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Sample records for venous hickman catheter

  1. Complications associated with different insertion techniques for Hickman catheters.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Z; Mohyuddin, Z

    1998-02-01

    A dependable central venous access is an essential prerequisite for the delivery of care to the cancer patients. This has become easier since the introduction of indwelling central venous catheters. However, pancytopenia, often encountered in haematological malignancies, does influence the morbidity associated with these catheters. In this study the effects of two different placement techniques of Hickman catheters were evaluated. A total of 177 Hickman catheters were inserted in patients suffering from haematological malignancies. In 112 patients the catheters were placed percutaneously into subclavian veins without prior tunnelling; in the other 65 patients these were introduced, after having been tunnelled, into cephalic/external jugular veins by a cut-down technique. The catheters remained in use in each patient for between 18 and 253 days. Excessive bleeding and haematoma formation occurred in a significantly higher proportion of patients from the cut-down group (61% and 41%, respectively) compared to patients from the percutaneous group (8% and 0%, respectively). These in turn had a profound impact on the incidence of infective complications. Catheter exit site infection, tunnel infection and septicaemia were observed in 26%, 18%, and 41%, respectively, of the patients from the cut-down group, while in patients from the percutaneous group, skin exit site infection was noted only in 7% and septicaemia in 19% of patients. It was concluded that the placement technique of these catheters exerts a significant influence on the immediate as well as delayed complications. The results indicate that the insertion technique requiring minimal dissection is more beneficial. It is therefore recommended that percutaneous insertion without tunnelling should be the technique of choice for catheter placement. PMID:9616492

  2. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  3. Infectious Complications of Radiologically Inserted Hickman Catheters in Patients with Hematologic Disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Jeannette; Overhagen, Hans van; Wielenga, Jenne; Marie, Siem de; Nouwen, Jan; Ridder, Marie A.J. de; Lameris, Johan S.

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of infections and its influence on the survival of radiologically inserted Hickman catheters (HCs) in patients with hematologic disorders and to determine factors associated with premature HC removal. Methods: Survival and complications of 175 HCs in 115 patients were studied retrospectively. To describe the data the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used, using the date of HC removal due to HC-related infection as endpoint. A stratified Cox regression model was used to determine explanatory factors. Results: Seventy (40%) HCs were removed prematurely because of proven or probable HC-related infections. The incidence of infection leading to HC removal was 4.78 per 1000 catheter-days for proven HC infections. Univariate analysis revealed that acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, or treatment for these diseases, gender, each subsequent catheter in the same patient and insertion site increased the risk of premature removal of the catheter due to infection. Conclusion: Infection is a major problem in patients with HCs. Unfortunately, the factors associated with increased infection rates that were found in this study cannot be influenced. Further studies are necessary to determine the role of environmental conditions in a radiology suite in relation to the risk of developing a catheter-related infection.

  4. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  5. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  6. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  7. A retrospective study of central venous catheters GCRI experience

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin A.; Shukla, Shilin N.; Talati, Shailesh S.; Parikh, Sonia K.; Bhatt, Shivani J.; Maka, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) has greatly improved the quality-of-care in cancer patients, yet these catheters may cause serious infectious and thrombotic complications. The aim of this retrospective study was to study the various types of CVCs and their complications. Materials and Methods: We studied retrospectively 213 cases of CVCs in our institute with their indications, type and complications from August 2010 to July 2011. Results: A total of 213 CVCs were inserted in patients with hematological (62%) and solid organ malignancies (38%). Ninety-eight patients (46%) had peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC), 90 (42%) patients had Hickman catheters and 25 (12%) had a port. The median duration of retention of Hickman catheters was 104 days (3-365 days), for the peripherally inserted central catheters was 59 days (3-100 days) and for the port it was 280 days (45-365 days). Non-infective complications were more than infective (12% vs. 7%). The most common complication was non-infective occlusion and thrombophlebitis. In one patient with PICC thrombosis occurred in the cephalic, radial and ulnar vein and in one patient with port thrombosis occurred in the superior vena cava. Organisms were isolated in 60% (12 out of 20) of cultures. Common organisms isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 5 (42%), Staphylococcus aureus in 2 (16%), Escherichia coli in 2 (16%) and Aspergillus in 3 (25%) patients. 7 out of 12 infected patients had negative blood cultures within 7 days of antibiotic treatment, 5 patients remained positive for more than 7 days with antibiotics. In 155 patients (73%), the desired treatment protocol was completed and at present there are still 28 patients (13%) with catheters. 5 patients (2.3%) died of febrile neutropenia and septicemia with multi-organ failure. In 5 patients (2.3%), the catheters (1 Port, 1 Hickman and 3 PICC) were prematurely removed because of thrombosis. Conclusion: CVCs are better options to facilitate the long-term vascular access provided infection is prevented with meticulous care and treated promptly with proper antibiotics. Most CVCs is acceptable to patients. PMID:24604950

  8. Prevention of thrombosis of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Borow, M; Crowley, J G

    1986-01-01

    All central venous catheters develop a fibrin sheath and clot formation which can cause pulmonary emboli, especially when the catheter is withdrawn. The degree of fibrin sheath and clot is dependent not on the length of residence in the vein but related more to the type of catheter material. A study was performed placing the more commonly used catheters in arteries and veins of canines for two weeks and then evaluating the volume of sheath and thrombus. Polyurethane catheters were the most thrombogenic, whereas polyurethane coated with hydromer was the least thrombogenic, followed closely by silicone catheters. Polyvinyl chloride catheters were intermediate in their thrombogenic activity. PMID:3760021

  9. Thrombolytic therapy for central venous catheter occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters have improved the quality of care for patients with chronic illnesses, but are complicated by obstructions which can result in delay of treatment or catheter removal. Design and Methods This paper reviews thrombolytic treatment for catheter obstruction. Literature from Medline searches using the terms central venous catheter, central venous access device OR central venous line associated with the terms obstruction, occlusion OR thrombolytic was reviewed. Efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, central venous catheter clearance rates and time to clearance were assessed. Results Alteplase, one of the current therapies, clears 52% of obstructed catheters within 30 min with 86% overall clearance (after 2 doses, when necessary). However, newer medications may have higher efficacy or shorter time to clearance. Reteplase cleared 6774% within 3040 min and 95% of catheters overall. Occlusions were resolved in 70 and 83% of patients with one and 2 doses of tenecteplase, respectively. Recombinant urokinase cleared 60% of catheters at 30 min and 73% overall. Alfimeprase demonstrated rapid catheter clearance with resolution in 40% of subjects within 5 min, 60% within 30 min, and 80% within 2 h. Additionally, urokinase prophylaxis decreased the incidence of catheter occlusions from 1668% in the control group to 423% in the treatment group; in some studies, rates of catheter infections were also decreased in the urokinase group. Conclusions Thrombolytic agents successfully clear central venous catheter occlusions in most cases. Newer agents may act more rapidly and effectively than currently utilized therapies, but randomized studies with direct comparisons of these agents are needed to determine optimal management for catheter obstruction. PMID:22180420

  10. Ultrasound assessment of thrombotic complications in pediatric patients with tunneled central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kosiak, Wojciech; Irga, Ninela; Połczyńska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Central venous access consists in inserting a vascular catheter to the vena cava and placing its tip in the vicinity of the opening to the right atrium. In the patients of the Clinic of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology at the Academic Clinical Centre of the Medical University in Gdańsk, such implantation procedures are conducted 40–50 times in a year using Broviac/Hickman catheters that are placed in the subclavian vein. In the Ultrasound and Biopsy Laboratory at the clinic mentioned above, approximately 200–250 examinations have been conducted since 2005 to assess the central venous access. Implantation of a catheter considerably increases the comfort of patients who require a long-term venous access. Nevertheless, it is an invasive procedure, burdened with a risk of numerous, early and late complications. The late complications are associated with implanted catheters and include catheter-related thrombosis. The aim of this paper was to present three patients of the Clinic of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology at the Academic Clinical Centre of the Medical University in Gdańsk, in whom thrombotic complications occurred as a result of long-term central venous catheters. The paper also discusses the possibilities of using sonography in the assessment of such complications. In the presented patients, it was possible to determine the size and localization of a thrombus which enabled effective treatment in two cases. The pathomechanism of catheter-related thrombosis was explained and the risk factors of such complications were discussed. The attention was paid to the necessity of conducting ultrasound examinations in pediatric patients with inserted catheters as soon as the first symptoms of thrombosis appear. Based on own observations and despite the lack of validation of ultrasound imaging in the assessment of central catheters, we believe that this method is highly promising and can be recommended for the assessment of thrombotic complications in pediatric patients with central venous catheters. PMID:26673005

  11. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  12. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, called a Biopatch A clear ... around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place ...

  13. Evaluation of central venous catheter thrombogenicity.

    PubMed

    Borow, M; Crowley, J G

    1985-01-01

    Four studies were performed to evaluate the thrombogenicity of different central venous catheter materials. Two of these studies consisted of evaluating the amount of platelet deposition on different catheter materials, firstly in vitro and then in vivo using dogs. In these studies, 51-chromium was used to label the platelets. In the following study, the volume of clot and the degree of fibrin sheath were determined by placing catheters in both arteries and veins of dogs for two to four weeks before removing the vessels and performing a quantitative analysis. For the fourth study, indium labelled platelet deposition with scintillation counting was performed on six dogs in whom catheters had been placed in the femoral and carotid arteries. The vessels in three of these animals were removed 48 hours after imaging was completed to correlate the scintigraphic findings with a quantitative analysis of the clot and fibrin sheath on each catheter. There was a high degree of correlation between all these studies. The most consistently thrombogenic catheter material was polyurethane, and the least thrombogenic catheter material was polyurethane coated with hydromer. Silicone was the next least thrombogenic material examined. PMID:3866475

  14. Central venous catheters: incidence and predictive factors of venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Mary; Desai, Amishi; Pasupneti, Shravani; Kress, John; Funaki, Brian; Watson, Sydeaka; Herlitz, Jean; Hines, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Central venous catheter access in an acute setting can be a challenge given underlying disease and risk for venous thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed but limit sites for fistula creation in patients with chronic renal failure (CKD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of venous thrombosis from small bore internal jugular (SBIJ) and PICC line placement. This investigation identifies populations of patients who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC and highlights the importance of peripheral vein preservation in patients with renal failure. Materials and methods: A venous Doppler ultrasound was performed at the time of SBIJ insertion and removal to evaluate for thrombosis in the internal jugular vein. Data was collected pre- and post-intervention to ascertain if increased vein preservation knowledge amongst the healthcare team led to less use of PICCs. Demographic factors were collected in the SBIJ and PICC groups and risk factor analysis was completed. Results: 1,122 subjects had PICC placement and 23 had SBIJ placement. The incidence of thrombosis in the PICC group was 10%. One patient with an SBIJ had evidence of central vein thrombosis when the catheter was removed. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a history of transplant, and the indication of total parenteral nutrition was associated with thrombosis (p < 0.001). The decrease in PICCs placed in patients with CKD 6 months before and after intervention was significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There are subsets of patients with high risk for thrombosis who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC. PMID:25997503

  15. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  16. Percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of intracardiac central venous catheter fragments in two infants using Amplatz Goose Neck snare.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Ercan; Aypar, Ebru; Atalay, Semra; Yavuz, Gülsan; Doğu, Figen

    2009-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) fracture with embolization is a serious and rare complication, and few cases have been reported in children. Catheter fragments may cause cardiac perforation, arrythmias, pulmonary embolism, and sepsis. We report the successful retrieval of intracardiac CVC fragments by percutaneous transcatheter technique in two infants, aged 8 and 15 months. Double-lumen 7 French Hickman CVCs were accidentally fractured during their removal. Chest radiographs of the two patients revealed migrated intracardiac catheter fragments extending from the superior vena cava (SVC) to the right atrium and from the SVC to the right ventricle, respectively. The procedure was performed under ketamine anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance using a percutaneous femoral vein approach. Nitinol Amplatz Goose Neck snares (10 mm in diameter) were used to successfully retrieve the catheter fragments without any complication. Percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of catheter fragments using Goose Neck snare is a safe and successful technique and can be chosen before resorting to surgery, which has potential risks related to general anesthesia, thoracotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:20112614

  17. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment. PMID:25771092

  18. How to use central venous catheter tip cultures.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, Niamh; Crowley, Brendan

    2015-04-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) tip cultures are useful in the assessment of a patient with a potential catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). However, these results can be misleading particularly in the absence of concomitant peripheral and central line blood cultures. Catheter tip cultures should not be submitted to the laboratory unless CRBSI is suspected as the predictive value of culture results depends on the pretest probability of CRBSI. A positive CVC tip culture does not usually warrant further investigation or therapy (except in the case of Staphylococcus aureus and possibly Candida sp) while a negative catheter tip culture in isolation does not definitively exclude CRBSI. Clinicians can use alternative criteria for the diagnosis of CRBSI that do not require catheter tip cultures if necessary. Further research into the significance of CVC tip cultures in the absence of concomitant bacteraemia is required. PMID:24711374

  19. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter. PMID:25278411

  20. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for “Central line malposition” and then for “Central venous catheters intravascular malposition,” we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient’s body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition. PMID:26587087

  1. Corynebacterium striatum bacteremia associated with central venous catheter infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Lun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Sing-On; Ou, Tsong-Yih; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2012-06-01

    Corynebacterium striatum (C striatum) has been considered a contaminant of blood culture in past decades. Here we report the case of a patient with acute deterioration of chronic renal failure. She received hemodialysis and died from C striatum bacteremia. By using a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method, we found that an association existed between C striatum from the bloodstream and that from the central venous catheter. We suggest that C striatum could be a pathogen of bloodstream infection in patients with such a catheter in place. PMID:22154992

  2. Migration of Central Venous Catheters in Neonates: A Radiographic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruby; Drendel, Amy L; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Quijano, Carla V; Uhing, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Objective This study aims to determine the frequency that umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) migrate into the cardiothymic silhouette after initial verification of correct placement. Study Design This is a single-center, retrospective study in neonates in whom a PICC or UVC was placed. The frequency of catheter tip migration into the cardiothymic silhouette requiring catheter manipulation was determined radiographically at 1 and 24 hours, respectively, after insertion. Results At 1 and 24 hours, 36 and 23% of UVCs (n = 41) migrated into the cardiothymic silhouette, respectively. At 1 and 24 hours, 23 and 11% of PICCs (n = 63) migrated into the cardiothymic silhouette, respectively. Migration was not associated with birth weight, weight at insertion, or postnatal age at insertion. Conclusion UVCs and PICCs frequently migrate into the cardiothymic silhouette increase the risk for development of a pericardial effusion. Serial radiographic assessment of catheter tip location is needed to assess catheter migration within the first 24 hours of line placement. PMID:26731179

  3. Heparin Leakage in Central Venous Catheters by Hemodynamic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava for hemodialysis, are routinely filled with heparin, an anticoagulant, while not in use to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. However, the heparin-lock procedure places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences, as heparin is known to leak into the blood stream. We propose that the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage is advective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile blood flow surrounding the catheter tip. This novel hypothesis is based on Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of heparin transport from a CVC placed inside an in vitro pulsatile flow loop and validated with CFD simulations. The results show an initial, fast (<10s), advection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin at the CVC tip, followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin at the tip. These results, which estimate leakage rates consistent with published in vivo data, predict that the concentration of heparin at the catheter tip is effectively zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin lock ineffective.

  4. Malposition of central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch via external jugular vein -a case report-

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, SoWoon; Lee, Ju Ho; Park, Chunghyun; Hong, Yong-woo

    2015-01-01

    The central venous cannulation is commonly performed in the operating rooms and intensive care units for various purposes. Although the central venous catheter (CVC) is used in many ways, the malpositioning of the CVC is often associated with serious complications. We report a case of an unexpected malposition of a CVC in the jugular venous arch via external jugular vein. PMID:25844137

  5. JUGULAR CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT THROUGH A MODIFIED SELDINGER TECHNIQUE FOR LONG-TERM VENOUS ACCESS IN CHELONIANS.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Mariana A; Divers, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Long-term or repeated venous access in chelonians is difficult to obtain and manage, but can be critically important for administration of medications and blood sampling in hospitalized patients. Jugular catheterization provides the most rapid and secure route for vascular access, but catheters can be difficult to place, and maintaining catheter patency may be challenging. Long multilumen polyurethane catheters provide flexibility and sampling access, and minimize difficulties, such as catheter displacement, that have been encountered with traditional over-the-needle catheters. We describe placement of 4 Fr. 13-cm polyurethane catheters in three chelonians with the use of a modified Seldinger technique. Venous access was obtained with the use of an over-the-needle catheter, which allowed placement of a 0.018-in.-diameter wire, over which the polyurethane catheter was placed. Indwelling time has ranged between 1 and 4 mo currently. All tortoises were sedated for this procedure. Polyurethane central catheters provide safe, long-term venous access that allows clinicians to perform serial blood sampling as well as intravenous administration of medications, anesthetic agents, and fluids. A jugular catheter can also allow central venous pressure measurement. Utilization of central line catheters was associated with improvements in diagnostic efficiency and therapeutic case management, with minimal risks and complications. PMID:27010289

  6. Hemodynamics of Central Venous Catheters: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Clark, Alicia; Ng, Chin Hei; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are used to provide vascular access during hemodialysis in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Despite several advantages and widespread use, CVCs have a high incidence rate of clot formation during the interdialytic phase (48 hrs). In an attempt the prevent clot formation, hospitals routinely administer heparin, an anticoagulant, into the catheter after a dialysis session. It has been reported, however, that up to 40% of the heparin solution will leak into the blood stream during the interdialytic phase, placing the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences. The aim of this study is to determine the role that advective-diffusive transport plays in the heparin leaking process. Numerical simulations of heparin convective mass transfer have been conducted, showing that while advective losses may be significant at the tip, previous studies may be overestimating the total amount of heparin leakage. To validate the quantitative prediction from the simulations, P.L.I.F. is used to experimentally measure heparin transport from CVCs placed in an idealized Superior Vena Cava with physically accurate pulsatile flow conditions. Improved understanding of flow near the catheter tip is applied to improve catheter design and heparin locking procedures.

  7. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing. PMID:22059378

  8. Managing bloodstream infections in patients who have short-term central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Naomi P; Chertow, Daniel S

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections can be complicated to manage, but a growing body of evidence supports specific recommendations. In 2009, the Infectious Diseases Society of America published updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of all intravascular catheter-related infections. Here we provide a focused review on the management of bloodstream infections in adult patients with short-term (not surgically implanted and not tunneled) central venous catheters, including peripherally inserted central catheters. This review should serve as a ready reference for providers (eg, hospitalists, surgeons, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, intensivists) managing adult patients with short-term central venous catheters in place. PMID:21199902

  9. Study of in vivo catheter biofilm infections using pediatric central venous catheter implanted in rat.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashwini; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Venous access catheters used in clinics are prone to biofilm contamination, contributing to chronic and nosocomial infections. Although several animal models for studying device-associated biofilms were previously described, only a few detailed protocols are currently available. Here we provide a protocol using totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) implanted in rats. This model recapitulates all phenomena observed in the clinic, and it allows bacterial biofilm development and physiology to be studied. After TIVAP implantation and inoculation with luminescent pathogens, in vivo biofilm formation can be monitored in situ, and biofilm biomass can be recovered from contaminated TIVAP and organs. We used this protocol to study host responses to biofilm infection, to evaluate preventive and curative antibiofilm strategies and to study fundamental biofilm properties. For this procedure, one should expect ∼3 h of hands-on time, including the implantation in one rat followed by in situ luminescence monitoring and bacterial load estimation. PMID:26890680

  10. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections. PMID:26569627

  11. Distance of the internal central venous catheter tip from the right atrium is positively correlated with central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Samra, Navdeep S; Gifford, Karen Mathiesen; Roller, Robert; Wolfe, Bruce M; Owings, John T

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with occlusive, infectious, and thrombotic complications. The aim of this study was to determine if internal CVC tip position was correlated with subsequent complications. This was an institutional review board approved single-center retrospective review of 169 consecutive patients who underwent placement of 203 semipermanent CVCs. Using post-placement chest X-rays, a de novo scale of internal catheter tip position was developed. Major complications were recorded. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine if catheter tip position predicted subsequent complications. There were 78 men and 91 women with a mean age of 48 ± 11 years. There were 21 catheter tips placed in the subclavian/innominate veins, 32 in the upper superior vena cava, 113 in the atriocaval junction, and 37 in the right atrium. There were 83 complications occurring in 61 (36.1 %) patients, including sepsis in 40 (23.7 %), venous thrombosis in 18 (10.7 %), catheter occlusion in 16 (9.5 %), internal catheter repositioning in 6 (3.6 %), pneumothorax in 2 (1.2 %), and death in 1 (0.6 %). An internal catheter tip position peripheral to the atriocaval junction resulted in a catheter that was more likely to undergo internal repositioning (p < 0.001) and venous thrombosis (p < 0.001). Patients with femoral catheters were more likely to develop sepsis (45 %) than patients whose catheters were inserted through the upper extremity veins (18 %) (p < 0.01). In conclusion, to reduce catheter-associated morbidity and potentially mortality, the internal catheter tip should be positioned at the atriocaval junction or within the right atrium and femoral insertion sites should be avoided whenever possible. PMID:27112774

  12. The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view for central venous catheter placement and catheter change over guidewire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Chan; Klebach, Christian; Heinze, Ingo; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view can be useful for central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Venipuncture of the internal jugular veins (IJV) or subclavian veins is performed with a micro-convex ultrasound probe, using a neonatal abdominal preset with a probe frequency of 10 Mhz at a depth of 10-12 cm. Following insertion of the guidewire into the vein, the probe is shifted to the right supraclavicular fossa to obtain a view of the superior vena cava (SVC), right pulmonary artery and ascending aorta. Under real-time ultrasound view, the guidewire and its J-tip is visualized and pushed forward to the lower SVC. Insertion depth is read from guidewire marks using central venous catheter. CVC is then inserted following skin and venous dilation. The supraclavicular fossa view is most suitable for right IJV CVC insertion. If other insertion sites are chosen the right supraclavicular fossa should be within the sterile field. Scanning of the IJVs, brachiocephalic veins and SVC can reveal significant thrombosis before venipuncture. Misplaced CVCs can be corrected with a change over guidewire technique under real-time ultrasound guidance. In conjunction with a diagnostic lung ultrasound scan, this technique has a potential to replace chest radiograph for confirmation of CVC tip position and exclusion of pneumothorax. Moreover, this view is of advantage in patients with a non-p-wave cardiac rhythm were an intra-cardiac electrocardiography (ECG) is not feasible for CVC tip position confirmation. Limitations of the method are lack of availability of a micro-convex probe and the need for training. PMID:25548874

  13. Contralateral effusions secondary to subclavian venous catheters. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ciment, L M; Rotbart, A; Galbut, R N

    1983-06-01

    Two cases of contralateral pleural effusions due to indwelling central venous catheters are presented. Radiographic contrast studies were performed to elucidate diagnosis and to define the mechanism of this complication; mediastinal leakage was documented in one case. PMID:6851699

  14. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  15. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Central Venous Catheter Sutured to the Wall of the Right Atrium

    SciTech Connect

    Neuerburg, Joerg-M.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Chalabi, Khaled; Hunter, David

    1999-01-15

    A transjugular central venous catheter was inadvertently sutured to the wall of the right atrium in a 63-year-old female during coronary bypass surgery. Using two nitinol Goose Neck snares via a transfemoral and a transjugular approach the catheter was severed into two pieces and retrieved percutaneously.

  16. An effective and biocompatible antibiofilm coating for central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Silva Paes Leme, Annelisa Farah; Ferreira, Aline Siqueira; Alves, Fernanda Aparecida Oliveira; de Azevedo, Bruna Martinho; de Bretas, Liza Porcaro; Farias, Rogerio Estevam; Oliveira, Murilo Gomes; Raposo, Nádia Rezende Barbosa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and the tissue reaction of an antibiofilm coating composed of xylitol, triclosan, and polyhexamethylene biguanide. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed by a turbidimetric method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the antiadherent property of central venous catheter (CVC) fragments impregnated with an antibiofilm coating (I-CVC) in comparison with noncoated CVC (NC-CVC) fragments. Two in vivo assays using subcutaneous implantation of NC-CVC and I-CVC fragments in the dorsal area of rats were performed. The first assay comprised hematological and microbiological analysis. The second assay evaluated tissue response by examining the inflammatory reactions after 7 and 21 days. The formulation displayed antimicrobial activity against all tested strains. A biofilm disaggregation with significant reduction of microorganism's adherence in I-CVC fragments was observed. In vivo antiadherence results demonstrated a reduction of early biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, mainly in an external surface of the I-CVC, in comparison with the NC-CVC. All animals displayed negative hemoculture. No significant tissue reaction was observed, indicating that the antibiofilm formulation could be considered biocompatible. The use of I-CVC could decrease the probability of development of localized or systemic infections. PMID:25826042

  17. [Procedure adverse events: nursing care in central venous catheter fracture].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juan, Eva; Maqueda-Palau, Mònica; Romero-Grilo, Cristina; Muñoz-Moles, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    In a intensive care unit (ICU) there are many factors that can lead to the occurrence of adverse events. A high percentage of these events are associated with the administration of drugs. Diagnostic tests, such as computed tomography, is common in critically ill patients and technique can be performed with injection of contrast agent to enhance the visualization of soft tissue. The contrast is a medication and the nurse is responsible for its proper administration. The management of the critically ill patient is complex. ICU team and radiology shares responsibility for the care and safety of the patient safety during the transfer and performing tests with contrast. The World Health Organisation patient safety strategies, recommends analysing errors and learning from them. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the causes of the category E severity adverse events that occurred in a patient who was admitted to the ICU for septic shock of abdominal origin. An abdominal computed tomography was performed with contrast which was injected through a central venous catheter. The contrast did not appear in the image. What happened? Causal analysis helped to understand what triggered the event. A care plan and an algorithm were drafted to prevent it from happening again, with the following objectives: improving knowledge, skills and promoting positive attitudes towards patient safety, working at primary, secondary and tertiary care levels. PMID:24439203

  18. Heparinized and Saline Solutions in the Maintenance of Arterial and Central Venous Catheters After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Alizadehasl, Azin; Aghdaii, Nahid; Sadeghi, Ali; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Masoumi, Gholamreza; Golbargian, Ghodrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heparinized saline solution is used to prevent occlusion in the arterial catheters and central venous pressure monitoring catheters. Even at low dose, heparin administration can be associated with serious complications. Normal saline solution can maintain patency of arterial catheters and central venous pressure monitoring catheters. Objectives: The current study aimed to compare the efficacy of normal saline with that of heparinized one to maintain patency of arterial and central venous catheters after cardiac surgery. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized controlled trial, 100 patients, with an age range of 18 - 65 years of valve and coronary artery surgery were studied in Rajaie heart center, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomized to receive either heparinized saline (n = 50) or normal saline flush solutions (n = 50). In the study, arterial catheters and central venous pressure monitoring catheters were daily checked for any signs of occlusion in three postoperative days as primary end-point of the study. Results: According to the information obtained from the study, four (8%) arterial catheters in the saline group (P value: 0.135) and three (6%) arterial catheters in the heparin group (P value = 0.097) were obstructed. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of obstruction and changes in all other parameters between the two groups during the three-day follow-up was not significant (all P values > 0.05). Conclusions: It seems that there is no difference in the use of heparinized and normal saline solutions to prevent catheter occlusion of arterial and central venous pressure. PMID:26478866

  19. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Brennan, Rachel C.; Shook, David R.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J.; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. Methods We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as “non-laminar.” Results Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–21.5; p <0.01; sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 67%). A combined prediction model comprising either change in resistance greater than 8.8% or a non-laminar result predicted subsequent occlusion (odds ratio = 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–22.8; p = 0.002; sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 63%). Participants rated catheter-resistance monitoring as highly acceptable. Conclusions In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate these findings, assess the predictive value for other clinical outcomes, and determine the impact of pre-emptive therapy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01737554 PMID:26322512

  20. Comparison of NHSN-defined central venous catheter day counts with a method that accounts for concurrent catheters.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Thomas R; Johnson, James G; Anders, Theodore; Hayes, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) day definitions do not consider concurrent CVCs. We examined traditional CVC day counts and resultant central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates with a CVC day definition that included concurrent CVCs. Accounting for concurrent CVCs increased device day counts by 8.5% but only mildly impacted CLABSI rates. PMID:25627768

  1. Fracture and migration of implantable venous access port catheters: Cause analysis and management of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-ping; Xiong, Bin; Chu, Jun; Li, Xiao-fang; Yao, Qi; Zheng, Chuan-sheng

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the causes and managements of the fractures and migrations of the implantable venous access port catheter (IVAPC). The fracture or migration of IVAPC occurred in 4 patients who were treated between May 2012 and January 2014 in Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. The port catheter leakage was found in 2 cases during drug infusion. Catheters that dislodged to the superior vena cava and right atrium were confirmed by port angiogram. The two dislodged catheters were successfully retrieved by interventional procedures. Catheter fracture occurred in two cases during port removal. One catheter was eventually removed from the subclavian vein through right clavicle osteotomy and subclavian venotomy, and the other removed by external jugular venotomy. Flushing the port in high pressure and injury of the totally implantable venous access port (TIVP) during implantation are usually responsible for catheter displacement. Interventional retrieval procedure can be used if the catheter dislodges to the vena cava and right atrium. Catheter fracture may occur during removal if clipping syndrome occurs or the catheter is sutured very tight during implantation. PMID:26489636

  2. Utility of the routine chest X-ray after "over-wire" venous catheter changes.

    PubMed

    Riblet, J L; Shillinglaw, W; Goldberg, A J; Mitchell, K; Sedani, K H; Davis, F E; Reynolds, H N

    1996-12-01

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used to change central venous access catheters in the Intensive Care Unit. These catheters are routinely being changed to prevent septic complications. Some of these changes are performed by an "over-wire" technique. To assess the utility of postprocedural chest X-rays on critically ill patients after an over-wire catheter change, we followed 68 patients after they had 80 catheter changes. This study assesses catheter position by use of a postprocedural X-ray. During the study, we found no misplaced catheters and minimum symptomatology in 80 patients. The trauma/critical care fellows performing the procedures rated them as easy in 97.5 percent of the changes. The conclusion of the study is that, if the catheter change is technically easy and the patient has no symptoms, a postprocedural X-ray is not necessary. PMID:8955250

  3. Experience of on table modified standard catheters for directed arterial and venous thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ram, Bhavin; Baliga, Kapil; Rajesh, S; George, Robbie K

    2016-07-01

    To describe an on-table modification of standard angiography catheters for use in directed arterial and venous thrombolysis. An angiogram is performed and the length of thrombosed vessel (artery or vein) is measured. A 5 or 6 Fr catheter (preferably straight/multi- purpose/vertebral catheter) is modified on table for use by making multiple holes with 23 G needle. After testing ex vivo with saline injection, the on table modified catheter is placed over a wire into the thrombosed segment of the vessel and thrombolytic agent infusion is commenced utilizing a syringe driver after giving a bolus dose of thrombolytic agent. Median duration of thrombolysis was 24 h in our study. We have utilized this method in twenty thrombosed vessels, without any catheter related complications. In our experience, this modification of a standard catheter as a multi-hole catheter is a readily available, simple, cheap, versatile and effective device for directed thrombolysis. PMID:26719163

  4. A novel approach to central venous catheter thrombosis in a patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H K; Tucker, W; Hatrick, A G; Knight, R K; Ho, T B L

    2007-11-30

    Catheter directed thrombolysis has been described as a treatment for large pulmonary emboli resistant to systemic therapy [Kelly P, Carroll N, Grant C, Barrett C, Kocka V. Successful treatment of massive pulmonary embolism with prolonged catheter-directed thrombolysis. Heart Vessels 2006;21:124?6]. We now describe a case in which local catheter directed thrombolysis, via a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), was used to treat a large thrombus surrounding the tip of an indwelling central venous line that was causing superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO), in a patient with cystic fibrosis. PMID:17379581

  5. Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava and Left Brachiocephalic Vein with Preserving the Central Venous Catheter in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2011-01-01

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein. PMID:21927566

  6. Implementation of a children’s hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation requires changes in the hospital system as well as in healthcare professionals’ behaviour. The aim of the study is to evaluate process and outcome of implementation of a state-of-the-art central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle in a large university children’s hospital. Methods/design An interrupted time series design will be used; the study will encompass all children who need a central venous catheter. New state-of-the-art central venous catheter bundles will be developed. The Pronovost-model will guide the implementation process. We developed a tailored multifaceted implementation strategy consisting of reminders, feedback, management support, local opinion leaders, and education. Primary outcome measure is the number of catheter-associated infections per 1000 line-days. The process outcome is degree of adherence to use of these central venous catheter bundles is the secondary outcome. A cost-effectiveness analysis is part of the study. Outcomes will be monitored during three periods: baseline, pre-intervention, and post-intervention for over 48 months. Discussion This model-based implementation strategy will reveal the challenges of implementing a hospital-wide safety program. This work will add to the body of knowledge in the field of implementation. We postulate that healthcare workers’ willingness to shift from providing habitual care to state-of-the-art care may reflect the need for consistent care improvement. Trial registration: Dutch trials registry, trial # 3635. Trial registration Dutch trials registry (http://www.trialregister.nl), trial # 3635 PMID:24125520

  7. Flushing and Locking of Venous Catheters: Available Evidence and Evidence Deficit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flushing and locking of intravenous catheters are thought to be essential in the prevention of occlusion. The clinical sign of an occlusion is catheter malfunction and flushing is strongly recommended to ensure a well-functioning catheter. Therefore fluid dynamics, flushing techniques, and sufficient flushing volumes are important matters in adequate flushing in all catheter types. If a catheter is not in use, it is locked. For years, it has been thought that the catheter has to be filled with an anticoagulant to prevent catheter occlusion. Heparin has played a key role in locking venous catheters. However, the high number of risks associated with heparin forces us to look for alternatives. A long time ago, 0.9% sodium chloride was already introduced as locking solution in peripheral cannulas. More recently, a 0.9% sodium chloride lock has also been investigated in other types of catheters. Thrombolytic agents have also been studied as a locking solution because their antithrombotic effect was suggested as superior to heparin. Other catheter lock solutions focus on the anti-infective properties of the locks such as antibiotics and chelating agents. Still, the most effective locking solution will depend on the catheter type and the patient's condition. PMID:26075094

  8. Feasibility of the use of a reliable and valid central venous catheter blood draw bundle checklist.

    PubMed

    Secola, Rita; Lewis, Mary Ann; Pike, Nancy; Needleman, Jack; Doering, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the feasibility of creating a central venous catheter blood draw bundle checklist to ensure adherence to the evidence-based blood draw procedure. This study included establishing checklist reliability and validity and periodic observations in 2 inpatient pediatric oncology units. The findings provided support for the reliability and validity of this checklist based on content validity, test-retest reliability, interrater agreement, and internal consistency and reinforced the need for periodic observations to ensure consistency in proper central venous catheter blood draw procedures. PMID:22269906

  9. Rhodococcus equi venous catheter infection: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that was initially isolated from horses and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans with impaired cellular immunity. However, this pathogen is underestimated as a challenging antagonist and is frequently considered to be a mere contaminant despite the potential for life-threatening infections. Most case reports have occurred in immunocompromised patients who have received organ transplants (for example kidney, heart, bone marrow) or those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Infections often manifest as pulmonary involvement or soft tissue abscesses. Bacteremia related to R. equi infections of tunneled central venous catheters has rarely been described. Case presentation We report the case of a 63-year-old non-transplant recipient, non-HIV infected Caucasian woman with endometrial carcinoma who developed recurrent bloodstream infections and septic shock due to R. equi and ultimately required the removal of her port catheter, a subcutaneous implantable central venous catheter. We also review the medical literature related to human infections with R. equi. Conclusion R. equi should be considered a serious pathogen, not a contaminant, particularly in an immunocompromised patient who presents with a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. Counseling patients with central venous catheters who participate in activities involving exposure to domesticated animals is recommended. PMID:21827681

  10. Clearance of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans Bacteremia in a Child without Central Venous Catheter Removal

    PubMed Central

    Rowlinson, Marie-Claire; Bruckner, David A.; Hinnebusch, Claudia; Nielsen, Karin; Deville, Jaime G.

    2006-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (formerly known as Oerskovia xanthineolytica) rarely causes human infection. Infections have been reported in immunocompromised hosts or in patients with foreign bodies, such as catheters, where treatment has generally involved removal of the foreign body. We report on a case in which the organism was isolated in multiple blood cultures from a 13-year-old male. After initial therapy failed, treatment with vancomycin and rifampin resulted in infection clearance without removal of the central venous catheter. PMID:16825406

  11. Clearance of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans bacteremia in a child without central venous catheter removal.

    PubMed

    Rowlinson, Marie-Claire; Bruckner, David A; Hinnebusch, Claudia; Nielsen, Karin; Deville, Jaime G

    2006-07-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (formerly known as Oerskovia xanthineolytica) rarely causes human infection. Infections have been reported in immunocompromised hosts or in patients with foreign bodies, such as catheters, where treatment has generally involved removal of the foreign body. We report on a case in which the organism was isolated in multiple blood cultures from a 13-year-old male. After initial therapy failed, treatment with vancomycin and rifampin resulted in infection clearance without removal of the central venous catheter. PMID:16825406

  12. Lack of clinical benefit from subcutaneous tunnel insertion of central venous catheters in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Andrivet, P; Bacquer, A; Ngoc, C V; Ferme, C; Letinier, J Y; Gautier, H; Gallet, C B; Brun-Buisson, C

    1994-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of subcutaneous tunneling, we randomly designated 212 central venous catheters for tunneling (107 catheters) or for standard insertion (105 catheters) in 169 immunocompromised patients. The patients who received tunneled catheters (TCs) and the patients who received nontunneled catheters (NTCs) were similar with respect to age, gender, underlying disease, incidence of leukopenic episodes, receipt of blood product transfusions or parenteral nutrition, and medical care and attendants. The life span of catheters was 112.5 +/- 9.5 days in the TC group and 119 +/- 9 days in the NTC group (P = .5). Clinically relevant bacteremia occurred in 26 cases in the TC group (0.22 episode per 100 catheter-days), a rate not significantly different from that in the NTC group (25 episodes; 0.20 episode per 100 catheter-days). Catheter-related bacteremia was documented in seven cases and non-catheter-related bacteremia in five cases. In most instances, the precise origin of the septic episode could not be determined. Cutaneous infection and bacteremia were associated with the same microorganism in two cases in each group. Since the present study failed to demonstrate any clinical benefit of subcutaneous tunneling, such a procedure is no longer performed in our hospital. PMID:8161627

  13. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  14. A simulation-based "just in time" and "just in place" central venous catheter education program.

    PubMed

    Lengetti, Evelyn; Monachino, Anne Marie; Scholtz, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the Central Venous Catheter Dress Rehearsal simulation program. Teaching is conducted at the bedside, which is efficient and cost effective and allows nurses to practice in a safe environment with no harm to the patient. The educators' challenges and remediation strategies are shared. This simulation program has demonstrated improved consistency of practice and knowledge among pediatric nurses. PMID:22108068

  15. Protocol for Detection of Biofilms on Needleless Connectors Attached to Central Venous Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, R. M.; Murga, R.; Bell, M.; Toscano, C. M.; Carr, J. H.; Novicki, T. J.; Zuckerman, C.; Corey, L. C.; Miller, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  16. The Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC) initiative: A summary and review of peripherally inserted central catheter and venous catheter appropriate use.

    PubMed

    Woller, Scott C; Stevens, Scott M; Evans, R Scott

    2016-04-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are being selected for venous access more frequently today than ever before. Often the choice of a PICC, when compared with other vascular access devices (VADs), is attractive because of perceived safety, availability, and ease of insertion. However, complications associated with PICCs exist, and there is a paucity of evidence to guide clinician choice for PICC selection and valid use. An international panel with expertise in the arena of venous access and populations associated with these devices was convened to clarify approaches for the optimal use of PICCs and VADs. Here we present for the busy hospital-based practitioner the methodology, key outcomes, and recommendations of the Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC) panelists for the appropriate use of VADs. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:306-310. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26662622

  17. Percutaneously inserted long-term central venous catheters in pigs of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Larsson, N; Claesson Lingehall, H; Al Zaidi, N; Claesson, J; Jensen-Waern, M; Lehtipalo, S

    2015-07-01

    Pigs are used for long-term biomedical experiments requiring repeated injections, infusions and collections of blood samples. Thus, it is necessary for vascular catheters to be indwelling to avoid undue stress to the animals and the use of restraints. We propose a refined model of percutaneous insertion of long-term central venous catheters to minimize the surgical trauma and postoperative complications associated with catheter insertion. Different sizes of needles (18 Ga versus 21 Ga) for initial puncture of the veins were compared. In conventional pigs weighing less than 30 kg, catheter insertion may be facilitated by using a microintroducer set with a 21 Ga needle. In pigs weighing 50 kg, a standard 18 Ga needle may be preferable. PMID:25732575

  18. [Use of ECG-EC in the positioning of central venous catheters].

    PubMed

    Calabria, Maria; Zamboli, Pasquale; D'Amelio, Alessandro; Granata, Antonio; Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Logias, Franco; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2012-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are widely used in clinical practice for the administration of chemotherapy, parental nutrition, hemodynamic monitoring, and hemodialysis. International guidelines have defined the right internal jugular vein as the preferred site of CVC insertion and underline that accurate positioning of the catheter tip is essential to maximize the blood flow and reduce long-term complications. Endocavitary electrocardiography (EC-ECG) improves the accuracy of catheter tip positioning without increasing the placement time by the recognition of typical P wave patterns during catheter insertion:the normally shaped P wave identifies the mid to upper superior vena cava, the widest P wave may be used to place the CVC tip at the superior vena cava-right atrium junction, and biphasic P waves identify the location of the right atrium. Because of its simplicity and safety, EC-ECG should always be considered during CVC placement, especially if other means of verifying correct CVC insertion are not available. PMID:22388906

  19. Neonatal atrial flutter after insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marcos Moura; Tavares, Wládia Gislaynne de Sousa; Furtado, Maria Mônica Alencar Araripe; Fontenele, Maria Marcia Farias Trajano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe a case of neonatal atrial flutter after the insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter, reporting the clinical presentation and reviewing the literature on this subject. Case description: A late-preterm newborn, born at 35 weeks of gestational age to a diabetic mother and large for gestational age, with respiratory distress and rule-out sepsis, required an umbilical venous access. After the insertion of the umbilical venous catheter, the patient presented with tachycardia. Chest radiography showed that the catheter was placed in the position that corresponds to the left atrium, and traction was applied. The patient persisted with tachycardia, and an electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter. As the patient was hemodynamically unstable, electric cardioversion was successfully applied. Comments: The association between atrial arrhythmias and misplaced umbilical catheters has been described in the literature, but in this case, it is noteworthy that the patient was an infant born to a diabetic mother, which consists in another risk factor for heart arrhythmias. Isolated atrial flutter is a rare tachyarrhythmia in the neonatal period and its identification is essential to establish early treatment and prevent systemic complications and even death. PMID:26525686

  20. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J J; Zhang, Z H; Shan, Z; Wang, W J; Li, X X; Wang, S M; Li, Y-X; Cheng, G-S

    2014-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis for systematic evaluation of the status quo of catheter thrombolysis for the treatment of acute lower limb deep vein thrombosis in China. We searched the China Biomedical bibliographic database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Weipu full-text electronic journals, Wanfang full-text database, and Medline (1990 through June 2011) for clinical randomized controlled trials of catheter-directed thrombolysis and superficial venous thrombolysis to compare their efficacies for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis. The results were analyzed by using the Cochrane-recommended RevMan 4.2 software package, and the odds ratio (OR) was used as the combined measure of efficacy. The search retrieved 8 randomized controlled trials, and meta-analysis using the total rate of effective treatment as the clinical observation index found that the combined OR for the catheter thrombolysis group versus the superficial venous thrombolysis group was significant (P < 0.01; OR = 11.78; 95% confidence interval = 6.99-19.87). In conclusion, the meta-analysis indicated that catheter thrombolysis was more effective than superficial venous thrombolysis for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis in the lower limb in Chinese individuals. However, the included trials were only of medium quality, so more rational and scientific clinical trials are needed to validate this conclusion. PMID:25078578

  1. (Mis)placed central venous catheter in the left superior intercostal vein

    PubMed Central

    Padovan, Ranka Stern; Paar, Maja Hrabak; Aurer, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest X-ray is routinely performed to check the position of the central venous catheter (CVC) inserted through the internal jugular or subclavian vein, while the further evaluation of CVC malfunction is usually performed by contrast venography. In patients with superior vena cava obstruction, the tip of the catheter is often seen in collateral mediastinal venous pathways, rather than in the superior vena cava. In such cases detailed knowledge of thoracic vessel anatomy is necessary to identify the exact location of the catheter. Case report. We report a case of 32-year-old female patient with relapsing mediastinal lymphoma and previous superior vena cava obstruction with collateral azygos-hemiazygos venous pathways. The patient had CVC inserted through the left subclavian vein and its position was detected by CT to be in the dilated left superior intercostal vein and accessory hemiazygos vein. Considering that dilated accessory hemiazygos vein can tolerate infusion, the CVC was left in place and the patient had no complaints related to CVC (mal)position. Furthermore, we present anatomical and radiological observations on the azygos-hemiazygos venous system with the special emphasis on the left superior intercostal vein. Conclusions Non-contrast CT scans can be a valuable imaging tool in the detection of the CVC position, especially in patients with renal insufficiency and contrast media hypersensitivity. PMID:22933931

  2. Additional Analgesia for Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Placebo Controlled Randomized Trial of Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Aloka; Hanumantha Rao, Mangu; Sahu, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to show that a single preprocedural dose of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl reduces procedural pain and discomfort and provides clinically acceptable sedation. In this prospective, double-blind study, sixty patients scheduled for elective surgery and requiring planned central venous catheter insertion were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg), fentanyl (1 μg/kg), or 0.9% normal saline intravenously over ten minutes followed by local anesthetic field infiltration before attempting central venous catheterization. The primary outcome measures are assessment and analysis of pain, discomfort, and sedation level before, during, and after the central venous catheter insertion at five time points. The median (IQR) pain score is worst for normal saline group at local anaesthetic injection [6 (4–6.7)] which was significantly attenuated by addition of fentanyl [3 (2–4)] and dexmedetomidine [4 (3–5)] in the immediate postprocedural period (P = 0.001). However, the procedure related discomfort was significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group compared to fentanyl group in the first 10 min of procedure after local anaesthetic Injection (P = 0.001). Fentanyl is more analgesically efficient for central venous catheter insertion along with local anaesthetic injection. However, dexmedetomidine has the potential to be superior to fentanyl and placebo in terms of providing comfort to the patients during the procedure. PMID:27200187

  3. What is the best site for central venous catheter insertion in critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    The choice of the best central venous access for a particular patient is based on the rate and the severity of failures and complications. Based on two recent papers, internal jugular access is associated with a low rate of severe mechanical complications in the intensive care unit as compared with subclavian access, and it is preferable for short-term access (<5–7 days) and for haemodialysis catheters. Subclavian access is associated with a lower risk for infection and is the route of choice, in experienced hands, if the risk for infection is high (central venous catheter placement >5–7 days) or if the risk for mechanical complications is low. The femoral route is associated with a higher risk for infection and thrombosis (as compared with the subclavian route). It should be restricted to patients in whom pneumothorax or haemorrhage would be unacceptable. PMID:14624670

  4. Inadvertent Puncture of the Thoracic Duct During Attempted Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraber, Ulf K.M. Nibbe, Lutz; Gebauer, Bernhard; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2003-11-15

    We report a case of puncture of the thoracic duct during left subclavian vein catheterization on the intensive care unit. Computed tomography and measurement of the triglyceride levels in the aspirated fluid proved the inadvertent penetration of the guidewire into the thoracic duct. Early recognition of central line misplacement avoided serious complications. Inadvertent central venous catheter placement into the thoracic duct may have the potential complications of infusion mediastinum and chylothorax.

