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Sample records for versatile skin bioactive

  1. Tropoelastin - a versatile, bioactive assembly module

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Steven G.; Yeo, Giselle C.; Hiob, Matti A.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Kaplan, David L.; Ng, Martin K. C.; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2013-01-01

    Elastin provides structural integrity, biological cues and persistent elasticity to a range of important tissues including the vasculature and lungs. Its critical importance to normal physiology makes it a desirable component of biomaterials that seek to repair or replace these tissues. The recent availability of large quantities of the highly purified elastin monomer, tropoelastin, have allowed for a thorough characterization of the mechanical and biological mechanisms underpinning the benefits of mature elastin. While tropoelastin is a flexible molecule, a combination of optical and structural analyses has defined key regions of the molecule that directly contribute to the elastomeric properties and control the cell interactions of the protein. Insights into the structure and behavior of tropoelastin have translated into increasingly sophisticated elastin-like biomaterials, evolving from classically manufactured hydrogels and fibers to new forms, stabilized in the absence of incorporated cross-linkers. Tropoelastin is also compatible with synthetic and natural co-polymers, expanding the applications of its potential use beyond traditional elastin-rich tissues and facilitating finer control of biomaterial properties and the design of next-generation tailored bioactive materials. PMID:23938199

  2. Growth Factor-Bearing Polymer Brushes - Versatile Bioactive Substrates Influencing Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Psarra, Evmorfia; Foster, Elena; König, Ulla; You, Jungmok; Ueda, Yuichiro; Eichhorn, Klaus-J; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Revzin, Alexander; Uhlmann, Petra

    2015-11-01

    In this study we present the development of responsive nanoscale substrates exhibiting cell-guiding properties based on incorporated bioactive signaling cues. The investigative approach considered the effect of two different surface-bound growth factors (GFs) on cell behavior and response: hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Two surface biofunctionalization strategies were explored in order to conceive versatile, bioactive thin polymer brush films. Polymer brushes made of tethered poly(acrylic)acid (PAA) polymer layers with a high grafting density of polymer chains were biofunctionalized with GFs either by physisorption or chemisorption. Both GFs showed high binding efficiencies to PAA brushes based on their initial loading concentrations. The GF release kinetics can be distinguished depending on the applied biofunctionalization method. Specifically, a high initial burst followed by a constant slow release was observed in the case of both physisorbed HGF and bFGF. In contrast, the release kinetics of chemisorbed GFs were quite different. Remarkably, chemisorbed HGF remained bound to the brush surface for over 1 week, whereas 50% of chemisorbed bFGF was released slowly. Furthermore, the effect of these GF-biofunctionalized PAA brushes on different cells was investigated. A human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) was used to analyze the bioactivity of HGF-modified PAA brushes by measuring cell growth inhibition and scattering effects. Additionally, the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) toward endoderm was studied on bFGF-modified PAA brush surfaces. Finally, the results illustrate that PAA brushes, particularly those biofunctionalized with chemisorbed GFs, produce an expected measurable effect on both cell types. Therefore, PAA polymer brushes biofunctionalized with GFs can be used as bioactive cell culture substrates with tuned efficiency. PMID:26447354

  3. Diphenylthiourea, a common rubber chemical, is bioactivated to potent skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Kristin; Bergström, Moa Andresen; Jonsson, Charlotte A; Westman, Gunnar; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2011-01-14

    Diphenylthiourea (DPTU) is a known skin sensitizer commonly used as a vulcanization accelerator in the production of synthetic rubber, for example, neoprene. The versatile usage of neoprene is due to the multifaceted properties of the material; for example, it is stretchable, waterproof, and chemical- and abrasion-resistant. The wide application of neoprene has resulted in numerous case reports of dermatitis patients allergic to DPTU. The mechanism by which DPTU works as a contact allergen has not been described; thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate if DPTU is a prohapten that can be activated by skin metabolism. The metabolic activation and covalent binding of (14)C-labeled DPTU to proteins were tested using a skinlike cytochrome P450 (P450) cocktail containing the five most abundant P450s found in human skin (CYP1A1, 1B1, 2B6, 2E1, and 3A5) and human liver microsomes. The incubations were carried out in the presence or absence of the metabolite trapping agents glutathione, methoxylamine, and benzylamine. The metabolism mixtures were analyzed by LC-radiochromatography, LC-MS, and LC-MS/MS. DPTU was mainly metabolically activated to reactive sulfoxides resulting in desulfurated adducts in both enzymatic systems used. Also, phenylisothiocyanate and phenylisocyanate were found to be metabolites of DPTU. The sensitizing capacity of the substrate (DPTU) and three metabolites was tested in the murine local lymph node assay. Two out of three metabolites tested were strong skin sensitizers, whereas DPTU itself, as previously known, was negative using this mouse model. In conclusion, DPTU forms highly reactive metabolites upon bioactivation by enzymes present in the skin. These metabolites are able to induce skin sensitization and are probable causes for DPTU allergy. To increase the possibilities of diagnosing contact allergy to DPTU-containing items, we suggest that suitable metabolites of DPTU should be used for screening testing. PMID:21073181

  4. Skin electronics is one of the most promising applications of stretchable electronics. The versatility of skin electronics can only be guaranteed when it has conformal contact with human

    E-print Network

    Skin electronics is one of the most promising applications of stretchable electronics. The versatility of skin electronics can only be guaranteed when it has conformal contact with human skin. While analysis for the conformability of skin electronics, including modeling, meshing method and step setup etc

  5. Bioactive compounds from natural resources against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Maity, Niladri; Nema, Neelesh K; Sarkar, Birendra K

    2011-12-15

    Skin aging involves degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in both the epidermal and dermal layers, it leaves visible signs on the surface of skin and the physical properties of the skin are modified. Chronological aging is due to passage of time, whereas premature aging occurred due to some environmental factors on skin produces visible signs such as irregular dryness, dark/light pigmentation, sallowness, severe atrophy, telangiectases, premalignant lesions, laxity, leathery appearance and deep wrinkling. There are several synthetic skincare cosmetics existing in the market to treat premature aging and the most common adverse reactions of those include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, phototoxic and photo-allergic reactions. Recent trends in anti-aging research projected the use of natural products derived from ancient era after scientific validation. Ample varieties of phytomolecules such as aloin, ginsenoside, curcumin, epicatechin, asiaticoside, ziyuglycoside I, magnolol, gallic acid, hydroxychavicol, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, etc. scavenges free radicals from skin cells, prevent trans-epidermal water loss, include a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher contribute to protect skin from wrinkles, leading to glowing and healthy younger skin. Present era of treating aging skin has become technologically more invasive; but herbal products including botanicals are still relevant and combining them with molecular techniques outlined throughout this review will help to maximize the results and maintain the desired anti-skin aging benefits. PMID:22115797

  6. Simultaneous Delivery of Highly Diverse Bioactive Compounds from Blend Electrospun Fibers for Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Peh, Priscilla; Lim, Natalie Sheng Jie; Blocki, Anna; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Park, Heyjin Chris; Liao, Susan; Chan, Casey; Raghunath, Michael

    2015-07-15

    Blend emulsion electrospinning is widely perceived to destroy the bioactivity of proteins, and a blend emulsion of water-soluble and nonsoluble molecules is believed to be thermodynamically unstable to electrospin smoothly. Here we demonstrate a method to retain the bioactivity of disparate fragile biomolecules when electrospun. Using bovine serum albumin as a carrier protein; water-soluble vitamin C, fat soluble vitamin D3, steroid hormone hydrocortisone, peptide hormone insulin, thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), and peptide epidermal growth factor (EGF) were simultaneously blend-spun into PLGA-collagen nanofibers. Upon release, vitamin C maintained the ability to facilitate Type I collagen secretion by fibroblasts, EGF stimulated skin fibroblast proliferation, and insulin potentiated adipogenic differentiation. Transgenic cell reporter assays confirmed the bioactivity of vitamin D3, T3, and hydrocortisone. These factors concertedly increased keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation while maintaining keratinocyte basal state. This method presents an elegant solution to simultaneously deliver disparate bioactive biomolecules for wound healing applications. PMID:26079091

  7. Cocoa Bioactive Compounds: Significance and Potential for the Maintenance of Skin Health

    PubMed Central

    Scapagnini, Giovanni; Davinelli, Sergio; Di Renzo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Olarte, Hector Hugo; Micali, Giuseppe; Cicero, Arrigo F.; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Cocoa has a rich history in human use. Skin is prone to the development of several diseases, and the mechanisms in the pathogenesis of aged skin are still poorly understood. However, a growing body of evidence from clinical and bench research has begun to provide scientific validation for the use of cocoa-derived phytochemicals as an effective approach for skin protection. Although the specific molecular and cellular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of cocoa phytochemicals remain to be elucidated, this review will provide an overview of the current literature emphasizing potential cytoprotective pathways modulated by cocoa and its polyphenolic components. Moreover, we will summarize in vivo studies showing that bioactive compounds of cocoa may have a positive impact on skin health. PMID:25116848

  8. Epigenetic alterations in ultraviolet radiation-induced skin carcinogenesis: interaction of bioactive dietary components on epigenetic targets.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Sun, Qian; Vaid, Mudit

    2012-01-01

    The importance of epigenetic alterations in the development of various diseases including the cancers has been realized. As epigenetic changes are reversible heritable changes, these can be utilized as an effective strategy for the prevention of cancers. DNA methylation is the most characterized epigenetic mechanism that can be inherited without changing the DNA sequence. Although limited available data suggest that silencing of tumor suppressor genes in ultraviolet (UV) radiation-exposed epidermis leads to photocarcinogenesis and is associated with a network of epigenetic modifications including alterations in DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferases and histone acetylations. Various bioactive dietary components have been shown to protect skin from UV radiation-induced skin tumors in animal models. The role of bioactive dietary components, such as, (-)-epicatechins from green tea and proanthocyanidins from grape seeds has been assessed in chemoprevention of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis and underlying epigenetic mechanism in vitro and in vivo animal models. These bioactive components have the ability to block UV-induced DNA hypermethylation and histone modifications in the skin required for the silencing of tumor suppressor genes (e.g. Cip1/p21, p16(INK4a) ). This information is of importance for understanding the role of epigenetic modulation in UV-induced skin tumor and the chemopreventive mechanism of bioactive dietary components. PMID:22017262

  9. Influence of extraction techniques on antioxidant properties and bioactive compounds of loquat fruit (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) skin and pulp extracts

    PubMed Central

    Delfanian, Mojtaba; Esmaeilzadeh Kenari, Reza; Sahari, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the bioactive compounds of loquat fruit (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) skin and pulp extracted by two extraction methods (solvent and ultrasound-assisted) with three solvents (ethanol, water and ethanol–water) were compared to supercritical fluid extraction. The antioxidant activities of skin and pulp extracts were evaluated and compared to tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH?) radical scavenging, ?-carotene bleaching, and the Rancimat assays. In DPPH assay solvent extracts of skin by ethanol (SSE) and ethanol–water (SSEW) showed strong inhibitory activity. The SSEW also showed the highest inhibition percentage of 85.58% by the ?-carotene bleaching assay and longest induction time of 4.78 h by the Rancimat method. The large amount of tocopherols and phenolics contained in the skin extract may cause its strong antioxidant ability. The results indicated that the solvent extraction with ethanol–water produced the maximum extraction yield of phenolic and tocopherol compounds from loquat fruit skin and pulp. Furthermore, solvent extraction was the most effective in antioxidant activity of the extracts compared to other extraction techniques. PMID:25987992

  10. A review on skin targeted delivery of bioactives as ultradeformable vesicles: overcoming the penetration problem.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Karunanidhi; Singh, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Administration of drugs through skin via transdermal route is a non-invasive approach and applicable for systemic delivery but it is not suitable for drugs having higher molecular weight. Various approaches have been used to improve the efficacy of transdermal route such as vesicular system, iontophoresis, microneedles, use of permeation enhancers, etc. Among the several approaches, vesicular delivery is gaining importance in transdermal drug delivery. Transfersomes are one of the vesicular systems and they are best suited for the transdermal delivery of higher molecular weight compounds. Due to the deformable nature of transfersomes, they penetrate into deeper layers of skin, retain their original structure after penetration and finally enter into the systemic circulation. This review focuses mainly on the applications of transfersomes in the field of drug delivery i.e. delivery of analgesics, anti-cancers, proteins and peptides, immunomodulators, steroidal hormones and herbal drugs with increased penetration through skin. In addition, this review also deals with preparation methods available for preparing transfersomes, characterization, mechanism of penetration upon topical application and its kinetic aspects. PMID:24410447

  11. Assessment of Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.) Hydrogels: Quality and Bioactivity in Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskien?, Kristina; Stelmakiene, Ada; Majien?, Daiva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to design gels with lemon balm extract, assess their quality, and investigate the effect of rosmarinic acid on skin cells in normal conditions and under oxidative stress. Methods. The quantities of rosmarinic acid (RA) released from gels were evaluated by applying the HPLC technique. HaCaT cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. ROS generation was measured using DCFH-DA dye. The results showed that the gelling material affected the release of RA content from gels. Lower and slower RA content release was determined in carbomer-based gels. After 6 hours of biopharmaceutical research in vitro, at least 4% of RA was released from the gel. The results of the biological studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that, in the oxidative stress conditions, RA reduced intracellular ROS amounts to 28%; 0.25–0.5?mg/mL of RA increased cell viability by 10–24% and protected cells from the damage caused by H2O2. Conclusions. According to research results, it is appropriate to use a carbomer as the main gelling material, and its concentration should not exceed 1.0%. RA, depending on the concentration, reduces the amount of intracellular ROS and enhances cell viability in human keratinocytes in oxidative stress conditions. PMID:26600864

  12. Bioactives derived from ripe corn tassels: a possible new natural skin whitener, 4-hydroxy-1-oxindole-3-acetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we showed that extracts of ripe seasonal sweet corn tassels possess anti-irritant and anti-oxidant activities. The chemical identification of corn tassel bioactives were investigated by HPLC analysis. The hydroalcoholic extracts are composed primarily (>85%) phenolic-type compounds. The ...

  13. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  14. Bioactivation of particles

    DOEpatents

    Pinaud, Fabien (Berkeley, CA); King, David (San Francisco, CA); Weiss, Shimon (Los Angeles, CA)

    2011-08-16

    Particles are bioactivated by attaching bioactivation peptides to the particle surface. The bioactivation peptides are peptide-based compounds that impart one or more biologically important functions to the particles. Each bioactivation peptide includes a molecular or surface recognition part that binds with the surface of the particle and one or more functional parts. The surface recognition part includes an amino-end and a carboxy-end and is composed of one or more hydrophobic spacers and one or more binding clusters. The functional part(s) is attached to the surface recognition part at the amino-end and/or said carboxy-end.

  15. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  16. Dietary Bioactive Functional Foods

    E-print Network

    Powers, Robert

    systems of bioactive food components and additives. Dr. Zhang has a particular interestDietary Bioactive Agents and Functional Foods IMPACTING THE WORLD THREE TIMES A DAY DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Learn more at foodsci.unl.edu Contact Us 1901 N. 21 ST, PO Box 886205 Food

  17. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Cancer What is Skin Cancer? Skin cancer is the most common type ... of approximately 9,480 Americans in 2013. Can Skin Cancer Be Treated? Most basal cell and squamous ...

  18. Dry skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin - dry; Winter itch ... Dry skin is common. It happens more often in the winter when cold air outside and heated air inside cause low humidity. Forced-air furnaces make skin even drier. The skin loses moisture and may ...

  19. Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Your Skin KidsHealth > Kids > How the Body Works > Your Skin ... are really dead skin cells. Continue Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  20. Skin Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Skin Biopsy KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Skin Stuff > Skin Biopsy ... Preparation The Procedure Safety Results What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would Need One? In a ...

  1. Aging Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it comes ... early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins and ...

  2. DVD - digital versatile disks

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    An international standard has emerged for the first true multimedia format. Digital Versatile Disk (by its official name), you may know it as Digital Video Disks. DVD has applications in movies, music, games, information CD-ROMS, and many other areas where massive amounts of digital information is needed. Did I say massive amounts of data? Would you believe over 17 gigabytes on a single piece of plastic the size of an audio-CD? That`s the promise, at least, by the group of nine electronics manufacturers who have agreed to the format specification, and who hope to make this goal a reality by 1998. In this major agreement, which didn`t come easily, the manufacturers will combine Sony and Phillip`s one side double-layer NMCD format with Toshiba and Matsushita`s double sided Super-Density disk. By Spring of this year, they plan to market the first 4.7 gigabyte units. The question is: Will DVD take off? Some believe that read-only disks recorded with movies will be about as popular as video laser disks. They say that until the eraseable/writable DVD arrives, the consumer will most likely not buy it. Also, DVD has a good market for replacement of CD- Roms. Back in the early 80`s, the international committee deciding the format of the audio compact disk decided its length would be 73 minutes. This, they declared, would allow Beethoven`s 9th Symphony to be contained entirely on a single CD. Similarly, today it was agreed that playback length of a single sided, single layer DVD would be 133 minutes, long enough to hold 94% of all feature-length movies. Further, audio can be in Dolby`s AC-3 stereo or 5.1 tracks of surround sound, better than CD-quality audio (16-bits at 48kHz). In addition, there are three to five language tracks, copy protection and parental ``locks`` for R rated movies. DVD will be backwards compatible with current CD-ROM and audio CD formats. Added versatility comes by way of multiple aspect rations: 4:3 pan-scan, 4:3 letterbox, and 16:9 widescreen. MPEG-2 is the selected image compression format, with full ITU Rec. 601 video resolution (72Ox480). MPEG-2 and AC-3 are also part of the U.S. high definition Advance Television standard (ATV). DVD has an average video bit rate of 3.5 Mbits/sec or 4.69Mbits/sec for image and sound. Unlike digital television transmission, which will use fixed length packets for audio and video, DVD will use variable length packets with a maximum throughput of more than 1OMbits/sec. The higher bit rate allows for less compression of difficult to encode material. Even with all the compression, narrow-beam red light lasers are required to significantly increase the physical data density of a platter by decreasing the size of the pits. This allows 4.7 gigabytes of data on a single sided, single layer DVD. The maximum 17 gigabyte capacity is achieved by employing two reflective layers on both sides of the disk. To read the imbedded layer of data, the laser`s focal length is altered so that the top layer pits are not picked up by the reader. It will be a couple of years before we have dual-layer, double-sided DVDS, and it will be achieved in four stages. The first format to appear will be the single sided, single layer disk (4.7 gigabytes). That will allow Hollywood to begin releasing DVD movie titles. DVD-ROM will be the next phase, allowing 4.7 gigabytes of CD-ROM-like content. The third stage will be write-once disks, and stage four will be rewritable disks. These last stages presents some issues which have yet to be resolved. For one, copyrighted materials may have some form of payment system, and there is the issue that erasable disks reflect less light than today`s DVDS. The problem here is that their data most likely will not be readable on earlier built players.

  3. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  4. Electrostatic Control of Bioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Joshua E.; Berns, Eric J.; Bitton, Ronit; Newcomb, Christina J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-03-15

    The power of independence: When exhibited on the surface of self-assembling peptide-amphiphile nanofibers, the hydrophobic laminin-derived IKVAV epitope induced nanofiber bundling through interdigitation with neighboring fibers and thus decreased the bioactivity of the resulting materials. The inclusion of charged amino acids in the peptide amphiphiles disrupted the tendency to bundle and led to significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth.

  5. New bioactive lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  6. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  7. Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. PMID:26612377

  8. Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use of skin flaps or muscle flaps. In the present review, we describe how to perform skin grafting successfully, and some variation of skin grafting. PMID:22570780

  9. Photocleavable linker for the patterning of bioactive molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Seraphine V.; Sentürk, Oya I.; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the use of a versatile photocleavable nitrobenzyl linker to micropattern a wide variety of bioactive molecules and photorelease them on demand. On one end, the linker has an NHS group that can be coupled with any amine, such as peptides, proteins or amine-linkers, and on the other end an alkyne for convenient attachment to materials with an azide functional group. This linker was conjugated with NTA-amine or the cell adhesion peptide cRGD to enable straightforward patterning of His6-tagged proteins or cells, respectively, on PEGylated glass surfaces. This approach provides a practical way to control the presentation of a wide variety of bioactive molecules with high spatial and temporal resolution. The extent of photocleavage can also be controlled to tune the biomolecule density and degree of cell attachment to the surface. PMID:26670693

  10. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  11. Bioactivities of chicken essence.

    PubMed

    Li, Y F; He, R R; Tsoi, B; Kurihara, H

    2012-04-01

    The special flavor and health effects of chicken essence are being widely accepted by people. Scientific researches are revealing its truth as a tonic food in traditional health preservation. Chicken essence has been found to possess many bioactivities including relief of stress and fatigue, amelioration of anxiety, promotion of metabolisms and post-partum lactation, improvement on hyperglycemia and hypertension, enhancement of immune, and so on. These activities of chicken essence are suggested to be related with its active components, including proteins, dipeptides (such as carnosine and anserine), polypeptides, minerals, trace elements, and multiple amino acids, and so on. Underlying mechanisms responsible for the bioactivities of chicken essence are mainly related with anti-stress, anti-oxidant, and neural regulation effects. However, the mechanisms are complicated and may be mediated via the combined actions of many active components, more than the action of 1 or 2 components alone. PMID:22432477

  12. Mechanisms of Nitrite Bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that the anion nitrite, once considered an inert oxidation product of nitric oxide (NO), contributes to hypoxic vasodilation, physiological blood pressure control, and redox signaling. As such, its application in therapeutics is being actively testing in pre-clinical models and in human phase I–II clinical trials. Major pathways for nitrite bioactivation involve its reduction to NO by members of the hemoglobin or molybdopterin family of proteins, or catalyzed dysproportionation. These conversions occur preferentially under hypoxic and acidic conditions. A number of enzymatic systems reduce nitrite to NO and their activity and importance are defined by oxygen tension, specific organ system and allosteric and redox effectors. In this work, we review different proposed mechanisms of nitrite bioactivation, focusing on analysis of kinetics and experimental evidence for the relevance of each mechanism under different conditions. PMID:24315961

  13. Skin flicks

    E-print Network

    Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

    1993-01-01

    The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

  14. Skin Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... html Chat Online Chat Closed engagement en -- 365 Days of Wellness - 2016-jan-wellness-lives-here-eng. ...

  15. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Squamous cell carcinoma Stasis dermatitis Tattoo removal Tinea versicolor U - W ... of this very serious skin cancer. Learn more. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) This skin cancer tends to form on ...

  16. Skin Aging

    MedlinePLUS

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  17. Bioactivity in Organic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Lloyd N.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are three ways in which bioactivity of organic compounds has been introduced in organic chemistry courses. One is to point out a typical bioactivity of a given functional group. A second is to discuss biorganic mechanisms. A third is to draw structure-activity correlations (SAR). (Author/HM)

  18. Bioactivity of certain Egyptian Ficus species.

    PubMed

    Mousa, O; Vuorela, P; Kiviranta, J; Wahab, S A; Hiltunen, R; Vuorela, H

    1994-01-01

    The fruit extracts of Ficus sycomorus L., F. benjamina L., F. bengalensis L. and F. religiosa L. were screened for bioactivity. F. bengalensis and F. religiosa demonstrated activity in the brine shrimp test (Artemia salina) which indicates toxicity, whereas F. sycomorus and F. benjamina showed no activity. All the fruit extracts exhibited antitumor activity in the potato disc bioassay. None of the tested extracts showed any marked inhibition on the uptake of calcium into rat pituitary cells GH4C1. The extracts of the four tested Ficus species had significant antibacterial activity, but no antifungal activity. The results of this preliminary investigation support the traditional use of these plants in folk medicine for respiratory disorders and certain skin diseases. PMID:8170162

  19. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  20. Bioactive Glasses: Frontiers and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Hench, Larry L; Jones, Julian R

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980s, it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass(®). The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs. PMID:26649290

  1. Bioactive Glasses: Frontiers and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hench, Larry L.; Jones, Julian R.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics. In the 1980s, it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs. PMID:26649290

  2. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  3. Double scalping flap: a versatile technique in scalp reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Othon; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Moustaki, Margarita; Chrisostomidis, Chrisostomos; Grigorios, Champsas; Epaminondas, Kostopoulos; Frangoulis, Marios

    2009-09-01

    Scalp reconstruction is a challenging area in plastic surgery. The susceptibility of potentially exposed brain tissue is almost always a concern along with the provision of adequate soft tissue coverage in cases of full-thickness defects. The applied reconstructive strategy also affects efficiency in malignant disease treatment providing both local control of the disease and vigorous monitoring for recurrence or metastasis. The general condition of the patients presenting with malignant lesions of the scalp is often impaired because of old age or concomitant disease. Therefore, demanding, long-lasting, or multistage procedures may often be undesirable. The double scalping flap comprises a 1-stage procedure, which can be used in most full-thickness defects of the vertex of the scalp. Some of the primary advantages of the double scalping flap procedure are its versatility and arc of rotation, its minimal donor site morbidity, being relatively simple, and being a short technique. Disadvantages that may be considered are the loss of hair-bearing skin at the occipital region and the poor color and texture match between scalp skin and the split-thickness skin graft that is used on the donor site. We present 2 patients with exemplary case of neglected malignancy of the scalp and their successful treatment using the double scalping flap. Comparison and contrast of alternative reconstructive procedures are also included to further investigate scalp reconstruction. PMID:19816283

  4. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... It usually takes less than a minute. The freezing may cause some discomfort. Your health care provider ... to pain and infection Scarring, especially if the freezing was prolonged or deeper areas of the skin ...

  5. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ... and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to ...

  6. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Review. 21 Wu S, Han J, Laden F, Qureshi AA. Long-term ultraviolet flux, other potential risk factors, ... MR, Shive ML, Chren MM, Han J, Qureshi AA, Linos E. Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin ...

  7. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nonmelanoma skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, were diagnosed in 3.3 million people in ... 2005 study found that basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are increasing in men and women under 40. ...

  8. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present?

  9. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  10. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePLUS

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  11. Skin characteristics in newborns

    MedlinePLUS

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  12. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  13. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  14. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  15. Versatile machine mills, saws light materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Versatile milling/sawing machine performs angle cuts, flat and profile milling, machining of grooves and slots, and edge trimming of phenolic panels. The machine is mounted on rails above a table equipped with vacuum capability for holding workpieces.

  16. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. B.; Lerner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the large-scale production and use of methanol as a substitute for the diminishing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Describes the manufacturing process and advantages of the versatile fuel. (JR)

  17. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Even in normal gravity, bioactive glass particles enhance bone growth in laboratory tests with flat tissue cultures. Ducheyne and his team believe that using the bioactive microcarriers in a rotating bioreactor in microgravity will produce improved, three-dimensional tissue cultures. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering.

  18. Skin - clammy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you are not sure. If you think the person is in shock, lie him or her down on the back and raise the legs about 12 inches. Call your local emergency number (such as 911) or take the person to the hospital. If the clammy skin may ...

  19. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  20. Healthy Skin Matters Normal Skin

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    to help you remove it. Acne Most teenagers get a skin disease called acne (AK- nee). The blackheads everyone gets them at some point. Acne isn't usually serious, but severe cases can cause scars that will last for years. Acne is caused by bacteria (Propionibacterium acnes, often shortened to P. acnes

  1. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  2. Bioactive natural products from Lysobacter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunxuan; Wright, Stephen; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng

    2012-11-01

    The gliding Gram-negative Lysobacter bacteria are emerging as a promising source of new bioactive natural products. These ubiquitous freshwater and soil microorganisms are fast growing, simple to use and maintain, and genetically amenable for biosynthetic engineering. This Highlight reviews a group of biologically active and structurally distinct natural products from the genus Lysobacter, with a focus on their biosyntheses. Although Lysobacter sp. are known as prolific producers of bioactive natural products, detailed molecular mechanistic studies of their enzymatic assembly have been surprisingly scarce. We hope to provide a snapshot of the important work done on the lysobacterial natural products and to provide useful information for future biosynthetic engineering of novel antibiotics in Lysobacter. PMID:22898908

  3. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  4. Synthesis of a semi-interpenetrating polymer network as a bioactive curcumin film.

    PubMed

    Mayet, Naeema; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on the synthesis and characterization of a natural polymeric system employing the interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) comprising curcumin as a bioactive. Biopolymers and actives such as chitosan, hypromellose, citric acid, genipin, and curcumin were used to develop an effective, biodegradable, and biocompatible film employed therapeutically as a wound healing platform. The semi-IPN films were investigated for their physicochemical, physicomechanical, and biological properties by quantification by FTIR, DSC, and Young's modulus. Following characterization, an optimum candidate formulation was produced whereby further in vitro and ex vivo studies were performed. Results revealed a burst release occurring at the first hour with 1.1 mg bioactive released when in contact with the dissolution medium and 2.23 mg due to bioactive permeation through the skin, thus suggesting that the lipophilic nature of skin greatly impacted the bioactive release rate. Furthermore, chemical and mechanical characterization and tensile strength analysis revealed that the degree of crosslinking and concentration of polymeric material used significantly influenced the properties of the film. PMID:24984920

  5. A Versatile Technique for Solving Quintic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a versatile technique to solve several types of solvable quintic equations. In the technique described here, the given quintic is first converted to a sextic equation by adding a root, and the resulting sextic equation is decomposed into two cubic polynomials as factors in a novel fashion. The resultant cubic equations are…

  6. Guinea Pigs: Versatile Animals for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pigs are presented as versatile classroom animals. Suggestions for animal behavior and genetics studies are given. Also included is information concerning sex determination and the breeding of guinea pigs, and hints on keeping these animals in the classroom. References and illustrations complete the article. (MA)

  7. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption of ketamine, bupivacaine, diclofenac, gabapentin, orphenadrine, and pentoxifylline: comparison of versatile cream vs. reference cream.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexuan; Black, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This ex vivo human percutaneous absorption study evaluated a set of six model drugs (ketamine hydrochloride, bupivacaine hydrochloride, diclofenac sodium, gabapentin, orphenadrine citrate, pentoxifylline) from two popular formulations for topically applied compounding preparations. The compounded preparations used in this study were Versatile cream and a reference cream. Each formulation was applied to human trunk skin mounted on Franz Diffusion Cells, 50 mg/chamber (or 28.2 mg/cm2). Serial dermal receiver solutions were collected for 48 hours. Analysis of the resultant data supports the concept that the Versatile base formulation provides improved characteristics relative to the reference base. This is of key importance where the patient does not show clinical improvement when a conventional topical delivery vehicle is used in the formulation. From the results, it is reasonable to anticipate that, relative to the reference formulation, the Versatile formulation provides enhanced transdermal delivery of some analgesic medications. PMID:24579304

  8. Bioactivity of electro-thermally poled bioactive silicate glass.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, C R; Yunos, D M; Boccaccini, A R; Roling, B

    2009-05-01

    A 45S5 bioactive glass (nominal composition: 46.1 mol.% SiO2, 2.6 mol.% P2O5, 26.9 mol.% CaO, 24.4 mol.% Na2O) was electrothermally poled by applying voltages up to 750 V for 45 min at 200 degrees C, and the thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) were recorded. Changes in chemical composition and electrical properties after poling were investigated by TSDC measurements, impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). The poling led to the formation of interfacial layers underneath the surface in contact with the electrodes. Under the positive electrode, the layer was characterized by Na+ ion depletion and by a negative charge density, and the layer was more resistive than the bulk. The influence of poling on the bioactivity was studied by immersion of samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) with subsequent cross-sectional SEM/EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that poling leads to morphological changes in the silica-rich layer and to changes in the growth rate of amorphous calcium phosphate and bone-like apatite on the glass surface. The bone-like apatite layer under the positive electrode was slightly thicker than that under the negative electrode. PMID:19097952

  9. Quinazoline derivatives: synthesis and bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the significant biological activities, quinazoline derivatives have drawn more and more attention in the synthesis and bioactivities research. This review summarizes the recent advances in the synthesis and biological activities investigations of quinazoline derivatives. According to the main method the authors adopted in their research design, those synthetic methods were divided into five main classifications, including Aza-reaction, Microwave-assisted reaction, Metal-mediated reaction, Ultrasound-promoted reaction and Phase-transfer catalysis reaction. The biological activities of the synthesized quinazoline derivatives also are discussed. PMID:23731671

  10. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin self-exam means checking your own skin regularly for any abnormal growths or unusual changes. A skin self-exam helps find any suspicious skin problems early. The earlier skin cancer is diagnosed, the better chance you will have ...

  11. Bioactive Components in Fish Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Ziegman, Rebekah; Alewood, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Animal venoms are widely recognized excellent resources for the discovery of novel drug leads and physiological tools. Most are comprised of a large number of components, of which the enzymes, small peptides, and proteins are studied for their important bioactivities. However, in spite of there being over 2000 venomous fish species, piscine venoms have been relatively underrepresented in the literature thus far. Most studies have explored whole or partially fractioned venom, revealing broad pharmacology, which includes cardiovascular, neuromuscular, cytotoxic, inflammatory, and nociceptive activities. Several large proteinaceous toxins, such as stonustoxin, verrucotoxin, and Sp-CTx, have been isolated from scorpaenoid fish. These form pores in cell membranes, resulting in cell death and creating a cascade of reactions that result in many, but not all, of the physiological symptoms observed from envenomation. Additionally, Natterins, a novel family of toxins possessing kininogenase activity have been found in toadfish venom. A variety of smaller protein toxins, as well as a small number of peptides, enzymes, and non-proteinaceous molecules have also been isolated from a range of fish venoms, but most remain poorly characterized. Many other bioactive fish venom components remain to be discovered and investigated. These represent an untapped treasure of potentially useful molecules. PMID:25941767

  12. Bioactivity of plasma implanted biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification of biomedical materials is described. NiTi alloys have unique super-elastic and shape memory properties and are suitable for orthopedic implants but the leaching of toxic Ni may pose health hazards in humans. We have recently investigated the use of acetylene, oxygen and nitrogen PIII&D to prevent out-diffusion of nickel and good results have been obtained. Silicon is the most important material in the microelectronics industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PIII into silicon to improve the surface bioactivity and observed biomimetic growth of apatite on the surface in simulated body fluids. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness and by incorporation of elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the surface blood compatibility can be improved. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results are discussed in this article.

  13. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk. PMID:26389951

  14. Components of skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... underlying skin layers from the outside environment and contains cells that make keratin, a substance that waterproofs ... the skin. The epidermis also has cells that contain melanin, the dark pigment that gives skin its ...

  15. CSD skin test

    MedlinePLUS

    Cat scratch disease skin test ... cat scratch disease is injected just under the skin. After 48 to 72 hours, a health care ... no special preparation. People with dermatitis or other skin irritations should have the test performed on an ...

  16. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  17. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Punch biopsy; Shave biopsy; Skin biopsy; Biopsy - skin ... There are several ways to do a skin biopsy. Most procedures can be done in your provider's office or an outpatient medical office. It will take about 15 minutes. Which procedure ...

  18. Melanoma of the Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the skin cells called melanocytes (cells that color the skin). Melanocytes are found throughout the lower ... melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. Additional Information Learn more about melanoma More Information ...

  19. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Fungal Skin Infections by Denise M. Aaron, MD NOTE: This ...

  20. Bacterial Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections by A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD NOTE: ...

  1. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  2. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePLUS

    The infection is diagnosed by identifying the fungus in a culture taken from a skin lesion. This usually requires a skin biopsy . ... of pus) Another (secondary) skin infection caused by bacteria Complications related to medicines (for instance, amphotericin B ...

  3. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Signs of Skin Cancer, Doctors Advise (News) B Vitamin May Help Ward Off Some Skin Cancers Additional ... Day News by By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter B Vitamin May Help Ward Off Some Skin Cancers WEDNESDAY, ...

  4. Investigating the protective properties of milk phospholipids against ultraviolet light exposure in a skin equivalent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ashley; Laubscher, Andrea; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Laiho, Lily H.

    2010-02-01

    Current research on bioactive molecules in milk has documented health advantages of bovine milk and its components. Milk Phospholipids, selected for this study, represent molecules with great potential benefit in human health and nutrition. In this study we used confocal reflectance and multiphoton microscopy to monitor changes in skin morphology upon skin exposure to ultraviolet light and evaluate the potential of milk phospholipids in preventing photodamage to skin equivalent models. The results suggest that milk phospholipids act upon skin cells in a protective manner against the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Similar results were obtained from MTT tissue viability assay and histology.

  5. Bioactive coating with low-fouling polymers for the development of biocompatible vascular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalla, Pradeep Kumar

    The replacement of occluded blood vessels and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) are performed with the use of synthetic vascular grafts and stent grafts, respectively. Both implants lead to frequent clinical complications that are different but due to a similar problem, namely the inadequate surface properties of the polymeric biomaterials used (generally polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)). Therefore the general objective of this thesis was to create a versatile bioactive coating on vascular biomaterials that reduce material-induced thrombosis and promote desired cell interactions favorable to tissue healing around implants. The use of low-fouling backgrounds was decided in order to reduce platelet adhesion as well as the non-specific protein adsorption and thus increase the bioactivity of immobilized biomolecules. As part of the preliminary objective, a multi-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG) was chosen to create a versatile low-fouling surface, since the current coating methods are far from being versatile and rely on the availability of compatible functional groups on both PEG and the host surface. This PEG coating method was developed by taking advantage of novel primary amine-rich plasma polymerized coatings (LP). As demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), fluorescence measurements and platelet adhesion assays, our PEG coatings exhibited low protein adsorption and almost no platelet adhesion after 15 min perfusion in whole blood. Although protein adsorption was not completely abrogated and short-term platelet adhesion assay was clearly insufficient to draw conclusions for long-term prevention of thrombosis in vivo, the low-fouling properties of this PEG coating were sufficient to be exploited for further coupling of bioactive molecules to create bioactive coatings. Therefore, as a part of the second objective, an innovative and versatile bioactive coating was developed on PEG and carboxymethylated dextran (CMD), using the combination of an adhesive peptide (KQAGDV/RGD) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). CMD was chosen as an alternative to PEG due to its better low-fouling properties and the presence of abundant carboxyl terminal groups. Although the QCM-D technique enabled us to optimize the combined immobilization of KQAGDV/RGD and EGF, cell adhesion assay results did not show improvement of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) adhesion on peptide-modified PEG or CMD surfaces. Among the reasons explaining low cell adhesion on peptides grafted low-fouling surfaces is the difficulty of preventing protein adsorption/platelet adhesion without significantly reducing cell adhesion. Preliminary data in our laboratory indicated that CS could be an ideal substrate to find this compromise. For that reason, the final objective of this PhD consisted in evaluating the potential of chondroitin sulfate (CS) coating by comparing its properties with well-known low-fouling polymers such as PEG and CMD. It was shown that CS presents selective low-fouling properties, low-platelet adhesion and pro-endothelial cell (EC) adhesive properties As demonstrated by QCM-D and fluorescence measurements, CS was as effective as PEG in reducing fibrinogen adsorption, but it reduced adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) to a lower extent than PEG and CMD surfaces. Whole blood perfusion assays indicated that all three surfaces drastically decreased platelet adhesion and activation to levels significantly lower than PET surfaces. However, while EC adhesion and growth were found to be very limited on PEG and CMD, cell attachment on CS was strong, with focal adhesion points and resistance to shear stress. CS coatings therefore form a low-thrombogenic background promoting the formation of a confluent endothelium layer, which may then act as an active anti-thrombogenic surface. CS coating can also be used to further graft biomolecules. Combination of LP, CS coating followed by GF immobilization shows great promise as a bioactive coating to optimize the bio

  6. A versatile scalable PET processing system

    SciTech Connect

    H. Dong, A. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, Xi Wenze, C. Cuevas, J. Wilson, L. Zukerman

    2011-06-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) historically has major clinical and preclinical applications in cancerous oncology, neurology, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, in a new direction, an application specific PET system is being developed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with Duke University, University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB), and West Virginia University (WVU) targeted for plant eco-physiology research. The new plant imaging PET system is versatile and scalable such that it could adapt to several plant imaging needs - imaging many important plant organs including leaves, roots, and stems. The mechanical arrangement of the detectors is designed to accommodate the unpredictable and random distribution in space of the plant organs without requiring the plant be disturbed. Prototyping such a system requires a new data acquisition system (DAQ) and data processing system which are adaptable to the requirements of these unique and versatile detectors.

