus thrombosis, even while on anticoagulation therapy, appears to be an indication for thrombectomy and infusion of thrombolytic agent through a balloon catheter to the site of thrombosis. Our experience suggests that this approach appears to improve the chance of survival, with either a symptom-free recovery or a recovery with only mild residual neurologic deficit.

  15. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution. PMID:26118204

  16. Influence of the central venous site on the transpulmonary thermodilution parameters in critically ill burn patients.

    PubMed

    Soussi, Sabri; Sisso, Fiona; Maurel, Véronique; Oueslati, Haikel; Legrand, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the measurement concordance of cardiac index (CI), extra-vascular lung water index (EVLWI) and global end diastolic volume index (GEDVI) with transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) between the jugular and femoral access with catheters inserted ipsilaterally in critically ill burn patients. Correlations were excellent and the concordance was good for the CI, EVLW and GEDVI (mean bias -0.11 L/min/m², -0.3 mL/kg and -20 mL/m² for CI, EVLW and GEDVI, respectively). We conclude that ipsilateral arterial and venous femoral and jugular measurement of TPTD parameters can be used interchangeably if catheters with different lengths on the femoral site are used. PMID:26771037

  17. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters Inserted Through Occluded or Collateral Veins Versus Conventional Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Steven; Chan, Tze Yuan; Bhat, Rammohan; Lam, Kimberly; Narlawar, Ranjeet S.; Cullen, Nicola; Littler, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Tunneled hemodialysis catheters become essential in dialysis access when there is no possibility of using a functioning arteriovenous fistula. Collateral or occluded veins visible on ultrasound are used for puncture and passage of catheters into the central venous system. Chronically occluded veins are crossed with guidewires to allow dilatation and subsequent passage of hemodialysis catheters. We performed a retrospective analysis of patient demographics, comorbidities, procedural complications, functional survival, performance, and history of previous vascular access. The study group was compared with two control groups in which dialysis catheters were inserted either by radiologists in the interventional suite or by clinicians on the wards. Nineteen patients from the study group were compared with same number of patients in both control groups. The mean age of the study group was higher compared with the control groups. There was no significant difference in mean functional survival, infection rates, dialysis pump speeds in the first 2 weeks, and procedural complications between the study group and the controls. The study group had a significantly higher number of previous vascular access interventions, longer dialysis careers, and more comorbidities. Tunneled dialysis catheter placement by way of collateral or occluded veins appears safe and effective. These techniques give the operator further options when faced with patients possessing challenging vascular access. Indeed, there may be a case for preferential use of these veins to keep patent central veins in reserve.

  18. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, James B.; Daniels, Don J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters.

  19. Robust pigtail catheter tip detection in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    The pigtail catheter is a type of catheter inserted into the human body during interventional surgeries such as the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The catheter is characterized by a tightly curled end in order to remain attached to a valve pocket during the intervention, and it is used to inject contrast agent for the visualization of the vessel in fluoroscopy. Image-based detection of this catheter is used during TAVI, in order to overlay a model of the aorta and enhance visibility during the surgery. Due to the different possible projection angles in fluoroscopy, the pigtail tip can appear in a variety of different shapes spanning from pure circular to ellipsoid or even line. Furthermore, the appearance of the catheter tip is radically altered when the contrast agent is injected during the intervention or when it is occluded by other devices. All these factors make the robust real-time detection and tracking of the pigtail catheter a challenging task. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a new tree-structured, hierarchical detection scheme, based on a shape categorization of the pigtail catheter tip, and a combination of novel Haar features. The proposed framework demonstrates improved detection performance, through a validation on a data set consisting of 272 sequences with more than 20,000 images. The detection framework presented in this paper is not limited to pigtail catheter detection, but it can also be applied successfully to any other shape-varying object with similar characteristics.

  20. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  1. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  2. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  3. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  4. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  5. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  6. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  7. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  8. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  9. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  12. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  14. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  15. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  16. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  17. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  18. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  20. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  1. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  3. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  4. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  5. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  6. Options for users of intermittent catheters.

    PubMed

    Fader, Mandy; Macaulay, Margaret; Delgado, Debbie; McClurg, Doreen

    Users of intermittent self-catheterisation in the UK have access only to single-use catheters. The Mult/Cath study is under way to determine whether multi-use catheters are safe and acceptable to patients; if so, a mixed approach could improve patient choice. PMID:26201153

  7. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  8. Suprapubic catheters: a comparison of suprapubic versus urethral catheters in the treatment of acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Ichsan, J; Hunt, D R

    1987-01-01

    Sixty patients presenting with acute urinary retention were randomly allocated to treatment with either suprapubic or urethral catheters. An initial specimen of urine was obtained for bacteriological culture and organism count. Subsequently, repeat specimens of urine were obtained at intervals of 2 days until the catheter was removed. The results of these cultures showed that suprapubic catheters caused less urinary tract infection (P less than 0.05). In addition, suprapubic catheters were more comfortable for the patients, easier to manage and more cost-effective. In patients with suprapubic catheters, their ability to void could be assessed prior to removal of the catheter, thus avoiding the need for recatheterization. It was concluded that patients presenting with acute urinary retention should be routinely treated by drainage using suprapubic catheters. PMID:3472510

  9. Nutcracker syndrome and deep venous thrombosis in a patient with duplicated inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ricardo de Alvarenga; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti; Costa, Renato Fanchiotti; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Sobreira, Marcone Lima; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin

    2016-04-01

    Duplicated inferior vena cava is a rare anomaly, and thrombosis in one or both segments is even less frequent. We present a case of deep venous thrombosis of the left lower limb involving the popliteal, femoral, and iliac veins as well as the left segment of the duplicated vena cava and nutcracker syndrome. After catheter-directed thrombolysis complemented by mechanical thrombolysis, the compromised veins had complete revascularization; the nutcracker syndrome was treated with stent placement, followed by the use of anticoagulants. There was technical success and complete recovery of the patient. PMID:26993872

  10. Does prophylactic anticoagulation prevent PICC-related upper extremity venous thrombosis? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James D; Alred, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    The evidence regarding the value of prophylactic anticoagulation to prevent peripherally inserted central catheter-related upper extremity venous thrombosis (PRUEVT) is inconsistent. The authors reviewed 3 years of data, identifying all cases of PRUEVT at a facility in Texas, and individually matched each for risk factors with 2 controls. Not being on any form of anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent was associated with a modestly increased risk of PRUEVT (odds ratio 1.93, P = .036, 95% confidence interval, 1.025-3.602). Each approach to thrombosis prevention showed a trend toward a protective effect, but none reached statistical significance individually. PMID:25191821