  5. [A Case of Delayed Vascular Injury as a Complication Related to Implanted Central Venous Port Catheter].

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Tomohiro; Fujii, Ryoji; Minagawa, Takeyoshi; Fujie, Shinya; Kimura, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideyuki; Yoshizaki, Naohito; Kondo, Hitoshi; Kitayama, Hiromitsu; Sugiyama, Junko; Hirayama, Michiaki; Tsuji, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawarada, You; Okushiba, Shunichi; Nishioka, Noriko; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    A 74-year-old woman with advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital. A central venous (CV) port catheter was implanted into the right subclavian vein for preoperative chemotherapy and parenteral nutritional management. On the 35th day after implantation, she complained of diarrhea, fever and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed a right-sided massive pleural effusion. As the patient progressively fell into severe respiratory distress, endotracheal intubation was performed for management of respiration by mechanical ventilation. Initially, given the patient's symptoms, she was diagnosed with septic shock. Therefore, after placement of a CV catheter through the right femoral vein, in consideration of the possibility of a port infection, she was treated with thoracentesis and infusion of antibiotics. The patient gradually recovered, and again received parenteral nutrition through the CV port catheter. After the infusion was administered, she complained of dyspnea. A CT scan of the chest revealed a right pleural effusion and displacement of the tip of the CV port catheter out of the wall of the superior vena cava. We diagnosed delayed vascular injury (DVI), and the CV port catheter was removed. She soon recovered with conservative treatment. We speculated that the initial respiratory symptoms such as the pleural effusion were caused by DVI. DVI should therefore be recognized as a complication related to implanted CV port catheters. PMID:26809313

  6. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in children: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Agarwal, Arnav; Tassone, Maria Cristina; Shahjahan, Nadia; Walton, Mark; Chan, Anthony; Mondal, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with increased risk of thrombosis in the paediatric population, particularly in relation to the type of catheter and the manner of its insertion. Here, we investigate risk factors associated with CVC-related thrombosis in children, with particular emphasis on positioning of the catheter tip. Patients aged 0-18 who underwent at least one CVC placement from 2008 to 2013 at a single centre with a subsequent follow-up echocardiogram were included for a total of 104 patients and 147 lines. Data on clinical and catheter-related risk factors were collected from patient charts. Statistical analysis using Pearson's χ tests, independent samples t-test, and odds ratios were used to assess potential risk factors for thrombosis. Neither insertion site (subclavian vein or otherwise), left- vs. right-sided insertion, nor catheter type were significant risk factors for thrombosis. There were no thrombotic events reported at the superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium junction and no significant differences in thrombotic risk with initial tip placement in the SVC-right atrium junction vs. the SVC, right atrium, or inferior vena cava. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was a major clinical risk factor for thrombosis. Tip movement was common and may have been an important factor in the development of CVC-related thrombi. Prospective studies can yield insight into the role of follow-up imaging in the prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in children. PMID:26977751

  7. Central venous catheter-related infection in a prospective and observational study of 2,595 catheters

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Henry, Christophe; Martín, María M; Jiménez, Alejandro; Mora, María L

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Central venous catheterization is commonly used in critically ill patients and may cause different complications, including infection. Although there are many studies about CVC-related infection, very few have analyzed it in detail. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence of catheter-related local infection (CRLI) and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) with central venous catheters (CVCs) according to different access sites. Methods This is a prospective and observational study, conducted in a 24-bed medical surgical intensive care unit of a 650-bed university hospital. All consecutive patients admitted to the ICU during 3 years (1 May 2000 and 30 April 2003) were included. Results The study included 2,018 patients. The number of CVCs and days of catheterization duration were: global, 2,595 and 18,999; subclavian, 917 and 8,239; jugular, 1,390 and 8,361; femoral, 288 and 2,399. CRLI incidence density was statistically higher for femoral than for jugular (15.83 versus 7.65, p < 0.001) and subclavian (15.83 versus 1.57, p < 0.001) accesses, and higher for jugular than for subclavian access (7.65 versus 1.57, p < 0.001). CRBSI incidence density was statistically higher for femoral than for jugular (8.34 versus 2.99, p = 0.002) and subclavian (8.34 versus 0.97, p < 0.001) accesses, and higher for jugular than for subclavian access (2.99 versus 0.97, p = 0.005). Conclusion Our results suggest that the order for punction, to minimize the CVC-related infection risk, should be subclavian (first order), jugular (second order) and femoral vein (third order). PMID:16280064

  8. Factors Influencing Intracavitary Electrocardiographic P-Wave Changes during Central Venous Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guorong; Guo, Ling; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Min; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude changes in the P-wave of intracavitary electrocardiography have been used to assess the tip placement of central venous catheters. The research assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this sign in comparison with standard radiographic techniques for tip location, focusing on factors influencing its clinical utility. Both intracavitary electrocardiography guided tip location and X-ray positioning were used to verify catheter tip locations in patients undergoing central venous catheter insertion. Intracavitary electrocardiograms from 1119 patients (of a total 1160 subjects) showed specific amplitude changes in the P-wave. As the results show, compared with X-ray positioning, the sensitivity of electrocardiography-guided tip location was 97.3%, with false negative rate of 2.7%; the specificity was 1, with false positive rate of zero. Univariate analyses indicated that features including age, gender, height, body weight, and heart rate have no statistically significant influence on P-wave amplitude changes (P > 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that catheter insertion routes (OR = 2.280, P = 0.003) and basal P-wave amplitude (OR = 0.553, P = 0.003) have statistically significant impacts on P-wave amplitude changes. As a reliable indicator of tip location, amplitude change in the P-wave has proved of good sensitivity and excellent specificity, and the minor, zero, false positive rate supports the clinical utility of this technique in early recognition of malpositioned tips. A better sensitivity was achieved in placement of centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs) than that of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). In clinical practice, a combination of intracavitary electrocardiography, ultrasonic inspection and the anthropometric measurement method would further improve the accuracy. PMID:25915758

  9. Improving patient safety during insertion of peripheral venous catheters: an observational intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Reise, Gesche; James, Claudia; Gittelbauer, Kirsten; Gosch, Jutta; Alpers, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peripheral venous catheters are frequently used in hospitalized patients but increase the risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Evidence-based guidelines describe specific steps that are known to reduce infection risk. However, the degree of guideline implementation in clinical practice is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the use of specific steps for insertion of peripheral venous catheters in clinical practice and to implement a multimodal intervention aimed at improving both compliance and the optimum order of the steps. Methods: The study was conducted at University Hospital Hamburg. An optimum procedure for inserting a peripheral venous catheter was defined based on three evidence-based guidelines (WHO, CDC, RKI) including five steps with 1A or 1B level of evidence: hand disinfection before patient contact, skin antisepsis of the puncture site, no palpation of treated puncture site, hand disinfection before aseptic procedure, and sterile dressing on the puncture site. A research nurse observed and recorded procedures for peripheral venous catheter insertion for healthcare workers in four different departments (endoscopy, central emergency admissions, pediatrics, and dermatology). A multimodal intervention with 5 elements was established (teaching session, dummy training, e-learning tool, tablet and poster, and direct feedback), followed by a second observation period. During the last observation week, participants evaluated the intervention. Results: In the control period, 207 insertions were observed, and 202 in the intervention period. Compliance improved significantly for four of five steps (e.g., from 11.6% to 57.9% for hand disinfection before patient contact; p<0.001, chi-square test). Compliance with skin antisepsis of the puncture site was high before and after intervention (99.5% before and 99.0% after). Performance of specific steps in the correct order also improved (e.g., from 7.7% to 68.6% when three of five steps were done; p<0.001). The intervention was described as helpful by 46.8% of the participants, as neutral by 46.8%, and as disruptive by 6.4%. Conclusions: A multimodal strategy to improve both compliance with safety steps for peripheral venous catheter insertion and performance of an optimum procedure was effective and was regarded helpful by healthcare workers. PMID:24327944

  10. We still go for the jugular: implications of the 3SITES central venous catheter study for nephrology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The 3SITES study randomly assigned a nontunneled central venous catheter site in over 3000 adults treated in intensive care units. The subclavian site was associated with a lower rate of short-term complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection and deep venous thrombosis, compared to the femoral or internal jugular site. Nephrologists should be aware of this study and should continue to advocate for alternatives to subclavian vein catheter placement in patients with chronic kidney disease who are expected to require arteriovenous access for dialysis in the future. PMID:26880443

  11. Correction of malposition of central venous catheter with 9-Fr introducer sheath assisted by mobile type diagnostic X-ray apparatus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jaekyu; Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Joon; Lee, Chia An; Woo, Seong Chang

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters provide long-term available vascular access. They are useful for central venous pressure monitoring, rapid fluid management, massive transfusion and direct cardiovascular medication, especially in operation. Central venous catheterization is usually performed by the landmark bedside technique without imaging guidance. The complications of central venous catheterization are frequent, which include malposition, pneumothorax, hemothorax, chylothorax, arterial puncture, hematoma, air embolism and infection. Malposition of a central venous catheter is not rare and may cause several complications such as malfunction of the catheter, default measurement of central venous pressure, catheter erosion, thrombophlebitis and cardiac tamponade. In this case, we report a malposition of central venous catheter with 9-Fr introducer sheath which is located in the right subclavian vein via ipsilateral internal jugular vein and the correction of this misplacement assisted by mobile type diagnostic X-ray apparatus (C-arm fluoroscope). PMID:26257855

  12. Complications from long-term indwelling central venous catheters in hematologic patients with special reference to infection.

    PubMed

    Kappers-Klunne, M C; Degener, J E; Stijnen, T; Abels, J

    1989-10-15

    Forty-three evaluable patients with hematologic malignancies, mainly acute leukemia, were prospectively randomized to receive a double lumen central venous catheter or a totally implantable venous access system. The mean catheter stay was 166 days (median, 104 days) for the 23 double lumen catheters and 164 days (median, 65 days) for implanted systems. Exit site infections were not encountered in double lumen catheters, but there were two proven infections around the injection port of implanted devices. Tunnel infections did not occur. Seven double lumen catheters and four implanted systems were removed because of infection. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant microorganism cultured from these catheters. Five of nine patients with double lumen catheters and catheter-related S. epidermidis infection and the two patients with implanted systems in whom S. epidermidis was cultured were on selective gut decontamination. The pattern of infection did not seem to be influenced by this regimen. Totally implantable systems proved to be as safe as double lumen central venous lines. PMID:2790689

  13. The role of routine chest radiography for detecting complications after central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Morteza Kavanin; Shirvani, Amir

    2014-09-01

    Chest radiographs are obtained routinely after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion in many institutions, although it consumes time and money. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of post-procedural chest X-ray in detecting complications of CVC insertion; we performed CVC insertion without using ultrasonography guidance. A total of 454 patients who required an emergency vascular access for hemodialysis between February 2008 and March 2010 were included in this study. In cases where three to five unsuccessful attempts were encountered to place the CVC or pierce the artery, we used another site for CVC placement or we placed the CVC under ultrasonographic guidance. Both the internal jugular and the subclavian veins were used as routes for catheter insertion. All the catheters were dual lumen and were inserted by the same vascular access surgeon. All the catheters were inserted using the same protocol. This protocol consists of five stages including position, percutaneous anesthesia, puncture, pull out and placement. Chest radiography was obtained after the procedure and patients were interviewed for the presence of any unusual symptoms. The X-rays were reviewed by a radiologist who was unaware of the patients' symptoms. Complications occurred in two patients who had unusual symptoms after the placement of the catheter. Although immediate postprocedural chest radiography is recommended for tip position confirmation, it should not be considered a reliable procedure for detecting complications in the absence of clinical symptoms. It is recommended to monitor patients after catheter insertion and perform delayed chest X-ray in the presence of any unusual symptoms. PMID:25193899

  14. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolated microorganisms from central venous catheters in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    Khorvash, Farzin; Abbasi, Saeed; Meidani, Mohsen; Shakeri, Mehrnoosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The abundance of infections associated with intensive care unit (ICU) is increasing due to the increased use of aggressive medical equipments like the central venous catheter (CVC). This study was designed and performed in 2010-2011 at Alzahra hospital, which is a referral center. This study aimed at determining the relative abundance and microbial sensitivity of organisms, which were creating contamination with CVCs in hospitalized patients in the ICUs of Alzahra hospital. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed on 71 patients who were hospitalized in the Alzahra hospital ICU and had CVCs during 2010-2011. The data obtained was analyzed by SPSS version 20 software and descriptive statistical approaches and chi-square and t-test trials. Results: In the sample culture obtained from the patients’ catheter in 19 cases (26/8%), no microorganism was grown and in 52 cases (73.3%) at least one type of microorganism including bacteria or fungus was grown. In this study, average hospitalization time in patients who got positive results from their catheter culture was significantly more compared with patients who did not grow any kinds of microorganism in their sample cultures. Conclusion: In this study, CVCs microbial contamination has a high prevalence, which is a major cause of prolonged patients staying in ICUs, and therefore, it is essential to take precaution and discharge the patient early for decreasing the catheter contamination and preventing the hospital infections incidence in the ICU patients. PMID:24800191

  15. Management of complications related to central venous catheters in cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are important for the treatment of patients with cancer, especially in the perioperative and palliative care settings. These devices not only allow for the administration of chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and other intravenous therapies, but they may also improve the patients' quality of life by reducing the need for repeated peripheral venipunctures. Thrombotic and infectious complications are common, especially in the long-term use of CVCs. There are different types of thrombotic complications associated with CVCs, that is, a thrombotic occlusion of the catheter, a mural thrombus at the catheter tip and classical deep vein thrombosis, which occurs most frequently in the upper extremity where the majority of long-term catheters are inserted. Infections are common complications associated with CVCs. Patients with cancer who receive intensive chemotherapy and those patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have a markedly increased risk for insertion site and bloodstream infections. In this review, the epidemiology and risk factors that predispose patients to CVC-related thrombosis and infection are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic options according to the published data and the current guidelines are summarized and data for establishing primary and secondary preventative strategies are provided. PMID:24595880

  16. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the neonatal unit: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jacqueline E; McDonald, Susan J; Tan, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter infections are the leading cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections and contribute significantly to mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Moreover, infection poses significant economic consequence which increased hospital costs and increased length of hospital stay. Prevention strategies are detailed in guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States; nevertheless, recent surveys in neonatal units in the United States, and Australia and New Zealand demonstrate these are not always followed. This review discusses the numerous evidence-based strategies to prevent catheter infections including hand hygiene, maximal sterile barriers during insertion, skin disinfection, selection of insertion site, dressings, aseptic non-touch technique, disinfection of catheter hubs/ports, administration set management, prompt removal of catheter, antibiotic locks, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and chlorhexidine bathing. Furthermore, it will describe different strategies that can be implemented into clinical practice to reduce infection rates. These include the use of care bundles including checklists, education and the use of CVC teams. PMID:25076387

  17. A retrospective analysis of trabectedin infusion by peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a multicentric Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Martella, Francesca; Salutari, Vanda; Marchetti, Claudia; Pisano, Carmela; Di Napoli, Marilena; Pietta, Francesca; Centineo, Dina; Caringella, Anna M; Musella, Angela; Fioretto, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    The European Medicines Agency strongly recommends administration of trabectedin through a central venous catheter (CVC) to minimize the risk of extravasation. However, CVCs place patients at risk of catheter-related complications and have a significant budgetary impact for oncology departments. The most frequently used CVCs are subcutaneously implanted PORT-chamber catheters (PORTs); peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are relatively new. We reviewed data of trabectedin-treated patients to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of the use of PORTs and PICCs in six Italian centres. Data on 102 trabectedin-treated patients (20 with sarcoma, 80 with ovarian cancer and two with cervical cancer) were evaluated. Forty-five patients received trabectedin by a PICC, inserted by trained nurses using an ultrasound-guided technique at the bedside, whereas 57 patients received trabectedin infusion by a PORT, requiring a day surgery procedure in the hospital by a surgeon. Device dislocation and infections were reported in four patients, equally distributed between PORT or PICC users. Thrombosis occurred in a single patient with a PORT. Complications requiring devices removal were not reported during any of the 509 cycles of therapy (median 5; range 1-20). PICC misplacement or early malfunctions were not reported during trabectedin infusion. The cost-efficiency ratio favours PORT over PICC only when the device is used for more than 1 year. Our data suggest that trabectedin infusion by PICC is safe and well accepted, with a preferable cost-efficiency ratio compared with PORT in patients requiring short-term use of the device (≤1 year). PMID:26241804

  18. Hospital-Wide Multidisciplinary, Multimodal Intervention Programme to Reduce Central Venous Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, Walter; Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Touveneau, Sylvie; Theriault, Michel; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Clergue, François; Pittet, Didier; Walder, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is the major complication of central venous catheters (CVC). The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of a hospital-wide strategy on CLABSI reduction. Between 2008 and 2011, all CVCs were observed individually and hospital-wide at a large university-affiliated, tertiary care hospital. CVC insertion training started from the 3rd quarter and a total of 146 physicians employed or newly entering the hospital were trained in simulator workshops. CVC care started from quarter 7 and a total of 1274 nurses were trained by their supervisors using a web-based, modular, e-learning programme. The study included 3952 patients with 6353 CVCs accumulating 61,366 catheter-days. Hospital-wide, 106 patients had 114 CLABSIs with a cumulative incidence of 1.79 infections per 100 catheters. We observed a significant quarterly reduction of the incidence density (incidence rate ratios [95% confidence interval]: 0.92 [0.88–0.96]; P<0.001) after adjusting for multiple confounders. The incidence densities (n/1000 catheter-days) in the first and last study year were 2.3/1000 and 0.7/1000 hospital-wide, 1.7/1000 and 0.4/1000 in the intensive care units, and 2.7/1000 and 0.9/1000 in non-intensive care settings, respectively. Median time-to-infection was 15 days (Interquartile range, 8-22). Our findings suggest that clinically relevant reduction of hospital-wide CLABSI was reached with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and multimodal quality improvement programme including aspects of behavioural change and key principles of good implementation practice. This is one of the first multimodal, multidisciplinary, hospital-wide training strategies successfully reducing CLABSI. PMID:24714418

  19. Computed Tomography-Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement in a Patient with Superior Vena Cava and Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, Maria A.; Shaw, Dennis W.W.; Schaller, Robert T. Jr.

    1999-01-15

    An 18-year-old man with a gastrointestinal hypomotility syndrome required lifelong parenteral nutrition. Both the superior and inferior vena cava were occluded. Computed tomography guidance was used to place a long-term central venous catheter via a large tributary to the azygos vein.

  20. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  1. Safety of Central Venous Catheter Placement at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, G.; Davidoff, A.M.; Howard, S.C.; Pui, C-H.; Rao, B.N.; Shenep, J. L.; Wozniak, A.; Shochat, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Central venous catheters (CVC) facilitate the management of patients with cancer. Optimal timing for placement of a CVC is controversial. We sought to determine whether early placement in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a group at high risk for infection and thrombosis, was associated with an increased rate of surgical complications. Procedure We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for early surgical complications in children with ALL diagnosed between 2004 and 2009 at a single pediatric cancer center. Results One hundred seventy-two patients were studied. There were 17 episodes of bloodstream infection, for a 30-day incidence of 9.8% (95% CI, 5.915%). There were no surgical site infections and no CVC was removed due to infection. Early thrombosis occurred in only one patient, 3 days after CVC placement. Infection was not influenced by catheter type, patient age, body mass index, or fever at the time of placement. The infection rate was not statistically higher when the ANC was <500/mm3 at the time of CVC placement (14.2% vs. 6.8%; P = 0.12). Conclusion Early CVC placement at the time of diagnosis of ALL was associated with a low surgical complication rate with no catheters requiring removal due to infection. Utilizing our current methods of preoperative preparation, surgical management and postoperative CVC care, early placement of a CVC is safe in children with ALL even when their ANC is <500/mm3, but larger cohort studies would be helpful to further clarify this issue. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2012;58:498502. PMID:22162460

  2. Going with the flow or swimming against the tide: should children with central venous catheters swim?

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica; Dalton, Meghan K; Duggan, Christopher; Lam, Shirley; Iglesias, Julie; Jaksic, Tom; Gura, Kathleen M

    2014-02-01

    Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) have central venous catheters (CVCs) in place to allow the safe and effective infusion of life-sustaining fluids and nutrition. Many consider recreational swimming to be a common part of childhood, but for some, the risk may outweigh the benefit. Children with CVCs may be at increased risk of exit site, tunnel, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) if these catheters are immersed in water. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current literature regarding the risk of infection for patients with CVCs who swim and determine if there is consensus among home PN (HPN) programs on this controversial issue. A total 45 articles were reviewed and 16 pediatric HPN programs were surveyed regarding swimming and CVCs. Due to the limited data available, a firm recommendation cannot be made. Recreational water associated outbreaks are well documented in the general public, as is the presence of human pathogens even in chlorinated swimming pools. As a medical team, practitioners can provide information and education regarding the potential risk, but ultimately the decision lies with the parents. If the parents decide swimming is worth the risk, they are encouraged to use products designed for this use and to change their child's dressing immediately after swimming. Due to our experience with a fatal event immediately after swimming, we continue to strongly discourage patients with CVCs from swimming. Further large and well-designed studies regarding the risk of swimming with a CVC are needed to make a strong, evidence-based recommendation. PMID:24347530

  3. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction after living donor liver transplantation managed with ectopic placement of a foley catheter: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Mohamed Abdel; Shehta, Ahmed; Hamed, Hosam; Elshobary, Mohamed; Salah, Tarek; Sultan, Ahmed Mohamed; Fathy, Omar; Elghawalby, Ahmed; Yassen, Amr; Shiha, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The early hepatic venous outflow obstruction (HVOO) is a rare but serious complication after liver transplantation, which may result in graft loss. We report a case of early HVOO after living donor liver transplantation, which was managed by ectopic placement of foley catheter. Presentation A 51 years old male patient with end stage liver disease received a right hemi-liver graft. On the first postoperative day the patient developed impairment of the liver functions. Doppler ultrasound (US) showed absence of blood flow in the right hepatic vein without thrombosis. The decision was to re-explore the patient, which showed torsion of the graft upward and to the right side causing HVOO. This was managed by ectopic placement of a foley catheter between the graft and the diaphragm and the chest wall. Gradual deflation of the catheter was gradually done guided by Doppler US and the patient was discharged without complications. Discussion Mechanical HVOO results from kinking or twisting of the venous anastomosis due to anatomical mismatch between the graft and the recipient abdomen. It should be managed surgically by repositioning of the graft or redo of venous anastomosis. Several ideas had been suggested for repositioning and fixation of the graft by the use of Sengstaken–Blakemore tubes, tissue expanders, and surgical glove expander. Conclusion We report the use of foley catheter to temporary fix the graft and correct the HVOO. It is a simple and safe way, and could be easily monitored and removed under Doppler US without any complications. PMID:25805611

  4. A comprehensive approach to the prevention of central venous catheter complications: results of 10-year prospective surveillance in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Cavaliere, Mara; Pegoraro, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Tridello, Gloria

    2016-04-01

    We report our decennial experience with 1161 newly-placed long-term central venous catheters inserted in 919 hematology-oncology patients for a total of 413,901 CVC-days of observation. Most of the CVCs were partially-implanted, open-ended, Broviac-Hickman type of CVC (95 %). One thousand and twenty-four complications were recorded equal to 2.47 per 1000 CVC-days. The frequency of complications per CVC, the rate of episodes per 1000 CVC-days, and removal rate were malfunction/occlusion 42 %, 1.18/1000, and 2.3 %; mechanical (dislodgement/rupture/kinking) 18.3 %, 0.51/1000, and 77.4 %; bacteremia 14.8 %, 0.42/1000, and 18.6 %; exit-site/tunnel infection 11.5 %, 0.32/1000, and 9.7 %; thrombosis 0.86 %, 0.02/1000, and 30 %; pneumothorax 0.52 %, 0.01/1000, and 0. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors were for mechanical complications, a younger age <6.1 years at CVC insertion (HR 1.8, p = 0.0006); for bacteremia, a double lumen CVC (HR 3.1, p < 0.0001) and the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.5, p = 0.03); for exit-site/tunnel infection, a double lumen CVC (HR 2.1, p = 0.0003) and a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.8, p = 0.01); for malfunction/occlusion, an age <6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0003), the diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.9, p < 0.0001) and double lumen CVC (HR 1.33, p = 0.023). The cumulative incidence of premature CVC removal was 29.2 % and the risk factors associated with this event were the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.4, p = 0.0153) and an age at CVC positioning less than 6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0025). We conclude that a best-practice set of rules resulted in reduced CVC complications. PMID:26961934

  5. A Case of Unrecognized Intrathoracic Placement of a Subclavian Central Venous Catheter in a Patient with Large Traumatic Hemothorax

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Dina; Privette, Alicia R.; Campbell, Andre R.; Tang, Julin F.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional recommendations suggest placement of a subclavian central venous catheter (CVC) ipsilateral to a known pneumothorax to minimize risk of bilateral pneumothorax. We present the case of a 65-year-old male with a right hemopneumothorax who was found to have intrathoracic placement of his right subclavian CVC at thoracotomy despite successful aspiration of blood and transduction of central venous pressure (CVP). We thus recommend extreme caution with the interpretation of CVC placement by blood aspiration and CVP measurement alone in patients with large volume ipsilateral hemothorax. PMID:26347830

  6. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad Chakraverty, Sam Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-15

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  7. Management of traumatic hemothorax by closed thoracic drainage using a central venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jian-hua; Liu, Hua-bo; Zhang, Mao; Wu, Jun-song; Yang, Jian-xin; Chen, Jin-ming; Xu, Shan-xiang; Wang, Jian-an

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of traumatic hemothorax by closed pleural drainage using a central venous catheter (CVC), compared with using a conventional chest tube. Methods: A prospective controlled study with the Ethics Committee approval was undertaken. A total of 407 patients with traumatic hemothorax were involved and they were randomly assigned to undergo closed pleural drainage with CVCs (n=214) or conventional chest tubes (n=193). The Seldinger technique was used for drainage by CVC, and the conventional technique for drainage by chest tube. If the residual volume of the hemothorax was less than 200 ml after the daily volume of drainage decreased to below 100 ml for two consecutive days, the treatment was considered successful. The correlative data of efficacy and safety between the two groups were analyzed using t or chi-squared tests with SPSS 13.0. A P value of less than 0.05 was taken as indicating statistical significance. Results: Compared with the chest tube group, the operation time, fraction of analgesic treatment, time of surgical wound healing, and infection rate of surgical wounds were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the CVC group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the success rate of treatment and the incidence of serious complications (P>0.05), or in the mean catheter/tube indwelling time and mean medical costs of patients treated successfully (P>0.05). Conclusions: Management of medium or large traumatic hemothoraxes by closed thoracic drainage using CVC is minimally invasive and as effective as using a conventional large-bore chest tube. Its complications can be prevented and it has the potential to replace the large-bore chest tube. PMID:22205619

  8. Central venous catheter use in severe malaria: time to reconsider the World Health Organization guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To optimize the fluid status of adult patients with severe malaria, World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) and a target central venous pressure (CVP) of 0-5 cmH2O. However there are few data from clinical trials to support this recommendation. Methods Twenty-eight adult Indian and Bangladeshi patients admitted to the intensive care unit with severe falciparum malaria were enrolled in the study. All patients had a CVC inserted and had regular CVP measurements recorded. The CVP measurements were compared with markers of disease severity, clinical endpoints and volumetric measures derived from transpulmonary thermodilution. Results There was no correlation between the admission CVP and patient outcome (p = 0.67) or disease severity (p = 0.33). There was no correlation between the baseline CVP and the concomitant extravascular lung water (p = 0.62), global end diastolic volume (p = 0.88) or cardiac index (p = 0.44). There was no correlation between the baseline CVP and the likelihood of a patient being fluid responsive (p = 0.37). On the occasions when the CVP was in the WHO target range patients were usually hypovolaemic and often had pulmonary oedema by volumetric measures. Seven of 28 patients suffered a complication of the CVC insertion, although none were fatal. Conclusion The WHO recommendation for the routine insertion of a CVC, and the maintenance of a CVP of 0-5 cmH2O in adults with severe malaria, should be reconsidered. PMID:22082224

  9. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Vik, Anders; Holme, Pal Andre; Singh, Kulbir; Dorenberg, Eric; Nordhus, Kare Christian; Kumar, Satish; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-09-15

    Traditional anticoagulant treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities (UEDVT) is associated with a relatively high incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for UEDVT would provide efficient thrombolysis with less subsequent PTS than during traditional anticoagulation. Primary efficacy, complications, and long-term results after CDT are reported in a retrospective cohort (2002-2007) of patients (n = 30) with DVT in the upper extremities. PTS was assessed by a modified Villalta scale. UEDVT was unprovoked in 11 (37%) cases and effort related in 9 (30%) cases. The median duration of symptoms prior to CDT was 7.0 days (range, 1-30); median duration of thrombolysis treatment, 70 h (range, 24-264 h); and the median amount of rt-PA infused during CDT, 52 mg (range, 19-225 mg). Major bleeding was registered in three (9%) patients, and CDT was stopped prematurely in three patients due to local hematoma. No intracerebral bleeding, clinical pulmonary embolism, or deaths occurred during treatment. Grade II (>50%) or III (>90%) lysis was present in 29 patients (97%) at the end of CDT. Bleeding complications increased by each day of delay from the debut of symptoms to the start of treatment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). At follow-up (n = 29; median, 21 months; range, 5-58 months), 11 (38%) patients had occluded veins, whereas 18 (62%) had patent veins. However, stenosis of varying severity was present in eight of those with a patent vein. No patients had severe PTS, whereas six (21%) experienced mild PTS. In conclusion, our retrospective cohort study of patients with UEDVT showed that treatment restored venous drainage, with a subsequent low frequency of mild PTS at follow-up. Early intervention with CDT prevented bleeding complications.

  10. Convective Leakage Makes Heparin Locking of Central Venous Catheters Ineffective Within Seconds: Experimental Measurements in a Model Superior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Michael C; McGah, Patrick M; Ng, Chin H; Clark, Alicia M; Gow, Kenneth W; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava (SVC) for hemodialysis or chemotherapy, are routinely filled while not in use with heparin, an anticoagulant, to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. The heparin-locking procedure, however, places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding, as heparin is known to leak from the catheter into the blood stream. We provide evidence from detailed in vitro experiments that shows the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage to be convective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile flow surrounding the catheter. This novel mechanism is supported by experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow velocity and heparin transport from a CVC placed inside a model SVC inside a pulsatile flow loop. The results predict an initial, fast (<10 s), convection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region, the region of the catheter with side holes. This is followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where the concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin concentration in the near-tip region. The results presented here, which are consistent with previous in vivo estimates of 24 hour leakage rates, predict that the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region is essentially zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin locking procedure ineffective. PMID:26418203

  11. Sonothrombolysis of Intra-Catheter Aged Venous Thrombi Using Microbubble Enhancement and Guided Three Dimensional Ultrasound Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Shelby; Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Drvol, Lucas K; Lof, John; Fletcher, Scott E; Radio, Stanley J; Danford, David A; Hammel, James M; Porter, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    Central venous and arterial catheters are a major source of thrombo-embolic disease in children. We hypothesized that guided high mechanical index (MI) impulses from diagnostic three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound during an intravenous microbubble infusion could dissolve these thrombi. An in vitro system simulating intra-catheter thrombi was created and then treated with guided high MI impulses from 3D ultrasound, utilizing low MI microbubble sensitive imaging pulse sequence schemes to detect the microbubbles (Perflutren Lipid Microsphere, Definity®, Lantheus). Ten aged thrombi over 24 hours old were tested using 3D ultrasound coupled with a continuous diluted microbubble infusion (Group A), and ten with 3D ultrasound alone (Group B). Mean thrombus age was 28.6 hours (range 26.6–30.3). Groups A exhibited a 55 ± 19 % reduction in venous thrombus size, compared to 31±10 % for Group B (p=0.008). Feasibility testing was performed in 4 pigs, establishing a model to further investigate the efficacy. Sonothrombolysis of aged intra-catheter venous thrombi can be achieved with commercially available microbubbles and guided high MI ultrasound from a diagnostic 3D transducer. PMID:20696549

  12. Measurement of central venous pressure from a peripheral intravenous catheter following cardiopulmonary bypass in infants and children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baty, Laura; Russo, Pierantonio; Tobias, Joseph D

    2008-01-01

    The current study evaluates the feasibility and accuracy of measuring central venous pressure from a peripheral intravenous catheter following cardiopulmonary bypass in infants and children. Central venous pressure was simultaneously measured from a right atrial catheter and from a peripheral intravenous cannula. The continuity of the peripheral intravenous cannula with the central venous system was evaluated by noting the change in the pressure during a sustained inspiratory effort and during occlusion of the vessel above (proximal to) the catheter. The cohort for the study included 29 infants and children. In 5 of the 29 patients (17%), there was no increase in the peripheral venous pressure in response to a Valsalva maneuver or occlusion of the extremity proximal to the intravenous site. The difference between peripheral venous pressure and central venous pressure in these patients was 11 +/- 3 mm Hg versus 2 +/- 1 mm Hg in the patients in whom the peripheral venous pressure increased with these maneuvers (P < .0001). No clinically significant variation in the accuracy of the technique was noted based on the actual CVP value, size of the PIV, its location, or the patient's weight. Provided that the peripheral venous pressure increases to a sustained inspiratory breath and occlusion above the intravenous site, there is a clinically useful correlation between the peripheral venous pressure and the central venous pressure following cardiopulmonary bypass in infants and children with congenital heart disease. PMID:18372352

  13. Central venous catheter malposition in the azygos vein and difficult endotracheal intubation in severe ankylosing spondylitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjin; Jeong, Hyungmo; Chung, Junyoung; Yi, Jaewoo

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can be challenging for anesthesiologists because central venous access can be difficult, and the airway can be blocked due to the fixed flexion deformity of the spine. In this case, we attempted central access via the right subclavian vein, but the catheter was repeatedly inserted into the azygos vein, which was confirmed by radiology. After several attempts, the catheter position was corrected at the superior vena cava-atrial junction. Although several useful devices have been developed to address difficult intubation, in this case, fiberoptic bronchoscopy was the only applicable safe alternative because of the patient’s extremely severe chin on chest deformity and temporomandibular joint disease. We report a successful awake fiberoptic bronchoscopic intubation in a patient with extremely severe AS and recommend that the catheter placement should be confirmed with radiology to ensure proper positioning for severe AS patients. PMID:26885138

  14. Bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and peripherally inserted central catheters: reappraising the evidence.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Krein, Sarah L; Chenoweth, Carol; Saint, Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has transformed the care of medical and surgical patients. Whereas intravenous antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and administration of chemotherapy once necessitated prolonged hospitalization, PICCs have eliminated the need for such practice. However, PICCs may not be as innocuous as once thought; a growing body of evidence suggests that these devices also have important risks. This review discusses the origin of PICCs and highlights reasons behind their rapid adoption in medical practice. We evaluate the evidence behind 2 important PICC-related complications--venous thrombosis and bloodstream infections--and describe how initial studies may have led to a false sense of security with respect to these outcomes. In this context, we introduce a conceptual model to understand the risk of PICC-related complications and guide the use of these devices. Through this model, we outline recommendations that clinicians may use to prevent PICC-related adverse events. We conclude by highlighting important knowledge gaps and identifying avenues for future research in this area. PMID:22840660

  15. Hydrophilic surface coatings with embedded biocidal silver nanoparticles and sodium heparin for central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kris N J; Croes, Sander; Boersma, Rinske S; Stobberingh, Ellen E; van der Marel, Cees; van der Veen, Frederik H; Knetsch, Menno L W; Koole, Leo H

    2011-02-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) have become indispensable in the treatment of neonates and patients undergoing chemotherapy or hemodialysis. A CVC provides easy access to the patient's circulation, thus enabling facile monitoring of hemodynamic parameters, nutritional support, or administration of (cytostatic) medication. However, complications with CVCs, such as bacterial bloodstream infection or thromboembolism, are common. Bloodstream infections, predominantly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, are notoriously difficult to prevent and treat. Furthermore, patients receiving infusion therapy through a CVC are at risk for deep-vein thrombosis, especially of the upper limbs. Several recent clinical trials have shown that prophylactic anticoagulation (low-molecular-weight heparin or vitamin K antagonists) is not effective. Here, we report on the systematic development of a new bifunctional coating concept that can -uniquely- be applied to make CVC surfaces antimicrobial and antithrombogenic at the same time. The novel coating consists of a moderately hydrophilic synthetic copolymer of N-vinylpyrrollidinone (NVP) and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), containing embedded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and sodium heparin. The work demonstrates that the AgNPs strongly inhibit adhesion of S. aureus (reference strain and clinical isolates). Surprisingly, heparin not only rendered our surfaces practically non-thrombogenic, but also contributed synergistically to their biocidal activity. PMID:21093906

  16. Misinsertion of central venous catheter into the suspected vertebral vein: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So-Hee; Jung, Sung-Mee

    2014-01-01

    We experienced a case in which a central venous catheter (CVC) was misplaced into the wrong vein, which was mistaken for the internal jugular vein (IJV), identified by chest x-ray and ultrasound. The vertebral vein passes through the transverse foramina from the atlas to the 6th cervical vertebra. After exiting the transverse foramen of the 6th vertebra, the vein subsequently runs anterolateral to the vertebral artery and posterior to the IJV and drains the innominate vein. In this case, chest x-ray and ultrasound revealed that the inserted CVC had a course very similar to the vertebral vein. The misplacement of a CVC into the vertebral vein might occur from excessive rotation of the patient's head, which leads to alterations in the cervical vascular anatomy, and from deep insertion of the puncture needle. Therefore, it is advised, for safe CVC insertion, to minimize a patient's head rotation and to make use of ultrasound when the anatomical structures cannot be clearly identified. PMID:25473464

  17. Central Venous Catheters and Bloodstream Infection During Induction Therapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Kristin; Hasle, Henrik; Asdahl, Peter; Handrup, Mette M; Wehner, Peder S; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the risk of first-time bloodstream infection (BSI) according to type of central venous catheter (CVC) during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients eligible for our analysis were all newly diagnosed children with ALL treated at 3 pediatric centers in Denmark between 2008 and 2014. A total of 136 patients were followed from initial CVC placement until first BSI, CVC removal, death, or day 28, whichever occurred first. Thirty-nine BSIs were detected, of which 67% were gram-positive infections, and 59% met the criteria for being CVC associated. The 28-day cumulative incidence of BSI was similar in 77 patients with a nontunneled CVC (28%; 95% confidence interval, 19%-40%) and in 59 patients with a tunneled CVC with external lines (TE) (33%; 95% confidence interval, 23%-47%). Subgroup analyses showed that gram-negative blood isolates occurred more frequently in patients with a TE, and that lower incidences of BSI were detected in patients older than 9 years with a TE, and in patients with T-ALL. It is concluded that the type of CVC inserted at diagnosis has no impact upon the risk of BSI in patients with ALL undergoing induction therapy. PMID:26907653

  18. A Rare Case of Jejunal Arterio-Venous Fistula: Treatment with Superselective Catheter Embolization with a Tracker-18 Catheter and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Martin J. Anderson, Suzanne E.; Lourens, Steven; Triller, Juergen

    2004-11-15

    Arterio-venous fistulas may develop spontaneously, following trauma or infection, or be iatrogenic in nature. We present a rare case of a jejunal arterio- venous fistula in a 35-year-old man with a history of pancreatic head resection that had been performed two years previously because of chronic pancreatitis. The patient was admitted with acute upper abdominal pain, vomiting and an abdominal machinery-type bruit. The diagnosis of a jejunal arterio-venous fistula was established by MR imaging. Transfemoral angiography was performed to assess the possibility of catheter embolization. The angiographic study revealed a small aneurysm of the third jejunal artery, abnormal early filling of dilated jejunal veins and marked filling of the slightly dilated portal vein (13-14 mm). We considered the presence of segmental portal hypertension. The patient was treated with coil embolization in the same angiographic session. This case report demonstrates the importance of auscultation of the abdomen in the initial clinical examination. MR imaging and color Doppler ultrasound are excellent noninvasive tools in establishing the diagnosis. The role of interventional radiological techniques in the treatment of early portal hypertension secondary to jejunal arterio-venous fistula is discussed at a time when this condition is still asymptomatic. A review of the current literature is included.