  7. Versatile microfluidic droplets array for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shan-Wen; Xu, Bi-Yi; Ye, Wei-Ke; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Xu, Jing-Juan

    2015-01-14

    We propose a novel method to obtain versatile droplets arrays on a regional hydrophilic chip that is fabricated by PDMS soft lithography and regional plasma treatment. It enables rapid liquid dispensation and droplets array formation just making the chip surface in contact with solution. By combining this chip with a special Christmas Tree structure, the droplets array with concentrations in gradient is generated. It possesses the greatly improved performance of convenience and versatility in bioscreening and biosensing. For example, high throughput condition screening of toxic tests of CdSe quantum dots on HL-60 cells are conducted and cell death rates are successfully counted quickly and efficiently. Furthermore, a rapid biosensing approach for cancer biomarkers carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA) is developed via magnetic beads (MBs)-based sandwich immunoassay methods. PMID:25525675

  8. Bioactive composite materials for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Boccaccini, Aldo R; Blaker, Jonny J

    2005-05-01

    Synthetic bioactive and bioresorbable composite materials are becoming increasingly important as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Next-generation biomaterials should combine bioactive and bioresorbable properties to activate in vivo mechanisms of tissue regeneration, stimulating the body to heal itself and leading to replacement of the scaffold by the regenerating tissue. Certain bioactive ceramics such as tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite as well as bioactive glasses, such as 45S5 Bioglass, react with physiologic fluids to form tenacious bonds with hard (and in some cases soft) tissue. However, these bioactive materials are relatively stiff, brittle and difficult to form into complex shapes. Conversely, synthetic bioresorbable polymers are easily fabricated into complex structures, yet they are too weak to meet the demands of surgery and the in vivo physiologic environment. Composites of tailored physical, biologic and mechanical properties as well as predictable degradation behavior can be produced combining bioresorbable polymers and bioactive inorganic phases. This review covers recent international research presenting the state-of-the-art development of these composite systems in terms of material constituents, fabrication technologies, structural and bioactive properties, as well as in vitro and in vivo characteristics for applications in tissue engineering and tissue regeneration. These materials may represent the effective optimal solution for tailored tissue engineering scaffolds, making tissue engineering a realistic clinical alternative in the near future. PMID:16288594

  9. Bioactive Hybrid Particles from Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) Nanoparticle Stabilized Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Paul; Whitby, Catherine P; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-08-12

    Biodegradable and bioactive hybrid particles composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles and medium-chain triglycerides were prepared by spray drying lipid-in-water emulsions stabilized by PLGA nanoparticles, to form PLGA-lipid hybrid (PLH) microparticles approximately 5 ?m in mean diameter. The nanoparticle stabilizer was varied and mannitol was also incorporated during the preparation to investigate the effect of stabilizer charge and cryoprotectant content on the particle microstructure. An in vitro lipolysis model was used to demonstrate the particles' bioactivity by manipulating the digestion kinetics of encapsulated lipid by pancreatic lipase in simulated gastrointestinal fluid. Lipid digestion kinetics were enhanced in PLH and PLGA-lipid-mannitol hybrid (PLMH) microparticles for both stabilizers, compared to a coarse emulsion, in biorelevant media. An optimal digestion rate was observed for the negatively charged PLMH system, evidenced by a 2-fold increase in the pseudo-first-order rate constant compared to a coarse emulsion. Improved microparticle redispersion, probed by dual dye confocal fluorescence microscopy, increased the available surface area of lipid for lipase adsorption, enhancing digestion kinetics. Thereby, lipase action was controlled in hybrid microparticles by altering the surface charge and carbohydrate content. Our results demonstrate that bioactive microparticles composed of versatile and biodegradable polymeric particles and oil droplets have great potential for use in smart food and nutrient delivery, as well as safer and more efficacious oral delivery of drugs and drug combinations. PMID:26181279

  10. Bioactive factor delivery strategies from engineered polymer hydrogels for therapeutic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Khanh; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    Polymer hydrogels have been widely explored as therapeutic delivery matrices because of their ability to present sustained, localized and controlled release of bioactive factors. Bioactive factor delivery from injectable biopolymer hydrogels provides a versatile approach to treat a wide variety of diseases, to direct cell function and to enhance tissue regeneration. The innovative development and modification of both natural-(e.g., alginate (ALG), chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA), gelatin, heparin (HEP), etc.) and synthetic-(e.g., polyesters, polyethyleneimine (PEI), etc.) based polymers has resulted in a variety of approaches to design drug delivery hydrogel systems from which loaded therapeutics are released. This review presents the state-of-the-art in a wide range of hydrogels that are formed though self-assembly of polymers and peptides, chemical crosslinking, ionic crosslinking and biomolecule recognition. Hydrogel design for bioactive factor delivery is the focus of the first section. The second section then thoroughly discusses release strategies of payloads from hydrogels for therapeutic medicine, such as physical incorporation, covalent tethering, affinity interactions, on demand release and/or use of hybrid polymer scaffolds, with an emphasis on the last 5 years. PMID:25242831

  11. Fabrication of a nanofibrous mat with a human skin pattern.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hwa; Jang, Jinah; Jeong, Young Hun; Ko, Tae Jo; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-13

    A number of studies on skin tissue regeneration and wound healing have been conducted. Electrospun nanofibers have numerous advantages for use in wound healing dressings. Here, we present an electrospinning method for alteration of the surface morphological properties of electrospun mats because most previous studies focused on the materials used or the introduction of bioactive healing agents. In this study, a micromachined human skin pattern mold was used as a collector in an electrospinning setup to replicate the pattern onto the surface of the electrospun mat. We demonstrated the successful fabrication of a nanofibrous mat with a human skin pattern. To verify its suitability for wound healing, a 14-day in vitro cell culture was carried out. The results indicated that the fabricated mat not only induces equivalent cell viability to the conventional electrospun mat, but also exhibits guidance of cells along the skin pattern without significant deterioration of pattern geometry. PMID:25479420

  12. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these. PMID:26393573

  13. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these. PMID:26393573

  14. Natural Bioactive Compounds from Winery By-Products as Health Promoters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Ana; Baenas, Nieves; Dominguez-Perles, Raul; Barros, Ana; Rosa, Eduardo; Moreno, Diego A.; Garcia-Viguera, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of food composition for human health has increased consumers’ interest in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals. This fact has led to a growing attention of suppliers on reuse of agro-industrial wastes rich in healthy plant ingredients. On this matter, grape has been pointed out as a rich source of bioactive compounds. Currently, up to 210 million tons of grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are produced annually, being the 15% of the produced grapes addressed to the wine-making industry. This socio-economic activity generates a large amount of solid waste (up to 30%, w/w of the material used). Winery wastes include biodegradable solids namely stems, skins, and seeds. Bioactive compounds from winery by-products have disclosed interesting health promoting activities both in vitro and in vivo. This is a comprehensive review on the phytochemicals present in winery by-products, extraction techniques, industrial uses, and biological activities demonstrated by their bioactive compounds concerning potential for human health. PMID:25192288

  15. Natural bioactive compounds from winery by-products as health promoters: a review.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana; Baenas, Nieves; Dominguez-Perles, Raul; Barros, Ana; Rosa, Eduardo; Moreno, Diego A; Garcia-Viguera, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of food composition for human health has increased consumers' interest in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals. This fact has led to a growing attention of suppliers on reuse of agro-industrial wastes rich in healthy plant ingredients. On this matter, grape has been pointed out as a rich source of bioactive compounds. Currently, up to 210 million tons of grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are produced annually, being the 15% of the produced grapes addressed to the wine-making industry. This socio-economic activity generates a large amount of solid waste (up to 30%, w/w of the material used). Winery wastes include biodegradable solids namely stems, skins, and seeds. Bioactive compounds from winery by-products have disclosed interesting health promoting activities both in vitro and in vivo. This is a comprehensive review on the phytochemicals present in winery by-products, extraction techniques, industrial uses, and biological activities demonstrated by their bioactive compounds concerning potential for human health. PMID:25192288

  16. What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... statistics about melanoma skin cancer? What is melanoma skin cancer? Melanoma is a cancer that starts in ... normal structure and function of the skin. Normal skin The skin is the largest organ in your ...

  17. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, most often ...

  18. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... to make it feel and look better. Dry Skin and Itching Click for more information Many older ...

  19. Skin cancer in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Porcia T

    2009-01-01

    In general, skin cancer is uncommon in people of color when compared to Caucasians. When it does occur, it is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Differences in survival rates may be attributed to skin cancers being diagnosed at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate insurance coverage and lack of transportation can function as barriers to timely diagnosis and early treatment. In addition to advanced stage at presentation, malignant skin lesions in skin of color often present in an atypical fashion. Because skin cancer prevention and screening practices historically have been lower among Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians, and given the changing demographics in the United States, interventions that are tailored to each of these groups will be needed. Public educational campaigns should be expanded to educate people of all skin types with emphasis on skin cancers occurring in areas not exposed to the sun (Byrd-Miles et al., 2007), since sunlight is not as important an etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in people of color. Dermatologists and primary care physicians should instruct their darker-skinned patients on how to perform routine skin self-examinations. Physicians should also encourage patients to ask their specialists such as their gynecologist, dentist, and ophthalmologist to look for abnormal pigmentation during routine exams. To reduce the burden of skin cancer, several prevention methods for all people have been strongly encouraged, including monthly self-examinations, daily use of SPF 30 or greater sunscreen, sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses, and avoiding tanning booths (American Cancer Society, 2008) (see Table 7). In addition, recommendations for clinicians to promote the prevention of skin cancer in skin of color have also been made, including closely monitoring changing pigmented lesions on the palms and soles and hyperkeratotic or poorly healing ulcers in immunosuppressed patients (Halder & Bridgeman-Shah, 1995) (see Table 7). PMID:19691228

  20. [Development and research advances of iridoids from Valeriana jatamansi and their bioactivity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning-ning; Ding, Guang-zhi

    2015-05-01

    Valeriana jatamansi (syn. V. wallichii), a traditional Chinese medicine recorded in Chinese Pharmacopeia (1977 and 2010 edition), has been used for treatment of a variety of conditions including sleep problems, obesity, nervous disorders, epilepsy, insanity, snake poisoning, eye trouble, and skin diseases. Also, it was used as an important substitute for the European V. officinalis, whose root preparation, popularly known as valerian, has been employed as a mild sedative for a long time. In recent years, much attention has been draw to the iridoids, one of the major bioactive constituents of V. jatamansi, leading to the discovery of a series of new iridoids with anti-tumor and neuroprotective activities. Their action machnism also has been discussed. This paper summerized the iridoids and their bioactivities from V. jatamansi in recent years, which could provide basic foundation for development and research of V. jatamansi. PMID:26390643

  1. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  2. A Versatile Ion Injector at KACST

    SciTech Connect

    El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Behery, S. A.; Almuqhim, A. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-27

    A versatile ion-beam injector is presently being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP) at the King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Saudi Arabia. This versatile injector will provide an electrostatic storage ring with high-quality ion beams of energies up to 30 keV per charge q. It will also allow for crossed-beams experiments in single-pass setups. The injector has been designed to include beams from two different ion sources, switched by a 90 deg. deflection setup, and to allow for matching of the beam parameters to the Twiss parameters of the ring. The injector is equipped with two crossed beam-lines (inlets), with duplicated beam extraction and acceleration systems. As part of the initial setup, a simple electric discharge ion source has been developed for commissioning of the whole injector. In this paper, we report on the ion optics layout and the design parameters of the injector.

  3. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  4. Suspended, Shrinkage-Free, Electrospun PLGA Nanofibrous Scaffold for Skin Tissue Engineering

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yu

    , Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Electrospinning is a technique for creating into the scaffold. KEYWORDS: electrospining, suspending scaffold, scaffold shrinkage, skin tissue engineering and self-assembly,18 electrospinning is a versatile technique for producing tissue engineering scaffolds

  5. Composite surgical sutures with bioactive glass coating.

    PubMed

    Boccaccini, Aldo R; Stamboulis, Artemis G; Rashid, Azrina; Roether, Judith A

    2003-10-15

    A processing method was developed to coat polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) sutures with bioactive glass powder (45S5 Bioglass). High reproducibility and homogeneity of the coating in terms of microstructure and thickness along the suture length were achieved. Bioglass-coated sutures exhibited a high level of chemical reactivity in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating their bioactive behavior. This was evident by the prompt formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals on the surface after only 7 days of immersion in SBF. These crystals grew to form a thick HA layer (15 microm thickness) after 3 weeks in SBF. The tensile strength of the sutures was tested before and after immersion in SBF in order to assess the effect of the bioactive glass coating on suture degradation. The tensile strength of composite sutures was lower than that of as-received Vicryl sutures, 385 and 467 MPa, respectively. However, after 28 days of immersion in SBF the residual tensile strengths of coated and uncoated sutures were similar (83 and 88 MPa, respectively), indicating no negative effect of the HA layer formation on the suture strength. The effect of bioactive glass coating on the polymer degradation is discussed. The developed bioactive sutures represent interesting materials for applications in wound healing, fabrication of fibrous three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering, and reinforcement elements for calcium-phosphate temporary implants. PMID:14528459

  6. Examine Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  7. Skin Cancer Trends

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Skin Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Lung Ovarian Prostate Cancer Home Skin Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  8. Laser Skin Renewal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a combination of skin dressings, ointments, and diluted vinegar compresses applied around the clock. Antibiotic and antiviral ... moderately intense skin care (often ointments and diluted vinegar compresses) for 2–3 days, as microscopic areas ...

  9. Polymer photonic sensing skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Zhang, C.; Webb, D. J.; Van Hoe, B.; Van Steenberge, G.; Kalli, K.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.; Urbanczyk, W.; Sugden, K.; Peng, G.-D.

    2010-09-01

    A highly flexible sensing skin with embedded polymer optical fibre Bragg gratings is characterised The response to pressure and strain compare favourably to a similar skin instrumented with silica fibre Bragg grating sensors.

  10. Layers of the Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over the entire body, these glands regulate body temperature by bringing water via the pores to the surface of the skin, where it evaporates and reduces skin temperature. These glands can produce up to two liters ...

  11. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Actinic Keratosis Basal Cell Carcinoma Dysplastic Nevi Melanoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Facts Ask the Experts Early Detection ... Actinic Keratosis Basal Cell Carcinoma Dysplastic Nevi Melanoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Facts Early Detection Mohs Surgery Ask ...

  12. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  13. Tuberculin skin test (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... evaluate whether a person has been exposed to tuberculosis. If there has been a prior exposure, antibodies ... in the body. During the skin test, the tuberculosis antigen is injected under the skin and if ...

  14. Tissue viability imaging for quantification of skin erythema and blanching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Gert E.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2010-02-01

    Naked eye observation has up to recently been the main method of determining skin erythema (vasodilatation) and blanching (vasoconstriction) in skin testing. Since naked eye observation is a highly subjective and investigatordependent method, it is difficult to attain reproducibility and to compare results reported by different researchers performing their studies at different laboratories. Consequently there is a need for more objective, quantitative and versatile methods in the assessment of alterations in skin erythema and blanching caused by internal and external factors such as the intake of vasoactive drugs, application of agents on the skin surface and by constituents in the environment. Since skin microcirculation is sensitive to applied pressure and heat, such methods should preferably be noninvasive and designed for remote use without touching the skin. As skin microcirculation further possesses substantial spatial variability, imaging techniques are to be preferred before single point measurements. An emerging technology based on polarization digital camera spectroscopy - Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) - fulfills these requirements. The principles of TiVi (1) and some of its early applications (2-5) are addressed in this paper.

  15. The Versatile Link common project: feasibility report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasey, F.; Hall, D.; Huffman, T.; Kwan, S.; Prosser, A.; Soos, C.; Troska, J.; Weidberg, T.; Xiang, A.; Ye, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Versatile Link is a bi-directional digital optical data link operating at rates up to 4.8 Gbit/s and featuring radiation-resistant low-power and low-mass front-end components. The system is being developed in multimode or singlemode versions operating at 850 nm or 1310 nm wavelength respectively. It has serial data interfaces and is protocol-agnostic, but is targeted to operate in tandem with the GigaBit Transceiver (GBT) serializer/deserializer chip being designed at CERN. This paper gives an overview of the project status three and a half years after its launch. It describes the challenges encountered and highlights the solutions proposed at the system as well as the component level. It concludes with a positive feasibility assesment and an outlook for future project development directions.

  16. Spaser as Novel Versatile Biomedical Tool

    E-print Network

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Kuchyanov, Alexander S; Parkhomenko, Roman G; Plekhanov, Alexander I; Stockman, Mark I; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy remain the most powerful tools for visualization with chemical and immunological specificity of labeled biomolecules, viruses, cellular organelles, and living cells in complex biological backgrounds. However, a common drawback of fluorescence labels is that their brightness is limited by optical saturation and photobleaching. As an alternative, plasmonic metal nanoparticles are very promising as optical labels with no photobleaching and low optical saturation at realistic exciting intensities as was demonstrated in photoacoustic and photothermal sensing, imaging, and theranostics. However, plasmonic nanoparticles have wide absorption spectra and are not fluorescent, which limits their spectral selectivity and multimodal functionality, respectively. Here we demonstrate experimentally, both in vitro and in vivo, that spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) provides unprecedented efficiency as a versatile tool in biomedical research and app...

  17. Versatile UHV compatible Knudsen type effusion cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, A.K.; Banik, S.; Dhaka, R.S.; Biswas, C.; Barman, S.R.; Haak, H.

    2004-11-01

    A versatile Knudsen type effusion cell has been fabricated for growing nanostructures and epitaxial layers of metals and semiconductors. The cell provides excellent vacuum compatibility (10{sup -10} mbar range during operation), efficient water cooling, uniform heating, and moderate input power consumption (100 W at 1000 deg. C). The thermal properties of the cell have been determined. The performance of the cell has been assessed by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) for Mn adlayer growth on Al(111). We find that this Knudsen cell has a stable deposition rate of 0.17 monolayer per minute at 550 deg. C. From the XPS spectra, we show that the Mn adlayers are completely clean, i.e., devoid of any surface contamination.

  18. Versatile repair vessel tested in deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Testing of a new subsea pipeline repair system in up to 1640 ft of water has been completed. The versatile system, integrated into a catamaran-type vessel, was to be operational by the end of 1985. The main characteristic of the Submersible Underwater Pipeline Repair and Work Apparatus (Supra) is its stable floating capability on the sea surface. Supra can be towed by a supply tug or diving support vessel at five knots in 13-ft waves. The system can be operated without the assistance of heavy-lift cranes or large barges. The developers claim Supra is highly independent of bad weather and sea conditions and can work 90% of the year. Since Supra is pressure-proof similar to a submarine, it can be submerged at sea by means of an integrated propulsion and ballast system and then maneuvered to the desired working location and positioned on the seabed by means of an underwater tracking and navigation system.

  19. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  20. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  1. Incorporation of bioactive materials into integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kim, Byung-Il; Boal, Andrew K.; Bachand, George D.; Rivera, Susan B.; Bauer, Joseph M.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2003-10-01

    Sandia is exploring two classes of integrated systems involving bioactive materials: 1) microfluidic systems that can be used to manipulate biomolecules for applications ranging from counter-terrorism to drug delivery systems, and 2) fluidic systems in which active biomolecules such as motor proteins provide specific functions such as active transport. An example of the first class involves the development of a reversible protein trap based on the integration of the thermally-switchable polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) into a micro-hotplate device. To exemplify the second class, we describe the technical challenges associated with integrating microtubules and motor proteins into microfluidic systems for: 1) the active transport of nanoparticle cargo, or 2) templated growth of high-aspect ratio nanowires. These examples illustrate the functions of bioactive materials, synthesis and fabrication issues, mechanisms for switching surface chemistry and active transport, and new techniques such as the interfacial force microscope (IFM) that can be used to characterize bioactive surfaces.

  2. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  3. Methods of Manufacturing Bioactive Gels from Extracellular Matrix Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentner, Kimberly A. (Inventor); Stuart, Katherine A. (Inventor); Janis, Abram D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of manufacturing bioactive gels from ECM material, i.e., gels which retain bioactivity, and can serve as scaffolds for preclinical and clinical tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. The manufacturing methods take advantage of a new recognition that bioactive gels from ECM material can be created by digesting particularized ECM material in an alkaline environment and neutralizing to provide bioactive gels.

  4. Methods of Manufacturing Bioactive Gels from Extracellular Matrix Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentner, Kimberly A. (Inventor); Stuart, Katherine A. (Inventor); Janis, Abram D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of manufacturing bioactive gels from ECM material, i.e., gels which retain bioactivity, and can serve as scaffolds for preclinical and clinical tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. The manufacturing methods take advantage of a new recognition that bioactive gels from ECM material can be created by digesting particularized ECM material in an alkaline environment and neutralizing to provide bioactive gels.

  5. Investigation of bioactivity and cell effects of nano-porous sol-gel derived bioactive glass film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhijun; Ji, Huijiao; Hu, Xiaomeng; Teng, Yu; Zhao, Guiyun; Mo, Lijuan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Chen, Weibo; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhang, Ming

    2013-11-01

    In orthopedic surgery, bioactive glass film coating is extensively studied to improve the synthetic performance of orthopedic implants. A lot of investigations have confirmed that nano-porous structure in bioactive glasses can remarkably improve their bioactivity. Nevertheless, researches on preparation of nano-porous bioactive glasses in the form of film coating and their cell response activities are scarce. Herein, we report the preparation of nano-porous bioactive glass film on commercial glass slide based on a sol-gel technique, together with the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity through immersion in simulated body fluid and monitoring the precipitation of apatite-like layer. Cell responses of the samples, including attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, were also investigated using BMSCS (bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) as a model. The results presented here provide some basic information on structural influence of bioactive glass film on the improvement of bioactivity and cellular effects.

  6. Three-dimensional, bioactive, biodegradable, polymerbioactive glass composite scaffolds with

    E-print Network

    Lu, Helen H.

    Three-dimensional, bioactive, biodegradable, polymer­bioactive glass composite scaffolds alternative to biologi- cal and synthetic grafts. The biomaterial component is a critical determinant (3-D), porous composite of polylactide-co-glycolide (PLAGA) and 45S5 bioactive glass (BG

  7. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals. PMID:23254724

  8. Silk sericin: A versatile material for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lamboni, Lallepak; Gauthier, Mario; Yang, Guang; Wang, Qun

    2015-12-01

    Sericin is an inexpensive glycoprotein obtained as a by-product in the silk industry. Its variable amino acid composition and diverse functional groups confer upon it attractive bioactive properties, which are particularly interesting for biomedical applications. Because of its antioxidant character, moisturizing ability, and mitogenic effect on mammalian cells, sericin is useful in cell culture and tissue engineering. Its positive effects on keratinocytes and fibroblasts have led to the development of sericin-based biomaterials for skin tissue repair, mainly as wound dressings. Additionally, sericin can be used for bone tissue engineering owing to its ability to induce nucleation of bone-like hydroxyapatite. Stable silk sericin biomaterials, such as films, sponges, and hydrogels, are prepared by cross-linking, ethanol precipitation, or blending with other polymers. Sericin may also be employed for drug delivery because its chemical reactivity and pH-responsiveness facilitate the fabrication of nano- and microparticles, hydrogels, and conjugated molecules, improving the bioactivity of drugs. Here, we summarized the recent advancements in the study of silk sericin for application in tissue engineering and drug delivery. PMID:26523781

  9. Bromophenols in Marine Algae and Their Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Hansen, Poul Erik; Lin, Xiukun

    2011-01-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols that have been shown to possess a variety of biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-thrombotic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress of these marine algal biomaterials, with respect to structure, bioactivities, and their potential application as pharmaceuticals. PMID:21822416

  10. Marine Bioactives and Potential Application in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Gemello, Eugenio; Riccioni, Graziano; D’Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2014-01-01

    An enriched diet with antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, ?-carotene and phenolic compounds, has always been suggested to improve oxidative stress, preventing related diseases. In this respect, marine natural product (MNP), such as COX inhibitors, marine steroids, molecules interfering with factors involved in the modulation of gene expression (such as NF-?B), macrolides, many antioxidant agents, thermogenic substances and even substances that could help the immune system and that result in the protection of cartilage, have been recently gaining attention. The marine world represents a reserve of bioactive ingredients, with considerable potential as functional food. Substances, such as chitin, chitosan, n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and bioactive peptides, can provide several health benefits, such as the reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. In addition, new marine bioactive substances with potential anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and thermogenic capacity may provide health benefits and performance improvement, especially in those who practice physical activity, because of their increased free radical and Reacting Oxygen Species (ROS) production during exercise, and, particularly, in athletes. The aim of this review is to examine the potential pharmacological properties and application of many marine bioactive substances in sports. PMID:24796298

  11. Citrus Limonoids: Analysis, Bioactivity, and Biomedical Prospects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication is a review of the chemistry, biochemistry and bioactivity of limonoids occurring in citrus. The review chronologically relates the evolution of research in citrus limonoids beginning with their association with bitterness development in citrus juices. The chemical and biochemical...

  12. Bioactive Terpenes from Marine-Derived Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Elissawy, Ahmed M.; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Ebada, Sherif S.; Singab, AbdelNasser B.; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi continue to be a prolific source of secondary metabolites showing diverse bioactivities. Terpenoids from marine-derived fungi exhibit wide structural diversity including numerous compounds with pronounced biological activities. In this review, we survey the last five years’ reports on terpenoidal metabolites from marine-derived fungi with particular attention on those showing marked biological activities. PMID:25854644

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF USDA'S DATABASES FOR BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is responsible for developing and maintaining composition databases for foods and supplements. Recent hypotheses concerning the possible roles of new bioactive dietary compounds in managing...

  14. Bioactive alkaloids in vertically transmitted fungal endophytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants form mutualistic symbioses with a variety of microorganisms, including endophytic fungi that live inside the plant and cause no symptoms of infection. Some endophytic fungi form defensive mutualisms based on the production of bioactive metabolites that protect the plant from herbivores in exc...

  15. Cyanobacteria and microalgae: a renewable source of bioactive compounds and other chemicals.

    PubMed

    Encarnação, Telma; Pais, Alberto A C C; Campos, Maria G; Burrows, Hugh D

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria are rich sources of many valuable compounds, including important bioactive and biotechnologically relevant chemicals. Their enormous biodiversity, and the consequent variability in the respective biochemical composition, make microalgae cultivations a promising resource for many novel chemically and biologically active molecules and compounds of high commercial value such as lipids and dyes. The nature of the chemicals produced can be manipulated by changing the cultivation media and conditions. Algae are extremely versatile because they can be adapted to a variety of cell culture conditions. They do not require arable land, can be cultivated on saline water and wastewaters, and require much less water than plants. They possess an extremely high growth rate making these microorganisms very attractive for use in biofuel production--some species of algae can achieve around 100 times more oil than oil seeds. In addition, microalgae and cyanobacteria can accumulate various biotoxins and can contribute to mitigate greenhouse gases since they produce biomass through carbon dioxide fixation. In this review, we provide an overview of the application of microalgae in the production of bioactive and other chemicals. PMID:26288917

  16. Effect of nanoparticulate bioactive glass particles on bioactivity and cytocompatibility of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) composites.

    PubMed

    Misra, Superb K; Ansari, Tahera; Mohn, Dirk; Valappil, Sabeel P; Brunner, Tobias J; Stark, Wendelin J; Roy, Ipsita; Knowles, Jonathan C; Sibbons, Paul D; Jones, Eugenia Valsami; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Salih, Vehid

    2010-03-01

    This work investigated the effect of adding nanoparticulate (29 nm) bioactive glass particles on the bioactivity, degradation and in vitro cytocompatibility of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) composites/nano-sized bioactive glass (n-BG). Two different concentrations (10 and 20 wt %) of nanoscale bioactive glass particles of 45S5 Bioglass composition were used to prepare composite films. Several techniques (Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray) were used to monitor their surface and bioreactivity over a 45-day period of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). All results suggested the P(3HB)/n-BG composites to be highly bioactive, confirmed by the formation of hydroxyapatite on material surfaces upon immersion in SBF. The weight loss and water uptake were found to increase on increasing bioactive glass content. Cytocompatibility study (cell proliferation, cell attachment, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production) using human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells in osteogenic and non-osteogenic medium showed that the composite substrates are suitable for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. PMID:19640877

  17. Thermal analysis and in vitro bioactivity of bioactive glass-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzistavrou, Xanthippi; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Labrini; Koidis, Petros; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M.

    2011-01-15

    Bioactive glass-alumina composite (BA) pellets were fabricated in the range 95/5-60/40 wt.% respectively and were heat-treated under a specific thermal treatment up to 950 {sup o}C. Control (unheated) and heat-treated pellets were immersed in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for bioactivity testing. All pellets before and after immersion in SBF were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. All composite pellets presented bioactive response. On the surface of the heat-treated pellets the development of a rich biological hydroxyapatite (HAp) layer was delayed for one day, compared to the respective control pellets. Independent of the proportion of the two components, all composites of each group (control and heat-treated) presented the same bioactive response as a function of immersion time in SBF. It was found that by the applied methodology, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be successfully applied in bioactive glass composites without obstructing their bioactive response. - Research Highlights: {yields} Isostatically pressed glass-alumina composites presented apatite-forming ability. {yields} The interaction with SBF resulted in an aluminium phosphate phase formation. {yields} The formation of an aluminium phosphate phase enhanced the in vitro apatite growth.

  18. Versatile fire barrier systems for telephone cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, R. H.; Dahms, D. G.; Licht, R. R.

    Fire barriers prevent smoke and fire spread along and between cables, through walls and floors, and protect critical conductors and equipment from heat. New flexible intrumescent materials expand up to 10 times when heated, are versatile and easy to install in sealing fire rated floor and wall penetrations. Telephone cables have large insulator/metal ratios and may have slack or oval jacketing, making older limited expansion materials ineffective. Strict design for specific cables and cable densities is obsoleted; reactive foaming chemicals are not needed for an effective seal. Fire expanding hydrated silicate particles are incorporated in a neoprene matrix yielding environmental protection for tough, flexible board, sheet, tape, caulk, putty, and foam rubber products. Penetration kits from these materials have been underwriter tested. Their UL ratings are compared with rubber blocks, foaming resins, and compressed washer devices. Traditional telecraft skills and tools install and adapt the new material to many cable types. Ease, simplicity, speed, and sureness of installation entry, and reentry/reseal are related to the fire hazard window of cable, fiber, or coax additions.

  19. A Versatile Nonlinear Method for Predictive Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Yao, Weigang

    2015-01-01

    As computational fluid dynamics techniques and tools become widely accepted for realworld practice today, it is intriguing to ask: what areas can it be utilized to its potential in the future. Some promising areas include design optimization and exploration of fluid dynamics phenomena (the concept of numerical wind tunnel), in which both have the common feature where some parameters are varied repeatedly and the computation can be costly. We are especially interested in the need for an accurate and efficient approach for handling these applications: (1) capturing complex nonlinear dynamics inherent in a system under consideration and (2) versatility (robustness) to encompass a range of parametric variations. In our previous paper, we proposed to use first-order Taylor expansion collected at numerous sampling points along a trajectory and assembled together via nonlinear weighting functions. The validity and performance of this approach was demonstrated for a number of problems with a vastly different input functions. In this study, we are especially interested in enhancing the method's accuracy; we extend it to include the second-orer Taylor expansion, which however requires a complicated evaluation of Hessian matrices for a system of equations, like in fluid dynamics. We propose a method to avoid these Hessian matrices, while maintaining the accuracy. Results based on the method are presented to confirm its validity.

  20. Development of versatile multiaperture negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Minarello, A.; Sattin, M.; Serianni, G.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Recchia, M.; Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Barbisan, M.; Baseggio, L.; Cervaro, V.; Degli Agostini, F.; Franchin, L.; Laterza, B.; Ravarotto, D.; Rossetto, F.; Zaniol, B.; Zucchetti, S.; and others

    2015-04-08

    Enhancement of negative ion sources for production of large ion beams is a very active research field nowadays, driven from demand of plasma heating in nuclear fusion devices and accelerator applications. As a versatile test bench, the ion source NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is being commissioned by Consorzio RFX and INFN. The nominal beam current of 135?mA at ?60?kV is divided into 9 beamlets, with multiaperture extraction electrodes. The plasma is sustained by a 2?MHz radiofrequency power supply, with a standard matching box. A High Voltage Deck (HVD) placed inside the lead shielding surrounding NIO1 contains the radiofrequency generator, the gas control, electronics and power supplies for the ion source. An autonomous closed circuit water cooling system was installed for the whole system, with a branch towards the HVD, using carefully optimized helical tubing. Insulation transformer is installed in a nearby box. Tests of several magnetic configurations can be performed. Status of experiments, measured spectra and plasma luminosity are described. Upgrades of magnetic filter, beam calorimeter and extraction grid and related theoretical issues are reviewed.

  1. Development of versatile multiaperture negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; De Muri, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Recchia, M.; Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Barbisan, M.; Baseggio, L.; Cervaro, V.; Cazzador, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Franchin, L.; Kulevoy, T.; Laterza, B.; Mimo, A.; Minarello, A.; Petrenko, S.; Ravarotto, D.; Rossetto, F.; Sattin, M.; Zaniol, B.; Zucchetti, S.

    2015-04-01

    Enhancement of negative ion sources for production of large ion beams is a very active research field nowadays, driven from demand of plasma heating in nuclear fusion devices and accelerator applications. As a versatile test bench, the ion source NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is being commissioned by Consorzio RFX and INFN. The nominal beam current of 135 mA at -60 kV is divided into 9 beamlets, with multiaperture extraction electrodes. The plasma is sustained by a 2 MHz radiofrequency power supply, with a standard matching box. A High Voltage Deck (HVD) placed inside the lead shielding surrounding NIO1 contains the radiofrequency generator, the gas control, electronics and power supplies for the ion source. An autonomous closed circuit water cooling system was installed for the whole system, with a branch towards the HVD, using carefully optimized helical tubing. Insulation transformer is installed in a nearby box. Tests of several magnetic configurations can be performed. Status of experiments, measured spectra and plasma luminosity are described. Upgrades of magnetic filter, beam calorimeter and extraction grid and related theoretical issues are reviewed.

  2. Design of a versatile clinical aberrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Matthew; Goncharov, Alexander; Dainty, Chris

    2005-09-01

    We have designed an ocular aberrometer based on the Hartmann-Shack (HS) type wavefront sensor for use in optometry clinics. The optical system has enhanced versatility compared with commercial aberrometers, yet it is compact and user-friendly. The system has the capability to sense both on-axis and off-axis aberrations in the eye within an unobstructed 20 degree field. This capability is essential to collect population data for off-axis aberrations. This data will be useful in designing future adaptive optics (AO) systems to improve image quality of eccentric retinal areas, in particular, for multi-conjugate AO systems. The ability of the examiner to control the accommodation demand is a unique feature of the design that commercial instruments are capable of only after modification. The pupil alignment channel is re-combined with the sensing channel in a parallel path and imaged on a single CCD. This makes the instrument more compact, less expensive, and it helps to synchronize the pupil center with the HS spot coordinate system. Another advantage of the optical design is telecentric re-imaging of the HS spots, increasing the robustness to small longitudinal alignment errors. The optical system has been optimized with a ray-tracing program and its prototype is being constructed. Design considerations together with a description of the optical components are presented. Difficulties and future work are outlined.

  3. Type IV Pilin Proteins: Versatile Molecular Modules

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, Carmen L.; Nguyen, Ylan

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Type IV pili (T4P) are multifunctional protein fibers produced on the surfaces of a wide variety of bacteria and archaea. The major subunit of T4P is the type IV pilin, and structurally related proteins are found as components of the type II secretion (T2S) system, where they are called pseudopilins; of DNA uptake/competence systems in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive species; and of flagella, pili, and sugar-binding systems in the archaea. This broad distribution of a single protein family implies both a common evolutionary origin and a highly adaptable functional plan. The type IV pilin is a remarkably versatile architectural module that has been adopted widely for a variety of functions, including motility, attachment to chemically diverse surfaces, electrical conductance, acquisition of DNA, and secretion of a broad range of structurally distinct protein substrates. In this review, we consider recent advances in this research area, from structural revelations to insights into diversity, posttranslational modifications, regulation, and function. PMID:23204365

  4. A Versatile Family of Galactic Wind Models

    E-print Network

    Bustard, Chad; D'Onghia, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We present a versatile family of model galactic outflows including non-uniform mass and energy source distributions, a gravitational potential from an extended mass source, and radiative losses. The model easily produces steady-state wind solutions for a range of mass-loading factors, energy-loading factors, galaxy mass and galaxy radius. We find that, with radiative losses included, highly mass-loaded winds must be driven at high central temperatures, whereas low mass-loaded winds can be driven at low temperatures just above the peak of the cooling curve, meaning radiative losses can drastically affect the wind solution even for low mass-loading factors. By including radiative losses, we are able to show that subsonic flows can be ignored as a possible mechanism for expelling mass and energy from a galaxy compared to the more efficient transonic solutions. Specifically, the transonic solutions with low mass-loading and high energy-loading are the most efficient. Our model also produces low-temperature, high-...