  11. Emergency central venous catheterization during trauma resuscitation: a safety analysis by site.

    PubMed

    Choron, Rachel L; Wang, Andrew; Van Orden, Kathryn; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa; Seamon, Mark J

    2015-05-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is often necessary during initial trauma resuscitations, but may cause complications including catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary emboli (PE), arterial injury, or pneumothoraces. Our primary objective compared subclavian versus femoral CVC complications during initial trauma resuscitations. A retrospective review (2010-2011) at an urban, Level-I Trauma Center reviewed CVCs during initial trauma resuscitations. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and complications including: CRBSIs, DVTs, arterial injuries, pneumothoraces, and PEs were analyzed. Fisher's exact test and Student's t test were used; P ? 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Overall, 504 CVCs were placed (subclavian, n = 259; femoral, n = 245). No difference in age (47 ± 22 vs 45 ± 23 years) or body mass index (28 ± 6 vs 29 ± 16 kg/m(2)) was detected (P > 0.05) in subclavian vs femoral CVC, but subclavian CVCs had more blunt injuries (81% vs 69%), greater systolic blood pressure (95 ± 55 vs 83 ± 43 mmHg), greater Glasgow Coma Scale (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 5), and less introducers (49% vs 73%) than femoral CVCs (all P < 0.05). Catheter related arterial injuries, PEs, and CRBSIs were similar in subclavian and femoral groups (3% vs 2%, 0% vs 1%, and 3% vs 3%; all P > 0.05). Catheter-related DVTs occurred in 2 per cent of subclavian and 9 per cent of femoral CVCs (P < 0.001). There was a 3 per cent occurrence of pneumothorax in the subclavian CVC population. In conclusion, both subclavian and femoral CVCs caused significant complications. Subclavian catheter-related pneumothoraces occurred more commonly and femoral CRBSIs less commonly than expected compared with prior literature in nonemergent scenarios. This suggests that femoral CVC may be safer than subclavian CVC during initial trauma resuscitations. PMID:25975341

  12. Intraluminal fluorescence spectroscopy catheter with ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yang; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marcu, Laura

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intraluminal investigation of arterial vessel composition under intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. A prototype 1.8-mm (5.4 Fr) catheter combining a side-viewing optical fiber (SVOF) and an IVUS catheter was constructed and tested with in vitro vessel phantoms. The prototype catheter can locate a fluorophore in the phantom vessel wall, steer the SVOF in place, perform blood flushing under flow conditions, and acquire high-quality TRFS data using 337-nm wavelength excitation. The catheter steering capability used for the coregistration of the IVUS image plane and the SVOF beam produce a guiding precision to an arterial phantom wall site location of 0.53+/-0.16 mm. This new intravascular multimodal catheter enables the potential for in vivo arterial plaque composition identification using TRFS.

  13. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  14. Pancreas Transplant Venous Thrombosis: Role of Endovascular Interventions for Graft Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Stockland, Andrew H.; Willingham, Darrin L.; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; Grewal, Hani P.; McKinney, J. Mark; Hughes, Christopher B.; Walser, Eric M.

    2009-03-15

    Venous thrombosis of pancreas transplant allografts often leads to graft loss. We evaluated the efficacy of emergent endovascular techniques to salvage thrombosed pancreatic allografts in a series of six patients. Of the 76 pancreas transplants performed between 2002 and 2006, six patients were diagnosed with venous thrombosis on MRI between 2 and 28 days posttransplant (mean, 9 days). Five patients were systemic-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient iliac vein) and one patient was portal-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient superior mesenteric vein). Conventional venography confirmed the diagnosis of venous thrombosis in all patients. One patient was treated with catheter-directed venous thrombolysis and balloon thrombectomy. Another patient was treated with rheolytic thrombectomy alone. The remaining four patients were treated with a combination of these mechanical and thrombolytic techniques. Completion venography revealed >50% clot reduction and resumption of venous drainage in all patients. One patient required additional intervention 16 days later for recurrent thrombosis. Two patients required metal stent placement for anastomotic stenoses or kinks. One patient required pancreatectomy 36 h after attempted salvage secondary to a major hemorrhage and graft necrosis. Two patients recovered pancreatic function initially but lost graft function at 8 and 14 months, respectively, from severe chronic rejection. Patient survival was 100%, long-term graft survival was 50%, rethrombosis rate was 16.6%, and graft loss from rejection was 33%. In conclusion, early recognition and treatment of venous thrombosis after pancreas transplantation has acceptable morbidity and no mortality using short-term endovascular pharmacomechanical therapy.

  15. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  16. Resuscitation by hyperbaric exposure from a venous gas emboli following laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Venous gas embolism is common after laparoscopic surgery but is only rarely of clinical relevance. We present a 52?year old woman undergoing laparoscopic treatment for liver cysts, who also underwent cholecystectomy. She was successfully extubated. However, after a few minutes she developed cardiac arrest due to a venous carbon dioxide (CO2) embolism as identified by transthoracic echocardiography and aspiration of approximately 7?ml of gas from a central venous catheter. She was resuscitated and subsequently treated with hyperbaric oxygen to reduce the size of remaining gas bubbles. Subsequently the patient developed one more episode of cardiac arrest but still made a full recovery. The courses of events indicate that bubbles had persisted in the circulation for a prolonged period. We speculate whether insufficient CO2 flushing of the laparoscopic tubing, causing air to enter the peritoneal cavity, could have contributed to the formation of the intravascular gas emboli. We conclude that persistent resuscitation followed by hyperbaric oxygen treatment after venous gas emboli contributed to the elimination of intravascular bubbles and the favourable outcome for the patient. PMID:22862957