  19. Comparison of hospital length of stay, costs, and readmissions of alteplase versus catheter replacement among patients with occluded central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Frank R; Chen, Er; Lipkin, Craig; Tayama, Darren; Amin, Alpesh N

    2014-01-01

    Background Central venous catheter (CVC) occlusion is common, affecting 30% of all CVCs. Objective To compare length of stay (LOS), costs, and readmissions associated with the use of alteplase to clear catheter blockage to outcomes associated with catheter replacement. Design Retrospective observational study utilizing a large hospital database. Participants Hospitalized patients treated for catheter occlusion from January 2006 to December 2011. Main Measures Univariate analyses of patient characteristics and treatment patterns and multivariable regression analyses of postocclusion hospital costs, LOS, and 30- and 90-day readmissions were conducted. Key Results We included 34,579 patients treated for a CVC occlusion by replacement (N = 1028) or by alteplase (2 mg) administration (N = 33,551). Patients receiving alteplase were somewhat younger than those having catheter replacement (60 ± 19 vs 62 ± 20 years old, P = 0.0002). After adjusting for patient and hospital factors via regression modeling, average daily postocclusion costs were $317 lower for alteplase recipients than for catheter replacement patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 238.22–392.24; P < 0.0001). Adjusted total postocclusion costs were $1419 lower for alteplase recipients versus patients receiving catheter replacement (95% CI: 307.27–2458.12; P = 0.0121). Postocclusion operating room/surgery, radiology, and supply costs were significantly lower for alteplase recipients (P < 0.001). Average adjusted postocclusion LOS was similar for both groups (P > 0.05). Odds of readmission were not significantly different at 30 or 90 days. Conclusions Among patients treated for an occluded CVC, alteplase-treated patients had lower daily and total postocclusion costs than patients receiving catheter replacement. Cost differences were mainly driven by lower operating room/surgery, radiology, and supplier costs. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2014;9:490–496. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Hospital Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Hospital Medicine PMID:24825837

  20. Managing central venous catheters: a prospective randomised trial of two methods.

    PubMed

    Larwood, K A; Anstey, C M; Dunn, S V

    2000-05-01

    A randomised, prospective study was conducted to evaluate the impact on central venous catheter (CVC) infection when fluids and lines connected to a CVC were changed using a 'sterile' compared to an 'aseptic, non-touch' technique. The study sought to determine whether there were any differences in CVC tip colonisation (CTC) or CVC-related bacteraemia (CRB) as a result of the technique used for fluid and line changes. In the sterile technique (control) group, fluids and tubing were changed using full sterile technique. In the aseptic, non-touch (experimental) group, fluids and tubing attached to the CVC were changed using only a small sterile drape and a 2-minute clinical hand wash. When the CVC was removed, the tip was sampled and cultured using the semi-quantitative method. Blood cultures were also collected. In all, 111 samples from 79 patients were included in the trial: 61 in the sterile technique group and 50 in the non-touch, aseptic technique group. Results showed a CTC rate of 31 per cent in the control group and 14 per cent in the experimental group, while the CRB rate was 8.2 per cent and 6 per cent respectively. The most common organisms cultured were Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermis respectively. This study indicates that it is safe to change fluids and lines attached to CVCs using the aseptic, non-touch technique, which has resulted in significant financial savings through less use of equipment and less nursing time required to perform fluid and line changes. PMID:11235451

  1. Infection of a subclavian venous stent in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Guest, S S; Kirsch, C M; Baxter, R; Sorooshian, M; Young, J

    1995-08-01

    Endovascular stent placement to prevent restenosis after angioplasty is being increasingly employed. A 63-year-old hemodialysis patient with a right forearm gortex graft developed ipsilateral arm edema, and a right subclavian vein stenosis was diagnosed. This vascular stenosis was presumably secondary to previous placement of temporary access catheters. The subclavian vein stenosis was treated with angioplasty, endovascular stenting, and warfarin, which resulted in resolution of the arm edema. Three weeks after stenting, the patient developed fever to 104 degrees F, chills, and right arm and shoulder edema. All blood cultures grew Staphylococcus aureus, and an Indium-labeled white blood cell scan was positive at the sight of the subclavian stent. Infectious disease consultants recommended urgent removal of the infected stent, but the extensive surgery required posed considerable risk of major morbidity. We elected to conservatively treat the patient. With loss of all upper-extremity access sites, the patient was converted to peritoneal dialysis. Despite the patient's ambulatory status, a femoral venous Hickman catheter was placed and tunneled through the abdominal subcutaneous soft tissue. The patient received 9 weeks of antibiotics by the Hickman catheter with an infusion pump, and warfarin was continued. There has been complete clinical resolution of infection and subclavian thrombosis. Endovascular stents are being used more commonly, and this is the first description, to our knowledge, of a stent infection. The stent infection was successfully managed without surgical removal. PMID:7645545

  2. On-demand antimicrobial release from a temperature-sensitive polymer - comparison with ad libitum release from central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Jelmer; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Abeln, Caroline; van der Mei, Henny C; van Asseldonk, Dirk; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-28

    Antimicrobial releasing biomaterial coatings have found application for instance in the fixation of orthopedic joint prostheses and central venous catheters. Most frequently, the release kinetics is such that antimicrobially-effective concentrations are only reached within the first days to weeks after implantation, leaving no local antimicrobial release available when a biomaterial-associated infection occurs later. Here we compare the ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a central venous catheter with their release from a new, on-demand release coating consisting of a temperature-sensitive copolymer of styrene and n-butyl (meth)acrylate. The copolymer can be loaded with an antimicrobial, which is released when the temperature is raised above its glass transition temperature. Ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a commercially-purchased catheter and associated antimicrobial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was limited to 16days. Consecutive temperature-triggers of our on-demand coating yielded little or no antimicrobial efficacy of silver-acetate release, but antimicrobially-effective chlorhexidine concentrations were observed over a time period of 60-80days. This attests to the clear advantage of on-demand coatings above ad libitum releasing coatings, that may have released their antimicrobial content before it is actually needed. Importantly, glass transition temperature of chlorhexidine loaded copolymers was lower (48°C) than of silver loaded ones (61°C), facilitating their clinical use. PMID:24950430

  3. Catheter-related infection and pathogens of umbilical venous catheterization in a neonatal intensive care unit in China.

    PubMed

    Hei, Ming-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Chun; Gao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Wu, Zhi-Xiang; Tian, Lang; Tan, Yan-Juan

    2012-02-01

    We studied the incidence of umbilical venous catheterization (UVC)-related infection and pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in China. Patients were grouped into <2000-g UVC or <2000-g non-UVC groups or ≥2001-g UVC or ≥2001-g non-UVC groups. Blood culture and umbilical root skin swab culture were taken following UVC insertion and extraction. UVCs were removed after 7 days and cultures of UVC tips were performed then. A total of 516 patients were enrolled. The incidence of UVC-related septicemia was 9.5%. The incidence of UVC-related septicemia per 1000 UVC days was 13.6. No significant difference was noted between <2000-g UVC and <2000-g non-UVC groups and between ≥2001-g UVC group and ≥2001-g non-UVC groups, in the number of positive blood cultures and skin cultures, the percentage of catheter-related septicemia, the incidence of catheter-related septicemia per 1000 catheter days, and the increase in the number of positive cultures between two skin cultures following UVC insertion and extraction. The predominant pathogen in all cultures was gram-positive pathogens. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most frequently noted pathogen. UVC did not increase the incidence of catheter-related infection in the NICU. It is necessary to consider local pathogen spectrum when choosing antibiotic therapy before specific culture results become available. PMID:22131046

  4. Detection of viable but non-culturable staphylococci in biofilms from central venous catheters negative on standard microbiological assays.

    PubMed

    Zandri, G; Pasquaroli, S; Vignaroli, C; Talevi, S; Manso, E; Donelli, G; Biavasco, F

    2012-07-01

    Viable bacteria were sought in 44 Maki-negative biofilms from central venous catheters (CVCs) using epifluorescence microscopy after live/dead staining. Thirty (77%) samples contained viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells; the majority were positive on real-time PCR specific for Staphylococcus epidermidis (one also for Staphylococcus aureus). Viable cells were significantly (p<0.01) associated with CVCs from febrile patients, three of whom showed S. epidermidis-positive blood cultures, suggesting that CVC-associated biofilms can be reservoirs for staphylococci in the VBNC state. The possible role of VBNC staphylococci in persistent infections related to medical devices requires further investigation. PMID:22578149

  5. Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of an Antibiotic-Lock Technique for Prevention of Gram-Positive Central Venous Catheter-Related Infection in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carratal, Jordi; Niub, Jordi; Fernndez-Sevilla, Alberto; Juv, Eulalia; Castellsagu, Xavier; Berlanga, Juan; Liares, Josefina; Gudiol, Francesc

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of an antibiotic-lock technique in preventing endoluminal catheter-related infection with gram-positive bacteria in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients with nontunneled, multilumen central venous catheters were assigned in a randomized, double-blinded manner to receive either 10 U of heparin per ml (57 patients) or 10 U of heparin per ml and 25 ?g of vancomycin per ml (60 patients), which were instilled in the catheter lumen and which were allowed to dwell in the catheter lumen for 1 h every 2 days. Insertion-site and hub swabs were taken twice weekly. The primary and secondary end points of the trial were significant colonization of the catheter hub and catheter-related bacteremia, respectively. Significant colonization of the catheter hub occurred in nine (15.8%) patients receiving heparin (seven patients were colonized with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one patient was colonized with Staphylococcus capitis, and one patient was colonized with Corynebacterium sp.), whereas the catheter hubs of none of the patients receiving heparin and vancomycin were colonized (P = 0.001). Catheter-related bacteremia developed in four (7%) patients receiving heparin (three patients had S. epidermidis bacteremia and one patient had S. capitis bacteremia), whereas none of the patients in the heparin and vancomycin group had catheter-related bacteremia (P = 0.05). The times to catheter hub colonization and to catheter-related bacteremia by the Kaplan-Meier method were longer in patients receiving heparin and vancomycin than in patients receiving heparin alone (P = 0.004 and P = 0.06, respectively). Our study shows that a solution containing heparin and vancomycin administered by using an antibiotic-lock technique effectively prevents catheter hub colonization with gram-positive bacteria and subsequent bacteremia during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with hematologic malignancy. PMID:10471564

  6. CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER-RELATED THROMBOSIS AND THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, E.; Sharathkumar, A.; Glover, J.; Faustino, E. V. S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVES In preparation for a pediatric randomized controlled trial on thromboprophylaxis, we determined the frequency of catheter-related thrombosis in children. We also systematically reviewed the pediatric trials on thromboprophylaxis to evaluate its efficacy and to identify possible pitfalls in the conduct of these trials. PATIENTS/METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials for articles published until December 2013. We included cohort studies and trials on patients 018 years old with central venous catheter actively surveilled for thrombosis with radiologic imaging. We estimated the pooled frequency of thrombosis and the pooled risk ratio (RR) with thromboprophylaxis using random effects model. RESULTS Of 2,651 articles identified, we analyzed 37 articles with 3,128 patients. The pooled frequency of thrombosis was 0.20 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.160.24). Of 10 trials, we did not find evidence that heparin-bonded catheter (RR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.017.68), unfractionated heparin (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.571.51), low molecular weight heparin (RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 0.512.50), warfarin (RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.342.17), antithrombin concentrate (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.381.55) and nitroglycerin (RR: 1.53; 95% CI: 0.574.10) reduced the risk for thrombosis. Most of the trials were either not powered for thrombosis or powered to detect large, likely unachievable, reductions in thrombosis. Missing data on thrombosis also limited these trials. CONCLUSIONS Catheter-related thrombosis is common in children. An adequately powered multicenter trial that can detect a modest, clinically significant, reduction in thrombosis is critically needed. Missing outcome data should be minimized in this trial. PMID:24801495

  7. Evaluation of alternatives for dysfunctional double lumen central venous catheters using a two-compartmental mathematical model for different solutes.

    PubMed

    Van Canneyt, Koen; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond; Segers, Patrick; Verdonck, Pascal; Eloot, Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Double lumen (DL) central venous catheters (CVC) often suffer from thrombosis, fibrin sheet formation, and/or suction towards the vessel wall, resulting in insufficient blood flow during hemodialysis. Reversing the catheter connection often restores blood flows, but will lead to higher recirculation. Single lumen (SL) CVCs have often fewer flow problems, but they inherently have some degree of recirculation. To assist bedside clinical decision making on optimal catheter application, we investigated mathematically the differences in dialysis adequacy using different modes of access with CVCs.
A mathematical model was developed to calculate reduction ratio (RR) and total solute removal (TSR) of urea, methylguanidine (MG), beta-2-microglobulin (β2M), and phosphate (P) during different dialysis scenarios: 4-h dialysis with a well-functioning DL CVC (DL-normal, blood flow QB 350 ml/min), dysfunctional DL CVC (DL-low flow, QB 250), reversed DL CVC (DL-reversed, QB 350, recirculation 
R = 10%) and 12 Fr SL CVC (effective QB 273). 
With DL-normal as reference, urea RR was decreased by 3.5% (DL-reversed), 13.0% (SL), and 15.6% (DL-low flow), while urea TSR was decreased by 3.3% (DL-reversed), 13.2% (SL), and 13.5% (DL-low flow). The same trend was found for MG and P. However, β2M RR decreased only 1.5% with SL CVC although TSR decrease was 17.2%, while RR decreased 21.1% with DL-low flow although TSR decrease was only 4.9%.
In the case of dysfunctional DL CVCs, reversing the catheter connection and restoring the blood flow did not impair TSR, with 10% recirculation. The SL CVC showed suboptimal TSR results that were similar to those of the dysfunctional DL CVC. PMID:23280082

  8. Recanalization of Acute and Subacute Venous and Synthetic Bypass-Graft Occlusions With a Mechanical Rotational Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Wissgott, Christian Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2013-08-01

    PurposePercutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) is now established as an alternative treatment of acute arterial occlusions in addition to fibrinolysis and surgical thrombectomy. The objective of this retrospective study was the investigation of a rotational atherothrombectomy catheter in terms of safety and efficacy in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions.Materials and MethodsForty-two patients (average age 65.8 {+-} 9.1 years) with acute (<14 days [n = 31]) and subacute (14-42 days [n = 11]) femoropopliteal bypass occlusions were treated consecutively with a rotational debulking and removal catheter (Straub Rotarex). The average occlusion length was 28.4 {+-} 2.9 (24-34) cm. Thirty-four (81 %) patients underwent venous bypass, and 8 (19 %) patients underwent polytetrafluoroethylene bypass.ResultsThe technical success rate was 97.6 % (41 of 42). In 1 patient, blood flow could not be restored despite the use of the atherothrombectomy system. The average catheter intervention time was 6.9 {+-} 2.1 (4-9) min. Ankle-brachial index increased from 0.39 {+-} 0.13 to 0.83 {+-} 0.11 at discharge and to 0.82 {+-} 0.17 after 1 month (p < 0.05). There were a total of 2 (4.8 %) peri-interventional complications: One patient developed a distal embolism, which was successfully treated with local lysis, and another patient had a small perforation at the distal anastomosis, which was successfully treated with a stent.ConclusionPMT with the Rotarex atherothrombectomy catheter represents a safe and effective option in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions because it can quickly restore blood flow.

  9. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  10. [Inferior vena cava thrombosis reaching the right atrium after removal of the central venous catheter at femoral vein in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis].

    PubMed

    Morita, Yoko; Ariyama, Jun; Mieda, Tsutomu; Terao, Kazuhisa; Ueshima, Hironobu; Imanishi, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-05-01

    A 19-year-old male was admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis. A central venous catheter for fluid loading and insulin administration was inserted from the right femoral vein. The catheter was placed for 4days and was removal. Three days after removal thrombus was pointed out with echocardiography. Cardiac ultrasound revealed floating thrombi in the right atrium. Venography demonstrated a large thrombus from the right femoral vein to the end of the inferior vena cava. Emergency surgery was performed. A tubular thrombus was trapped from the inferior vena cava departure at the right atrium under cardiopulmonary bypass. The surgeon also implanted an inferior vena caval filter. The patient was weaned from ventilator assist next day and was discharged from the hospital 13 days later. This case suggests that deep vein thrombosis should be checked in diabetic ketoacidosis even after removal of a central venous catheter implanted at the femoral vein. PMID:24864582

  11. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this case was the SUS. PMID:27096678

  12. Alginate Dressing Application in Hemostasis After Using Seldinger Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in Tumor Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qun; Lei, Sanlin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to observe hemostatic effects of alginate dressing after using seldinger PICC catheter in tumor patients. Sixty tumor patients with PICC receiving chemotherapy were divided into the test group (30 cases) and the control group (30 cases) randomly. The test group was treated with alginate dressing and oppressed by the puncture point, while the control group was treated with gauze of the same size. PICC transparent films were used in both groups. Finally, dressing ooze blood soaked states on the puncture points and dressing change times were observed in the two groups for 1 week. Moreover, local infection rate and incidence of catheter leak were also evaluated. The results showed that the oozing of blood and the changing frequency in the test group were obviously less than that in the control group, and there has a statistical difference (P < 0.05). Infection rate of puncture point and incidence of catheter leak were simultaneously reduced in the test group. Alginate dressing is effective in preventing seldinger PICC catheter-induced hemorrhage. PMID:26306067

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Low Dosage of Urokinase for Catheter-directed Thrombolysis of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiao-Long; Kong, Ling-Shang; Meng, Qing-You; Qian, Aimin; Li, Wen-Dong; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Cheng-Long

    2015-01-01

    Background: Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) has been a mainstay in treating deep venous thrombosis (DVT). However, the optimal dosage of a thrombolytic agent is still controversial. The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low dosage urokinase with CDT for DVT. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using data from a total of 427 patients with DVT treated with CDT in our single center between July 2009 and December 2012. Early efficacy of thrombolysis was assessed with a thrombus score based on daily venography. The therapeutic safety was evaluated by adverse events. A venography or duplex ultrasound was performed to assess the outcome at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years postoperatively. Results: The mean total dose of 3.34 (standard deviation [SD] 1.38) million units of urokinase was administered during a mean of 5.18 (SD 2.28) days. Prior to discharge, Grade III (complete lysis) was achieved in 154 (36%) patients; Grade II (50–99% lysis) in 222 (52%); and Grade I (50% lysis) in 51 (12%). The major complications included one intracranial hemorrhage, one hematochezia, five gross hematuria, and one pulmonary embolism. Moreover, no death occurred in the study. Conclusions: Treatment of low-dose catheter-directed thrombosis is an efficacious and safe therapeutic approach in patients with DVT offering good long-term outcomes and minimal complications. PMID:26112721

  14. Role of chest X-ray in citing central venous catheter tip: A few case reports with a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Achuthan Nair; Koshy, Rachel Cherian; Koshy, Sumod M

    2013-07-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) insertions are increasingly performed in surgical patients and intensive therapy. A simple and invasive procedure performed under strict sterile precautions with complications ranging from arrhythmias; infections; and life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade, cardiac perforation and even death. A post-procedure chest X-ray (CXR), though does not accurately assess the tip of the catheter in relation to the superior vena cava (SVC) and right atrium (RA), can detect malpositions, safety of catheter tip, pneumothorax and kinking. We would like to share some of the malpositions we encountered in our centre, their management and a brief review of the literature on optimal catheter tip location. PMID:24106371

  15. Implementation of central venous catheter bundle in an intensive care unit in Kuwait: Effect on central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa; Al Mousa, Haifa; Rotimi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSIs) is an important healthcare-associated infection in the critical care units. It causes substantial morbidity, mortality and incurs high costs. The use of central venous line (CVL) insertion bundle has been shown to decrease the incidence of CLABSIs. Our aim was to study the impact of CVL insertion bundle on incidence of CLABSI and study the causative microbial agents in an intensive care unit in Kuwait. Surveillance for CLABSI was conducted by trained infection control team using National Health Safety Network (NHSN) case definitions and device days measurement methods. During the intervention period, nursing staff used central line care bundle consisting of (1) hand hygiene by inserter (2) maximal barrier precautions upon insertion by the physician inserting the catheter and sterile drape from head to toe to the patient (3) use of a 2% chlorohexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% ethanol scrub for the insertion site (4) optimum catheter site selection. (5) Examination of the daily necessity of the central line. During the pre-intervention period, there were 5367 documented catheter-days and 80 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 14.9 CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days. After implementation of the interventions, there were 5052 catheter-days and 56 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 11.08 per 1000 catheter-days. The reduction in the CLABSI/1000 catheter days was not statistically significant (P=0.0859). This study demonstrates that implementation of a central venous catheter post-insertion care bundle was associated with a reduction in CLABSI in an intensive care area setting. PMID:26138518

  16. Minimally Invasive Monitoring of Chronic Central Venous Catheter Patency in Mice Using Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA)

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Giovanna; Fiebig, Teresa; Kirschner, Stefanie; Nikoubashman, Omid; Kabelitz, Lisa; Othman, Ahmed; Nonn, Andrea; Kramer, Martin; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Repetitive administration of medication or contrast agents is frequently performed in mice. The introduction of vascular access mini-ports (VAMP) for mice allows long-term vascular catheterization, hereby eliminating the need for repeated vessel puncture. With catheter occlusion being the most commonly reported complication of chronic jugular vein catheterization, we tested whether digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can be utilized to evaluate VAMP patency in mice. Methods Twenty-three mice underwent catheterization of the jugular vein and subcutaneous implantation of a VAMP. The VAMP was flushed every second day with 50 μL of heparinized saline solution (25 IU/ml). DSA was performed during injection of 100 μL of an iodine based contrast agent using an industrial X-ray inspection system intraoperatively, as well as 7±2 and 14±2 days post implantation. Results DSA allowed localization of catheter tip position, to rule out dislocation, kinking or occlusion of a microcatheter, and to evaluate parent vessel patency. In addition, we observed different ante- and retrograde collateral flow patterns in case of jugular vein occlusion. More exactly, 30% of animals showed parent vessel occlusion after 7±2 days in our setting. At this time point, nevertheless, all VAMPs verified intravascular contrast administration. After 14±2 days, intravascular contrast injection was verified in 70% of the implanted VAMPs, whereas at this point of time 5 animals had died or were sacrificed and in 2 mice parent vessel occlusion hampered intravascular contrast injection. Notably, no occlusion of the catheter itself was observed. Conclusion From our observations we conclude DSA to be a fast and valuable minimally invasive tool for investigation of catheter and parent vessel patency and for anatomical studies of collateral blood flow in animals as small as mice. PMID:26098622

  17. Successful Salvage of Central Venous Catheters in Patients with Catheter-Related or Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections by Using a Catheter Lock Solution Consisting of Minocycline, EDTA, and 25% Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Raad, Issam; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Zakhour, Ramia; Jordan, Mary; Al Hamal, Zanaib; Jiang, Ying; Yousif, Ammar; Garoge, Kumait; Mulanovich, Victor; Viola, George M; Kanj, Soha; Pravinkumar, Egbert; Rosenblatt, Joel; Hachem, Ray

    2016-06-01

    In cancer patients with long-term central venous catheters (CVC), removal and reinsertion of a new CVC at a different site might be difficult because of the unavailability of accessible vascular sites. In vitro and animal studies showed that a minocycline-EDTA-ethanol (M-EDTA-EtOH) lock solution may eradicate microbial organisms in biofilms, hence enabling the treatment of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) while retaining the catheter in situ Between April 2013 and July 2014, we enrolled 30 patients with CLABSI in a prospective study and compared them to a historical group of 60 patients with CLABSI who had their CVC removed and a new CVC inserted. Each catheter lumen was locked with an M-EDTA-EtOH solution for 2 h administered once daily, for a total of 7 doses. Patients who received locks had clinical characteristics that were comparable to those of the control group. The times to fever resolution and microbiological eradication were similar in the two groups. Patients with the lock intervention received a shorter duration of systemic antibiotic therapy than that of the control patients (median, 11 days versus 16 days, respectively; P < 0.0001), and they were able to retain their CVCs for a median of 74 days after the onset of bacteremia. The M-EDTA-EtOH lock was associated with a significantly decreased rate of mechanical and infectious complications compared to that of the CVC removal/reinsertion group, who received a longer duration of systemic antimicrobial therapy. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01539343.). PMID:27001822

  18. Bilateral sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis secondary to indwelling central venous catheter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Charita; Watson, Nicholas FS; Jagasia, Nitin; Chari, Ray; Patterson, Jane E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare, comprising approximately 0.5% to 1% of all joint infections. Predisposing causes include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. Case presentation We report a rare case of bilateral sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis in an elderly patient secondary to an indwelling right subclavian vein catheter. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. We also review the literature regarding the epidemiology, investigation and methods of treatment of the condition. Conclusion SCJ infections are rare, and require a high degree of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of neck and shoulder pain may cloud the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Surgical intervention is often required; however, our patient avoided major intervention and settled with parenteral antibiotics and washout of the joint. PMID:18445257

  19. Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children Receiving Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT).

    PubMed

    Kovacich, Amanda; Tamma, Pranita D; Advani, Sonali; Popoola, Victor O; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the frequency of and risk factors associated with complications necessitating removal of the peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients receiving outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) and to determine the appropriateness of OPAT in children with OPAT-related complications. METHODS A retrospective cohort of children who had a PICC inserted at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, and were discharged from the hospital on OPAT was assembled. RESULTS A total of 1,465 PICCs were used to provide antibiotic therapy for 955 children after hospital discharge. Among these, 117 PICCs (8%) required removal due to a complication (4.6 of 1,000 catheter days). Children discharged to a long-term care facility were at increased risk of adverse PICC events (incidence risk ratio [IRR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-6.17). For children receiving OPAT, age of the child (adjusted IRR [aIRR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), noncentral PICC tip location (aIRR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.66-4.82), and public insurance (aIRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40) were associated with adverse PICC events. In addition, 34 patients (32%) with adverse events may not have required intravenous antibiotics at the time of hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS Of children discharged with PICCs on OPAT during the study period, 8% developed a complication necessitating PICC removal. Children discharged to a long-term care facility had an increased rate of complication compared with children who were discharged home. With improved education regarding appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy and situations in which early conversion to enteral therapy should be considered, PICC-related complications may have been avoided in 32% of children. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):420-424. PMID:26961677

  20. Early and Late Complications Related to Central Venous Catheters in Hematological Malignancies: a Retrospective Analysis of 1102 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 – 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  1. Early and late complications related to central venous catheters in hematological malignancies: a retrospective analysis of 1102 patients.

    PubMed

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 - 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  2. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  3. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  4. Using lateral radiographs to determine umbilical venous catheter tip position in neonates.

    PubMed

    Butler, G C; Al-Assaf, N; Tarrant, A; Ryan, S; El-Khuffash, A

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to assess the difference in measurement of the distance of the UVC tip from the diaphragm between (Anteroposterior) AP and lateral radiographs and to determine the reliability of the measurement of UVC tip distance from the diaphragm between the two views. A retrospective review of paired AP and lateral radiographs taken to assess UVC tip position was carried out in 25 infants was conducted and reliability analysis was carried out. There was a significant difference in the mean (SD) distance of the UVC catheter above the diaphragm between the AP and lateral radiographs: 8.7 (7.8) mm versus 11.6 (7.3) mm (p = 0.003) respectively. Measurements using lateral radiographs were more reliable (Intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.99 vs. 0.93). Inter-observer reliability analysis yielded similar results. Lateral radiographs are more reliable in measurement of UVC tip position and should be performed in conjunction with AP films to aid in determining UVC position. PMID:25282975

  5. "Scrub the hub": cleaning duration and reduction in bacterial load on central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sarah; Bryson, Celestina; Porter, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study on the effect of alcohol disinfection duration on bacterial load on catheter hubs. Three different levels of disinfection (3, 10, and 15 seconds) were analyzed as well as a positive and negative control. All hubs with the exception of the negative controls were contaminated with a 10 bacterial solution and allowed to dry for 24 hours. Through each hub, 1 mL of sterile saline was flushed; a 10-?L calibrated loop was used to plate the flush onto blood agar. Colony counts were performed on the plates after a 24-hour incubation period. Results revealed that the 3 different levels of disinfection duration were not found to differ significantly in reduction in bacterial load. The duration of disinfection did not significantly change the bacterial load on the hub. However, any disinfection duration significantly decreased the bacterial load as compared to the positive control. A larger study would likely detect a significant result among the disinfections. PMID:21160298

  6. Real clinical practice of catheter therapy for deep venous thrombosis: periprocedural and 6-month outcomes from the EDO registry.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Anzai, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Makoto; Yajima, Junji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Ando, Hiroshi; Umemoto, Tomoyuki; Higashitani, Michiaki; Ozaki, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Nakao, Masashi; Yuzawa, Yasufumi; Kaneko, Hidehiro; Nakamura, Masato

    2015-07-01

    A recent national study in Japan indicated that 5.8 % of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) patients were treated using endovascular procedures, 83 % of which included catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT). However, the details of these endovascular procedures and their outcomes have not yet been fully evaluated. Using DVT data from the EDO registry (EnDOvascular treatment registry) database, a total of 35 symptomatic iliac or femoral DVT patients who received endovascular treatment (54.3 % male, age 64.7 ± 15.1) were analyzed. The dominant patient risks were being bedridden (22.9 %) and May-Thurner syndrome (25.7 %). Approximately 77.1 % of patients were treated using an antegrade approach, and CDT and other endovascular procedures were performed in 82.9 and 57.1 % of patients, respectively. A periprocedural inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was used in 94.1 % of patients, which remained implanted in 37.1 and 20.0 % of patients after discharge and 6 months after hospitalization, respectively. After 6 months of treatment, 2.9 % of patients experienced a recurrence of DVT and 5.7 % suffered revascularization, but no patient had a recurrence of pulmonary embolism. Subjective symptoms improved in 80.0 % of patients, while 2.9 % of patients felt worse at 6 months after treatment. Postthrombotic syndrome-related symptoms were observed in seven patients (19.4 %), and edema was most frequently observed (71.4 %). The details of CDT procedures, such as approach site and the removal of the IVC filter, varied among hospitals. Despite improved symptoms, further procedural standardization and data collection should be conducted to reduce complications and improve outcomes. PMID:25575649

  7. Malassezia furfur: a cause of occlusion of percutaneous central venous catheters in infants in the intensive care nursery.

    PubMed

    Azimi, P H; Levernier, K; Lefrak, L M; Petru, A M; Barrett, T; Schenck, H; Sandhu, A S; Duritz, G; Valesco, M

    1988-02-01

    Growth of Malassezia furfur in the intravascular catheter used for administration of lipid emulsion resulted in occlusion of deep intravascular Silastic catheters in 12 infants in 2 intensive care nurseries. At the time of occlusion visible growth was noted in the clear catheter which was connected to the Silastic intravascular line. Five infants showed clinical signs suggestive of sepsis. The yield of M. furfur from blood cultures and catheter tips was low even when oil enrichment was used. The highest yield of M. furfur was found in the connecting catheter (11 of 11). The source from and the route by which M. furfur entered the catheter remain unclear. The potential portals of entry include the proximal and distal ends of the connecting catheter as well as the colonized skin of the infants and caretakers. PMID:3125516

  8. Successful catheter directed thrombolysis in postpartum deep venous thrombosis complicated by nicoumalone-induced skin necrosis and failure in retrieval of inferior vena caval filter.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Agrawal, Navin; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is an important cause for maternal morbidity and mortality in postpartum period. Though catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is now considered as a safe and effective therapy for the management of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) but still it is not indicated in postpartum DVT. We are presenting a case of 22-year-old female patient who presented with post-partum lower limb DVT and managed successfully with CDT by using injection streptokinase and temporary inferior vena caval filter was inserted as prophylactic for pulmonary embolism as she had extensive DVT extending into inferior vena cava (IVC). During follow-up, she developed large skin necrosis in left lower limb which was managed by adding injection low-molecular-weight heparin. IVC filter also could not be retrieved even after trying all manoeuvres during follow-up after 2 weeks. PMID:23887994

  9. Heparin Saline Versus Normal Saline for Flushing and Locking Peripheral Venous Catheters in Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Luo, Ou; He, Liu; Li, Jia-Xin; Tang, Yun-Jing; Luo, Yan-Li; Zhou, Min; Tang, Li; Zhang, Zong-Xia; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A prospective randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of heparin saline (HS) to those of normal saline (NS) as flushing and locking solutions for peripheral venous catheter (PVC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) patients. Patients with DLC at our institution between April 2012 and March 2013 were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the NS group received preservative-free 0.9% sodium chloride as the flushing and locking solution, while the HS group received HS (50?U/mL). PVC-related events and the duration of PVC maintenance were compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, the preinfusion and postinfusion levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and platelet (PLT) were also compared. A total of 32 and 36 DLC patients in the NS (125 PVCs) and HS (65 PVCs) groups, respectively, were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, including gender, age, ChildPugh grade, PVC type and administration of anticoagulant, and irritant agents, were comparable between the 2 groups (P?>?0.05). The maintenance times of the HS and NS groups were 80.27??26.47 and 84.19??29.32?hours, respectively (P?=?0.397). Removal of PVC for abnormal reasons occurred in 30.7% and 22.4% of patients in the HS and NS groups (P?=?0.208). The PVC occlusion rates were 6.2% and 5.6% in the HS and NS groups, respectively (OR?=?1.11, 95% CI 0.313.92). The PT, APTT, and PLT levels were comparable between the 2 groups both before and after infusion (P?>?0.05). Incremental analyses showed that ChildPugh grade C might be a risk factor for the suppression of PLT in the HS group. We consider NS to be as effective as and safer than conventional HS for flushing and locking PVC in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:26252305

  10. [Occlusion of central venous port catheters after simultaneous 24 h infusions of 5-FU and calcium-folinic acid in patients with gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fackler-Schwalbe, I; Schwalbe, B; Epple, M; Becker, A; Prgl, L; Gassel, W D; Stoffels, D; Sdhoff, T

    2004-05-01

    Folinic acid-modulated 5-FU regimens are standard elements in several chemotherapy combinations like FOLFIRI, FOLFOX or AIO-regimen in the palliative treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. When the simultaneous mixed infusion of 5-FU and calcium-folinic acid (Leucovorin) was authorized by the BfArM in 2002, we introduced this application regimen in the treatment of our cancer patients. 19 patients (AIO-regimen [5], FOLFIRI [12] and FOLFOX [2]) received a simultaneously mixed infusion of calcium-folinic acid and 5-FU over 24 hours with a total of 110 applications. 5-FU doses varied between 2000 and 2600 mg/m2, calcium-folinic acid was given with 500 mg/m2, infusion rate was 10 ml/hour using a 24 h pump. Central venous catheters employed included single Barth-Port in 18 cases, 1 patient had a Viggon-Port. In 3 out of the 19 patients catheter occlusion was noticed after 8-10 weekly applications of the mixed infusion. Heparine and subsequently urokinase were not successful in reversing the obstruction. All three catheters had to be explanted. Catheter tips in all cases showed a yellow cristalline precipitation. The crystallographic analysis exhibited calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in its polymorphic form (calcite). Thus, we confirmed calcite formation causing catheter occlusion as a frequent complication during a continuous 24 h-infusion of mixed high dose 5-FU and calcium-folinic acid. This reaction could not be avoided by increasing infusion volume and the application flow rate. As a result of our findings, recommending using calcium-folinic acid mixed with 5-FU has been withdrawn in the meantime. PMID:15244042

  11. CATheter Infections in CHildren (CATCH): a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation comparing impregnated and standard central venous catheters in children.

    PubMed Central

    Harron, Katie; Mok, Quen; Dwan, Kerry; Ridyard, Colin H; Moitt, Tracy; Millar, Michael; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Tibby, Shane M; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) are recommended for adults to reduce bloodstream infection (BSI) but not for children. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of impregnated compared with standard CVCs for reducing BSI in children admitted for intensive care. DESIGN Multicentre randomised controlled trial, cost-effectiveness analysis from a NHS perspective and a generalisability analysis and cost impact analysis. SETTING 14 English paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England. PARTICIPANTS Children aged < 16 years admitted to a PICU and expected to require a CVC for ≥ 3 days. INTERVENTIONS Heparin-bonded, antibiotic-impregnated (rifampicin and minocycline) or standard polyurethane CVCs, allocated randomly (1 : 1 : 1). The intervention was blinded to all but inserting clinicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Time to first BSI sampled between 48 hours after randomisation and 48 hours after CVC removal. The following data were used in the trial: trial case report forms; hospital administrative data for 6 months pre and post randomisation; and national-linked PICU audit and laboratory data. RESULTS In total, 1859 children were randomised, of whom 501 were randomised prospectively and 1358 were randomised as an emergency; of these, 984 subsequently provided deferred consent for follow-up. Clinical effectiveness - BSIs occurred in 3.59% (18/502) of children randomised to standard CVCs, 1.44% (7/486) of children randomised to antibiotic CVCs and 3.42% (17/497) of children randomised to heparin CVCs. Primary analyses comparing impregnated (antibiotic and heparin CVCs) with standard CVCs showed no effect of impregnated CVCs [hazard ratio (HR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 1.34]. Secondary analyses showed that antibiotic CVCs were superior to standard CVCs (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.96) but heparin CVCs were not (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.03). Time to thrombosis, mortality by 30 days and minocycline/rifampicin resistance did not differ by CVC. Cost-effectiveness - heparin CVCs were not clinically effective and therefore were not cost-effective. The incremental cost of antibiotic CVCs compared with standard CVCs over a 6-month time horizon was £1160 (95% CI -£4743 to £6962), with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £54,057 per BSI avoided. There was considerable uncertainty in costs: antibiotic CVCs had a probability of 0.35 of being dominant. Based on index hospital stay costs only, antibiotic CVCs were associated with a saving of £97,543 per BSI averted. The estimated value of health-care resources associated with each BSI was £10,975 (95% CI -£2801 to £24,751). Generalisability and cost-impact - the baseline risk of BSI in 2012 for PICUs in England was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42 to 4.74) per 1000 bed-days. An estimated 232 BSIs could have been averted in 2012 using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic CVCs for all children who require them (£36 per CVC) would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSIs in PICUs with standard BSI rates of > 1.2 per 1000 CVC-days. CONCLUSIONS The primary outcome did not differ between impregnated and standard CVCs. However, antibiotic-impregnated CVCs significantly reduced the risk of BSI compared with standard and heparin CVCs. Adoption of antibiotic-impregnated CVCs could be beneficial even for PICUs with low BSI rates, although uncertainty remains whether or not they represent value for money to the NHS. Limitations - inserting clinicians were not blinded to allocation and a lower than expected event rate meant that there was limited power for head-to-head comparisons of each type of impregnation. Future work - adoption of impregnated CVCs in PICUs should be considered and could be monitored through linkage of electronic health-care data and clinical data on CVC use with laboratory surveillance data on BSI. TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01029717. FUNDING This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 18. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:26935961

  12. Hemorrhagic shock occurring due to a concealed hematoma after insertion of a subclavian venous catheter in a patient undergoing anticoagulation therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Boo-Young; Kim, Won-Sung; Cho, Ah-Reum; Cho, Mi-Jung; Lee, Chung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man who had been receiving warfarin for atrial fibrillation, underwent emergency thrombectomy. A central venous catheter (CVC) was inserted via the left subclavian vein, and heparin was administered to prevent preoperative and postoperative thrombotic events. After an uneventful thrombectomy, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). On the second postoperative day, the patient developed syncope and his blood pressure and oxygen saturation decreased. A computed tomography (CT) revealed a huge hematoma under the pectoralis major muscle. The patient was then treated with continuous renal replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation for multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, which developed due to hemorrhagic shock in the ICU. These findings suggest that when a CVC is inserted in patients requiring anticoagulant therapy, the possible risk of excessive bleeding must be carefully considered. Further, choosing a proper insertion site and performing an ultrasound-guided aspiration may be helpful in preventing these complications. PMID:25473468

  13. Phase I Study of Hepatic Arterial Melphalan Infusion and Hepatic Venous Hemofiltration Using Percutaneously Placed Catheters in Patients With Unresectable Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pingpank, James F.; Libutti, Steven K.; Chang, Richard; Wood, Bradford J.; Neeman, Ziv; Kam, Anthony W.; Figg, William D.; Zhai, Souping; Beresneva, Tatiana; Seidel, Geoffrey D.; Alexander, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of a 30-minute hepatic artery infusion of melphalan via a percutaneously placed catheter and hepatic venous hemofiltration using a double balloon catheter positioned in the retrohepatic inferior vena cava to shunt hepatic venous effluent through an activated charcoal filter and then to the systemic circulation. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate feasibility in an initial cohort and subsequently determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of melphalan. Patients and Methods The initial cohort (n = 12) was treated with 2.0 mg/kg of melphalan before dose escalation to 3.5 mg/kg (n = 16). Total hepatic drug delivery, systemic levels, and percent filter efficiency were determined. Patients were assessed for hepatic and systemic toxicity and response. Results A total of 74 treatments were administered to 28 patients. Twelve patients with primary and metastatic hepatic tumors received 30 treatments (mean, 2.5 per patient) at an initial melphalan dose of 2.0 mg/kg. At 3.5 mg/kg, a dose-limiting toxicity (neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia) was observed in two of six patients. Transient grade 3/4 hepatic and systemic toxicity was seen after 19% and 66% of treatments, respectively. An overall radiographic response rate of 30% was observed in treated patients. In the 10 patients with ocular melanoma, a 50% overall response rate was observed, including two complete responses. Conclusion Delivery of melphalan via this system is feasible, with limited, manageable toxicity and evidence of substantial antitumor activity; 3 mg/kg is the maximum safe tolerated dose of melphalan administered via this technique. PMID:15908655

  14. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  15. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  16. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Ryan; Bares, Sara; David, Michael Z

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  17. Presence of fibrinogen-binding adhesin gene in Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from central venous catheters-associated and orthopaedic implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Campoccia, Davide; Gamberini, Simonetta; Donati, M Elena; Montanaro, Lucio

    2004-08-01

    Attention has recently been paid to identify and elucidate those pathogenetic mechanisms, which play a significant role in sustaining the early phases of Staphylococcus epidermidis colonisation and infection development. Several analogies with the physiology of Staphylococcus aureus, a more thoroughly investigated pathogen, have lead to carefully consider all bacterial surface components that mediate cell adhesion. This study aimed at investigating the presence of the fbe gene encoding for a fibrinogen-binding protein in a collection of 107 S. epidermidis strains isolated from orthopaedic infections and 67 from central venous catheter-associated infections. The strains isolated from orthopaedic infections were in large part associated to four different classes of orthopaedic devices, respectively: internal fixation devices, external fixation devices, knee arthroprostheses and hip arthroprostheses. The molecular epidemiology analysis performed by PCR enlightened a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of this adhesion mechanism between orthopaedic infections and catheter-related infections, respectively, of 78% and 91%. The prevalence of fbe ranged from 67% to 91%, suggesting that, even though this adhesin is not strictly necessary for the development of infection, nevertheless it represents a rather common characteristic of strains causing clinical infections, this independently on the presence or the absence of implant materials. PMID:15120529

  18. Tegaderm CHG IV Securement Dressing for Central Venous and Arterial Catheter Insertion Sites: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    PubMed

    Jenks, Michelle; Craig, Joyce; Green, William; Hewitt, Neil; Arber, Mick; Sims, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Catheters are widely used for vascular access and for the administration of drugs or fluids in critically ill patients. This exposes patients to an infection risk. Tegaderm chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) (developed by 3M)-a transparent securement dressing-covers and protects catheter sites and secures devices to the skin. It comprises a transparent adhesive dressing to act as a barrier against external contamination and an integrated gel pad containing an antiseptic agent. The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee (MTAC) at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected Tegaderm CHG for evaluation. One study was identified by the sponsor as relevant to the decision problem. From this, the sponsor concluded that compared with standard dressings, Tegaderm CHG is associated with lower rates of catheter-related infection, but increased dermatitis incidence. The External Assessment Centre (EAC) identified four paired comparative studies between Tegaderm CHG, other CHG dressings or standard dressings. The EAC agreed with the sponsor's conclusion, finding that CHG dressings reduce infections compared with standard dressings. The sponsor constructed a de novo costing model. Tegaderm CHG generated cost savings of £77.26 per patient compared with standard dressings and was cost saving in 98.5 % of a sample of sets of inputs (2013 prices). The EAC critiqued and updated the model's inputs, yielding similar results to those the sponsor estimate. The MTAC reviewed the evidence and decided to support the case for adoption, issuing a positive draft recommendation. After a public consultation, NICE published this as Medical Technology Guidance 25. PMID:26458938

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Along with Mechanical Thromboaspiration versus Anticoagulation Alone in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis—A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B. C.; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C. M.; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) with assisted mechanical thrombolysis is now considered as the standard of medical care for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The study was conducted to describe the immediate and long-term (6 months) safety and effectiveness of CDT in patient with lower limb DVT compared with the routine anticoagulation alone. All 12 to 85 years old patients with recent (0–8 weeks) DVT were included. In CDT group, thrombus was aspirated mechanically and streptokinase (STK) was given along with unfractionated heparin (UFH). After 6 months, deep venous patency and postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) was assessed by using duplex ultrasound and Villalta scale, respectively. Among 51 patients with completed data, 25 patients were allocated additional CDT given for a mean duration of 108 ± 32 hours and 26 patients were allocated standard treatment alone. Grade III (complete) lysis was achieved in 37% patients and grade II (50–90%) lysis in 63% of patients. Patients with partial lysis underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and/or venous stenting. After 6 months, iliofemoral patency was found in 20 (80%) in the CDT group versus 7 (23%) in anticoagulation alone group (p < 0.01). PTS was seen in 5 (20%) in the CDT group versus 19 (77%) in anticoagulation alone group (p < 0.01). We conclude that CDT and conventional manual aspiration thrombectomy are an effective treatment for lower extremity DVT. STK infusion can be safely given up to 6 days. As addition of UFH can cause thrombocytopenia, so daily monitoring of complete blood counts is needed during CDT. PMID:25484556

  20. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  1. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  2. Central venous catheter insertion in peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell sibling donors: the SIdEM (Italian Society of Hemapheresis and Cell Manipulation) point of view.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Michele; Perseghin, Paolo; Accorsi, Patrizia; Pierelli, Luca

    2014-04-01

    Collection of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (PBSC) is the practice of choice for graft procurement in both autologous and allogeneic setting. The success of this procedure depends on the use of adequate vascular accesses. Well-sized peripheral veins are the first option in autologous and allogeneic donations. In autologous setting, in case of lack of adequate veins, central venous catheters (CVC) may be used for collection. In the allogeneic setting, although available data have shown the safety of the use of CVC, there are still some controversies about the possible insertion of a CVC in donors. A specific policy from competent registries is usually applied in the different countries to regulate the use of CVC in unrelated donors. In siblings, the question is still undefined due both to the lack of shared guidelines and to the specific characteristics of this donation. In fact, in not so rare cases, larger stem cell doses for specific cell manipulations (e.g., T/B cell depletion in the haploidentical setting) are needed. The lack of international rules or standard that forbid the use of a CVC in siblings and published data that document the safety of this procedure, allowed the Società Italiana di Emaferesi e Manipolazione Cellulare (SIdEM) national Board to identify a possible, shared, operational approach to address this issue by a case-specific risk-benefit assessment. PMID:24569005

  3. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2% and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6% and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6% and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation. PMID:25477271

  4. Spontaneous fracture of implanted central venous catheters in cancer patients: report of two cases and retrospective analysis of the 'pinch-off sign' as a risk factor.