  5. Buried nanoantenna arrays: versatile antireflection coating.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Ali; Girgis, Emad; Capasso, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Reflection is usually a detrimental phenomenon in many applications such as flat-panel-displays, solar cells, photodetectors, infrared sensors, and lenses. Thus far, to control and suppress the reflection from a substrate, numerous techniques including dielectric interference coatings, surface texturing, adiabatic index matching, and scattering from plasmonic nanoparticles have been investigated. A new technique is demonstrated to manage and suppress reflection from lossless and lossy substrates. It provides a wider flexibility in design versus previous methods. Reflection from a surface can be suppressed over a narrowband, wideband, or multiband frequency range. The antireflection can be dependent or independent of the incident wave polarization. Moreover, antireflection at a very wide incidence angle can be attained. The reflection from a substrate is controlled by a buried nanoantenna array, a structure composed of (1) a subwavelength metallic array and (2) a dielectric cover layer referred to as a superstrate. The material properties and thickness of the superstrate and nanoantennas' geometry and periodicity control the phase and intensity of the wave circulating inside the superstrate cavity. A minimum reflectance of 0.02% is achieved in various experiments in the mid-infrared from a silicon substrate. The design can be integrated in straightforward way in optical devices. The proposed structure is a versatile AR coating to optically impedance matches any substrate to free space in selected any narrow and broadband spectral response across the entire visible and infrared spectrum. PMID:24266700

  6. Versatile SERS sensing based on black silicon.

    PubMed

    Seniutinas, Gediminas; Gervinskas, Gediminas; Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D; Lapierre, Florian; Stoddart, Paul R; Clark, Felix; McArthur, Sally L; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2015-03-01

    Black Si (b-Si) with gold or silver metal coating has been shown to be an extremely effective substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we demonstrate that it is also a highly versatile SERS platform, as it supports a wide range of surface functionalizations. In particular, we report the use of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coating and a hydrophobic coating on b-Si to establish two different sensing modalities. First, using a MIP layer on Au-coated b-Si, we show selective sensing of two closely related varieties of tetracycline. Second, a hydrophobic coating was used to concentrate the analyte adsorbed on gold colloidal nanoparticles, thus increasing the sensitivity of the measurement by an order of magnitude. In this experiment, Au nanoparticles and analyte were mixed just before SERS measurements and were concentrated by drop-drying on the super-hydrophobic b-Si. These approaches are promising for SERS measurements that are sensitive to the aging of bare plasmonic metal-coated substrates. PMID:25836894

  7. Bread enriched in lycopene and other bioactive compounds by addition of dry tomato waste.

    PubMed

    Nour, Violeta; Ionica, Mira Elena; Trandafir, Ion

    2015-12-01

    The tomato processing industry generates high amounts of waste, mainly tomato skins and seeds, which create environmental problems. These residues are attractive sources of valuable bioactive components and pigments. A relatively simple recovery technology could consist of production of powders to be directly incorporated into foods. Tomato waste coming from a Romanian tomato processing unit were analyzed for the content of several bioactive compounds like ascorbic acid, ?-carotene, lycopene, total phenolics, mineral and trace elements. In addition, its antioxidant capacity was assayed. Results revealed that tomato waste (skins and seeds) could be successfully utilized as functional ingredient for the formulation of antioxidant rich functional foods. Dry tomato processing waste were used to supplement wheat flour at 6 and 10 % levels (w/w flour basis) and the effects on the bread's physicochemical, baking and sensorial characteristics were studied. The following changes were observed: increase in moisture content, titratable acidity and bread crumb elasticity, reduction in specific volume and bread crumb porosity. The addition of dry tomato waste at 6 % resulted in bread with good sensory characteristics and overall acceptability but as the amount of dry tomato waste increased to 10 %, bread was less acceptable. PMID:26604402

  8. Skin too thin? The developing utility of zebrafish skin (neuro)pharmacology for CNS drug discovery research.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael; Poudel, Manoj K; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-09-01

    Skin coloration can be affected by many genetic, environmental and pharmacological factors. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are a useful and versatile model organism in biomedical research due to their genetic tractability, physiological homology to mammals, low cost, reproducibility and high throughput. Zebrafish coloration is mediated by chromatophores - the skin color pigment cells largely controlled by endocrine and neural mechanisms. The characteristic darkening of zebrafish skin is caused by the dispersion (and paling - by aggregation) of melanosomes (pigment-containing organelles), which show high homology to mammalian structures. Various pharmacological agents potently affect zebrafish coloration - the phenotype that often accompanies behavioral effects of the drugs, and may be used for drug discovery. Although zebrafish behavior and skin responses are usually not directly related, they share common regulatory (neural, endocrine) mechanisms, and therefore may be assessed in parallel during psychotropic drug screening. For example, some psychoactive drugs can potently affect zebrafish skin coloration. Can we use this knowledge to refine phenotype-driven psychotropic drug discovery? Here, we present current models using zebrafish skin coloration assays, and discuss how these models may be applied to enhance in vivo CNS drug discovery. PMID:24007957

  9. Alimentary 'green' proteins as electrospun scaffolds for skin regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Leko; Perets, Anat; Har-el, Yah-el; Varma, Devika; Li, Mengyan; Lazarovici, Philip; Woerdeman, Dara L; Lelkes, Peter I

    2013-12-01

    As a potential alternative to currently available skin substitutes and wound dressings, we explored the use of bioactive scaffolds made of plant-derived proteins. We hypothesized that 'green' materials, derived from renewable and biodegradable natural sources, may confer bioactive properties to enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration. We optimized and characterized fibrous scaffolds electrospun from soy protein isolate (SPI) with addition of 0.05% poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol, and from corn zein dissolved in glacial acetic acid. Fibrous mats electrospun from either of these plant proteins remained intact without further cross-linking, possessing a skin-like pliability. Soy-derived scaffolds supported the adhesion and proliferation of cultured primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using targeted PCR arrays and qPCR validation, we found similar gene expression profiles of fibroblasts cultured for 2 and 24?h on SPI substrates and on collagen type I at both time points. On both substrates there was a pronounced time-dependent upregulation of several genes related to ECM deposition remodelling, including MMP-10, MMP-1, collagen VII, integrin-?2 and laminin-?3, indicating that both plant- and animal-derived materials induce similar responses from the cells after initial adhesion, degrading substrate proteins and depositing extracellular matrix in a 'normal' remodelling process. These results suggest that 'green' proteins, such as soy and zein, are promising as a platform for organotypic skin equivalent culture, as well as implantable scaffolds for skin regeneration. Future studies will determine specific mechanisms of their interaction with skin cells and their efficacy in wound-healing applications. PMID:22499248

  10. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  11. About Skin: Your Body's Largest Organ

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  12. VOTERS: Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors Principal Investigator

    E-print Network

    VOTERS: Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors CONTACT Principal Investigator: Prof Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors) will provide a simple, inex- pensive way to detect subsurface, Technology Innovation Program, Cooperative Agreement No. 70NANB9H9012. VOTERSVersatile Onboard Traffic

  13. Versatile RNA Interference Nanoplatform for Systemic Delivery of RNAs

    E-print Network

    Choi, Ki Young

    Development of nontoxic, tumor-targetable, and potent in vivo RNA delivery systems remains an arduous challenge for clinical application of RNAi therapeutics. Herein, we report a versatile RNAi nanoplatform based on ...

  14. Metadata Authoring with Versatility and Extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Olsen, Lola

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) assists the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 13,800 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 700 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information and direct links to the data, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a geographic location of interest, then quickly acquire those data. The GCMD strives to be the preferred data locator for world-wide directory-level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are attracting widespread usage; however, a need for tools that are portable, customizable and versatile still exists. With tool usage directly influencing metadata population, it has become apparent that new tools are needed to fill these voids. As a result, the GCMD has released a new authoring tool allowing for both web-based and stand-alone authoring of descriptions. Furthermore, this tool incorporates the ability to plug-and-play the metadata format of choice, offering users options of DIF, SERF, FGDC, ISO or any other defined standard. Allowing data holders to work with their preferred format, as well as an option of a stand-alone application or web-based environment, docBUlLDER will assist the scientific community in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata.

  15. Versatile microflex-based interconnection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Hansjoerg; Stieglitz, Thomas; Meyer, Joerg-Uwe

    1998-07-01

    A new interconnection technique has been developed that allows versatile multiple strand connections between microsensors, sensor arrays, and chips designed for wire bonding. The new technique has been termed `microflex interconnects' (MFI). Conventional wire bonding technique is commonly restricted to planar interconnects with a limited degree of freedom for placing microsystem components. The MFI technique has overcome this limitation by interconnecting microsystem components through custom designed flexible foils with embedded metallized conductors. The MFI foils may also serve as circuit substrates. This basic foil material is polyimide (Du Pont PI 2611) or BCB which are patterned photolithographically. Platinum, gold or either conductive metals are sputtered or evaporated on the foil and patterned using lift-off technique. Several metallization layers can be embedded in the material. Pitch and shape of the MFI contact pads correspond to the one of the chips to be interconnected. A via hole is placed in the center of the MFI contact pads. MFI pads and chip pads are adjusted. Metal balls or wedges generate the electrical and mechanical contact through the vias between the chips and the MFI substrate. An commercial wire bonder is the only equipment needed to perform the MFI method. The MFI technique was applied to bond standard CMOS integrated circuit bond pads with a width of 30 micrometers and a pitch of 70 micrometers to a 10 micrometers thick MFI foil. The integration density of the of the MFI technique correspond to one of the flip- chip technology. Special advantages of the MFI technique are 3D interconnects, the flexibility in design and shape, and easy visual inspection of alignment qualities. The MFI method is also suited for biomedical applications because all materials used are biocompatible.

  16. Polydopamine-Based Simple and Versatile Surface Modification of Polymeric Nano Drug Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonyoung; Brust, Tarsis F.; Lee, Hong Jae; Lee, Sang Cheon; Watts, Val J.; Yeo, Yoon

    2014-01-01

    The surface of a polymeric nanoparticle (NP) is often functionalized with cell-interactive ligands and/or additional polymeric layers to control NP interaction with cells and proteins. However, such modification is not always straightforward when the surface is not chemically reactive. For this reason, most NP functionalization processes employ reactive linkers or coupling agents or involve pre-functionalization of the polymer, which are complicated and inefficient. Moreover, pre-functionalized polymers can lose the ability to encapsulate and retain a drug if the added ligands change chemical properties of the polymer. To overcome this challenge, we use dopamine polymerization as a way of functionalizing NP surfaces. This method includes brief incubation of the pre-formed NPs in a weak alkaline solution of dopamine, followed by secondary incubation with desired ligands. Using this method, we have functionalized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs with three representative surface modifiers: a small molecule (folate), a peptide (Arg-Gly-Asp), and a polymer [poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate)]. We confirmed that the modified NPs showed the expected cellular interactions with no cytotoxicity or residual bioactivity of dopamine. The dopamine polymerization method is a simple and versatile surface modification method, applicable to a variety of NP drug carriers irrespective of their chemical reactivity and the types of ligands. PMID:24628245

  17. Anomalous Skin Effect Igor Kaganovich

    E-print Network

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Anomalous Skin Effect Revisited Igor Kaganovich Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12 to explain "simply" anomalous skin effect without abusing physics. #12;3 Outline Skin effect (Inductively Coupled Plasmas/ Lasers) ­ Normal skin effect ­ Concept of phase-mixing and scale ­ Anomalous skin effect

  18. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is ...

  19. Skin supersolidity slipperizing ice

    E-print Network

    Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun

    2013-10-03

    Consistency between theory predictions and measurements and calculations revealed that the skin of ice, containing water molecules with fewer than four neighbours, forms a supersolid phase that is highly polarized, elastic, hydrophobic, with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice.

  20. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a fungus infection that can affect the skin, nails, or scalp. Fungi called dermatophytes can infect the skin and related ... is called tinea corporis; and ringworm of the nails is called tinea unguium. With tinea corporis, the fungi can cause scaly, ring-like lesions anywhere on ...

  1. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Bleeding under the skin can occur from broken blood vessels that form tiny pinpoint red dots (called ... Aside from the common bruise, bleeding into the skin or mucous membranes is a very significant sign and should always be checked out by a health care ...

  2. Skin Problems in Construction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3 Keep skin clean Wash with soap and clean water if your skin comes in contact with hazardous ... caustics like wet cement. DO NOT use the water in the bucket used to clean your tools. DO NOT use hand sanitizers. Wash ...

  3. Skin problems in children.

    PubMed

    Verbov, J L

    1976-09-01

    Common skin problems in 340 children routinely seen during a winter period, included napkin rashes in infants, atopic eczema throughout childrhood, and acne vulgaris in late childhood. Skin infections and psoriasis were also commonly seen. If possible, when topical steroid preparations more potent than hydrocortisone cream BPC are used in children, they should be used sparingly and for short periods only. PMID:135974

  4. Investigation on Flos Trollii: constituents and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Wang, Ru-Feng; Wu, Xiu-Wen; An, Yan-Nan; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Flos Trollii, the flowers of Trollius chinensis Bunge, has been widely used in Chinese and Mongolian medicine for its efficacy of heat-clearing and detoxification. This drug has both medicinal and edible applications, and has led to various pharmacognosy, natural product chemistry, and pharmacology studies. As a result, its chemical constituents and bioactivities have been well-characterized in recent years. Nevertheless, a couple of critical issues, such as the major effective components, are still unresolved. The present review summarizes research progress on this drug regarding the constituents and bioactivities based on investigations in these laboratories and the results reported in recent publications. In addition, the pending issues are discussed and constructive suggestions for further investigation are proposed. PMID:24359766

  5. Microencapsulated Bioactive Agents and Method of Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The invention is directed to microcapsules encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation where shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter. The resulting uniform microcapsules can then be subjected to dewatering in order to cause the internal solution to become supersaturated with the dissolved substance. This dewatering allows controlled nucleation and crystallization of the dissolved substance. The crystal-filled microcapsules can be stored, keeping the encapsulated crystals in good condition for further direct use in x-ray crystallography or as injectable formulations of the dissolved drug, protein or other bioactive substance.

  6. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses: Glass design, structure, bioactivity, cellular interactions, and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Shah, Furqan A

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to bond to both hard and soft tissues. Upon exposure to an aqueous environment, BG undergoes ion exchange, hydrolysis, selective dissolution and precipitation of an apatite layer on their surface, which elicits an interfacial biological response resulting in bioactive fixation, inhibiting further dissolution of the glass, and preventing complete resorption of the material. Fluorine is considered one of the most effective in-vivo bone anabolic factors. In low concentrations, fluoride ions (F(-)) increase bone mass and mineral density, improve the resistance of the apatite structure to acid attack, and have well documented antibacterial properties. F(-) ions may be incorporated into the glass in the form of calcium fluoride (CaF2) either by part-substitution of network modifier oxides, or by maintaining the ratios of the other constituents relatively constant. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses (FBGs) enhance and control osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralisation. And with their ability to release fluoride locally, FBGs make interesting candidates for various clinical applications, dentinal tubule occlusion in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. This paper reviews the chemistry of FBGs and the influence of F(-) incorporation on the thermal properties, bioactivity, and cytotoxicity; and novel glass compositions for improved mechanical properties, processing, and bioactive potential. PMID:26478431

  7. Novel bioresorbable and bioactive composites based on bioactive glass and polylactide foams for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Roether, J A; Gough, J E; Boccaccini, A R; Hench, L L; Maquet, V; Jérôme, R

    2002-12-01

    Bioresorbable and bioactive tissue engineering scaffolds based on bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass(R)) particles and macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams were fabricated. A slurry dipping technique in conjunction with pretreatment in ethanol was used to achieve reproducible and well adhering bioactive glass coatings of uniform thickness on the internal and external surfaces of the foams. In vitro studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) demonstrated rapid hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on the surface of the composites, indicating their bioactivity. For comparison, composite foams containing Bioglass(R) particles as filler for the polymer matrix (in concentration of up to 40 wt %) were prepared by freeze-drying, enabling homogenous glass particle distribution in the polymer matrix. The formation of HA on the composite surfaces after immersion in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was investigated to confirm the bioactivity of the composites. Human osteoblasts (HOBs) were seeded onto as-fabricated PDLLA foams and onto PDLLA foams coated with Bioglass(R) particles to determine early cell attachment and spreading. Cells were observed to attach and spread on all surfaces after the first 90 min in culture. The results of this study indicate that the fabricated composite materials have potential as scaffolds for guided bone regeneration. PMID:15348667

  8. Promiscuity progression of bioactive compounds over time.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Jasial, Swarit; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In the context of polypharmacology, compound promiscuity is rationalized as the ability of small molecules to specifically interact with multiple targets. To study promiscuity progression of bioactive compounds in detail, nearly 1 million compounds and more than 5.2 million activity records were analyzed. Compound sets were assembled by applying different data confidence criteria and selecting compounds with activity histories over many years. On the basis of release dates, compounds and activity records were organized on a time course, which ultimately enabled monitoring data growth and promiscuity progression over nearly 40 years, beginning in 1976. Surprisingly low degrees of promiscuity were consistently detected for all compound sets and there were only small increases in promiscuity over time. In fact, most compounds had a constant degree of promiscuity, including compounds with an activity history of 10 or 20 years. Moreover, during periods of massive data growth, beginning in 2007, promiscuity degrees also remained constant or displayed only minor increases, depending on the activity data confidence levels. Considering high-confidence data, bioactive compounds currently interact with 1.5 targets on average, regardless of their origins, and display essentially constant degrees of promiscuity over time. Taken together, our findings provide expectation values for promiscuity progression and magnitudes among bioactive compounds as activity data further grow. PMID:26064479

  9. Promiscuity progression of bioactive compounds over time

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ye; Jasial, Swarit; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In the context of polypharmacology, compound promiscuity is rationalized as the ability of small molecules to specifically interact with multiple targets. To study promiscuity progression of bioactive compounds in detail, nearly 1 million compounds and more than 5.2 million activity records were analyzed. Compound sets were assembled by applying different data confidence criteria and selecting compounds with activity histories over many years. On the basis of release dates, compounds and activity records were organized on a time course, which ultimately enabled monitoring data growth and promiscuity progression over nearly 40 years, beginning in 1976. Surprisingly low degrees of promiscuity were consistently detected for all compound sets and there were only small increases in promiscuity over time. In fact, most compounds had a constant degree of promiscuity, including compounds with an activity history of 10 or 20 years. Moreover, during periods of massive data growth, beginning in 2007, promiscuity degrees also remained constant or displayed only minor increases, depending on the activity data confidence levels. Considering high-confidence data, bioactive compounds currently interact with 1.5 targets on average, regardless of their origins, and display essentially constant degrees of promiscuity over time. Taken together, our findings provide expectation values for promiscuity progression and magnitudes among bioactive compounds as activity data further grow. PMID:26064479

  10. Human Milk Composition: Nutrients and Bioactive Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Olivia; Morrow, Ardythe L.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The composition of human milk is the biologic norm for infant nutrition. Human milk also contains many hundreds to thousands of distinct bioactive molecules that protect against infection and inflammation and contribute to immune maturation, organ development, and healthy microbial colonization. Some of these molecules, e.g., lactoferrin, are being investigated as novel therapeutic agents. A dynamic, bioactive fluid, human milk changes in composition from colostrum to late lactation, and varies within feeds, diurnally, and between mothers. Feeding infants with expressed human milk is increasing. Pasteurized donor milk is now commonly provided to high risk infants and most mothers in the U.S. express and freeze their milk at some point in lactation for future infant feedings. Many milk proteins are degraded by heat treatment and freeze-thaw cycles may not have the same bioactivity after undergoing these treatments. This article provides an overview of the composition of human milk, sources of its variation, and its clinical relevance. PMID:23178060

  11. Nanotech: propensity in foods and bioactives.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Chiu-Yin; Yee-Fung, Wai; Yuen, Kah-Hay; Liong, Min-Tze

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is seeing higher propensity in various industries, including food and bioactives. New nanomaterials are constantly being developed from both natural biodegradable polymers of plant and animal origins such as polysaccharides and derivatives, peptides and proteins, lipids and fats, and biocompatible synthetic biopolyester polymers such as polylactic acid (PLA), polyhydroxyalkonoates (PHA), and polycaprolactone (PCL). Applications in food industries include molecular synthesis of new functional food compounds, innovative food packaging, food safety, and security monitoring. The relevance of bioactives includes targeted delivery systems with improved bioavailability using nanostructure vehicles such as association colloids, lipid based nanoencapsulator, nanoemulsions, biopolymeric nanoparticles, nanolaminates, and nanofibers. The extensive use of nanotechnology has led to the need for parallel safety assessment and regulations to protect public health and adverse effects to the environment. This review covers the use of biopolymers in the production of nanomaterials and the propensity of nanotechnology in food and bioactives. The exposure routes of nanoparticles, safety challenges, and measures undertaken to ensure optimal benefits that outweigh detriments are also discussed. PMID:21991990

  12. Miniaturized bioaffinity assessment coupled to mass spectrometry for guided purification of bioactives from toad and cone snail.

    PubMed

    Heus, Ferry; Otvos, Reka A; Aspers, Ruud L E G; van Elk, Rene; Halff, Jenny I; Ehlers, Andreas W; Dutertre, Sébastien; Lewis, Richard J; Wijmenga, Sybren; Smit, August B; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Kool, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    A nano-flow high-resolution screening platform, featuring a parallel chip-based microfluidic bioassay and mass spectrometry coupled to nano-liquid chromatography, was applied to screen animal venoms for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor like (nAChR) affinity by using the acetylcholine binding protein, a mimic of the nAChR. The potential of this microfluidic platform is demonstrated by profiling the Conus textile venom proteome, consisting of over 1,000 peptides. Within one analysis (<90 min, 500 ng venom injected), ligands are detected and identified. To show applicability for non-peptides, small molecular ligands such as steroidal ligands were identified in skin secretions from two toad species (Bufo alvarius and Bufo marinus). Bioactives from the toad samples were subsequently isolated by MS-guided fractionation. The fractions analyzed by NMR and a radioligand binding assay with ?7-nAChR confirmed the identity and bioactivity of several new ligands. PMID:24833338

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  14. Interfacial design for a bioactive composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Jeanne Marie

    2001-07-01

    The objective for this project is to develop a bioactive dental composite showing enhanced mechanical properties through the development of a designed interface and to experimentally evaluate and model these interfaces. The efficiency of the surface modifications is analyzed as it relates to the bioactivity of the filler, a sol-gel derived bioglass (60 mol% SiO2, 36 mol% CaO, 4 mol% P2O5), and to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Among the filler surfaces studied are a methacryloxypropyl triethoxysilane (MAMTES) coupling agent combined with a methyl triethoxysilane (MTES) coupling agent, and a grafted sulfonated polysulfone (SPSF) with different degrees of sulfonation. The resin system chosen is based on 2,2'-bis-(4-methacryloylethoxyphenyl) propane using triethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a diluent to improve processability. To help offset the polymerization shrinkage, nadic methyl anhydride is added Hydrolysis of this anhydride provides a mechanism for offsetting shrinkage. A dependence on the ratio of methacrylate functionalized coupling agent on the reinforcing capabilities of the filler was discovered. This dependence also translates into the stabilization of the interface after a solution soak. Enhanced properties at mid-level ratios of MAMTES to MTES show the importance of the coupling system and not just the presence of a coupling agent to the enhancement of a composite. Evidence of the bioactivity of the composites is seen in a comparison of composite samples after submersion in either pure water or a salt solution. Additional weight gain could be the result of the sorption of HCA forming ions (calcium and phosphate) from the salt solution. The lower weight gain rate for the silanated composite supports a shielding effect of the coupling agent to the bioactivity of the filler. Sulfonated polysulfones were successfully prepared and grafted onto the BioglassRTM filler. A dependence on the level of sulfonation on the reinforcing capabilities of the filler was discovered. At higher degrees of sulfonation there is an increased water attraction at the interface that leads to a higher propensity for hydrolytic degradation and lowered mechanical properties. Along with the lowered mechanical properties, however, there is evidence of HCA growth that is necessary for the condition of bioactivity.

  15. Hiding the squid: patterns in artificial cephalopod skin.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Aaron; Rossiter, Jonathan; Homer, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cephalopods employ their chromomorphic skins for rapid and versatile active camouflage and signalling effects. This is achieved using dense networks of pigmented, muscle-driven chromatophore cells which are neurally stimulated to actuate and affect local skin colouring. This allows cephalopods to adopt numerous dynamic and complex skin patterns, most commonly used to blend into the environment or to communicate with other animals. Our ultimate goal is to create an artificial skin that can mimic such pattern generation techniques, and that could produce a host of novel and compliant devices such as cloaking suits and dynamic illuminated clothing. This paper presents the design, mathematical modelling and analysis of a dynamic biomimetic pattern generation system using bioinspired artificial chromatophores. The artificial skin is made from electroactive dielectric elastomer: a soft, planar-actuating smart material that we show can be effective at mimicking the actuation of biological chromatophores. The proposed system achieves dynamic pattern generation by imposing simple local rules into the artificial chromatophore cells so that they can sense their surroundings in order to manipulate their actuation. By modelling sets of artificial chromatophores in linear arrays of cells, we explore the capability of the system to generate a variety of dynamic pattern types. We show that it is possible to mimic patterning seen in cephalopods, such as the passing cloud display, and other complex dynamic patterning. PMID:26063823

  16. Hiding the squid: patterns in artificial cephalopod skin

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Aaron; Rossiter, Jonathan; Homer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods employ their chromomorphic skins for rapid and versatile active camouflage and signalling effects. This is achieved using dense networks of pigmented, muscle-driven chromatophore cells which are neurally stimulated to actuate and affect local skin colouring. This allows cephalopods to adopt numerous dynamic and complex skin patterns, most commonly used to blend into the environment or to communicate with other animals. Our ultimate goal is to create an artificial skin that can mimic such pattern generation techniques, and that could produce a host of novel and compliant devices such as cloaking suits and dynamic illuminated clothing. This paper presents the design, mathematical modelling and analysis of a dynamic biomimetic pattern generation system using bioinspired artificial chromatophores. The artificial skin is made from electroactive dielectric elastomer: a soft, planar-actuating smart material that we show can be effective at mimicking the actuation of biological chromatophores. The proposed system achieves dynamic pattern generation by imposing simple local rules into the artificial chromatophore cells so that they can sense their surroundings in order to manipulate their actuation. By modelling sets of artificial chromatophores in linear arrays of cells, we explore the capability of the system to generate a variety of dynamic pattern types. We show that it is possible to mimic patterning seen in cephalopods, such as the passing cloud display, and other complex dynamic patterning. PMID:26063823

  17. The versatile temporoparietal fascial flap: adaptability to a variety of composite defects.

    PubMed

    Rose, E H; Norris, M S

    1990-02-01

    The unique properties of the temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF) offer adaptability in reconstruction of a variety of composite defects. The broad, thin sheet of vascularized tissue may be transferred alone or as a carrier of subjacent bone or overlying skin and scalp. As a pedicled flap, it is ideal for defects of the orbital, malar, mandibular, and mastoid regions. As a free-tissue transfer, the large vessels and lack of bulk find broad utility in reconstruction of the extremities. This flap is our choice for reconstruction of the dorsal hand and non-weight-bearing surfaces of the foot. A viscous gliding surface decreases friction for tendon excursion. The thin contour is aesthetically superior to thicker flaps, allowing unmodified footwear or gloves. The pliable fascia convolutes into surface defects (e.g., bone craters) or drapes over skeletal frameworks (e.g., ear cartilage). The rich capillary network offers nutrition to saucerized bone, cartilage or tendon grafts, and overlying skin grafts. The geometry of the skull lends to fabrication of membranous bone for complex facial puzzles. The donor site is well disguised by hair growth. Twelve cases performed over a 2-year period demonstrate the versatility of this flap. These include complex foot reconstruction, ear and scalp avulsion, shotgun wound of the cheek and orbit, posttraumatic jaw recontouring, chronic osteomyelitis of the hand and foot, and acute resurfacing of dorsal hand with tendon reconstruction. PMID:1967843

  18. Cutaneous and Labyrinthine Tolerance of Bioactive Glass S53P4 in Mastoid and Epitympanic Obliteration Surgery: Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernardeschi, Daniele; Nguyen, Yann; Russo, Francesca Yoshie; Mosnier, Isabelle; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the cutaneous and the inner ear tolerance of bioactive glass S53P4 when used in the mastoid and epitympanic obliteration for chronic otitis surgery. Material and Methods. Forty-one cases have been included in this prospective study. Cutaneous tolerance was clinically evaluated 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after surgery with a physical examination of the retroauricular and external auditory canal (EAC) skin and the presence of otalgia; the inner ear tolerance was assessed by bone-conduction hearing threshold 1 day after surgery and by the presence of vertigo or imbalance. Results. All surgeries but 1 were uneventful: all patients maintained the preoperative bone-conduction hearing threshold except for one case in which the round window membrane was opened during the dissection of the cholesteatoma in the hypotympanum and this led to a dead ear. No dizziness or vertigo was reported. Three months after surgery, healing was achieved in all cases with a healthy painless skin. No cases of revision surgery for removal of the granules occurred in this study. Conclusion. The bioactive glass S53P4 is a well-tolerated biomaterial for primary or revision chronic otitis surgery, as shown by the local skin reaction which lasted less than 3 months and by the absence of labyrinthine complications. PMID:26504792

  19. Silks as scaffolds for skin reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Kerstin; Liebsch, Christina; Radtke, Christine; Kuhbier, Jörn W; Vogt, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    In this short review, we describe the use of high molecular weight proteins produced in the glands of several arthropods-commonly called silks-for the purpose to enhance human skin wound healing. To this end an extensive literature search has been performed, the publications have been categorized concerning silk preparation and application and summarized accordingly: Scaffolds to promote wound healing were prepared by processing the silks in different ways including solubilization of the protein fibers followed by casting or electrospinning. The silk scaffolds were additionally modified by coating or blending with the intention of further functionalization. In several approaches, the scaffolds were also vitalized with skin cells or stem cells. In vitro and in vivo models were implied to test for safety and efficiency. We conclude that silk scaffolds are characterized by an advantageous biocompatibility as well as an impressive versatility rendering them ideally suited for application in wounds. Nevertheless, further investigation is needed to exploit the full capacity of silk in different wound models and to achieve clinical transfer in time. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2201-2205. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25995140

  20. Bioactive Peptides from Muscle Sources: Meat and Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph Thomas; Ross, Reynolds Paul; Bolton, Declan; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Stanton, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive peptides have been identified in a range of foods, including plant, milk and muscle, e.g., beef, chicken, pork and fish muscle proteins. Bioactive peptides from food proteins offer major potential for incorporation into functional foods and nutraceuticals. The aim of this paper is to present an outline of the bioactive peptides identified in the muscle protein of meat to date, with a focus on muscle protein from domestic animals and fish. The majority of research on bioactives from meat sources has focused on angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant peptides. PMID:22254123

  1. Journal of Bioactive and Compatible Polymers

    E-print Network

    Hasýrcý, Vasýf

    In this study, novel drug carriers were developed for the treatment of skin conditions such as psoriasis, aging,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test using L929 mouse fibroblasts, BALB/3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts, and HaCaT human

  2. Characterization of the bioactive and mechanical behavior of dental ceramic/sol-gel derived bioactive glass mixtures.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Zahra; Bahrololoum, Mohammad E; Bagheri, Rafat; Shariat, Mohammad H

    2016-02-01

    Dental ceramics can be modified by bioactive glasses in order to develop apatite layer on their surface. One of the benefits of such modification is to prolong the lifetime of the fixed dental prosthesis by preventing the formation of secondary caries. Dental ceramic/sol-gel derived bioactive glass mixture is one of the options for this modification. In the current study, mixtures of dental ceramic/bioactive glass with different compositions were successfully produced. To evaluate their bioactive behavior, prepared samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid at various time intervals. The prepared and soaked specimens were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Since bioactive glasses have deleterious effects on the mechanical properties of dental ceramics, 3-point bending tests were used to evaluate the flexural strength, flexural strain, tangent modulus of elasticity and Weibull modulus of the specimens in order to find the optimal relationship between mechanical and bioactive properties. PMID:26454135

  3. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    PubMed

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. PMID:24267423

  4. Skin disorders at sea.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ray; Boniface, Keith; Hite, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the types of skin disorders occurring at sea requiring acute treatment. The case logs of a tele-medicine service for US flagged ships at sea were reviewed from March 1, 2006 until March 1, 2009. Of 1844 total cases, 10% (n = 183) were for skin disorders. Sixty-eight percent (n = 125) were infections, 14% (n = 25) were inflammatory, 7% (n = 13) were environmental, and 11% (n = 20) were non-specific rashes. Cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis (n = 84) were the most common acute skin disorders encountered. In some cases (n = 81), still digital photographs aided in the diagnosis. PMID:20496321

  5. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  6. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  7. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... outside. What are stretch marks? As your belly grows during pregnancy, your skin may become marked with reddish lines called stretch marks. By the third trimester , many pregnant women commonly have stretch marks ...

  8. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  9. Discovery – Preventing Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer research includes stopping cancer before it spreads. NCI funded the development of the Melanoma Risk Assessment Tool and the ABC method. Both help to diagnose high-risk patients and prevent melanoma earlier in the fight against skin cancer.

  10. Aging changes in skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hematomas ) may form after even a minor injury. Pressure ulcers can be caused by skin changes, loss of ... up to 4 times slower. This contributes to pressure ulcers and infections. Diabetes , blood vessel changes, lowered immunity, ...

  11. Skin diseases in musicians.

    PubMed

    Crépy, Marie-Noelle

    2015-10-01

    Instrumental musicians are a risk group for skin diseases. A systematic review was performed on Pubmed database and in the musical literature. Most publications on dermatoses in musicians are case reports. The exact prevalence of skin diseases in musicians is unknown but high rates have been reported. The most at-risk musicians are percussionists, string and wind instrumentalists. Repeated physical trauma is a frequent cause of skin conditions in musicians (callosities, fiddler's neck syndrome…). The allergens most often reported in musicians' allergic contact dermatitis are metals (nickel, dichromate), exotic woods and cane reed components, colophony and propolis. The key preventive measures are early management of the skin disease, specific tests and avoidance of the causative allergens, together with better adjustment of playing techniques to reduce trauma. PMID:25905552

  12. Designing building skins

    E-print Network

    Desai, Arjun

    1992-01-01

    This thesis involves framing criteria and discerning issues to be considered in the design of building skins in an urban environment. The 'information age' has paradoxically seen the demise of the facade as an important ...

  13. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Tests or procedures that examine the skin ... and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are ...

  14. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Tests or procedures that examine the skin ... and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are ...

  15. Genetics and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Bekou, Vassiliki; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex process and underlies multiple influences with the probable involvement of heritable and various environmental factors. Several theories have been conducted regarding the pathomechanisms of aged skin, however fundamental mechanisms still remain poorly understood. This article addresses the influence of genetics on skin aging and in particular deals with the differences observed in ethnic populations and between both genders. Recent studies indicate that male and female aged skin differs as far as the type, the consistency and the sensitivity to external factors is concerned. The same has been also documented between elderly people of different origin. Consequently, the aging process taking place in both genders and in diverse ethnic groups should be examined separately and products specialized to each population should be developed in order to satisfy the special needs. PMID:23467395

  16. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by medical conditions, such as atopic dermatitis and malnutrition. Dry skin develops due to a decrease in ... Diabetes Hypothyroidism Down syndrome Liver or kidney disease Malnutrition HIV/AIDS Lymphoma Signs and Symptoms The most ...

  17. Skin picking disorder.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Keuthen, Nancy J; Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2012-11-01

    Although skin picking has been documented in the medical literature since the 19th century, only now is it receiving serious consideration as a DSM psychiatric disorder in discussions for DSM-5. Recent community prevalence studies suggest that skin picking disorder appears to be as common as many other psychiatric disorders, with reported prevalences ranging from 1.4% to 5.4%. Clinical evaluation of patients with skin picking disorder entails a broad physical and psychiatric examination, encouraging an interdisciplinary approach to evaluation and treatment. Approaches to treatment should include cognitive-behavioral therapy (including habit reversal or acceptance-enhanced behavior therapy) and medication (serotonin reuptake inhibitors, N-acetylcysteine, or naltrexone). Based on clinical experience and research findings, the authors recommend several management approaches to skin picking disorder. PMID:23128921

  18. Skin conditions of musicians.

    PubMed

    Adams, R M

    2000-01-01

    Although skin conditions among musicians are uncommon, when they do occur, they may cause considerable discomfort and disability. The pattern of the condition very often indicates the instrument played. PMID:10664874

  19. [Skin-picking disorder].

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Peters, E; Gieler, U

    2015-10-01

    The disorder is characterized by compulsive repetitive skin-picking (SP), resulting in skin lesions. The patients must have undertaken several attempts to reduce or stop SP. The disorder must have led to clinically significant limitations in social, professional, or other important areas of life. The symptoms cannot be better explained by another emotional disorder or any other dermatological disease. In the new DSM-V, skin-picking disorder has been included in the diagnostic system as an independent disorder and describes the self-injury of the skin by picking or scratching with an underlying emotional disorder. SP is classified among the impulse-control disorders and is, thus, differentiated from compulsive disorders as such. There are often emotional comorbidities. In cases of pronounced psychosocial limitation, interdisciplinary cooperation with a psychotherapist and/or psychiatrist is indicated. PMID:26391325

  20. [Photoaging of a skin].

    PubMed

    Galus, Ryszard; Zandecki, ?ukasz; Antiszko, Marek; Borowska, Katarzyna; Zabielski, Stanis?aw

    2007-06-01

    Photoaging is a skin aging caused by long-term exposure to the ultraviolet radiations of the sun. Ultraviolet activates activating protein-1 and generate reactive oxygen species which play a substantial role in collagen degradation. Clinically, photoaged skin appears as a coarse with deep wrinkles. Presently there are available several agents to reverse the photodamage. There is conclusive evidence that synthetic vitamin A derivatives are the most effective in the treatment of photoaging. Erythema and scaling may be experienced initially. PMID:17874634

  1. Influence of barium substitution on bioactivity, thermal and physico-mechanical properties of bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Arepalli, Sampath Kumar; Tripathi, Himanshu; Vyas, Vikash Kumar; Jain, Shubham; Suman, Shyam Kumar; Pyare, Ram; Singh, S P

    2015-04-01

    Barium with low concentration in the glasses acts as a muscle stimulant and is found in human teeth. We have made a primary study by substituting barium in the bioactive glass. The chemical composition containing (46.1-X) SiO2--24.3 Na2O-26.9 CaO-2.6 P2O5, where X=0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.6mol% of BaO was chosen and melted in an electric furnace at 1400±5°C. The glasses were characterized to determine their use in biomedical applications. The nucleation and crystallization regimes were determined by DTA and the controlled crystallization was carried out by suitable heat treatment. The crystalline phase formed was identified by using XRD technique. Bioactivity of these glasses was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for various time periods. The formation of hydroxy carbonate apatite (HCA) layer was identified by FTIR spectrometry, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD which showed the presence of HCA as the main phase in all tested bioactive glass samples. Flexural strength and densities of bioactive glasses have been measured and found to increase with increasing the barium content. The human blood compatibility of the samples was evaluated and found to be pertinent. PMID:25686983

  2. Physicochemical properties and bioactivity of freeze-cast chitosan nanocomposite scaffolds reinforced with bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Pourhaghgouy, Masoud; Zamanian, Ali; Shahrezaee, Mostafa; Masouleh, Milad Pourbaghi

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan based nanocomposite scaffolds were prepared by freeze casting method through blending constant chitosan concentration with different portions of synthesized bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGNPs). Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) image showed that the particles size of bioactive glass (64SiO2.28CaO.8P2O5) prepared by sol-gel method was approximately less than 20nm. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis showed proper interfacial bonding between BGNPs and chitosan polymers. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images depicted a unidirectional structure with homogenous distribution of BGNPs among chitosan matrix associated with the absence of pure chitosan scaffold's wall pores after addition of only 10wt.% BGNPs. As the BGNP content increased from 0 to 50wt.%, the compressive strength and compressive module values increased from 0.034 to 0.419MPa and 0.41 to 10.77MPa, respectively. Biodegradation study showed that increase in BGNP content leads to growth of weight loss amount. The in vitro biomineralization studies confirmed the bioactive nature of all nanocomposites. Amount of 30wt.% BGNPs represented the best concentration for absorption capacity and bioactivity behaviors. PMID:26478301

  3. Skin pigmentation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A

    2001-10-01

    The highest incidences of cancer are found in the skin, but endogenous pigmentation is associated with markedly reduced risk. Agents that enhance skin pigmentation have the potential to reduce both photodamage and skin cancer incidence. The purpose of this review is to evaluate agents that have the potential to increase skin pigmentation. These include topically applied substances that simulate natural pigmentation: dihydroxyacetone and melanins; and substances that stimulate the natural pigmentation process: psoralens with UVA (PUVA), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), L-tyrosine, L-Dopa, lysosomotropic agents, diacylglycerols, thymidine dinucleotides, DNA fragments, melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) analogs, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), nitric oxide donors, and bicyclic monoterpene (BMT) diols. These agents are compared with regards to efficacy when administered to melanoma cells, normal human epidermal melanocytes, animal skin, and human skin. In addition, mechanisms of action are reviewed since these may reveal issues related to both efficacy and safety. Both dihydroxyacetone and topically applied melanins are presently available to the consumer, and both of these have been shown to provide some photoprotection. Of the pigmentation stimulators, only PUVA and MSH analogs have been tested extensively on humans, but there are concerns about the safety and side effects of both. At least some of the remaining pigmentation stimulators under development have the potential to safely induce a photoprotective tan. PMID:11684462

  4. What Causes Our Skin to Age?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skin What causes aging skin What causes our skin to age? Sun protection essential: Dermatologists agree that ... on our skin. 11 ways to reduce premature skin aging The sun plays a major role in ...