  17. Comparison of brain tissue and local cerebral venous gas tensions and pH.

    PubMed

    Edelman, G J; Hoffman, W E; Rico, C; Ripper, R

    2000-09-01

    Neurosurgical monitoring devices have recently become available which are capable of measuring cerebral tissue gas tensions and pH. Brain tissue sensors have not been conclusively demonstrated to correlate with other measurements of regional cerebral gas tensions or pH. The present study was undertaken to correlate sensor values for pO2, pCO2 and pH with blood samples taken concurrently from local cerebral veins. Adult mongrel dogs were anesthetized and a craniotomy was performed. A small gyral vein was isolated and cannulated. Adjacent to the venous catheter tip, a Neurotrend brain tissue probe was inserted in an intracortical location. Each subject received a sequence of manipulations in inspired oxygen and end tidal carbon dioxide conditions. Under each experimental condition, samples of arterial and gyral venous blood were obtained and blood gas analysis performed. Concurrent brain probe measurements of tissue pO2, pCO2 and pH were recorded. Statistical analysis determined that local tissue and cerebral venous blood values for pO2, pCO2 and pH were highly correlated (R(s) = 0.62-0.82; p < 0.001). This indicates that there exists a confirmable monotonic relationship between tissue values and conditions in the post-capillary venous bed. Tissue sensors such as the Neurotrend probe can offer reliable trend indications in brain tissue gas tensions and pH. PMID:11045031

  18. Anticoagulant therapies versus heparin for the prevention of hemodialysis catheter-related complications: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinrui; Wang, Chang’an; Zhao, Hongfei; Zhang, Jinghua; Ma, Jie; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zou, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Locking of central venous catheters with heparin is an accepted practice to maintain catheter patency between dialysis sessions. However, this practice may cause other adverse reactions. Although many studies suggest benefits of other catheter lock solutions over heparin on these grounds, no consensus has been reached for clinical practice. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of randomized controlled trials (RCT) that compared antimicrobial-containing or citrate-alone catheter lock solutions with heparin alone in patients undergoing hemodialysis with central venous catheters. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from EMBASE, and PubMed were searched for articles published through June 2014. The primary outcomes were catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) and catheter malfunction (CM). The secondary outcomes were bleeding, exit-site infection (ESI), clinical sepsis, and all-cause mortality. Seventeen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed that antimicrobial-containing and citrate-alone lock solutions were superior to heparin for preventing CRB (both P < 0.01). Although antimicrobial-containing lock solutions significantly affected clinical sepsis (P < 0.01), they did not affect ESI, bleeding, or all-cause mortality. Incidence of CM episodes was lower in patients receiving antibiotics + heparin and gentamicin + citrate (both P < 0.05), while other antimicrobial-containing and citrate-alone lock solutions showed no difference. Only citrate-alone lock solutions significantly decreased bleeding and ESI episodes (both P < 0.05). Compared with heparin, antimicrobial-containing lock solutions more effectively prevent CRB and clinical sepsis. Antibiotics + heparin and gentamicin + citrate solutions showing better prevention of CM. Citrate-alone lock solutions result in fewer CRB, bleeding and ESI episodes. PMID:26550111

  19. The surgically created arteriovenous fistula: a forgotten alternative to venous access.

    PubMed

    Carsten, Christopher G; Taylor, Spence M; Cull, David L; Langan, Eugene M; Snyder, Bruce A; Jackson, Mark R; Youkey, Jerry R; Caldwell, Rebecca A

    2004-11-01

    The care of patients requiring lifelong intravenous access was revolutionized with the development of tunneled catheters and implantable ports. These devices are not without complications, however, and selected patients may benefit from alternative modalities to maintain access for such therapies as parenteral nutrition, phlebotomy, or chemotherapy. Use of surgically created arteriovenous (AV) fistulae as an alternative to central venous access has been described. This report reviews our experience using AV access for central venous access. An AV access database of more than 800 active patients was reviewed and all patients who had autogenous or synthetic AV fistulae created exclusively for central venous access between July 1, 2001, and December 31, 2003, were identified. Outcomes were assessed. A total of 853 new accesses were placed during the time period. Six fistulae in six patients (0.7%) were placed for central access. All patients (5 males, 1 female, mean age, 42.8 years) required access for intermittent parenteral nutrition or intravenous fluids secondary to short-gut syndrome (n = 5) or gastroparesis (n = 1). All patients had failed at least two prior catheter-based accesses before access placement was considered. Procedures were all brachial artery based and included autogenous brachiobasilic vein fistulae with elevation or transposition (n = 3), autogenous brachiocephalic fistula (n = 1), autogenous brachiobasilic graft with transposed greater saphenous vein (n = 1), and a prosthetic brachiobasilic graft with ePTFE (n = 1). There was one perioperative autogenous fistula thrombosis treated with thrombectomy and revision. A total of seven late revisions (thrombectomy, thrombectomy with venous outflow revision, fistula elevation, and 4 percutaneous angioplasties) in four patients were required. All fistulae were patent and functional at the end of the review period (mean follow-up, = 393 days; range, 35-757 days). Daily access was performed by family members (n = 2) or nurses (n = 4). One patient received small bowel transplantation and no longer required use of his patent fistula. One patient died of liver failure 382 days after fistula placement with a patent fistula. These results show that, while often forgotten and infrequently used, AV access can be a durable alternative to catheter-based venous access. PMID:15599619

  20. Double-lumen arterial balloon catheter technique for Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Albert Ho Yuen; Aw, Grace; Wenderoth, Jason David

    2014-01-01

    Background Dural arteriovenous fistulas are vascular malformations with variable clinical symptoms that range in severity from completely asymptomatic to seizures, dementia, loss of vision and intracranial hemorrhage. Historically, surgical obliteration was the treatment of choice but, more recently, endovascular embolization has become the first-line treatment. The liquid embolic agent Onyx (ethyl vinyl copolymer) has become the agent of choice, but problems with reflux around the delivery microcatheter and inadvertent venous penetration have arisen. Methods and results We present six cases in which the double-lumen balloon microcatheter was used to transarterially embolize dural arteriovenous fistulas via injection of Onyx through the wire lumen. Depending on the individual pathology a venous balloon was also used in some cases. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of these devices are discussed. Conclusions We consider that the use of the double-lumen balloon technique for fistula embolization has the potential for reducing overall procedural times, procedural failures and catheter retention in certain situations. In such cases we would advocate this as a first-line technique. When lower profile, more navigable balloon catheters become available, this may become the standard of care. PMID:23749795

  1. Creation of a Successful Transposed Antecubital Radiocephalic Arteriovenous Fistula in Patient with Known Ipsilateral Modified Radical Mastectomy, Postoperative Radiation, and Proximal Central Venous Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aamna Mahnoor; Khan, Sadia; Tayyarah, Majid