    PubMed

    Punt, C J; Strijk, S; van der Hoeven, J J; van de Sluis, R; Verhagen, C A

    1995-08-01

    Spontaneous fracture of central venous catheters (CVC) has been reported. It results from repeated compression of the extravasal part of the CVC between the clavicle and the first rib. The so called pinch-off sign (POS) of the CVC as visible on a chest radiograph has been described as a warning for this complication. Fracture of CVC in patients receiving chemotherapy results in extravasation of the drug which may have serious consequences. We describe the spontaneous fracture of a CVC in two cancer patients. Subsequently we retrospectively analyzed chest radiographs for the POS of 77 cancer patients who received chemotherapy through a CVC and correlated these results with the occurence of complications related to CVC compression. In 77 patients a total of 97 CVC were implanted for a median duration of 7 months. Four CVC (4%) showed a grade 2 POS (change in course of CVC)CVC with luminal narrowing) on a chest radiograph. In three of these (75%) a compression-related complication occurred versus no compression-related complications in 93 CVC showing a POS of grade 1 (change in course of CVC without narrowing) or 0 (no change in course of CVC). The grade of POS on a chest radiograph may vary with the position of the patient, but all grade 2 POS were visible in the upright position. We recommend a chest radiograph in the upright position after placement of a CVC for grading of the POS. CVC showing a grade 2 POS should be removed or at least checked by a chest radiograph before the start of each chemotherapy infusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7579564

  5. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26019186

  6. Use of the GuideLiner catheter for the treatment of a bifurcational total occlusion of the native left anterior descending artery through a tortuous composite venous graft.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Elias B; Dasari, Tarun W; Hennebry, Thomas A

    2011-03-01

    Difficulty in stent delivery is frequently encountered in cases of tortuous or calcified coronary arteries. Chronic total occlusion interventions often require extra back-up that may not be adequately provided by guiding catheters, even the most supportive guiding catheters. We report the first successful stenting of a complex native coronary artery occlusion through an angulated bypass graft with the support of a GuideLiner catheter. PMID:21364246

  7. ‘Matching Michigan’: a 2-year stepped interventional programme to minimise central venous catheter-blood stream infections in intensive care units in England

    PubMed Central

    Bion, Julian; Richardson, Annette; Hibbert, Peter; Beer, Jeanette; Abrusci, Tracy; McCutcheon, Martin; Cassidy, Jane; Eddleston, Jane; Gunning, Kevin; Bellingan, Geoff; Patten, Mark; Harrison, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections from central venous catheters (CVC-BSIs) increase morbidity and costs in intensive care units (ICUs). Substantial reductions in CVC-BSI rates have been reported using a combination of technical and non-technical interventions. Methods We conducted a 2-year, four-cluster, stepped non-randomised study of technical and non-technical (behavioural) interventions to prevent CVC-BSIs in adult and paediatric ICUs in England. Random-effects Poisson regression modelling was used to compare infection rates. A sample of ICUs participated in data verification. Results Of 223 ICUs in England, 215 (196 adult, 19 paediatric) submitted data on 2479 of 2787 possible months and 147 (66%) provided complete data. The exposure rate was 438 887 (404 252 adult and 34 635 paediatric) CVC-patient days. Over 20 months, 1092 CVC-BSIs were reported. Of these, 884 (81%) were ICU acquired. For adult ICUs, the mean CVC-BSI rate decreased over 20 months from 3.7 in the first cluster to 1.48 CVC-BSIs/1000 CVC-patient days (p<0.0001) for all clusters combined, and for paediatric ICUs from 5.65 to 2.89 (p=0.625). The trend for infection rate reduction did not accelerate following interventions training. CVC utilisation rates remained stable. Pre-ICU infections declined in parallel with ICU-acquired infections. Criterion-referenced case note review showed high agreement between adjudicators (κ 0.706) but wide variation in blood culture sampling rates and CVC utilisation. Generic infection control practices varied widely. Conclusions The marked reduction in CVC-BSI rates in English ICUs found in this study is likely part of a wider secular trend for a system-wide improvement in healthcare-associated infections. Opportunities exist for greater harmonisation of infection control practices. Future studies should investigate causal mechanisms and contextual factors influencing the impact of interventions directed at improving patient care. PMID:22996571

  8. Transhepatic Venous Approach for Balloon-assisted Cervical Collateral Venous Access

    SciTech Connect

    Eyheremendy, Eduardo P.; Malizia, Patricio; Sierre, Sergio

    2011-12-15

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in many situations, and an increasing number of patients require temporary and long-term central catheters. Frequently, patients who have undergone multiple central veins catheterizations develop complete and diffuse venous occlusion, and this constitutes a difficult-to-manage clinical problem. We report a case of a 20-year-old patient who was referred to our department for central venous line placement who manifested bilateral femoral, jugular, and subclavian veins occlusion. A central venous catheter was implanted through a cervical collateral vein, targeting on and puncturing an angioplasty balloon, and advanced into the collateral vein through a transhepatic venous access.

  9. Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death in Candida albicans Yeast and Hyphal Cells, Preventing Biofilm Formation In Vitro and in a Rodent Central Venous Catheter Model.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mohammed S; Lee, Hiu Ham; Sanchez, David A; Friedman, Adam J; Tar, Moses T; Davies, Kelvin P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Martinez, Luis R

    2016-04-01

    Candida albicansis a leading nosocomial pathogen. Today, candidal biofilms are a significant cause of catheter infections, and such infections are becoming increasingly responsible for the failure of medical-implanted devices.C. albicansforms biofilms in which fungal cells are encased in an autoproduced extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Consequently, the enclosed fungi are protected from antimicrobial agents and host cells, providing a unique niche conducive to robust microbial growth and a harbor for recurring infections. Here we demonstrate that a recently developed platform comprised of nanoparticles that release therapeutic levels of nitric oxide (NO-np) inhibits candidal biofilm formation, destroys the extracellular polysaccharide matrices of mature fungal biofilms, and hinders biofilm development on surface biomaterials such as the lumen of catheters. We found NO-np to decrease both the metabolic activity of biofilms and the cell viability ofC. albicansin vitroandin vivo Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis found NO-np to induce apoptosis in biofilm yeast cellsin vitro Moreover, NO-np behave synergistically when used in combination with established antifungal drug therapies. Here we propose NO-np as a novel treatment modality, especially in combination with standard antifungals, for the prevention and/or remediation of fungal biofilms on central venous catheters and other medical devices. PMID:26810653

  10. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  11. Jugular Venous Catheterization: A Case of Knotting

    PubMed Central

    Erkılıç, E.; Aksoy, M.; Gümüş, T.; Sarı, S.; Kesimci, E.

    2015-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman, diagnosed for cancer of the ovary, had a central catheter that was placed with difficulty through the right internal jugular vein intraoperatively. After oophorectomy, it was realized that the catheter was knotted. Thus, the central venous catheter was removed successfully using a traction technique in the operating room. Central venous catheter use may result in various complications, although it has been used as an invasive method for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid and drug infusion. Here, we present catheter knotting in a case with solutions for this complication, under literature review. PMID:26633975

  12. A history of nitrous oxide and oxygen anaesthesia IVD: Henry Hill Hickman in his time.

    PubMed

    Smith, W D

    1978-06-01

    Fresh evidence of Hickman in Ludlow is recorded: an advertisement for an apprentice and an annotation in the Shrewsbury Chronicle relate to his private museum. This and his household goods were auctioned in 1824. That he may have been inspired by Benjamin Collins Brodie is considered. PMID:352373

  13. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  18. Daily Catheter-directed Single Dosing of t-PA in Treatment of Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard; Cannon, Richard O.; Chen, Clara C.; Doppman, John L.; Shawker, Thomas H.; Mayo, Donna Jo; Wood, Bradford; Horne, McDonald K.

    2008-01-01

    The strong fibrin affinity of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) theoretically obviates continuous infusion or replacement of t-PA after direct intrathrombic injection. This hypothesis led the authors to evaluate single daily catheter-directed injection of rt-PA as a thrombolytic treatment for acute deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Once-daily injection of rt-PA was performed in large thrombosed veins (popliteal or larger) with use of pulse-spray catheters and in small thrombosed veins in patients' calves with use of 3−4-F coaxial catheters. Patients received only full systemic anticoagulation on his/her patient care unit. This dosing regimen has been tested in 10 patients (12 legs) with a maximum dose of 50 mg per leg per day. Extensive thrombolysis was achieved in nine patients and partial thrombolysis was achieved in one patient, at an average total dose of 106 mg of rt-PA per leg. Minor bleeding was seen in three patients and no transfusions were needed. Our technique and the rationale for this pilot study is the focus of this article. PMID:11265890

  19. The pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2012-10-01

    The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) has been widely used for monitoring of critically ill patients over the years, but with advances in less invasive monitoring techniques, notably echocardiography, there are fewer indications for PAC insertion. Nevertheless, the PAC provides simultaneous monitoring of pulmonary artery pressures, cardiac filling, cardiac output and mixed venous oxygen saturation, and still has an important role in complex cases. Adequate and continued training are required to ensure that PAC-derived data are correctly interpreted and applied. PMID:22886686

  20. Molecular-marker characterization of strawberry differential genotypes for race determination of isolates of Phytophthora fragariae var.fragariae Hickman

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten Fragaria L. (strawberry) differentials for race determination of isolates of Phytophthora fragariae C.J. Hickman var. fragariae, the causal organism of red stele root rot disease, were molecularly characterized with previously published polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based sequence-characterize...

  1. Neogene sinistral transtension along the Hickman fault zone, southeastern Colorado Plateau, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, R.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A north-northeast-trending crustal flaw known as the Hickman fault zone (HFZ) transects the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau from Mangas to Grants, New Mexico, a distance of 140 km. Recent reconnaissance mapping of the eastern half of the Quemado 1:100,000 sheet by the author indicates that the southern half of the HFZ is a Neogene oblique-slip zone that displays a normal-sinistral sense of shear. The vertical slip component is 150--200 m and the apparent horizontal component is as much as 120 m. Basaltic debris flows and fluvial deposits of the Miocene Fence Lake Formation are preferentially preserved on the downthrown western side of the HFZ. West of Pietown, Fence Lake strata define an asymmetric synclinal basin. Older northwest-striking Late Oligocene basaltic dikes are locally concealed where they pass under the shallow (200 m) northeast--trending basin. Within the 5-km-wide HFZ, north-trending segments appear to form releasing bends and east-northeast-trending segments appear to form weakly constraining bends, a pattern that implies distributed sinistral shear. Small alluvial basins (incipient half grabens) in the Mangas Mountains are associated with north-striking bends. An east-northeast-trending bend near Pietown is locally defined by an asymmetric anticline; also the Late Oligocene dike trend here bends westerly (counterclockwise) where it crosses the anticlinal axis. Near Hickman (a.k.a. Lehew), the HFZ shows two sinistral offsets of another Late Oligocene dike; cumulative offset is about 120 m.

  2. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  3. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  4. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies. PMID:24709460

  5. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. PMID:25480771

  6. Reducing infection associated with central venous access devices.

    PubMed

    Scales, Katie

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection is a recognised complication associated with central venous access devices, and increases patient morbidity and mortality. The national evidence-based epic2 guidelines remain the most comprehensive guidance on the prevention of infection associated with central venous access devices. This article discusses how evidence-based care can reduce the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection. PMID:21702355

  7. Should catheter-directed thrombolysis be monitored?

    PubMed

    Bækgaard, Niels; Klitfod, Lotte; Jørgensen, Maja

    2016-03-01

    Catheter-directed thrombolysis for deep venous thrombosis is considered the basic treatment modality for intrathrombus removal. This method is preferably used in patients with iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis due to poor spontaneous recanalization in this segment, especially on the left side. The method was published almost 25 years ago and has gained ground in the treatment because of poor results from systemic thrombolysis and because of the possibility of stenting any underlying iliac obstruction during the procedure. However, the publications of catheter-directed thrombolysis reveal a great heterogeneity concerning catheter-directed thrombolysis technique and the lack of high quality evidence about monitoring as a tool to minimize the risk of bleeding and pulmonary embolism. Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, correct composition and infusion of thrombolysis agent, imaging thrombus clearance during catheter-directed thrombolysis, ensuring flow enhancement during the bedridden situation, careful evaluation of indication for stenting based on imaging, and sufficient conversion to anticoagulation treatment following catheter-directed thrombolysis are essential. The aim of this paper is to discuss different treatment aspects of catheter-directed thrombolysis for iliofemoral thrombosis and to suggest a monitoring model for future treatment. PMID:26916762

  8. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  9. Recommendations for the use of long-term central venous catheter (CVC) in children with hemato-oncological disorders: management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis. On behalf of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Giordano, Paola; Saracco, Paola; Grassi, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Banov, Laura; Carraro, Francesca; Crocoli, Alessandro; Cesaro, Simone; Zanazzo, Giulio Andrea; Molinari, Angelo Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), used for the management of children with hemato-oncological disorders, are burdened by a significant incidence of mechanical, infective, or thrombotic complications. These complications favor an increasing risk in prolongation of hospitalization, extra costs of care, and sometimes severe life-threatening events. No guidelines for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis are available for children. To this aim, members of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP) reviewed the pediatric and adult literature to propose the first recommendations for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis in children with hemato-oncological disorders. PMID:26300457

  10. How to remove a pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Scales, Katie

    2016-02-24

    Rationale and key points This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of pulmonary artery (PA) catheters in a safe manner. ▶ PA catheter removal is associated with several risks and complications, and nurses should be cognisant of these and take appropriate action to ensure patient safety and optimum outcomes. ▶ When PA catheters are no longer required, the temporary central venous catheter and its wide-bore introducer must be removed. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Your knowledge of cardiac anatomy and physiology. Label a diagram of the heart, including pressure values for all four chambers. 2. A comparison of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Explain why entanglement occurs in the tricuspid valve. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26907147

  11. Angioscope-assisted endovascular occlusion of venous tributaries: preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, D; Herring, M B; McCready, R A; Levy, A M

    1993-06-01

    The feasibility of angioscope-assisted occlusion of venous tributaries from within a vein using a steerable 'shaped-memory' nickel-titanium (nitinol) alloy catheter and occlusion coils was evaluated. An initial series of tests was designed to establish the necessary pressure (275 p.s.i., 1897.5 kPa), time (1.5 s) and volume (2.5 ml normal saline) requirements for hydraulic delivery of platinum occlusion coils from the nitinol catheter through a 3-Fr tracking catheter. In a second series, 25 side branches of the saphenous vein in 11 amputated limbs were visualized angioscopically and cannulated with the nitinol catheter under angioscopic and fluoroscopic surveillance to determine whether the catheter tip could be positioned and coils deployed. In a third series of studies, ten canine femoral vein tributaries were successfully cannulated with an 8-Fr nitinol catheter and 19 occlusion coils delivered under angioscopic surveillance. Fluoroscopy verified coil placement and all embolized venous tributaries were thrombosed. An ideal approach for femoropopliteal in situ saphenous vein bypass would allow the surgeon to divide saphenous vein valves while occluding venous side branches from within the saphenous vein. These initial studies demonstrate that the nitinol catheter can occlude venous tributaries from within a vein by coil embolization. Further development of this technique for clinical investigation is warranted. PMID:8076034

  12. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  13. [Venous aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Ritter, H; Weber, J; Loose, D A

    1993-01-01

    Incidence, etiology, diagnostic procedures and therapy of venous aneurysms, basing on 152 own cases, are discussed. The main procedure for diagnosis is phlebography. It must be distinguished between aneurysms of epi- and subfascial veins. The localization determines the surgical procedure which represents the only successful therapy. Without proper treatment, venous aneurysms may be responsible for complications such as thrombophlebitis, thrombosis with pulmonary embolism, aneurysm rupture and compression of adjacent structures. The results of surgical treatment are excellent. PMID:8322498

  14. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access].

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Régis; Rougé, Pierre; Pierre, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    International guidelines advocate the use of first-line ultrasound for central venous catheter, particularly for the internal jugular vein. The role of ultrasound in peripheral venous access remains questionable. In some specific situations, such as pediatrics, obesity and patients with poor venous network, problems to cannulate peripheral vein may occur. Success rate of peripheral intravenous access increases with the diameter of the vein and for a depth of the vein between 0.3 and 1.5cm. The type of puncture (long-axis or short-axis) and the type of catheters have little influence on the success rate. Specific considerations have to be taken concerning infection control. PMID:26632089

  15. Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) include umbilical venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and tunneled catheters. CRBSI is defined as a laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI) with either a positive catheter tip culture or a positive blood culture drawn from the CVC. BSIs most frequently result from pathogens such as gram-positive cocci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and sometimes gram-negative organisms. CRBSIs are usually associated with several risk factors, including prolonged catheter placement, femoral access, low birth weight, and young gestational age. Most NICUs have a strategy for catheter insertion and maintenance designed to decrease CRBSIs. Specific interventions slightly differ between NICUs, particularly with regard to the types of disinfectants used for hand hygiene and appropriate skin care for the infant. In conclusion, infection rates can be reduced by the application of strict protocols for the placement and maintenance of CVCs and the education of NICU physicians and nurses. PMID:22232628

  16. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  17. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Banks, Jennifer; Abraham, Breanna; Capati, Gian; Pretorius, Casper

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%). The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis. PMID:26904283

  18. Structure of the jet from a generic catheter tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2006-10-01

    A generic feature of a wide variety of central venous catheters, which are typically located within the superior vena cava (SVC), is a jet from a side hole of the catheter tip. Particle image velocimetry is employed in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, in order to characterize the structure of the jet as a function of dimensionless hole diameter and jet velocity ratio. Quantitative patterns in the radial and crossflow planes of the catheter-SVC system define the jet evolution. It has distinctive features, relative to the classical jet in a crossflow, which issues from a small opening in a planar surface into a region of large extent.

  19. Catheter-Associated Nocardia higoensis Bacteremia in a Child with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia▿

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael E.; Estabrook, Michele M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2011-01-01

    A 23-month-old child with leukemia who was receiving chemotherapy developed fevers. Serial blood cultures from a central venous catheter and a peripheral venous site grew an organism identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic analysis as Nocardia higoensis, an opportunistic organism isolated once previously from a pulmonary infection in Japan. PMID:21084509

  20. Superfund record of decision amendment (EPA Region 4): Wrigley Charcoal Superfund Site, Hickman County, Wrigley, TN, February 2, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected Interim Remedial Action (IRA) for the Wrigley Charcoal Site, in Wrigley, Hickman County, Tennessee. The U.S. EPA has modified a wide variety of items that require immediate response action for the first step of cleanup activities to be taken at the Wrigley Charcoal Site. The major goal of these cleanup activities is to address the most serious threats at the Wrigley Charcoal Site by removing contaminated media from the Primary Site flood plain, remediating wastes at the Storage Basin, and through limited access restrictions at the Primary Site and the Storage Basin. The cleanup activities as presented in this IRA Record of Decision (ROD) Amendment will achieve significant risk reduction and will prepare the Site for future remedial activities.

  1. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  2. Venous Port Salvage Utilizing Low Dose tPA

    SciTech Connect

    Whigham, Cliff J.; Lindsey, Jason I.; Goodman, Chad J.; Fisher, Richard G.

    2002-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of low dose tPA for catheter salvage in cases of fibrin sheath formation in patients with venous access ports. Prospective evaluation was accomplished in patients who had venous ports with catheter malfunction. There were a total of 50 patients and 56 occlusive events.Each patient had a catheter injection documenting a fibrin sheath.Patient population included 45 for chemotherapy and 5 for antibiotics.A low dose tPA regimen was instilled into the port and upon successful return of function, a completion venogram was accomplished. Fifty patients were enrolled in the study with the average time between placement and dysfunction of 99 days. Five patients had a second occlusive event (38.5 days) and one had a third event (27 days). All patients had a venogram confirming a fibrin sheath as the cause of catheter malfunction. The average dose of tPA was 2.29 mg (range 1 mg-4 mg). Success was achieved in 52 of the 56 occlusive events(92.9%). There were no bleeding complications. Catheter occlusion is a common complication of long-term venous access ports. Aggressive therapy with low-dose tPA can salvage function. It provides safe and effective therapy for venous port malfunction secondary to fibrin sheath.

  3. Advances in venous access devices and nursing management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wickham, R S

    1990-06-01

    VADs are indicated for many persons who require reliable long-term venous access. Nontunneled, tunneled, and venous access ports are constructed of silicone or polyurethane, the most biocompatible materials identified thus far. These devices are inserted in a similar fashion and are extremely versatile. Although VADs represent a major advance in catheter technology, they are not without problems. The most serious and frequently reported complications include infection, thrombosis, and extravasation. Catheter occlusions are another frequent problem, and may be caused by clotted blood or precipitated drug within the catheter. Nursing care centers on prevention and intervention to remove the occlusion. Catheter-related infections may occur at one or more points along the catheter. The most serious are those occurring in the tunnel or as a result of a mural or catheter-tip thrombus. Normal skin flora are most commonly cultured with catheter-related infections. These organisms may be introduced into the body through the catheter hub or less often by migrating along the external catheter. Infections differ in their severity, prognosis, and treatment. Actions to minimize risk (scrupulous care and patient teaching), prompt recognition, and appropriate interventions are crucial. Thrombotic events include fibrin sheaths, patchy thrombotic plaques on the cannulated venous intima, and totally occlusive mural thromboses. Problems associated with these can range from withdrawal occlusion to obstruction of the great vessels and symptoms of superior vena cava syndrome. Mural thrombosis, which probably occurs more frequently than previously suspected, is the most significant risk factor for infection and may also potentiate extravasation. Prompt initiation of therapy will resolve symptoms and maintain the functioning of the catheter. Extravasation can result in transient discomfort or major tissue damage, pain, and functional loss. Needle dislodgment from ports is the most frequent cause. Adequate stabilization of needles and use of nonsiliconized needles are recommended to decrease this risk. Thrombosis at the catheter tip with back tracking of infusate out of the vein to subcutaneous tissues is the second most frequent cause of extravasation and has been reported with tunneled catheters as well as ports. It should be noted that catheter-tip displacement and catheter damage infrequently lead to extravasation. When extravasation is suspected, the infusion is stopped, and the nurse notifies the physician so diagnostic procedures and treatment can be initiated. Other complications occur infrequently but may contribute to patient discomfort, morbidity, and mortality. These include phlebitis, which resolves with conservative management in most instances, and pneumothorax, which occurs in a small percentage of patients within a short period after catheter placement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2110664

  4. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  5. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  6. Endovascular Removal of Long-Term Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Peter T.; Carter, Ranjana M.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-09-15

    Central venous catheters that have been in place for a long time can become fixed to the vein wall, making them impossible to pull out. Leaving them in situ is undesirable because of the risk that they could act as a nidus for thrombosis. Moreover, inserting new catheters alongside the old ones might compromise flow in the superior vena cava, further predisposing to thrombosis. Surgical removal is likewise undesirable, as this would necessitate thoracotomy with the attendant risks. We describe a novel technique, which we were able to use to remove retained long-term hemodialysis catheters in a patient who needed new catheters and who would have been a high-risk candidate for surgery. The right internal jugular vein was punctured adjacent to the site of insertion and a guide wire was used to form a snare, which was passed around the catheters and used to saw through the fibrous attachments to the vein wall. The midsection of one catheter could not be freed but the snare was used to cut off the proximal and distal ends, which could then be removed, the latter via the femoral vein. New catheters were then inserted via the left internal jugular vein. This technique enabled successful catheter extraction and replacement in a patient who would have been a poor candidate for cardiothoracic surgery.

  7. Blood recirculation in temporary central catheters for acute hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, M; Fedak, S; Mokris, G; Paganini, E P

    1996-05-01

    The low-flow method has been shown as a reliable evaluation of access recirculation. Few data is available on temporary central catheter blood recirculation; results of 2% and 4% have been reported in subclavian, 10% in 24 cm long femoral, and 18% in 15 cm long femoral catheters, mostly in indwelling catheters for chronic hemodialysis. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate blood recirculation in a larger number of recently inserted temporary intravenous catheters for acute hemodialysis, comparing subclavian and femoral sites. Fifty blood recirculation measurements were performed in 38 different temporary central venous dialysis catheters inserted in thirty-one critically ill patients from medical and surgical intensive care units presenting acute renal failure supported by intermittent hemodialysis. All the catheters used were well-functioning 11.5 French dual lumen Quinton of 13.5 or 19.5 cm length. Catheters presenting mechanical dysfunction, which did not allow a blood flow rate of 300 ml/min or for which lines had to be reversed were excluded from the analysis. Access blood recirculation was measured shortly after catheter insertion according to the low flow method applied after the first 30 minutes of hemodialysis at a blood flow rate of 300 ml/min. Mean blood recirculation for the 50 measurements was 10.3 +/- 9.2%. It was significantly higher in the 26 femoral catheters than in the 24 subclavian catheters, reaching respective means of 16.1 +/- 9.1% and 4.1 +/- 3.6% (p = 0.0001). Blood recirculation rate was not different between 13.5 cm and 19.5 cm long subclavian catheters (3.0 +/- 2.6%, n = 13, versus 5.4 +/- 4.3%, n = 11, respectively), but was significantly higher in 13.5 cm long femoral catheters (22.8 +/- 9.1%, n = 9, versus 12.6 +/- 6.9%, n = 17) (p = 0.004). Blood recirculation was measured on two separate occasions in 12 catheters randomly selected (5 femoral and 7 subclavian catheters); the obtained results were reproducible with a mean difference of only 2.1 +/- 1.8% between the two measurements and a correlation of 0.96. The mean time elapsed between catheter insertion and recirculation assessment was 2.2 +/- 3.1 days and was similar for femoral and subclavian catheters. No correlation was found between the percentage of recirculation and the arterial and venous resistances recorded during dialysis session or with the time from catheter insertion. Mean urea reduction ratio (URR) for the 50 dialysis sessions was 57.8 +/- 13.0%. It was significantly higher for sessions performed with subclavian than with femoral catheters (62.5 +/- 10.9%, n = 24, versus 54.5 +/- 14.2%, n = 26) (p = 0.03). In conclusion, the expected blood recirculation in well-functioning and recently inserted temporary dialysis catheters is under 5% for subclavian, over 12% in 19.5 cm femoral, and over 22% in shorter 13.5 cm femoral catheters at a blood flow rate of 300 ml/min. The consequently reduced dialysis efficiency with femoral catheters is another factor to be considered in the choice of a site for temporary dialysis catheter insertion in acute renal failure patients, particularly when dialysis dose delivery is a priority, such as intoxication cases treated by extracorporeal therapy. PMID:8738663

  8. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  9. Urgent peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis catheter dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, there is a steady incident rate of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who require renal replacement therapy. Of these patients, approximately one-third have an "unplanned" or "urgent" start to dialysis. This can be a very challenging situation where patients have either not had adequate time for education and decision making regarding dialysis modality and appropriate dialysis access, or a decision was made and plans were altered due to unforeseen circumstances. Despite such unplanned starts, clinicians must still consider the patient's ESKD "life-plan", which includes the best initial dialysis modality and access to suit the patient's individual goals and their medical, social, logistic, and facility circumstances. This paper will discuss the considerations of peritoneal dialysis and a peritoneal dialysis catheter access and hemodialysis and central venous catheter access in patients who require an urgent start to dialysis. PMID:26951906

  10. [Catheter- associated bacteremia caused by Ochrobactrum anthropi].

    PubMed

    Soloaga, Rolando; Carrion, Natalia; Pidone, Juan; Guelfand, Liliana; Margari, Alejandra; Altieri, Roxana

    2009-01-01

    Ochrobactrum anthropi is a non-glucose fermentative, aerobic gram-negative bacillus, formerly known as Achromobacter sp or CDC group Vd. It has been isolated from the environment and from infections in usually immunocompromised human beings. The documented infections frequently involved catheter related bacteremia whereas endophthalmitis, urinary infections, meningitis, endocarditis, hepatic abscess, osteochondritis, pelvic abscess and pancreatic abscess were rarely involved. Here it is presented the case of a male patient aged 69 years with sustained hypotension, four day febrile syndrome, chill, lavish perspiration and sensorium deterioration. He had type 2 diabetes and antecedent of cerebrovascular accident. A double-lumen dialysis catheter was present due to chronic renal insufficiency. An episode of catheter-related bloodstream infection was documented by using Bact-Alert Blood Culture System and Differential-Time-to-Positivity Method for central venous catheter versus peripheral blood cultures (>120 min). Once removed, it was confirmed through Maki semi quantitative technique (>15 FCU). The microorganism was identified by API 20NE and Vitek 1 as Ochrobactrum anthropi. PMID:20053608

  11. Care of the central venous catheterization site: the use of a transparent polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, R M; Jarrard, M M

    1984-01-01

    Studies of care of patients with central venous catheters report a 3-7% incidence of catheter-induced sepsis when sterile gauze and tape are used as an occlusive dressing. The technique requires that the dressing be changed three times each week for catheterization site inspection. From June 1979 to September 1980, a noncomparative evaluation of a transparent, self-adhesive, polyurethane dressing which is permeable to water vapor but not bacteria was performed. This dressing was used for the care of 100 consecutive patients with central venous catheters. Dressing life averaged 5.3 days with silicone rubber catheters and 4.3 days for polyvinyl chloride catheters. One patient developed catheter induced sepsis (incidence 1%). This dressing material: (1) is acceptable for use as a dressing of central venous catheters; (2) continuously permits inspection of the insertion sites; (3) decreases nursing hours; (4) provides a comfortable dressing which secures the catheter to the patient; and (5) is durable even when exposed to high humidity therapy devices, or when possible permits the patient to take showers. PMID:6425522

  12. Transhepatic venous approach to permanent pacemaker placement in a patient with limited central venous access.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Adeel M; Harris, Gregory S; Movahed, Assad; Chiang, Karl S; Chelu, Mihail G; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar

    2015-09-16

    The end-stage renal disease population poses a challenge for obtaining venous access required for life-saving invasive cardiac procedures. In this case report, we describe an adult patient with end-stage renal disease in whom the hepatic vein was the only available access to implant a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. A 63-year-old male with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis and permanent atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter presented with symptomatic bradycardia. Imaging studies revealed all traditional central venous access sites to be occluded/non-accessible. With the assistance of vascular interventional radiology, a trans-hepatic venous catheter was placed. This was then used to place a right ventricular pacing lead with close attention to numerous technical aspects. The procedure was completed successfully with placement of a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:26380831

  13. Chronic performance of polyurethane catheters covalently coated with ATH complex: a rabbit jugular vein model.

    PubMed

    Klement, Petr; Du, Ying Jun; Berry, Leslie R; Tressel, Paul; Chan, Anthony K C

    2006-10-01

    Covalent complexes of antithrombin (AT) and heparin (ATH) have superb anticoagulant activity towards thrombin and factor Xa. Stability of polyurethane central venous catheters covalently modified with radiolabeled ATH was studied using a roller pump with saline or protease P-5147. Saline wash removed loosely bound ATH molecules to decrease graft density from 26 to 12 pmol/cm2. However, only slightly more ATH was removed by strong protease (from 12 to 7 pmol/cm2). To evaluate ATH-coated, heparin-coated, and uncoated catheters, a chronic rabbit jugular vein model was developed with catheters maintained for up to 30-106 days. Lumen occlusion was tested by drawing blood twice daily. Although unmodified or heparin-coated catheters occluded within 5-7 days after insertion, all ATH catheters remained patent throughout the experiment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of heparin and uncoated catheters revealed extensive thrombosis (lumen+mural) while ATH catheters were unaffected. Visual observation showed significant deposition of protein and cells on control and heparin-modified catheters and, to a lesser degree, on ATH-coated surfaces. SEM showed no fibrin inside or outside of ATH catheters, which remained patent in extended studies out to 106 days. Although atomic force microscopy showed ATH coatings to be rough, 6-fold higher anti-factor Xa activity likely contributed to increased patency. Our data confirm that ATH-modified catheters are stable and have superior potency compared to heparin or control catheters. PMID:16781768

  14. Reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections in critically ill patients through a multiple system intervention.

    PubMed

    Peredo, R; Sabatier, C; Villagrá, A; González, J; Hernández, C; Pérez, F; Suárez, D; Vallés, J

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the utility of a multiple system intervention to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) in our intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective cohort study was undertaken in the medical and surgical ICU at a university hospital. We applied five measures: educational sessions about inserting and maintaining central venous catheters, skin cleaning with chlorhexidine, a checklist during catheter insertion, subclavian vein insertion and avoiding femoral insertion whenever possible, and removing unnecessary catheters. We determined the rate of CR-BSI per 1,000 catheter-days during the intervention (March to December 2007) and compared it with the rate during the same period in 2006 in which we applied only conventional preventive measures. CR-BSI was defined as the recovery of the same organism (same species, same antibiotic susceptibility profile) from catheter tip and blood cultures. We registered 4,289 patient-days and 3,572 catheter-days in the control period and 4,174 patient-days and 3,296 catheter-days in the intervention period. No significant differences in the number of patients with central venous catheters during the two periods were observed: catheters were used in 81.5% of patients during the control period and in 80.6% of patients during the intervention period. During the control period, 24 CR-BSI were diagnosed (6.7/1,000 catheter-days); during the intervention period, 8 CR-BSI were diagnosed (2.4/1,000 catheter-days) (relative risk 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16 to 0.80; p = 0.015). Nurses interrupted the procedure to correct at least one aspect when completing the checklist in 17.7% of insertions. In conclusion, a multiple system intervention applying evidence-based measures reduced the incidence of CR-BSI in our ICU. PMID:20533071

  15. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  16. The Incidence of Central Line–Associated Bacteremia After the Introduction of Midline Catheters in a Ventilator Unit Population

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rahul; Patel, Anish; Enuh, Hilary; Adekunle, Oluwaseyi; Shrisgantharajah, Vasanthy; Diaz, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Our objective was to evaluate whether the use of midline venous catheters in place of central line venous catheters, when appropriate, decreased the overall incidence of central line–associated bacteremia in a ventilator unit. Methods The time interval between February 2012 and February 2013 was divided into 2 periods. Group A was the first half of the year, before the introduction of midline catheters, and group B was the second half of the year, 6 months after their introduction. Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) was calculated using the equation: (total number of CLABSI/total number of catheter days) × 1000. The Z test was used for proportions between independent groups to compare the significance in the difference in CLABSI between groups A and B. Results There was a significant decrease in the total number of catheter days on the ventilator unit in group A from 2408 catheter days in 1 year (August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012) before the introduction of midline catheters to 1521 catheter days in group B in the following year (November 1, 2012, to October 31, 2013; P < 0.05 for both groups). Conclusions Midline catheters in place of central lines decrease the rate of CLABSI in a ventilator unit. In addition, no bloodstream infections were associated with midline catheters. PMID:25972725

  17. Persistent Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria rhizophila Related to a Damaged Central Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Karsten; Mérens, Audrey; Ferroni, Agnès; Dubern, Béatrice; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    A case of persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central venous catheter in a 3-year-old girl with Hirschsprung's disease is reported. The strain was identified as K. rhizophila by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Arbitrarily primed PCR analysis showed a clonal strain. The repeated septic episodes were resolved with the catheter repair. PMID:22259211

  18. A rare complication of endovenous laser ablation: intravascular laser catheter breakage

    PubMed Central

    Bozoglan, Orhan; Mese, Bulent; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Eroglu, Erdinc

    2013-01-01

    During endovenous laser ablation, which is performed as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of superficial venous insufficiency of lower extremity and associated varicose veins, it was realised that the distal end of the catheter protecting the fibre sheared off; the retained catheter fragment in the saphenous vein was removed by a mini incision. Herein, we aim to present a rare complication of endovenous laser ablation. PMID:23513025

  19. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required. PMID:24847039

  20. Umbilical venous catheterization gone wrong: Hepatic complications

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Poonam; Vire, Adweta; Anand, Rama; Jajoo, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic complications of malposition of umbilical venous catheter (UVC) are uncommon and occur due to extravasation of hypertonic fluids and the blood products in the liver tissue. Various hepatic complications include thrombosis of hepatic vessels, hepatic necrosis, hepatic fluid collections, and hematoma, with the intraparenchymal liver lesions seen along the course of ductus venosus. Radiologists must be aware of these complications and their imaging findings, as the timely recognition and immediate management can prevent the fatal outcome. Here, we present a rare case of intraparenchymal liver lesions associated with malposition of UVC in a preterm baby. PMID:27081222

  1. Peripheral venous embolized intracardiac foreign body.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Pietro; García-Bordes, Luis; Méndez López, José Manuel

    2009-12-01

    Embolized intracardiac foreign bodies have been previously described in the literature. Those related to iatrogenic procedures, such as catheters and pacemaker electrodes, are the most common. However, traumatic embolization of a metal foreign body is scantily described. We report a case of a peripheral venous embolized intracardiac metal foreign body after traumatic elbow injury. A review of the literature is therefore performed. Intracardiac foreign body removal must be considered when its diameter exceeds 5 mm, its shape is irregular or when symptomatic. PMID:19762420

  2. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  3. Selection of the vascular catheter: can it minimise the risk of infection?

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Guembe, M; Muñoz, P

    2010-12-01

    Data regarding the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) by making the correct decisions about when to place a central line, the appropriate selection of catheter composition and the size and number of lumens, a suitable choice of insertion site and the technique used are not well reported in recent medical literature. There is no clear evidence that the composition of the catheters presently on the market makes a significant difference to the risk of infection. Several prospective studies suggest that femoral vein location represents the highest risk of infection, followed by jugular vein and subclavian vein positioning, however, most articles do not correct for basic confounding variables. Several papers have reported that arterial catheters have a similar risk of infection as central venous catheters (CVCs). The slight increase in infection risk when using multi-lumen catheters is probably offset by their improved convenience. Current evidence does not support routine tunnelling of short-term catheters until its efficacy is evaluated at different placement sites, using specific catheters and situations and in relation to other preventive interventions. Cuffing is usually applied only to long-term tunnelled catheters. The available evidence suggests that chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine, minocycline-rifampicin CVCs and antifungal-coated catheters are useful in decreasing the incidence of CRBSI when other measures are not effective. PMID:21130605

  4. Dose Intraoperative Fluoroscopy Precisely Predict Catheter Tip Location via Superior Vena Cava Route?

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Fu, Jui-Ying; Wu, Ching-Feng; Ko, Po-Jen; Liu, Yun-Hen; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Yu, Shang-Yueh

    2015-12-01

    Adequate catheter tip location is crucial for functional intravenous port and central venous catheter. Numerous complications were reported because of catheter migration that caused by inadequate tip location. Different guidelines recommend different ideal locations without consensus. Another debate is actual movement of intravascular portion of implanted catheter. From literature review, the catheter migrated peripherally an average of 20 mm on the erect chest radiographs. In this study, we want to verify the actual presentation of catheter movement within a vessel and try to find a quantitative catheter length model to recommend.From March 2012 to March 2013, 346 patients were included into this prospective cohort study. We collect clinical data from medical record and utilized picture archiving and communication system to measure all image parameters. Statistical analysis was utilized to identify the risk factors for catheter migration.The nonmigration group had 221 patients (63.9%); 67 (19.4%) patients were classified into the peripheral migration group; and 58 (16.8%) patients were classified into the central migration group. Patients with short height (P = 0.03), larger superior vena cava (SVC) diameters at the brachiocephalic vein confluence site (P = 0.02), and longer implanted catheter length (P = 0.0004) had greater risks for central migration. We utilized regression curve for further analysis and height (centimeters)/10 had moderate correlation distances from the entry vessel to the carina.Although intravascular movement of catheter was exist in implanted catheter, the intraoperative fluoroscopy could provide accurate catheter tip location in 63.9% patients. Additional length of catheter implantation seems unnecessary in 80.6% patients. Patients with short height, larger SVC diameters at the brachiocephalic vein confluence site had greater risk for catheter central movement. Height/10 may be consider as reference length of implantation for inexperience surgeon and precise implantation length could be adjust under guidance of fluoroscopy. PMID:26656351

  5. Catheter-related UTI

    MedlinePlus

    ... incontinence) Not being able to empty your bladder Surgery on your bladder, prostate, or vagina During a hospital stay, you may have an indwelling catheter: Right after any type of surgery If you are very ill and cannot control ...

  6. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... stent placement Cancer - bone Cancer - breast Cancer - kidney Cancer - liver Cancer - lung Deep vein thrombosis Endovascular Treatment of CCSVI for MS Gastrostomy (feeding tubes) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Hypertension and end-stage renal ... biopsy Osteoporosis Pediatrics Pelvic pain (chronic) ...

  7. Association Between Disruption of Fibrin Sheaths Using Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Balloons and Late Onset of Central Venous Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Nina Mojibian, Hamid; Pollak, Jeffrey; Tal, Michael

    2011-02-15

    To compare the rates of central venous stenosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis who underwent disruption of fibrin sheath with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloons and those who underwent over-the-wire catheter exchange. This study is a retrospective review of 209 percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption and 1304 over-the-wire catheter exchange procedures performed in 753 patients. Approval from the Human Investigations Committee was obtained for this study. Up to 10-year follow-up was performed. A {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare the rates of central venous stenosis after balloon disruption versus catheter exchange. A t-test was used to compare time to central venous stenosis development. Of the 753 patients in the study, 127 patients underwent balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and 626 had catheter exchange. Within the balloon disruption group, 18 (14.2%) of 127 patients subsequently developed central venous stenosis, compared with 44 (7.0%) of 626 in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). Time to central venous stenosis development was approximately 3 years in both groups and not significantly different (1371 and 1010 days, P = 0.20). A total of 25.2% of patients in the balloon disruption group had four or more subsequent catheter exchanges, versus 12.6% in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). In conclusions, there is a possible association between percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and late-onset central venous stenosis. Because venography was not routinely performed in catheter exchange patients, future randomized studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  8. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  9. Transhepatic Guidance of Translumbar Hemodialysis Catheter Placement in the Setting of Chronic Infrarenal IVC Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Regalado, Sidney; Navuluri, Rakesh Zangan, Steven; Thuong Van Ha; Funaki, Brian

    2010-06-15

    When patients with end-stage renal disease have exhausted both conventional and unconventional venous access options, creative solutions must be sought for hemodialysis catheter placement in order to ensure survival. This case describes a patient in urgent need of a dialysis catheter despite total occlusion of the jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. Occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right renal vein resulted in failed attempts at translumbar catheter placement. A gooseneck snare was temporarily advanced through the liver to the IVC for use as a fluoroscopic target to facilitate successful single-puncture, translumbar catheterization.

  10. Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Catheter-Related Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jouvenot, Marie; Willoteaux, Serge; Meslier, Nicole; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that fluid accumulation in the neck contributes to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case of catheter-related superior v ena cava (SVC) thrombosis revealed by rapid onset of typical symptoms of OSA. A marked improvement in OSA severity was observed after central venous catheter removal, anticoagulant therapy, and SVC angioplasty Citation: Jouvenot M, Willoteaux S, Meslier N, Gagnadoux F. Worsening of obstructive sleep apnea associated with catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):681–682. PMID:25766698

  11. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  12. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  13. Percutaneous retrieval of an intracardiac central venous port fragment using snare with triple loops.

    PubMed

    Ghaderian, Mehdi; Sabri, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadi, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted venous ports fracture with embolization in patients who received chemotherapy is a serious and rare complication, and few cases have been reported in children. We report a successful endovascular technique using a snare for retrieving broken peripherally inserted venous ports in a child for chemotherapy. Catheter fragments may cause complications such as cardiac perforation, arrhythmias, sepsis, and pulmonary embolism. A 12-year-old female received chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia through a central venous port implanted into her right subclavian area. The patient completed chemotherapy without complications 6 months ago. Venous port was accidentally fractured during its removal. Chest radiographs of the patient revealed intracardiac catheter fragment extending from the right subclavian to the right atrium (RA) and looping in the RA. The procedure was performed under ketamine and midazolam anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance using a percutaneous femoral vein approach. A snare with triple loops (10 mm in diameter) was used to successfully retrieve the catheter fragments without any complication. Percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of catheter fragments is occasionally extremely useful and should be considered by interventional cardiologists for retrieving migrated catheters and can be chosen before resorting to surgery, which has potential risks related to thoracotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and general anesthesia. PMID:25767529

  14. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Philip J. Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G.

    2011-02-15

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71-3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  15. Defining peripherally inserted central catheter tip position and an evaluation of insertions in one unit.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A J; Bishop, S M; Martin, L; See, T C; Streater, C T

    2013-05-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are increasingly used to provide access to the central venous circulation. They are commonly positioned 'blind' using a variety of anthropometric techniques and operator experience to direct insertion length. Malposition rates are poorly defined because of differing insertion techniques, difficulties defining anatomical tip position on chest radiographs, controversy over what constitutes an adequate catheter position and possible differences between patient groups. We have developed a reproducible method to define catheter positions on chest radiograph and have applied this in a retrospective analysis of 256 ICU and 243 non-ICU catheter insertions over a 6-month period. Two different definitions were used for adequate position. 'Blind' positioning of peripherally inserted central catheters was associated with a definition-dependent malposition rate of 42-76%. Malposition rates were significantly higher in ICU patients. Emerging technologies may assist in reducing these high rates. PMID:23488895

  16. Intra-atrial Reentrant Tachycardia in Complete Transposition of the Great Arteries Without Femoral Venous Access.

    PubMed

    Borne, Ryan T; Kay, Joseph; Fagan, Thomas; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    Catheter ablation for patients with transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) requires multiple considerations and careful preprocedural planning. Knowledge of the patient's anatomy and surgical correction, in addition to electroanatomic mapping and entrainment maneuvers, are important to identify and successfully treat arrhythmias. This case was unique in that the lack of femoral venous access required transhepatic venous access and bidirectional block was attained with ablation lesions along the cavotricuspid isthmus on both sides of the baffle. PMID:26920194

  17. Prevention of transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms during catheter exchange using antimicrobial catheters.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mohamed A; Rosenblatt, Joel; Jiang, Ying; Hachem, Ray; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I

    2014-09-01

    Exchanging a central venous catheter (CVC) over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated CVC in the presence of bacteremia can result in cross-infection of the newly exchanged CVC. A recent retrospective clinical study showed that exchanging a catheter over a guide wire in the presence of bacteremia using an antimicrobial minocycline-rifampin (M/R) catheter may improve outcomes. To expand on this, we developed an in vitro cross-contamination model of exchange to evaluate the efficacy of different antimicrobial CVCs in preventing cross-contamination of multidrug-resistant organisms during exchange. Uncoated CVCs were allowed to form biofilm by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 h, the biofilm-colonized CVCs were placed in a glass tube containing bovine calf serum plus Mueller-Hinton broth, and each catheter was exchanged over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated or an M/R-, chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHX/SS)-, or chlorhexidine-M/R (CHX-M/R)-coated CVC. Cross-contamination of exchanged catheters was enumerated by sonication and quantitative plating methods. The exchange of M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA biofilms compared to control exchanged CVCs (P<0.0001). Exchange with CHX/SS CVCs reduced but did not completely prevent cross-contamination by MRSA (P=0.005). Exchange with CHX-M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans biofilms (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CHX-M/R CVCs were superior to M/R CVCs against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans (P=0.003) and were superior to CHX/SS CVCs against MRSA and P. aeruginosa (P=0.01). In conclusion, exchange with the novel CHX-M/R CVC was the only exchange effective in completely and concurrently preventing cross-contamination from bacteria and Candida. PMID:24957841

  18. [Experience in the use of Broviac catheters in children with hematologic neoplastic diseases].