  5. Marine Nucleosides: Structure, Bioactivity, Synthesis and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ri-Ming; Chen, Yin-Ning; Zeng, Ziyu; Gao, Cheng-Hai; Su, Xiangdong; Peng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosides are glycosylamines that structurally form part of nucleotide molecules, the building block of DNA and RNA. Both nucleosides and nucleotides are vital components of all living cells and involved in several key biological processes. Some of these nucleosides have been obtained from a variety of marine resources. Because of the biological importance of these compounds, this review covers 68 marine originated nucleosides and their synthetic analogs published up to June 2014. The review will focus on the structures, bioactivities, synthesis and biosynthetic processes of these compounds. PMID:25474189

  6. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite - HAp - layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. PMID:26042695

  7. Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds: a challenging journey to bioefficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Maarit J.; Renouf, Mathieu; Cruz?Hernandez, Cristina; Actis?Goretta, Lucas; Thakkar, Sagar K.; da Silva Pinto, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is a key step in ensuring bioefficacy of bioactive food compounds or oral drugs. Bioavailability is a complex process involving several different stages: liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination phases (LADME). Bioactive food compounds, whether derived from various plant or animal sources, need to be bioavailable in order to exert any beneficial effects. Through a better understanding of the digestive fate of bioactive food compounds we can impact the promotion of health and improvement of performance. Many varying factors affect bioavailability, such as bioaccessibility, food matrix effect, transporters, molecular structures and metabolizing enzymes. Bioefficacy may be improved through enhanced bioavailability. Therefore, several technologies have been developed to improve the bioavailability of xenobiotics, including structural modifications, nanotechnology and colloidal systems. Due to the complex nature of food bioactive compounds and also to the different mechanisms of absorption of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive compounds, unravelling the bioavailability of food constituents is challenging. Among the food sources discussed during this review, coffee, tea, citrus fruit and fish oil were included as sources of food bioactive compounds (e.g. (poly)phenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)) since they are examples of important ingredients for the food industry. Although there are many studies reporting on bioavailability and bioefficacy of these bioactive food components, understanding their interactions, metabolism and mechanism of action still requires extensive work. This review focuses on some of the major factors affecting the bioavailability of the aforementioned bioactive food compounds. PMID:22897361

  8. The TopClosure® 3S System, for skin stretching and a secure wound closure.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin-Nard; Silberman, Adi; Li, Ming Sen; Li, Yong Zhong

    2012-07-01

    The principle of stretching wound margins for primary wound closure is commonly practiced and used for various skin defects, leading at times to excessive tension and complications during wound closure. Different surgical techniques, skin stretching devices and tissue expanders have been utilized to address this issue. Previously designed skin stretching devices resulted in considerable morbidity. They were invasive by nature and associated with relatively high localized tissue pressure, frequently leading to necrosis, damage and tearing of skin at the wound margins. To assess the clinical effectiveness and performance and, to determine the safety of TopClosure® for gradual, controlled, temporary, noninvasive and invasive applications for skin stretching and secure wound closing, the TopClosure® device was applied to 20 patients for preoperative skin lesion removal and to secure closure of a variety of wound sizes. TopClosure® was reinforced with adhesives, staples and/or surgical sutures, depending on the circumstances of the wound and the surgeon's judgment. TopClosure® was used prior to, during and/or after surgery to reduce tension across wound edges. No significant complications or adverse events were associated with its use. TopClosure® was effectively used for preoperative skin expansion in preparation for dermal resection (e.g., congenital nevi). It aided closure of large wounds involving significant loss of skin and soft tissue by mobilizing skin and subcutaneous tissue, thus avoiding the need for skin grafts or flaps. Following surgery, it was used to secure closure of wounds under tension, thus improving wound aesthetics. A sample case study will be presented. We designed TopClosure®, an innovative device, to modify the currently practiced concept of wound closure by applying minimal stress to the skin, away from damaged wound edges, with flexible force vectors and versatile methods of attachment to the skin, in a noninvasive or invasive manner. PMID:22719176

  9. Bioactive glasses: Importance of structure and properties in bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hench, Larry L.; Roki, Niksa; Fenn, Michael B.

    2014-09-01

    This review provides a brief background on the applications, mechanisms and genetics involved with use of bioactive glass to stimulate regeneration of bone. The emphasis is on the role of structural changes of the bioactive glasses, in particular Bioglass, which result in controlled release of osteostimulative ions. The review also summarizes the use of Raman spectroscopy, referred to hereto forward as bio-Raman spectroscopy, to obtain rapid, real time in vitro analysis of human cells in contact with bioactive glasses, and the osteostimulative dissolution ions that lead to osteogenesis. The bio-Raman studies support the results obtained from in vivo studies of bioactive glasses, as well as extensive cell and molecular biology studies, and thus offers an innovative means for rapid screening of new bioactive materials while reducing the need for animal testing.

  10. Mechanisms of human erythrocytic bioactivation of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wajih, Nadeem; Liu, Xiaohua; Basu, Swati; Janes, John; Marvel, Madison; Keggi, Christian; Helms, Christine C; Lee, Amber N; Belanger, Andrea M; Diz, Debra I; Laurienti, Paul J; Caudell, David L; Wang, Jun; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite signaling likely occurs through its reduction to nitric oxide (NO). Several reports support a role of erythrocytes and hemoglobin in nitrite reduction, but this remains controversial, and alternative reductive pathways have been proposed. In this work we determined whether the primary human erythrocytic nitrite reductase is hemoglobin as opposed to other erythrocytic proteins that have been suggested to be the major source of nitrite reduction. We employed several different assays to determine NO production from nitrite in erythrocytes including electron paramagnetic resonance detection of nitrosyl hemoglobin, chemiluminescent detection of NO, and inhibition of platelet activation and aggregation. Our studies show that NO is formed by red blood cells and inhibits platelet activation. Nitric oxide formation and signaling can be recapitulated with isolated deoxyhemoglobin. Importantly, there is limited NO production from erythrocytic xanthine oxidoreductase and nitric-oxide synthase. Under certain conditions we find dorzolamide (an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase) results in diminished nitrite bioactivation, but the role of carbonic anhydrase is abrogated when physiological concentrations of CO2 are present. Importantly, carbon monoxide, which inhibits hemoglobin function as a nitrite reductase, abolishes nitrite bioactivation. Overall our data suggest that deoxyhemoglobin is the primary erythrocytic nitrite reductase operating under physiological conditions and accounts for nitrite-mediated NO signaling in blood. PMID:25471374

  11. Bioactivity, toxicity and dissipation of hexaconazole enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiajun; Jiang, Jiazhen; Su, Hang; Sun, Mingjing; Wang, Peng; Liu, Donghui; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the bioactivity, acute toxicity and dissipation in vegetables of the individual enantiomers of the fungicide hexaconazole had been investigated. The optical pure single enantiomers were prepared and the bioactivity of (+)-, (-)- and rac-hexaconazole was tested using four target fungi including Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz, Alternaria solani, Alternaria mali Roberts and Monilinia fructicola. The results showed (-)-hexaconazole was always more active than (+)-hexaconazole with the fungicidal activity 11–13-fold higher to A. solani, A. mali Roberts and Monilinia fructicola, and 1.26-fold higher to C. gloeosporioides Penz. (-)-Hexaconazole also showed 1.3-fold higher acute toxicity to aquatic species Daphnia magna based on the 48 h EC50 values. There was obvious enantioselectivity in the dissipation in tomato with (-)-hexaconazole degraded faster resulting an enrichment of (+)-form, and the half-lives of (-)-hexaconazole and (+)-hexaconazole in tomato were 2.96 d and 3.38 d respectively, while it was not enantioselective in green pepper, in which the both enantiomers had the half-lives about 4.36 d. The findings are helpful for better environmental and ecological risk assessment of hexaconazole on an enantiomeric level. PMID:24206830

  12. Bioactivation of biomorphous silicon carbide bone implants.

    PubMed

    Will, Julia; Hoppe, Alexander; Müller, Frank A; Raya, Carmen T; Fernández, Julián M; Greil, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Wood-derived silicon carbide (SiC) offers a specific biomorphous microstructure similar to the cellular pore microstructure of bone. Compared with bioactive ceramics such as calcium phosphate, however, silicon carbide is considered not to induce spontaneous interface bonding to living bone. Bioactivation by chemical treatment of biomorphous silicon carbide was investigated in order to accelerate osseointegration and improve bone bonding ability. Biomorphous SiC was processed from sipo (Entrandrophragma utile) wood by heating in an inert atmosphere and infiltrating the resulting carbon replica with liquid silicon melt at 1450°C. After removing excess silicon by leaching in HF/HNO? the biomorphous preform consisted of ?-SiC with a small amount (approximately 6wt.%) of unreacted carbon. The preform was again leached in HCl/HNO? and finally exposed to CaCl? solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared analyses proved that oxidation of the residual carbon at the surface induced formation of carboxyl [COO?] groups, which triggered adsorption of Ca(2+), as confirmed by XPS and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements. A local increase in Ca(2+) concentration stimulated in vitro precipitation of Ca?(PO?)?OH (HAP) on the silicon carbide preform surface during exposure to simulated body fluid, which indicates a significantly increased bone bonding activity compared with SiC. PMID:20615484

  13. Dietary bioactive compounds and their health implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Hai

    2013-06-01

    There is strong scientific evidence suggesting that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is negatively associated with risk of developing chronic diseases. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend at least 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day based on a 2000 kcal diet. However, the average person in the United States consumes 3.6 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. In order to achieve the goal of at least 9 servings, we should continue educating Americans about the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and recommend consumers to eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. The key is to increase the amount up to 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables a day in all forms. Fresh, cooked, and processed fruits and vegetables including frozen and canned, 100% fruit juices, 100% vegetable juices, and dried fruits are all considered as servings of fruits and vegetables. A wide variety of fruits and vegetables provide a range of nutrients and different bioactive compounds including phytochemicals (phenolics, flavonoids, and carotenoids), vitamins (vitamin C, folate, and provitamin A), minerals (potassium, calcium, and magnesium), and fibers. More and more evidence suggests that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are attributed to the additive and synergistic interactions of the phytochemicals present in whole foods by targeting multiple signal transduction pathways. Therefore, consumers should obtain nutrients and bioactive compounds from a wide variety of whole foods for optimal nutrition and health well-being, not from expensive dietary supplements. PMID:23789932

  14. Micropatterning of bioactive self-assembling gels†

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Hsu, Lorraine; Capito, Ramille; Aparicio, Conrado; Henrikson, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Microscale topographical features have been known to affect cell behavior. An important target in this area is to integrate top down techniques with bottom up self-assembly to create three-dimensional (3D) patterned bioactive mimics of extracellular matrices. We report a novel approach toward this goal and demonstrate its use to study the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). By incorporating polymerizable acetylene groups in the hydrophobic segment of peptide amphiphiles (PAs), we were able to micro-pattern nanofiber gels of these bioactive materials. PAs containing the cell adhesive epitope arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine (RGDS) were allowed to self-assemble within microfabricated molds to create networks of either randomly oriented or aligned ~30 nm diameter nanofiber bundles that were shaped into topographical patterns containing holes, posts, or channels up to 8 ?m in height and down to 5 ?m in lateral dimensions. When topographical patterns contained nanofibers aligned through flow prior to gelation, the majority of hMSCs aligned in the direction of the nanofibers even in the presence of hole microtextures and more than a third of them maintained this alignment when encountering perpendicular channel microtextures. Interestingly, in topographical patterns with randomly oriented nanofibers, osteoblastic differentiation was enhanced on hole microtextures compared to all other surfaces. PMID:20047022

  15. Exploring marine resources for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Paula; D?Auria, M Valeria; Muller, Christian D; Tammela, Päivi; Vuorela, Heikki; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Biodiversity in the seas is only partly explored, although marine organisms are excellent sources for many industrial products. Through close co-operation between industrial and academic partners, it is possible to successfully collect, isolate and classify marine organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, micro- and macroalgae, cyanobacteria, and marine invertebrates from the oceans and seas globally. Extracts and purified compounds of these organisms can be studied for several therapeutically and industrially significant biological activities, including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and anticoagulant activities by applying a wide variety of screening tools, as well as for ion channel/receptor modulation and plant growth regulation. Chromatographic isolation of bioactive compounds will be followed by structural determination. Sustainable cultivation methods for promising organisms and biotechnological processes for selected compounds can be developed, as well as biosensors for monitoring the target compounds. The (semi)synthetic modification of marine-based bioactive compounds produces their new derivatives, structural analogs and mimetics that could serve as hit or lead compounds and be used to expand compound libraries based on marine natural products. The research innovations can be targeted for industrial product development in order to improve the growth and productivity of marine biotechnology. Marine research aims at a better understanding of environmentally conscious sourcing of marine biotechnology products and increased public awareness of marine biodiversity. Marine research is expected to offer novel marine-based lead compounds for industries and strengthen their product portfolios related to pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmetic, agrochemical, food processing, material and biosensor applications. PMID:25203732

  16. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  17. Skin cleansing in children.

    PubMed

    Gelmetti, C

    2001-09-01

    The problems of skin cleansing in infants have been re-evaluated in recent years on the basis of current understanding of cosmetology and skin physiology. The anatomical and functional peculiarities of infant's skin have been elucidated and, although it is known that the barrier function is established at birth in normal babies, it remains the case that children's skin is more delicate and therefore more prone to irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. These factors determine the choice of cleansing agents during infancy. The products available on the market differ markedly. Indeed detergents, bath oils, bath powders, due to their distinctive properties, have different indications and different benefits. The method of cleansing the skin, i.e. bathing or showering, is also important. The frequency of cleansing should take into account the age and the degree of exposure to pollutants. For special purposes, e.g. impetiginized dermatoses, antiseptics such as potassium permanganate or chlorhexidine can be added to the water in appropriate concentrations. The ideal paediatric detergent should be very mild to avoid irritant dermatitis, and very simple to avoid allergic dermatitis. PMID:11720072

  18. Polygonum cuspidatum extracts as bioactive antioxidaion, anti-tyrosinase, immune stimulation and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yen-Ting; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Wei-Ting; Liu, Yung-Chuan; David Wang, Hui-Min

    2015-04-01

    In our study, it was applied for the technology of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction to achieve biological constitutes from a Taiwan native plant, Polygonum cuspidatum. We developed bioactive effects of P. cuspidatum extracts via multiple examinations that established bio-purposes at a range of dosage ranges. The research of P. cuspidatum extracts indicated that they possessed anti-oxidative properties on radical-scavenging abilities, reducing activities and metal chelating powers in dose-dependant manners. The extracts also had minor in vitro mushroom tyrosinase suppression and decreased cellular tyrosinase activities and melanin production in B16-F10 cells. Immunologically, P. cuspidatum extracts enhanced the release of tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) induced by THP-1 macrophage cell line. In addition, the cell proliferation showed anti-proliferation in dose-dependent manner on human skin melanoma cells, A375 and A375.S2, of the extracts suggesting biological constitutes employed the anti-cancer possessions. This is the first statement presenting bioactivities on P. cuspidatum extracts including anti-oxidation, immune stimulation, anti-tyrosinase and anti-melanoma as far as we know. PMID:25311751

  19. Characterization and bioactivity of nano-submicro octacalcium phosphate/gelatin composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kei-ichiro; Anada, Takahisa; Honda, Yoshitomo; Shiwaku, Yukari; Kawai, Tadashi; Echigo, Seishi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Suzuki, Osamu

    2013-10-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the physicochemical and bioactive properties of a nano-submicro sized octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-dispersed gelatin (Gel) composite (nano-submicro OCP/Gel) used as a bone substitute material in various bone defects. Well-grown, synthesized OCP was mechanically ground from 100 to 300 ?m-sieved granules to particles that were approximately 500 nm in size. Then, 50 wt% of the nano-submicro OCP was mixed with porcine skin-derived acid extracted gelatin. The mixture was molded and lyophilized and then subjected to dehydrothermal crosslinking. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that the structure of OCP was retained even after mechanical grinding to a nano-submicro scale level as well as inclusion in the Gel matrix. The bioactivity of nano-submicro OCP/Gel was examined by immersing the composite in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days and by implanting it in rat critical-sized calvaria defects for 8 weeks. The nano-submicro OCP tended to convert to low crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) in SBF as assessed by XRD. The nano-submicro OCP/Gel exhibited osteoconductivity in vivo, yielding new bone formation that was closely associated with the implanted composite. These results suggest that the nano-submicro OCP/Gel composite exhibits similar osteoconductivity as observed in other OCP-based materials previously reported and could be used as a bone substitute material for repairing various defects in bone.

  20. Titanium Enolates of Thiazolidinethione Chiral Auxiliaries: Versatile Tools for

    E-print Network

    Titanium Enolates of Thiazolidinethione Chiral Auxiliaries: Versatile Tools for Asymmetric Aldol of titanium tetrachloride and nature of the amine employed.3 However, more easily cleavable auxiliaries than (Figure 2). Formation of the enolate at 0 °C using titanium tetrachlo- ride and the appropriate amine base

  1. Dynamic Multibody Protein Interactions Suggest Versatile Pathways for Copper Trafficking

    E-print Network

    Chen, Peng

    Dynamic Multibody Protein Interactions Suggest Versatile Pathways for Copper Trafficking Aaron M, the human copper chaperone Hah1 delivers Cu+ to the Wilson's Disease Protein (WDP) via weak and dynamic, the copper chaperone, Hah1, specifically delivers Cu+ via weak and dynamic protein interactions to two

  2. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  3. Ophthalmic wavefront measurements using a versatile pyramid sensor

    E-print Network

    Dainty, Chris

    Ophthalmic wavefront measurements using a versatile pyramid sensor Elizabeth M. Daly* and Chris describe the operation of a pyramid wavefront sensor used to measure and correct aberrations of the human [1­3] have traditionally been based upon the well- known Shack­Hartmann sensor [4,5] to provide

  4. A sensitive, versatile microfluidic assay for bacterial chemotaxis

    E-print Network

    A sensitive, versatile microfluidic assay for bacterial chemotaxis Hanbin Mao*, Paul S. Cremer 19, 2002) We have developed a microfluidic assay for bacterial chemotaxis in which a gradient and chemotaxis are reviewed in refs. 1 and 2, respectively. Modern studies on bacterial chemotaxis began

  5. Breakthrough Makes LED Lights More Versatile Author: Andrea Thompson

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Breakthrough Makes LED Lights More Versatile Author: Andrea Thompson Source: http these limitations by combining the best of two worlds of LEDs to make ultrathin, ultrasmall and flexible light-sized inorganic LEDs after a request from Ford Motor Co. to create a third brake light for cars that would

  6. Versatile Surface Tension and Adhesion for SPH Fluids Nadir Akinci

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    Versatile Surface Tension and Adhesion for SPH Fluids Nadir Akinci University of Freiburg Gizem as a result of the impact of a water droplet into a filled container. Our surface tension force allows such as surface tension and adhesion emerge as a result of inter-molecular forces in a microscopic scale

  7. Skin conditions: common skin rashes in infants.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Ramiro; Nguyen, Tam

    2013-04-01

    Infants exhibit many skin rashes. Erythema toxicum neonatorum presents as erythematous macules, papules, and pustules on the face, trunk, and extremities; it typically resolves spontaneously within 1 week. Neonatal acne presents as comedones or erythematous papules on the face, scalp, chest, and back. Infantile acne is similar but starts after the neonatal period. Both conditions typically resolve spontaneously; failure to resolve within 1 year warrants evaluation for androgen excess. Neonatal cephalic pustulosis is an acne variant caused by hypersensitivity to Malassezia furfur. It is typically self-limited, but severe cases are managed with topical ketoconazole. Miliaria and milia are caused by sweat retention and present as tiny vesicles or papules; they resolve spontaneously. Contact diaper dermatitis is managed by keeping the diaper area clean and with open air exposure. Diaper dermatitis due to Candida albicans is managed with topical antifungals. Seborrheic dermatitis causes scaling on the scalp. Management involves shampooing and removing scales with a soft brush after applying mineral oil or petrolatum; severe cases are managed with tar or ketoconazole shampoo. Atopic dermatitis is related to food allergy in approximately one-third of children. Food allergy can be confirmed with oral food challenges or skin prick tests. Management includes elimination of irritants and triggers and use of low-potency topical steroids. PMID:23600337

  8. Sprayed skin turbine component

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  9. Environment and the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Suskind, R.R. )

    1990-03-01

    The skin is an important organ of defense adaptation and a portal of entry for xenobiotics. It is vulnerable to physical, chemical, and biologic agents and capable of expressing responses to these agents in a variety of pathologic patterns. These patterns are characterized by morphologic and functional features which are elicited by careful examination and test procedures. Cutaneous cancer may result from exposure to nonionizing as well as ionizing radiation, to specific identifiable chemical hazards, and may be enhanced by trauma. Cutaneous hazards of chemical sources are largely found in the workplace and among consumer products, including drugs and toilet goods. Environmental skin diseases and injuries are preventable. Prior to use assessment for safety and for possible risks from exposure to an agent, product, or process is of primary importance in the prevention and control of environmental skin disease and injury.

  10. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  11. Limitations of skin protection.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Sibylle

    2007-01-01

    Skin protection products and gloves are essential constituents of personal protective equipment at workplaces, which can be used in a complementary way, each offering particular benefits and disadvantages. In many workplace situations, both measures are being used either in an alternating or in a combined manner, typically in professions with exposures to mild irritants and a high wet-work load, such as hairdressers, healthcare workers or employees in the food-processing industry. Skin protection creams can be used to reduce unnecessarily long glove usage in order to reduce occlusion-related effects on the skin barrier. Whenever rotating machines are used, these products are the only option due to safety regulations. However, some particular requirements can be postulated for skin-protective products claimed especially to be used in combination with gloves. Reduction of glove-induced perspiration, of stratum corneum swelling, and postocclusive barrier impairment are intended attributes of such products, which have been already successfully implemented in some commercially available products. On the other hand it has to be proven that the ingredients do not interfere with the glove material, neither in the way of degrading the material, thus making it permeable for harmful substances, nor by enhancing the potential release of rubber allergens. Examples out of the literature are reviewed showing that skin products can exhibit unpredictable effects on the allergen release of rubber materials, if not thoroughly tested for this purpose beforehand. Some raw materials should be avoided in protection products, though they are of established value when used in afterwork emollients to accelerate barrier recovery. Usage of moisturizers, in contrast to special barrier products, at the workplace together or even under gloves is therefore judged critically, although selected products showed beneficial effects in particular experimental settings. Another future option is the implementation of 'active gloves' that are intended to gradually release ingredients that help to strengthen and preserve skin barrier integrity. PMID:17312367

  12. Smoking and the skin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Arisa; Grando, Sergei A

    2012-03-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with significant morbidity affecting all systems of the body, including the integumentary system. We review the many dermatologic hazards of tobacco use. It is important to distinguish between the effects of tobacco smoke from effects of pure nicotine on the skin. All skin cells express several subtypes of the nicotinic class of acetylcholine receptors, including the ?7 receptor. Many chronic dermatoses are affected by smoking either negatively or positively. Elucidation of positive associations with a particular disease can lead to improvement from smoking cessation, whereas inverse correlation may lead to development of a disease-specific treatment with nicotinergic agonists. PMID:22348557

  13. Three-dimensional chemical imaging of skin using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drutis, Dane M.; Hancewicz, Thomas M.; Pashkovski, Eugene; Feng, Lin; Mihalov, Dawn; Holtom, Gary; Ananthapadmanabhan, Kavssery P.; Xie, X. Sunney; Misra, Manoj

    2014-11-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is used to generate structural and chemical three-dimensional images of native skin. We employed SRS microscopy to investigate the microanatomical features of skin and penetration of topically applied materials. Image depth stacks are collected at distinct wavelengths corresponding to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, and water in the skin. We observed that corneocytes in stratum corneum are grouped together in clusters, 100 to 250 ?m in diameter, separated by 10- to 25-?m-wide microanatomical skin-folds called canyons. These canyons occasionally extend down to depths comparable to that of the dermal-epidermal junction below the flat surface regions in porcine and human skin. SRS imaging shows the distribution of chemical species within cell clusters and canyons. Water is predominately located within the cell clusters, and its concentration rapidly increases at the transition from stratum corneum to viable epidermis. Canyons do not contain detectable levels of water and are rich in lipid material. Oleic acid-d34 applied to the skin surface lines the canyons down to a depth of 50 ?m below the surface of the skin. This observation could have implications on the evaluation of penetration profiles of bioactive materials measured using traditional methods, such as tape-stripping.

  14. About Skin-to-Skin Care (Kangaroo Care)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care ... overcrowded hospitals. Mothers were instructed to hold their diaper-clad premature infants beneath their clothing, skin-to- ...

  15. Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Fluoridated and Unfluoridated Bioactive Glass Composites: Structural Analysis and Bioactivity Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Kapoor, Seema; Sharma, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Biphasic bioceramic composites containing nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) and nanosized bioactive glasses have been prepared in the form of pellets and have been examined for the effects of bioglass concentrations and sintering temperature on the structural transformations and bioactivity behavior. Pure stoichiometric nano-HAP was synthesized using sol-gel technique. Two bioglasses synthesized in this work—fluoridated bioglass (Cao-P2O5-Na2O3-CaF2) and unfluoridated bioglass (Cao-P2O5-Na2O3) designated as FBG and UFBG respectively, were added to nano-HAP with concentrations of 5, 10, 12 and 15%. The average particle sizes of synthesized HAP and bioglasses were 23 nm and 35 nm, respectively. The pellets were sintered at four different temperatures i.e. 1000 °C, 1150 °C, 1250 °C and 1350 °C. The investigations involved study of structural and bioactivity behavior of green and sintered pellets and their deviations from original materials i.e. HAP, FBG and UFBG, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase composition of the sintered pellets was found to be non-stoichiometric HAP with ?-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) and ?-TCP. It was revealed from SEM images that bonding mechanism was mainly solid state sintering for all pellets sintered at 1000 °C and 1150 °C and also for pellets with lower concentrations of bioglass i.e. 5% and 10% sintered at 1250 °C. Partly liquid phase sintering was observed for pellets with higher bioglass concentrations of 12% and 15% sintered at 1250 °C and same behaviour was noted for pellets at all concentrations of bioglasses at 1350 °C. The sintered density, hardness and compression strength of pellets have been influenced both by the concentration of the bioglasses and sintering temperature. It was observed that the biological HAP layer formation was faster on the green pellets surface than on pure HAP and sintered pellets, showing higher bioactivity in the green pellets.

  16. 76 FR 31362 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Versatile Onboard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ...and Production Act of 1993--Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors (Formerly...To Perform Project Entitled Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors) Notice...seq. (``the Act''), Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors...

  17. Bioactive Compounds Found in Brazilian Cerrado Fruits.

    PubMed

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Devilla, Ivano Alessandro; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso; Borges, Leonardo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Functional foods include any natural product that presents health-promoting effects, thereby reducing the risk of chronic diseases. Cerrado fruits are considered a source of bioactive substances, mainly phenolic compounds, making them important functional foods. Despite this, the losses of natural vegetation in the Cerrado are progressive. Hence, the knowledge propagation about the importance of the species found in Cerrado could contribute to the preservation of this biome. This review provides information about Cerrado fruits and highlights the structures and pharmacologic potential of functional compounds found in these fruits. Compounds detected in Caryocar brasiliense Camb. (pequi), Dipteryx alata Vog. (baru), Eugenia dysenterica DC. (cagaita), Eugenia uniflora L. (pitanga), Genipa americana L. (jenipapo), Hancornia speciosa Gomes (mangaba), Mauritia flexuosa L.f. (buriti), Myrciaria cauliflora (DC) Berg (jabuticaba), Psidium guajava L. (goiaba), Psidium spp. (araçá), Solanum lycocarpum St. Hill (lobeira), Spondias mombin L. (cajá), Annona crassiflora Mart. (araticum), among others are reported here. PMID:26473827

  18. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  19. Bioactive Compounds Found in Brazilian Cerrado Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Devilla, Ivano Alessandro; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso; Borges, Leonardo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Functional foods include any natural product that presents health-promoting effects, thereby reducing the risk of chronic diseases. Cerrado fruits are considered a source of bioactive substances, mainly phenolic compounds, making them important functional foods. Despite this, the losses of natural vegetation in the Cerrado are progressive. Hence, the knowledge propagation about the importance of the species found in Cerrado could contribute to the preservation of this biome. This review provides information about Cerrado fruits and highlights the structures and pharmacologic potential of functional compounds found in these fruits. Compounds detected in Caryocar brasiliense Camb. (pequi), Dipteryx alata Vog. (baru), Eugenia dysenterica DC. (cagaita), Eugenia uniflora L. (pitanga), Genipa americana L. (jenipapo), Hancornia speciosa Gomes (mangaba), Mauritia flexuosa L.f. (buriti), Myrciaria cauliflora (DC) Berg (jabuticaba), Psidium guajava L. (goiaba), Psidium spp. (araçá), Solanum lycocarpum St. Hill (lobeira), Spondias mombin L. (cajá), Annona crassiflora Mart. (araticum), among others are reported here. PMID:26473827

  20. Electrospinning Bioactive Supramolecular Polymers from Water

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a high-throughput, low-cost technique for manufacturing long fibers from solution. Conventionally, this technique is used with covalent polymers with large molecular weights. We report here the electrospinning of functional peptide-based supramolecular polymers from water at very low concentrations (<4 wt %). Molecules with low molecular weights (<1 kDa) could be electrospun because they self-assembled into one-dimensional supramolecular polymers upon solvation and the critical parameters of viscosity, solution conductivity, and surface tension were optimized for this technique. The supramolecular structure of the electrospun fibers could ensure that certain residues, like bioepitopes, are displayed on the surface even after processing. This system provides an opportunity to electrospin bioactive supramolecular materials from water for biomedical applications. PMID:24697625

  1. Electrospinning bioactive supramolecular polymers from water.

    PubMed

    Tayi, Alok S; Pashuck, E Thomas; Newcomb, Christina J; McClendon, Mark T; Stupp, Samuel I

    2014-04-14

    Electrospinning is a high-throughput, low-cost technique for manufacturing long fibers from solution. Conventionally, this technique is used with covalent polymers with large molecular weights. We report here the electrospinning of functional peptide-based supramolecular polymers from water at very low concentrations (<4 wt %). Molecules with low molecular weights (<1 kDa) could be electrospun because they self-assembled into one-dimensional supramolecular polymers upon solvation and the critical parameters of viscosity, solution conductivity, and surface tension were optimized for this technique. The supramolecular structure of the electrospun fibers could ensure that certain residues, like bioepitopes, are displayed on the surface even after processing. This system provides an opportunity to electrospin bioactive supramolecular materials from water for biomedical applications. PMID:24697625

  2. A compilation of Bioactive Compounds from Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Ramar Perumal; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam

    2008-01-01

    This review deals with the key bioactive compounds and the role of medicinal plants in Ayurvedic systems of medicine in India and their earlier investigation. There has been an increase in demand for the Phytopharmaceutical products of Ayurv?da in Western countries, because of the fact that the allopathic drugs have more side effects. Many pharmaceutical companies are now concentrating on manufacturing of Ayurv?dic Phytopharmaceutical products. Ayurv?da is the Indian traditional system of medicine, which also deals about pharmaceutical science. Different type of plant parts used for the Ayurvedic formulation; overall out line of those herbal scenario and its future prospects for the scientific evaluation of medicinal plants used by traditional healers are also discussed. In India most of them, where Ayurvedic treatment is frequently used, for their ailments and provides instructions to local people how to prepare medicine from the herbs. As much as possible importance is also given for the taxonomic literature. PMID:19238245

  3. Bioactive properties of honey with propolis.

    PubMed

    Osés, S M; Pascual-Maté, A; Fernández-Muiño, M A; López-Díaz, T M; Sancho, M T

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, propolis is used as an innovative preservative and as a bioactive food supplement. Due to its bitter and astringent flavour, propolis is hardly accepted by consumers. The aim of this study was to obtain a likeable food product made with honey and propolis, whose antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties were enhanced in comparison with those of the base honeys used. 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5% soft propolis extracts were added to honeys and the products that most appealed to the users were subjected to further research. Total phenolics, flavonoids, ABTS free radical and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities increased in all mixtures. Antimicrobial activity of the combined products showed synergic effects, resulting in higher results than those of the base honeys and propolis extracts. Therefore, honeys enriched with small amounts of propolis extracts are promising functional foods. PMID:26593609

  4. Influence of mental stress on platelet bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Koudouovoh-Tripp, Pia; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that various mental stress conditions contribute, or at least influence, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in somatic, as well as in psychiatric disorders; blood platelets are supposed to represent a possible link in this respect. The anculeated platelets are the smallest corpuscular elements circulating in the human blood. They display different serotonergic markers which seem to reflect the central nervous serotonin metabolism. They are known as main effectors in haematological processes but recent research highlights their role in the innate and adaptive immune system. Platelets are containing a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immune-modulatory bioactive compounds in their granules and are expressing immune-competent surface markers. Research gives hint that platelets activation and reactivity is increased by mental stress. This leads to enhanced cross talk with the immune system via paracrine secretion, receptor interaction and formation of platelet leucocyte-aggregates. Recently it has been demonstrated that the immune system can have a remarkable impact in the development of psychiatric disorders. Therefore platelets represent an interesting research area in psychiatry and their role as a possible biomarker has been investigated. We review the influence of mental stress on what is termed platelet bioactivity in this article, which subsumes the mainly immune-modulatory activity of platelets in healthy volunteers, elderly persons with chronic care-giving strain, patients with cardiovascular diseases who are prone to psychosocial stress, as well as in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. Research data suggest that stress enhances platelet activity, reactivity and immune-modulatory capacities. PMID:24175179

  5. Bioactive metabolites from Spilanthes acmella Murr.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Suphapong, Saowapa; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Lawung, Ratana; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2009-01-01

    Spilanthes acmella Murr. (Compositae) has been used as a traditional medicine for toothache, rheumatism and fever. Its extracts had been shown to exhibit vasorelaxant and antioxidant activities. Herein, its antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were evaluated. Agar dilution method assays against 27 strains of microorganisms were performed. Results showed that fractions from the chloroform and methanol extracts inhibited the growth of many tested organisms, e.g. Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC 10356 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64-256 mg/mL and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 with MIC of 128-256 mg/mL. The tested fractions all exhibited antioxidant properties in both DPPH and SOD assays. Potent radical scavenging activity was observed in the DPPH assay. No cytotoxic effects of the extracts against KB and HuCCA-1 cell lines were evident. Bioassay-guided isolation resulted in a diverse group of bioactive compounds such as phenolics [vanillic acid (2), trans-ferulic acid (5) and trans-isoferulic acid (6)], coumarin (scopoletin, 4) and triterpenoids like 3-acetylaleuritolic acid (1), b-sitostenone (3), stigmasterol and stigmasteryl-3-O-b-D-glucopyranosides, in addition to a mixture of stigmasteryl-and b-sitosteryl-3-O-b-D-glucopyranosides. The compounds 1-6 represent bioactive metabolites of S. acmella Murr. that were never previously reported. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the potential benefits of this medicinal plant as a rich source of high therapeutic value compounds for medicines, cosmetics, supplements and as a health food. PMID:19255544

  6. Immunopathology of skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Khan, N; Maheshwari, V; Trivedi, I; Kalam, A

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted on 130 patients suffering from skin lesions which included psoriasis, lichen planus, DLE, pemphigus, vitiligo and alopecia areata. Forty age-and-sex-matched healthy individuals served as control. Serum IgG, IgM, and circulating immune complexes (CIC) were estimated. Significant increase in serum IgG (1937.2 +/- 1030.43 mg%) and IgM (232.12 +/- 136.98 mg%) was observed in all the skin lesions when compared with controls except in lichen planus where they were significantly lowered, values being 580.61+/- 77.35 mg% and 66.88 +/- 6.59 mg% respectively. CIC levels were significantly raised (P< 0.00 1) in various skin lesions (40.49+/-23.29) when compared with controls (17.68+/- 3.21), but no significance was observed in lichen planus( 17.72 +/- 4.28). Serum IgG, IgM and CIC were statistically significantly altered depending on the extent of the lesion and lowered significantly to almost normal values following treatment, thereby confirming the role of immunity in the pathogenesis of these skin disorders. PMID:17664758

  7. Healthy Skin Matters

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are many false ideas about what causes acne. Acne Most teenagers get a skin disease called acne (AK-nee). The blackheads and pimples can be ... that almost everyone gets them at some point. Acne isn’t usually serious, but severe cases can ...

  8. Noninvasive Skin Tightening Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive skin tightening has become one of the most common cosmetic aesthetic procedures being performed today. The use of radiofrequency devices for these procedures has been at the forefront of this trend for the past several years. Newer and more sophisticated radiofrequency devices are being brought to the market and presented here are the Venus Freeze and Venus Legacy. PMID:26155322

  9. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy. PMID:25182982

  10. Noninvasive Skin Tightening Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Noninvasive skin tightening has become one of the most common cosmetic aesthetic procedures being performed today. The use of radiofrequency devices for these procedures has been at the forefront of this trend for the past several years. Newer and more sophisticated radiofrequency devices are being brought to the market and presented here are the Venus Freeze and Venus Legacy. PMID:26155322

  11. Immunity and skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.B.; Brysk, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations in humans and animal studies support the theory that immunologic surveillance plays an important role in limiting the development of skin malignancies. These immune responses undergo progressive diminution with age. In addition, other factors, such as bereavement, poor nutrition, and acute and chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, can further diminish immune mechanisms.

  12. Reprint of: Review of bioactive glass: From Hench to hybrids.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julian R

    2015-09-01

    Bioactive glasses are reported to be able to stimulate more bone regeneration than other bioactive ceramics but they lag behind other bioactive ceramics in terms of commercial success. Bioactive glass has not yet reached its potential but research activity is growing. This paper reviews the current state of the art, starting with current products and moving onto recent developments. Larry Hench's 45S5 Bioglass® was the first artificial material that was found to form a chemical bond with bone, launching the field of bioactive ceramics. In vivo studies have shown that bioactive glasses bond with bone more rapidly than other bioceramics, and in vitro studies indicate that their osteogenic properties are due to their dissolution products stimulating osteoprogenitor cells at the genetic level. However, calcium phosphates such as tricalcium phosphate and synthetic hydroxyapatite are more widely used in the clinic. Some of the reasons are commercial, but others are due to the scientific limitations of the original Bioglass 45S5. An example is that it is difficult to produce porous bioactive glass templates (scaffolds) for bone regeneration from Bioglass 45S5 because it crystallizes during sintering. Recently, this has been overcome by understanding how the glass composition can be tailored to prevent crystallization. The sintering problems can also be avoided by synthesizing sol-gel glass, where the silica network is assembled at room temperature. Process developments in foaming, solid freeform fabrication and nanofibre spinning have now allowed the production of porous bioactive glass scaffolds from both melt- and sol-gel-derived glasses. An ideal scaffold for bone regeneration would share load with bone. Bioceramics cannot do this when the bone defect is subjected to cyclic loads, as they are brittle. To overcome this, bioactive glass polymer hybrids are being synthesized that have the potential to be tough, with congruent degradation of the bioactive inorganic and the polymer components. Key to this is creating nanoscale interpenetrating networks, the organic and inorganic components of which have covalent coupling between them, which involves careful control of the chemistry of the sol-gel process. Bioactive nanoparticles can also now be synthesized and their fate tracked as they are internalized in cells. This paper reviews the main developments in the field of bioactive glass and its variants, covering the importance of control of hierarchical structure, synthesis, processing and cellular response in the quest for new regenerative synthetic bone grafts. The paper takes the reader from Hench's Bioglass 45S5 to new hybrid materials that have tailorable mechanical properties and degradation rates. PMID:26235346

  13. Cyclodextrins as encapsulation agents for plant bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Eva; Grootveld, Martin; Soares, Graça; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-30

    Plants possess a wide range of molecules capable of improve healing: fibre, vitamins, phytosterols, and further sulphur-containing compounds, carotenoids, organic acid anions and polyphenolics. However, they require an adequate level of protection from the environmental conditions to prevent losing their structural integrity and bioactivity. Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides arising from the degradation of starch, which can be a viable option as encapsulation technique. Cyclodextrins are inexpensive, friendly to humans, and also capable of improving the biological, chemical and physical properties of bioactive molecules. Therefore, the aim of this review is to highlight the use of cyclodextrins as encapsulating agents for bioactive plant molecules in the pharmaceutical field. PMID:24299757

  14. Not miR-ly micromanagers: the functions and regulatory networks of miRNAs in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Riemondy, Kent; Hoefert, Jaimee E

    2014-01-01

    The microRNA (miRNA) pathway is a widespread mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotic cells. In animals, each miRNA species can regulate hundreds of protein coding genes, resulting in pervasive functions for miRNAs in numerous cellular processes. Since the identification of the first mammalian miRNA, the function of miRNAs in mammals has been a topic of great interest, both because of the versatile roles of miRNAs in biological systems, as well as the clinical potential of these regulatory RNAs. With well-defined cell lineages and the availability of versatile tools for both in vivo and in vitro studies, mammalian skin has emerged as an important system in which to examine miRNAs’ functions in adult tissues. In this review, we discuss recent insights into the functions and regulatory networks of miRNAs in mammals, with a specific focus on murine skin development as a model system. We first introduce functional analyses of the miRNA biogenesis pathway in the skin, then highlight the functions of individual miRNAs in skin development, followed by an examination of miRNA roles in skin stress responses. We finish with a discussion of miRNA regulatory networks and emphasize future challenges and emerging technologies that permit the genome-wide study of miRNA functions and regulatory mechanisms in mammalian skin. PMID:25044412

  15. Improved electrodes for skin contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, J. G.; Lattanzi, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Design is described of thick, flexible electrodes with appropriate metal surfaces which prevent unnecessary skin motion. Electrodes provide sufficient radial pressure directed toward body surface to depress skin a noticeable portion of its normal resilient thickness.