    2016-04-01

    Native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) placement in patients with ipsilateral mastectomy and radiation has been avoided because of concerns regarding central venous outflow obstruction. To our knowledge, only 3 such cases have been reported. We present a patient with bilateral mastectomies and right-sided radiation therapy presenting for vascular access in the setting of multiple failed AVF in her left upper extremity and infected-groin catheter, central catheters, and axillary loop graft. We created and superficialized a radiocephalic AVF in her right upper extremity in the setting of central vein occlusion and robust collaterals which remains patent and has been cannulated successfully. PMID:26802298

  2. Sepsis, venous return, and teleology.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, R G

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of heart-circulation interaction is crucial to our ability to guide our patients through an episode of septic shock. Our knowledge has advanced greatly in the last one hundred years. There are, however, certain empirical phenomena that may lead us to question the wisdom of our prevailing treatment algorithm. Three extreme but iatrogenically possible haemodynamic states exist. Firstly, inappropriately low venous return; secondly, overzealous arteriolar constriction; and finally, misguided inotropy and chronotropy. Following an unsuccessful fluid challenge, it would be logical to first set the venous tone, then set the cardiac rate and contractility, and finally set the peripheral vascular resistance. It is hypothesized that a combination of dihydroergotamine, milrinone and esmolol should be superior to a combination of noradrenaline and dobutamine for surviving sepsis. PMID:25245463

  3. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  4. Venous allografts for vascular reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Vermassen, F; Degrieck, N; De Kock, L; Goubeau, J; Van Landuyt, K; Derom, F

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate various protocols for the preservation of venous allografts 162 arterial reconstructions were performed in mongrel dogs bypassing their ligated femoral arteries. The cumulative 6-month patency-rates as determined by weekly palpation and regular angiography were. Group I = Synthetic grafts: (a) Dacron 48%, (b) PTFE 53%. Group II = Fresh venous grafts: (a) autografts 100%, (b) allografts 37%. Group III = Veins preserved in saline at 4 degrees C for 1 month: (a) autografts 44%, (b) allografts 34%. Group IV = Veins preserved in saline at -70 degrees C: (a) autografts 58%, (b) allografts 47%. Group V = Veins preserved in glutaraldehyde solution: (a) autografts 26%, (b) allografts 22%. Group VI = Veins preserved in Hanks-solution with 15% DMSO at -160 degrees C: (a) autografts 77%, (b) allografts 35%. Histological as well as immunological studies suggest that these results are determined by the preservation protocol in Groups III, IV and V and by the presence of rejection in Groups I and VI. As the results with the allografts are not superior to those obtained with synthetic grafts, their use should be confined to those cases where the use of synthetic materials should be avoided at any price. Further experiments with immunosuppression and antigenic matching are indicated to see whether this would improve the results obtained with viable venous allografts. PMID:1287000

  5. Silicon sensors for catheters and guide wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosen, Hans F.

    2001-11-01

    One area that can make use of the miniature size of present day micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) is that of the medical field of minimally invasive interventions. These procedures, used for both diagnosis and treatment, use catheters that are advanced through the blood vessels deep into the body, without the need for surgery. However, once inside the body, the doctor performing the procedure is completely reliant on the information the catheter(s) can provide in addition to the projection imaging of a fluoroscope. A good range of sensors for catheters is required for a proper diagnosis. To this end, miniature sensors are being developed to be fitted to catheters and guide wires. As the accurate positioning of these instruments is problematic, it is necessary to combine several sensors on the same guide wire or catheter to measure several parameters in the same location. This however, brings many special problems to the design of the sensors, such as small size, low power consumption, bio-compatibility of materials, robust design for patient safety, a limited number of connections, packaging, etc. This paper will go into both the advantages and design problems of micromachined sensors and actuators in catheters and guide wires. As an example, a multi parameter blood sensor, measuring flow velocity, pressure and oxygen saturation, will be discussed.

  6. Cardiac catheterisation with 5 French catheters.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, J J; McDonald, K; Crean, P A; Walsh, M J; McCarthy, C; Erwin, R J; Maurer, B J

    1990-01-01

    From the beginning of November 1987 to the end of January 1989, 526 coronary arteriograms and left ventricular angiograms were performed with 5 French coronary catheters. In 448 (85%) patients diagnostic pictures were obtained with three standard types of 5 French catheters (No 4 Judkins): that is, left coronary, right coronary, and pigtail catheters. In 60 patients (11.4%) various other 5 French catheters were required to complete the study. In nine patients (1.7%), a 7 or 8 French catheter was used. Major complications causing cardiac arrest or requiring urgent operation developed in five patients. Sixty two patients (11.77%) had minor complications that required sublingual nitrates or a single bolus of atropine, or developed a haematoma that did not need intervention or had a mild reaction to the contrast material. Complications of moderate severity developed in 17 patients (3.2%): severe chest pain, arrhythmia requiring a temporary pacemaker, contrast reaction associated with hypotension, haematoma requiring blood transfusion, or a transient ischaemic episode. There were no deaths. 5 French catheters were used for routine coronary angiography and left ventriculography in 98.3% of patients. There were no major complications related to femoral artery puncture. The routine use of 5 French coronary catheters should increase the feasibility of safe coronary angiography in outpatients and should reduce the cost of this investigation. PMID:2206716

  7. Cardiogenic shock in right ventricular infarction managed with a combined thermodilution and pacing pulmonary artery flotation catheter.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J D; Wilkins, R; Gibson, H

    1987-01-01

    When cardiogenic shock complicates right ventricular infarction it is widely appreciated that rational therapy can only be achieved by use of plasma volume expansion and inotropic agents guided by invasive monitoring (Cohn et al., 1974). In these cases, there is a high incidence of symptomatic heart block and serious atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias (Cohn, 1979). Thus, venous access may be required for monitoring, pacing, infusion of fluid, and vasoactive or antiarrhythmic drugs. A case of right ventricular infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock, heart block, multiple arrhythmias and severe hypoxaemic respiratory failure is described. Technical problems in venous access were encountered and overcome by the use of a single multi-purpose catheter for haemodynamic monitoring, infusion of drugs and fluids and passage of a pacing wire. We believe that this is the first description of the use of such a catheter in the United Kingdom, although the use of a multi-purpose pulmonary artery flotation catheter with fixed pacing electrodes has been described before (Zaidan & Freniere, 1983). PMID:3620050