    PubMed

    Swiatkiewicz, V; Molski, S; Wysocki, M; Jundziłł, W; Hryncewicz, W; Pilecki, O

    1996-08-01

    Between 1990 and 1994, 61 Broviac catheters were implanted in 53 children with haematological neoplastic diseases. The mean duration of catheter function was 206 days (range 14-615 days). The total observation time was 12544 days, during which 84 catheter-related complications were recorded, i.e. 6.7 per 1000 catheter use days. Infections occurred with a frequency of 3.8 episodes/1000 cath, days, the majority of which were bacteriemias (2.6/1000 cath, days). Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains were the isolated etiologic agents with equal frequency. Most of infectious episodes (85%) responded well to initial empiric antibiotics treatment without removal of the catheters. Mechanica complications (occlusion, displacement or catheter leakage) occurred significant less frequently and were managed by repairing or replacing the device or clearing the block. No deaths were related to catheter complications. In conclusion indwelling Broviac catheters offer a safe and effective method of long-term venous access. Infections are the most frequent catheter-related complications. PMID:8927470

  19. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  20. Microbial diversity on intravascular catheters from paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Marsh, N; Long, D; Wei, M; Morrison, M; Rickard, C M

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms play important roles in intravascular catheter (IVC)-related infections, which are the most serious complications in children with IVCs, leading to increased hospitalisation, intensive care admissions, extensive antibiotic treatment and mortality. A greater understanding of bacterial communities is needed in order to improve the management of infections. We describe here the systematic culture-independent evaluation of IVC bacteriology in IVC biofilms. Twenty-four IVC samples (six peripherally inserted central catheters, eight central venous catheters and ten arterial catheters) were collected from 24 paediatric patients aged 0 to 14 years old. Barcoded amplicon libraries produced from genes coding 16S rRNA and roll-plate culture methods were used to determine the microbial composition of these samples. From a total of 1,043,406 high-quality sequence reads, eight microbial phyla and 136 diverse microbial genera were detected, separated into 12,224 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Three phyla (Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria) predominate the microorganism on the IVC surfaces, with Firmicutes representing nearly half of the OTUs found. Among the Firmicutes, Staphylococcus (15.0% of 16S rRNA reads), Streptococcus (9.6%) and Bacillus (6.1%) were the most common. Community composition did not appear to be affected by patients' age, gender, antibiotic treatment or IVC type. Differences in IVC microbiota were more likely associated with events arising from catheter dwell time, rather than the type of IVC used. PMID:26515578

  1. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  2. Treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, A Y

    2001-06-15

    The management of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with cancer can be a clinical dilemma. Comorbid conditions, warfarin failure, difficult venous access, and a high bleeding risk are some of the factors that often complicate anticoagulant therapy in these patients. In addition, the use of central venous access devices is increasing but the optimal treatment of catheter-related thrombosis remains controversial. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the traditional standard for the initial treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) but low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) have been shown to be equally safe and effective in hemodynamically stable patients. For long-term treatment or secondary prophylaxis, vitamin K antagonists remain the mainstay treatment. However, the inconvenience and narrow therapeutic window of oral anticoagulants make extended therapy unattractive and problematic. As a result, LMWHs are being evaluated as an alternative for long-term therapy. New antithrombotic agents are being tested in clinical trials and may have the potential to replace conventional treatment. The role of inferior vena cava filters in cancer patients remains ill defined but these devices remain the treatment of choice in patients with contraindications for anticoagulant therapy. PMID:11516453

  3. Mobility therapy and central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in an ICU in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Natália Pontes; da Silva, Gregório Marques Cardim; Park, Marcelo; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether mobility therapy is associated with central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in critically ill patients in an ICU in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the daily medical records of patients admitted to the Clinical Emergency ICU of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas Central Institute between December of 2009 and April of 2011. In addition to the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, we collected data related to central venous catheters (CVCs), hemodialysis (HD) catheters and indwelling arterial catheters (IACs): insertion site; number of catheter days; and types of adverse events. We also characterized the mobility therapy provided. RESULTS: Among the 275 patients evaluated, CVCs were used in 49%, HD catheters were used in 26%, and IACs were used in 29%. A total of 1,268 mobility therapy sessions were provided to patients while they had a catheter in place. Catheter-related adverse events occurred in 20 patients (a total of 22 adverse events): 32%, infection; 32%, obstruction; and 32%, accidental dislodgement. We found that mobility therapy was not significantly associated with any catheter-related adverse event, regardless of the type of catheter employed: CVC-OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.7-1.0; p = 0.14; HD catheter-OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.89-1.21; p = 0.56; or IAC-OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 0.94-3.23; p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients, mobility therapy is not associated with the incidence of adverse events involving CVCs, HD catheters, or IACs. PMID:26176520

  4. Recanalization of Aged Venous Thrombotic Occlusions with the Aid of a Rheolytic System: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vicol, Calin; Dalichau, Harald

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: The suitability of a rheolytic system for recanalization of aged venous thrombotic occlusions was tested in an animal experiment. Methods: The system consists of a flush-suction catheter and a high-pressure liquid pump. Thrombosis was experimentally induced in 13 venous segments of 10 adult goats. Results: After a mean period of 12 days, a complete thrombectomy using the flush-suction system was achieved in 12 cases. No complications such as perforation or dissection were observed. Conclusion: This system seems to be an appropriate device for percutaneous transluminal venous thrombectomy, even in older occlusions.

  5. Feasibility and Safety of Endovascular Stripping of Totally Implantable Venous Access Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heye, Sam Maleux, Geert; Goossens, G. A.; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Jerome, M.; Stas, M.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous stripping of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) in case of catheter-related sleeve and to report a technique to free the catheter tip from vessel wall adherence. Materials and Methods: A total of 37 stripping procedures in 35 patients (14 men, 40%, and 21 women, 60%, mean age 53 {+-} 14 years) were reviewed. Totally implantable venous access devices were implanted because of malignancy in most cases (85.7%). Catheter-related sleeve was confirmed as cause of persistent catheter dysfunction despite instillation of thrombolytics. A technique to mobilize the catheter tip from the vessel wall was used when stripping with the snare catheter was impossible. Technical success, complication rate, and outcome were noted. Results: A total of 55.9% (n = 19) of the 34 technically successful procedures (91.9%) could be done with the snare catheter. In 15 cases (44.1%), additional maneuvers to free the TIVAD's tip from the vessel wall were needed. Success rate was not significantly lower before (72.4%) than after (96.7%) implementation of the new technique (P = 0.09). No complications were observed. Follow-up was available in 67.6% of cases. Recurrent catheter dysfunction was found in 17 TIVADs (78.3%) at a mean of 137.7 days and a median of 105 days. Conclusions: Stripping of TIVADs is technically feasible and safe, with an overall success rate of 91.9%. Additional endovascular techniques to mobilize the distal catheter tip from the wall of the superior vena cava or right atrium to allow encircling the TIVAD tip with the snare catheter may be needed in 44.1% of cases.

  6. Identification and characterization of catheter-related bloodstream infections due to viridans group streptococci in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Shelburne, Samuel A; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Jamal, Mohamed; Al Wohoush, Iba; Jiang, Ying; Abughazaleh, Shaadi; Cairo, Javier; Raad, Sammy; Debiane, Labib; Raad, Issam

    2014-10-01

    Viridans group streptococci (VGS), a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) in cancer patients, are thought to arise from the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to determine whether central venous catheters may serve as the source of VGS BSI, and to compare the ability of the newly proposed mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed BSI definition to assign a VGS BSI source compared with the catheter-related BSI definition. PMID:25278410

  7. Non-invasive measurement of peripheral venous oxygen saturation using a new venous oximetry method: evaluation during bypass in heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Echiadis, A S; Crabtree, V P; Bence, J; Hadjinikolaou, L; Alexiou, C; Spyt, T J; Hu, S

    2007-08-01

    Monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) is currently performed using invasive fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterization. This paper describes an alternative, non-invasive method of monitoring peripheral venous oxygen saturation (SxvO(2)) which, although it cannot replace pulmonary artery catheters, can serve as an adjunct/early warning indicator of when there is an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. The technique requires the generation of an artificial venous pulse at the finger, thereby causing modulation of the venous blood volume within the digit. The blood volume changes are monitored using an optical sensor. Just as pulse oximetry utilizes the natural arterial pulse to perform a spectrophotometric analysis of the peripheral blood in order to estimate the arterial blood oxygen saturation, the proposed venous oximetry technique uses the artificially generated venous pulse to estimate SxvO(2). A prototype device was tested in a pilot study with patients undergoing heart surgery. Data from this study support the notion that the method is capable of tracking haemodynamic changes and suggests the technique is worthy of further development and evaluation. PMID:17664681

  8. Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (V V ECMO): Indications, Preprocedural Considerations, and Technique.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Aisha; Tanaka, Daizo; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V V ECMO) has been used for refractory respiratory failure. We describe the indications, technical aspects, and outcomes of placing V V ECMO in adults using a dual-lumen, single-cannula catheter. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12690 (J Card Surg 2016;31:248-252). PMID:26842109

  9. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis.

  10. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal ischemia is a serious complication of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Some or all of the intestine dies because of ... Brandt LJ, Feuerstadt P. Instestinal ischemia. In: Feldman M, ... Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 9th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  11. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  12. Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hmoud, Bashar; Singal, Ashwani K.; Kamath, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of mesenteric ischemia. Acute thrombosis commonly presents with abdominal pain and chronic type with features of portal hypertension. Contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen is quite accurate for diagnosing and differentiating two types of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Prothrombotic state, hematological malignancy, and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common predisposing conditions. Over the last decade, JAK-2 (janus kinase 2) mutation has emerged as an accurate biomarker for diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm, an important cause for mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation is the treatment of choice for acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. Thrombolysis using systemic or transcatheter route is another option. Patients with peritoneal signs or refractory to initial measures require surgical exploration. Increasing recognition of mesenteric venous thrombosis and use of anticoagulation for treatment has resulted in reduction in the need for surgery with improvement in survival. PMID:25755568

  13. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  14. Preliminary clinical investigations of a new noninvasive venous pulse oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Daniel; Smith, Peter R.; Caine, Michael P.; Spyt, Tomasz; Boehm, Maria; Machin, David

    2003-10-01

    For decades, the monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation, SvO2 has been performed invasively using fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterisation. The group has devised a new non-invasive venous oximetry method which involves inducing regular modulations of the venous blood volume and associated measurement of those modulations using optical means. A clinical investigation was conducted in Glenfield Hospital, UK to evaluate the sensitivity of the new technique to haemodynamic changes such as Cardiac Output (CO) in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac patients. Preliminary trials on patients recovering from cardiac surgery yielded an average correlation of r = 0.72 between CO at different Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) augmentation levels and SvO2 measured by the new venous oximeter. In intraoperative patients undergoing off-pump cardiac surgery, SvO2 recorded by the new technique responded to unplanned events such as a cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: The new venous oximetry technique is a promising technique which responds to haemodynamic changes such as CO and with further development might offer an alternative means of monitoring SvO2 non-invasively.

  15. Injection From Side Holes on a Generic Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jason; Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), typically positioned within the superior vena cava (SVC), play an important role in the process of hemodialysis. Simultaneous extraction and injection of blood typically occur through one or more side holes at the catheter tip. High-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed, in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, to characterize the structure of single and multiple jets. The injection jets that penetrate the steady crossflow generate complex, but deterministic, flow patterns. Significant interaction between multiple jets generates flow features that are more pronounced than those of a single jet, including increased jet penetration and elevated levels of turbulent shear stresses. In addition, the effects of a pulsatile throughflow on the structure of an isolated, single jet are determined as a function of phase of the systole-diastole cycle, corresponding to actual blood flow in a normal adult.

  16. Inflammation in venous disease.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, P; Lanzara, S; Mascoli, F; Caggiati, A; Liboni, A

    2008-10-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD), mainly due to venous reflux or, sometimes, to venous outflow obstruction, produces a microcirculatory overload leading to the impairment of venous drainage. Venous drainage depends primarily on a major hemodynamic parameter called trans-mural pressure (TMP). TMP is increased in patients affected by CVD, leading to impaired tissue drainage, and, consequently, facilitating the beginning of the inflammatory cascade. Increased TMP determines red blood cell extravasation and either dermal hemosiderin deposits or iron laden-phagocytes. Iron deposits are readily visible in the legs of all patients affected by severe CVD. Local iron overload could generate free radicals or activate a proteolytic hyperactivity of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and/or downregulate tissue inhibitors of MMPs. These negative effects are particularly evident in carriers of the common HFE gene's mutations C282Y and H63D, because intracellular iron deposits of mutated macrophages have less stability than those of the wild type, inducing a significant oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated that such genetic variants increase the risk of ulcers and advance the age of ulcer onset, respectively. The iron-dependent vision of inflammation in CVD paves the way to new therapeutic strategies including the deliberate induction of iron deficiency as a treatment modality for non-healing and/or recurrent venous leg ulcers. The inflammatory cascade in CVD shares several aspects with that activated in the course of multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin in which the impairment of cerebral venous outflow mechanisms has been recently demonstrated. PMID:18974697

  17. [Prevalence of stenosis and thrombosis of central veins in hemodialysis after a tunneled jugular catheter].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Vanel, T; Chazot, C; Charra, B; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M

    2001-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (ST) and thrombosis (TB) related to catheter (KT) had been reported mostly for the subclavian vein. We performed a systematic cavographic study to evaluate the prevalence of these complications in 51 hemodialysis patients with present or previous history of tunneled internal jugular catheter. Each of them had used one or several KT (1.8 +/- 1.4 KT) for a mean 28 +/- 26 month cumulative time (i.e. 43,584 days total exposure time). Fifty percent of the KT were PermCath Quinton and 50% were Twincath (uncuffed) or CS 100 (cuffed) Medcomp. Twenty-seven had no ST (53%, group I), 24 had one or several significant ST (47%, group II) of superior Vena Cava (SVC, n = 4), inferior Vena Cava (IVC, n = 1), Brachio-cephalic Vein (BCV, n = 5) and subclavian vein (SC, n = 10), or a TB of SVC (n = 1), IVC (n = 3), BCV (n = 3), SC (n = 2). This accounts for an incidence of 0.55 ST or TB/1000 patient-days. Five of the twelve subclavian ST and TB had no history of previous subclavian catheter. Comparison between the two groups showed no differences according to age, time on dialysis, diabetes, hematocrit, CRP, cumulative time with catheter, catheter-related infections, type of catheter and anticoagulant treatment. IVC catheter tip's position is an important risk factor for TB and ST (4/6). Twelve group II patients had ST or TB-related symptoms, with a functional AV fistula in 9 cases. Eleven patients underwent repeated percutaneous angioplasty with 4 additional Wallstents and in 2 cases an AV fistula need to be closed. Central venous ST and TB after a jugular KT is extremely frequent, mostly without any symptoms. Consequences on peripheral or central vascular access, cost and poor long-term patency rate of angioplasty are of major importance. These results incite us to further reduce the catheter use in dialysis patients. PMID:11811018

  18. Effect of External Pressure and Catheter Gauge on Flow Rate, Kinetic Energy, and Endothelial Injury During Intravenous Fluid Administration in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Chan, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chou, Yu-Ching; Huang, Go-Shine

    2016-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) catheter gauge and pressurization of IV fluid (IVF) bags on fluid flow rate have been studied. However, the pressure needed to achieve a flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 gauge (G) catheter through smaller G catheters and the potential for endothelial damage from the increased kinetic energy produced by higher pressurization are unclear. Constant pressure on an IVF bag was maintained by an automatic adjustable pneumatic pressure regulator of our own design. Fluids running through 16 G, 18 G, 20 G, and 22 G catheters were assessed while using IV bag pressurization to achieve the flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 G catheter. We assessed flow rates, kinetic energy, and flow injury to rabbit inferior vena cava endothelium. By applying sufficient external constant pressure to an IVF bag, all fluids could be run through smaller (G) catheters at the flow rate in a 16 G catheter. However, the kinetic energy increased significantly as the catheter G increased. Damage to the venous endothelium was negligible or minimal/patchy cell loss. We designed a new rapid infusion system, which provides a constant pressure that compresses the fluid volume until it is free from visible residual fluid. When large-bore venous access cannot be obtained, multiple smaller catheters, external pressure, or both should be considered. However, caution should be exercised when fluid pressurized to reach a flow rate equivalent to that in a 16 G catheter is run through a smaller G catheter because of the profound increase in kinetic energy that can lead to venous endothelium injury. PMID:26674456

  19. [Rotational stability of angiography catheters].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Weber, M

    1992-10-01

    Rotatory stability is a parameter that reflects the ability of a catheter to transmit a rotation applied at the outer end to the catheter tip for the purpose of selective probing. A method for measuring the rotatory stability is described, and the results of rotatory stability measurements of 70 different commercially available catheters are reported. There is an almost linear correlation between the rotatory stability and the difference between the respective fourth power of the external and internal diameter or, approximately, to the fourth power of the external diameter for catheters without wire reinforcement. With the same cross-sectional dimensions, the rotatory stability of teflon, polyethylene, and nylon catheters has an approximate ratio of 1:2:4. Wire reinforcement increases rotatory stability by an average factor of about 3. For catheters of calibers 5 F and 6 F, a correlation between the rotatory stability and the weight of the reinforcing wire mesh is apparent. PMID:1441693

  20. The problem of catheter encrustation

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, A. W.; Sira, S. S.; Clark, A. F.; Awad, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Catheter encrustation was studied in a group of long-stay hospital patients using both latex and silicone catheters. Moisture accounted for 80% by weight of the encrusted material with both catheters. Of the dry weight 90% was composed of protein, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and uric acid. No relationship was found between the amounts of these substances in the urine and in the encrusted material. High levels of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium were found in the encrusted material from patients infected with Proteus organisms. No direct relationship was found between the duration of catheter drainage and the degree of encrustation, and there was a variation in patient susceptibility to encrustation irrespective of the catheter material. There was significantly less encrustation associated with silicone catheters. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:4855013

  1. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks associated with each type of CVAD (CICCs or PICCs). Second, an inappropriate CVAD choice and, particularly, an inadequate insertion technique are relevant-and often not recognized-potential risk factors for complications in critically ill patients. We strongly believe that all healthcare professionals involved in the choice, insertion or management of CVADs in critically ill patients should know all potential risk factors of complications. This knowledge may minimize complications and guarantee longevity to the CVAD optimizing the risk/benefit ratio of CVAD insertion and use. Proper management of CVADs in critical care saves lines and lives. Much evidence from the medical literature and from the clinical practice supports our belief that, compared to CICCs, the so-called power-injectable peripherally inserted central catheters are a good alternative choice in critical care. PMID:25374804

  2. Leclercia adecarboxylata and catheter-related bacteraemia: review of the literature and outcome with regard to catheters and patients.

    PubMed

    De Mauri, Andreana; Chiarinotti, Doriana; Andreoni, Stefano; Molinari, Gian Lorenzo; Conti, Novella; De Leo, Martino

    2013-10-01

    Infection is a common complication in patients carrying a central venous catheter (CVC) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Leclercia adecarboxylata is an unusual but emerging pathogen in healthy and immunocompromised patients. We report a case of L. adecarboxylata bacteraemia in a patient with a haemodialysis tunnelled CVC. In accordance with the susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, a long-course treatment with intravenous gentamicin plus amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and gentamicin-lock therapy was adopted. The patient had a full recovery and the catheter was not removed. We also performed a systematic PubMed/Medline and Scopus review of peer-reviewed English papers on L. adecarboxylata infections, focusing on bacteraemia in patients with different types of CVCs. Moreover, we suggest a treatment algorithm to preserve the patient and maintain the CVC. PMID:23882033

  3. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goltz, Jan P. Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O.; Wittenberg, Guenther; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  4. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  5. Venous ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Risk factors for venous ulcers include: Varicose veins History of blood clots in the legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) Leg swelling Age Being female (related to levels of the hormone progesterone) Being tall Family history of venous insufficiency ...

  6. Stepwise Angioplasty and Catheter Directed Thrombolysis for Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicated with Floating Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we experienced a rare case of Budd-Chiari Syndrome. The case was a 57-year-old female patient. Venous return had been severely disturbed by the membranous occlusion of the IVC and a giant floating thrombus. After catheter directed thrombolysis combined with stepwise percutaneous angioplasty, the IVC was recanalized sufficiently and the thrombus was completely resolved. PMID:24995066

  7. The jugular venous pressure revisited

    PubMed Central

    CHIACO, JOHN MICHAEL S. CHUA; PARIKH, NISHA I.; FERGUSSON, DAVID J.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the jugular venous pressure is often inadequately performed and undervalued. Here, we review the physiologic and anatomic basis for the jugular venous pressure, including the discrepancy between right atrial and central venous pressures. We also describe the correct method of evaluating this clinical finding and review the clinical relevance of the jugular venous pressure, especially its value in assessing the severity and response to treatment of congestive heart failure. Waveforms reflective of specific conditions are also discussed. PMID:24085809

  8. Microbiological and clinical features of four cases of catheter-related infection by Methylobacterium radiotolerans.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Han, Xiang Y

    2015-04-01

    Four cases of central venous catheter-related Methylobacterium radiotolerans infection are presented here. The patients were all long-term catheter carriers with an underlying diagnosis of leukemia, and they mostly manifested fevers. The isolated bacterial strains all showed far better growth on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar during the initial isolation and/or subcultures than they did on sheep blood or chocolate agar. This microbiological feature may improve the culture recovery of this fastidious pink Gram-negative bacillus that has rarely been isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:25631797

  9. Catheter-Malposition-Induced Cardiac Tamponade via Contrast Media Leakage During Computed Tomography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.-D. Ko, S.-F.; Huang, C.-F.; Chien, S.J.; Tiao, M.M.

    2005-12-15

    We present a rare case of a central venous catheter-malposition-induced life-threatening cardiac tamponade as a result of computed tomography (CT) with contrast enhancement in an infant with a ventricular septal defect and pulmonary atresia after a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. The diagnosis was confirmed by chest radiographs and CT study with catheter perforation through the right atrial wall and extravasation of the contrast medium into the pericardium, leading to cardiac tamponade and subsequent circulatory collapse. Two hours after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the patient gradually resumed normal hemodynamic status.

  10. A numerical study of the effect of catheter angle on the blood flow characteristics in a graft during hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Hong Sun; Kim, Soyoon; Ro, Kyoungchul

    2013-02-01

    For patients with renal failure, renal replacement therapies are needed. Hemodialysis is a widely used renal replacement method to remove waste products. It is important to improve the patency rate of the vascular access for efficient dialysis. Since some complications such as an intimal hyperplasia are associated with the flow pattern, the hemodynamics in the vascular access must be considered to achieve a high patency rate. In addition, the blood flow from an artificial kidney affects the flow in the vascular access. Generally, the clinical techniques of hemodialysis such as the catheter angle or dialysis dose have been set up empirically. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed on the effect of the catheter angle on the flow in the graft. Blood is assumed to be a non-Newtonian fluid. According to the high average wall shear stress value, the leucocytes and platelets can be activated not only at the arterial anastomosis, but also at the bottom of the venous graft, when the catheter angle is not zero. For a catheter angle less than five degrees, there is a low shear and high oscillatory shear index region that appears at the venous graft and the venous anastomosis. Thus, a catheter angle less than five degrees should be avoided to prevent graft failure.

  11. Evaluation of prosthetic venous valves, fabricated by electrospinning, for percutaneous treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Masaki; Kubota, Shinichiro; Tashiro, Hideo; Tonami, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) remains a major health problem worldwide. Direct venous valve surgical repair and venous segment transplantation are clinical options; however, they are highly invasive procedures. The objectives of this study were to fabricate prosthetic venous valves (PVVs) by electrospinning, for percutaneous treatment of CVI, and evaluate their hydrodynamic characteristics in vitro at the same locations and under the same flow conditions. The PVVs consisted of polyurethane fiber scaffolds attached to a cobalt-chromium stent. PVVs with two different valve-leaflet configurations were compared: biomimetic PVV (bPVV) and open PVV (oPVV). A balloon catheter was used to implant the devices in a poly(vinyl chloride) tube and the column outlet was set at a height of 100 cm above the test valve to simulate the elevation of the heart above a distal vein valve while standing; 50 wt% glycerin solution was used as the test fluid. The devices were evaluated for antegrade flow, effect of ankle flexion, and stagnation zones around the valve leaflets. During sudden hydrostatic backpressure, little leakage and constant peripheral pressure were observed for the devices; under forward pulsatile pressure of 0-4 mmHg, to simulate the effect of breathing, the oPVV had a higher flow rate than the bPVV. With regard to the effect of ankle flexion, the oPVV was functionless. Moreover, the stagnation zone around the oPVV valve leaflets was larger than that around the bPVV valve leaflets. These results suggest that the bPVV would be clinically suitable for percutaneous treatment of CVI. PMID:21789716

  12. Heart catheter cable and connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Cota, F. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraminiature catheter cables that are stiff enough for intravenous insertion yet flexible at the tip, sterilizable, and economical are fabricated entirely from commercially available parts. Assembly includes air passageway for reference pressures and coaxial cable for transmission of signals from the tip of catheter.

  13. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  14. Venous thrombosis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiac arrest and sometimes death. This is called pulmonary embolism. ... Post-operative patients are at risk for pulmonary embolism because of the time spent in bed after surgery. One method for reducing the risk of venous thrombosis is the use of sequential ...

  15. The prevention, diagnosis and management of central venous line infections in children.

    PubMed

    Chesshyre, Emily; Goff, Zoy; Bowen, Asha; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    With advancing paediatric healthcare, the use of central venous lines has become a fundamental part of management of neonates and children. Uses include haemodynamic monitoring and the delivery of lifesaving treatments such as intravenous fluids, blood products, antibiotics, chemotherapy, haemodialysis and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite preventative measures, central venous catheter-related infections are common, with rates of 0.5-2.8/1000 catheter days in children and 0.6-2.5/1000 catheter days in neonates. Central line infections in children are associated with increased mortality, increased length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, treatment interruptions, and increased complications. Prevention is paramount, using a variety of measures including tunnelling of long-term devices, chlorhexidine antisepsis, maximum sterile barriers, aseptic non-touch technique, minimal line accessing, and evidence-based care bundles. Diagnosis of central line infections in children is challenging. Available samples are often limited to a single central line blood culture, as clinicians are reluctant to perform painful venepuncture on children with a central, pain-free, access device. With the advancing evidence basis for antibiotic lock therapy for treatment, paediatricians are pushing the boundaries of line retention if safe to do so, due to among other reasons, often limited venous access sites. This review evaluates the available paediatric studies on management of central venous line infections and refers to consensus guidelines such as those of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). PMID:25934326

  16. Thermal manipulator of medical catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Chastagner, P.

    1991-03-04

    This invention consists of a maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  17. A systematic review of patient-related risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2015-10-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We performed a systematic review of the literature assessing patient-related risk factors for thrombosis related to CVC or PICC. The databases PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library were searched for observational studies pertaining to patient-related risk factors for CVC and PICC-related thrombosis. The initial search through PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library yielded 516 results. After 71 duplicates were removed, 445 articles were assessed for eligibility based on title and abstract. Four hundred and eleven articles were then excluded and 33 full text articles were manually assessed for eligibility. Eight articles were eliminated as they did not contain content relevant to the review. Twenty-five studies were then selected to assess 20 risk factors. There were no consistent significant associations for catheter-related thrombosis across the twenty-five studies. Multiple studies identified age, malignancy, diabetes, obesity, chemotherapy, thrombophilia and a history of thrombosis as significant risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis. Inconsistent findings among studies make it difficult to establish which patient-related risk factors are associated with catheter-related thrombosis. Future studies could include larger sample sizes and more cases of catheter-related thrombosis to produce more significant results. Identification of patient-related risk factors could lead to early recognition of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in patients with catheters, thereby preventing complications. PMID:25680892

  18. Predicted burden of venous disease.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun Huw

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition with clinical signs and symptoms ranging from spider veins, to varicose veins, to active venous ulceration. Both superficial and deep venous dysfunction may be implicated in the development of this disease. Socio-economic factors are shaping our population, with increasing age and body mass index resulting in significant pressure on healthcare systems worldwide. These risk factors also lead to an increased risk of developing superficial and/or deep venous insufficiency, increasing disease prevalence and morbidity. In this chapter, the authors review the current and future burden of chronic venous disease from an epidemiological, quality of life and economic perspective. PMID:26916773

  19. Relationship between venous pressure and tissue volume during venous congestion plethysmography in man.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, F; Gamble, J; Baschnegger, H; Gartside, I B

    1997-01-01

    1. Venous congestion strain-gauge plethysmography enables the non-invasive assessment of arterial blood flow, fluid filtration capacity (Kf), venous pressure (Pv) and isovolumetric venous pressure (Pvi) in man. One of the major assumptions of this technique, that cuff pressure (Pcuff) applied to the limb equals Pv at the level of the strain gauge, was tested in this study. 2. In nine healthy male volunteers (mean age, 29.3 +/- 1.2 years) the saphenous vein was cannulated with an 18-gauge catheter proximal to the medial malleolus. The subjects were supine and Pv was continuously measured during the application of small step (8-10 mmHg) increases in congestion Pcuff (up to 70 mmHg). Pcuff, changes in limb circumference and Pv were recorded by computer for off-line analysis. Since the determination of Kf is influenced by the changes in plasma oncotic pressure, venous blood samples were obtained at the start of the study, when Pcuff was raised to 30 mmHg and again to 65 mmHg and 4 min after deflation of the cuff. 3. The relationship between Pv and Pcuff was linear over the range of 10-70 mmHg (n = 9, 69 measurements, slope 0.91, r = 0.97, P << 0.001). The non-invasively measured calf Pv, based on the intercept of the relationship between the vascular compliance component (Va) and Pcuff, was 8.0 +/- 0.4 mmHg, which was not significantly different from the corrected invasively measured Pv value of 8.8 +/- 0.3 mmHg (P = 0.08). 4. Venous blood lactate and haemoglobin concentrations, as well as colloid osmotic pressure, total protein and albumin concentrations were unchanged throughout the protocol, whereas significant decreases in PO2 and blood glucose concentration were observed when Pcuff reached 65 mmHg. Assuming a constant oxygen consumption, this may suggest a reduction in tissue perfusion. 5. This study demonstrates the close correlation between Pcuff and Pv in the saphenous vein. Since the small congestion Pcuff step protocol does not cause significant increase in plasma oncotic pressure, we conclude that Pv, as well as Kf, can be accurately determined with this venous congestion plethysmography protocol. PMID:9306287

  20. Venous thromboembolism in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S; Neff, A; Nagler, A; Savani, U; Mohty, M; Savani, B N

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an increasingly recognized problem in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting, with a lack of high-quality evidence-based data to recommend best practices. Few patients with hematologic malignancies and even fewer post-HSCT patients were included in randomized trials of VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Prior VTE, GVHD, infections and indwelling venous catheters are risk factors for thrombosis. The increasing use of post-transplant maintenance therapy with lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma adds to this risk after autologous HSCT. These patients are also at high risk of bleeding complications because of prolonged thrombocytopenia and managing the competing risks of bleeding and thrombosis can be challenging. This review aims to provide a practical, clinician-focused approach to the prevention and treatment of VTE in the post-HSCT setting. PMID:26691425

  1. Evaluation of a new hydrocolloid occlusive dressing for central catheters used in total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Haffejee, A A; Moodley, J; Pillay, K; Singh, B; Thomson, S; Bhamjee, A

    1991-12-01

    Catheter-related sepsis still remains one of the most frequent and serious complication of total parenteral nutrition. Strategies for preventing contamination of central venous lines have focused on decreasing the number of micro-organisms around the exit site and inhibiting their entry into the catheter wound. This prospective study compares a new occlusive hydrocolloid dressing (Visiband; Convatec Squibb) with that of a polyurethane film dressing for nutritional catheters. Dressings were changed either on day 3 or day 5 after application. Swab smears of the catheter exit site at each dressing change were stained by Gram's method before inoculation onto a blood agar plate, a chocolate agar plate and a MacConkey agar plate. Significantly less colonisation occurred under the former dressing at day 3 and day 5 dressing changes. In addition, the polyurethane film dressing was associated with a significant increase in skin colonisation (P = 0.04) and the number of positive Gram-stain microbes if left unchanged for 5 days (P = 0.0018). Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related sepsis occurred in 1 patient on day 18 in the polyurethane film dressing group. In addition, Candida albicans colonisation was confined to patients with the polyurethane film dressing. While the type of dressing applied to the catheter exit site may influence the incidence of catheter colonisation and infection, it must be emphasised that strict adherence to aseptic technique during catheter insertion and manipulation of the dressing is vital in the prevention of catheter-related sepsis during total parenteral nutrition. PMID:1763392

  2. CHLORHEXIDINE-IMPREGNATED DRESSING FOR PREVENTION OF CATHETER-RELATED BLOODSTREAM INFECTION: A META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Nasia; O’Horo, John C.; Ghufran, Aiman; Bearden, Allison; Didier, Maria Eugenia; Chateau, Dan; Maki, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and effective methods for their prevention are needed. Objective To assess the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing for prevention of central venous catheter-related colonization and CRBSI using meta-analysis. Data Sources Multiple computerized database searches supplemented by manual searches including relevant conference proceedings. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing compared with conventional dressings for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI. Data Extraction Data were extracted on patient and catheter characteristics and outcomes. Data Synthesis Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and I2. Subgroup analyses were used to explore heterogeneity. Results Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Use of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing resulted in a reduced incidence of CRBSI (random effects RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.42–0.79, P=0.002). The incidence of catheter colonization was also markedly reduced in the chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing group (random effects RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67, P< 0.001). There was significant benefit for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI, including arterial catheters used for hemodynamic monitoring. Other than in low birth weight infants, adverse effects were rare and minor. Conclusions Our analysis shows that a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing is beneficial in preventing catheter colonization and, more importantly, CRBSI and warrants routine use in patients at high risk of CRBSI and CVC or arterial catheter colonization in ICUs. PMID:24674924

  3. What went wrong? The flawed concept of cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Valdueza, José M; Doepp, Florian; Schreiber, Stephan J; van Oosten, Bob W; Schmierer, Klaus; Paul, Friedemann; Wattjes, Mike P

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Zamboni reintroduced the concept that chronic impaired venous outflow of the central nervous system is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), coining the term of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (‘CCSVI'). The diagnosis of ‘CCSVI' is based on sonographic criteria, which he found exclusively fulfilled in MS. The concept proposes that chronic venous outflow failure is associated with venous reflux and congestion and leads to iron deposition, thereby inducing neuroinflammation and degeneration. The revival of this concept has generated major interest in media and patient groups, mainly driven by the hope that endovascular treatment of ‘CCSVI' could alleviate MS. Many investigators tried to replicate Zamboni's results with duplex sonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography. The data obtained here do generally not support the ‘CCSVI' concept. Moreover, there are no methodologically adequate studies to prove or disprove beneficial effects of endovascular treatment in MS. This review not only gives a comprehensive overview of the methodological flaws and pathophysiologic implausibility of the ‘CCSVI' concept, but also summarizes the multimodality diagnostic validation studies and open-label trials of endovascular treatment. In our view, there is currently no basis to diagnose or treat ‘CCSVI' in the care of MS patients, outside of the setting of scientific research. PMID:23443168

  4. Development of Needle Insertion Manipulator for Central Venous Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Hashizume, Makoto; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure, which a doctor insert a catheter into the patient’s vein for transfusion. Since there are risks of bleeding from arterial puncture or pneumothorax from pleural puncture. Physicians are strictly required to make needle reach up into the vein and to stop the needle in the middle of vein. We proposed a robot system for assisting the venous puncture, which can relieve the difficulties in conventional procedure, and the risks of complication. This paper reports the design structuring and experimental results of needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relationship between insertion force and angle into the vein. The results indicated that the judgment of perforation using the reaction force is possible in case where the needling angle is from 10 to 20 degree. The experiment to evaluate accuracy of the robot also revealed that it has beyond 0.5 mm accuracy. We also evaluated the positioning accuracy in the ultrasound images. The results displays that the accuracy is beyond 1.0 mm and it has enough for venous puncture. We also carried out the venous puncture experiment to the phantom and confirm our manipulator realized to make needle reach up into the vein.

  5. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  6. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  7. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome. PMID:23475546

  8. Declotting a Thrombosed Brescia-Cimino Fistula by Manual Catheter-Directed Aspiration of the Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Turmel-Rodrigues, Luc A E-mail: cim.stgatien@wanadoo.fr

    2005-01-15

    Acute thrombosis of native fistulae for hemodialysis occurs more rarely than for prosthetic grafts. The vascular access should be reopened as soon as possible in order to resume regular dialysis and to avoid resorting to a temporary central line. Manual aspiration is one of the numerous methods described in this setting. Clinical examination is essential to rule out local infection, which is the only serious contraindication to percutaneous maneuvers. Two introducer-sheaths are placed in a criss-cross fashion in order to gain access to the venous outflow and to the anastomosis. Access to the venous outflow is performed first in order to check the proximal extent of the thrombosis. Heparin and antibiotics are injected systemically. A similar maneuver is then performed in the direction of the anastomosis. The aspiration phase is then initiated. A 7-9 Fr aspiration catheter is pushed through the 'venous' introducer. Manual aspiration is created through a 50 ml syringe while the catheter is progressively removed with back and forth movements. The catheter and the contents of the syringe are flushed through a gauze on the working table to evaluate the amount of thrombus which has been removed and the maneuver is repeated as often as necessary to remove all the thrombus. Once all the clots located downstream from the venous introducer have been removed, any unmasked underlying stenosis is NOT dilated at this stage since it provides protection against major embolism coming from the inflow. The aspiration catheter is then pushed through the 'arterial' introducer down to the anastomosis in order to aspirate the thrombus located between the tip of the introducer and the anastomosis. Dilatation of unmasked stenoses is finally performed using high-pressure balloons. The holes made by the two introducers are closed using a U-shaped suture with interposition of a short piece of plastic and the patient is sent back to the nephrologists for dialysis.

  9. Recurrent bilateral pleural effusions secondary to superior vena cava obstruction as a complication of central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Dhande, V; Kattwinkel, J; Alford, B

    1983-07-01

    Five babies (birth weight 730 to 1,120 g) who developed bilateral pleural effusions as a complication of the use of central venous catheters are described. The effusions occurred seven to 19 days after initial placement or change of a central venous catheter. All required repeated thoracenteses to remove fluid accumulation of up to 200 mL/kg/d. The fluid was a clear transudate, but it became chylous when feedings were given. Venograms and autopsies demonstrated obstruction of the superior vena cava with drainage occurring through collaterals to the azygous vein and inferior vena cava. Silastic gas-sterilized catheters implanted in animals for four and 24 hours showed fibrin deposition when scanned by electron microscopy. No deposition occurred on autoclaved catheters after four hours and there was minimal deposition after 24 hours. It may be concluded that the pleural effusions resulted from obstruction of thoracic lymph flow into the venous system. Vena caval thrombosis may have been enhanced by 2-chloroethanol or ethylene oxide residues from gas sterilization of Silastic catheters. PMID:6408592

  10. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  11. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein. PMID:26655801

  12. Retrograde leptomeningeal venous approach for dural arteriovenous fistulas at foramen magnum

    PubMed Central

    Caire, François; Saleme, Suzana; Ponomarjova, Sanita; Mounayer, Charbel

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with sudden right homonymous hemianopsia. Work-up imaging revealed a left occipital haematoma and an arteriovenous fistula supplied by the meningeal branches to the clivus from the left vertebral artery (VA) with a rostral venous reflux into cortical veins. A microcatheter was advanced through brainstem veins into the venous collector. A compliant balloon was placed in the left VA facing the origin of feeders. The balloon was inflated to protect the vertebrobasilar circulation from embolic migration. Onyx was injected by the transvenous catheter. Control angiogram revealed exclusion of the lesion. Informed consent was obtained from the patient. PMID:25964442

  13. Large eccentric laser angioplasty catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kevin D.; Reiser, Christopher

    1997-05-01

    In response to recent demand for increased debulking of large diameter coronary vascular segments, a large eccentric catheter for excimer laser coronary angioplasty has been developed. The outer tip diameter is 2.0 mm and incorporates approximately 300 fibers of 50 micron diameter in a monorail- type percutaneous catheter. The basic function of the device is to ablate a coronary atherosclerotic lesion with 308 nm excimer laser pulses, while passing the tip of the catheter through the lesion. By employing multiple passes through the lesion, rotating the catheter 90 degrees after each pass, we expect to create luminal diameters close to 3 mm with this device. Design characteristics, in-vitro testing, and initial clinical experience is presented.

  14. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  15. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - insertion ... A PICC is a long, thin tube (called a catheter) that goes into your body through a vein in ... into a large vein near your heart. The PICC helps carry nutrients and medicines into your body. ...

  16. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  17. The First Case of Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection Caused by Nocardia farcinica

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Sang Taek; Ko, Kwan Soo; Kwon, Ki Tae; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Bae, In Gyu; Oh, Won Sup; Song, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran

    2010-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised hosts. Even though several species of Nocardia have been reported as causative pathogens of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI), CRBSI caused by N. farcinica has not been reported. A 70-yr-old man with a tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) for home parenteral nutrition was admitted with fever for two days. Norcardia species was isolated from the blood through CVC and peripheral bloods and identified to N. farcinica by 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequence analyses. This report emphasizes the rapid and correct identification of causative agents in infectious diseases in the selection of antimicrobial agents and the consideration of catheter removal. PMID:21060759

  18. Comparison of a new venous control device with a bladder box system for use in ECMO.

    PubMed

    Setz, K; Kesser, K; Kopotic, R J; Cornish, J D

    1992-01-01

    During extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), forward pump flow must not be allowed to exceed the rate of blood drainage from the patient so that excessive negative pressure does not develop within the ECMO circuit or in the patient's right atrium. A distensible reservoir ("bladder") and mechanically actuated electronic switch ("bladder box"), has typically been used for this purpose. If the rate of blood flow from the patient to the pump is insufficient to support the perfusion rate desired and adjustments in volume status and catheter position do not increase blood drainage, the only recourse is to increase the siphon pressure by elevating the patient. At the author's institution, a novel venous control module (VCM), without a reservoir, that can provide increased venous drainage without elevating the patient is used. Using an in vitro model of neonatal ECMO, the authors' compared their VCM to a commercially available "bladder box" system. Pressures were monitored in a collapsible chamber inside a water bath (simulating the right atrium), at the gravitational high point of the ECMO circuit ("neck site") and at the low point of the circuit ("venous site") at flow rates of 100, 450, 900, and 1,300 cc/min. Pump shut-off characteristics for both systems were also measured with either sudden interruption of venous drainage ("cross-clamping") or restriction of venous inflow ("hypovolemia"). Under continuous flow conditions, higher flows could be achieved with the VCM. With acute venous catheter occlusion, instantaneous ("trough") pressures at the neck site were lower, and venous monitoring site pressures were higher with the bladder box system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1450482

  19. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  20. Treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, Suman W; Kirkpatrick, Angelia C

    2007-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) results from venous hypertension secondary to superficial or deep venous valvular reflux. Treatment modalities are aimed at reducing venous valvular reflux, thereby inhibiting the ensuing pathologic inflammatory process. Compression therapy using pumps, bandaging, and/or graded compression stockings is the mainstay of treatment for CVI. Compression therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing venous hypertension retarding the development of inflammation and pathologic skin changes. Pharmacologic agents such as diuretics and topical steroid creams reduce swelling and pain short term but offer no long-term treatment advantage. Herbal supplements may reduce the inflammatory response to venous hypertension, but are not licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration, and vary in their efficacy, quality, and safety. However, several randomized controlled trials using the herbal horse chestnut seed extract containing aescin have shown short-term improvement in signs and symptoms of CVI. Endovascular and surgical techniques aimed at treatment of primary and secondary venous valvular reflux have been shown to improve venous hemodynamics promoting healing of venous ulcers and improving quality of life. The newer endovascular treatments of varicose veins using laser, radiofrequency ablation, and chemical foam sclerotherapy show some promise. PMID:17484814

  1. [Metastatic tumor implantation from a primary cancer of the base of the tongue at the site of placement of a central venous portacath].