  16. Staining of skin with dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    WITTGENSTEIN, E; BERRY, H K

    1960-09-30

    The reaction of skin with dihydroxyacetone to produce a brown "artificial tan" appears to proceed through combination with free amino groups in skin proteins, and particularly by combination of dihydroxyacetone with the free guanido group in arginine. PMID:13845496

  17. Taking Care of Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Puberty Video: Am I Normal? (Girls and Puberty) Movie: Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page ... Your Skin Checking Out Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions Movie: Skin Eek! It's Eczema! Fungal Infections How Stitches ...

  18. Skin Cancer: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skin cancer appears in many shapes and sizes. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) This is a very common type of ... lip; skin on the lip can get thick Squamous cell carcinoma . These patients all have forms of squamous cell ...

  19. Brain-Skin Connection: Stress, Inflammation and Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lyga, John

    2014-01-01

    The intricate relationship between stress and skin conditions has been documented since ancient times. Recent clinical observations also link psychological stress to the onset or aggravation of multiple skin diseases. However, the exact underlying mechanisms have only been studied and partially revealed in the past 20 years or so. In this review, the authors will discuss the recent discoveries in the field of “Brain-Skin Connection”, summarizing findings from the overlapping fields of psychology, endocrinology, skin neurobiology, skin inflammation, immunology, and pharmacology. PMID:24853682

  20. Dynamic Skin Triangulation (extended abstract)

    E-print Network

    Sullivan, John M.

    Dynamic Skin Triangulation (extended abstract) Ho-Lun Cheng , Tamal K. Dey , Herbert Edelsbrunner small and large angles. Skin Surfaces. The approach to deforming surfaces taken in this paper is based on the technical notion of skin surfaces, as introduced in [3]. The main reason for this choice is the existence

  1. Polyamines and nonmelanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, Susan K.

    2007-11-01

    Elevated levels of polyamines have long been associated with skin tumorigenesis. Tightly regulated metabolism of polyamines is critical for cell survival and normal skin homeostasis, and these controls are dysregulated in skin tumorigenesis. A key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is upregulated in skin tumors compared to normal skin. Use of transgenic mouse models has demonstrated that polyamines play an essential role in the early promotional phase of skin tumorigenesis. The formation of skin tumors in these transgenic mice is dependent upon polyamine biosynthesis, especially putrescine, since treatment with inhibitors of ODC activity blocks the formation of skin tumors and causes the rapid regression of existing tumors. Although the mechanism by which polyamines promote skin tumorigenesis are not well understood, elevated levels of polyamines have been shown to stimulate epidermal proliferation, alter keratinocyte differentiation status, increase neovascularization, and increase synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in a manner similar to that seen in wound healing. It is becoming increasingly apparent that elevated polyamine levels activate not only epidermal cells but also underlying stromal cells in the skin to promote the development and progression of skin tumors. The inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis has potential to be an effective chemoprevention strategy for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  2. AT NORTHWESTERN SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    six Skin Disease Research Centers as designated by the National Institutes of Health." Joan GuitartTHE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE "Through the Skin Cancer Institute, we are endeavoring

  3. Sun Safety: Save Your Skin!

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sunburn. To remind ever yone to protect their skin and health while enjoying the outdoors, the National Council on ... for skin cancer •a family member who’shad skin cancer If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care pre- cautions; some ...

  4. Physiological skin changes during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kelly H

    2015-03-01

    Physicians may often mistake normal physiological skin changes in pregnancy for pathologic changes, so being able to recognize the skin manifestations unique to pregnancy is of the utmost importance to avoid unnecessary testing and stress for the obstetric patient. Most physiological skin changes will resolve postpartum, so reassurance and expectant management is indicated in almost all cases. PMID:25517755

  5. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resemble non-cancerous skin tumors or benign ulcers. Squamous Cell Carcinoma : Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer on ... skin of the feet. Most types of early squamous cell carcinoma are confined to the skin and do not ...

  6. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  7. [Skin manifestations of monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Hello, M; Barbarot, S; Néel, A; Connault, J; Graveleau, J; Durant, C; Decaux, O; Hamidou, M

    2014-01-01

    Whatever their aetiology, monoclonal gammopathies can be associated to several clinical features. Mechanisms are various and sometimes unknown. Skin is frequently involved and may represent a challenging diagnosis. Indeed, skin manifestations are either the presenting features and isolated, or at the background of a systemic syndrome. Our objective was to review the various skin manifestations that have been associated with monoclonal gammopathies. PMID:24070793

  8. Magnetoliposomes: versatile innovative nanocolloids for use in biotechnology and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stefaan J H; Hodenius, Michael; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2009-02-01

    The high biocompatibility and versatile nature of liposomes have made these particles keystone components in many hot-topic biomedical research areas. Liposomes can be combined with a large variety of nanomaterials, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocores. Because the unique features of both the magnetizable colloid and the versatile lipid bilayer can be joined, the resulting so-called magnetoliposomes can be exploited in a great array of biotechnological and biomedical applications. In this article, we highlight the use of magnetoliposomes in immobilizing enzymes, both water-soluble and hydrophobic ones, as well as their potential in several biomedical applications, including MRI, hyperthermia cancer treatment and drug delivery. The goal of this article is not to list all known uses of magnetoliposomes but rather to present some conspicuous applications in comparison to other currently used nanoparticles. PMID:19193184

  9. Research and development of a versatile portable speech prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Versatile Portable Speech Prosthesis (VPSP), a synthetic speech output communication aid for non-speaking people is described. It was intended initially for severely physically limited people with cerebral palsy who are in electric wheelchairs. Hence, it was designed to be placed on a wheelchair and powered from a wheelchair battery. It can easily be separated from the wheelchair. The VPSP is versatile because it is designed to accept any means of single switch, multiple switch, or keyboard control which physically limited people have the ability to use. It is portable because it is mounted on and can go with the electric wheelchair. It is a speech prosthesis, obviously, because it speaks with a synthetic voice for people unable to speak with their own voices. Both hardware and software are described.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Acral peeling skin syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Acral peeling skin syndrome On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... definitions Reviewed April 2014 What is acral peeling skin syndrome? Acral peeling skin syndrome is a skin ...

  11. A Versatile Method for Grafting Polymers on Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gann, John P.; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple and versatile method for grafting polymers on nanoparticles. A procedure was developed for the synthesis and subsequent functionalization of silica nanoparticles with a perfluorophenylazide. Polymers were then grafted by the photochemically induced insertion reactions of the perfluorophenylnitrene. Polystyrene, poly(4-vinylpyridine), and poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) were successfully grafted on silica nanoparticles. Grafting density was studied with regard to polymer concentration and molecular weight. PMID:18433181

  12. Pseudooutbreak of Candida versatilitis fungemia in a microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mary E; Benjamin, Lynette E; Steinkraus, Gregory E

    2003-05-01

    Candida versatilitis was isolated from 10 blood cultures that had been supplemented with olive oil to promote the growth of Malassezia spp., and from the stock olive oil bottle in the laboratory. This unusual non-pathogenic yeast isolate was readily identified by DNA sequencing methodology. This report also points out that care must be taken to ensure the sterility of supplements added to blood culture media. PMID:12742323

  13. Recordable Digital Versatile Disc for High Data Transfer Rate Recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Komura, Atsushi; Satake, Kenichi; Kurose, Yutaka; Takeshima, Hideharu; Maeda, Shuuichi

    2003-02-01

    We studied the characteristics of the 4.7 GB recordable digital versatile disc (DVD-R) for a high data transfer rate higher than 44 Mbps. Using simulation, analytical pulse sequence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement, we analyzed the thermal interference. We also used originally synthesized dye with low thermal interference and realized good recording characteristics with jitter values of around 8% at 66 Mbps recording and 11% at 89 Mbps recording.

  14. Metabolism of Monoepoxides of Methyl Linoleate: Bioactivation and Detoxification

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Metabolism of Monoepoxides of Methyl Linoleate: Bioactivation and Detoxification Jessica F. Greene diet (1), is a major component of membrane fatty acids (2) and endothelial cell trigylceride stores (3

  15. Identifying bioactive components in natural products through chromatographic fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Xu, Qing-Song; Chan, Chi-On; Mok, Daniel Kam-Wah; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Chau, Foo-Tim

    2015-04-22

    Bioactive component identification is a crucial issue in search for new drug leads. We provide a new strategy to search for bioactive components based on Sure Independence Screening (SIS) and interval PLS (iPLS). The method, which is termed as SIS-iPLS, is not only able to find out the chief bioactive components, but also able to judge how many components should be there responsible for the total bioactivity. The method is totally "data-driven" with no need for prior knowledge about the unknown mixture analyzed, therefore especially suitable for effect-directed work like bioassay-guided fractionation. Two data sets, a synthetic mixture system of twelve components and a suite of Radix Puerariae Lobatae extracts samples, are used to test the identification ability of the SIS-iPLS method. PMID:25819786

  16. Hydrogeologic Controls on Bioactive Zone Development in Biostimulated Aquifers

    E-print Network

    Schillig, Peter Curtis

    2012-05-31

    This study investigates the hydrogeological factors that control the feedback between bioactive zone formation and groundwater flow, as well as developing and assessing tools useful for making these investigations. The ...

  17. Bioactive and Biodegradable Nanocomposites and Hybrid Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Allo, Bedilu A.; Costa, Daniel O.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S.

    2012-01-01

    Strategies for bone tissue engineering and regeneration rely on bioactive scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix and act as templates onto which cells attach, multiply, migrate and function. Of particular interest are nanocomposites and organic-inorganic (O/I) hybrid biomaterials based on selective combinations of biodegradable polymers and bioactive inorganic materials. In this paper, we review the current state of bioactive and biodegradable nanocomposite and O/I hybrid biomaterials and their applications in bone regeneration. We focus specifically on nanocomposites based on nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glass (BG) fillers in combination with biodegradable polyesters and their hybrid counterparts. Topics include 3D scaffold design, materials that are widely used in bone regeneration, and recent trends in next generation biomaterials. We conclude with a perspective on the future application of nanocomposites and O/I hybrid biomaterials for regeneration of bone. PMID:24955542

  18. Current Strategies to Improve the Bioactivity of PEEK

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rui; Tang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic thermoplastic polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is becoming a popular component of clinical orthopedic and spinal applications, but its practical use suffers from several limitations. Although PEEK is biocompatible, chemically stable, radiolucent and has an elastic modulus similar to that of normal human bone, it is biologically inert, preventing good integration with adjacent bone tissues upon implantation. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK to improve the bone-implant interface. Two main strategies have been used to overcome the inert character of PEEK. One approach is surface modification to activate PEEK through surface treatment alone or in combination with a surface coating. Another strategy is to prepare bioactive PEEK composites by impregnating bioactive materials into PEEK substrate. Researchers believe that modified bioactive PEEK will have a wide range of orthopedic applications. PMID:24686515

  19. Modulation of inflammatory genes by natural dietary bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Lai, Ching-Shu; Dushenkov, Slavik; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2009-06-10

    Several epidemiologic studies have shown that chronic inflammation predisposes individuals to various types of cancer. Many cancers arise from sites of infection, chronic irritation, and inflammation. Conversely, an oncogenic change induces an inflammatory microenvironment that promotes the development of tumors. Natural bioactive compounds in dietary plant products including fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, tea, and wine are claimed to help prevent cancer, degenerative diseases, and chronic and acute inflammation. Modern methods in cell and molecular biology allow us to understand the interactions of different natural bioactive compounds with basic mechanisms of inflammatory response. The molecular pathways of this cancer-related inflammation are now unraveled. Natural bioactive compounds exert anti-inflammatory activity by modulating pro-inflammatory gene expressions have shown promising chemopreventive activity. This review summarizes current knowledge on natural bioactive compounds that act through the signaling pathways and modulate inflammatory gene expressions, thus providing evidence for these substances in cancer chemopreventive action. PMID:19489612

  20. Versatile new ion source for the analysis of materials in open air under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Robert B; Laramée, James A; Durst, H Dupont

    2005-04-15

    A new ion source has been developed for rapid, noncontact analysis of materials at ambient pressure and at ground potential. The new source, termed DART (for "Direct Analysis in Real Time"), is based on the reactions of electronic or vibronic excited-state species with reagent molecules and polar or nonpolar analytes. DART has been installed on a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) that provides improved selectivity and accurate elemental composition assignment through exact mass measurements. Although DART has been applied to the analysis of gases, liquids, and solids, a unique application is the direct detection of chemicals on surfaces without requiring sample preparation, such as wiping or solvent extraction. DART has demonstrated success in sampling hundreds of chemicals, including chemical agents and their signatures, pharmaceutics, metabolites, peptides and oligosaccharides, synthetic organics, organometallics, drugs of abuse, explosives, and toxic industrial chemicals. These species were detected on various surfaces, such as concrete, asphalt, human skin, currency, airline boarding passes, business cards, fruits, vegetables, spices, beverages, body fluids, horticultural leaves, cocktail glasses, and clothing. DART employs no radioactive components and is more versatile than devices using radioisotope-based ionization. Because its response is instantaneous, DART provides real-time information, a critical requirement for screening or high throughput. PMID:15828760

  1. Bioactivation of myelotoxic xenobiotics by human neutrophil myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants and drugs are toxic to the bone marrow. Some of these xenobiotics may initiate toxicity after undergoing bioactivation to free radicals and/or other reactive electrophiles. Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the one-electron oxidative bioactivation of a variety of xenobiotics in vitro. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidative enzyme found in very high concentration in the neutrophils of human bone marrow. In this study, human MPO was evaluated to determine its ability to catalyze the in vitro bioactivation of known bone marrow toxicants that contain the aromatic hydroxyl (Ar-OH), aromatic amine (Ar-N-R{sub 2}), or heterocyclic tertiary amine ({double bond}N-R) moieties. The formation of free radical metabolites during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of hydroquinone and catechol (benzene metabolites), mitoxantrone and ametantrone (antitumor drugs), and chlorpromazine and promazine (antipsychotic drugs) was demonstrated by EPR spectroscopy. The reactivity of the products formed during the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of ({sup 14}C)hydroquinone and ({sup 14}C)catechol was shown by their covalent binding to protein and DNA in vitro. The covalently binding metabolite in each case is postulated to be the quinone form of the xenobiotic. In addition, both GSH and NADH were oxidized by the reactive intermediate(s) formed during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of many of the bone marrow toxicants tested. It was also shown that p,p-biphenol stimulated the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of both hydroquinone and catechol, while p-cresol stimulated the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of catechol.

  2. Bioactive ceramic glasses in situ synthesized by laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taca, Mihaela; Vasile, Eugeniu; Boroica, Lucica; Udrea, Mircea; Medianu, Rares; Munteanu, Maria Cristina

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of bioactive glass from raw materials even during the laser deposition process, could provide formation of a biocompatible layer on the metallic prosthesis. During the laser irradiation melting and ultrarapid solidification of ceramic materials occur and glasses controlled by the process parameters (especially laser power and solidification rate) will be obtained. The aim of the present paper is to study the influence of the processing parameters on the laser synthesized glasses chemical composition, structure and bioactive behaviour.

  3. Biofunctionalized electrospun silk mats as a topical bioactive dressing for accelerated wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A.; Wang, X.Y.; Kaplan, D.L.; Garlick, J.A.; Egles, C.

    2010-01-01

    Materials able to deliver topically bioactive molecules represent a new generation of biomaterials. In this article, we describe the use of silk mats, made of electrospun nanoscale silk fibers containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), for the promotion of wound healing processes. In our experiments, we demonstrated that EGF is incorporated into the silk mats and slowly released in a time-dependent manner (25% EGF release in 170 h). We tested these materials using a new model of wounded human skin-equivalents displaying the same structure as human skin and able to heal using the same molecular and cellular mechanisms found in vivo. This human three-dimensional model allows us to demonstrate that the biofunctionalized silk mats, when placed on the wounds as a dressing, aid the healing by increasing the time of wound closure by the epidermal tongue by 90%. The preservation of the structure of the mats during the healing period as demonstrated by electronic microscopy, the biological action of the dressing, as well as the biocompatibility of the silk demonstrate that this biomaterial is a new and very promising material for medical applications, especially for patients suffering from chronic wounds. PMID:19162575

  4. Skin contamination dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR); Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Cazalas, Edward (Corvallis, OR)

    2011-06-21

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  5. Newborn skin care.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jonathan A

    2013-02-01

    Many organ systems undergo significant and rapid changes during the transition from an intrauterine to an extrauterine environment, especially those which serve as interfaces between the infant and the external environment. Historically the skin care methods employed during and after this period of rapid physiologic change have been derived from individual anecdotal experience or cultural tradition, rather than evidence-based or pathomechanistically derived data. While research in this area has historically been limited, it is increasing in scope and volume, and recent work has shed light on the changes experienced by the cutaneous organ during this period of transition. This increased understanding has driven new recommendations in skin care protocols for newborn infants and neonates. PMID:23419756

  6. Alkaline phosphatase grafting on bioactive glasses and glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Verné, Enrica; Ferraris, Sara; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Spriano, Silvia; Bianchi, Claudia L; Naldoni, Alberto; Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara

    2010-01-01

    Bone integration of orthopaedic or dental implants and regeneration of damaged bone at the surgical site are still unresolved problems in prosthetic surgery. For this reason, biomimetic surfaces (i.e. both inorganic and biological bioactive surfaces) represent a challenge for bone implantation. In this research work a hydrolase enzyme (alkaline phosphatase) was covalently grafted to inorganic bioactive glass and glass ceramic surfaces, in order to impart biological bioactivity. The functionalized samples were analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to verify enzyme presence on the surface. Enzyme activity was measured by means of UV-visual spectroscopy after reaction with the natural substrate. Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy observations allowed monitoring of the morphological and chemical modification of the materials during the different steps of functionalization. In vitro inorganic bioactivity was investigated by soaking samples in simulated body fluid. Enzymatic activity of the samples was tested and compared before and after soaking. Enzymatic activity of the solution was monitored at different experimental times. This study demonstrates that alkaline phosphatase could be successfully grafted onto different bioactive surfaces while maintaining its activity. Presence of the enzyme in vitro enhances the inorganic bioactivity of the materials tested. PMID:19540371

  7. Flies With Skin Blisters.

    PubMed

    Simons, Matias

    2015-08-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) belongs to a family of genetic conditions that cause the skin to be fragile and to blister easily. Although most of the genes involved are known, the molecular mechanisms underlying keratin aggregation remain obscure. In this issue of the Journal, Bohnekamp et al. report on a novel EBS model that is based on the de novo formation of keratin filaments in "keratin null flies." PMID:26174537

  8. Nitrogen-Based Diazeniumdiolates: Versatile Nitric Oxide-Releasing Compounds for Biomedical Research and Potential Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Joseph E.; Keefer, Larry K.

    2002-12-01

    Nitric oxide-generating ions of the nitrogen-diazeniumdiolate class with the general structure R1R2N-[N(O)NO]1 have been prepared by exposing primary, secondary, and polyamines to nitric oxide (NO). The resulting complexes regenerate bioactive NO at physiological pH with half-lives ranging from 2 seconds to 20 hours. An important goal in our research is to deliver NO to a specific organ or cell type where it is needed without affecting other NO-sensitive parts of the anatomy. By taking advantage of the remarkable chemical versatility of diazeniumdiolates, we have developed general strategies to prepare either tissue-selective NO donor drugs or materials containing NO delivery agents that can be physically placed near the target sites. Inhibition of blood coagulation, induction of penile erection, relief of pulmonary hypertension, and reversal of cerebral vasospasm are a few examples of their potential clinical applications.

    See Featured Molecules.

  9. Utility of High-Frequency Ultrasound: Moving Beyond the Surface to Detect Changes in Skin Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Valentina S.; Burk, Ruth S.; Creehan, Sue; Grap, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a versatile modality frequently used in clinical medicine, most likely due to its low cost, low risk to patients, and the ability to provide images in real time. Ultrasound used typically in clinical settings has frequencies between 2 and 12 MHz. Lower frequencies produce greater resolution but are limited in depth penetration; higher frequencies produce greater resolution, but depth of penetration is limited. High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) shows promise for detection of certain changes in the skin and this has implications for early detection of changes associated with pressure ulcer formation and wound healing. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of where HFUS has been used with the skin and provide some discussion on its utility with detecting skin changes related to pressure. PMID:24583666

  10. Ablation of human skin mast cells in situ by lysosomotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Hagforsen, Eva; Paivandy, Aida; Lampinen, Maria; Weström, Simone; Calounova, Gabriela; Melo, Fabio R; Rollman, Ola; Pejler, Gunnar

    2015-07-01

    Mast cells are known to have a detrimental impact on numerous types of inflammatory skin diseases such as contact dermatitis, atopic eczema and cutaneous mastocytosis. Regimens that dampen skin mast cell-mediated activities can thus offer an attractive therapeutic option under such circumstances. As mast cells are known to secrete a large array of potentially pathogenic compounds, both from preformed stores in secretory lysosomes (granules) and after de novo synthesis, mere inhibition of degranulation or interference with individual mast cell mediators may not be sufficient to provide an effective blockade of harmful mast cell activities. An alternative strategy may therefore be to locally reduce skin mast cell numbers. Here, we explored the possibility of using lysosomotropic agents for this purpose, appreciating the fact that mast cell granules contain bioactive compounds prone to trigger apoptosis if released into the cytosolic compartment. Based on this principle, we show that incubation of human skin punch biopsies with the lysosomotropic agents siramesine or Leu-Leu methyl ester preferably ablated the mast cell population, without causing any gross adverse effects on the skin morphology. Subsequent analysis revealed that mast cells treated with lysosomotropic agents predominantly underwent apoptotic rather than necrotic cell death. In summary, this study raises the possibility of using lysosomotropic agents as a novel approach to targeting deleterious mast cell populations in cutaneous mastocytosis and other skin disorders negatively influenced by mast cells. PMID:25808581

  11. Burchellin: study of bioactivity against Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti Linnaeus, 1762 is a widespread insect pest of serious medical importance. Since no effective vaccine is available for treating dengue, the eradication or control of the main mosquito vector is regarded as essential. Since conventional insecticides have limited success, plants may be an alternative source of larvicidal agents, since they contain a rich source of bioactive chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of the neolignan burchellin isolated from Ocotea cymbarum (Lauraceae), a plant from the Amazon region, against third instar larvae of A. aegypti. Methods Burchellin obtained from O. cymbarum was analyzed. The inhibitory activity against A. aegypti eggs and larvae and histological changes in the digestive system of treated L3 larvae were evaluated. In addition, nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide levels were determined, and cytotoxicity bioassays performed. Results The data showed that burchellin interfered with the development cycle of the mosquito, where its strongest toxic effect was 100% mortality in larvae (L3) at concentrations???30 ppm. This compound did not show target cell toxicity in peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice, and proved to have molecular stability when dissolved in water. The L3 and L4 larvae treated with the compound showed cellular destruction and disorganization, cell spacing, and vacuolization of epithelial cells in small regions of the midgut. Conclusion The neolignan burchellin proved to be a strong candidate for a natural, safe and stable phytolarvicidal to be used in population control of A. aegypti. PMID:24713267

  12. Microencapsulated Bioactive Agents and Method of Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0- 100 dynes per sq cm at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic watering solution, the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated, and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged, protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected. mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D structure of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  13. Thermal decomposition of bioactive sodium titanate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelingien, Matthieu; Mullens, Steven; Luyten, Jan; Meynen, Vera; Vinck, Evi; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul

    2009-09-01

    Alkali-treated orthopaedic titanium surfaces have earlier shown to induce apatite deposition. A subsequent heat treatment under air improved the adhesion of the sodium titanate layer but decreased the rate of apatite deposition. Furthermore, insufficient attention was paid to the sensitivity of titanium substrates to oxidation and nitriding during heat treatment under air. Therefore, in the present study, alkali-treated titanium samples were heat-treated under air, argon flow or vacuum. The microstructure and composition of their surfaces were characterized to clarify what mechanism is responsible for inhibiting in vitro calcium phosphate deposition after heat treatment. All heat treatments under various atmospheres turned out to be detrimental for apatite deposition. They led to the thermal decomposition of the dense sodium titanate basis near the interface with the titanium substrate. Depending on the atmosphere, several forms of Ti yO z were formed and Na 2O was sublimated. Consequently, less exchangeable sodium ions remained available. This pointed to the importance of the ion exchange capacity of the sodium titanate layer for in vitro bioactivity.

  14. Clinical applications of bioactive milk components.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Newburg, David S

    2015-07-01

    Milk represents a unique resource for translational medicine: It contains a rich pool of biologically active molecules with demonstrated clinical benefits. The ongoing characterization of the mechanistic process through which milk components promote development and immunity has revealed numerous milk-derived compounds with potential applications as clinical therapies in infectious and inflammatory disease, cancer, and other conditions. Lactoferrin is an effective antimicrobial and antiviral agent in high-risk patient populations and a potentially potent adjuvant to chemotherapy in lung cancer. Enteric nutrition formulas supplemented with transforming growth factor ?, a milk cytokine, have been shown to promote remission in pediatric Crohn's disease. A number of milk glycans, including human milk oligosaccharides, show promise in preclinical studies as antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agents. While active preclinical investigations of human milk may soon result in large-scale production of human milk molecules, bovine milk components in many instances represent a practical source of bioactive milk compounds for use in clinical trials. This review summarizes current efforts to translate the compounds derived from human and bovine milk into effective clinical therapies. These efforts suggest a common pathway for the translation of milk-derived compounds into clinical applications. PMID:26011900

  15. Bioactivities of phytochemicals in Araiostegia yunnanensis (Christ).

    PubMed

    Chen, Longsheng; Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Du, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    The profile and bioactivity of phytochemicals in Araiostegia yunnanensis (Christ) Cop were investigated. The total flavonoids content in A. yunnanensis is about 84.90 mg/g. By means of HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS, the main flavonoids in A. yunnanensis were tentatively identified as myricetin 3-O-rhamnosylglucoside, eriodictyol 7-O-rutinoside, quercetin 3-O-rutinoside, luteolin-7-O-apiosylglucoside, quercetin 3-O-rhamnosylgalactoside, and luteolin 7-O-glucoside. The extract (0.268 mg/ml total flavonoids) from A. yunnanensis showed very strong superoxide anion radical scavenging potential and reducing power, which are higher than those of rutin (0.25 mg/ml). The extract (0.268 mg/ml total flavonoids) from A. yunnanensis exhibited similar DPPH scavenging activity with rutin (0.25 mg/ml). However, rutin (0.25 mg/ml) showed a significantly higher ABTS radical scavenging effect than that of the extract (0.268 mg/ml total flavonoids) from A. yunnanensis. The methanol extract from A. yunnanensis showed obviously cytotoxic effects on A549 cells and it had no effect against acetylcholinesterase. PMID:25976789

  16. Interactions of bioactive glass materials in the oral environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efflandt, Sarah Elizabeth

    The aim of this research was to investigate bioactive glass materials for their use in dental restorations. Mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and wear resistance were considered initially, but the focus of this thesis was the biological properties such as reactions with saliva and interactions with natural dental tissues. Bioactive composite materials were created by incorporating bioactive glass and alumina powders into an aqueous suspension, slip casting, and infiltrating with resin. Microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance were evaluated. Mechanically, the composites are comparable to natural dental tissues and current dental materials with a strength of 206 +/- 18.7 MPa and a toughness of 1.74 +/- 0.08 MPa(m)1/2. Interfacial reactions were examined using bulk bioactive glasses. Disks were prepared from a melt, placed in saliva and incubated at 37°C. Surfaces were analyzed at 2, 5, 10, 21, and 42 days using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microdiffraction. Results showed changes at 2 days with apatite crystallization by 10 days. These glass disks were then secured against extracted human dentin and incubated in saliva for 21 or 42 days. Results from SEM, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and microdiffraction showed that dentin and bioactive glasses adhered in this in vitro environment due to attraction of collagen to bioactive glasses and growth of an interfacial apatite. After investigating these bulk glass responses, particulate bioactive glasses were placed in in vitro and in vivo set-ups for evaluation. Particles immersed in biologically buffered saliva showed crystallization of apatite at 3 days. These bioactive glass particles were placed in the molars of mini-pigs and left in vivo. After 30 days the bioactive paste was evaluated using SEM, EMPA and microdiffraction analyses. Results showed that the paste gained structural integrity and had chemical changes in vivo. These sets of experiments show that bioactive glasses have many mechanical and biological characteristics desirable for use in dental materials. Hopefully, the conclusions presented here will lead to further investigations toward their use in dentistry.

  17. A Versatile Source of PolarizationA Versatile Source of Polarization--Entangled photonsEntangled photons Andreas MaserAndreas Maser1,1,

    E-print Network

    Hensinger, Winfried

    A Versatile Source of PolarizationA Versatile Source of Polarization--Entangled photonsEntangled photons Andreas MaserAndreas Maser1,1, *, Ralph Wiegner*, Ralph Wiegner11 ,, UweUwe SchillingSchilling11 for the generation of a large variety of polarizationarization-- entangled photon states within the same experimental

  18. [Dry skin and black skin: what are the facts?].

    PubMed

    Mahé, A

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of the data in the literature on the potential specificities of the stratum corneum of so-called "black" skin, together with the afferent cutaneous hydration regulation process. The methodology of the studies is often debatable, not only for basic (absence of definition of "black skin") but also for technical reasons. Their results are often contradicting. Other than certain subtle differences, related to potentially enhanced preservation of the epidermis of dark skin from heliodermal xerosis, we conclude in the similarity of the physicochemical characteristics of the stratum corneum in the different color of skin. Moreover, the data available do not suggest a predisposition of certain skin colors to the occurrence of pathological states involving the stratum corneum. However, dark skin is characterized by its semiologic capacity of taking on a "ashy" aspect related to a better assessment of normal or xerotic stratum corneum because of melanic pigmentation. PMID:11976544

  19. Skin moisturization mechanisms: new data.

    PubMed

    Bonté, F

    2011-05-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances and excessive water loss. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, called the stratum corneum, which is composed of corneocytes, originating from the keratinocytes differentiation process, embedded in organized complex lipid domains. Moisturizing of the skin is recognized as the first anti-aging skin care. Skin moisturization is essential for its appearance, protection, complexion, softness and the reinforcement of its barrier properties against deleterious and exogenous environmental factors. The intrinsic water binding capacity of skin is not only due to the complex natural moisturizing factor present in corneocytes, but also to hyaluronic acid and a regulated water transport within the skin. Recent data shows that the water movements between the cells at the different levels of the epidermis are due to dedicated water and glycerol transport proteins named aquaporins. Their role in the skin moisturization is completed by corneodesmosomes and tight junctions. Water and pH are now shown to be of prime importance in the regulation of the epidermal enzymes linked to corneocytes desquamation and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, the level of moisturization of the skin is important in its protection against repeated exposure to various irritant agents or phenomena such as very frequent washing with strong tensioactive materials. PMID:21570537

  20. Bioactive and thermally compatible glass coating on zirconia dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, A; Hausmann, A; Weber, M; Fischer, J; Fischer, H

    2015-02-01

    The healing time of zirconia implants may be reduced by the use of bioactive glass coatings. Unfortunately, existing glasses are either bioactive like Bioglass 45S5 but thermally incompatible with the zirconia substrate, or they are thermally compatible but exhibit only a very low level of bioactivity. In this study, we hypothesized that a tailored substitution of alkaline earth metals and alkaline metals in 45S5 can lead to a glass composition that is both bioactive and thermally compatible with zirconia implants. A novel glass composition was analyzed using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and heating microscopy to investigate its chemical, physical, and thermal properties. Bioactivity was tested in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF). Smooth and microstructured glass coatings were applied using a tailored spray technique with subsequent thermal treatment. Coating adhesion was tested on implants that were inserted in bovine ribs. The cytocompatibility of the coating was analyzed using L929 mouse fibroblasts. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the novel glass was shown to be slightly lower (11.58 · 10(-6) K(-1)) than that of the zirconia (11.67 · 10(-6) K(-1)). After storage in SBF, the glass showed reaction layers almost identical to the bioactive glass gold standard, 45S5. A process window between 800 °C and 910 °C was found to result in densely sintered and amorphous coatings. Microstructured glass coatings on zirconia implants survived a minimum insertion torque of 60 Ncm in the in vitro experiment on bovine ribs. Proliferation and cytotoxicity of the glass coatings was comparable with the controls. The novel glass composition showed a strong adhesion to the zirconia substrate and a significant bioactive behavior in the SBF in vitro experiments. Therefore, it holds great potential to significantly reduce the healing time of zirconia dental implants. PMID:25421839

  1. Feasibility of skin surface elastography by tracking skin surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutts, Louise V.; Miller, Naomi R.; Harland, Christopher C.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances have led to a multitude of image modalities being used for visualization of tissue stiffness. High-resolution images of tissue stiffness are desirable, as they have the potential to provide useful diagnostic information. A noncontact optical imaging method has the attractions of low cost, simplicity, and utility when skin contact is undesirable. However, previous optical techniques have required the application of paint or ink to the surface of the skin and so have required contact. Therefore, the present study assessed the feasibility of tracking skin surface topography to produce elastograms. The study showed, by analyzing a variety of silicone skin surface replicas from various body sites of subjects of different ages, that skin surface elastography by tracking surface topography would be feasible. The study further showed that the quality of the strain images can be optimized by measuring skin line pattern frequency. Skin samples with high skin line frequency will achieve best spatial resolution, in the order of 1 mm, comparable to contact techniques reported previously. A mechanically inhomogeneous silicone replica was then imaged, illustrating the technique's ability to detect strain contrast. Finally, the feasibility of implementing the technique in vivo was illustrated using a single pigmented skin lesion.

  2. In-vivo differentiation of photo-aged epidermis skin by texture-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Weng, Cuncheng; Yu, Biying; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Two sets of in vivo female cheek skin epidermis images were analyzed through gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and fast fourier transform (FFT). One set was derived from women in their 20s and the other from women more than 60 years of age. GLCM was used to evaluate the texture features of the regions of interest within the cheek epidermis, and texture classification was subsequently performed. During texture classification, 25 images (320×240 pixels) in each age set were randomly selected. Three texture features, i.e., energy, contrast, and correlation, were obtained from the skin images and analyzed at four orientations (0°, 45°,90°, and 135°), accompanied by different distances between two pixels. The textures of the different aging skins were characterized by FFT, which provides the dermatoglyph orientation index. The differences in the textures between the young and old skin samples can be well described by the FFT dermatoglyph orientation index. The texture features varied among the different aging skins, which provide a versatile platform for differentiating the statuses of aging skins.

  3. Climate change and skin.

    PubMed

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many dermatoses. PMID:23407083

  4. Improved Skin Friction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved system for measuring aerodynamic skin friction which uses a dual-laser-beam oil-film interferometer was developed. Improvements in the optical hardware provided equal signal characteristics for each beam and reduced the cost and complexity of the system by replacing polarization rotation by a mirrored prism for separation of the two signals. An automated, objective, data-reduction procedure was implemented to eliminate tedious manual manipulation of the interferometry data records. The present system was intended for use in two-dimensional, incompressible flows over a smooth, level surface without pressure gradient, but the improvements discussed are not limited to this application.

  5. Low temperature skin treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipping, G.; Krishna, A.; Ruppert, U.; Srinivasan, R.; Walter, H.

    Although freezing has been a successful method of curing various kinds of skin lesions for at least 80 years, little progress has been made regarding the techniques and instruments available to the dermatoligist for applying cold. The attempts to improve this technique are reviewed, and the requirements is for successful cryotreatment are discussed taking warts as an example. With these requirements in mind, a simple and effective cryoprobe has been developed by the authors. Its design is described, and the experiences from a year's routine application of the probe to the treatment of warts are discussed.

  6. [Youth Healthcare guideline 'Skin disorders'].

    PubMed

    Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Gameren-Oosterom, Helma B M; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    There is a high incidence of skin disorders; these are also frequently encountered within Youth Healthcare (YHC). Some skin disorders are caused by an underlying disease, syndrome or child abuse. Therefore, detection of these causes in an early stage is important. Skin disorders can have a huge psychosocial impact on both child and parents. This is one of the reasons why prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, referral, and uniform advice and guidance are of great importance. The YHC Guideline examines counselling and advice, criteria for referral to primary or secondary healthcare, and skincare in general. It also describes the disorders that should be actively detected. The Guideline also looks at specific aspects of dark skins and ethnic diversity, and the impact of skin disorders on general wellbeing. The accompanying web-based tool includes argumentation and opinions from experts on more than 75 skin disorders, including illustrations and decision trees, to aid the drawing up of a treatment plan. PMID:23151335

  7. Fabrication of versatile nanocomponents using single-crystalline Au nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Park, Gwangseo; Ah, Chil Seong; Park, Hyung Ju; Yun, Wan Soo; Ha, Dong Han

    2005-12-01

    We suggest an approach to the fabrication of versatile nanocomponents designed deliberately by selective Ga+ focused-ion-beam etching or Ar+ ion milling of single-crystalline Au nanoplates synthesized by the chemical reaction. The nanocomponents have various shapes like gear, wheel, dumbbell, square and letter "A" with in-plane size of about 400nm and thickness of 40-50nm. They can be picked up or moved freely one by one to be assembled into sophisticated nanodevices or micromachines. The applicability of our approach both to the fundamental research and to the applied research is discussed.

  8. Fabrication of versatile nanocomponents using single-crystalline Au nanoplates

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Yong Ju; Park, Gwangseo; Ah, Chil Seong; Park, Hyung Ju; Yun, Wan Soo; Ha, Dong Han

    2005-12-05

    We suggest an approach to the fabrication of versatile nanocomponents designed deliberately by selective Ga{sup +} focused-ion-beam etching or Ar{sup +} ion milling of single-crystalline Au nanoplates synthesized by the chemical reaction. The nanocomponents have various shapes like gear, wheel, dumbbell, square and letter 'A' with in-plane size of about 400 nm and thickness of 40-50 nm. They can be picked up or moved freely one by one to be assembled into sophisticated nanodevices or micromachines. The applicability of our approach both to the fundamental research and to the applied research is discussed.