  8. Groshong catheters: technical aspects and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Campisi, C; Camillucci, L; Campopiano, A; Fanizza, C; Sardonio, A

    2000-01-01

    After thousands of Groshong catheter applications over more than twenty years, the cause of blood withdrawal drawbacks is not yet completely understood. This phenomenon - which is not typical of closed-tip catheters since it is also common in open-tip catheters - in the Groshong catheter is attributed to the valve (ball-valve effect). The aim of this work is to understand the relationship between causes and effects in order to provide clinicians with practical solutions. Out of the 16 catheters examined, we observed no clear correlation among electron microscope ultrastructural analysis, valve closing pressure, intraluminal clots and clinical failures after different implantation times up to a maximum of 36 months. The ultrastructural analysis revealed an optimal no-time-related aspect for internal and external surfaces, while the closing pressure in each case was compatible with the efficiency of the working valve (range 22-36 cmH 2 O). We conclude that the blood withdrawal drawbacks cannot be attributed to a single cause and certainly not to the silicone biostability or directly to the valve. Different studies are suggesting that clinical failures can be the re-sult of several different causes such as slime or clots in the internal catheter surfaces and fibrin sleeve in the external catheter surfaces. These are common causes in open-tip catheters and we believe that the presence of valves on the tip of the Groshong may encourage inferences. Our suggestion is to place the tip of the Groshong catheter in atrium one centimetre after the junction with the vena cava. After the implant, it is possible to remove the causes of drawbacks by strong flushing using a 5-ml syringe and/or postural manoeuvres. PMID:17638221

  9. Self-administration of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy and risk of catheter-related adverse events: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Barr, D A; Semple, L; Seaton, R A

    2012-10-01

    Despite increasing use, limited data has been published comparing safety of different outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) models. Potential risks of self-administration at home include venous access device infection and other line complications. This study aims to investigate rates and predictors of intravenous access device complications in a large OPAT cohort. This is a retrospective cohort study of all uses of midlines, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVCs) with univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analysis of factors associated with line infections (LIs) and with other line events (OLEs). On univariate analysis, line infections were associated with length of line use, female sex and TCVC lines (compared to midlines). Patients self-administering OPAT in the home had a non-significantly lower rate of LIs. On multivariate analysis only duration of line use was a significant predictor of LIs-OR 1.012 (95%CI 1.001-1.023). For OLEs, multivariate analysis suggested that only line type and use of flucloxacillin were significant explanatory variables. In this cohort, there is no evidence that self-administration of OPAT is associated with higher rates of venous access device complications after controlling for confounding variables. PMID:22526869

  10. [Prevention of catheter-related infections].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Christ, M; Battegay, M; Widmer, A

    2012-10-01

    Bloodstream infections due to intravascular catheterization, peritoneal catheters for dialysis, suprapubic or transurethral catheters, are one of the major sources of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the prevention of catheter-associated infections is an important issue for physicians and nursing staff working in hospitals or in outpatient settings. The risk can be minimized by diligent checking of the indications, hygienic measures, using the right materials, thorough follow-up and education of the medical and nursing staff. Thus it is possible to avoid individual suffering of patients and to reduce costs in the healthcare system. PMID:23080356

  11. [Prevention of catheter-related infections].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Christ, M; Battegay, M; Widmer, A

    2012-06-01

    Bloodstream infections due to intravascular catheterization, peritoneal catheters for dialysis, suprapubic or transurethral catheters, are one of the major sources of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the prevention of catheter-associated infections is an important issue for physicians and nursing staff working in hospitals or in outpatient settings. The risk can be minimized by diligent checking of the indications, hygienic measures, using the right materials, thorough follow-up and education of the medical and nursing staff. Thus it is possible to avoid individual suffering of patients and to reduce costs in the healthcare system. PMID:22562110

  12. Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in hospital and community settings. The major risk factor for developing a UTI is having a urethral catheter in situ. The longer the catheter remains in place, the higher the risk of infection. The consensus in guidelines is that indwelling urethral catheters should not be used unless necessary and should be removed within 24 hours if possible. The care of patients and nursing home residents who are catheterised for long periods could be improved if guidelines were implemented fully. PMID:26530593

  13. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  14. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2010 (Springer Verlag) and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/yearbook. Further information about the Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/2855. PMID:20236456

  15. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876... catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a form... type of device includes the rectal catheter for continent ileostomy. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. The GuideLiner Catheter: A Useful Tool in the Armamentarium of the Interventional Cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Boukhris, Marouane; Azzarelli, Salvatore; Tomasello, Salvatore Davide; Elhadj, Zied Ibn; Marzà, Francesco; Galassi, Alfredo R.

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the clinical setting, a good back-up represents one of the most important conditions to ensure guide wire and balloon advancement and stent delivery. As a “mother and child” system, the GuideLiner catheter (Vascular Solutions Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) provides an extension to the guide catheter with better coaxial alignment and stability. We report two didactic cases showing the usefulness of the GuideLiner device in everyday catheterization laboratory practice. The first case was a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a 71-year-old diabetic man admitted for inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction, related to tight proximal stenosis in a dominant tortuous and calcified left circumflex. The second case was an elective PCI in a 76-year-old man admitted for stable angina (Canadian Cardiovascular Society [CCS] class III), related to focal intra-stent restenosis of a saphenous venous graft to the left anterior descending. In both cases, the GuideLiner catheter provided a good back-up insuring the success of PCI and drug-eluting stents implantation, with a good in-hospital outcome. PMID:26985211

  17. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Occluded Hemodialysis Native Fistulas and Grafts Using a Hydrodynamic Thrombectomy Catheter: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Vikram Kaniyur, Sunil; Malhotra, Anmol; Fan, Stanley; Blakeney, Charles; Fotheringham, Tim; Sobeh, Mohammed; Matson, Matthew

    2005-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new hydrodynamic percutaneous thrombectomy catheter in the treatment of thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas and grafts. Twenty-two patients (median age: 47 years; range: 31-79 years) underwent mechanical thrombectomy for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. In all cases, an Oasis hydrodynamic catheter was used. Five patients had native fistulas and 17 had PTFE grafts. Six patients required repeat procedures. All patients with native fistulas and 15 of the 17 with PTFE grafts also underwent angioplasty of the venous limb following the thrombectomy. Major outcome measures included technical success, clinical success, primary and secondary patency, and complication rates. Twenty-eight procedures were performed in total. The technical success rate was 100% and 90% and clinical success was 86% and 76% for native fistulas and grafts, respectively. The primary patency at 6 months was 50% and 59% for fistulas and grafts, respectively, and the secondary patency at 6 months was 75% and 70% for fistulas and grafts, respectively. Two patients died of unrelated causes during the follow-up period. The Oasis catheter is an effective mechanical device for the percutaneous treatment of thrombosed hemodialysis access. Our initial success rate showed that the technique is safe in the treatment of both native fistulas and grafts.