    PubMed

    Tixier, H; Fraisse, J; Bruchon, Y; Cuisenier, J

    2009-10-01

    Central venous catheter placement with an implanted port (portacath) is used to provide long-term venous access. We report a case of metastatic implantation at a port site from a primary cancer of the base of the tongue. Insertion of portacaths must be performed using full sterile precautions to avoid spread of tumor cells; in no case should the port site incisions be in contact with the surgical field in which the tumor resection was performed. PMID:19833338

  2. Peripheral venous pressure as a reliable predictor for monitoring central venous pressure in patients with burns

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Lulu; Joshi, Vikas S.; Ollapally, Anjali; Jain, Prithi; Shetty, Kishan; Ribeiro, Karl Sa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimizing cardiovascular function to ensure adequate tissue oxygen delivery is a key objective in the care of critically ill patients with burns. Hemodynamic monitoring may be necessary to optimize resuscitation in serious burn patients with reasonable safety. Invasive central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring has become the corner stone of hemodynamic monitoring in patients with burns but is associated with inherent risks and technical difficulties. Previous studies on perioperative patients have shown that measurement of peripheral venous pressure (PVP) is a less invasive and cost-effective procedure and can reliably predict CVP. Objective: The aim of the present prospective clinical study was to determine whether a reliable association exists between changes in CVP and PVP over a long period in patients admitted to the Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU). Subjects and Methods: The CVP and PVP were measured simultaneously hourly in 30 burns patients in the BICU up to 10 consecutive hours. The predictability of CVP by monitoring PVP was tested by applying the linear regression formula and also using the Bland–Altman plots of repeated measures to evaluate the agreement between CVP and PVP. Results: The regression formula revealed a reliable and significant association between CVP and PVP. The overall mean difference between CVP and PVP was 1.628 ± 0.84 mmHg (P < 0.001). The Bland–Altman diagram also showed a perfect agreement between the two pressures throughout the 10 h period. Conclusion: Peripheral venous pressure measured from a peripheral intravenous catheter in burns patients is a reliable estimation of CVP, and its changes have good concordance with CVP over a long period of time. PMID:25878426

  3. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klösges, Laura Meyer, Carsten Boschewitz, Jack Andersson, Magnus; Rudlowski, Christian; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  4. Radiofrequency Guide Wire Recanalization of Venous Occlusions in Patients with Malignant Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert M.; David, Elizabeth; Pugash, Robyn A.; Annamalai, Ganesan

    2012-06-15

    Fibrotic central venous occlusions in patients with thoracic malignancy and prior radiotherapy can be impassable with standard catheters and wires, including the trailing or stiff end of a hydrophilic wire. We report two patients with superior vena cava syndrome in whom we successfully utilized a radiofrequency guide wire (PowerWire, Baylis Medical, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) to perforate through the occlusion and recanalize the occluded segment to alleviate symptoms.

  5. Prevention and management of hemodialysis catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Venkat; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2012-12-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are associated with blood stream infections, and catheter use continues to be high among incident and prevalent patients on maintenance HD. Migration of micro-organism along the external surface of the catheter is probably the most common route of infection, followed by the endoluminal route of contamination. Almost all HD catheters have biofilm formation on their surfaces and this serves as a good reservoir for micro-organisms. These active but protected microorganisms have been implicated in local and systemic infections associated with HD catheters. Good personal hygiene, exit-site care with topical antibiotics and antibiotic lock solution in the dialysis catheter reduce the incidence of catheter infection. In selected subgroup of patients, HD catheter is promptly removed after the diagnosis of blood stream infection. However, catheter guidewire exchange is an acceptable alternate strategy in some patients. The most important goal should be to increase the rate of incident arteriovenous fistula use in the HD population. PMID:23253322

  6. Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, V V; Stringer, M D

    1990-01-01

    The objective of prophylaxis in venous thromboembolism is, first, to prevent fatal pulmonary embolism and, second, to reduce the morbidity associated with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the postphlebitic limb. This should now be standard practice for most patients over 40 years of age undergoing major surgery and for younger patients with a history of venous thromboembolism. Particularly high-risk groups include patients over 60 years of age undergoing major surgery, those with malignancy, and those requiring hip operations. Low-dose subcutaneous heparin 5,000 IU commencing 2 hours preoperatively and continuing 12 hourly until the patient is fully mobile is unequivocally effective in preventing DVT in medical and surgical patients and, most importantly, significantly reduces the incidence of fatal postoperative pulmonary embolism and total mortality. Such prophylaxis, in the presence of established DVT, also limits proximal clot propagation, which is the precursor of major pulmonary embolism. Low-dose heparin prophylaxis is associated with a small risk of bleeding complications, evidenced mostly by an increased frequency of wound hematoma rather than major clinical hemorrhage. Low molecular weight heparin fragments (e.g., Fragmin, Choay, Enoxaparine) are emerging as useful alternative agents, having the advantage of once daily administration and yet providing similar efficacy in the prevention of DVT. Mechanical methods of prevention which counteract venous stasis, such as graduated elastic compression stockings, are also useful in protecting against DVT but have not been shown to prevent fatal postoperative pulmonary embolism. They are recommended particularly for patients in whom heparin prophylaxis is best avoided (e.g., neurosurgery) and possibly in combination with heparin in very high-risk patients. PMID:2122604

  7. [Endogenous venous thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Porembskaya, O Ya; Khmelniker, S M; Shaidakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    Widely incorporated into vascular surgery pharmacological thrombolysis in treatment for deep vain thrombosis is fraught with a series of unsolved problems requiring further consideration. In spite of aggressive nature of treatment in a series of cases pharmacological thrombolysis sometimes turns out ineffective. Along with it, the results of experimental studies suggest a possibility of accelerating resorption of thrombotic masses and inhibiting remodelling of the venous wall by means of influencing effector cells of endogenous thrombolysis. A detailed study of the mechanisms of thrombolysis would make it possible to formulate strict criteria for carrying out pharmacological thrombolysis and to increase its efficacy. PMID:26355926

  8. Traumatic Dural Venous Sinus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sub; Jung, Seung-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Jae-Hyoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The importance of traumatic dural venous sinus injury lies in the probability of massive blood loss at the time of trauma or emergency operation resulting in a high mortality rate during the perioperative period. We considered the appropriate methods of treatment that are most essential in the overall management of traumatic dural venous sinus injuries. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of all cases involving patients with dural venous sinus injury who presented to our hospital between January 1999 and December 2014. Results Between January 1999 and December 2014, 20 patients with a dural venous sinus injury out of the 1,200 patients with severe head injuries who had been operated upon in our clinic were reviewed retrospectively. There were 17 male and 3 female patients. In 11 out of the 13 patients with a linear skull fracture crossing the dural venous sinus, massive blood loss from the injured sinus wall could be controlled by simple digital pressure using Gelfoam. All 5 patients with a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the venous sinus developed massive sinus bleeding that could not be controlled by simple digital pressure. Conclusion When there is a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the dural venous sinus or a depressed skull fracture penetrating the sinus, the surgeon should be prepared for the possibility of potentially fatal venous sinus injury, even in the absence of a hematoma. PMID:27169076

  9. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  10. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  11. Urinary Retention: Catheter Drainage Bag or Catheter Valve?

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Gurnam; Hendry, David

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with intractable urinary incontinence presents as a challenging priority in the ageing population. To preserve the antibacterial mechanisms of the bladder, a urine collection that enables the bladder to fill and empty regularly and completely, should be used. This mimics the action of the healthy bladder. We compared the success rates of two widely used urinary-collection systems (catheter with drainage bag or a catheter valve) at our institution for those patients undergoing a trial of void. PMID:26989368

  12. Geochemistry of and radioactivity in ground water of the Highland Rim and Central Basin aquifer systems, Hickman and Maury counties, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hileman, G.E.; Lee, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    A reconnaissance of the geochemistry of and radioactivity in ground water from the Highland Rim and Central Basin aquifer systems in Hickman and Maury Counties, Tennessee, was conducted in 1989. Water in both aquifer systems typically is of the calcium or calcium magnesium bicarbonate type, but concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate are greater in water of the Central Basin system; differences in the concentrations are statistically significant. Dissolution of calcite, magnesium-calcite, dolomite, and gypsum are the primary geochemical processes controlling ground-water chemistry in both aquifer systems. Saturation-state calculations using the computer code WATEQF indicated that ground water from the Central Basin system is more saturated with respect to calcite, dolomite, and gypsum than water from the Highland Rim system. Geochemical environments within each aquifer system are somewhat different with respect to dissolution of magnesium-bearing minerals. Water samples from the Highland Rim system had a fairly constant calcium to magnesium molar ratio, implying congruent dissolution of magnesium-bearing minerals, whereas water samples from the Central Basin system had highly variable ratios, implying either incongruent dissolution or heterogeneity in soluble constituents of the aquifer matrix. Concentrations of radionuclides in water were low and not greatly different between aquifer systems. Median gross alpha activities were 0.54 picocuries per liter in water from each system; median gross beta activities were 1.1 and 2.3 picocuries per liter in water from the Highland Rim and Central Basin systems, respectively. Radon-222 concentrations were 559 and 422 picocuries per liter, respectively. Concentrations of gross alpha and radium in all samples were substantially less than Tennessee?s maximum permissible levels for community water-supply systems. The data indicated no relations between concentrations of dissolved radionuclides (uranium, radium-226, radium-228, radon-222, gross alpha, and gross beta) and any key indicators of water chemistry, except in water from the Highland Rim system, in which radon-222 was moderately related to pH and weakly related to dissolved magnesium. The only relation among radiochemical constituents indicated by the data was between radium-226 and gross alpha activity; this relation was indicated for water from both aquifer systems.

  13. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  14. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  15. Microbial biofilms associated with intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infections in adult intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Gowardman, J; Morrison, M; Runnegar, N; Rickard, C M

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the most serious complications in hospitalised patients, leading to increased hospitalisation, intensive care admissions, extensive antibiotic treatment and mortality. A greater understanding of these bacterial infections is needed to improve the prevention and the management of CRBSIs. We describe here the systematic culture-independent evaluation of intravascular catheter (IVC) bacteriology. Twelve IVCs (6 central venous catheters and 6 arterial catheters) were collected from 6 patients. By using traditional culture methods, 3 patients were diagnosed with catheter colonisation including 1 patient who also had CRBSI, and 3 had no colonisation. From a total of 839,539 high-quality sequence reads from high-throughput sequencing, 8 microbial phyla and 76 diverse microbial genera were detected. All IVCs examined in this study were colonised with complex microbial communities including "non-colonised IVCs," as defined using traditional culture methods. Two main community types were observed: Enterobacteriaceae spp., dominant in patients without colonisation or CRBSI; and Staphylococcus spp., dominant in patients with colonisation and CRBSI. More diverse pathogens and a higher microbial diversity were present in patients with IVC colonisation and CRBSI. Community composition did not appear to be affected by patients' antibiotic treatment or IVC type. Characterisation of these communities is the first step in elucidating roles of these pathogens in disease progression, and to ultimately facilitate the improved prevention, refined diagnosis and management of CRBSI. PMID:26610337

  16. Review of catheter thrombectomy devices.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Jose A; Meyerrose, Gary E; Phisitkul, Sorot; Kennedy, Shalyn; Roongsritong, Chanwit; Tsikouris, James; Huang, Shoei K Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequently fatal event that causes significant compromise of hemodynamic stability. Unfortunately, mortality rates for PE have remained relatively constant despite advances in prophylactic and treatment measures. In addition to embolus size, symptom recognition for diagnosis and emergent treatment are two distinct factors that dictate survival. Treatment generally includes thrombolytic agents; however, not all patients are candidates for aggressive thrombolytic management. Development of catheter thrombectomy devices provides an alternative treatment modality for severe cases when thrombolytics are contraindicated. Catheter thrombectomy devices have undergone major advances over the last decade, but literature support of their success is limited. PMID:14988612

  17. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    SciTech Connect

    Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S. Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  18. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5175 Septostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A septostomy catheter is...

  19. The benefits of irrigation in catheter care.

    PubMed

    Gates, A

    2000-10-01

    'Bladder washout' is a misnomer, as it is the catheter that is being washed. Urinary catheters can cause significant physical and psychological problems. Although nurses are responsible for urinary catheter maintenance, there is a lack of knowledge in some areas. Some urological practices have been based on historical practice rather than evidence. PMID:12029720

  20. Varicose Veins and Venous Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter (SIRspecialists) YouTube RSS Feeds Radiation Safety IR History Bibliographies Meetings and Education Doctor Finder/Patient information Select a State: Advanced ...

  1. A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes with Regular- and Low-Profile Totally Implanted Central Venous Port Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Steitparth, Florian; Cho, Chie Hee; Benter, Thomas; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether low-profile totally implanted central venous port systems can reduce the late complication of skin perforation. Forty patients (age, 57 {+-} 13 years; 22 females, 18 males) were randomized for the implantation of a low-profile port system, and another 40 patients (age, 61 {+-} 14 years; 24 females, 16 males) received a regular port system as control group. Indications for port catheter implantation were malignant disease requiring chemotherapy. All port implantations were performed in the angiography suite using sonographically guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance of the catheter placement. Procedure time, number of complications (procedure-related immediate, early, and late complications), and number of explantations were assessed. Follow-up was performed for 6 months. All port implantations were successfully completed in both study groups. There were two incidents of skin perforation observed in the control group. One skin perforation occurred 13 weeks and the other 16 weeks after port implantation (incidence, 5%) in patients with regular-profile port systems. Two infections were observed, one port infection in each study group. Both infections were characterized as catheter-related infections (infection rate: 0.15 catheter-related infections per 1000 catheter days). In conclusion, low-profile port systems can be placed as safely as traditional chest ports and reduce the risk of developing skin perforations, which occurs when the port system is too tight within the port pocket.

  2. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  3. Aging of silastic peritoneal catheters.

    PubMed

    Poisetti, P; Bergonzi, G; Ballocchi, S; Fontana, F; Scarpioni, L

    1991-12-01

    Increasing the survival of patients on CAPD is related to the long-term reliability of the peritoneal access. Six silicone Tenckhoff catheters (with strip or diffuse barium sulphate inclusion) removed after 39-69 months because of the appearance of external segment fissures, were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infra-red spectroscopy with attenuated total refractance (ATR). The extracorporeal portion of the catheters showed (by ATR) a more prominent oxidation peak on the external than the internal surface; SEM showed marks and cracks on the external surface and exfoliation and flattening of the silastic reticle on the intraluminal surface. No evidence of oxidation was found in the intra-abdominal portion of the catheters but biofilm was found. We suggest that barium sulphate may render the silastic brittle and physiological and environmental long-term factors (such as uv-rays, temperature, sweat and disinfectants) could cause oxidation and loss of physico-chemical properties, with critical aging of the silastic and loss of catheter resistance to mechanical injury. PMID:1783450

  4. Minimizing the complications associated with migrating catheters.

    PubMed

    Billington, A; Crane, C; Jownally, S; Kirkwood, L; Roodhouse, A

    2008-11-01

    This article seeks to explore the clinical practice of urinary catheter fixation. Traditionally, this area of practice has been neglected and nurses are familiar with tension lesions and dermal problems associated with inappropriate or incorrect urinary catheter fixation. A novel solution to this problem is a catheter fixation device. This device secures the catheter safely, making clinical practice safer and the experience of catheterization more tolerable for the patient. An example of a urinary catheter fixation device available in the UK is Bard's StatLock. PMID:18981965

  5. Clinical utility of the Covidien Closure Fast™ Endovenous Radiofrequency Ablation Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Simon A; Braithwaite, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    The Closure Fast™ Endovenous Radiofrequency Ablation Catheter is the latest version of a minimally invasive system for the treatment of patients with superficial venous disease. The Closure Fast™ catheter heats the vein wall to 120°C, causing denaturation of the collagen of the vein wall and contraction of the vessel such that no blood can flow through it. Nearly one million systems have been sold since the product was launched. Many, if not all, patients can be treated under local anesthesia with the Closure Fast™ catheter. Duplex ultrasound reports occlusion rates for the treated vein of 94%–98% at 1 year and 85%–93% at 3 years. The system produces average postoperative pain scores of less than 2 out of 10 on a visual analog score. In the first postoperative week, 76% of patients do not require analgesia. Some 45% of patients return to normal activity on the first postoperative day. Serious complications appear to be rare following the Closure Fast™ procedure. Transient paresthesia occurs in 0.2% of cases, thrombophlebitis in 1%–10%, and thromboembolic events in up to 1.4%, mainly heat-induced thrombosis. Closure Fast™ adds significant costs to treating superficial venous disease but studies have shown it to be cost-effective when used in an office setting. PMID:24940086

  6. Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sign In Cardiology Patient Page Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes Claire M. Hull , PhD ; Julia A. Harris , ... general adult population are indisputable. However, for the marathon athlete who trains intensively and for long periods ...

  7. Smart central venous port for early detection of bacterial biofilm related infections.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J; Alonso-Arce, M; Schmidt, C; Valderas, D; Sedano, B; Legarda, J; Arizti, F; Gómez, E; Aguinaga, A; Del Pozo, J L; Arana, S

    2014-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are commonly used in clinical practice to improve a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic risk of acquiring an infection related to microbial biofilm formation inside the catheter lumen. It has been estimated that 80 % of all human bacterial infections are biofilm-associated. Additionally, 50 % of all nosocomial infections are associated with indwelling devices. Bloodstream infections account for 30-40 % of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock, and are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of bloodstream infections must be performed promptly so that adequate antimicrobial therapy can be started and patient outcome improved. An ideal diagnostic technology would identify the infecting organism(s) in a timely manner, so that appropriate pathogen-driven therapy could begin promptly. Unfortunately, despite the essential information it provides, blood culture, the gold standard, largely fails in this purpose because time is lost waiting for bacterial or fungal growth. This work presents a new design of a venous access port that allows the monitoring of the inner reservoir surface by means of an impedimetric biosensor. An ad-hoc electronic system was designed to manage the sensor and to allow communication with the external receiver. Historic data recorded and stored in the device was used as the reference value for the detection of bacterial biofilm. The RF communication system sends an alarm signal to the external receiver when a microbial colonization of the port occurs. The successful in vitro analysis of the biosensor, the electronics and the antenna of the new indwelling device prototype are shown. The experimental conditions were selected in each case as the closest to the clinical working conditions for the smart central venous catheter (SCVC) testing. The results of this work allow a new generation of this kind of device that could potentially provide more efficient treatments for catheter-related infections. PMID:24515846

  8. Nontraumatic vascular emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute venous occlusion.

    PubMed

    Haage, Patrick; Krings, Timo; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Risk factors for acute venous occlusion range from prolonged immobilization to hypercoagulability syndromes, trauma, and malignancy. The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of acute venous occlusion and to assess the value of interventional strategies for venous thrombosis treatment in an emergency setting.First, diagnosis and treatment of the most common form of venous occlusion, at the level of the lower extremities, is presented, followed by pelvic vein and inferior vena cava occlusion, mesenteric venous thrombosis, upper extremity occlusion, acute cerebral vein thrombosis, and finally acute venous occlusion of hemodialysis access.In acute venous occlusion of the lower extremity phlebography is still the reference gold standard. Presently, duplex ultrasound with manual compression is the most sensitive and specific noninvasive test. Limitations of ultrasonography include isolated distal calf vein occlusion, obesity, and patients with lower extremity edema. If sonography is nondiagnostic, venography should be considered. Magnetic resonance venography can differentiate an acute occlusion from chronic thrombus, but because of its high cost and limited availability, it is not yet used for the routine diagnosis of lower extremity venous occlusion only. Regarding interventional treatment, catheter-directed thrombolysis can be applied to dissolve thrombus in charily selected patients with symptomatic occlusion and no contraindications to therapy. Acute occlusion of the pelvic veins and the inferior vena cava, often due to extension from the femoropopliteal system, represents a major risk for pulmonary embolism. Color flow Doppler imaging is often limited owing to obesity and bowel gas. Venography has long been considered the gold standard for identifying proximal venous occlusion. Both CT scanning and MR imaging, however, can even more accurately diagnose acute pelvis vein or inferior vena cava occlusion. MRI is preferred because it is noninvasive, does not require contrast agent, carries no exposure to ionizing radiation, and is highly accurate and reproducible. Apart from catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy has proven to be a quick and safe treatment modality by enabling the recanalization of thrombotic occlusions in conjunction with minimal invasiveness and a low bleeding risk. Mechanical thrombectomy devices should only be used in conjunction with a temporary cava filter.Contrast-enhanced CT is at present considered the examination of choice for acute mesenteric vein occlusion which has mortality rates as high as 80%. Patients with proven acute mesenteric venous occlusion and contraindications to surgical therapy and no identified bleeding disposition without looming bowel ischemia or infarction are possible contenders to the less invasive percutaneous approach either by (in)direct thrombolysis or mechanical means. Ultrasonography is the primary imaging modality for the diagnosis of upper extremity thrombosis. Computed tomography and MRI are in addition helpful in diagnosing central chest vein occlusions. The interventionalist is rarely involved in the treatment of this entity. Catheter-directed thrombolysis is known to improve lysis rates. Together with balloon angioplasty good results have been obtained. If stenosis or thrombus remains after thrombolysis and angioplasty, stent placement should follow. Within the first two weeks, thrombosed dural sinus and cerebral venous vessels are typically hyperdense on CT compared with brain parenchyma; after the course of 2 weeks, the thrombus will become isodense. In MRI an axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence, an axial diffusion-weighted MRI, coronal T1-weighted spin-echo and T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences, a coronal gradient-echo and a 3D phase-contrast venous angiogram should be performed. Local thrombolysis is needed only when patients have an exacerbation of clinical symptoms or imaging signs of worsening disease despite sufficient anticoagulation therapy. Acute occlusions of dialysialysis grafts and fistulae are a frequently encountered complication. Among the various methods described for acute occlusion screening, ultrasonography and MRI have been proven to be accurate and noninvasive; however, if immediate treatment can be anticipated, imaging should be performed directly by digital subtraction angiography before the percutaneous intervention. Initial percutaneous thrombectomy is very effective with success rates and patency rates comparable to those of surgical thrombectomy. A short thrombosis can be treated with balloon angioplasty alone, whereas an extensive thrombosis requires a combination of mechanical devices and/or thrombolytic agents with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. PMID:12386751

  9. Adherence of staphylococci to intravascular catheters.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, K G

    1989-04-01

    Adherence of seven strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis and three strains of S. aureus to three types of intravascular catheters was assessed by ATP bioluminescence, by culture after ultrasonication and by scanning electronmicroscopy. The catheter materials studied were silicone elastomer, thermoplastic polyurethane and polyurethane coated with Hydromer, a coating which absorbs water and provides a hydrophilic sheath around the catheter. The adherence assays were performed in phosphate-buffered saline on a rotary shaker at 37 degrees C, with the catheters precoated with serum and uncoated, and the results were correlated with bacterial hydrophobicity. There was wide strain-to-strain variation in bacterial adherence; S. aureus and slime-producing S. epidermidis strains adhered better than did non-slime-producing strains. Overall, there was less bacterial adherence to Hydromer-coated catheters than to polyurethane and silicone catheters but it was unrelated to bacterial hydrophobicity. Serum coating of catheters resulted in marked reduction of bacterial adherence. PMID:2704036

  10. Neurological recovery after coma related to diffuse cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Interest in thrombi-aspiration with Penumbra system

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerome; Dousset, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We report a young man with a history of deep coma secondary to an extensive superior sagittal sinus thrombosis despite full systemic anticoagulation. Endovascular treatment combining a 5 Max ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) and Solitaire (Covidien) retrieval device permitted revascularization of the superior sagittal sinus with restoration of anterograde venous flow. This treatment led to the disappearance of cytotoxic edema on MRI and to a neurological improvement with a modified Rankin scale score of 2 after two months. Our experience shows that this technique provides a useful and safe tool after failure of anticoagulation in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:25943847

  11. Inaccuracy of Venous Point-of-Care Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Adriano José; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; de Almeida, Francisca Pereira; Deliberato, Rodrigo Octávio; Lobato, Michelle dos Santos; Akamine, Nelson; Silva, Eliézer; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current guidelines and consensus recommend arterial and venous samples as equally acceptable for blood glucose assessment in point-of-care devices, but there is limited evidence to support this recommendation. We evaluated the accuracy of two devices for bedside point-of-care blood glucose measurements using arterial, fingerstick and catheter venous blood samples in ICU patients, and assessed which factors could impair their accuracy. Methods 145 patients from a 41-bed adult mixed-ICU, in a tertiary care hospital were prospectively enrolled. Fingerstick, central venous (catheter) and arterial blood (indwelling catheter) samples were simultaneously collected, once per patient. Arterial measurements obtained with Precision PCx, and arterial, fingerstick and venous measurements obtained with Accu-chek Advantage II were compared to arterial central lab measurements. Agreement between point-of-care and laboratory measurements were evaluated with Bland-Altman, and multiple linear regression models were used to investigate interference of associated factors. Results Mean difference between Accu-chek arterial samples versus central lab was 10.7 mg/dL (95% LA -21.3 to 42.7 mg/dL), and between Precision PCx versus central lab was 18.6 mg/dL (95% LA -12.6 to 49.5 mg/dL). Accu-chek fingerstick versus central lab arterial samples presented a similar bias (10.0 mg/dL) but a wider 95% LA (-31.8 to 51.8 mg/dL). Agreement between venous samples with arterial central lab was the poorest (mean bias 15.1 mg/dL; 95% LA -51.7 to 81.9). Hyperglycemia, low hematocrit, and acidosis were associated with larger differences between arterial and venous blood measurements with the two glucometers and central lab. Vasopressor administration was associated with increased error for fingerstick measurements. Conclusions Sampling from central venous catheters should not be used for glycemic control in ICU patients. In addition, reliability of the two evaluated glucometers was insufficient. Error with Accu-chek Advantage II increases mostly with central venous samples. Hyperglycemia, lower hematocrit, acidosis, and vasopressor administration increase measurement error. PMID:26067093

  12. [Venous thromboembolism and cancer].

    PubMed

    Meyer, G

    2014-01-01

    Incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high in patients with cancer and varies with the type, the stage and the histologic type of the cancer but also with some anticancer therapies and patient related risk factors. Therapeutic trials on long-term prophylaxis have not provided convincing results. In patients with established VTE, the risk of recurrence and bleeding is high. Although prolonged treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is more efficient than vitamin K antagonists in patients with VTE and cancer, it is already associated with a risk of recurrence which is much higher than in non-cancer patients. The nature of the treatment to be administered after the initial six months, which is often required in this context and the treatment of recurrent VTE during anticoagulant treatment are still debated. Some long-standing data suggest that LMWH could play an adjuvant role as specific anticancer treatment. These data have still not been confirmed in clinical trials but several studies in different cancer types are ongoing. PMID:24566034

  13. [Assessment of diagnostic methods for the catheter-related bloodstream infections in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Ataman Hatipoğlu, Ciğdem; Ipekkan, Korhan; Oral, Behiç; Onde, Ufuk; Bulut, Cemal; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2011-01-01

    The majority of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are associated with central venous catheters (CVCs) and most of them develop in patients staying at intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to assess the performance of different methods for the diagnosis of CR-BSI in neurology and neurosurgery ICUs of our hospital. This prospective study was carried out between January 2007 and January 2008 and all of the patients were followed daily for CR-BSI after the insertion of CVCs. Blood cultures were taken simultaneously from the catheter lumen and from at least one peripheral vein when there was a suspicion of CR-BSI. Additionally, from patients whose CVCs were removed, catheter tip cultures were taken and from patients with exit site infection, cultures of the skin surrounding the catheter entrance were taken. Catheter tip cultures were done by using quantitative and semiquantitative culture methods. Blood cultures taken from the catheter lumen and peripheral vein were incubated in the BACTEC 9050 (Becton Dickinson, USA) automated blood culture system. Gram and acridine orange (AO) staining were used for the smears prepared from the catheter tips and blood cultures. To evaluate the value of culture and staining methods in the diagnosis of CR-BSI; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) of each method were determined. A total of 148 patients (66 male, 82 female; age range: 1-94 years, mean age: 58.7 ± 21.8 years) were included in the study, of whom 67 (45.3%) were from neurology and 81 (54.7%) were from neurosurgery ICUs. One hundred ninety-nine CVC application performed in 148 patients were evaluated. Mean duration of catheterization was 8.5 ± 5.2 days. Thirty-two episodes of CR-BSI among 199 catheterizations (16%) in 29 patients among a total of 148 patients (19.6%) were determined. The most frequently isolated microorganisms were methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (8/32; 25%), penicillin-resistant Enterococcus spp. (8/32; 25%) and Candida albicans (4/32; 12.5%). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPVs of the quantitative and semiquantitative culture methods of the catheter tip and the differential time to positivity (positive result obtained at least two hours earlier in blood cultures drawn through the catheter than the peripheral blood cultures which were taken simultaneously) between blood cultures drawn through the catheter and those drawn from the peripheral vein were 100% for the diagnosis of CR-BSI. Sensitivity and NPV of the isolation method of the same microorganism from blood culture drawn through the catheter and drawn from the peripheral vein were 100%, specificity was 85% and PPV was 88% for the diagnosis of CR-BSI. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPVs of Gram and drawn simultaneously from the peripheral vein and quantitative and semiquantitative cultures of the catheter tip in patients with removed catheter, were important factors in terms of diagnosis of CR-BSI. It was also concluded that AO staining could provide additional benefit in the diagnosis of CR-BSI since it has higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPVs for peripheral blood cultures and catheter tip cultures compared to Gram staining. PMID:21341162

  14. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  15. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Khalid; Arab, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV), which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique. PMID:20668564

  16. Cerebral venous hypertension and blindness: a reversible complication.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, Salvador A; Padberg, Frank T; Turbin, Roger E; Farkas, Jeffrey; Frohman, Larry P

    2005-10-01

    A 57-year-old woman developed blindness during treatment for sarcoidosis-induced end-stage renal disease. An initial renal transplantation failed, and hemoaccess was maintained with multiple central catheters and upper extremity prosthetic arteriovenous grafts. A successful second transplantation eliminated her need for hemodialysis, but a right brachial to internal jugular graft remained patent. Progressive visual loss 2 years after transplantation prompted ophthalmic evaluation which initially revealed unilateral left optic nerve edema and visual loss, ultimately worsening over several months to no light perception in the left eye, 20/60 vision in the right eye, and bilateral papilledema. Arteriography demonstrated cerebral venous hypertension attributed to the functioning hemoaccess graft. Permanent graft occlusion normalized the papilledema, and visual field defects in the right eye and visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye. PMID:16242571

  17. A Life-Threatening Mediastinal Hematoma After Central Venous Port System Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, Janine; Zschokke, Irin; Melcher, Gian A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Mediastinal hematoma Symptoms: Agitation • severe hemodynamic instability • severe respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation • reintubation • thoracic drain Specialty: Surgery Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: We report a case of surgical central venous port system implantation using Seldinger’s technique with a life-threatening mediastinal hematoma due to the perforation of the superior vena cava. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for port implantation. Open access to the cephalic vein and 2 punctures of the right subclavian vein were unsuccessful. Finally, the port catheter could be placed into the superior vena cava using Seldinger’s technique. As blood aspiration via the port catheter was not possible, fluoroscopy was performed, revealing mediastinal contrast extravasation without contrasting the venous system. A new port system could be placed in the correct position without difficulties. After extubation, the patient presented with severe respiratory distress and required consecutive cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reintubation. The CT scan showed a significant hematoma in the lower neck and posterior mediastinum with tracheal compression. We assumed a perforation of the superior vena cava with the tip of the guidewire using Seldinger’s technique. Long-term intensive treatment with prolonged ventilation and tracheotomy was necessary. The port system had to be subsequently explanted due to infection. Conclusions: Mediastinal hematoma is a rare but life-threatening complication associated with central venous catheterization using Seldinger’s technique. Perforation occurs most often during central venous catheterization in critical care. Mediastinal hematoma is an example of a mechanical complication occurring after central venous catheterization, which has been described only a few times in the literature to date. This case highlights the importance of awareness of possible, rare, life-threatening complications during port implantation, mostly performed in multimorbid patients by surgeons in training. PMID:26703924

  18. Detection of emetic activity in the cat by monitoring venous pressure and audio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, A.; Fox, Robert A.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Elfar, S.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the use of audio signals as a simple, noninvasive measure of emetic activity, the relationship between the somatic events and sounds associated with retching and vomiting was studied. Thoracic venous pressure obtained from an implanted external jugular catheter was shown to provide a precise measure of the somatic events associated with retching and vomiting. Changes in thoracic venous pressure monitored through an indwelling external jugular catheter with audio signals, obtained from a microphone located above the animal in a test chamber, were compared. In addition, two independent observers visually monitored emetic episodes. Retching and vomiting were induced by injection of xylazine (0.66mg/kg s.c.), or by motion. A unique audio signal at a frequency of approximately 250 Hz is produced at the time of the negative thoracic venous pressure change associated with retching. Sounds with higher frequencies (around 2500 Hz) occur in conjunction with the positive pressure changes associated with vomiting. These specific signals could be discriminated reliably by individuals reviewing the audio recordings of the sessions. Retching and those emetic episodes associated with positive venous pressure changes were detected accurately by audio monitoring, with 90 percent of retches and 100 percent of emetic episodes correctly identified. Retching was detected more accurately (p is less than .05) by audio monitoring than by direct visual observation. However, with visual observation a few incidents in which stomach contents were expelled in the absence of positive pressure changes or detectable sounds were identified. These data suggest that in emetic situations, the expulsion of stomach contents may be accomplished by more than one neuromuscular system and that audio signals can be used to detect emetic episodes associated with thoracic venous pressure changes.

  19. The Impact of Implementation of Bundle to Reduce Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Ardison, Kym Marcel Martins; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Puga, Marcelo Lourencini; Laus, Ana Maria; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate how control bundles reduce the rate of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs) rates in critically ill patients. Methods This is a prospective before-and-after study designed to evaluate whether a set of control measures (bundle) can help prevent CVC-BSI. The bundles included a checklist that aimed to correct practices related to CVC insertion, manipulation, and maintenance based on guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results We examined 123 checklists before and 155 checklists after implementation of the training program. Compared with the pre-intervention period, CVC-BSI rates decreased. Hand hygiene techniques were used correctly. CVC-BSI incidence was 9.3 and 5.1 per 1,000 catheter-days before and after the training program, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of a bundle and training program effectively reduces CVC-BSI rates. PMID:26491498

  20. Intravenous Catheter-Associated Candidemia due to Candida membranaefaciens: The First Iranian Case.

    PubMed

    Aghili, Seyed Reza; Shokohi, Tahereh; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi Fesharaki, Shirinsadat; Salmanian, Bahar

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of candidemia due to the uncommon non-albicans Candida species appears to be increasing, and certain species such as Candida (C.) membranaefaciens have been reported in some clinical researches. Vascular catheters are considered the likely culprit for the sudden emergence of hospital-acquired candidemia. The identification of C. membranaefaciens can be problematic in clinical practice owing to its phenotypic resemblance to C. guilliermondii. We report the first case of C. membranaefaciens in Iran, which occurred in a 70-year-old woman, who had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We isolated germ-tube negative yeast from both blood culture and central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture on brain-heart infusion agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar plates, and biphasic brain-heart infusion media bottle; it developed smooth, pink colonies on CHROMagar Candida. By using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of theinternal transcribed spacer region of rDNA, we identified C. membranaefaciens. After the removal of the CVC and initiation of Fluconazole treatment, the patient's condition gradually improved and she was discharged from the hospital. The early detection of organisms in the catheter, removal of the catheter, and treatment with anti-fungal antibiotics have an important role in controlling disease and preventing septicemia after CABG. As C. membranaefaciens is an opportunistic Candida species, both clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the factors that confer fast diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:26110010

  1. Intravenous Catheter-Associated Candidemia due to Candida membranaefaciens: The First Iranian Case

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Seyed Reza; Shokohi, Tahereh; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi Fesharaki, Shirinsadat; Salmanian, Bahar

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of candidemia due to the uncommon non-albicans Candida species appears to be increasing, and certain species such as Candida (C.) membranaefaciens have been reported in some clinical researches. Vascular catheters are considered the likely culprit for the sudden emergence of hospital-acquired candidemia. The identification of C. membranaefaciens can be problematic in clinical practice owing to its phenotypic resemblance to C. guilliermondii. We report the first case of C. membranaefaciens in Iran, which occurred in a 70-year-old woman, who had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We isolated germ-tube negative yeast from both blood culture and central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture on brain-heart infusion agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar plates, and biphasic brain-heart infusion media bottle; it developed smooth, pink colonies on CHROMagar Candida. By using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of theinternal transcribed spacer region of rDNA, we identified C. membranaefaciens. After the removal of the CVC and initiation of Fluconazole treatment, the patient's condition gradually improved and she was discharged from the hospital. The early detection of organisms in the catheter, removal of the catheter, and treatment with anti-fungal antibiotics have an important role in controlling disease and preventing septicemia after CABG. As C. membranaefaciens is an opportunistic Candida species, both clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the factors that confer fast diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:26110010

  2. An Organoselenium Compound Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms on Hemodialysis Catheters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phat L.; Lowry, Nathan; Campbell, Thomas; Reid, Ted W.; Webster, Daniel R.; Tobin, Eric; Aslani, Arash; Mosley, Thomas; Dertien, Janet; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of central venous catheters (CVCs) by pathogenic bacteria leads to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). These colonizing bacteria form highly antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequently isolated pathogens in CRBSIs. Impregnating CVC surfaces with antimicrobial agents has various degrees of effectiveness in reducing the incidence of CRBSIs. We recently showed that organoselenium covalently attached to disks as an antibiofilm agent inhibited the development of S. aureus biofilms. In this study, we investigated the ability of an organoselenium coating on hemodialysis catheters (HDCs) to inhibit S. aureus biofilms in vitro and in vivo. S. aureus failed to develop biofilms on HDCs coated with selenocyanatodiacetic acid (SCAA) in either static or flowthrough continuous-culture systems. The SCAA coating also inhibited the development of S. aureus biofilms on HDCs in vivo for 3 days. The SCAA coating was stable and nontoxic to cell culture or animals. This new method for coating the internal and external surfaces of HDCs with SCAA has the potential to prevent catheter-related infections due to S. aureus. PMID:22123688

  3. Which is the easiest and safest technique for central venous access? A retrospective survey of more than 5,400 cases.

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, M; Malerba, M; Carriero, C; Tazza, L; Gui, D

    2000-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the technique for central venous catheterization associated with the lowest complication rate and the highest success rate. In an attempt to better define the easiest and safest venous approach, we have reviewed our 7-year experience with 5479 central venous percutaneous punctures (by Seldinger's technique) for the insertion of short-term (n=2109), medium/long-term (n=2627) catheters, as well as double-lumen, large-bore catheters for hemodialysis and/or hemapheresis (n=743). We have analyzed the incidence of the most frequent in-sertion-related complications by comparing seven different venous approaches: jugular vein, low lateral approach; jugular vein, high lateral approach; jugular vein, low axial approach; subclavian vein, infraclavicular approach; subclavian vein, supraclavicular approach; external jugular vein; femoral vein. The results of our retrospective study suggest that the 'low lateral' approach to the internal jugular vein, as described by Jernigan and modified according to our protocol, appears to be the easiest and safest technique for percutaneous insertion of central venous access, being characterized by the lowest incidence of accidental arte-rial puncture (1.2%) and malposition (0.8%), no pneumothorax, and an extremely low rate of repeated attempts (i.e. more than two punctures before successful cannulation) (3.3%). We advocate the 'low lateral' approach to the internal jugular vein as first-choice technique for venipuncture in both adults and children, for both short-term and long-term central venous percutaneous cannulation. PMID:17638235

  4. Providing effective evidence-based catheter management.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Linda

    Around a quarter of people admitted to hospital are catheterized at some point, however, urinary catheterization can have catastrophic effects on the bladder and a persons ability to regain continence in the future (Patel and Arya, 2001). Although most urinary catheters are used for a short-term period, bladder drainage complications, such as pain or bypassing, can occur (Niël-Weise and van den Broek, 2005). Sometimes, when these problems develop, or if the catheter is expelled, nurses react by changing the catheter, even though this is not necessarily the most appropriate solution. In fact, catheter-related problems provide nurses with the opportunity to evaluate the clinical indications for continued catheterization and to remove catheters that are not clinically indicated. When catheters are clinically indicated, nurses who use an evidence-based approach to diagnose and treat problems provide more effective care and reduce the risk of patient discomfort and recurrent problems. PMID:19373178

  5. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  6. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  7. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton. PMID:17336540

  8. Measurement of Vein Diameter for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) Insertion: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Rebecca; Cummings, Melita; Childs, Jessie; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Grech, Carol; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Choosing an appropriately sized vein reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters. This observational study described the diameters of the brachial, basilic, and cephalic veins and determined the effect of patient factors on vein size. Ultrasound was used to measure the veins of 176 participants. Vein diameter was similar in both arms regardless of hand dominance and side. Patient factors-including greater age, height, and weight, as well as male gender-were associated with increased vein diameter. The basilic vein tended to have the largest diameter statistically. However, this was the case in only 55% of patients. PMID:26339941

  9. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Iain Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  10. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage using a ligated catheter for recurrent catheter obstruction: antireflux technique.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hakuta, Ryunosuke; Ito, Yukiko; Nakata, Ryo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an established procedure for biliary obstruction. However, duodenobiliary or jejunobiliary reflux of the intestinal contents through a PTBD catheter sometimes causes recurrent catheter obstruction or cholangitis. A 64-year-old female patient with a history of choledochojejunostomy was referred to our department with acute cholangitis due to choledochojejunal anastomotic obstruction. Emergent PTBD was performed, but frequent obstructions of the catheter due to the reflux of intestinal contents complicated the post-PTBD course. We therefore introduced a catheter with an antireflux mechanism to prevent jejunobiliary reflux. A commercially available catheter was modified; side holes were made at 1 cm and 5 to 10 cm (1 cm apart) from the tip of the catheter, and the catheter was ligated with a nylon thread just proximal to the first side hole. Using this novel "antireflux PTBD technique," jejunobiliary reflux was prevented successfully, resulting in a longer patency of the catheter. PMID:23560165

  11. Assessment of infants with peripherally inserted central catheters: Part 1. Detecting the most frequently occurring complications.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Janet

    2002-12-01

    Inserting, maintaining, and monitoring vascular access are integral components of neonatal care. Advances in vascular access technology have led to the insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) to provide stable venous access for early and aggressive parenteral nutrition. Medications that are irritating or damaging, or those with a high osmolality or a nonphysiologic pH, can also be safely administered into the central venous system. The need for repeated peripheral intravenous attempts, as well as the associated pain and physiologic instability, are virtually eliminated once a PICC line is placed. Complications related to PICCs may occur at any phase of therapy: during insertion, while indwelling, or after discontinuing the line. The risk factors associated with PICCs are distinctly different from peripheral intravenous lines because of their long dwell time, central placement, and potential to migrate. Part 1 of Focus on the Physical offers a review of the relevant anatomy of the vascular system and a discussion of the appropriate sites for catheter tip placement. Guidelines for a systematic physical assessment, along with recommendations for standardized PICC documentation, are provided. A review of the signs and symptoms of more frequently occurring complications, such as catheter occlusion and bloodstream infections, is presented to enhance awareness of PICC-specific complications in the neonate and to expedite early detection and treatment. Part 2 of this series will focus on systematic assessment for less common complications such as catheter migration, dislodgement, breakage, and thrombosis, as well as the life-threatening complications of pleural and pericardial effusion. PMID:12881943

  12. [Insertion of a fiber optic catheter into the hepatic veins of patients with multiple organ dsfunction syndrome (MODS)].