  9. The versatility of furfuryl alcohols and furanoxonium ions in synthesis.

    PubMed

    Palframan, Matthew J; Pattenden, Gerald

    2014-07-14

    Substituted furfuryl alcohols are extraordinarily versatile starting materials in synthesis. They are precursors to furanoxonium ion intermediates which are implicated in the Piancatelli reaction (leading to 2-cyclopentenones) and in the synthesis of novel dihydrofuran-based exo enol ether/cyclic ketal natural products. They are also intermediates in a recently discovered (4+3) cycloaddition reaction with 1,3-dienes leading to furan ring-fused cycloheptenes. Here we provide a perspective on recent developments in these areas of synthesis, alongside recent applications of the Achmatowicz reaction and [5+2] cycloaddition reactions of the resulting oxidopyrylium ions. PMID:24728307

  10. A versatile stepping motor controller for systems with many motors

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S.K.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A versatile system for controlling beamlines or complex experimental setups is described. The system as currently configured can control up to 32 motors, with all motors capable of full speed operation concurrently. There are 2 limit switch inputs for each motor, and a further input to accept a reference position marker. The motors can be controlled via a front panel keyboard with display, or by a host computer over an IEEE-488 interface. Both methods can be used together if required. There is an emergency stop'' key on the front panel keyboard to stop the motion of all motors without losing track of the motors' position. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A Single Versatile Appliance for Habit Interception and Crossbite Correction

    PubMed Central

    Zameer, Mohammed; Basheer, Syed Nahid; Reddy, Arun; Kovvuru, Suresh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Digit sucking is a common childhood behavior, which has an adaptive value for children up to the fourth year of life. It is usually associated with oral pleasure and self-comforting behavior. But chronic practice may produce deleterious effect in the form of dental and skeletal deformities. Adjunctive therapy using bluegrass appliance as a permanent reminder and quadhelix appliance as a reminder as well as a slow palatal expander has proven successful in intercepting digit-sucking habit and expanding the arch for crossbite correction. In the present case, a versatile modified quadhelix appliance incorporating a roller was designed to clinically correct the habit and its resulting dentofacial deformities. PMID:26640722

  12. Versatile cold atom source for multi-species experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Paris-Mandoki, A.; Jones, M. D.; Nute, J.; Warriar, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Wu, J.

    2014-11-15

    We present a dual-species oven and Zeeman slower setup capable of producing slow, high-flux atomic beams for loading magneto-optical traps. Our compact and versatile system is based on electronic switching between different magnetic field profiles and is applicable to a wide range of multi-species experiments. We give details of the vacuum setup, coils, and simple electronic circuitry. In addition, we demonstrate the performance of our system by optimized, sequential loading of magneto-optical traps of lithium-6 and cesium-133.

  13. A Versatile Approach Towards Nucleobase-Modified Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Tolle, Fabian; Brändle, Gerhard M; Matzner, Daniel; Mayer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    A novel and versatile method has been developed for modular expansion of the chemical space of nucleic acid libraries, thus enabling the generation of nucleobase-modified aptamers with unprecedented recognition properties. Reintroduction of the modification after enzymatic replication gives broad access to many chemical modifications. This wide applicability, which is not limited to a single modification, will rapidly advance the application of in?vitro selection approaches beyond what is currently feasible and enable the generation of aptamers to many targets that have so far not been addressable. PMID:26224087

  14. Parallel optics technology assessment for the versatile link project

    SciTech Connect

    Chramowicz, J.; Kwan, S.; Rivera, R.; Prosser, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes the assessment of commercially available and prototype parallel optics modules for possible use as back end components for the Versatile Link common project. The assessment covers SNAP12 transmitter and receiver modules as well as optical engine technologies in dense packaging options. Tests were performed using vendor evaluation boards (SNAP12) as well as custom evaluation boards (optical engines). The measurements obtained were used to compare the performance of these components with single channel SFP+ components operating at a transmission wavelength of 850 nm over multimode fibers.

  15. A versatile detector for total fluorescence and electron yield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thielemann, N.; Hoffmann, P.; Foehlisch, A.

    2012-09-15

    The combination of a non-coated silicon photodiode with electron repelling meshes makes a versatile detector for total fluorescence yield and electron yield techniques highly suitable for x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In particular, a copper mesh with a bias voltage allows to suppress or transmit the electron yield signal. The performance of this detection scheme has been characterized by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies of thermal oxidized silicon and sapphire. The results show that the new detector probes both electron yield and for a bias voltage exceeding the maximum photon energy the total fluorescence yield.

  16. Surface plasmon resonance-enabled antibacterial digital versatile discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xuan; Chung, Pei-Yu; Jiang, Peng; Dai, Jianli

    2012-02-01

    We report the achievement of effective sterilization of exemplary bacteria including Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on a digital versatile disc (DVD). The spiral arrangement of aluminum-covered pits generates strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption of near-infrared light, leading to high surface temperature that could even damage the DVD plastics. Localized protein denaturation and high sterilization efficiency have been demonstrated by using a fluorescence microscope and cell cultures. Numerical simulations have also been conducted to model the SPR properties and the surface temperature distribution of DVDs under laser illumination. The theoretical predictions agree reasonably well with the experimental results.

  17. Ferrimagnetic nanocrystal assemblies as versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediators.

    PubMed

    Sakellari, D; Brintakis, K; Kostopoulou, A; Myrovali, E; Simeonidis, K; Lappas, A; Angelakeris, M

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystal assemblies (nanoclusters), consisting of 13nm iron oxide nanocrystals, were synthesized in various sizes (45-98nm), and were investigated as heating mediators for magnetic particle hyperthermia. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters show enhanced heating efficiency in comparison with their constituent primary iron oxide nanocrystals due to collective magnetic features. The fine tuning of intra-cluster magnetic interactions results to the domination of the hysteresis losses mechanism over the relaxation loss heating contributions and eventually to a versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediator. PMID:26478302

  18. Engineering organic macrocycles and cages: versatile bonding approaches.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Li; Jin, Guo-Xin; Luo, He-Kuan; Hor, T S Andy

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of supramolecular chemistry has led to the discovery of a rising number of macrocycles and cages with a range of functionalities. Most of these supramolecular aggregates are metal coordination networks, whereas pure organic assemblies are less developed. Organic macrocycles and cages have the advantages of chemical robustness, processability in organic solvents, and suitability for pilot-scale applications. They are constructed primarily from covalent bonds, with irreversible and reversible bond types. We herein highlight the use of different versatile bonding approaches in engineering these soft materials, as well as their emerging applications, such as gas storage, thin films, liquid crystals, and catalysis. PMID:25403872

  19. Development of a versatile multiaperture negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Cavenago, M; Kulevoy, T; Petrenko, S; Serianni, G; Antoni, V; Bigi, M; Fellin, F; Recchia, M; Veltri, P

    2012-02-01

    A 60 kV ion source (9 beamlets of 15 mA each of H(-)) and plasma generators are being developed at Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL, for their versatility in experimental campaigns and for training. Unlike most experimental sources, the design aimed at continuous operation. Magnetic configuration can achieve a minimum ?B? trap, smoothly merged with the extraction filter. Modular design allows for quick substitution and upgrading of parts such as the extraction and postacceleration grids or the electrodes in contact with plasma. Experiments with a radio frequency plasma generator and Faraday cage inside the plasma are also described. PMID:22380216

  20. [Skin expansion. Material and technique].

    PubMed

    Bardot, J; Paulhe, P; Magalon, G

    1996-10-01

    Skin expansion material has progressed and now covers all needs in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Breast reconstruction occupies a special place among expansion techniques and requires specific material. The skin expansion technique was approved by French Social Security in 1995 and is now covered in both the public and private sectors. The skin expansion protocol is rigorous with no room for improvisation. It is only in this way that the quality of the result justifies the use of this technique. PMID:9687603

  1. Bioactivity studies on Musa seminifera Lour

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sanjib; Shilpi, Jamil A.; Mondal, Himangsu; Gofur, Royhan; Billah, Morsaline; Nahar, Lutfun; Sarker, Satyajit D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Musa seminifera Lour is a tree-like perennial herb that has been used in folk medicine in Bangladesh to heal a number of ailments. Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant, analgesic, antidiarrheal, anthelmintic activities, and general toxicity of the ethanol extract of the roots. Materials and Methods: The extract was assessed for free-radical-scavenging activity by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin Ciocalteu reagent, antioxidant activity by the ferric reducing power assay, analgesic activity by the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests, antidiarrheal activity by the castor oil-induced diarrhea model in mice, anthelmintic activity on Paramphistomum cervi and Haemonchus contortus, and general toxicity by the brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: The extract showed free-radical-scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 44.86 ?g/mL. TPC was 537.89 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g of dried plant material. It showed concentration-dependent reducing power, and displayed 42.11 and 69.32% writhing inhibition at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The extract also significantly raised the pain threshold at the above-mentioned dose levels. In vivo antidiarrheal property was substantiated by significant prolongation of latent period and decrease in total number of stools compared with the control. The LC50 against brine shrimp nauplii was 36.21 ?g/mL. The extract exhibited dose-dependent decrease in paralysis and death time of the helminths. Conclusion: The above results demonstrated that the plant possesses notable bioactivities and somewhat supports its use in folk medicine. PMID:24124283

  2. Bioactivation of the human carcinogen aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, Viktoriya S.; Attaluri, Sivaprasad; Zaitseva, Irina; Iden, Charles R.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Johnson, Francis; Grollman, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Aristolochic acids are potent human carcinogens; the role of phase II metabolism in their bioactivation is unclear. Accordingly, we tested the ability of the partially reduced metabolites, N-hydroxyaristolactams (AL-NOHs), and their N-O-sulfonated and N-O-acetylated derivatives to react with DNA to form aristolactam–DNA adducts. AL-NOHs displayed little or no activity in this regard while the sulfo- and acetyl compounds readily form DNA adducts, as detected by 32P-post-labeling analysis. Mouse hepatic and renal cytosols stimulated binding of AL-NOHs to DNA in the presence of adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) but not of acetyl-CoA. Using Time of Flight liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, N-hydroxyaristolactam I formed the sulfated compound in the presence of PAPS and certain human sulfotransferases, SULT1B1 >>> SULT1A2 > SULT1A1 >>> SULT1A3. The same pattern of SULT reactivity was observed when N-hydroxyaristolactam I was incubated with these enzymes and PAPS and the reaction was monitored by formation of aristolactam–DNA adducts. In the presence of human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, the ability of aristolochic acid I to bind DNA covalently was increased significantly by addition of PAPS and SULT1B1. We conclude from these studies that AL-NOHs, formed following partial nitroreduction of aristolochic acids, serve as substrates for SULT1B1, producing N-sulfated esters, which, in turn, are converted to highly active species that react with DNA and, potentially, cellular proteins, resulting in the genotoxicity and nephrotoxicity associated with ingestion of aristolochic acids by humans. PMID:24743514

  3. Immense Essence of Excellence: Marine Microbial Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Oceans have borne most of the biological activities on our planet. A number of biologically active compounds with varying degrees of action, such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-microtubule, anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, photo protective, as well as antibiotic and antifouling properties, have been isolated to date from marine sources. The marine environment also represents a largely unexplored source for isolation of new microbes (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, microalgae-cyanobacteria and diatoms) that are potent producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Extensive research has been done to unveil the bioactive potential of marine microbes (free living and symbiotic) and the results are amazingly diverse and productive. Some of these bioactive secondary metabolites of microbial origin with strong antibacterial and antifungal activities are being intensely used as antibiotics and may be effective against infectious diseases such as HIV, conditions of multiple bacterial infections (penicillin, cephalosporines, streptomycin, and vancomycin) or neuropsychiatric sequelae. Research is also being conducted on the general aspects of biophysical and biochemical properties, chemical structures and biotechnological applications of the bioactive substances derived from marine microorganisms, and their potential use as cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals. This review is an attempt to consolidate the latest studies and critical research in this field, and to showcase the immense competence of marine microbial flora as bioactive metabolite producers. In addition, the present review addresses some effective and novel approaches of procuring marine microbial compounds utilizing the latest screening strategies of drug discovery. PMID:21116414

  4. Littoral lichens as a novel source of potentially bioactive Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Delphine; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Intertaglia, Laurent; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie; Suzuki, Marcelino T

    2015-01-01

    Cultivable Actinobacteria are the largest source of microbially derived bioactive molecules. The high demand for novel antibiotics highlights the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria. Microbial symbioses with sessile macro-organisms, known to contain bioactive compounds likely of bacterial origin, represent an interesting and underexplored source of Actinobacteria. We studied the diversity and potential for bioactive-metabolite production of Actinobacteria associated with two marine lichens (Lichina confinis and L. pygmaea; from intertidal and subtidal zones) and one littoral lichen (Roccella fuciformis; from supratidal zone) from the Brittany coast (France), as well as the terrestrial lichen Collema auriforme (from a riparian zone, Austria). A total of 247 bacterial strains were isolated using two selective media. Isolates were identified and clustered into 101 OTUs (98% identity) including 51 actinobacterial OTUs. The actinobacterial families observed were: Brevibacteriaceae, Cellulomonadaceae, Gordoniaceae, Micrococcaceae, Mycobacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, Promicromonosporaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Sanguibacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae. Interestingly, the diversity was most influenced by the selective media rather than lichen species or the level of lichen thallus association. The potential for bioactive-metabolite biosynthesis of the isolates was confirmed by screening genes coding for polyketide synthases types I and II. These results show that littoral lichens are a source of diverse potentially bioactive Actinobacteria. PMID:26514347

  5. Mechanisms underlying the antihypertensive effects of garlic bioactives.

    PubMed

    Shouk, Reem; Abdou, Aya; Shetty, Kalidas; Sarkar, Dipayan; Eid, Ali H

    2014-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide with hypertension being a major contributing factor to cardiovascular disease-associated mortality. On a population level, non-pharmacological approaches, such as alternative/complementary medicine, including phytochemicals, have the potential to ameliorate cardiovascular risk factors, including high blood pressure. Several epidemiological studies suggest an antihypertensive effect of garlic (Allium sativum) and of many its bioactive components. The aim of this review is to present an in-depth discussion regarding the molecular, biochemical and cellular rationale underlying the antihypertensive properties of garlic and its bioactive constituents with a primary focus on S-allyl cysteine and allicin. Key studies, largely from PubMed, were selected and screened to develop a comprehensive understanding of the specific role of garlic and its bioactive constituents in the management of hypertension. We also reviewed recent advances focusing on the role of garlic bioactives, S-allyl cysteine and allicin, in modulating various parameters implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. These parameters include oxidative stress, nitric oxide bioavailability, hydrogen sulfide production, angiotensin converting enzyme activity, expression of nuclear factor-?B and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. This review suggests that garlic and garlic derived bioactives have significant medicinal properties with the potential for ameliorating hypertension and associated morbidity; however, further clinical and epidemiological studies are required to determine completely the specific physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in disease prevention and management. PMID:24461311

  6. Littoral lichens as a novel source of potentially bioactive Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Parrot, Delphine; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Intertaglia, Laurent; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie; Suzuki, Marcelino T.

    2015-01-01

    Cultivable Actinobacteria are the largest source of microbially derived bioactive molecules. The high demand for novel antibiotics highlights the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria. Microbial symbioses with sessile macro-organisms, known to contain bioactive compounds likely of bacterial origin, represent an interesting and underexplored source of Actinobacteria. We studied the diversity and potential for bioactive-metabolite production of Actinobacteria associated with two marine lichens (Lichina confinis and L. pygmaea; from intertidal and subtidal zones) and one littoral lichen (Roccella fuciformis; from supratidal zone) from the Brittany coast (France), as well as the terrestrial lichen Collema auriforme (from a riparian zone, Austria). A total of 247 bacterial strains were isolated using two selective media. Isolates were identified and clustered into 101 OTUs (98% identity) including 51 actinobacterial OTUs. The actinobacterial families observed were: Brevibacteriaceae, Cellulomonadaceae, Gordoniaceae, Micrococcaceae, Mycobacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, Promicromonosporaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Sanguibacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae. Interestingly, the diversity was most influenced by the selective media rather than lichen species or the level of lichen thallus association. The potential for bioactive-metabolite biosynthesis of the isolates was confirmed by screening genes coding for polyketide synthases types I and II. These results show that littoral lichens are a source of diverse potentially bioactive Actinobacteria. PMID:26514347

  7. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination. PMID:22851522

  8. Skin segmentation using multiple thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Francesca; Schettini, Raimondo

    2006-01-01

    The segmentation of skin regions in color images is a preliminary step in several applications. Many different methods for discriminating between skin and non-skin pixels are available in the literature. The simplest, and often applied, methods build what is called an "explicit skin cluster" classifier which expressly defines the boundaries of the skin cluster in certain color spaces. These binary methods are very popular as they are easy to implement and do not require a training phase. The main difficulty in achieving high skin recognition rates, and producing the smallest possible number of false positive pixels, is that of defining accurate cluster boundaries through simple, often heuristically chosen, decision rules. In this study we apply a genetic algorithm to determine the boundaries of the skin clusters in multiple color spaces. To quantify the performance of these skin detection methods, we use recall and precision scores. A good classifier should provide both high recall and high precision, but generally, as recall increases, precision decreases. Consequently, we adopt a weighted mean of precision and recall as the fitness function of the genetic algorithm. Keeping in mind that different applications may have sharply different requirements, the weighting coefficients can be chosen to favor either high recall or high precision, or to satisfy a reasonable tradeoff between the two, depending on application demands. To train the genetic algorithm (GA) and test the performance of the classifiers applying the GA suggested boundaries, we use the large and heterogeneous Compaq skin database.

  9. Combining xanthan and chitosan membranes to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as bioactive dressings for dermo-epidermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Márcia Z; Caliari-Oliveira, Carolina; Mizukami, Amanda; Swiech, Kamilla; Covas, Dimas T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Oliva-Neto, Pedro; Moraes, Ângela M

    2015-03-01

    The association between tridimensional scaffolds to cells of interest has provided excellent perspectives for obtaining viable complex tissues in vitro, such as skin, resulting in impressive advances in the field of tissue engineering applied to regenerative therapies. The use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the treatment of dermo-epidermal wounds is particularly promising due to several relevant properties of these cells, such as high capacity of proliferation in culture, potential of differentiation in multiple skin cell types, important paracrine and immunomodulatory effects, among others. Membranes of chitosan complexed with xanthan may be potentially useful as scaffolds for multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, given that they present suitable physico-chemical characteristics and have adequate tridimensional structure for the adhesion, growth, and maintenance of cell function. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to assess the applicability of bioactive dressings associating dense and porous chitosan-xanthan membranes to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for the treatment of skin wounds. The membranes showed to be non-mutagenic and allowed efficient adhesion and proliferation of the mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro. In vivo assays performed with mesenchymal stromal cells grown on the surface of the dense membranes showed acceleration of wound healing in Wistar rats, thus indicating that the use of this cell-scaffold association for tissue engineering purposes is feasible and attractive. PMID:25281644

  10. Versatile optical coherence tomography for imaging the human eye.

    PubMed

    Tao, Aizhu; Shao, Yilei; Zhong, Jianguang; Jiang, Hong; Shen, Meixiao; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of a CMOS-based spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) for versatile ophthalmic applications of imaging the corneal epithelium, limbus, ocular surface, contact lens, crystalline lens, retina, and full eye in vivo. The system was based on a single spectrometer and an alternating reference arm with four mirrors. A galvanometer scanner was used to switch the reference beam among the four mirrors, depending on the imaging application. An axial resolution of 7.7 ?m in air, a scan depth of up to 37.7 mm in air, and a scan speed of up to 70,000 A-lines per second were achieved. The approach has the capability to provide high-resolution imaging of the corneal epithelium, contact lens, ocular surface, and tear meniscus. Using two reference mirrors, the zero delay lines were alternatively placed on the front cornea or on the back lens. The entire ocular anterior segment was imaged by registering and overlapping the two images. The full eye through the pupil was measured when the reference arm was switched among the four reference mirrors. After mounting a 60 D lens in the sample arm, this SD-OCT was used to image the retina, including the macula and optical nerve head. This system demonstrates versatility and simplicity for multi-purpose ophthalmic applications. PMID:23847729

  11. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  12. Versatile optical coherence tomography for imaging the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Aizhu; Shao, Yilei; Zhong, Jianguang; Jiang, Hong; Shen, Meixiao; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of a CMOS-based spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) for versatile ophthalmic applications of imaging the corneal epithelium, limbus, ocular surface, contact lens, crystalline lens, retina, and full eye in vivo. The system was based on a single spectrometer and an alternating reference arm with four mirrors. A galvanometer scanner was used to switch the reference beam among the four mirrors, depending on the imaging application. An axial resolution of 7.7 ?m in air, a scan depth of up to 37.7 mm in air, and a scan speed of up to 70,000 A-lines per second were achieved. The approach has the capability to provide high-resolution imaging of the corneal epithelium, contact lens, ocular surface, and tear meniscus. Using two reference mirrors, the zero delay lines were alternatively placed on the front cornea or on the back lens. The entire ocular anterior segment was imaged by registering and overlapping the two images. The full eye through the pupil was measured when the reference arm was switched among the four reference mirrors. After mounting a 60 D lens in the sample arm, this SD-OCT was used to image the retina, including the macula and optical nerve head. This system demonstrates versatility and simplicity for multi-purpose ophthalmic applications. PMID:23847729

  13. Green tea catechins and their metabolites in human skin before and after exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Kayleigh A; Dew, Tristan P; Watson, Rachel E B; Farrar, Mark D; Osman, Joanne E; Nicolaou, Anna; Rhodes, Lesley E; Williamson, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Dietary flavonoids may protect against sunburn inflammation in skin. Preliminary reports using less complete analysis suggest that certain catechins and their metabolites are found in skin biopsies and blister fluid after consumption of green tea; however, it is not known if they are affected by solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation (UVR) or whether conjugated forms, with consequently altered bioactivity, are present. The present study tested the hypothesis that UVR affects the catechin levels in the skin of healthy volunteers after consumption of green tea and how catechins in the plasma are related to their presence in skin tissue samples. In an open oral intervention study, 11 subjects consumed green tea and vitamin C supplements daily for 3months. Presupplementation and postsupplementation plasma samples, suction blister fluid and skin biopsies were collected; the latter two samples were collected both before and after UVR. A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assay was used to measure the intact catechin metabolites, conjugates and free forms. Seven green tea catechins and their corresponding metabolites were identified postsupplementation in skin biopsies, 20 in blister fluid and 26 in plasma, with 15 green tea catechin metabolites present in both blister fluid and plasma. The valerolactone, O-methyl-M4-O-sulfate, a gut microbiota metabolite of catechins, was significantly increased 1.6-fold by UVR in blister fluid samples. In conclusion, there were some common catechin metabolites in the plasma and blister fluid, and the concentration was always higher in plasma. The results suggest that green tea catechins and metabolites are bioavailable in skin and provide a novel link between catechin metabolites derived from the skin and gut microbiota. PMID:26454512

  14. A study of the human skin-whitening effects of resveratryl triacetate.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ja Hyun; Seok, Jin Kyung; An, Sang Mi; Baek, Ji Hwoon; Koh, Jae Sook; Boo, Yong Chool

    2015-04-01

    Resveratrol has a variety of bioactivities that include its anti-melanogenic effects, but its use in cosmetics has been challenging partly because of its chemical instability. Resveratryl triacetate (RTA) is a prodrug that can enhance stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the skin safety and whitening effects of RTA in human subjects. The primary skin irritation potentials of RTA and resveratrol were tested at 0.1 and 0.5 % on human subjects. Resveratrol at a concentration of 0.5 % induced weak skin irritation, whereas RTA did not induce any skin responses. The skin-whitening efficacy of a cosmetic formulation containing 0.4 % RTA was evaluated in two different test models. In the artificial tanning model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the skin of the forearms of 22 human subjects after pigmentation induction by ultraviolet irradiation. Applying the test and the control products to the artificial tanning model for 8 weeks increased the individual topology angles (ITA°) by 17.06 and 13.81 %, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). In the hyperpigmentation model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the faces of 21 human subjects. The averaged intensity of the hyperpigmented spots decreased by 2.67 % in the test group and 1.46 % in the control group, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Therefore, RTA incorporated into cosmetic formulations can whiten human skin without inducing skin irritation. PMID:25750159

  15. Characteristics of the Aging Skin

    PubMed Central

    Farage, Miranda A.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Elsner, Peter; Maibach, Howard I.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Although most researches into the changes in skin with age focus on the unwelcome aesthetic aspects of the aging skin, skin deterioration with age is more than a merely cosmetic problem. Although mortality from skin disease is primarily restricted to melanoma, dermatological disorders are ubiquitous in older people with a significant impact on quality of life. The structural and functional deterioration of the skin that occurs with age has numerous clinical presentations, ranging from benign but potentially excruciating disorders like pruritus to the more threatening carcinomas and melanomas. Recent Advances The degenerative changes that occur in the aging skin are increasingly understood at both the molecular and cellular level, facilitating a deeper understanding of the structural and functional deterioration that these changes produce. Critical Issues A loss of both function and structural stability in skin proceeds unavoidably as individuals age, which is the result of both intrinsic and extrinsic processes, which contribute simultaneously to a progressive loss of skin integrity. Intrinsic aging proceeds at a genetically determined pace, primarily caused by the buildup of damaging products of cellular metabolism as well as an increasing biological aging of the cells. Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity in women as well; falling levels in midlife, therefore, produce premature aging as compared with similarly aged men. Extrinsic insults from the environment add to the dermatological signs of aging. Future Directions A deeper understanding of the physiological basis of skin aging will facilitate progress in the treatment of the unwelcome sequelae of aging skin, both cosmetic and pathogenic. PMID:24527317

  16. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment...acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance...

  17. Synthesis of nano-bioactive glass-ceramic powders and its in vitro bioactivity study in bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabian, Nima; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood

    2011-07-01

    Bioactive glasses and ceramics have proved to be able to chemically bond to living bone due to the formation of an apatite-like layer on its surface. The aim of this work was preparation and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic by sol-gel method. Nano-bioglass-ceramic material was crushed into powder and its bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of hydroxyapatite layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. The obtained nano-bioactive glass-ceramic was analyzed before and after contact with BSA solution. This study used scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to examine its morphology, crystallinity and composition. The TEM images showed that the NBG particles size were 10-40 nm. Bioactivity of nanopowder was confirmed by SEM and XRD due to the presence of a rich bone-like apatite layer. Therefore, this nano-BSA-bioglass-ceramic composite material is promising for medical applications such as bone substitutes and drug carriers.

  18. Application of novel extraction technologies for bioactives from marine algae.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Shekhar U; Tiwari, Brijesh K; O'Donnell, Colm P

    2013-05-22

    Marine algae are a rich source of bioactive compounds. This paper outlines the main bioactive compounds in marine algae and recent advances in novel technologies for extracting them. Novel extraction technologies reviewed include enzyme-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, and pressurized liquid extraction. These technologies are reviewed with respect to principles, benefits, and potential applications for marine algal bioactives. Advantages of novel technologies include higher yield, reduced treatment time, and lower cost compared to traditional solvent extraction techniques. Moreover, different combinations of novel techniques used for extraction and technologies suitable for thermolabile compounds are identified. The limitations of and challenges to employing these novel extraction technologies in industry are also highlighted. PMID:23634989

  19. Structural characterization of bioactive pectic polysaccharides from elderflowers (Sambuci flos).

    PubMed

    Ho, Giang Thanh Thi; Zou, Yuan-Feng; Aslaksen, Torun Helene; Wangensteen, Helle; Barsett, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    Elderflowers have traditionally been used and are still used for its anti-inflammatory property. Traditionally elderflowers were used as remedies against cold, flu and diuretic. The aim of this study was to relate the structure of pectic-polysaccharides from elderflowers to immunomodulating properties. Purified fractions obtained by gelfiltration and ion exchange chromatography of 50% ethanol, 50°C water and 100°C water extracts exhibited strong complement fixating activity and macrophage stimulating activity. Reduced bioactivity was observed after removal of arabinose and 1,3,6-Gal linkages by weak acid hydrolysis. Enhanced bioactivity was observed after removal of estergroups by NaOH. Relating linkage analysis to the results of the bioactivity tests, led to the assumption that the branched moieties of the arabinogalactans linked to rhamnogalacturonan region, is important for the immunomodulating activity seen in elderflowers. No cytotoxity was observed. PMID:26453860

  20. Edible berries: bioactive components and their effect on human health.

    PubMed

    Nile, Shivraj Hariram; Park, Se Won

    2014-02-01

    The importance of food consumption in relation to human health has increased consumer attention in nutraceutical components and foods, especially fruits and vegetables. Berries are a rich source of a wide variety of non-nutritive, nutritive, and bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, phenolics, anthocyanins, phenolic acids, stilbenes, and tannins, as well as nutritive compounds such as sugars, essential oils, carotenoids, vitamins, and minerals. Bioactive compounds from berries have potent antioxidant, anticancer, antimutagenic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antineurodegenerative properties, both in vitro and in vivo. The following is a comprehensive and critical review on nutritional and non-nutritional bioactive compounds of berries including their absorption, metabolism, and biological activity in relation to their potential effect on human health. PMID:24012283

  1. In vitro bioactivity of titanium-doped bioglass.

    PubMed

    Asif, Imran M; Shelton, Richard M; Cooper, Paul R; Addison, Owen; Martin, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that incorporating relatively small quantities of titanium dioxide into bioactive glasses may result in an increase in bioactivity and hydroxyapatite formation. The present work therefore investigated the in vitro bioactivity of a titanium doped bioglass and compared the results with 45S5 bioglass. Apatite formation was evaluated for bioglass and Ti-bioglass in the presence and absence of foetal calf serum. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were used to evaluate the surface development and energy dispersive X-ray measurements provided information on the elemental ratios. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of apatite formation. Cell viability was assessed for bone marrow stromal cells under direct and indirect contact conditions and cell adhesion was assessed using SEM. PMID:24801063

  2. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries

    PubMed Central

    Skrovankova, Sona; Sumczynski, Daniela; Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits. PMID:26501271

  3. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.

    PubMed

    Skrovankova, Sona; Sumczynski, Daniela; Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits. PMID:26501271

  4. Potential of Fruit Wastes as Natural Resources of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Shen, Chen; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Kuang, Ru-Dan; Guo, Ya-Jun; Zeng, Li-Shan; Gao, Li-Li; Lin, Xi; Xie, Jie-Feng; Xia, En-Qin; Li, Sha; Wu, Shan; Chen, Feng; Ling, Wen-Hua; Li, Hua-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Fruit wastes are one of the main sources of municipal waste. In order to explore the potential of fruit wastes as natural resources of bioactive compounds, the antioxidant potency and total phenolic contents (TPC) of lipophilic and hydrophilic components in wastes (peel and seed) of 50 fruits were systematically evaluated. The results showed that different fruit residues had diverse antioxidant potency and the variation was very large. Furthermore, the main bioactive compounds were identified and quantified, and catechin, cyanidin 3-glucoside, epicatechin, galangin, gallic acid, homogentisic acid, kaempferol, and chlorogenic acid were widely found in these residues. Especially, the values of ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and TPC in the residues were higher than in pulps. The results showed that fruit residues could be inexpensive and readily available resources of bioactive compounds for use in the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22942704

  5. Bioactive Molecules in Soil Ecosystems: Masters of the Underground

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xuliang; Gao, Jie; Ma, Anzhou; Fu, Shenglei; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Complex biological and ecological processes occur in the rhizosphere through ecosystem-level interactions between roots, microorganisms and soil fauna. Over the past decade, studies of the rhizosphere have revealed that when roots, microorganisms and soil fauna physically contact one another, bioactive molecular exchanges often mediate these interactions as intercellular signal, which prepare the partners for successful interactions. Despite the importance of bioactive molecules in sustainable agriculture, little is known of their numerous functions, and improving plant health and productivity by altering ecological processes remains difficult. In this review, we describe the major bioactive molecules present in below-ground ecosystems (i.e., flavonoids, exopolysaccharides, antibiotics and quorum-sensing signals), and we discuss how these molecules affect microbial communities, nutrient availability and plant defense responses. PMID:23615474

  6. Beta-conglycinins among sources of bioactives in soybean hydrolysates that inhibited leukemia cells in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is a complex matrix containing several potentially bioactive components. The objective was to build a statistical model to predict the anticancer potential of soybean based on the composition of bioactive components in soybean hydrolysates produced by simulated gastrointestinal digestion. ...

  7. TSLP expression in the skin is mediated via RAR?-RXR pathways.

    PubMed

    Mihály, Johanna; Gericke, Janine; Lucas, Renata; de Lera, Angel R; Alvarez, Susana; Tör?csik, Dániel; Rühl, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    TSLP is an important trigger and initiator for various atopic diseases mainly atopic dermatitis (AD). Activators of nuclear hormone receptors like bioactive vitamin A and D derivatives are known to induce TSLP up-regulation in the skin. In this study, various combinations of synthetic specific agonists and antagonists of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) were topically administered to mice. The aim of the study was to elucidate via which nuclear hormone receptor pathways TSLP is regulated and how this regulation is connected to the development and phenotype of atopic dermatitis. TSLP expression was monitored using QRT-PCR and serum TSLP levels using ELISA. Synthetic agonists of the VDR and RAR? as well as the natural agonist all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased TSLP expression in the skin, while an RXR agonist was not active. Treatments with antagonists of RXRs and RARs in addition to RAR?-agonists reduced skin TSLP expression. Strong activation was found after a combination of a VDR and an RXR agonist (ca. 5 times induction) and even stronger by an RAR? and an RXR agonist treatment (ca. 48 times induction). We conclude that besides VDR-mediated signaling mainly RAR?-RXR mediated pathways in the skin are important patho-physiological triggers for increased skin TSLP expression. We conclude that topical synthesized retinoids stimulated by internal or external triggers or topically applied induce TSLP production and are thereby important triggers for atopic dermatitis prevalence. PMID:26531761

  8. Bioactive polymers for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Samuel Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Prevalent in the US and worldwide, acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) can cause ischemic injuries to the heart that persist and lead to progressive degradation of the organ. Tissue engineering techniques exploiting biomaterials present a hopeful means of treating these injuries, either by mechanically stabilizing the injured ventricle, or by fostering cell growth to replace myocytes lost to damage. This thesis describes the development and testing of a synthetic extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering applications. The first stage of this process was using an advanced finite element model of an injured ovine left ventricle to evaluate the potential benefits of injecting synthetic materials into the heart. These simulations indicated that addition of small amounts non-contractile material (on the order of 1--5% total wall volume) to infarct border zone regions reduced pathological systolic fiber stress to levels near those found in normal remote regions. Simulations also determined that direct addition to the infarct itself caused increases in ventricle ejection fraction while the underlying performance of the pump, ascertained by the Starling relation, was not improved. From these theoretical results, biomaterials were developed specifically for injection into the injured myocardium, and were characterized and tested for their mechanical properties and ability to sustain the proliferation of a stem cell population suitable for transplantation. Thermoresponsive synthetic copolymer hydrogels consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid, p(NIPAAm-co-AAc), crosslinked with protease degradable amino acid sequences and modified with integrin binding ligands were synthesized, characterized in vitro, and used for myocardial implantation. These injectable materials could maintain a population of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in both two dimensional and three dimensional culture, and when tested in vivo in a murine infarct model they stabilized injured ventricles, reducing functional loss over 6 weeks, and promoted the survival of transplanted stem cells. In addition, modifications to the hydrogel to impart novel bioactivity through a developed tethered form of the protein sonic hedgehog were synthesized and characterized. This tethered form increased protein potency, induced angiogenesis, and could be incorporated into the hydrogel material for future implantation studies in the injured ventricle.

  9. Silicon Utilizing Microbial Bioactivities in the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, M. M.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms are unicellular eukaryotic algae and an important member of the silicon utilizing organisms, that generate ~20% of the ~100 billion metric tons of organic carbon produced through photosynthesis on Earth each year. Fragilariopsis is a dominating psychrophilic diatom genus in polar sea ice. The two species Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Fragilariopsis curta are able to grow and divide below freezing temperature. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), involved in cold adaptation in several psychrophilic organisms, are widespread in this two polar species. Achanthes minutissima isolated as dominant diatom has degradable effects involving petroleum hydocarbons. Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have antibacterial activity and the fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been identified as one compound responsible for this activity. Other antibacterial compounds are monounsaturated fatty acid (9Z)-hexadecenoic acid (palmitoleic acid; C16:1 n-7) and the relatively unusual polyunsaturated fatty acid (6Z, 9Z, 12Z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (HTA; C16:3 n-4). Both are active against Gram-positive bacteria and many Gram-negative pathogen. Palmitoleic acid is active at micro-molar concentrations, kills bacteria rapidly, and is highly active against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Domoic acid -a neurotoxin produced by Pseudo-nitzschia accumulates in marine invertebrates. Evidences of sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and human poisoning following consumption of contaminated blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) is mainly due to this toxin. Among the most prominent features described in human beings was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Silicon utilizing organisms can act as a bioindicator of environmental contamination, thus a rapid change in phytochelatins to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress was found in Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii. Some of them also can produce biofuels particularly diatoms have significant potential as a source of biomass for the production of biofuels, due to their high growth rates and high cellular lipid content. Petroleum pollutant degradation can also be done by these organisms-Achanthes minutissima has degradable effects involving petroleum hydocarbons. Stephanopyxis turris a silicon utilizing organism releases a blend of chlorinated C8 hydrocarbons. This adds a fundamentally new pathway to the limited set of halogenating enzymatic activities known from nature. Many silicon utilizing organisms can produce PUFA from saturated fatty acids which ultimately produce many important bioactive chemicals like hormosirene, finaverrene, heptadienal, dietyopterene, cystophorene, decadienal. Trienoic acid, octadiene and many other important agents. Similarly terpenoid biosynthetic pathway is activated by them with formation of diterpenoids, sesterpenoids, triterpenoids and sterols.