  18. A Case-Control Study to Identify Risk Factors for Totally Implantable Central Venous Port-Related Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guk Jin; Hong, Sook Hee; Roh, Sang Young; Park, Sa Rah; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Hong, Young Seon; Kang, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Ho Jong; Oh, Jung Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To date, the risk factors for central venous port-related bloodstream infection (CVPBSI) in solid cancer patients have not been fully elucidated. We conducted this study in order to determine the risk factors for CVP-BSI in patients with solid cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 1,642 patients with solid cancer received an implantable central venous port for delivery of chemotherapy between October 2008 and December 2011 in a single center. CVP-BSI was diagnosed in 66 patients (4%). We selected a control group of 130 patients, who were individually matched with respect to age, sex, and catheter insertion time. Results CVP-BSI occurred most frequently between September and November (37.9%). The most common pathogen was gram-positive cocci (n=35, 53.0%), followed by fungus (n=14, 21.2%). Multivariate analysis identified monthly catheter-stay as a risk factor for CVP-BSI (p=0.000), however, its risk was lower in primary gastrointestinal cancer than in other cancer (p=0.002). Initial metastatic disease and long catheter-stay were statistically significant factors affecting catheter life span (p=0.005 and p=0.000). Results of multivariate analysis showed that recent transfusion was a risk factor for mortality in patients with CVP-BSI (p=0.047). Conclusion In analysis of the results with respect to risk factors, prolonged catheter-stay should be avoided as much as possible. It is necessary to be cautious of CVP-BSI in metastatic solid cancer, especially non-gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, avoidance of unnecessary transfusion is essential in order to reduce the mortality of CVP-BSI. Finally, considering the fact that confounding factors may have affected the results, conduct of a well-designed prospective controlled study is warranted. PMID:25038760

  19. Drug treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, T R; Scurr, J H; Smith, P D

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of venous insufficiency and venous ulceration has for many years relied on established principles of compression and limb elevation. Drug treatment has been of little benefit. In recent years, a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying skin damage in venous disease has allowed more rational pharmacotherapeutic approaches to be made. This review examines these, with special reference to current theories of the cause of venous ulceration. PMID:2061904

  20. Task-Space Motion Planning of MRI-Actuated Catheters for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Cavu?o?lu, M Cenk

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a motion planning algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) actuated catheters for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The MRI-actuated catheters is a new robotic catheter concept which utilizes MRI for remote steering and guidance. Magnetic moments generated by a set of coils wound near the tip are used to steer the catheter under MRI scanner magnetic field. The catheter during an ablation procedure is modeled as a constrained robotic manipulator with flexible joints, and the proposed motion-planning algorithm calculates a sequence of magnetic moments based on the manipulator model to move the tip of the catheter along a predefined trajectory on the surface of the left atrium. The difficulties in motion planning of the catheter are due to kinematic redundancy and underactuation. The proposed motion planning algorithm overcomes the challenges by operating in the task space instead of the configuration space. The catheter is then regulated around this nominal trajectory using feedback control to reduce the effect of uncertainties. PMID:25485168

  1. Task-Space Motion Planning of MRI-Actuated Catheters for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Çavu?o?lu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a motion planning algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) actuated catheters for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The MRI-actuated catheters is a new robotic catheter concept which utilizes MRI for remote steering and guidance. Magnetic moments generated by a set of coils wound near the tip are used to steer the catheter under MRI scanner magnetic field. The catheter during an ablation procedure is modeled as a constrained robotic manipulator with flexible joints, and the proposed motion-planning algorithm calculates a sequence of magnetic moments based on the manipulator model to move the tip of the catheter along a predefined trajectory on the surface of the left atrium. The difficulties in motion planning of the catheter are due to kinematic redundancy and underactuation. The proposed motion planning algorithm overcomes the challenges by operating in the task space instead of the configuration space. The catheter is then regulated around this nominal trajectory using feedback control to reduce the effect of uncertainties. PMID:25485168

  2. The pulmonary artery catheter: gold standard or redundant relic.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Sherrie

    2005-12-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) technology has changed significantly and use has decreased over the last 20 years. Barriers to use include: (a) increased patient risk with placement; (b) ability to measure similar variables via less invasive measures; (c) increased cost; (d) inaccurate measurement leading to misuse of PAC-derived variables; (e) incorrect interpretation and clinical application; and (f) lack of proven benefit for patient management. Advances in technology have allowed for continuous trending of hemodynamic parameters measured via the PAC. Patient risk is similar to that of central line placement; however risks associated with pulmonary artery infarction and rupture are inherent to the PAC. Less invasive assessment of cardiac output equals that of the PAC, whereas pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and mixed venous oxygen saturation monitoring are unique features of the PAC. Effective use of PAC data will require ongoing standardized education. More studies are needed on the cost-effectiveness of PAC monitoring as well as outcome benefits. Much of the data available from the PAC can be obtained via less invasive methods. However, the PAC continues to be useful in specific situations and remains the gold standard for comparison of new technologies. This paper discusses use of the PAC during the past 2 decades and reviews studies affecting its use in clinical practice. PMID:16387268

  3. Clinical relevance of data from the pulmonary artery catheter

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of parameters measured using the pulmonary artery catheter has been challenged because no benefit in patient outcome has been observed in clinical trials. However, technological advances have been made, including continuous measurement of cardiac output (CO), mixed venous saturation (SvO2), and right ventricle end-diastolic volume (CEDV) have been made. Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP), CEDV and right atrial pressure (RAP) are not good predictors of fluid load responsiveness except when very low. Despite this methodological limitation, variation of these parameters during fluid loading remains a good indicator of fluid challenge tolerance. Accuracy of continuous thermodilution and SvO2 measurement has been demonstrated in vitro and at bedside. A decrease in SvO2 is a global index of an inadequate oxygen delivery (DO2)/oxygen requirement relationship. In this setting, a therapeutic decision to improve determinants of SvO2 should be considered with the help of all other PAC parameters. Technological improvement transforms PAC in a real time integrated physiological device and allows one to observe the impact of therapeutic intervention. What we need now is a clinical trial with a PAC-guided treatment algorithm taking into account the above integrated PAC parameters. PMID:17164015

  4. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  9. Adult Catheter Care and Infection Prevention Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chlorhexidine solution in 70% alcohol, 70% alcohol or povidone-iodine. 5. Properly clean/disinfect the exit site ... g. sensitivity or allergy), use 70% alcohol or povidone-iodine. 6. Cover the catheter exit site with ...