    PubMed

    Lampert, R; Rudlof, B; Weih, E H; Koepp, A; Brandt, L

    1996-06-01

    As it is the driving force in the development of a multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS), the gastro-intestinal region is at the centre of current discussion. Recently, hepatovenous oximetry has been used increasingly to monitor the relationship between oxygen supply and consumption in the splanchnic system. In the present paper we report an exclusively oximetrically controlled catheterisation procedure that can be carried out at the bedside without the use of imaging procedures. In the inferior vena cava a typical venous oxygen saturation profile can be expected. Near the opening of renal veins there is a peak in venous saturation due to the large extent to which the kidneys partake in the cardiac output and their relatively low oxygen consumption. Correspondingly there is a significant drop in saturation in the area around the opening of the hepatic veins. At the right atrium the oxygen saturation increase again due to admixing of more highly saturated blood from the superior vena cava. Taking these physiological facts into consideration it was attempted to find the opening of the hepatic veins into the inferior vena cava using only continuous in vivo oximetry and to insert a hepatovenous catheter. MATERIAL AND METHODS. In 14 patients with postoperative MODS (Apache II score > or = 20) a fibreoptic pulmonary catheter for the continuous evaluation of oxygen saturation was inserted via the inferior vena cava (entrance through the femoral vein). First the catheter was pushed forward into the wedge position in the usual way. Subsequently it was pulled back up to the region of high renal venous saturation. At this point the catheter, now unblocked, was pushed forward again with gentle twisting motions until a distinct decrease in saturation was reached well below the value of the mixed-venous saturation which can be taken as an indication for having entered the hepatic vein. Using a CO oximeter a slowly aspirated blood specimen was taken from the distal line of the catheter and analysed. The placement of the hepatovenous catheter was verified by radiograph of the abdomen. In most cases the catheter had to be readjusted several times before it reached its final position. RESULTS. Of the 14 patients, 13 showed the saturation course in the inferior vena cava that could theoretically be expected. In 12 patients (85.7%) we succeeded in placing the hepatovenous catheter correctly by applying this procedure. The average depth of insertion of the catheter after final positioning was 57 +/- 4 cm. Initial values of hepatovenous saturation (ShvO2) amounted to an average of 35.1 +/- 9.4%. The minimum value was 19%; the maximum ShvO2 came to 59%. DISCUSSION. With the procedure presented it was possible in 12 of 14 patients to position a hepatovenous catheter oximetrically controlled without further means. A precondition for this is a typical saturation profile of the inferior vena cava, which, however, was not found in one of the patients. A possible explanation for this could be an increased shunt volume in the hepatosplanchnicus area, which can lead to high ShvO2 values. For this reason the opening of the hepatic veins could not be recognized by a decrease in saturation using the oximetric procedure. Placement of a catheter was not possible. Future studies on larger groups of patients will be required to show to what extent monitoring of ShvO2 can lead to an efficient therapy specific for this part of the cardiovascular system in patients with sepsis and MODS. PMID:8767566

  13. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration

    PubMed Central

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications,the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. Methods: This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.7515.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. Conclusion: The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance. PMID:25097505

  14. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization by Means of a TIPS Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Honnef, Dagmar Wingen, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.; Haage, Patrick

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to perform an alternative technique for recanalization of a chronic occlusion of the left brachiocephalic vein that could not be traversed with a guidewire. Restoration of a completely thrombosed left brachiocephalic vein was attempted in a 76-year-old male hemodialysis patient with massive upper inflow obstruction, massive edema of the face, neck, shoulder, and arm, and occlusion of the stented right brachiocephalic vein/superior vena cava. Vessel negotiation with several guidewires and multipurpose catheters proved unsuccessful. The procedure was also non-viable using a long, 21G puncture needle. Puncture of the superior vena cava (SVC) at the distal circumference of the stent in the right brachiocephalic vein/superior vena cava, however, was feasible with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) set under biplanar fluoroscopy using the distal end of the right brachiocephalic vein as a target, followed by balloon dilatation and partial extraction of thrombotic material of the left brachiocephalic vein with a wire basket. Finally, two overlapping stents were deployed to avoid early re-occlusion. Venography demonstrated complete vessel patency with free contrast media flow via the stents into the SVC, which was reconfirmed in follow-up examinations. Immediate clinical improvement was observed. Venous vascular recanalization of chronic venous occlusion by means of a TIPS needle is feasible as a last resort under certain precautions.

  15. Thoracic venous injuries: an imaging and management overview.

    PubMed

    Haq, Aftab A; Restrepo, Carlos S; Lamus, Daniel; Ocazionez-Trujillo, Daniel; Vargas, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Thoracic venous injuries are predominantly attributed to traumatic and iatrogenic causes. Gunshot wounds and knife stabbings make up the vast majority of penetrating trauma whereas motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of blunt trauma to the chest. Iatrogenic injuries, mostly from central venous catheter complications are being described in growing detail. Although these injuries are rare, they pose a diagnostic challenge as their clinical presentation does not substantially differ from that of arterial injury. Furthermore, the highly lethal nature of some of these injuries provides limited literature for review and probably underestimates their true incidence. The widespread use of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has increased the detection rate of these lesions in hemodynamically stable patients that survive the initial traumatic event. In this article, we will discuss and illustrate various causes of injury to each vein and their supporting CT findings while briefly discussing management. The available literature will be reviewed for penetrating, blunt, and iatrogenic injuries to the vena cava, innominate, subclavian, axillary, azygos, and pulmonary veins. PMID:26965007

  16. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch instrument, suprapubic drainage tube, and the suprapubic cannula and trocar. (b) Classification. (1) Class...

  2. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Latchamsetty, Rakesh; Morady, Fred

    2016-04-01

    Strategies and technology related to catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) continue to advance since its inception nearly 20 years ago. Broader selections of patients are now offered ablation with a similar level of procedural outcome and safety standards. It is hoped that improved understanding of the pathophysiologic processes of the initiation and maintenance of AF will refine target selection during ablation and improve long-term procedural efficacy, particularly in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent AF. PMID:26968667

  3. Comparative utility of centrally versus peripherally transduced venous pressure monitoring in the perioperative period in spine surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Bombardieri, Anna Maria; Beckman, James; Shaw, Pamela; Girardi, Federico P.; Ma, Yan; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective To compare central venous pressure (CVP) with peripheral venous pressure (PVP) monitoring during the intraoperative and postoperative periods in patients undergoing spine surgery. Design Prospective observational study. Setting University-affiliated teaching hospital. Patients 35 ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients. Interventions A peripheral catheter in the forearm or hand and a central catheter into the internal jugular vein were placed for PVP and CVP monitoring, respectively. Measurements CVP and PVP values were collected simultaneously and recorded electronically at 5-minute intervals throughout surgery and in the recovey room. The number of attempts for catheter placement, ease of use, maintenance, and interpretation were recorded. Patient comfort, frequency of complications, and cost were analyzed. Main results The correlation coefficient between CVP and PVP was 0.650 in the operating room (P < 0.0001) and 0.388 in the recovery room (P < 0.0001). There was no difference between groups in number of attempts to place either catheter, maintenance, and interpretation with respect to PVP and CVP monitoring in the operating room. In the recovery room, the nurses reported a higher level of difficulty in interpretation of PVP than CVP, but no differences were noted in ease of maintenance. There were no complications related to either central or peripheral catheter placement. Patient comfort and cost efficiency were higher with a peripheral than a central catheter. Conclusion During clinically relevant conditions, there was limited correlation between PVP and CVP in the prone position during surgery and postoperatively in the recovery room. PMID:22999983

  4. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  5. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To carry out a retrospective analysis of patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, and the role of cerebral venous congestion in patient management. Methods. Twenty-five patients were identified with the clinical and imaging diagnosis of acute dural sinus thrombosis. The imaging diagnosis was by magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computed tomography (CT) venography. There was a female predominance with a female to male ratio of 1.5 to 1 (16 women, 9 men). The age range was from 19 to 64 years old with an average age of 37 years. The first 10 patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 64 years old (average 37 years), received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. The remaining 15 patients ranged in age from 19 to 57 years old (average 38 years). They either underwent subsequent thrombectomy after a trial of anticoagulation therapy, or went straight to thrombectomy. These latter 15 patients had initial evidence of cerebral venous congestion, either clinically by severe or worsening symptoms despite anticoagulation therapy, or on initial or subsequent CT or MR imaging. In our experience, the cerebral venous congestion imaging findings included intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. The thrombolytic treatment technique consisted of the advancement of a 6 Fr guiding catheter to the jugular bulb or sigmoid sinus from a transfemoral approach. A microcatheter was then advanced to the proximal portion of the thrombus and then either tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase was injected to prevent clot propagation. A balloon catheter was used to perform thrombectomy since the thrombolytic agents can be injected via the inner lumen with an inflated balloon. The inflated balloon helped to keep the venous flow from washing out the thrombolytic agent, thus facilitating the agent's effect. Results. The first 10 patients received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. Eight of these were diagnosed with dural sinus thrombosis only, and had a stable hospital course without worsening of symptoms. These patients also did not have imaging evidence of cerebral venous congestion. The remaining 2 patients had cerebral edema on the CT scan. One had only a small amount of edema in the right cerebellum, but the other had severe edema in the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic areas. Nine of these patients had a stable hospitalization course and experienced a symptom-free recovery, but 1 died with severe cerebral edema and hemorrhage. Seven of the remaining 15 patients were initially treated with anticoagulation therapy for periods ranging from 2 days to 2 months (average 11 days). These 7 patients were considered to have failed anticoagulation therapy since they had worsening symptoms, and 5 of these had developed hemorrhage on subsequent CT or MR imaging scans. Five of the 7 then underwent thrombectomy with the administration of tPA. Of the remaining 2, 1 underwent thrombectomy alone without the administration of tPA, and the other was given 1 million units of urokinase instead of tPA. Three of these patients had a symptom-free recovery, but 2 had residual left-sided weakness, 1 patient had a minimal gait disturbance, and another patient developed a transverse sinus arteriovenous fistula 7 months after thrombolytic therapy. The remaining 8 patients did not receive anticoagulation therapy, and went straight to treatment with thrombectomy and administration of tPA. All of these presented with worsening clinical symptoms. Six had hemorrhage on their imaging studies, 1 had new edema on a subsequent CT scan, and 1 had edema along with the dural sinus thrombosis, but experienced worsening clinical symptoms consisting of headache and atypical dystonia. Five of these 8 patients experienced a symptom-free recovery, and 3 patients had mild residual weakness. Conclusion. In patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, an indication for thrombectomy or thrombolytic therapy may be the development of cerebral venous congestion which appears to include (1) worsening or severe clinical symptoms, and/or (2) CT or MR imaging findings including intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. It appears that anticoagulation therapy alone is not adequate in patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis when they develop cerebral venous congestion. This may be due to a lack of sufficient collateral flow. Those patients who went straight to thrombectomy because of worsening symptoms, or the imaging findings of cerebral vascular congestion, survived with either a symptom-free recovery or only mild residual neurologic deficit. The patient with evidence of cerebral venous congestion died while on anticoagulation therapy. Thus, the presence of cerebral venous congestion in patients with dural sinus thrombosis, even while on anticoagulation therapy, appears to be an indication for thrombectomy and infusion of thrombolytic agent through a balloon catheter to the site of thrombosis. Our experience suggests that this approach appears to improve the chance of survival, with either a symptom-free recovery or a recovery with only mild residual neurologic deficit.

  6. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters Inserted Through Occluded or Collateral Veins Versus Conventional Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Steven; Chan, Tze Yuan; Bhat, Rammohan; Lam, Kimberly; Narlawar, Ranjeet S.; Cullen, Nicola; Littler, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Tunneled hemodialysis catheters become essential in dialysis access when there is no possibility of using a functioning arteriovenous fistula. Collateral or occluded veins visible on ultrasound are used for puncture and passage of catheters into the central venous system. Chronically occluded veins are crossed with guidewires to allow dilatation and subsequent passage of hemodialysis catheters. We performed a retrospective analysis of patient demographics, comorbidities, procedural complications, functional survival, performance, and history of previous vascular access. The study group was compared with two control groups in which dialysis catheters were inserted either by radiologists in the interventional suite or by clinicians on the wards. Nineteen patients from the study group were compared with same number of patients in both control groups. The mean age of the study group was higher compared with the control groups. There was no significant difference in mean functional survival, infection rates, dialysis pump speeds in the first 2 weeks, and procedural complications between the study group and the controls. The study group had a significantly higher number of previous vascular access interventions, longer dialysis careers, and more comorbidities. Tunneled dialysis catheter placement by way of collateral or occluded veins appears safe and effective. These techniques give the operator further options when faced with patients possessing challenging vascular access. Indeed, there may be a case for preferential use of these veins to keep patent central veins in reserve.

  7. Incidence, risk factors and microbiology of central vascular catheter-related bloodstream infection in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hajjej, Zied; Nasri, Mourad; Sellami, Walid; Gharsallah, Hedi; Labben, Iheb; Ferjani, Mustapha

    2014-03-01

    Although there are many studies about catheter related infection in industrialized countries, very few have analyzed it in emerging countries. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence, microbiological profile and risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in a Tunisian medical intensive care unit. Over eight months (1 January 2012-30 August 2012) a prospective, observational study was performed in an 18-bed medical surgical intensive care unit at Tunis military hospital. Patients who required central venous catheter (CVC) placement for a duration greater than 48 h were included in the study. Two hundred sixty patients, with a total of 482 CVCs were enrolled. The mean duration of catheterization was 9.6 ± 6.2 days. The incidence for CRBSI and catheter colonization (CC) was 2.4 and 9.3 per 1000 catheter days, respectively. Risk factors independently associated with CRBSI were diabetes mellitus, long duration of catheterization, sepsis at insertion and administration of one or more antibiotics before insertion. The mortality rate among the CRBSI group was 21.8%. The predominant microorganisms isolated from CRBSI and CC episodes were Gram negative bacilli. All Gram negative organisms isolated among dead patients in CRBSI group were Extensive Drug Resistant (XDR). In our study the mortality rate among patients with CRBSI was high despite a low incidence of CRBSI. This high rate can be explained by the high-virulent status of Gram negative bacteria involved in CRBSI. PMID:24508422

  8. In vivo quantitative assessment of catheter patency in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Formation of fibrin sleeves around catheter tips is a central factor in catheter failure during chronic implantation, and such tissue growth can occur despite administration of anticoagulants. We developed a novel method for monitoring catheter patency. This method recognizes the progressive nature of catheter occlusion, and tracks this process over time through measurement of changes in catheter resistance to a standardized 1 mL bolus infusion from a pressurized reservoir. Two indirect measures of catheter patency were used: (a) reservoir residual pressure and (b) reservoir discharge time. This method was applied to the study of catheter patency in rats comparing the effect of catheter material (silastic, polyurethane, Microrenathane™), lock solution (heparin, heparin/dexamethasone) and two different cannulation sites (superior vena cava via the external jugular vein, inferior vena cava via the femoral vein). Our findings reveal that application of flexible smaller-size silastic catheters and a dexamethasone lock solution resulted in prolonged catheter patency. Patency could be maintained over nine weeks with the femoral vein catheters, compared with five weeks with the external jugular vein catheters. The current method for measuring catheter patency provides a useful index for the assessment of tissue growth around the catheter tip. The method also provides an objective and quantitative way of comparing changes in catheter patency for different surgical methods and catheter types. Our method improves on the conventional method of assessing catheter occlusion by judging the ability to aspirate from the catheter. PMID:16004684

  9. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Russell K; Hulin, James B; Daniels, Don J

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters. PMID:27034548

  10. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, James B.; Daniels, Don J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters. PMID:27034548

  11. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  12. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  13. [Catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Bodoky, A; Heberer, M; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1985-10-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy is used to a varying extent today. Therefore, the need for nutritional support was evaluated following elective abdominal surgery and compared to experiences with postoperative enteral feeding. Oesophagectomy, total gastrectomy and the Whipple procedure were identified as good indications for catheter jejunostomy, whereas with other types of operation an individual decision is required. PMID:3935397

  14. Audit of catheter urine culture requests.

    PubMed

    Manek, N; Napier Rees, E

    1992-01-01

    An audit to assess the appropriateness of catheter urine culture requests was carried out for a period of one month. The requests were followed up by members of the Infection Control Team at ward level. The laboratory report had no impact on the removal of the catheter in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients, although the reports did aid antibiotic prescribing in symptomatic patients. PMID:1740523

  15. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  16. 21 CFR 880.5200 - Intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intravascular catheter. 880.5200 Section 880.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5200 Intravascular catheter....

  17. 21 CFR 880.5200 - Intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intravascular catheter. 880.5200 Section 880.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5200 Intravascular catheter....

  18. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  19. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  20. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  1. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  2. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  4. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1340 Catheter...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  6. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  7. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  8. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  9. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  10. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  11. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  12. 21 CFR 870.1380 - Catheter stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter stylet. 870.1380 Section 870.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1380 Catheter stylet....

  13. 21 CFR 870.1300 - Catheter cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter cannula. 870.1300 Section 870.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1300 Catheter cannula....

  14. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter....

  15. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  16. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  17. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  18. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  19. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  20. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    Lpez Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; Garca Jbega, Rosa Ma; Garca Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta Garca, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution. PMID:26118204

  1. Congenital anomalies of superior vena cava and their implications in central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Umberto G; Rigamonti, Paolo; Torcia, Pierluca; Mauri, Giovanni; Brunini, Francesca; Rossi, Michele; Gallieni, Maurizio; Cariati, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of superior vena cava (SVC) are generally discovered incidentally during central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, pacemaker electrode placement, and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Persistent left SVC (PLSVC) is a rare (0.3%) anomaly in healthy subjects, usually asymptomatic, but when present and undiagnosed, it may be associated with difficulties and complications of CVC placement. In individuals with congenital heart anomalies, its prevalence may be up to 10 times higher than in the general population.In this perspective, awareness of the importance of the incidental finding of PLSV during CVC placement is crucial. To improve knowledge of this rare but potentially dangerous condition, we describe the embryological origin of SVC, its normal anatomy, and possible congenital anomalies of the venous system and of the heart, including the presence of a right to left cardiac shunt. Diagnosis of PLSVC as well as the clinical complications and technical impact of SVC congenital anomalies for CVC placement are emphasized. PMID:25768048

  2. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  3. Nutcracker syndrome and deep venous thrombosis in a patient with duplicated inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ricardo de Alvarenga; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti; Costa, Renato Fanchiotti; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Sobreira, Marcone Lima; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin

    2016-04-01

    Duplicated inferior vena cava is a rare anomaly, and thrombosis in one or both segments is even less frequent. We present a case of deep venous thrombosis of the left lower limb involving the popliteal, femoral, and iliac veins as well as the left segment of the duplicated vena cava and nutcracker syndrome. After catheter-directed thrombolysis complemented by mechanical thrombolysis, the compromised veins had complete revascularization; the nutcracker syndrome was treated with stent placement, followed by the use of anticoagulants. There was technical success and complete recovery of the patient. PMID:26993872

  4. Microbial inactivation properties of a new antimicrobial/antithrombotic catheter lock solution (citrate/methylene blue/parabens)

    PubMed Central

    Steczko, Janusz; Ash, Stephen R.; Nivens, David E.; Brewer, Lloyd; Winger, Roland K.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Microbial infections are the most serious complications associated with indwelling central venous catheters. A catheter lock solution that is both antibacterial and antithrombotic is needed. The goal of this study was to determine whether a new catheter lock solution containing citrate, methylene blue and parabens has antimicrobial properties against planktonic bacteria and against sessile bacteria within a biofilm. These effects were compared to the antimicrobial properties of heparin at 2500 units/ml. Methods. The tested solution (C/MB/P comprising 7% sodium citrate, 0.05% methylene blue and 0.165% parabens) and individual components were challenged against gram-positive and gram-negative organisms and fungi. Control solutions were heparin with preservatives. Studies included evaluation of eradication of planktonic bacteria and sessile organisms in a biofilm grown on polymeric and glass coupons. Biofilm samples were inspected by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and vital stains. Results. The C/MB/P solution, contrary to heparin, kills most tested planktonic microorganisms within 1 h of incubation. All tested organisms have an MIC of 25% or less of the original concentration of a new catheter lock. Bacteria strains did not develop resistance over more than 40 passages of culture suspensions. The C/MB/P solution is able to kill nearly all sessile bacteria in biofilm growth on plastic or glass discs in 1 h. Microscopic methods demonstrated extensive physical elimination of biofilm deposits from treated coupons. In contrast, heparin had a minimal effect on planktonic or biofilm organisms. Conclusions. The new multicomponent lock solution has strong antimicrobial properties against both planktonic and sessile microorganisms. By comparison, heparin with preservative has weak antibacterial properties against planktonic and biofilm bacteria. The tested catheter lock may have usefulness in preventing bacterial colonization of haemodialysis catheters and diminishing the incidence of catheter-related bacteraemia. PMID:19181762

  5. Pancreas Transplant Venous Thrombosis: Role of Endovascular Interventions for Graft Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Stockland, Andrew H.; Willingham, Darrin L.; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; Grewal, Hani P.; McKinney, J. Mark; Hughes, Christopher B.; Walser, Eric M.

    2009-03-15

    Venous thrombosis of pancreas transplant allografts often leads to graft loss. We evaluated the efficacy of emergent endovascular techniques to salvage thrombosed pancreatic allografts in a series of six patients. Of the 76 pancreas transplants performed between 2002 and 2006, six patients were diagnosed with venous thrombosis on MRI between 2 and 28 days posttransplant (mean, 9 days). Five patients were systemic-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient iliac vein) and one patient was portal-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient superior mesenteric vein). Conventional venography confirmed the diagnosis of venous thrombosis in all patients. One patient was treated with catheter-directed venous thrombolysis and balloon thrombectomy. Another patient was treated with rheolytic thrombectomy alone. The remaining four patients were treated with a combination of these mechanical and thrombolytic techniques. Completion venography revealed >50% clot reduction and resumption of venous drainage in all patients. One patient required additional intervention 16 days later for recurrent thrombosis. Two patients required metal stent placement for anastomotic stenoses or kinks. One patient required pancreatectomy 36 h after attempted salvage secondary to a major hemorrhage and graft necrosis. Two patients recovered pancreatic function initially but lost graft function at 8 and 14 months, respectively, from severe chronic rejection. Patient survival was 100%, long-term graft survival was 50%, rethrombosis rate was 16.6%, and graft loss from rejection was 33%. In conclusion, early recognition and treatment of venous thrombosis after pancreas transplantation has acceptable morbidity and no mortality using short-term endovascular pharmacomechanical therapy.

  6. Anticoagulant therapies versus heparin for the prevention of hemodialysis catheter-related complications: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinrui; Wang, Chang’an; Zhao, Hongfei; Zhang, Jinghua; Ma, Jie; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zou, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Locking of central venous catheters with heparin is an accepted practice to maintain catheter patency between dialysis sessions. However, this practice may cause other adverse reactions. Although many studies suggest benefits of other catheter lock solutions over heparin on these grounds, no consensus has been reached for clinical practice. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of randomized controlled trials (RCT) that compared antimicrobial-containing or citrate-alone catheter lock solutions with heparin alone in patients undergoing hemodialysis with central venous catheters. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from EMBASE, and PubMed were searched for articles published through June 2014. The primary outcomes were catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) and catheter malfunction (CM). The secondary outcomes were bleeding, exit-site infection (ESI), clinical sepsis, and all-cause mortality. Seventeen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed that antimicrobial-containing and citrate-alone lock solutions were superior to heparin for preventing CRB (both P < 0.01). Although antimicrobial-containing lock solutions significantly affected clinical sepsis (P < 0.01), they did not affect ESI, bleeding, or all-cause mortality. Incidence of CM episodes was lower in patients receiving antibiotics + heparin and gentamicin + citrate (both P < 0.05), while other antimicrobial-containing and citrate-alone lock solutions showed no difference. Only citrate-alone lock solutions significantly decreased bleeding and ESI episodes (both P < 0.05). Compared with heparin, antimicrobial-containing lock solutions more effectively prevent CRB and clinical sepsis. Antibiotics + heparin and gentamicin + citrate solutions showing better prevention of CM. Citrate-alone lock solutions result in fewer CRB, bleeding and ESI episodes. PMID:26550111

  7. Impact of Different Vein Catheter Sizes for Mechanical Power Injection in CT: In Vitro Evaluation with Use of a Circulation Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Behrendt, Florian F. Bruners, Philipp; Keil, Sebastian; Plumhans, Cedric; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Stanzel, Sven; Das, Marco; Guenther, Rolf W.; Muehlenbruch, Georg

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different peripheral vein catheter sizes on the injection pressure, flow rate, injection duration, and intravascular contrast enhancement. A flow phantom with a low-pressure venous compartment and a high-pressure arterial compartment simulating physiological circulation parameters was used. High-iodine-concentration contrast medium (370 mg iodine/ml; Ultravist 370) was administered in the venous compartment through peripheral vein catheters of different sizes (14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 G) using a double-head power injector with a pressure limit of 325 psi. The flow rate was set to 5 ml/s, with a total iodine load of 36 g for all protocols. Serial CT scans at the level of the pulmonary artery and the ascending and the descending aorta replica were obtained. The true injection flow rate, injection pressure, injection duration, true contrast material volume, and pressure in the phantom during and after injection were continuously monitored. Time enhancement curves were computed and both pulmonary and aortic peak time and peak enhancement were determined. Using peripheral vein catheters with sizes of 14-20 G, flow rates of approximately 5 ml/s were obtained. During injection through a 22-G catheter the pressure limit was reached and the flow rate was decreased, with a consecutive decreased pulmonary and aortic contrast enhancement compared to the 14- to 20-G catheters. Injection through a 24-G peripheral vein catheter was not possible because of disconnection of the canula due to the high flow rate and pressure. In summary, intravenous catheters with sizes of 14-20 G are suitable for CT angiography using an injection protocol with a high flow rate and a high-iodine-concentration contrast medium.

  8. Comparison of brain tissue and local cerebral venous gas tensions and pH.

    PubMed

    Edelman, G J; Hoffman, W E; Rico, C; Ripper, R

    2000-09-01

    Neurosurgical monitoring devices have recently become available which are capable of measuring cerebral tissue gas tensions and pH. Brain tissue sensors have not been conclusively demonstrated to correlate with other measurements of regional cerebral gas tensions or pH. The present study was undertaken to correlate sensor values for pO2, pCO2 and pH with blood samples taken concurrently from local cerebral veins. Adult mongrel dogs were anesthetized and a craniotomy was performed. A small gyral vein was isolated and cannulated. Adjacent to the venous catheter tip, a Neurotrend brain tissue probe was inserted in an intracortical location. Each subject received a sequence of manipulations in inspired oxygen and end tidal carbon dioxide conditions. Under each experimental condition, samples of arterial and gyral venous blood were obtained and blood gas analysis performed. Concurrent brain probe measurements of tissue pO2, pCO2 and pH were recorded. Statistical analysis determined that local tissue and cerebral venous blood values for pO2, pCO2 and pH were highly correlated (R(s) = 0.62-0.82; p < 0.001). This indicates that there exists a confirmable monotonic relationship between tissue values and conditions in the post-capillary venous bed. Tissue sensors such as the Neurotrend probe can offer reliable trend indications in brain tissue gas tensions and pH. PMID:11045031

  9. Case of cerebral venous thrombosis with unusual venous infarcts.

    PubMed

    Narra, Ramakrishna; Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  10. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  11. Double-lumen arterial balloon catheter technique for Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Albert Ho Yuen; Aw, Grace; Wenderoth, Jason David

    2014-01-01

    Background Dural arteriovenous fistulas are vascular malformations with variable clinical symptoms that range in severity from completely asymptomatic to seizures, dementia, loss of vision and intracranial hemorrhage. Historically, surgical obliteration was the treatment of choice but, more recently, endovascular embolization has become the first-line treatment. The liquid embolic agent Onyx (ethyl vinyl copolymer) has become the agent of choice, but problems with reflux around the delivery microcatheter and inadvertent venous penetration have arisen. Methods and results We present six cases in which the double-lumen balloon microcatheter was used to transarterially embolize dural arteriovenous fistulas via injection of Onyx through the wire lumen. Depending on the individual pathology a venous balloon was also used in some cases. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of these devices are discussed. Conclusions We consider that the use of the double-lumen balloon technique for fistula embolization has the potential for reducing overall procedural times, procedural failures and catheter retention in certain situations. In such cases we would advocate this as a first-line technique. When lower profile, more navigable balloon catheters become available, this may become the standard of care. PMID:23749795

  12. Creation of a Successful Transposed Antecubital Radiocephalic Arteriovenous Fistula in Patient with Known Ipsilateral Modified Radical Mastectomy, Postoperative Radiation, and Proximal Central Venous Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aamna Mahnoor; Khan, Sadia; Tayyarah, Majid

    2016-04-01

    Native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) placement in patients with ipsilateral mastectomy and radiation has been avoided because of concerns regarding central venous outflow obstruction. To our knowledge, only 3 such cases have been reported. We present a patient with bilateral mastectomies and right-sided radiation therapy presenting for vascular access in the setting of multiple failed AVF in her left upper extremity and infected-groin catheter, central catheters, and axillary loop graft. We created and superficialized a radiocephalic AVF in her right upper extremity in the setting of central vein occlusion and robust collaterals which remains patent and has been cannulated successfully. PMID:26802298

  13. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  14. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  15. Tumor seeding from percutaneous biliary catheters.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, W C; Sharp, K W; Weaver, F; Sawyers, J L

    1989-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary decompression has been used since 1973 as a preoperative surgical adjunct in patients with obstructive jaundice. Tumor seeding along the catheter tract is an unusual complication but it occurred recently in one of our patients who had preoperative biliary drainage for four days. Four months after his pancreaticoduodenectomy, a 2-cm nodule developed at the catheter exit site. This nodule was a metastatic focus of adenocarcinoma similar to his pancreatic tumor. He died 1 month later and at autopsy was found to have numerous metastases along the catheter tract. A review of the world literature found 17 other patients with this complication. Thirteen of the 18 total patients had catheters placed for palliation, while 5 patients underwent preoperative drainage before definitive procedures, and 4 of these patients had undergone "curative" resections. Nine of the 18 patients had biliary obstruction from cholangiocarcinoma, while seven patients had primary pancreatic carcinoma. Positioning of the catheter tip above the obstructing tumor and maintaining the catheter for only a short duration before operation (mean 8 days for resected patients, range 2 to 16 days) did not protect against catheter-related tumor seeding. Patients with suspected malignant obstruction of the biliary tract who may have resectable tumors should not undergo routine preoperative biliary decompression. If, on exploration, the tumor is found to be unresectable, then a palliative bypass may be performed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2658881

  16. Groshong catheters: technical aspects and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Campisi, C; Camillucci, L; Campopiano, A; Fanizza, C; Sardonio, A

    2000-01-01

    After thousands of Groshong catheter applications over more than twenty years, the cause of blood withdrawal drawbacks is not yet completely understood. This phenomenon - which is not typical of closed-tip catheters since it is also common in open-tip catheters - in the Groshong catheter is attributed to the valve (ball-valve effect). The aim of this work is to understand the relationship between causes and effects in order to provide clinicians with practical solutions. Out of the 16 catheters examined, we observed no clear correlation among electron microscope ultrastructural analysis, valve closing pressure, intraluminal clots and clinical failures after different implantation times up to a maximum of 36 months. The ultrastructural analysis revealed an optimal no-time-related aspect for internal and external surfaces, while the closing pressure in each case was compatible with the efficiency of the working valve (range 22-36 cmH 2 O). We conclude that the blood withdrawal drawbacks cannot be attributed to a single cause and certainly not to the silicone biostability or directly to the valve. Different studies are suggesting that clinical failures can be the re-sult of several different causes such as slime or clots in the internal catheter surfaces and fibrin sleeve in the external catheter surfaces. These are common causes in open-tip catheters and we believe that the presence of valves on the tip of the Groshong may encourage inferences. Our suggestion is to place the tip of the Groshong catheter in atrium one centimetre after the junction with the vena cava. After the implant, it is possible to remove the causes of drawbacks by strong flushing using a 5-ml syringe and/or postural manoeuvres. PMID:17638221

  17. Pycnogenol in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, P

    2000-06-01

    Forty patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and varices of the legs were selected and double-blindly randomly assigned to a treatment with Pycnogenol (French maritime pine bark extract), 100 mg x 3/day or a placebo for 2 months, according to a double-blind experimental design. The effects of the treatment were evaluated by scoring the symptomatology with a semi-quantitative scale, and the venous blood flow by means of a hand-held Doppler ultrasound. The tolerability was evaluated by recording the adverse effects and by means of hematology and blood chemistry parameters, before and at the end of the treatment. Pycnogenol treatment induced a significant reduction in subcutaneous edema as well as heaviness and pain in the legs, on both after 30 and 60 days, the evaluation time periods. Approximately 60% of patients treated with Pycnogenol(R) experienced a complete disappearance of edema (the most rapidly disappearing symptom) and pain at the end of the treatment, while almost all the patients reported a reduction in leg heaviness which disappeared in approximately 33% of patients. These changes were statistically significant. No effect was observed in the placebo-treated subjects. No effect on the venous blood flow was observed in either of the experimental groups. PMID:10844161

  18. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  20. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2010 (Springer Verlag) and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/yearbook. Further information about the Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/2855. PMID:20236456

  1. Supraclavicular approach of central venous catheter insertion in critical patients in emergency settings: Re-visited

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Gaurav Singh; Chawla, Sonali; Ganguly, Suprio; Cherian, Grace; Tiwari, Akhilesh

    2013-01-01

    The supraclavicular approach was first put into clinical practice in 1965 by Yoffa and is an underused method for gaining central access. It offers several advantages over the conventional infraclavicular approach to the subclavian vein. At the insertion site, the subclavian vein is closer to the skin, and the right-sided approach offers a straighter path into the subclavian vein. Also, this site is often more accessible during CPR and surgical procedures. In patients who are obese, this anatomic area is less distorted and in patient with congestive heart failure and cervical spine instability repositioning is not required. PMID:23833470

  2. The GuideLiner Catheter: A Useful Tool in the Armamentarium of the Interventional Cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Boukhris, Marouane; Azzarelli, Salvatore; Tomasello, Salvatore Davide; Elhadj, Zied Ibn; Marzà, Francesco; Galassi, Alfredo R.

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the clinical setting, a good back-up represents one of the most important conditions to ensure guide wire and balloon advancement and stent delivery. As a “mother and child” system, the GuideLiner catheter (Vascular Solutions Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) provides an extension to the guide catheter with better coaxial alignment and stability. We report two didactic cases showing the usefulness of the GuideLiner device in everyday catheterization laboratory practice. The first case was a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a 71-year-old diabetic man admitted for inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction, related to tight proximal stenosis in a dominant tortuous and calcified left circumflex. The second case was an elective PCI in a 76-year-old man admitted for stable angina (Canadian Cardiovascular Society [CCS] class III), related to focal intra-stent restenosis of a saphenous venous graft to the left anterior descending. In both cases, the GuideLiner catheter provided a good back-up insuring the success of PCI and drug-eluting stents implantation, with a good in-hospital outcome. PMID:26985211

  3. New catheter-pump system for diastolic synchronized coronary sinus retroperfusion.

    PubMed

    Farcot, J C; Barry, M; Bourdarias, J P; Bardet, J; Berdeaux, A; Giudicelli, J F

    1980-01-01

    Coronary retroperfusion with the object of delivering oxygenated blood to the ischemic myocardium might be defined as the process of withdrawing blood from a systemic artery and reinjecting it into the coronary sinus. A diastolic synchronized retroperfusion catheter-pump system is presented and feasibility of achieving retrograde infusion of arterial blood was tested. An autoinflatable bladder catheter was specially designed to compartmentalize the coronary sinus at onset of diastole and insure unidirectional retrograde infusion of arterial blood. Bladder deflation at onset of systole allowed coronary venous drainage. Actuation of the retroperfusion bladder catheter was obtained from an electropneumatic console triggered by the electrocardiogram. In vitro and animal studies indicate that this system converted the natural (steady) arteriovenous shunt flow into an artificially pulsed shunt flow, with maximal positive flow in diastole and trivial negative flow in systole but did not alter absolute magnitude of shunt flow. Thus, diastolic synchronized retroperfusion of arterial blood through the coronary sinus may provide temporary protection from acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:7464721

  4. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  5. PRE-INOCULATION OF URINARY CATHETERS WITH ESCHERICHIA COLI 83972 INHIBITS CATHETER COLONIZATION BY ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS

    PubMed Central

    TRAUTNER, BARBARA W.; DAROUICHE, RABIH O.; HULL, RICHARD A.; HULL, SHEILA; THORNBY, JOHN I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The capacity of a preexisting coating of Escherichia coli 83972 to reduce catheter colonization by Enterococcus faecalis 210 was investigated. Enterococcus was chosen for these trials since it is a common urinary pathogen in patients with an indwelling urinary catheter. Materials and Methods Each experiment tested 3 growth conditions. Group 1 or E. coli plus Enterococcus catheters were exposed to E. coli 83972 for 24 hours and then to Enterococcus for 30 minutes. Group 2 or E. coli alone catheters were incubated in E. coli for 24 hours and then in sterile broth for 30 minutes. Group 3 or Enterococcus alone catheters did not undergo the initial incubation with E. coli before the 30-minute incubation with Enterococcus: All catheters were then incubated in sterile human urine for 24 hours. Catheters were washed with saline and cut into 5, 1 cm. segments. Each segment was sonicated and the sonication fluid was diluted and plated. The results of each of the 5 segments were averaged and the set of experiments was repeated 7 times. Results A preexisting coating of E. coli 83972 reduced catheter colonization by E. faecalis 210 more than 10-fold. Enterococcus alone catheters had a median of 9.7 × 105 enterococci per cm., whereas E. coli plus Enterococcus catheters had a median of 0.38 × 105 enterococci per cm. (p = 0.016). Conclusions Pre-inoculating urinary catheters with E. coli 83972 significantly impedes catheter colonization by Enterococcus: These promising in vitro results prompt the clinical investigation of this particular application of bacterial interference. PMID:11743359

  6. Task-Space Motion Planning of MRI-Actuated Catheters for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a motion planning algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) actuated catheters for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The MRI-actuated catheters is a new robotic catheter concept which utilizes MRI for remote steering and guidance. Magnetic moments generated by a set of coils wound near the tip are used to steer the catheter under MRI scanner magnetic field. The catheter during an ablation procedure is modeled as a constrained robotic manipulator with flexible joints, and the proposed motion-planning algorithm calculates a sequence of magnetic moments based on the manipulator model to move the tip of the catheter along a predefined trajectory on the surface of the left atrium. The difficulties in motion planning of the catheter are due to kinematic redundancy and underactuation. The proposed motion planning algorithm overcomes the challenges by operating in the task space instead of the configuration space. The catheter is then regulated around this nominal trajectory using feedback control to reduce the effect of uncertainties. PMID:25485168

  7. The pulmonary artery catheter: gold standard or redundant relic.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Sherrie

    2005-12-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) technology has changed significantly and use has decreased over the last 20 years. Barriers to use include: (a) increased patient risk with placement; (b) ability to measure similar variables via less invasive measures; (c) increased cost; (d) inaccurate measurement leading to misuse of PAC-derived variables; (e) incorrect interpretation and clinical application; and (f) lack of proven benefit for patient management. Advances in technology have allowed for continuous trending of hemodynamic parameters measured via the PAC. Patient risk is similar to that of central line placement; however risks associated with pulmonary artery infarction and rupture are inherent to the PAC. Less invasive assessment of cardiac output equals that of the PAC, whereas pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and mixed venous oxygen saturation monitoring are unique features of the PAC. Effective use of PAC data will require ongoing standardized education. More studies are needed on the cost-effectiveness of PAC monitoring as well as outcome benefits. Much of the data available from the PAC can be obtained via less invasive methods. However, the PAC continues to be useful in specific situations and remains the gold standard for comparison of new technologies. This paper discusses use of the PAC during the past 2 decades and reviews studies affecting its use in clinical practice. PMID:16387268

  8. Adult Catheter Care and Infection Prevention Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... chlorhexidine solution in 70% alcohol, 70% alcohol or povidone-iodine. 5. Properly clean/disinfect the exit site ... g. sensitivity or allergy), use 70% alcohol or povidone-iodine. 6. Cover the catheter exit site with ...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  11. [Intrathecal misplacement of an interscalene plexus catheter].

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Rogalla, P; Spies, C; Kox, W J; Volk, T

    2005-03-01

    For perioperative anesthesia in a case of shoulder arthroscopy, a continuous interscalene plexus block according to Meier was performed in a 51-year-old female patient. The catheter was placed after stimulator-assisted punction and application of a local anesthetic. A few minutes after a further dose of local anesthetic was given via the catheter, the patient had to be intubated and ventilated with signs of total spinal anesthesia. The cervical CT showed the intrathecal displacement of the catheter, reaching the spinal canal near the root of the 7th spinal nerve. Blind advancement and deep placement increase the risk of an abnormal catheter position. Intraspinal misplacement should be reliably excluded. PMID:15599489

  12. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  15. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  16. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-02-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  17. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Monish S.; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  18. Greece reports prototype intervention with first peripherally inserted central catheter: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou, Evangelos A; Stafylarakis, Emmanuil; Kapritsou, Maria; Mitsos, Aristotelis P; Fotis, Theofanis G; Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Mariolis-Sapsakos, Theodoros; Argyras, Eriphyli; Nomikou, Irini Th; Dimitrakopoulos, Antonios

    2012-09-01

    Placement of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), definitely offers a clear advantage over any other method regarding central venous catheterization. Its ultrasonographic orientation enhances significantly its accuracy, safety and efficacy, making this method extremely comfortable for the patient who can continue his or her therapy even in an outpatient basis. We present the first reported case of a PICCS insertion in Greece, which has been performed by a university-degree nurse. The aim of this review of literature was to present the evolution in nursing practice in Greece. A PICC was inserted in a 77-year-old male patient suffering from a recent chemical pneumonia with a history of Alzheimer's disease. A description of all the technical details of this insertion is reported, focusing on the pros and cons of the method and a thorough review of the history and advances in central venous catheterization throughout the years is also presented. PICCs provide long-term intravenous access and facilitate the delivery of extended antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition. We strongly believe that PICCs are the safest and most effective method of peripherally inserted central venous catheterization. Larger series are necessary to prove the above hypothesis, and they are under construction by our team. PMID:22901447

  19. Drug treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, T R; Scurr, J H; Smith, P D

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of venous insufficiency and venous ulceration has for many years relied on established principles of compression and limb elevation. Drug treatment has been of little benefit. In recent years, a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying skin damage in venous disease has allowed more rational pharmacotherapeutic approaches to be made. This review examines these, with special reference to current theories of the cause of venous ulceration. PMID:2061904

  20. Successful treatment of extensive cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using a combined approach with Penumbra aspiration system and Solitaire FR retrieval device.

    PubMed

    Raychev, Radoslav; Tateshima, Satoshi; Rastogi, Sachin; Balgude, Amit; Yafeh, Banafsheh; Saver, Jeffrey L; Vespa, Paul M; Buitrago, Manuel; Duckwiler, Gary

    2014-06-01

    We present a young woman with rapidly progressive neurologic decline in the setting of malignant cerebral edema due to extensive superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and cortical venous thrombosis despite intravenous heparin administration. Complete revascularization of the occluded sinus was achieved using suction thrombectomy with the 5 max Penumbra catheter in combination with the Solitaire FR clot retrieval device. The successful endovascular treatment halted the progression of her cerebral edema, and the patient eventually had an excellent recovery after prolonged intensive medical therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case describing such a combined mechanical approach for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The clot retrieval properties of the Solitaire device combined with direct aspiration via the newest generation Penumbra catheters may allow more rapid, safe and efficient revascularization than all previously reported endovascular treatments for this potentially devastating condition. PMID:24049112

  1. Successful treatment of extensive cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using a combined approach with Penumbra aspiration system and Solitaire FR retrieval device.