  10. Chemically engineered extracts: source of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramallo, I Ayelen; Salazar, Mario O; Mendez, Luciana; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2011-04-19

    Biological research and drug discovery critically depend on access to libraries of small molecules that have an affinity for biomacromolecules. By virtue of their sustained success as sources of lead compounds, natural products are recognized as "privileged" starting points in structural space for library development. Compared with synthetic compounds, natural products have distinguishing structural properties; indeed, researchers have begun to quantify and catalog the differences between the two classes of molecules. Measurable differences in the number of chiral centers, the degree of saturation, the presence of aromatic rings, and the number of the various heteroatoms are among the chief distinctions between natural and synthetic compounds. Natural products also include a significant proportion of recurring molecular scaffolds that are not present in currently marketed drugs: the bioactivity of these natural substructures has been refined over the long process of evolution. In this Account, we present our research aimed at preparing libraries of semisynthetic compounds, or chemically engineered extracts (CEEs), through chemical diversification of natural products mixtures. The approach relies on the power of numbers, that is, in the chemical alteration of a sizable fraction of the starting complex mixture. Major changes in composition can be achieved through the chemical transformation of reactive molecular fragments that are found in most natural products. If such fragments are common enough, their transformation represents an entry point for chemically altering a high proportion of the components of crude natural extracts. We have searched for common reactive fragments in the Dictionary of Natural Products (CRC Press) and identified several functional groups that are expected to be present in a large fraction of the components of an average natural crude extract. To date, we have used reactions that incorporate (i) nitrogen atoms through carbonyl groups, (ii) sulfur by transformation of -OH and amines, and (iii) bromine through double bonds and aromatic rings. The resulting CEEs had different composition and biomolecular properties than their natural progenitors. We isolated a semisynthetic ?-glucosidase inhibitor from a CEE prepared by reaction with benzenesulfonyl chloride, an antifungal pyrazole from a CEE prepared by reaction with hydrazine, and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor from a CEE prepared through bromination. Our results illustrate how biological activity can be generated through chemical diversification of natural product mixtures. Moreover, the level of control that can be asserted in the process by judicious design and experimental choices underscores the potential for further development of CEEs in both basic research and drug discovery. PMID:21355557

  11. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  12. Pain-induced skin autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Odoardi, Francesca; Neuhuber, Winfried; Flügel, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    A recent paper published in Nature reports sensory nerve fibers in the skin that give local immune cells important instructions for the organization of an immune response; in this particular case the cooperation between the nervous and immune systems had disastrous consequences, namely an auto-destruction of the skin. PMID:24946740

  13. Occupational Skin Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Skin disease is the most common occupational disease, but the reported number is small in Korea due to a difficulty of detection and diagnosis in time. We described various official statistics and data from occupational skin disease surveillance system, epidemiological surveys and cases published in scientific journals. Until 1981, 2,222 cases of occupational skin disease were reported by Korean employee's regular medical check-up, accounting for 4.9% of the total occupational diseases. There was no subsequent official statistics to figure out occupational skin diseases till 1998. From 1999, the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) published the number of occupational skin diseases through the statistics of Cause Investigation for Industrial Accidents. A total of 301 cases were reported from 1999 to 2007. Recent one study showed the figures of compensated occupational skin diseases. Many of them belonged to daily-paid workers in the public service, especially forestry workers. Also, it described the interesting cases such as vitiligo and trichloroethylene-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Skin diseases are still important though the number of cases has decreased, and therefore it is recommended to grasp the status of occupational skin diseases through continuous surveillance system and to make policy protecting high-risk group. PMID:21258591

  14. Moisturizing Different Racial Skin Types

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a complex organ involved in thermoregulation, gas exchange, protection against pathogens, and barrier function to maintain proper hydration. When dry, the ability for skin to execute these tasks becomes impaired. Dry skin affects almost everyone as we age, but it is also dependent on external factors, such as dry climate, colder temperatures, and repeated washing. In addition, increasing evidence has shown racial variability in the physiological properties of skin, which directly impacts water content of the stratum corneum and sensitivity to exogenously applied agents. A multitude of products have been developed to treat dry skin, and as a group, moisturizers have been designed to either impart or restore hydration in the stratum corneum. Given the large number of moisturizers presently available, depending on individual components, several different mechanisms may be employed to promote skin hydration. As there exists dramatic racial variability in skin properties, certain moisturizers may thus be more effective in some and less effective in others to treat the common condition of dry skin. PMID:25013536

  15. Rheological behaviour of reconstructed skin.

    PubMed

    Pailler-Mattei, C; Laquièze, L; Debret, R; Tupin, S; Aimond, G; Sommer, P; Zahouani, H

    2014-09-01

    Reconstructed skins have been developed to replace skin when the integrity of tissue has been compromised following severe injury, and to provide alternative methods validating the innocuousness and effectiveness of dermatological and cosmetic products. However the functional properties of tissue substitutes have not been well characterised, mainly since mechanical measurement devices have not been designed to test cell culture materials in vitro. From the mechanical standpoint, reconstructed skin is a heterogeneous multi-layer viscoelastic material. To characterise the time-dependent behaviour of reconstructed skin, spherical indentation load-relaxation tests were performed with a specific original device adapted to measure small soft tissue samples. Load-relaxation indentation tests were performed on a standard reconstructed skin model and on sub-components of the reconstructed skin (3D-scaffold alone and dermal equivalent). Generalised Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt rheological models are proposed for analysing the mechanical behaviour of each biological tissue. The results indicated a modification of the rheological behaviour of the samples tested as a function of their biological structure. The 3D-scaffold was modelled using the one-branch Maxwell model, while the dermis equivalent and the reconstructed skin were modeled using a one-branch and a two-branch Kelvin-Voigt model, respectively. Finally, we demonstrated that skin cells contribute to global mechanical behaviour through an increase of the instantaneous relaxation function, while the 3D-scaffold alone influences the mechanical response of long relaxation times. PMID:24956159

  16. Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in many tissues of the body and is essential to maintain moistness in the skin tissues, which contain approximately half the body’s HA mass. Due to its viscosity and moisturizing effect, HA is widely distributed as a medicine, cosmetic, food, and, recently marketed in Japan as a popular dietary supplement to promote skin moisture. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study it was found that ingested HA increased skin moisture and improved treatment outcomes for patients with dry skin. HA is also reported to be absorbed by the body distributed, in part, to the skin. Ingested HA contributes to the increased synthesis of HA and promotes cell proliferation in fibroblasts. These effects show that ingestion of HA moisturizes the skin and is expected to improve the quality of life for people who suffer from dry skin. This review examines the moisturizing effects of dry skin by ingested HA and summarizes the series of mechanisms from absorption to pharmacological action. PMID:25014997

  17. [Travel and skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1992-02-20

    The problem "travelling and dermatological diseases" is presented as a temporary change of place with associated changes in ecological conditions. Latent dermatoses may be provoked--but full-blown dermatoses may also improve with no specific treatment (climatic therapy of neurodermatitis). Physiological changes at the surface of the skin brought about by, for example, temperature or the effects of solar radiation, may allow fungal, bacterial or viral infections to develop. Direct contact with the living environment on land or in the water, in particular in the tropics, can lead to the development of diseases. Some dermatoses have a lengthy latency and develop only later at home. Recommendations for general and specific prophylaxis and treatment are made. PMID:1544613

  18. Skin cancer chemoprevention by ?-santalol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-santalol, a naturally occurring terpenoid, has been shown to have chemopreventive effects on both 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O- tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin cancer development in CD-1 and SENCAR mice, and UVB-induced skin cancer developments in SKH-1 hairless mice in a concentration-dependent manner. Studies have demonstrated that ?-santalol could be effective against skin carcinogenesis through both induction of apoptosis via caspase activation together with dissipation of mitochondria membrane potential and cytochrome c release in A431 cells, and inhibition of cell growth via induction of G2/M phase arrest in both A431 cells and melanoma UACC-62 cells by altering multiple cell cycle regulatory proteins and complexes. This review summarizes the chemopreventive effects and molecular mechanisms of ?-santalol on skin cancer development in both animal models and skin cancer cell lines. PMID:21196411

  19. Highly bioactive polysiloxane modified bioactive glass-poly(ethylene glycol) hybrids monoliths with controlled surface structure for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Que, Wenxiu; Xing, Yonglei; Lei, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Crack-free monoliths with controllable surface microstructure have high bioactivities and therefore potential applications in bone tissue regeneration. In this paper, crack-free polydimethylsiloxane-modified bioactive glass-poly (ethylene glycol) (PDMS-BG-PEG) hybrids monoliths were fabricated via using a modified sol-gel process. Results show that the addition of PEG plays an important part in the formation of crack-free and gelation of the monoliths, and surface microstructures of the as-prepared hybrid monoliths were significantly influenced by the concentration and molecular weight of PEG. The samples obtained from PEG 300 had porous surface result in higher bioactivity (apatite formation) in simulated body fluid (SBF), while the samples obtained from PEG 600 had the smooth surface and inhibited the formation of apatite layer in SBF. These as-prepared hybrid monoliths can be used as a good candidate of implant and scaffold for highly efficient bone tissue regeneration.

  20. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin...

  1. Usefulness of rat skin as a substitute for human skin in the in vitro skin permeation study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yoko; Terasaka, Shuichi; Sakurai, Takanobu; Furuya, Atsushi; Urano, Hidetoshi; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats are broadly used in preclinical studies for drug development, so a lot of information for the rats can be obtained especially from pharmacokinetic, pharmacological and toxicological studies. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether SD rat skin can be used to predict human skin permeability. In vitro permeation studies of the three model drugs, nicorandil, isosorbide dinitrate, and flurbiprofen, through human skin and SD rat skin were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells. The permeation rates of the three model drugs through human skin and SD rat skin were determined, and their variations were evaluated. The inter-individual variations in SD rat skin permeability of the three model drugs were much lower than that in human skin permeability, although the permeation rates of the three model drugs through the SD rat skin were about twice those through human skin. In addition, no difference in the skin permeability coefficients of the three model drugs was obtained between fresh SD rat skin and frozen SD rat skin. The markedly smaller variation in the permeability through SD rat skin compared with that through human skin indicated that in vitro permeation studies using SD rat skin would be especially useful for evaluating differences in the skin permeability of the three model drugs as well as for predicting human skin permeability. PMID:21791877

  2. Skin ultrastructure in senile lentigo.

    PubMed

    Noblesse, E; Nizard, C; Cario-André, M; Lepreux, S; Pain, C; Schnebert, S; Taïeb, A; Kurfurst, R

    2006-01-01

    Senile lentigo is a common component of photoaged skin. It is characterized by hyperpigmented macules which affect chronically irradiated skin mostly after the age of 50. This study was undertaken to assess the morphology of senile lentigo on the dorsum of the hands. A systematic comparison between lesional and perilesional skin using histology and transmission electron microscopy was done to determine whether melanocytes or keratinocytes are affected in the evolution of lesions and which tissue structure is modified. The histology study showed that lesional skin is characterized by a hyperpigmented basal layer and an elongation of the rete ridges, which seem to drive deeply into the dermis. The epidermis contained clusters of keratinocytes, which retained and accumulated the melanin pigment. Electron microscopy studies showed important modifications in the lesional skin ultrastructure in comparison with perilesional skin. In melanocytes from perilesional and lesional skin, we observed normal size melanosomes at all stages of maturation in the cytoplasm and in migration within dendrites. No pigment accumulation was observed. However, the morphology of melanocytes in lesional skin revealed an activated status with numerous mitochondria and a well-developed endoplasmic reticulum, which could reflect intense protein synthesis. In basal keratinocytes from lesional skin, we observed numerous melanosome complexes called polymelanosomes, which formed massive caps on the nuclei. Observations in colored semi-thin sections also revealed perturbed structures in the basal layer region, which could explain the skin perturbation. Indeed, we observed keratinocytes that presented important microinvaginations and pendulum melanocytes, which sank into the dermis, beneath the basal layer of keratinocytes. These cell modifications seemed to be due to a perturbation of the dermal-epidermal junction, which appeared disorganized and disrupted and could directly disturb the basal support of the cells. PMID:16685148

  3. Lipid mediator profile in vernix caseosa reflects skin barrier development.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio; Holm, Tina; Sjödin, Marcus O D; Reinke, Stacey N; Alm, Johan; Scheynius, Annika; Wheelock, Craig E

    2015-01-01

    Vernix caseosa (VC) is a protective layer that covers the skin of most human newborns. This study characterized the VC lipid mediator profile, and examined its relationship to gestational period, gender of the newborn and maternal lifestyle. VC collected at birth from 156 newborns within the ALADDIN birth cohort was analyzed and 3 different groups of lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related oxylipin analogs, endocannabinoids and sphingolipids) were screened using LC-MS/MS. A total of 54 compounds were detected in VC. A number of associations between lipid mediators and the gestational period were observed, including increases in the ceramide to sphingomyelin ratio as well as the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Gender-specific differences in lipid mediator levels were observed for all 3 lipid classes. In addition, levels of the linoleic acid oxidation products 9(10)-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic and 12(13)-epoxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (EpOMEs) as well as 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (DiHOME) were increased in VC of children from mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle. Accordingly, VC was found to be rich in multiple classes of bioactive lipid mediators, which evidence lifestyle, gender and gestational week dependencies. Levels of lipid mediators in VC may therefore be useful as early stage non-invasive markers of the development of the skin as a protective barrier. PMID:26521946

  4. Lipid mediator profile in vernix caseosa reflects skin barrier development

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio; Holm, Tina; Sjödin, Marcus O. D.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Alm, Johan; Scheynius, Annika; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Vernix caseosa (VC) is a protective layer that covers the skin of most human newborns. This study characterized the VC lipid mediator profile, and examined its relationship to gestational period, gender of the newborn and maternal lifestyle. VC collected at birth from 156 newborns within the ALADDIN birth cohort was analyzed and 3 different groups of lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related oxylipin analogs, endocannabinoids and sphingolipids) were screened using LC-MS/MS. A total of 54 compounds were detected in VC. A number of associations between lipid mediators and the gestational period were observed, including increases in the ceramide to sphingomyelin ratio as well as the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Gender-specific differences in lipid mediator levels were observed for all 3 lipid classes. In addition, levels of the linoleic acid oxidation products 9(10)-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic and 12(13)-epoxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (EpOMEs) as well as 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (DiHOME) were increased in VC of children from mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle. Accordingly, VC was found to be rich in multiple classes of bioactive lipid mediators, which evidence lifestyle, gender and gestational week dependencies. Levels of lipid mediators in VC may therefore be useful as early stage non-invasive markers of the development of the skin as a protective barrier. PMID:26521946

  5. Frog skin opioid peptides: a case for environmental mimicry.

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, L H; Bryant, S D; Attila, M; Salvadori, S

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring environmental substances often mimic endogenous substances found in mammals and are capable of interacting with specific proteins, such as receptors, with a high degree of fidelity and selectivity. Narcotic alkaloids and amphibian skin secretions, introduced into human society through close association with plants and animals through folk medicine and religious divination practices, were incorporated into the armamentarium of the early pharmacopoeia. These skin secretions contain a myriad of potent bioactive substances, including alkaloids, biogenic amines, peptides, enzymes, mucus, and toxins (noxious compounds notwithstanding); each class exhibits a broad range of characteristic properties. One specific group of peptides, the opioids, containing the dermorphins (dermal morphinelike substances) and the deltorphins (delta-selective opioids), display remarkable analgesic properties and include an amino acid with the rare (in a mammalian context) D-enantiomer in lieu of the normal L-isomer. Synthesis of numerous stereospecific analogues and conformational analyses of these peptides provided essential insights into the tertiary composition and microenvironment of the receptor "pocket" and the optimal interactions between receptor and ligand that trigger a biological response; new advances in the synthesis and receptor-binding properties of the deltorphins are discussed in detail. These receptor-specific opioid peptides act as more than mimics of endogenous opioids: their high selectivity for either the mu or delta receptor makes them formidable environmentally derived agents in the search for new antagonists for treating opiate addiction and in the treatment of a wide variety of human disorders. Images p648-a Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7895704

  6. Effects of calcitriol on random skin flap survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai-Liang; Zhang, Yi-Hui; Lin, Ding-Sheng; Tao, Xian-Yao; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol, a metabolite of vitamin D, is often used in osteoporosis clinics. However, the material has other bioactivities; for example, it accelerates angiogenesis, has anti-inflammatory properties, and inhibits oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of calcitriol in a random skin flap rat model. "McFarlane flap" models were established in 84 male Sprague Dawley rats, divided into two groups. One group received intraperitoneal injections of calcitriol (2??g/kg/day) whereas control rats received intraperitoneal injections of saline. The percentage flap survival area and tissue water content were measured 7 days later, which showed that calcitriol improved flap survival area and reduced tissue edema. It also increased the mean vessel density and upregulated levels of VEGF mRNA/protein, both of which promote flap angiogenesis. Moreover, it decreased leukocyte and macrophage infiltration, reduced the inflammatory proteins IL1? and IL6, increased SOD activity, decreased MDA content, and upregulated the level of autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that calcitriol promotes skin flap survival by accelerating angiogenesis, having anti-inflammatory effects, reducing oxidative stress, and promoting autophagy. PMID:26732750

  7. Capturing skin properties from dynamic mechanical analyses

    E-print Network

    Sandford, Erika J. (Erika Jaye)

    2012-01-01

    Existing skin mechanical testing devices focus on measuring skin elasticity and are not tailored to assess the dynamic behavior of skin. The mathematical techniques used to analyze data collected using these devices are ...

  8. Laser speckle and skin cancer: skin roughness assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Incidence of skin cancer has been increasing rapidly since the last few decades. Non-invasive optical diagnostic tools may improve the diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, skin structure, skin cancer statistics and subtypes of skin cancer are briefly reviewed. Among the subtypes, malignant melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous; early detection dramatically improves the prognosis. Therefore, a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant melanoma is especially needed. In addition, in order for the diagnostic tool to be useful, it must be able to differentiate melanoma from common skin conditions such as seborrheic keratosis, a benign skin disease that resembles melanoma according to the well known clinical-assessment ABCD rule. The key diagnostic feature between these two diseases is surface roughness. Based on laser speckle contrast, our research team has recently developed a portable, optical, non-invasive, in-vivo diagnostic device for quantifying skin surface roughness. The methodology of our technique is described in details. Examining the preliminary data collected in a pilot clinical study for the prototype, we found that there was a difference in roughness between melanoma and seborrheic keratosis. In fact, there was a perfect cutoff value for the two diseases based on our initial data.

  9. Bioactivity of freeze-dried platelet-rich plasma in an adsorbed form on a biodegradable polymer material.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yu; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Mito; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the necessity for the immediate preparation from patients' blood, autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) limits its clinical applicability. To address this concern and respond to emergency care and other unpredictable uses, we have developed a freeze-dried PRP in an adsorbed form on a biodegradable polymer material (Polyglactin 910). On the polymer filaments of PRP mesh, which was prepared by coating the polymer mesh with human fresh PRP and subsequent freeze-drying, platelets were incorporated, and related growth factors were preserved at high levels. This new PRP mesh preparation significantly and reproducibly stimulated the proliferation of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro and neovascularization in a chorioallantoic membrane assay. A full-thickness skin defect model in a diabetic mouse demonstrated the PRP mesh, although prepared from human blood, substantially facilitated angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization without inducing severe inflammation in vivo. These data demonstrate that our new PRP mesh preparation functions as a bioactive material to facilitate tissue repair/regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that this bioactive material, composed of allogeneic PRP, could be clinically used as a promising alternative in emergency care or at times when autologous PRP is not prepared immediately before application. PMID:22273512

  10. Fucoxanthin, a marine carotenoid present in brown seaweeds and diatoms: metabolism and bioactivities relevant to human health.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wu, Chou-Fei; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2011-01-01

    The marine carotenoid fucoxanthin can be found in marine brown seaweeds, the macroalgae, and diatoms, the microalgae, and has remarkable biological properties. Numerous studies have shown that fucoxanthin has considerable potential and promising applications in human health. In this article, we review the current available scientific literature regarding the metabolism, safety, and bioactivities of fucoxanthin, including its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-obese, antidiabetic, antiangiogenic and antimalarial activities, and its protective effects on the liver, blood vessels of the brain, bones, skin, and eyes. Although some studies have shown the bioavailability of fucoxanthin in brown seaweeds to be low in humans, many studies have suggested that a dietary combination of fucoxanthin and edible oil or lipid could increase the absorption rate of fucoxanthin, and thus it might be a promising marine drug. PMID:22072997

  11. Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid Present in Brown Seaweeds and Diatoms: Metabolism and Bioactivities Relevant to Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wu, Chou-Fei; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2011-01-01

    The marine carotenoid fucoxanthin can be found in marine brown seaweeds, the macroalgae, and diatoms, the microalgae, and has remarkable biological properties. Numerous studies have shown that fucoxanthin has considerable potential and promising applications in human health. In this article, we review the current available scientific literature regarding the metabolism, safety, and bioactivities of fucoxanthin, including its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-obese, antidiabetic, antiangiogenic and antimalarial activities, and its protective effects on the liver, blood vessels of the brain, bones, skin, and eyes. Although some studies have shown the bioavailability of fucoxanthin in brown seaweeds to be low in humans, many studies have suggested that a dietary combination of fucoxanthin and edible oil or lipid could increase the absorption rate of fucoxanthin, and thus it might be a promising marine drug. PMID:22072997

  12. Microencapsulation of Bioactive Principles with an Airless Spray-Gun Suitable for Processing High Viscous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cocchietto, Moreno; Blasi, Paolo; Lapasin, Romano; Moro, Chiara; Gallo, Davide; Sava, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: to design, assemble and test a prototype of a novel production plant, suitable for producing microparticles (MPs) by processing highly viscous feed solutions (FSs). Methods: the prototype has been built using a commercial air compressor, a piston pump, an airless spray-gun, a customized air-treatment section, a timer, a rotating base, and a filtration section. Preliminary prototype parameter setting was carried out to individuate the best performing nozzle’s dimension, the nebulization timing, and the CaCl2 concentration in the gelation fluid. In addition, prototype throughput (1 L to 5 L) and the range of practicable feed solution (FS) viscosities were assayed. A set of four batches was prepared in order to characterize the MPs, in terms of mean particle size and distribution, flow properties, swelling, encapsulation efficiency and release. Results: according to a qualitative scoring, the large nozzle was suitable to nebulize FSs at a higher alginate concentration. Conversely, the small nozzle performed better in the processing of FSs with an alginate concentration up to 2% w/v. Only at the highest degree of viscosity, corresponding to 5% w/v of alginate, the FS processing was not technically possible. Among the CaCl2 concentrations considered, 15% w/v was recognized as the most versatile. The prototype appears to be convenient and suitable to grant a high yield starting from 2 L of FS. The flow behavior of the FSs assayed can be satisfactorily described with the Carreau-Yasuda equation and the throughput begins to slightly decrease for FSs at alginate concentrations exceeding 3% w/v. MP morphology was irregular with crumpled shape. The angle of repose indicates a good flowability and the release studies showed gastro-resistance and potential prolonged release applications. Conclusions: the novel prototype of production plant is suitable to process large amounts (2 L or more) of FSs, characterized by a high viscosity, to produce MPs suitable for bioactive principle delivery. PMID:24956192

  13. A versatile method to generate multiple types of micropatterns

    E-print Network

    Segerer, F J; Schuster, S; Alberola, A Piera; Zahler, S; Rädler, J O

    2015-01-01

    Micropatterning techniques have become an important tool for the study of cell behavior in controlled microenvironments. As a consequence, several approaches for the creation of micropatterns have been developed in recent years. However, the diversity of substrates, coatings and complex patterns used in cell science is so great that no single existing technique is capable of fabricating designs suitable for all experimental conditions. Hence, there is a need for patterning protocols that are flexible with regard to the materials used and compatible with different patterning strategies to create more elaborate setups. In this work, we present a novel and versatile approach to micropatterning. The protocol is based on plasma treatment, protein coating, and a PLL-PEG backfill step, and produces homogeneous patterns on a variety of substrates. Protein density within the patterns can be controlled, and gradients of surface-bound protein can be formed. Moreover, by combining the method with microcontact printing, i...

  14. A versatile spatial resolution enhancement method for data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M. H.; Flores De Jesus, K.; Cronin, S. D.; Sierros, K. A.; Bakhoum, E.

    2015-04-01

    While acquiring specific physical properties within a targeted area, spatial resolution of hardware is usually one of the major limitations that affects the precision of data acquisition. Though measured results with higher spatial resolution are always desired, adequate configuration of hardware setups sometimes implies higher cost or longer acquisition time. In this study, a versatile resolution enhancement method is proposed to improve the sampling resolution. An efficient algorithm is used to convert the lower-resolution data into higher-resolution approximation. Three different engineering applications are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. From the arithmetic results, the spatial sampling resolution can be greatly improved without trading-off the operating time.

  15. VERSATILE TWO-AXIS OPEN-LOOP SOLAR TRACKER CONTROLLER*

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Christina D; Maxey, L Curt; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Lapsa, Melissa Voss

    2008-01-01

    A versatile single-board controller for two-axis solar tracking applications has been developed and tested on operating solar tracking systems with over two years of field experience. The operating experience gained from the two systems and associated modifications are discussed as representative examples of the practical issues associated with implementing a new two-axis solar tracker design. In this research, open and closed loop control methods were evaluated; however, only the open loop method met the 0.125 tracking accuracy requirement and the requirement to maintain pointing accuracy in hazy and scattered cloudy skies. The open loop algorithm was finally implemented in a microcontroller-based tracking system. Methods of applying this controller hardware to different tracker geometries and hardware are discussed along with the experience gained to date.

  16. Preparation of a Versatile Bifunctional Zeolite for Targeted Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ndiege, Nicholas; Raidoo, Renugan; Schultz, Michael K.; Larsen, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Bifunctional zeolite Y was prepared for use in targeted in vivo molecular imaging applications. The strategy involved functionalization of the external surface of zeolite Y with chloropropyltriethoxysilane followed by reaction with sodium azide to form azide-functionalized NaY, which is amenable to copper(1) catalyzed click chemistry. In this study, a model alkyne (4-pentyn-1-ol) was attached to the azide-terminated surface via click chemistry to demonstrate feasibility for attachment of molecular targeting vectors (e.g., peptides, aptamers) to the zeolite surface. The modified particle efficiently incorporates the imaging radioisotope gallium-68 (68Ga) into the pores of the azide-functionalized NaY zeolite to form a stable bifunctional molecular targeting vector. The result is a versatile “clickable” zeolite platform that can be tailored for future in vivo molecular targeting and imaging modalities. PMID:21306141

  17. Parallel optics technology assessment for the Versatile Link project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chramowicz, J.; Kwan, S.; Rivera, R.; Prosser, A.

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes the assessment of commercially available and prototype parallel optics modules for possible use as back end components for the Versatile Link common project. The assessment covers SNAP12 transmitter and receiver modules as well as optical engine technologies in dense packaging options. Tests were performed using vendor evaluation boards (SNAP12) as well as custom evaluation boards (optical engines). The measurements obtained were used to compare the performance of these components with single channel SFP+ components operating at a transmission wavelength of 850 nm over multimode fibers. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  18. The versatility and adaptation of bacteria from the genus Stenotrophomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R.P.; van der Lelie, D.; Monchy, S.; Cardinale, M.; Taghavi, S.; Crossman, L.; Avison, M. B.; Berg, G.; Dow, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    The genus Stenotrophomonas comprises at least eight species. These bacteria are found throughout the environment, particularly in close association with plants. Strains of the most predominant species, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, have an extraordinary range of activities that include beneficial effects for plant growth and health, the breakdown of natural and man-made pollutants that are central to bioremediation and phytoremediation strategies and the production of biomolecules of economic value, as well as detrimental effects, such as multidrug resistance, in human pathogenic strains. Here, we discuss the versatility of the bacteria in the genus Stenotrophomonas and the insight that comparative genomic analysis of clinical and endophytic isolates of S. maltophilia has brought to our understanding of the adaptation of this genus to various niches.

  19. On the versatility of electronic structures in polymethine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Simon; Haefele, Alexandre; Monnereau, Cyrille; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; Jacquemin, Denis; Le Guennic, Boris; Maury, Olivier; Andraud, Chantal

    2014-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the photophysical behavior diversity of polymethine chromophores which are ubiquitous in biological imaging and material sciences. One major challenge in this class of chromophore is to correlate the chemical structure to the observed optical properties, especially when symmetry-breaking phenomena occur. With the constant concern for rationalization of their spectroscopy, we propose an extended classification of polymethine dyes based on their ground state electronic configuration using three limit forms namely: cyanine, dipole and bis-dipole. The chemical modifications of the dye and the influence of exogenous parameters can promote dramatic spectroscopic changes that can be correlated to significant electronic reorganization between the three-abovementioned forms. The deep understanding of such phenomena should allow to identify, predict and take advantage of the versatile electronic structure of polymethines.

  20. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging

    E-print Network

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Mascaro, Anna Letizia Allegra; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput um-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multimodal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2'-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy...

  1. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs)?–?about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  2. Sorghum - a versatile, multi-purpose biomass crop

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.W.; Jolts, E.J.; Miller, F.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sorghums are versatile, energy-efficient plants that exhibit excellent potentials for multi-product use. Grain sorghum, although already a major feed and food crop, offers promise as a source of starch and sugar for fermentation alcohol, as well as a number of fiber products. Sweet sorghum, a variety rich in extractable fermentable sugars, is now in limited production, but can be a major sugar, grain, forage, fuel and industrial products raw material. Sorghums can be grown in virtually every state. The need for multi-product crops to improve agricultural land productivities and to offset increasing cultural costs is detailed. Results of continuing plant breeding work to enhance sorghum varieties for multiple uses are discussed.

  3. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brullot, W.; Reddy, N. K.; Wouters, J.; Valev, V. K.; Goderis, B.; Vermant, J.; Verbiest, T.

    2012-06-01

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using a modified forced hydrolysis method were functionalized with polyethylene glycol silane (PEG silane), precipitated and dried. These functionalized particles are dispersable in a range of solvents and concentrations depending on the desired properties. Examples of tunable properties are magnetic behavior, optical and magneto-optical response, thermal features and rheological behavior. As such, PEG silane functionalized particles represent a platform for the development of new materials that have broad applicability in e.g. biomedical, industrial or photonic environments. Magnetic, optical, magneto-optical, thermal and rheological properties of several ferrofluids based on PEG coated particles with different concentrations of particles dispersed in low molecular mass polyethylene glycol were investigated, establishing the applicability of such materials.

  4. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-10-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  5. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Araujo, J F D F; Bruno, A C; Louro, S R W

    2015-10-01

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer's sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10(-8) Am(2) was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample. PMID:26520980

  6. Extraordinary phylogenetic diversity and metabolic versatility in aquifer sediment

    PubMed Central

    Castelle, Cindy J.; Hug, Laura A.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Thomas, Brian C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wu, Dongying; Tringe, Susannah G.; Singer, Steven W.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms in the subsurface represent a substantial but poorly understood component of the Earth’s biosphere. Subsurface environments are complex and difficult to characterize; thus, their microbiota have remained as a ‘dark matter’ of the carbon and other biogeochemical cycles. Here we deeply sequence two sediment-hosted microbial communities from an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, CO, USA. No single organism represents more than ~1% of either community. Remarkably, many bacteria and archaea in these communities are novel at the phylum level or belong to phyla lacking a sequenced representative. The dominant organism in deeper sediment, RBG-1, is a member of a new phylum. On the basis of its reconstructed complete genome, RBG-1 is metabolically versatile. Its wide respiration-based repertoire may enable it to respond to the fluctuating redox environment close to the water table. We document extraordinary microbial novelty and the importance of previously unknown lineages in sediment biogeochemical transformations. PMID:23979677

  7. Advanced Sorbents as a Versatile Platform for Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Stephenson

    2003-09-30

    The program objective was to develop materials and processes for industrial gas separations to reduce energy use and enable waste reduction. The approach chosen combined novel oxygen selective adsorbents and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes. Preliminary materials development and process simulation results indicated that oxygen selective adsorbents could provide a versatile platform for industrial gas separations. If fully successful, this new technology offered the potential for reducing the cost of producing nitrogen/oxygen co-products, high purity nitrogen, argon, and possibly oxygen. The potential energy savings for the gas separations are appreciable, but the end users are the main beneficiaries. Lowering the cost of industrial gases expands their use in applications that can employ them for reducing energy consumption and emissions.

  8. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs)?–?about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  9. A new versatile in-process monitoring system for milling

    E-print Network

    Ritou, Mathieu; Furet, Benoît; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Tool condition monitoring (TCM) systems can improve productivity and ensure workpiece quality, yet, there is a lack of reliable TCM solutions for small-batch or one-off manufacturing of industrial parts. TCM methods which include the characteristics of the cut seem to be particularly suitable for these demanding applications. In the first section of this paper, three process-based indicators have been retrieved from literature dealing with TCM. They are analysed using a cutting force model and experiments are carried out in industrial conditions. Specific transient cuttings encountered during the machining of the test part reveal the indicators to be unreliable. Consequently, in the second section, a versatile in-process monitoring method is suggested. Based on experiments carried out under a range of different cutting conditions, an adequate indicator is proposed: the relative radial eccentricity of the cutters is estimated at each instant and characterizes the tool state. It is then compared with the previo...

  10. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W.

    2015-10-01

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer's sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10-8 Am2 was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  11. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  12. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Bø, Lars Eirik; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A N

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy. PMID:25855886

  13. FLUTE: A versatile linac-based THz source

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, M. J.; Schuh, M.; Schwarz, M.; Naknaimueang, S.; Mathis, Y.-L.; Rossmanith, R.; Wesolowski, P.; Huttel, E.; Plech, A.; Schmelling, M.; Mueller, A.-S.

    2013-02-15

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short ({approx}1 ps) THz pulses (up to {approx}4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range ({approx}100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments.

  14. FLUTE: A versatile linac-based THz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, M. J.; Schuh, M.; Naknaimueang, S.; Schwarz, M.; Plech, A.; Mathis, Y.-L.; Rossmanith, R.; Wesolowski, P.; Huttel, E.; Schmelling, M.; Müller, A.-S.

    2013-02-01

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short (˜1 ps) THz pulses (up to ˜4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range (˜100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments.

  15. FLUTE: a versatile linac-based THz source.

    PubMed

    Nasse, M J; Schuh, M; Naknaimueang, S; Schwarz, M; Plech, A; Mathis, Y-L; Rossmanith, R; Wesolowski, P; Huttel, E; Schmelling, M; Müller, A-S

    2013-02-01

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short (~1 ps) THz pulses (up to ~4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range (~100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments. PMID:23464187

  16. A small low-power networked and versatile sensor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Peter S.; McMahon, Phillip J.; Muscat, Richard F.; Zeve, Ladislav; Wilson, Alan R.

    2007-01-01

    Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has developed a low power RS485 sensor network that can be hardware configured at design time from a number of modules, depending on its final application. The core predesigned module includes network communications, microprocessor control and digital input/output. A number of analogue sensor interface modules can easily be added to this core. In addition, the software is also of modular design consisting of a set of core operating routines and a set of routines for controlling sensor operations that can be downloaded or upgraded in the field. Prime consideration in this development has been given to the need for small size, low weight, low power and versatility of operation. The hardware is based around the Texas Instruments MSP430® micro-controller. This paper will present some of the considerations leading to the design and examples of applications of the sensor network.

  17. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-01-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  18. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  19. A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I-Lin; Narayan, Kedar; Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Tian, Fang; Subramaniam, Sriram; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.

    2015-01-01

    Dormant bacterial spores are encased in a thick protein shell, the ‘coat', which contains ?70 different proteins. The coat protects the spore from environmental insults, and is among the most durable static structures in biology. Owing to extensive cross-linking among coat proteins, this structure has been recalcitrant to detailed biochemical analysis, so molecular details of how it assembles are largely unknown. Here, we reconstitute the basement layer of the coat atop spherical membranes supported by silica beads to create artificial spore-like particles. We report that these synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayers (SSHELs) assemble and polymerize into a static structure, mimicking in vivo basement layer assembly during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we demonstrate that SSHELs may be easily covalently modified with small molecules and proteins. We propose that SSHELs may be versatile display platforms for drugs and vaccines in clinical settings, or for enzymes that neutralize pollutants for environmental remediation. PMID:25854653

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance as a unique tool for skin and hair research.

    PubMed

    Plonka, Przemyslaw M

    2009-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and imaging (EPRI) are deeply rooted in the basic and quantum physics, but the spectrum of their applications in modern experimental and clinical dermatology and cosmetology is surprisingly wide. The main aim of this review was to show the physical foundation, technical limitations and versatility of this method in skin studies. Free radical and metal ion detection, EPR dosimetry, melanin study, spin trapping, spin labelling, oximetry and NO-metry, EPR imaging, new generation methods of EPR and EPR/NMR hybrid technology used under ex vivo and in vivo regime are portrayed in the context of clinical and experimental skin research to study problems such as oxidative and nitrosative stress generated by UV or inflammation, skin oxygenation, hydration of corneal layer of epidermis, transport and metabolism of drugs and cosmeceutics, skin carcinogenesis, skin tumors and many others. A part of the paper is devoted to hair and nail research. The review of dermatological applications of EPR is supplemented with a handful of advice concerning practical aspects of EPR experimentation and usage of EPR reagents. PMID:19368555

  1. Age-related skin changes.

    PubMed

    Levakov, Aleksandra; Vuckovi?, Nada; Dolai, Matilda; Ka?anski, Mihaela Mocko; Bozani?, Snezana

    2012-01-01

    Age-related skin changes can be induced by chronological ageing, manifested in subcutaneous fat reduction, and photo-ageing eliciting increased elastotic substance in the upper dermis, destruction of its fibrilar structure, augmented intercellular substance and moderate inflammatory infiltrate. Forty-five biopsy skin samples of the sun-exposed and sun-protected skin were analyzed. The patients were both males and females, aged from 17 to 81 years. The thickness of the epidermal layers and the number of cellular living layers is greater in younger skin. The amount of keratohyaline granules is enlarged in older skin. Dermoepidermal junction is flattened and the presence of elastotic material in the dermis is pronounced with age. The amount of inflammatory infiltrate is increased, the fibrous trabeculae are thickened in older skin and the atrophy of the hypodermis is observed. Chronological ageing alters the fibroblasts metabolism by reducing their life span, capacity to divide and produce collagen. During ageing, the enlargement of collagen fibrils diminishes the skin elasticity. PMID:22730701

  2. Changes in intakes of selected foods rich in bioactive compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several foods have received considerable attention in recent years because of their possible protective effect on cardiovascular diseases and cancer. These foods are rich in bioactive compounds and include blueberries, strawberries, broccoli, soymilk, and tea. Dietary intake data for males and femal...

  3. Plastids of Marine Phytoplankton Produce Bioactive Pigments and Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Heydarizadeh, Parisa; Poirier, Isabelle; Loizeau, Damien; Ulmann, Lionel; Mimouni, Virginie; Schoefs, Benoît; Bertrand, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton is acknowledged to be a very diverse source of bioactive molecules. These compounds play physiological roles that allow cells to deal with changes of the environmental constrains. For example, the diversity of light harvesting pigments allows efficient photosynthesis at different depths in the seawater column. Identically, lipid composition of cell membranes can vary according to environmental factors. This, together with the heterogenous evolutionary origin of taxa, makes the chemical diversity of phytoplankton compounds much larger than in terrestrial plants. This contribution is dedicated to pigments and lipids synthesized within or from plastids/photosynthetic membranes. It starts with a short review of cyanobacteria and microalgae phylogeny. Then the bioactivity of pigments and lipids (anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, anti-allergic activities, and cardio- neuro-, hepato- and photoprotective effects), alone or in combination, is detailed. To increase the cellular production of bioactive compounds, specific culture conditions may be applied (e.g., high light intensity, nitrogen starvation). Regardless of the progress made in blue biotechnologies, the production of bioactive compounds is still limited. However, some examples of large scale production are given, and perspectives are suggested in the final section. PMID:24022731

  4. Bioactivity of cedarwood oil and cedrol against arthropod pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from Juniperus virginiana, were extracted with liquid carbon dioxide and the bioactivity of carbon dioxide-derived cedarwood oil (CWO) towards several species of arthropods was investigated. Repellency or toxicity was tested for ants, ticks, and cockroaches. Ants in an outdoor bi...

  5. New bioactive and biobased product applications of pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pectin is well known for its bioactive health-promoting properties and use in biobased products. Recent reports have demonstrated that pectin and pectic fractions have potential as prebiotics, prevent pathogenic bacterial adhesion, increase prostate specific antigen doubling time in patients with re...

  6. CLONING OF MILK-DERIVED BIOACTIVE PEPTIDES IN STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been shown that the enzymatic breakdown of milk proteins leads to the release of bioactive peptides. Two such peptides are the 11-residue antimicrobial peptide from bovine lactoferrin (BL-11) and the 12-residue antihypertensive peptide from s1-casein (C-12). This report summarizes the clonin...

  7. Production of the bioactive polysaccharide schizophyllan from renewable cellulosic materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Schizophyllan is a bioactive homoglucan with a ß-1,3-linked backbone and ß-1,6-linked side chains of single glucose units at every other residue. It is produced by the ubiquitous mushroom, Schizophyllum commune. Schizophyllan acts as a biological response modifier and a non-specific stimulator of ...