  10. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the catheter tubing. Top of page Resources for healthcare professionals: The following online resources provide more information ... Urinary Tract Infections, 2009 IDSA Guidelines NHSN - National Healthcare Safety Network SHEA/IDSA Practice Recommendation: Strategies to ...

  11. Optimizing Venous Drainage Using an Ultrasonic Flow Probe on the Venous Line

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Joshua L.; Young, Haven A.; Lawson, D. Scott; Husain, S. Adil; Calhoon, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The use of smaller cannulae for minimally invasive surgery techniques and/or aggressive miniaturization of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuitry has necessitated the need to augment venous drainage to achieve adequate flow rates. Vacuum assisted venous drainage (VAVD) has become the dominant method to augment venous drainage. VAVD, however, has been associated with a number of known side effects including increased transmission of gaseous microemboli to the patient, venous line chatter, and increased arterial to venous shunts in the circuit. Historically, our practice has been to monitor the arterial output flow rate and to monitor VAVD by observing venous line chatter and changes in the venous reservoir level. In 2008 our pediatric cardiothoracic service began monitoring venous line flow rates by using a second ultrasonic flow probe placed on the venous line. After 12 months, our staff perfusionists reviewed the impact of monitoring venous line flow rates on VAVD and its known side effects on daily clinical practice. When monitoring venous line flow rates, empiric observation revealed that less overall vacuum pressure was needed for our CPB cases. This novel approach to monitoring venous drainage has aided us in providing optimal vacuum levels and therefore, may reduce some of the known side effects experienced with excessive VAVD. PMID:22164455

  12. Continuous intra-jugular venous blood-gas monitoring with the Paratrend 7 during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Endoh, H; Honda, T; Oohashi, S; Nagata, Y; Shibue, C; Shimoji, K

    2001-08-01

    We measured the accuracy of the continuous intra-vascular blood-gas monitoring system (Paratrend 7, PT7) placed in the jugular venous bulb in 18 adult patients having cardiac or aortic surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After induction of anaesthesia, a PT7 sensor was inserted through a 20-gauge venous catheter into the right jugular venous bulb. Blood samples were drawn from the venous catheter and measured with a blood gas analyser (BGA). Five to eight paired measurements using the PT7 and blood samples were made per patient, and bias and precision were calculated for each patient using the Bland-Altman method. The ranges for the blood sample measurements were: pH 7.12 to 7.59, PCO(2) 3.7 to 9.6 kPa, PO(2) 3.5 to 16.0 kPa, oxygen saturation 40 to 99%, bicarbonate 18.6 to 34.4 mmol l(-1), and base excess -7.8 to 12.5 mmol l(-1). Bias and precision values were 0.014/0.071 for pH, 0/0.90 kPa for PCO(2), and -0.16/1.18 kPa for PO(2). These values were comparable with those previously made on arterial blood. However, precision for oxygen saturation in each patient varied 2.3 to 23.6% (95% CI: 6.3 to 12.9%), which was unsatisfactory for clinical measurements. Deep hypothermia ( approximately 19.6 degrees C) and marked haemodilution ( approximately 13.5%) during CPB did not influence the reliability of the PT7 sensor. Thus, we concluded that continuous intra-jugular venous blood-gas monitoring is clinically feasible using the PT7 and may provide valuable information during CPB. PMID:11493493

  13. Percutaneous catheter balloons: failure to deflate.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J R; Johnsrude, I S; Lund, G; Rysavy, J; Anderson, R W; Amplatz, K

    1985-06-01

    Three examples of permanently inflated transluminal catheter balloons are presented. Two of these occurred during attempted percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Nonsurgical solutions, which were successful in each case, are described. Percutaneous puncture with a needle or a larger diameter coaxial catheter under fluoroscopic guidance may be useful when this complication occurs during attempted balloon angioplasty or embolization with proximal balloon occlusion in large vessels. PMID:3159040

  14. Internal and external urinary catheters: a primer for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2008-12-01

    Internal and external urinary catheters are used to manage urinary incontinence and incomplete bladder emptying. Bladder dysfunction cause determines whether short- or long-term catheter use is required which, in turn, determines whether an indwelling, intermittent, or external catheter should be used. The method of catheterization is based on the underlying bladder condition, the goals of treatment, and gender appropriateness. Complications such as infection (eg, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, sepsis) and its related sequelae have been found to be directly related to length of time of catheter use (eg, women are at greater risk for catheter-associated urinary tract infection when an indwelling catheter is in place >2 weeks); thus, catheter use must be medically justified and in the case of an indwelling catheter, involve the shortest period possible to ensure patient safety and regulatory compliance. Some newer catheter systems include coatings to prevent complications; complications specific to indwelling catheter use include obstruction from encrustations, urethral trauma and erosion, bladder stones and bladder cancer, and, in men, epididymitis. Complications from external catheters may occur when skin condition is compromised. Overuse of catheters has reimbursement ramifications. Numerous guidelines reflect the need for the judicious use of urinary catheters, particularly in long-term care patients. Because evidence-based research on long-term use of these devices is lacking, clinicians should use clinical experience when caring for patients with catheters. PMID:19104121