    PubMed

    Raychev, Radoslav; Tateshima, Satoshi; Rastogi, Sachin; Balgude, Amit; Yafeh, Banafsheh; Saver, Jeffrey L; Vespa, Paul M; Buitrago, Manuel; Duckwiler, Gary

    2013-01-01

    We present a young woman with rapidly progressive neurologic decline in the setting of malignant cerebral edema due to extensive superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and cortical venous thrombosis despite intravenous heparin administration. Complete revascularization of the occluded sinus was achieved using suction thrombectomy with the 5 max Penumbra catheter in combination with the Solitaire FR clot retrieval device. The successful endovascular treatment halted the progression of her cerebral edema, and the patient eventually had an excellent recovery after prolonged intensive medical therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case describing such a combined mechanical approach for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The clot retrieval properties of the Solitaire device combined with direct aspiration via the newest generation Penumbra catheters may allow more rapid, safe and efficient revascularization than all previously reported endovascular treatments for this potentially devastating condition. PMID:24022899

  2. Continuous intra-jugular venous blood-gas monitoring with the Paratrend 7 during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Endoh, H; Honda, T; Oohashi, S; Nagata, Y; Shibue, C; Shimoji, K

    2001-08-01

    We measured the accuracy of the continuous intra-vascular blood-gas monitoring system (Paratrend 7, PT7) placed in the jugular venous bulb in 18 adult patients having cardiac or aortic surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After induction of anaesthesia, a PT7 sensor was inserted through a 20-gauge venous catheter into the right jugular venous bulb. Blood samples were drawn from the venous catheter and measured with a blood gas analyser (BGA). Five to eight paired measurements using the PT7 and blood samples were made per patient, and bias and precision were calculated for each patient using the Bland-Altman method. The ranges for the blood sample measurements were: pH 7.12 to 7.59, PCO(2) 3.7 to 9.6 kPa, PO(2) 3.5 to 16.0 kPa, oxygen saturation 40 to 99%, bicarbonate 18.6 to 34.4 mmol l(-1), and base excess -7.8 to 12.5 mmol l(-1). Bias and precision values were 0.014/0.071 for pH, 0/0.90 kPa for PCO(2), and -0.16/1.18 kPa for PO(2). These values were comparable with those previously made on arterial blood. However, precision for oxygen saturation in each patient varied 2.3 to 23.6% (95% CI: 6.3 to 12.9%), which was unsatisfactory for clinical measurements. Deep hypothermia ( approximately 19.6 degrees C) and marked haemodilution ( approximately 13.5%) during CPB did not influence the reliability of the PT7 sensor. Thus, we concluded that continuous intra-jugular venous blood-gas monitoring is clinically feasible using the PT7 and may provide valuable information during CPB. PMID:11493493

  3. Internal and external urinary catheters: a primer for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2008-12-01

    Internal and external urinary catheters are used to manage urinary incontinence and incomplete bladder emptying. Bladder dysfunction cause determines whether short- or long-term catheter use is required which, in turn, determines whether an indwelling, intermittent, or external catheter should be used. The method of catheterization is based on the underlying bladder condition, the goals of treatment, and gender appropriateness. Complications such as infection (eg, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, sepsis) and its related sequelae have been found to be directly related to length of time of catheter use (eg, women are at greater risk for catheter-associated urinary tract infection when an indwelling catheter is in place >2 weeks); thus, catheter use must be medically justified and in the case of an indwelling catheter, involve the shortest period possible to ensure patient safety and regulatory compliance. Some newer catheter systems include coatings to prevent complications; complications specific to indwelling catheter use include obstruction from encrustations, urethral trauma and erosion, bladder stones and bladder cancer, and, in men, epididymitis. Complications from external catheters may occur when skin condition is compromised. Overuse of catheters has reimbursement ramifications. Numerous guidelines reflect the need for the judicious use of urinary catheters, particularly in long-term care patients. Because evidence-based research on long-term use of these devices is lacking, clinicians should use clinical experience when caring for patients with catheters. PMID:19104121

  4. The use of central venous lines in the treatment of chronically ill children.

    PubMed

    Barczykowska, Ewa; Szwed-Kolińska, Marzena; Wróbel-Bania, Agnieszka; Ślusarz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic diseases in children is a special medical problem. Maintaining constant access to the central vascular system is necessary for long-term hemato-oncological and nephrological therapies as well as parenteral nutrition. Providing such access enables chemotherapic treatment, complete parenteral nutrition, long-term antibiotic therapy, hemodialysis, treatment of intensive care unit patients, monitoring blood pressure in the pulmonary artery and stimulation of heart rate in emergency situations as well as treatment of patients suffering from complications, especially when chances of access into peripheral veins are exhausted. Continuous access to the central vascular system is desirable in the treatment of chronically ill children. Insertion of a central venous catheter line eliminates the unnecessary pain and stress to a child patient accompanying injection into peripheral vessels. In order to gain long-term and secure access to the central venous system, respecting the guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention contained in the updated 'Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections' is necessary. PMID:25618129

  5. Optoacoustic measurement of central venous oxygenation for assessment of circulatory shock: clinical study in cardiac surgery patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock is a dangerous medical condition, in which blood flow cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. Currently, its diagnosis and therapy decisions are based on hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases) and mental status of a patient, which all have low specificity. Measurement of mixed or central venous blood oxygenation via catheters is more reliable, but highly invasive and associated with complications. Our previous studies in healthy volunteers demonstrated that optoacoustic systems provide non-invasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific vessels, including central veins. Here we report our first results of a clinical study in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients. We used a medical-grade OPO-based optoacoustic system developed in our laboratory to measure in real time blood oxygenation in the internal jugular vein (IJV) of these patients. A clinical ultrasound imaging system (GE Vivid e) was used for IJV localization. Catheters were placed in the IJV as part of routine care and blood samples taken via the catheters were processed with a CO-oximeter. The optoacoustic oxygenation data were compared to the CO-oximeter readings. Good correlation between the noninvasive and invasive measurements was obtained. The results of these studies suggest that the optoacoustic system can provide accurate, noninvasive measurements of central venous oxygenation that can be used for patients with circulatory shock.

  6. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation < 50% (normal range is 55-75%) correlates with poor clinical outcome. We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation. Recently, we designed and built a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system operating in the near-infrared spectral range for continuous, real-time oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. In this work, we designed and built a novel SSS optoacoustic probe and developed a new algorithm for SSS oxygenation measurement. The SSS signals were measured in healthy volunteers during voluntary hyperventilation, which induced changes in SSS oxygenation. Simultaneously, we measured exhaled carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) using capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  7. [Catheter ablation and the complications].

    PubMed

    Steven, D; van den Bruck, J H; Plenge, T; Lüker, J; Sultan, A

    2015-12-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation has developed into a standard therapy and even in some cases as a first line therapy. This has resulted in a clear increase in the number of procedures in recent years. The published data from experienced centers indicate that the number of complications decreases with increasing experience; however, due to the parallel increase in the number of inexperienced centers, the average complication rate shows a tendency to increase. In the long term this necessitates a reliable quality assurance in order not to leave the choice of the "safe centers" up to the patient. Vascular complications are the most common, which in most cases have an uneventful course and do not necessitate further interventions. Particularly the incidence of ischemic stroke can be well-countered by strict control of periprocedural anticoagulation. The frequency of occurrence of phrenic nerve lesions, which are more common when selecting cryoenergy, can be reduced by stimulation of the phrenic nerve during ablation of the right pulmonary vein. The most feared complication of an atrioesophageal fistula is rare. No data for an effective avoidance of complications are available. A postprocedural therapy with proton pump inhibitors for 4-6 weeks, the intraprocedural measurement of esophageal temperature and reduction of the ablation energy on the posterior wall of the left atrium can possible help to reduce the frequency of complications. PMID:26558906

  8. Saphenous Venous Ablation with Hot Contrast in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Amit Qian Zhong; Kirsch, David; Eissa, Marna; Narra, Pavan; Lopera, Jorge; Espinoza, Carmen G.; Castaneda, Wifrido

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To determine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of thermal ablation of the saphenous vein with hot contrast medium. Methods. Twelve saphenous veins of 6 dogs were percutaneously ablated with hot contrast medium. In all animals, ablation was performed in the vein of one leg, followed by ablation in the contralateral side 1 month later. An occlusion balloon catheter was placed in the infragenicular segment of the saphenous vein via a jugular access to prevent unwanted thermal effects on the non-target segment of the saphenous vein. After inflation of the balloon, 10 ml of hot contrast medium was injected under fluoroscopic control through a sheath placed in the saphenous vein above the ankle. A second 10 ml injection of hot contrast medium was made after 5 min in each vessel. Venographic follow-up of the ablated veins was performed at 1 month (n = 12) and 2 months (n = 6). Results. Follow-up venograms showed that all ablated venous segments were occluded at 1 month. In 6 veins which were followed up to 2 months, 4 (66%) remained occluded, 1 (16%) was partially patent, and the remaining vein (16%) was completely patent. In these latter 2 cases, an inadequate amount of hot contrast was delivered to the lumen due to a closed balloon catheter downstream which did not allow contrast to displace blood within the vessel. Discussion. Hot contrast medium thermal ablation of the saphenous vein appears feasible, safe, and effective in the canine model, provided an adequate amount of embolization agent is used.

  9. Percutaneous Selective Embolectomy using a Fogarty Thru-Lumen Catheter for Pancreas Graft Thrombosis: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Izaki, Kenta Yamaguchi, Masato; Matsumoto, Ippei; Shinzeki, Makoto; Ku, Yonson; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2011-06-15

    A 57-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus underwent simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation. The pancreaticoduodenal graft was implanted in the right iliac fossa. The donor's portal vein was anastomosed to the recipient's inferior vena cava (IVC). Seven days after the surgery, a thrombus was detected in the graft veins. Percutaneous thrombolysis was immediately performed; however, venous congestion was still present. We therefore attempted selective embolectomy using a Fogarty Thru-Lumen Catheter. Thrombi were directed from the graft veins toward the IVC and captured in the IVC filter with complete elimination of the thrombus without any major complications. We present our technique for the successful treatment of pancreas graft thrombosis within a short time period by percutaneous selective embolectomy using a Fogarty Thru-Lumen Catheter.

  10. Improving central line infection rates in the neonatal intensive care unit: Effect of hospital location, site of insertion, and implementation of catheter-associated bloodstream infection protocols

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer J.; Gadepalli, Samir K.; Siddiqui, Sabina M.; Jarboe, Marcus D.; Hirschl, Ronald B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Catheter associated blood stream infections (CABSI) are morbid and expensive for all ages, including neonates. Thus far, the impact of CABSI prevention protocols, such as insertion and maintenance bundles, in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is largely unknown. We hypothesized that lines placed in the operating room (OR) would have a lower infection rate due to established insertion protocols and a more sterile environment. Methods Retrospective chart review of NICU patients who received a percutaneous or tunneled central venous catheter between 2005 and 2012. ECMO cannulas, PICC and umbilical catheters were excluded. Variables of interest included demographics, anatomical site, hospital location, line days, and line infection. Line infection was defined as a positive blood culture drawn through the catheter. Results A total of 368 catheters were placed in 285 NICU patients. Majority of catheters (65.5%) were placed in OR. Saphenous and femoral veins were most common anatomical sites (50.8%). Twenty-eight catheters were infected (7.6%). After adjusting for pre-operative antibiotics, anatomical site, and SNAPPE-II scores, lines placed in OR were three times less likely to become infected (Odds Ratio=0.32, p=0.038). Although implementation of CABSI prevention protocols resulted in statistically significant reductions in infection (Odds Ratio=0.4, p=0.043), lines placed in the OR remained less likely to become infected. Conclusions NICU line infection rates decreased with implementation of CABSI prevention protocols. Despite this implementation, catheters placed in the NICU continued to have higher infection rates. As a result, when patient status allows it, we recommend that central lines in newborns be placed in the operating room. PMID:25783394

  11. Bench-to-bedside review: Challenges of diagnosis, care and prevention of central catheter-related bloodstream infections in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable in modern pediatric medicine. CVCs provide secure vascular access, but are associated with a risk of severe complications, in particular bloodstream infection. We provide a review of the recent literature about the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in children and its prevention. Variations in blood sampling and limitations in blood culturing interfere with accurate and timely diagnosis of CRBSI. Although novel molecular testing methods appear promising in overcoming some of the present diagnostic limitations of conventional blood sampling in children, they still need to solidly prove their accuracy and reliability in clinical practice. Standardized practices of catheter insertion and care remain the cornerstone of CRBSI prevention although their implementation in daily practice may be difficult. Technology such as CVC impregnation or catheter locking with antimicrobial substances has been shown less effective than anticipated. Despite encouraging results in CRBSI prevention among adults, the goal of zero infection in children is still not in range. More high-quality research is needed in the field of prevention, accurate and reliable diagnostic measures and effective treatment of CRBSI in children. PMID:24041298

  12. Aseptic non-touch technique and catheter-related bloodstream infection in children receiving parenteral nutrition at home

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Victoria; Hughes, Anna; Hill, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Parenteral nutrition (PN) at home is an acceptable form of delivering long-term PN for children with intestinal failure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the serious complications of long-term PN and can lead to increasing morbidity and mortality. Using aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) was proven to decrease the incidence of CRBSI in hospital patients. In this study we aimed to review the incidence of CRBSI in children receiving PN at home in our institution using the ANTT and a simplified training programme for parents and carers. Methods We retrospectively collected clinical and microbiological data on all children with intestinal failure (IF) who were on treatment with PN at home under our specialist IF rehabilitation service between November 2012 and November 2013. Results Thirty-five children were included, 16 of whom did not have any infection recorded during the study period. The overall CRBSI rate was 1.3 infections per 1000 line-days, with Staphylococcus being the commonest organism. Twenty-one children did not require catheter change and the overall catheter changes were 1.8 per 1000 line-days. Conclusion In this article, we report a low incidence of CRBSI in a single institution by using the principle of ANTT for accessing central venous catheters combined with a simplified, nurse-led, two-week standardised training programme for parents of children going home on PN. PMID:26279849

  13. Subcutaneous Venous Port Implantation in Patients with Bilateral Breast Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora Arslan, E. Bengi; Cil, Barbaros E.; Geyik, Serdar; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Konan, Ali; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of subcutaneous venous ports implanted in patients with bilateral mastectomies. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital charts and the electronic database of 17 patients with bilateral mastectomies whom had venous port implantation in our interventional radiology suit. A total of 17 ports were implanted to the paramedian (n = 3) and anterolateral (standard; n = 12) chest wall, on the trapezius muscle (n = 1), and to the antecubital fossa (n = 1). The mean age was 48.29 years (range: 35-60 years). The mean time interval from time of surgery to port implantation was 34 months (range: 1-84 months). The mean follow-up time was 15 months (range: 7-39 months). Follow-up parameters and classification of the complications was defined according to the SIR guidelines. No procedure-related complication occurred. A single case of mild late infection was noted and the infection rate was 0.19/1000 catheter days. Infusion chemotherapy administration was still going on in eight patients. Two patients died during the follow-up and four patients were lost after 6 months. Port removal was performed in three patients at follow-up because of the end of treatment. One trapezius port and one paramedian port weres among the removed ports without any problem. Although we have a limited number of patients, port placement to the anterior chest wall, either paramedian or anterolateral, on the trapezius muscle or to the antecubital fossa depending on the extent of the bilateral breast surgeries that can be performed with low complication rates by a careful patient and anatomical location selection by involving the patients in the decision-making process. We believe that patient education and knowledge of possible complications have high importance in follow-up.

  14. Diagnostic Usefulness of Differential Time to Positivity for Catheter-Related Candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Ho; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2014-01-01

    A differential time to positivity (DTP) of ≥120 min is useful for diagnosing catheter-related bacteremia, but data on diagnosing catheter-related candidemia (CRC) in this way are limited. We wished to evaluate the usefulness of the DTP for diagnosing CRC. All adult patients who had the same Candida species isolated from blood cultures drawn simultaneously from a central venous catheter (CVC) and a peripheral vein were included at a tertiary care hospital over an 18-month period. A total of 105 patients with candidemia who had positive simultaneous CVC and peripheral vein blood cultures were included in our study. Sixty-one patients (58%) had CRC (47 definite and 14 probable), and 38 (36%) had candidemia from another source (non-CRC). The remaining 6 patients (6%) with indeterminate candidemia were excluded from the final analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity of a DTP of ≥120 min for diagnosing CRC were 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74% to 93%) and 82% (95% CI, 66% to 92%), respectively, and for neutropenic patients, they were 75% (95% CI, 19% to 99%) and 100% (95% CI, 75% to 100%), respectively. For Candida glabrata infections, the optimal DTP cutoff was ≥6 h, with a sensitivity of 63% (95% CI, 35% to 85%) and a specificity of 75% (95% CI, 35% to 97%). In summary, DTP is useful for diagnosing CRC, and a DTP of ≥120 min appears to be the optimal cutoff except for CRC caused by C. glabrata. For neutropenic patients, DTP may be useful as an adjunct test to rule in CRC and to decide whether a catheter should be removed. PMID:24829236

  15. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a 13-Day-Old Neonate and Review of Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Jawad U.; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Casella, James F.; Streiff, Michael B.; Nwankwo, Ikechi J.; Kim, Hyun S.

    2008-07-15

    Complete inferior vena cava thrombosis (IVC) in neonates is uncommon, but may cause significant morbidity. A 13-day-old neonate suffered IVC thrombosis secondary to antithrombin III deficiency, possibly contributed to by a mutation in the methyl tetrahydrofolate reductase gene. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA, Alteplase) was used successfully to treat extensive venous thrombosis in this neonate without complications. We also review the literature on CDT for treatment of IVC thrombosis in critically ill neonates and infants.

  16. Undersampled Projection Reconstruction for Active Catheter Imaging With Adaptable Temporal Resolution and Catheter-Only Views

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dana C.; Lederman, Robert J.; Dick, Alexander J.; Raman, Venkatesh K.; Guttman, Michael A.; Derbyshire, J. Andrew; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    In this study undersampled projection reconstruction (PR) was used for rapid catheter imaging in the heart, employing steady-state free precession (SSFP) contrast. Active catheters and phased-array coils were used for combined imaging of anatomy and catheter position in swine. Real-time imaging of catheter position was performed with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution, providing 2 × 2 × 8 mm spatial resolution and four to eight frames per second. Two interactive features were introduced. The number of projections (Np) was adjusted interactively to trade off imaging speed and artifact reduction, allowing acquisition of high-quality or high-frame-rate images. Thin-slice imaging was performed, with interactive requests for thick-slab projection images of the signal received solely from the active catheter. Briefly toggling on catheter-only projection images was valuable for verifying that the catheter tip was contained within the selected slice, or for locating the catheter when part of it was outside the selected slice. PMID:12541240

  17. The Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC): Results From a Multispecialty Panel Using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Vineet; Flanders, Scott A; Saint, Sanjay; Woller, Scott C; O'Grady, Naomi P; Safdar, Nasia; Trerotola, Scott O; Saran, Rajiv; Moureau, Nancy; Wiseman, Stephen; Pittiruti, Mauro; Akl, Elie A; Lee, Agnes Y; Courey, Anthony; Swaminathan, Lakshmi; LeDonne, Jack; Becker, Carol; Krein, Sarah L; Bernstein, Steven J

    2015-09-15

    Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has grown substantially in recent years. Increasing use has led to the realization that PICCs are associated with important complications, including thrombosis and infection. Moreover, some PICCs may not be placed for clinically valid reasons. Defining appropriate indications for insertion, maintenance, and care of PICCs is thus important for patient safety. An international panel was convened that applied the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to develop criteria for use of PICCs. After systematic reviews of the literature, scenarios related to PICC use, care, and maintenance were developed according to patient population (for example, general hospitalized, critically ill, cancer, kidney disease), indication for insertion (infusion of peripherally compatible infusates vs. vesicants), and duration of use (≤5 days, 6 to 14 days, 15 to 30 days, or ≥31 days). Within each scenario, appropriateness of PICC use was compared with that of other venous access devices. After review of 665 scenarios, 253 (38%) were rated as appropriate, 124 (19%) as neutral/uncertain, and 288 (43%) as inappropriate. For peripherally compatible infusions, PICC use was rated as inappropriate when the proposed duration of use was 5 or fewer days. Midline catheters and ultrasonography-guided peripheral intravenous catheters were preferred to PICCs for use between 6 and 14 days. In critically ill patients, nontunneled central venous catheters were preferred over PICCs when 14 or fewer days of use were likely. In patients with cancer, PICCs were rated as appropriate for irritant or vesicant infusion, regardless of duration. The panel of experts used a validated method to develop appropriate indications for PICC use across patient populations. These criteria can be used to improve care, inform quality improvement efforts, and advance the safety of medical patients. PMID:26369828

  18. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated. PMID:25978469

  19. Strategies for the control of catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Evans, A; Morris, N; Hughes, G

    2002-06-01

    Two general strategies have been adopted to develop catheter materials that resist encrustaion by bacterial biofilms: (a) the incorporation of antimicrobial agents into the polymers and (b) the production of materials with surface properties which prevent the adherence of bacterial cells. Our experience to develop non-adherent surfaces which abstracts design from nature is reported. Compounds based on 2-methacryloloxyethylphosphorylcholine co-polymerised with long-chain alkyl methacrylates have been produced which have structural and surface properties similar to those of the outer membranes of erythrocytes. These PC-coatings have been applied onto catheter base materials where they produce polar surfaces that are extremely hydrophilic. In experiments using a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder we found that the PC-coatings did not reduce colonisation of latex or silicone catheters by crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm. There were no significant difference between the amounts of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on coated and non-coated catheters. In a further set of experiments the PC-coatings did not significantly increase the mean times for which catheters drained freely. In a parallel clinical study, the performance of PC-coated ureteral stents was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and bacteriological analysis on 44 PC-coated stents that had been implanted in patients for 12-week periods and 28 control stents suggested that the PC-coated devices were less vulnerable to encrustation and colonisation by bacterial biofilm than normal stents. It was of interest that in contrast to encrusted catheters, urease producing species such as P. mirabilis were rarely isolated from the stents. The main organisms colonising the stents were enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that the mechanisms of catheter and stent encrustation may be different and require different strategies for control. PMID:12135840

  20. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  1. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  2. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  3. Heritability of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Andreas; Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 x 10(-13)). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback-Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  4. Central venous access in critically ill patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Parsa, M H; Tabora, F

    1986-11-01

    Several techniques of percutaneous venipuncture and cut-downs for insertion of intravenous catheters and the respective clinical results are described. We believe that puncture of the subclavian vein from above the clavicle in the segment of the veins over the first rib is the safest anatomic approach to the vein. The first rib under the vein shields the pleural dome and the apex of the lung against the needle puncture, and the tip of the needle is directed away from the apex of the lung. Insertion of double and multiple IV catheters in one vein, adjacent veins, or even veins located away from each other is safe and much less costly than the double- and triple-lumen catheters. The special and unconventional venous cut-downs for providing IV access described here in patients with difficult access may be life saving. The experience with vascular access in our institution indicates that supervised training in vascular access and the personal experience of each physician with these techniques and teamwork help to reduce potential complications. PMID:3536436

  5. Continuous monitoring of mixed venous oxygen tension (PvO2) in cardiorespiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R F; Walker, J S; Andrew, D S; Cobbe, S M; Cohen, S L; Lincoln, J C

    1978-03-25

    The development of a miniature polarographic electrode mounted in the tip of a double-lumen plastic catheter has made possible continuous in-vivo monitoring of oxygen tension. Inexpensive catheters of this type have already proved of value as a means of continuously monitoring arterial oxygen tension in the newborn. In 25 patients with acute respiratory failure we found that these catheters could be safely and easily flow-guided into the pulmonary artery. In this way continuous recordings of mixed venous oxygen tension (PvO2) could be made for a period of several days. In our experience a sustained fall of PvO2 below 40 mm Hg proved to be a reliable indicator of respiratory or cardiac deterioration not always obvious by observation. In the patients described, falls of this order were seen after reductions in inspired oxygen concentration, in acute respiratory failure, in accidental underventilation, and in hypovolaemia and cardiac arrythmias. In some very ill patients routine nursing care involving movement of the patient caused pronounced falls of PvO2. Although electrode drift was an occasional problem, this could be checked by intermittent blood-sampling and recalibration if necessary. PMID:76169

  6. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, J W

    1987-12-01

    The two most common indications for long-term catheterization are recalcitrant urinary incontinence and urinary obstruction that is not corrected by surgery. For incontinent patients, if behavioral changes, nursing care, special clothes, special bed clothes, and medications have not been successful, then a device to collect urine must be considered. For men such a device is a condom catheter; for women an analogous external collection device would be very useful. Suprapubic catheterization may offer an alternative but has been inadequately studied in this patient population. Long-term urinary catheterization has salutary effects for selected patients including patient comfort, family satisfaction, and nursing efficiency and effectiveness. To the patient for whom any physical movement is uncomfortable or painful, and indwelling catheter may be preferable to frequent changes of clothes. Similarly, the family of of severely impaired patients may want to accept the risks of urethral catheterization in order to keep the patient dry. Further, to the extent that the indwelling catheter is effective in decubitus ulcer prevention and/or management, long-term catheterization may diminish the risk of bacteremia or death from soft tissue infection. These benefits of long-term urethral catheterization, in addition to its risks, should be examined in future studies. Once a urethral catheter is in place, even with good catheter hygiene, bacterial entry can be postponed only temporarily; eventually all patients become bacteriuric. Indeed, as the catheter remains in place, organisms continue to enter, others leave or die, and the bacteriuria becomes complex, polymicrobial, and dynamic. Some organisms, particularly recognized uropathogens such as E. coli and K. pneumoniae, appear to reside in the urinary tract itself. Others, such as P. mirabilis, P. stuartii, and M. morganii, probably establish a niche within the urinary catheter, thus increasing their ability to cause subsequent bladder bacteriuria. The complications of long-term urinary catheterization include fevers, acute pyelonephritis, and bacteremias (such as seen in short-term catheterized patients), as well as catheter obstructions, urinary stones, chronic renal inflammation, local periurinary infections, vasicoureteral reflux, renal failure, and, for very long-term catheterized patients, bladder cancer. The thrust of catheter care for the long-term catheterized patient is to prevent complications of the omnipresent bacteriuria. Unfortunately, clinical opportunities for preventing complications are limited.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3333661

  7. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  8. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  9. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  10. Insertion of Totally Implantable Central Venous Access Devices by Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyeonjun; Ryu, Chun-Geun; Jung, Eun-Joo; Kang, Hyun Jong; Paik, Jin Hee; Yang, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the results for the insertion of totally implantable central venous access devices (TICVADs) by surgeons. Methods Total 397 patients, in whom TICVADs had been inserted for intravenous chemotherapy between September 2008 and June 2014, were pooled. This procedure was performed under local anesthesia in an operation room. The insertion site for the TICVAD was mainly in the right-side subclavian vein. In the case of breast cancer patients, the subclavian vein opposite the surgical site was used for insertion. Results The 397 patients included 73 males and 324 females. Primary malignant tumors were mainly colorectal and breast cancer. The mean operation time was 54 minutes (18-276 minutes). Operation-related complications occurred in 33 cases (8.3%). Early complications developed in 15 cases with catheter malposition and puncture failure. Late complications, which developed after 24 hours, included inflammation in 6 cases, skin necrosis in 6 cases, hematoma in 3 cases, port malfunction in 1 case, port migration in 1 case, and intractable pain at the port site in 1 case. Conclusion Insertion of a TICVAD under local anesthesia by a surgeon is a relatively safe procedure. Meticulous undermining of the skin and carefully managing the TICVAD could minimize complications. PMID:25960974

  11. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  12. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  13. Venous anatomy of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Matloub, H S; Strathy, K M; Sanger, J R; Yousif, N J

    1991-11-01

    The venous anatomy of 20 thumbs (10 pairs) was detailed by latex injection. The thumbs were studied on the dorsal, palmar, radial, and ulnar surfaces. Characteristic patterns were found; these included a dominant longitudinal network, palmar veins within the pulp, oblique veins at the interphalangeal joint on the radial side, and a web space vein. A layered vascular pattern with a superficial fine network overlying a deeper system was noted. Cross sections were taken at the metacarpophalangeal joint and at the proximal and distal phalanges. The distribution of the vessels in cross section reveals consistent dorsal veins at all levels, as well as palmar veins distal to the interphalangeal joint in all thumbs. Palmar veins were present over the length of the proximal phalanx in more than 65% of the thumbs. PMID:1748753

  14. Proteus mirabilis biofilms and the encrustation of urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Ganderton, L; King, J; Nettleton, J; Winters, C

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were observed on 69 of 75 catheters taken from patients undergoing long-term bladder management. Ten catheters were colonized by pure cultures of Proteus mirabilis. In each of these cases the bacteria formed layers on the catheter surface, underlying encrustations of struvite and hydroxyapatite which partially or completely occluded the catheter lumen. Encrustation was also apparent on catheters colonized by P. mirabilis plus other species, but was rarely seen on catheters colonized by non-urease-producing species. These observations support the hypothesis that catheter encrustation is brought about by the activity of urease-producing biofilms and confirms that the main target in the control of catheter encrustation should be P. mirabilis. PMID:8171763

  15. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  16. Upper Body Venous Compliance Exceeds Lower Body Venous Compliance in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Human venous compliance hypothetically decreases from upper to lower body as a mechanism for maintenance of the hydrostatic indifference level 'headward' in the body, near the heart. This maintains cardiac filling pressure, and thus cardiac output and cerebral perfusion, during orthostasis. This project entailed four steps. First, acute whole-body tilting was employed to alter human calf and neck venous volumes. Subjects were tilted on a tilt table equipped with a footplate as follows: 90 deg, 53 deg, 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg, -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 53 deg, and 90 deg. Tilt angles were held for 30 sec each, with 10 sec transitions between angles. Neck volume increased and calf volume decreased during head-down tilting, and the opposite occurred during head-up tilt. Second, I sought to cross-validate Katkov and Chestukhin's (1980) measurements of human leg and neck venous pressures during whole-body tilting, so that those data could be used with volume data from the present study to calculate calf and neck venous compliance (compliance = (Delta)volume/(Delta)pressure). Direct measurements of venous pressures during postural chances and whole-body tilting confirmed that the local changes in venous pressures seen by Katkov and Chestukhin (1980) are valid. The present data also confirmed that gravitational changes in calf venous pressure substantially exceed those changes in upper body venous pressure. Third, the volume and pressure data above were used to find that human neck venous compliance exceeds calf venous compliance by a factor of 6, thereby upholding the primary hypothesis. Also, calf and neck venous compliance correlated significantly with each other (r(exp 2) = 0.56). Fourth, I wished to determine whether human calf muscle activation during head-up tilt reduces calf venous compliance. Findings from tilting and from supine assessments of relaxed calf venous compliance were similar, indicating that tilt-induced muscle activation is relatively unimportant. Low calf venous compliance probably results from stiffer venous, skeletal muscle, and connective tissues, and better-developed local and central neural controls of venous distensibility. This research establishes that upper-to-lower body reduction of venous compliance can explain headward positioning of the hydrostatic indifference level in humans.

  17. Direct puncture angiography in congenital venous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Boxt, L.M.; Levin, D.C.; Fellows, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Angiodysplasia of the extremities is a broad group of vascular lesions of arterial, capillary, and venous origin. They are generally detected initially during late childhood or early adulthood. Although they may cause swelling and pain, they are often asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on physical examination performed for other reasons. One of the most troublesome diagnostic aspects of these lesions is the fact that while they consist of enlarged venous channels, standard venographic techniques may fail to demonstrate them. Three cases are described in which the diagnosis of venous angioma was made by direct needle puncture and contrast material injection, after arteriographic and/or venographic examination was either negative or nondiagnostic.

  18. Measurement of venous compliance (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirsk, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    The prime objective of this International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) investigation is to measure the bulk compliance (distensibility) of the veins in the lower leg before, during, and after spaceflight. It is of particular interest whether venous compliance over the range of both positive and negative transmural pressures (various states of venous distention and collapse) changes throughout the duration of spaceflight. Information concerning the occurrence and character of compliance changes could have implications for the design of improved antigravity suits and further the understanding of inflight and postflight venous hemodynamics.

  19. Tractional venous loops in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hersh, P S; Green, W R; Thomas, J V

    1981-11-01

    A venous loop developed in a patient with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Fluorescein angiography showed staining of the vessel wall and nonperfusion of the surrounding capillary bed. Light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed the loop to consist of a telangiectatic retinal vein that had passed through a discontinuity in the internal limiting membrane. The thin-walled vessel loop was lined by an attenuated endothelium and occasional pericytes. The vitreous was detached posteriorly except at the venous loop and a few other points at which there was tenting of the internal limiting membrane. These findings suggested that vitreous traction plays a role in the pathogenesis of these venous loops. PMID:7304693

  20. A district urinary catheter policy. Why have one?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T. F.; Robinson, E.; Payne, S. R.; Robinson, E.

    1994-01-01

    A catheter audit was performed at the Central Manchester Trust, which found that there was excessive ordering, inappropriate catheter selection by size, materials, balloon size and poor guidelines on catheter storage. From these findings and from the available literature, we have proposed guidelines on catheter selection with the aim of offering the best patient care and to provide cost efficiency which may be of benefit to other hospitals. PMID:8017814

  1. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains. PMID:25658932

  2. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Iain; Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation. PMID:26229681

  3. Indications for peripheral, midline and central catheters: summary of the MAGIC recommendations.

    PubMed

    Moureau, Nancy; Chopra, Vineet

    2016-04-28

    Patients admitted to acute care frequently require intravenous access to effectively deliver medications and prescribed treatment. For patients with difficult intravenous access, those requiring multiple attempts, those who are obese, or have diabetes or other chronic conditions, determining the vascular access device (VAD) with the lowest risk that best meets the needs of the treatment plan can be confusing. Selection of a VAD should be based on specific indications for that device. In the clinical setting, requests for central venous access devices are frequently precipitated simply by failure to establish peripheral access. Selection of the most appropriate VAD is necessary to avoid the potentially serious complications of infection and/or thrombosis. An international panel of experts convened to establish a guide for indications and appropriate usage for VADs. This publication summarises the work and recommendations of the panel for the Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC). PMID:27126759

  4. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Iain; Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation. PMID:26229681

  5. Asian venous thromboembolism guidelines: prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Liew, N C; Chang, Y H; Choi, G; Chu, P H; Gao, X; Gibbs, H; Ho, C O; Ibrahim, H; Kim, T K; Kritpracha, B; Lee, L H; Lee, L; Lee, W Y; Li, Y J; Nicolaides, A N; Oh, D; Pratama, D; Ramakrishnan, N; Robless, P A; Villarama-Alemany, G; Wong, R

    2012-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis is under-utilized in Asia because of the misconception that its incidence is lower in Asians as compared to the Caucasians. The available data on VTE in Asia is limited due to the lack of well-designed multicenter randomized controlled trials as well as non-standardized research designs, making data comparison difficult. Emerging data indicates that the VTE incidence is not low in Asia, and is comparable to that reported in the Western literature in some instances. There is also a trend towards increasing incidence of VTE, as demonstrated by a number of hospital-based studies in Asia. This could be attributed to lifestyle changes, ageing population, increasing awareness of VTE and wider availability of Duplex ultrasound. The risk of VTE in hospitalized patients remain the same in Asians and Caucasians, even though there may be factors that are inherent to patients in Asia that influence the slight variation in incidence. The utilization rate of VTE prophylaxis remains suboptimal in Asia. The Asian Venous Thrombosis Forum (AVTF) comprises participants from various countries such as China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and experts from Australia and Europe. The forum evaluated the available data on VTE from the Asian region and formulated guidelines tailored to meet the needs of the region. We recommend that serious considerations are given to VTE prophylaxis especially in the at-risk group and a formal hospital policy be established to facilitate the implementation. On admission to the hospital, we recommend assessing the patients for both VTE and bleeding risk. We recommend mechanical prophylaxis for patients at increased risk of bleeding and utilizing it as an adjunctive measure in combination with pharmacological prophylaxis in patients with high risk of VTE. For patients undergoing general or gynecological surgery and with moderate risk for VTE, we recommend prophylaxis with one of the following: low dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux or intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC). For the same group of patients at high risk of VTE, we recommend pharmacological or combination of pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis. For patients undergoing major orthopedic surgeries like total hip replacement, total knee replacement and proximal hip fracture surgery, we recommend using one of the following: LMWH, fondaparinux, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, dabigatran, warfarin or aspirin with IPC. For patients admitted to the hospital with acute medical illness and has moderate risk of VTE, we recommend prophylaxis with LDUH, LMWH or Fondaparinux. For the same group at high risk of VTE, we recommend combination of pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis. PMID:23222928

  6. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  10. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290 Section 870.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  18. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  19. Hemodialysis catheter infection with unusual presentation and grave outcome.

    PubMed

    Gabaldon, Darlene; Xu, Zhi; Sun, Yijuan; Servilla, Karen S; Hartshorne, Michael F; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2011-10-01

    Bacteremia from central venous catheter (CVC) infection causes morbidity and mortality in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Diagnosis of the infection can be difficult and may require special imaging. A 70-year-old man with diabetic nephropathy was on HD for 11 months through a permanent CVC. Because of symptomatic osteoporosis, he had kyphoplasty in three lumbar vertebrae (L2, L3, L4) 6 months after starting HD. Severe back pain persisted after kyphoplasty. Throughout the HD period, the exit site of the CVC had a clean appearance, there was no fever, and blood leukocyte counts were normal. During the 11th month of HD, he complained of subjective fever at home. Blood count revealed normal leukocyte count with neutrophilic predominance and blood cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Echocardiogram revealed no heart valve vegetations, but irregular thickening of the CVC wall. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) revealed severe inflammation of the CVC wall and a picture consistent with osteomyelitis and severe destruction of the body of the 11th thoracic vertebra. He was treated with intravenous vancomycin and removal of the CVC, the wall of which was grossly inflamed and grew in culture MRSA. Three weeks later, he discontinued HD because of persistent severe back pain. CVC infection with bacteremia and remote infectious foci having grave sequelae can develop in HD patients with paucity of clinical manifestations. FDG-PET-CT is a useful imaging tool in establishing the presence and extent of both the CVC infection and remote metastatic infectious foci. PMID:22111828

  20. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  1. [Drug administration through enteral feeding catheters].

    PubMed

    Goñi Viguria, R; Sánchez Sanz, L; Asiain Erro, M; Baztán Indave, A

    2001-01-01

    Because of easiness and accessibility, the oral route of administration is usually the route of choice for medication delivery, as long as the oral drug form is available and the patients' circumstances allow it.In patients admitted to the intensive care unit this route is frequently altered. This provokes difficulties in swallowing and consequently an enteral feeding catheter must be inserted to supply the patient's nutritional requirements. This catheter is also used for the drug administration, which necessitates opening capsules or crushing pills before dilution. When added to drug-nutrient interactions, this process alters the drug's properties and modifies its pharmacokinetic profile, its pharmacological effect and the intensity of side effects. It can also provoke catheter obstruction. The aim of this study was to establish guidelines for drug administration through enteral feeding catheters. We provide a thorough review of the literature, describe oral drug forms, present a protocol for correct drug administration and provide a guide to the most commonly used drugs in our unit. For each of these drugs we include recommendations on administration and possible alternatives. PMID:11459545

  2. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1250 Percutaneous...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1250 Percutaneous...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  6. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. Long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Cecilia; Manina, Giorgia

    2014-05-01

    Long term treatment of venous thromboembolism is essential to complete therapy of the index episode and to reduce recurrences. Vitamin K antagonists are the mainstay for the long term treatment of venous thromboembolism for the majority of the patients as they allow oral administration. Low-molecular weight heparins are recommended for the long term treatment of cancer patients. The duration of long term anticoagulation depends on the features of the index venous thromboembolism and on the presence of associated risk factors. Patients at high risk for recurrence - mainly those who suffered unprovoked venous thromboembolism and those with cancer - should be evaluated for extended anticoagulation. The risk for major bleeding complications and the inconvenience for monitoring, dose adjustment and drug-food interactions are the main constraints for indefinite anticoagulant treatment. New anticoagulants with more favourable efficacy- safety profile and reduced need for monitoring could improve the feasibility of extended anticoagulation. PMID:24846227

  11. Debate: whether venous perforator surgery reduces recurrences.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Mark S; O'Donnell, Thomas F

    2014-09-01

    Superficial venous surgery and perforator vein surgery, specifically, have a long and varied history in the evolution of vascular surgery, especially because venous disease continues to be extremely common. As with other areas of our specialty, perforator vein procedures have progressed from being purely open operations to becoming less invasive procedures. Despite this, there remains much discussion (as well as overt disagreement) about whether perforator vein surgery is actually appropriate and beneficial in the first place. Surgeons have no level I evidence from randomized controlled studies to determine whether perforator vein surgery does or does not reduce the chances of recurrence of superficial venous varicosities, so we must rely on the evidence as it currently is. Perhaps not surprisingly, our two experts have assembled divergent opinions on the role of perforator venous surgery in contemporary practice. PMID:25154966

  12. Activity of a nitrofurazone matrix urinary catheter against catheter-associated uropathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R; Berggren, T; Conway, A J

    1993-01-01

    Nitrofurazone-coated urinary catheter segments inhibited 51 (75%) of 70 urinary bacterial isolates from patients with indwelling catheters. Inhibition zones correlated significantly with the nitrofurazone MIC (r2 = 0.79, P = 0.0001). All strains except the Pseudomonas spp. were inhibited by < or = 64 micrograms of nitrofurazone per ml. MICs of nitrofurazone and nitrofurantoin correlated significantly (r2 = 0.93, P = 0.0001). PMID:8239629

  13. Leash Your Guiding Catheter: Or How to Obtain a Stable Catheter Position for Crossover Iliac Embolization Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Charalambous, Nikolas; Trentmann, Jens; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Gross, Justus; Siggelkow, Markus; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2010-06-15

    We present a safe and quick technique for crossover embolization procedures of the internal iliac artery with high-profile guiding catheter systems, after a pull-through maneuver with establishment of a crossover catheter-snare system. The attached snare is used to stabilize and direct the guiding catheter.

  14. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  15. Comparison of hepatic venous pressure gradient and endoscopic grading of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunJi; Kim, Yong Jae; Goo, Dong Erk; Yang, Seung Boo; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices. METHODS: From September 2009 to March 2013, a total of 176 measurements of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) were done in 146 patients. Each transjugular HVPG was measured twice, first using an end whole catheter (EH-HVPG), and then using a balloon catheter (B-HVPG). The HVPG was compared with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices (according to the general rules for recording endoscopic findings of esophagogastric varices), which was recorded within a month of the measurement of HVPG. RESULTS: The study included 110 men and 36 women, with a mean age of 56.1 years (range, 43-76 years). The technical success rate of the pressure measurements was 100% and there were no complication related to the procedures. Mean HVPG was 15.3 mmHg as measured using the end hole catheter method and 16.5 mmHg as measured using the balloon catheter method. Mean HVPG (both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG) was not significantly different among patients with different characteristics, including sex and comorbid factors, except for cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (B-HVPG, P = 0.01; EH-HVPG, P = 0.02). Portal hypertension (> 12 mmHg HVPG) occurred in 66% of patients according to EH-HVPG and 83% of patients according to B-HVGP, and significantly correlated with Child’s status (B-HVPG, P < 0.000; EH-HVGP, P < 0.000) and esophageal varies observed upon endoscopy (EH-HVGP, P = 0.003; B-HVGP, P = 0.006). One hundred and thirty-five endoscopies were performed, of which 15 showed normal findings, 27 showed grade 1 endoscopic esophageal varices, 49 showed grade 2 varices, and 44 showed grade 3 varices. When comparing endoscopic esophageal variceal grades and HVPG using univariate analysis, the P value was 0.004 for EH-HVPG and 0.002 for B-HVPG. CONCLUSION: Both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG showed a positive correlation with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices, with B-HVPG showing a stronger correlation than EH-HVPG. PMID:27003998

  16. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced. PMID:27005500

  17. Prevention of urinary catheter incrustations by acetohydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Burns, J R; Gauthier, J F

    1984-09-01

    Acetohydroxamic acid was administered in 5 patients to determine its effect in reducing urinary catheter incrustations. All patients had chronic indwelling catheters that required frequent changes because of severe incrustations and catheter occlusion. Incrustations were analyzed chemically for calcium, magnesium, ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus. The degree of incrustation before and during acetohydroxamic acid therapy was compared in each patient and was decreased significantly (average 81 per cent) during therapy (p less than 0.05). Catheter changes were required less frequently during therapy in all patients. Acetohydroxamic acid is effective in preventing catheter incrustations and should be considered in patients with this problem. PMID:6381758

  18. Antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of silver nanoparticles coated catheters via a biomimetic surface functionalization strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ke; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Yanmei; Deng, Jiexi; Lin, Changjian

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant problem in the clinic and may result in a serious infection. Here, we developed a facile and green procedure for buildup of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the central venous catheters (CVCs) surface. Inspired by mussel adhesive proteins, dopamine was used to form a thin polydopamine layer and induce AgNPs formation without additional reductants or stabilizers. The chemical and physicochemical properties of AgNPs coated CVCs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle. The Staphylococcus aureus culture experiment was used to study the antibacterial properties. The cytocompatibility was assessed by water soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) assay, fluorescence staining, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The results indicated that the CVCs surface was successfully coated with compact AgNPs. AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with a size of 30–50 nm. The density of AgNPs could be modulated by the concentration of silver nitrate solution. The antibacterial activity was dependent on the AgNPs dose. The high dose of AgNPs showed excellent antibacterial activity while associated with increased cytotoxicity. The appropriate density of AgNPs coated CVCs could exhibit improved biocompatibility and maintained evident sterilization effect. It is promising to design mussel-inspired silver releasing CVCs with both significant antimicrobial efficacy and appropriate biological safety. PMID:26664115

  19. Antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of silver nanoparticles coated catheters via a biomimetic surface functionalization strategy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Yanmei; Deng, Jiexi; Lin, Changjian

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant problem in the clinic and may result in a serious infection. Here, we developed a facile and green procedure for buildup of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the central venous catheters (CVCs) surface. Inspired by mussel adhesive proteins, dopamine was used to form a thin polydopamine layer and induce AgNPs formation without additional reductants or stabilizers. The chemical and physicochemical properties of AgNPs coated CVCs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle. The Staphylococcus aureus culture experiment was used to study the antibacterial properties. The cytocompatibility was assessed by water soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) assay, fluorescence staining, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The results indicated that the CVCs surface was successfully coated with compact AgNPs. AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with a size of 30-50 nm. The density of AgNPs could be modulated by the concentration of silver nitrate solution. The antibacterial activity was dependent on the AgNPs dose. The high dose of AgNPs showed excellent antibacterial activity while associated with increased cytotoxicity. The appropriate density of AgNPs coated CVCs could exhibit improved biocompatibility and maintained evident sterilization effect. It is promising to design mussel-inspired silver releasing CVCs with both significant antimicrobial efficacy and appropriate biological safety. PMID:26664115

  20. Simultaneous subcutaneous implantation of two osmotic minipumps connected to a jugular vein catheter in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wedel, Johannes; Weij, Michel; Oosten, Annemieke Smit-van; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2014-10-01

    Subcutaneous osmotic pump implantation connected to a venous catheter is a well-established method for delivering compounds intravenously for an intermediate duration (approximately two weeks). When prolonged release is desired (approximately four weeks) reduced flow rate is needed with a similar pump volume. With a fixed intra-pump compound concentration, reduced flow rate results in unwanted reduced bioavailability of the compound. Prolonged intravenous delivery would therefore need a pump replacement, resulting in increased discomfort and confounding effects on experimental outcome. To overcome this, we describe a method to double the compound infusion rate for four weeks by implanting two low-flow rate osmotic pumps (2.5 µL/h for 28 days) connected to a jugular vein catheter in a single rat. Rats implanted with a single high-flow rate pump (5 µL/h for 14 days) served as controls. Double pump-implanted rats displayed similar post-operative weight gain and physical activity indicating similar levels of discomfort when compared with single pump-implanted rats. Double pump-implanted rats had an increased risk of pump-related complications (four delivery failures [double pump] versus one delivery failure [single pump]). Our data show that double pump implantation is a feasible alternative to changing pumps or the use of extracorporeal pump systems connected via a long wire to partly restrained animals. PMID:25002205