  15. Determination of urethral catheter surface lubricity.

    PubMed

    Kazmierska, Katarzyna; Szwast, Maciej; Ciach, Tomasz

    2008-06-01

    Device for in-vitro measurement of static and kinetic friction coefficient of catheter surface was developed. Tribometer was designed and constructed to work with exchangeable counter-faces (polymers, tissue) and various types of tubes, in wet conditions in order to mimic in-vivo process. Thus seven commercially available urethral catheters, made from vinyl polymers, natural latex with silicone coating, all-silicone or hydrogel coated, and one made from polyvinylchloride with polyurethane/polyvinylpyrrolidone hydrogel coating obtained in our laboratory, were tested against three various counter faces: polymethacrylate (organic glass), inner part of porcine aorta and porcine bladder mucosa. Additionally, the hydrophility/hydrophobity of tested catheters was stated via water wetting contact angle measurement. Super-hydrophilic biomaterials revealed low friction on tissue and hydrophobic counter-face; slightly hydrophobic showed higher friction in both cases, while more hydrophobic manifested low friction on tissue but high on hydrophobic polymer. The smoothest friction characteristic was achieved in all cases on tissue counter-faces. The measured values of the static coefficient of friction of catheters on bladder mucosa counter-face were as follows: the highest (0.15) for vinyl and siliconised latex catheters and 3 folds lower (0.05) for all-silicone ones. Hydrogel coated catheters exhibited the lowest static and kinetic friction factors. PMID:18071872

  16. Saphenous Venous Ablation with Hot Contrast in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Amit Qian Zhong; Kirsch, David; Eissa, Marna; Narra, Pavan; Lopera, Jorge; Espinoza, Carmen G.; Castaneda, Wifrido

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To determine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of thermal ablation of the saphenous vein with hot contrast medium. Methods. Twelve saphenous veins of 6 dogs were percutaneously ablated with hot contrast medium. In all animals, ablation was performed in the vein of one leg, followed by ablation in the contralateral side 1 month later. An occlusion balloon catheter was placed in the infragenicular segment of the saphenous vein via a jugular access to prevent unwanted thermal effects on the non-target segment of the saphenous vein. After inflation of the balloon, 10 ml of hot contrast medium was injected under fluoroscopic control through a sheath placed in the saphenous vein above the ankle. A second 10 ml injection of hot contrast medium was made after 5 min in each vessel. Venographic follow-up of the ablated veins was performed at 1 month (n = 12) and 2 months (n = 6). Results. Follow-up venograms showed that all ablated venous segments were occluded at 1 month. In 6 veins which were followed up to 2 months, 4 (66%) remained occluded, 1 (16%) was partially patent, and the remaining vein (16%) was completely patent. In these latter 2 cases, an inadequate amount of hot contrast was delivered to the lumen due to a closed balloon catheter downstream which did not allow contrast to displace blood within the vessel. Discussion. Hot contrast medium thermal ablation of the saphenous vein appears feasible, safe, and effective in the canine model, provided an adequate amount of embolization agent is used.

  17. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation < 50% (normal range is 55-75%) correlates with poor clinical outcome. We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation. Recently, we designed and built a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system operating in the near-infrared spectral range for continuous, real-time oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. In this work, we designed and built a novel SSS optoacoustic probe and developed a new algorithm for SSS oxygenation measurement. The SSS signals were measured in healthy volunteers during voluntary hyperventilation, which induced changes in SSS oxygenation. Simultaneously, we measured exhaled carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) using capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  18. Optoacoustic measurement of central venous oxygenation for assessment of circulatory shock: clinical study in cardiac surgery patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock is a dangerous medical condition, in which blood flow cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. Currently, its diagnosis and therapy decisions are based on hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases) and mental status of a patient, which all have low specificity. Measurement of mixed or central venous blood oxygenation via catheters is more reliable, but highly invasive and associated with complications. Our previous studies in healthy volunteers demonstrated that optoacoustic systems provide non-invasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific vessels, including central veins. Here we report our first results of a clinical study in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients. We used a medical-grade OPO-based optoacoustic system developed in our laboratory to measure in real time blood oxygenation in the internal jugular vein (IJV) of these patients. A clinical ultrasound imaging system (GE Vivid e) was used for IJV localization. Catheters were placed in the IJV as part of routine care and blood samples taken via the catheters were processed with a CO-oximeter. The optoacoustic oxygenation data were compared to the CO-oximeter readings. Good correlation between the noninvasive and invasive measurements was obtained. The results of these studies suggest that the optoacoustic system can provide accurate, noninvasive measurements of central venous oxygenation that can be used for patients with circulatory shock.

  19. Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

    2014-05-01

    Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should have quality assertion programmes for implementation and follow-up of routines, teaching, training and clinical outcome. Clinical guidelines on a wide range of relevant topics have been introduced, based on extensive literature retrieval, to facilitate effective and safe management of CVCs. PMID:24593804

  20. Perinatal renal venous thrombosis: presenting renal length predicts outcome

    PubMed Central

    Winyard, P J D; Bharucha, T; De Bruyn, R; Dillon, M J; Hoff, W van't; Trompeter, R S; Liesner, R; Wade, A; Rees, L

    2006-01-01

    Background Renal venous thrombosis (RVT) is the most common form of venous thrombosis in neonates, causing both acute and long term kidney dysfunction. Historical predisposing factors include dehydration, maternal diabetes, and umbilical catheters, but recent reports highlight associations with prothrombotic abnormalities. Study Twenty three patients with neonatal RVT were analysed over 15 years. Predisposing factors, presentation, and procoagulant status were compared with renal outcome using multilevel modelling. Results Median presentation was on day 1: 19/23 (83%) had pre/perinatal problems, including fetal distress (14), intrauterine growth retardation (five), and pre?identified renal abnormalities (two); 8/18 (44%) had procoagulant abnormalities, particularly factor V Leiden mutations (4/18). Long term abnormalities were detected in 28/34 (82%) affected kidneys; mean glomerular filtration rate was 93.6 versus 70.2?ml/min/1.73?m2 in unilateral versus bilateral cases (difference 23.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4 to 40.4; p ?=? 0.01). No correlation was observed between procoagulant tendencies and outcome, but presenting renal length had a significant negative correlation: mean fall in estimated single kidney glomerular filtration rate was 3?ml/min/1.73?m2 (95% confidence interval 3.7 to ?2.2; p ?=? 0.001) per 1?mm increase, and kidneys larger than 6?cm at presentation never had a normal outcome. Conclusions This subgroup of neonatal RVT would be better termed perinatal RVT to reflect antenatal and birth related antecedents. Prothrombotic defects should be considered in all patients with perinatal RVT. Kidney length at presentation correlated negatively with renal outcome. The latter, novel observation raises the question of whether larger organs should be treated more aggressively in future. PMID:16464938