  8. Advancement into the Arctic region for bioactive sponge secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Samuel; Kelly, Michelle; Bowling, John; Sims, James; Waters, Amanda; Hamann, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Porifera have long been a reservoir for the discovery of bioactive compounds and drug discovery. Most research in the area has focused on sponges from tropical and temperate waters, but more recently the focus has shifted to the less accessible colder waters of the Antarctic and, to a lesser extent, the Arctic. The Antarctic region in particular has been a more popular location for natural products discovery and has provided promising candidates for drug development. This article reviews groups of bioactive compounds that have been isolated and reported from the southern reaches of the Arctic Circle, surveys the known sponge diversity present in the Arctic waters, and details a recent sponge collection by our group in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The collection has yielded previously undescribed sponge species along with primary activity against opportunistic infectious diseases, malaria, and HCV. The discovery of new sponge species and bioactive crude extracts gives optimism for the isolation of new bioactive compounds from a relatively unexplored source. PMID:22163194

  9. Mechanical properties of biodegradable polymer sutures coated with bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Stamboulis, A; Hench, L L; Boccaccini, A R

    2002-09-01

    Combining commercially available Polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) sutures with bioactive glass powder offers new possibilities for application of composite materials in tissue engineering. Commercial bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass) powder was used to coat Vicryl sutures and the tensile strength of the sutures was tested before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) as a means to assess the effect of the bioactive glass coating on suture degradation. Different gauge lengths (126.6 and 111.6 mm) and strain rates (2.54, 11.4 and 25.4 mm/min) were tested. The tensile strength of composite sutures was slightly lower than that of as-received Vicryl sutures (404 MPa versus 463 MPa). However after 28 days immersion in SBF the residual tensile strength of the coated sutures was significantly higher, indicating a protective function of the Bioglass coating. The tensile strength results were similar for the different gauge lengths and strain rates investigated. A qualitative explanation for the effect of bioactive glass coating on polymer degradation is offered. PMID:15348548

  10. Bioactive glass reinforced elastomer composites for skeletal regeneration: A review.

    PubMed

    Zeimaran, Ehsan; Pourshahrestani, Sara; Djordjevic, Ivan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Towler, Mark R

    2015-08-01

    Biodegradable elastomers have clinical applicability due to their biocompatibility, tunable degradation and elasticity. The addition of bioactive glasses to these elastomers can impart mechanical properties sufficient for hard tissue replacement. Hence, a composite with a biodegradable polymer matrix and a bioglass filler can offer a method of augmenting existing tissue. This article reviews the applications of such composites for skeletal augmentation. PMID:26042705

  11. Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent observational and clinical studies have raised interest in the potential health effects of cranberry consumption, an association that appears due to the phytochemical content of this fruit. The profile of cranberry bioactives is distinct from other berry fruit, being rich in A-type proanthocy...

  12. Greener and Expeditious Synthesis of Bioactive Heterocycles using Microwave Irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utilization of green chemistry techniques is dramatically reducing chemical waste and reaction times as has recently been proven in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. To illustrate these advantages in the synthesis of bio-active heterocycles, we have stud...

  13. Metabolomic screening and identification of bioactivation pathways of ritonavir

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Lu, Jie; Ma, Xiaochao

    2011-01-01

    Ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor regimens are widely used for HIV chemotherapy. However, ritonavir causes multiple side effects, and the mechanisms are not fully understood. The current study was designed to explore the metabolic pathways of ritonavir that may be related to its toxicity. Metabolomic analysis screened out 26 ritonavir metabolites in mice, and half of them are novel. These novel ritonavir metabolites include two glycine conjugated, two N-acetylcysteine conjugated and three ring-open products. Accompanied with the generation of ritonavir ring-open metabolites, the formation of methanethioamide and 2-methylpropanethioamide were expected. Based upon the structures of these novel metabolites, five bioactivation pathways are proposed, which may be associated with sulfation and epoxidation. By using Cyp3a-null mice, we confirmed that CYP3A is involved in four pathways of RTV bioactivation. In addition, all these five bioactivation pathways were recapitulated in the incubation of ritonavir in human liver microsomes. Further studies are suggested to determine the role of CYP3A and these bioactivation pathways in ritonavir toxicity. PMID:22040299

  14. A Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies

    E-print Network

    Nyholt, Dale R.

    ,* We have derived a versatile gene-based test for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Our approach, called VEGAS (versatile gene- based association study), is applicable to all GWAS designs, including family-based GWAS, meta-analyses of GWAS on the basis of summary data, and DNA-pooling-based GWAS, where

  15. Versatility of cyclodextrins in self-assembly systems of amphiphiles Lingxiang Jiang, Yun Yan, Jianbin Huang

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianbin

    Versatility of cyclodextrins in self-assembly systems of amphiphiles Lingxiang Jiang, Yun Yan-assembly systems of amphiphiles or surfactants. Herein, we try to review and clarify the versatility of CDs unit) and four subgroups (destructive and constructive modulators, amphiphilic and unamphiphilic

  16. Description and performance of a highly versatile, low-cost fiber-optic confocal Raman microscope

    E-print Network

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Description and performance of a highly versatile, low-cost fiber-optic confocal Raman microscope C for publication 29 September 1995 A versatile fiber-optic confocal Raman microscope has been developed. Fiber microspectroscopy e.g., fluorescence, reflectance, Raman . II. INSTRUMENTAL DESIGN The microscope Fig. 1 is designed

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase 10 Degradomics in Keratinocytes and Epidermal Tissue Identifies Bioactive Substrates With Pleiotropic Functions.

    PubMed

    Schlage, Pascal; Kockmann, Tobias; Sabino, Fabio; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important players in skin homeostasis, wound repair, and in the pathogenesis of skin cancer. It is now well established that most of their functions are related to processing of bioactive proteins rather than components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMP10 is highly expressed in keratinocytes at the wound edge and at the invasive front of tumors, but hardly any non-ECM substrates have been identified and its function in tissue repair and carcinogenesis is unclear. To better understand the role of MMP10 in the epidermis, we employed multiplexed iTRAQ-based Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) and monitored MMP10-dependent proteolysis over time in secretomes from keratinocytes. Time-resolved abundance clustering of neo-N termini classified MMP10-dependent cleavage events by efficiency and refined the MMP10 cleavage site specificity by revealing a so far unknown preference for glutamate in the P1 position. Moreover, we identified and validated the integrin alpha 6 subunit, cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 and dermokine as novel direct MMP10 substrates and provide evidence for MMP10-dependent but indirect processing of phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1. Finally, we sampled the epidermal proteome and degradome in unprecedented depth and confirmed MMP10-dependent processing of dermokine in vivo by TAILS analysis of epidermis from transgenic mice that overexpress a constitutively active mutant of MMP10 in basal keratinocytes. The newly identified substrates are involved in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and/or differentiation, indicating a contribution of MMP10 to local modulation of these processes during wound healing and cancer development. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002474. PMID:26475864

  18. Optimization and characterization of bioactive glass nanofibers and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarber, Reginna E.

    Disease affects different areas of the bone and can impact individuals of all pathologies and ethnicities. These bone diseases can result in weakening which leads to trauma during ordinary function, the need for reconstructive surgery, and eventual bone replacement. Tissue engineering can provide a less traumatic and more fundamental solution to the current therapies. Bioactive glasses are promising materials in tissue engineering applications because of their ability to form hydroxycarbonate apatite in the presence of simulated body fluid, support cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation, induce bone formation, and concentrate bone morphogenic proteins in vivo. The research in this dissertation will attempt to improve the quality, yield, and toughness of bioactive glass nanofibrous scaffolds. The three specific aims of this research include, (1) Optimization and Characterization of Surfactant Modified Bioactive Glass (2) Optimization of Direct Synthesis Bioactive glass Nanofibers from Sols (3) Mechanical Properties and In-vitro Biomineralization of Bioglass-loaded Polyglyconate Nanocomposites Created Using the Particulate Leaching Method. The purpose of the first specific aim was to optimize the processing of bioactive glass nanofibers, resulting in greater fiber uniformity with a reduction in beading. The increase in viscosity coupled with the ability of the surfactant to limit polymeric secondary bonding led to improved fiber quality. The focal point of the second specific aim is the production of sol-gel derived glass fibers with high bioactivity prepared by electrospinning without the use of any polymer carrier system. Advantages of this method include decreased processing time, increased production of fibers, and a decrease in the loss of material due to the calcining process. The solvent cast/ particulate leaching method was used to create a nanocomposite of bioglass and the co-polymer polyglyconate (MaxonRTM) for bone tissue scaffolds The biocompatibility of the composite foams was observed and calcium phosphate presence was quantified. The incorporation of bioglass into the polymer matrix improved the strength (modulus - 21.47 MPa) and biocompatibility of the polyglyconate foam. Keywords: Bioactive glass, Electrospinning, Solvent Casting/Particulate Leaching Method, Nanocomposites

  19. Rapid screening of bioactive compounds from natural products by integrating 5-channel parallel chromatography coupled with on-line mass spectrometry and microplate based assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Xiao, Shun; Sun, Lijuan; Ge, Zhiwei; Fang, Fengkai; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2013-05-13

    A high throughput method was developed for rapid screening and identification of bioactive compounds from traditional Chinese medicine, marine products and other natural products. The system, integrated with five-channel chromatographic separation and dual UV-MS detection, is compatible with in vitro 96-well microplate based bioassays. The stability and applicability of the proposed method was validated by testing radical scavenging capability of a mixture of seven known compounds (rutin, dihydroquercetin, salvianolic acid A, salvianolic acid B, glycyrrhizic acid, rubescensin A and tangeretin). Moreover, the proposed method was successfully applied to the crude extracts of traditional Chinese medicine and a marine sponge from which 12 bioactive compounds were screened and characterized based on their anti-oxidative or anti-tumor activities. In particular, two diterpenoid derivatives, agelasine B and (-)-agelasine D, were identified for the first time as anti-tumor compounds from the sponge Agelas mauritiana, showing a considerable activity toward MCF-7 cells (IC50 values of 7.84±0.65 and 10.48±0.84 ?M, respectively). Our findings suggested that the integrated system of 5-channel parallel chromatography coupled with on-line mass spectrometry and microplate based assays can be a versatile and high efficient approach for the discovery of active compounds from natural products. PMID:23622964

  20. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bend your elbows. Look carefully at your fingernails, palms, forearms (including the undersides), and upper arms . Check ... new flesh-colored firm bump Write down the dates of your skin self-exams and make notes ...

  1. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  2. Skin and fascia staple closure.

    PubMed

    Waldron, D R

    1994-03-01

    Skin stapling is the fastest method of closure for long skin incisions. In addition, clean-contaminated wounds closed by staples have a greater resistance to infections than wounds closed with suture. It is important to realize that staples are a particular modality of suturing live tissues and if used properly they add speed and precision to wound closure. Many skin staplers are available to the veterinary surgeon and most perform satisfactorily. Stapling may be economically feasible when the reduced cost of surgical time and anesthesia is considered. PMID:8197678

  3. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure-function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  4. [Smoking and the skin].

    PubMed

    Just-Sarobé, M

    2008-04-01

    Smoking is the main modifiable cause of disease and death in the developed world. Tobacco consumption is directly linked to cardiovascular disease, chronic bronchitis, and many malignant diseases. Tobacco also has many cutaneous effects, most of which are harmful. Smoking is closely associated with several dermatologic diseases such as psoriasis, pustulosis palmoplantaris, hidrosadenitis suppurativa, and systemic and discoid lupus erythematosus, as well as cancers such as those of the lip, oral cavity, and anogenital region. A more debatable relationship exists with melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma, and acne. In contrast, smoking seems to protect against mouth sores, rosacea, labial herpes simplex, pemphigus vulgaris, and dermatitis herpetiformis. In addition to the influence of smoking on dermatologic diseases, tobacco consumption is also directly responsible for certain dermatoses such as nicotine stomatitis, black hairy tongue, periodontal disease, and some types of urticaria and contact dermatitis. Furthermore, we should not forget that smoking has cosmetic repercussions such as yellow fingers and fingernails, changes in tooth color, taste and smell disorders, halitosis and hypersalivation, and early development of facial wrinkles. PMID:18358192

  5. Skin-sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto O.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  6. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    PubMed Central

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Nazemi, Berouz; Choe, Chun Sik; Darvin, Maxim E; Hadam, Sabrina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Loza, Kateryna; Diendorf, Jörg; Epple, Matthias; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica) versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide) or antiseptics (silver). Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles. PMID:25551064

  7. Bioactive ceramic-based materials with designed reactivity for bone tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Toshiki

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics have been used clinically to repair bone defects owing to their biological affinity to living bone; i.e. the capability of direct bonding to living bone, their so-called bioactivity. However, currently available bioactive ceramics do not satisfy every clinical application. Therefore, the development of novel design of bioactive materials is necessary. Bioactive ceramics show osteoconduction by formation of biologically active bone-like apatite through chemical reaction of the ceramic surface with surrounding body fluid. Hence, the control of their chemical reactivity in body fluid is essential to developing novel bioactive materials as well as biodegradable materials. This paper reviews novel bioactive materials designed based on chemical reactivity in body fluid. PMID:19158015

  8. Recent advances in exopolysaccharides from Paenibacillus spp.: production, isolation, structure, and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Wang, San-Lang

    2015-04-01

    This review provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent developments of various aspects (i.e., production, purification, structure, and bioactivity) of the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) from Paenibacillus spp. For the production, in particular, squid pen waste was first utilized successfully to produce a high yield of inexpensive EPSs from Paenibacillus sp. TKU023 and P. macerans TKU029. In addition, this technology for EPS production is prevailing because it is more environmentally friendly. The Paenibacillus spp. EPSs reported from various references constitute a structurally diverse class of biological macromolecules with different applications in the broad fields of pharmacy, cosmetics and bioremediation. The EPS produced by P. macerans TKU029 can increase in vivo skin hydration and may be a new source of natural moisturizers with potential value in cosmetics. However, the relationships between the structures and activities of these EPSs in many studies are not well established. The contents and data in this review will serve as useful references for further investigation, production, structure and application of Paenibacillus spp. EPSs in various fields. PMID:25837984

  9. Triterpene glycosides and other polar constituents of shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels and their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kurita, Masahiro; Shinozaki, Takuro; Ukiya, Motohiko; Yasukawa, Ken; Shimizu, Naoto; Tokuda, Harukuni; Masters, Eliot T; Akihisa, Momoko; Akihisa, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The MeOH extract of defatted shea (Vitellaria paradoxa; Sapotaceae) kernels was investigated for its constituents, and fifteen oleanane-type triterpene acids and glycosides, two steroid glucosides, two pentane-2,4-diol glucosides, seven phenolic compounds, and three sugars, were isolated. The structures of five triterpene glycosides were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical methods. Upon evaluation of the bioactivity of the isolated compounds, it was found that some or most of the compounds have potent or moderate inhibitory activities against the following: melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells induced by ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?-MSH); generation of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-teradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells; t TPA-induced inflammation in mice, and proliferation of one or more of HL-60, A549, AZ521, and SK-BR-3 human cancer cell lines, respectively. Western blot analysis established that paradoxoside E inhibits melanogenesis by regulation of expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) and TRP-2. In addition, tieghemelin A was demonstrated to exhibit cytotoxic activity against A549 cells (IC50 13.5 ?M) mainly due to induction of apoptosis by flow cytometry. The extract of defatted shea kernels and its constituents may be, therefore, valuable as potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, skin-whitening, chemopreventive, and anticancer agents. PMID:25446237

  10. Recent Advances in Exopolysaccharides from Paenibacillus spp.: Production, Isolation, Structure, and Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Wang, San-Lang

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent developments of various aspects (i.e., production, purification, structure, and bioactivity) of the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) from Paenibacillus spp. For the production, in particular, squid pen waste was first utilized successfully to produce a high yield of inexpensive EPSs from Paenibacillus sp. TKU023 and P. macerans TKU029. In addition, this technology for EPS production is prevailing because it is more environmentally friendly. The Paenibacillus spp. EPSs reported from various references constitute a structurally diverse class of biological macromolecules with different applications in the broad fields of pharmacy, cosmetics and bioremediation. The EPS produced by P. macerans TKU029 can increase in vivo skin hydration and may be a new source of natural moisturizers with potential value in cosmetics. However, the relationships between the structures and activities of these EPSs in many studies are not well established. The contents and data in this review will serve as useful references for further investigation, production, structure and application of Paenibacillus spp. EPSs in various fields. PMID:25837984

  11. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  12. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  13. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  14. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  15. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  16. Skin Diseases and the Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Marjorie

    1970-01-01

    Discusses such concerns as acne, syphilis, drug abuse, and tatoos. Indicates need for physician not only to treat skin diseases but to help adolescents to accept themselves and find constructive directions. (CJ)

  17. Intertrigo and secondary skin infections.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Monica G; Higgins, Kim E; Kinney, Bruce S

    2014-04-01

    Intertrigo is a superficial inflammatory dermatitis occurring on two closely opposed skin surfaces as a result of moisture, friction, and lack of ventilation. Bodily secretions, including perspiration, urine, and feces, often exacerbate skin inflammation. Physical examination of skin folds reveals regions of erythema with peripheral scaling. Excessive friction and inflammation can cause skin breakdown and create an entry point for secondary fungal and bacterial infections, such as Candida, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, and Corynebacterium minutissimum. Candidal intertrigo is commonly diagnosed clinically, based on the characteristic appearance of satellite lesions. Diagnosis may be confirmed using a potassium hydroxide preparation. Resistant cases require oral fluconazole therapy. Bacterial superinfections may be identified with bacterial culture or Wood lamp examination. Fungal lesions are treated with topical nystatin, clotrimazole, ketoconazole, oxiconazole, or econazole. Secondary streptococcal infections are treated with topical mupirocin or oral penicillin. Corynebacterium infections are treated with oral erythromycin. PMID:24695603

  18. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer that forms in squamous cells is called squamous cell carcinoma . Basal cells : Round cells under the squamous cells. ... in the United States. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are also called nonmelanoma skin cancer and are ...

  19. Sun Safety: Save Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... member who's had skin cancer If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care ... from National Institutes of Health's National Library of Medicine Sunscreen More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's ...

  20. Tips for Relieving Dry Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rather than hot water Wash with a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser Apply enough cleanser to remove dirt ... Deodorant soaps Skin care products that contain alcohol, fragrance, retinoids, or alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA) Avoiding these ...

  1. [Atraumatic skin closure with Fasterzip].

    PubMed

    Carcoforo, P; Sortini, A; Navarra, G; Occhionorelli, S; Sartori, A; Pozza, E

    1996-01-01

    The Authors report their experience of skin closure using a new device, a surgical "zipper", without applying any sort of sutures. The application of this device, the functional and aesthetic advantages and the results obtained are described. PMID:8679416

  2. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  3. Common Skin Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Taradash, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Six common pediatric skin problems are discussed through the use of case histories. Problems of differential diagnosis are outlined, and the various steps and pitfalls in therapy itemized. PMID:21308018

  4. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. TRP channels in the skin.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöll?si, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as 'polymodal cellular sensors' on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24372189

  6. [Mobile pedicled skin flap in one-stage repair of stenoses of the male urethra].

    PubMed

    Falandry, L

    1993-01-01

    A simple technique is presented for the management of male urethral strictures through one-stage urethroplasty using a mobile pedicled skin flap, be it scrotal or penial skin. The distinctive feature of this technique is the use of a very versatile pedicle, with good blood supply carved out from the subcutaneous cell tissue and the dartos. Depending on the case encountered, our management technique offers a choice of two kinds of plasty: the widening patch, meant to widen the urethral canal, and the tubular graft, which consist in forming a tubular shaped graft in order to replace part or the entire urethra. Since 1984, we have performed this technique 237 times. All of the patients underwent regular check-up, and results, on the anatomical and functional aspect, were very satisfactory. Our experience in the use of this management technique has convinced us of its efficiency and reliability, particularly for infected, fistulated, recurrent and extensive urethral strictures. PMID:8139444

  7. PLGA/gelatin hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds encapsulating EGF for skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Mohammad; Shabani, Iman; Ahvaz, Hana H; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-07-01

    The novel strategies of skin regenerative treatment are aimed at the development of biologically responsive scaffolds capable of delivering multiple bioactive agents and cells to the target tissues. In this study, nanofibers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and gelatin were electrospun and the effect of parameters viz polymer concentration, acid concentration, flow rate and voltage on the morphology of the fibers were investigated. PLGA nanofibers encapsulating epidermal growth factor were also prepared through emulsion electrospinning. The core-sheath structure of the nanofibers was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The hemostatic attributes and the biocompatibility of the scaffolds for human fibroblast cell were scrutinized. Furthermore, gene expression of collagen type I and type III by the cells on the scaffolds was quantified using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated desirable bioactivity and hemostasis of the scaffolds with the capability of encapsulation and controlled release of the protein which can be served as skin tissue engineering scaffolds and wound dressings. PMID:25345387

  8. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  9. Protective Skins for Composite Airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.; Boone, Richard L.; Jones, Shannon; Pendse, Vandana; Hayward, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Traditional composite aircraft structures are designed for load bearing and then overdesigned for impact damage and hot humid environments. Seeking revolutionary improvement in the performance and weight of composite structures, Cessna Aircraft Company, with sponsorship from the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program/Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, has developed and tested a protective skin concept which would allow the primary composite structure to carry only load and would meet the impact, hot and humid, and other requirements through protective skins. A key requirement for the protective skins is to make any impact damage requiring repair visible. Testing from the first generation of skins helped identify the most promising materials which were used in a second generation of test articles. This report summarizes lessons learned from the first generation of protective skins, the design and construction of the second-generation test articles, test results from the second generation for impact, electromagnetic effects, aesthetics and smoothing, thermal, and acoustic (for the first time), and an assessment of the feasibility of the protective skin concept.

  10. Scaly-skinned Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The style of erosion along the highlands-lowlands boundary of southern Elysium Planitia has produced a strange pattern of troughs that look like the skin of a reptile. In reality, a very clear process of landscape degradation is evident in this image. Some process has produced polygon-shaped troughs that create zones of weakness in the uppermost crust. It is likely that wind-blown particles deepen and widen the troughs, producing isolated knobs and mesas. Ultimately, the erosional reworking of the landscape is so complete that all signs of the upper layer are removed, leaving the smooth lowland surface to the north.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  15. Modeling skin permeation revisited Gabriel Wittum

    E-print Network

    Hackbusch, Wolfgang

    Modeling skin permeation revisited Gabriel Wittum Computing diffusion through human skin is usually diffusion through human skin using two and three dimensional models. First computations for this problem were made a decade ago, yielding new insight into permeation pathways through human skin, which were

  16. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  20. Engineering bioactive polymers for the next generation of bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Emily Y.

    Bone disease is a serious health condition among the aged population. In some cases of bone damage it becomes necessary to replace, recontour, and assist in the healing of the bone. Many materials have been proposed as useful replacements but none have been proven to be ideal. In this thesis, two bioactive composites were investigated for bone replacements. First reported material is a hydroxyapatite (HA) particle reinforced polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composite treated with a co-polymer coupling agent for mandible augmentations. The influence of the coupling agent on the local mechanical properties of the system before and after simulated biological conditions was determined by applying nano-indentation at the cross-sectional HA/PMMA interface. The local interfacial results were indicative of the global quasi static compression test results. While the coupling agent improved the interfacial and global mechanical properties before and after 24 hours in vitro immersion, it did not affect the surface bioactivity of the system. However, the addition of coupling agent did not provide long term in vitro improvement of both local and global mechanical properties of the composite. An alternative approach of combining a bioactive phase into polymer matrix was developed. The second analyzed material is an injectable composite with osteoconductivity and ideal mechanical biocompatibility for vertebral fracture fixations which we formulated and fabricated. A bioactive component was engineered into the macromolecular structure to facilitate the formation of apatite nucleation sites on a thermo-sensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacryamide)-co-poly(ethyleneglycol) dimethacrylate (PNIPAAm-PEGDM), through incorporation of tri-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). PNIPAAm-PEGDM is capable of liquid to solid phase transformation at 32°C. In this study, the phase transformation temperature (LCSTs), the in vitro mechanical properties, swelling characteristics and bioactivity of the polymers were evaluated. The addition of NIPS to the polymer encouraged apatite formation and increased its compressive modulus while its LCST remained unchanged. The challenge of this material system is to balance the network-forming and bioactivity inducing MPS with the gain in elastic recovery induced by PEGDM addition to the PNIPAAm base, all while maintaining an injectable material system. This material platform offers a family of polymers that have a range of mechanical properties for various tissue replacements.

  1. Development of bioactive materials using reticulated ceramics for bone substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Gengwei

    For hard tissue prosthetics, it is necessary to seek novel synthesis routes by which a real structural bone can be simulated in terms of bioactivity, porosity, and mechanical behavior. The work presented here deals with the development of such a component by a novel synthesis route for bone implantation. To enhance the mechanical properties, an industrial alumina has been selected as the substrate. Alumina is not only bio inert but also mechanically strong which makes it an ideal substrate for bone substitute. The high porosity is achieved via a sponge technique by which both pore size and density can be changed easily. The bioactivity is induced by coating a highly bioactive HA film onto the inner pore surfaces of the reticulated alumina. Based on this concept, the research has focused on the coating of HA onto inner pore surfaces of the reticulated alumina via several effective methods that are developed in our laboratory. No previous studies have so far been reported on coating inner surfaces of small-diameter pores ranging from 0.1--1.0 mm. The key materials processing issues dealt with in this work include precursor chemistry, coating procedures, synthesis of coated component, interface structure study, film adhesion strength testing, and mechanical properties of the component. This novel approach has shown great promise in synthesizing bone substitutes. To determine the applicability of the coated component in hard tissue prosthetics, a bioactivity study has been carried out. By immersing the synthetic HA into simulated body fluid (SBF), the bioresponse has been measured for a variety of samples with different processing conditions. Fundamental aspects of this study are centered on the effects of structural characteristics of HA on the bioactivity. Based on extensive IR and XRD experimental data, it has been found that the bioactivity of HA is sensitively controlled by the structural crystallinity of the HA and its specific surface area. Furthermore, based on the extensive experimental data obtained in this dissertation, detailed recommendations have been made for future research. It is recommended that the porous composite is to be further developed to possess a porosity gradient similar to the bone structure.

  2. Controlled release of rhEGF and rhbFGF from electrospun scaffolds for skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mirdailami, Omolbanin; Soleimani, Masoud; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Mohammad; Hajarizadeh, Athena; Dodel, Masumeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2015-10-01

    Controlled delivery of multiple therapeutic agents can be considered as an effective approach in skin tissue engineering. In this study, recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) and recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) encapsulated in PLGA microspheres were loaded in hybrid scaffolds of PLGA and PEO. The scaffolds with various formulations were fabricated through electrospinning in order to maintain dual, individual or different release rate of rhEGF and rhbFGF. Morphological, physical and mechanical properties of the scaffold were investigated. The scaffold possessed uniform morphology with an average diameter of 280 nm for PLGA and 760 nm for PEO nanofibers. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were shown to be akin to those of human skin. Bioactivity of the scaffolds for human skin fibroblasts was evaluated. The HSF acquired significant proliferation and well-spread morphology on the scaffolds particularly in the case of different release rate of rhEGF and rhbFGF which implies the synergistic effect of the growth factors. Additionally, collagen and elastin gene expression was significantly up-regulated in the HSF seeded on the scaffolds in the case of individual delivery of rhEGF and dual delivery of rhEGF and rhbFGF. In conclusion, the prepared scaffolds as a suitable supportive substrate and multiple growth factor delivery system can find extensive utilization in skin tissue engineering. PMID:25856734

  3. Skin Transcriptome Profiles Associated with Skin Color in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqin; Liu, Fuzhu; Cao, Junting; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional and medicinal benefits have been attributed to the consumption of tissues from the black-boned chickens in oriental countries. Lueyang black-boned chicken is one of the native chicken breeds. However, some birds may instead have white or lighter skin, which directly causes economic losses every year. Previous studies of pigmentation have focused on a number of genes that may play important roles in coat color regulation. Illumina2000 sequencing technology was used to catalog the global gene expression profiles in the skin of the Lueyang chicken with white versus black skin. A total of 18,608 unigenes were assembled from the reads obtained from the skin of the white and black chickens. A total of 649 known genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, with 314 genes that were up regulated and 335 genes that were down-regulated, and a total of 162 novel genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, consisting of 73 genes that were up-regulated (including 4 highly expressed genes that were expressed exclusively in the skin of the black chickens) and 89 genes that were down-regulated. There were also a total of 8 known coat-color genes expressed in previous studies (ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R). In this study, 4 of which showed greater expression in the black chickens, and several were up-regulated, such as KIT, ASIP, TYR and OCA2. To our surprise, KITLG, MITF and MC1R showed no significant difference in expression between the black- and white-skinned chickens, and the expression of TYRP1 was not detected in either skin color. The expression of ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R was validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the results of the qPCR were consistent with the RNA-seq. This study provides several candidate genes that may be associated with the development of black versus white skin. More importantly, the fact that the MC1R gene showed no significant difference in expression between the black and white chickens is of particular interest for future studies that aim to elucidate its functional role in the regulation of skin color. PMID:26030885

  4. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  5. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  6. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  7. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  8. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  9. Removing bonded skin from a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    Metal skin is peeled off like sardine-can cover with key. Method is useful in removing bonded skins from any substrate where substrate is strong enough not to buckle or tear when bonded skin is rolled free. Also, it is useful for removing sections of damaged skin where bladders of other equipment below substrate might be damaged if saw or router were used to cut completely through skin.

  10. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis. PMID:24063883

  11. Versatile Langmuir Probe for the Europa Jupiter Systems Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Robert; Fish, C.; Peltz, L.; Leung, P.; Crary, F.; Cressler, J.

    2009-09-01

    This presentation outlines the design of a Versatile Langmuir Probe (VLP), intended to be deployed as a key instrument on the Europa Jupiter Systems Mission (EJSM) and other outer planet missions. The VLP will make in-situ planetary plasma particle, plasma wave, and electric field measurements that will be critical in developing a comprehensive picture of planetary processes. The VLP is an instrument that comprises two or more sensors that can be configured as either a single LP or a double LP In the single LP mode, instrument voltage sweep patterns and sampling frequencies are configured to target plasma density and temperature measurements. In the double LP mode the instrument is configured to target plasma wave velocity and electric field measurements. The key components of the VLP front-end electronics are the high impedance low noise operation amplifier and a-to-d converter, and GaN high-voltage sweep circuit that are mounted on the probe tip, thus exposing the electronics to the environments of cryo temperature and extreme radiation. The VLP front-end electronics use SiGe and GaN ASIC design tailored for the cryo temperatures and Europa radiation environment.

  12. Electrospray ionization with aluminum foil: A versatile mass spectrometric technique.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-03-19

    In this study, we developed a novel electrospray ionization (ESI) technique based on household aluminum foil (Al foil) and demonstated the desirable features and applications of this technique. Al foil can be readily cut and folded into desired configuration for effective ionization and for holding sample solution in bulk to allowing acquisition of durable ion signals. The present technique was demonstrated to be applicable in analysis of a wide variety of samples, ranging from pure chemical and biological compounds, e.g., organic compounds and proteins, to complex samples in liquid, semi-solid, and solid states, e.g., beverages, skincare cream, and herbal medicines. The inert, hydrophobic and impermeable surface of Al foil allows convenient and effective on-target extraction of solid samples and on-target sample clean-up, i.e., removal of salts and detergents from proteins and peptides, extending ESI device from usually only for sample loading and ionization to including sample processing. Moreover, Al foil is an excellent heat-conductor and highly heat-tolerant, permitting direct monitoring of thermal reactions, e.g., thermal denaturation of proteins. Overall, the present study showed that Al-foil ESI could be an economical and versatile method that allows a wide range of applications. PMID:24594810

  13. Sapporo2: a versatile direct N-body library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédorf, Jeroen; Gaburov, Evghenii; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Astrophysical direct N-body methods have been one of the first production algorithms to be implemented using NVIDIA's CUDA architecture. Now, almost seven years later, the GPU is the most used accelerator device in astronomy for simulating stellar systems. In this paper we present the implementation of the Sapporo2 N-body library, which allows researchers to use the GPU for N-body simulations with little to no effort. The first version, released five years ago, is actively used, but lacks advanced features and versatility in numerical precision and support for higher order integrators. In this updated version we have rebuilt the code from scratch and added support for OpenCL, multi-precision and higher order integrators. We show how to tune these codes for different GPU architectures and present how to continue utilizing the GPU optimal even when only a small number of particles (N < 100) is integrated. This careful tuning allows Sapporo2 to be faster than Sapporo1 even with the added options and double precision data loads. The code runs on a range of NVIDIA and AMD GPUs in single and double precision accuracy. With the addition of OpenCL support the library is also able to run on CPUs and other accelerators that support OpenCL.

  14. Versatile Apoferritin Nanoparticle Labels for Assay of Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-10-30

    A versatile bioassay label based on marker-loaded-apoferritin nanoparticles (MLAN) have been developed for sensitive protein detection. Dissociation and reconstitution characteristics at different pH as well as the special cavity structure of apoferritin provide a facile route to prepare nanoparticle labels, and avoid complicated and tedious synthesis process of conventional nanoparticle labels. The optical and electrochemical characteristics of the prepared nanoparticle labels are easily controlled by loading different optical or electrochemical markers. A fluorescence marker (fluorescein anion) and a redox marker [hexacyanoferrate (III)] were used as model markers to load into the cavity of apoferritin nanoparticle and developed for microscopic fluorescence immunoassay and electrochemical immunoassay, respectively. Detection limits of 0.06 ng mL-1 (0.39 pM) and 0.08 ng mL-1 (0.51 pM) of IgG were obtained with fluorescein MLAP and hexacyanoferrate MLAN, respectively. The new nanoparticle labels hold great promise for multiplex protein detection (in connection to nanoparticles loaded with different markers) and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassay.

  15. Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: A Versatile Tool for Preparing Antimicrobial Coatings.

    PubMed

    Séon, Lydie; Lavalle, Philippe; Schaaf, Pierre; Boulmedais, Fouzia

    2015-12-01

    The prevention of pathogen colonization of medical implants represents a major medical and financial issue. The development of antimicrobial coatings aimed at protecting against such infections has thus become a major field of scientific and technological research. Three main strategies are developed to design such coatings: (i) the prevention of microorganisms adhesion and the killing of microorganisms (ii) by contact and (iii) by the release of active compounds in the vicinity of the implant. Polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) technology alone covers the entire widespread spectrum of functionalization possibilities. PEMs are obtained through the alternating deposition of polyanions and polycations on a substrate, and the great advantages of PEMs are that (i) they can be applied to almost any type of substrate whatever its shape and composition; (ii) various chemical, physicochemical, and mechanical properties of the coatings can be obtained; and (iii) active compounds can be embedded and released in a controlled manner. In this article we will give an overview of the field of PEMs applied to the design of antimicrobial coatings, illustrating the large versatility of the PEM technology. PMID:26513437

  16. The versatile link, a common project for super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, Luis; Dris, Stefanos; Gerardin, Alexandre; Huffman, Todd; Issever, Cigdem; Pacheco, Alberto Jimenez; Jones, Mark; Kwan, Simon; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lian, Zhijun; Liu, Tiankuan; /CERN /Oxford U. /Fermilab /Taipei, Computing Ctr. /Southern Methodist U.

    2009-07-01

    Radiation tolerant, high speed optoelectronic data transmission links are fundamental building blocks in today's large scale High Energy Physics (HEP) detectors, as exemplified by the four experiments currently under commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), see for example. New experiments or upgrades will impose even more stringent demands on these systems from the point of view of performance and radiation tolerance. This can already be seen from the developments underway for the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC) project, a proposed upgrade to the LHC aiming at increasing the luminosity of the machine by factor of 10 to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and thus providing a better chance to see rare processes and improving statistically marginal measurements. In the past, specific data transmission links have been independently developed by each LHC experiment for data acquisition (DAQ), detector control as well as trigger and timing distribution (TTC). This was justified by the different types of applications being targeted as well as by technological limitations preventing one single solution from fitting all requirements. However with today's maturity of optoelectronic and CMOS technologies it is possible to envisage the development of a general purpose optical link which can cover most transmission applications: a Versatile Link. Such an approach has the clear advantage of concentrating the development effort on one single project targeting an optical link whose final functionality will only result from the topology and configuration settings adopted.

  17. Characteristics of pulsed power generator by versatile inductive voltage adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Shimiya, Kouichi; Masugata, Katsumi; Shigeta, Masao; Shibata, Kazuhiko

    2005-10-01

    A pulsed power generator by inductive voltage adder, versatile inductive voltage adder (VIVA-I), which features a high average potential gradient (2.5 MV/m), was designed and is currently in operation,. It was designed to produce an output pulse of 4 MV/60 ns by adding 2 MV pulses in two-stages of induction cells, where amorphous cores are installed. As a pulse forming line, we used a Blumlein line with the switching reversed, where cores are automatically biased due to the presence of prepulse. Good reproducibility was obtained even in the absence of the reset pulse. Within [similar]40% of full charge voltage, pulsed power characteristics of Marx generator, pulse forming line (PFL), transmission line (TL), and induction cells were tested for three types of loads; open-circuit, dummy load of liquid (CuSO4) resistor, and electron beam diode. In the open-circuit test, [similar]2.0 MV of output voltage was obtained with good reproducibility. Dependences of output voltage on diode impedances were evaluated by using various dummy loads, and the results were found as expected. An electron-beam diode was operated successfully, and [similar]18 kA of beam current was obtained at the diode voltage of [similar]1 MV.

  18. Fullerene nanowires as a versatile platform for organic electronics

    PubMed Central

    Maeyoshi, Yuta; Saeki, Akinori; Suwa, Shotaro; Omichi, Masaaki; Marui, Hiromi; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Kishimura, Akihiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Seki, Shu

    2012-01-01

    The development of organic semiconducting nanowires that act as charge carrier transport pathways in flexible and lightweight nanoelectronics is a major scientific challenge. We report on the fabrication of fullerene nanowires that is universally applicable to its derivatives (pristine C60, methanofullerenes of C61 and C71, and indene C60 bis-adduct), realized by the single particle nanofabrication technique (SPNT). Nanowires with radii of 8–11?nm were formed via a chain polymerization reaction induced by a high-energy ion beam. Fabrication of a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell including PC61BM nanowires with precisely-controlled length and density demonstrates how application of this methodology can improve the power conversion efficiency of these inverted cells. The proposed technique provides a versatile platform for the fabrication of continuous and uniform n-type fullerene nanowires towards a wide range of organic electronics applications. PMID:22934128

  19. Robust and versatile black-box certification of quantum devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzyh Haur; Vértesi, Tamás; Bancal, Jean-Daniel; Scarani, Valerio; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-07-25

    Self-testing refers to the fact that, in some quantum devices, both states and measurements can be assessed in a black-box scenario, on the sole basis of the observed statistics, i.e., without reference to any prior device calibration. Only a few examples of self-testing are known, and they just provide nontrivial assessment for devices performing unrealistically close to the ideal case. We overcome these difficulties by approaching self-testing with the semidefinite programing hierarchy for the characterization of quantum correlations. This allows us to improve dramatically the robustness of previous self-testing schemes; e.g., we show that a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt violation larger than 2.57 certifies a singlet fidelity of more than 70%. In addition, the versatility of the tool brings about self-testing of hitherto impossible cases, such as the robust self-testing of nonmaximally entangled two-qutrit states in the Collins-Gisin-Linden-Massar-Popescu scenario. PMID:25105599

  20. The genus Pseudovibrio contains metabolically versatile bacteria adapted for symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bondarev, Vladimir; Richter, Michael; Romano, Stefano; Piel, Jörn; Schwedt, Anne; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N

    2013-01-01

    The majority of strains belonging to the genus Pseudovibrio have been isolated from marine invertebrates such as tunicates, corals and particularly sponges, but the physiology of these bacteria is poorly understood. In this study, we analyse for the first time the genomes of two Pseudovibrio strains – FO-BEG1 and JE062. The strain FO-BEG1 is a required symbiont of a cultivated Beggiatoa strain, a sulfide-oxidizing, autotrophic bacterium, which was initially isolated from a coral. Strain JE062 was isolated from a sponge. The presented data show that both strains are generalistic bacteria capable of importing and oxidizing a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds to meet their carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and energy requirements under both, oxic and anoxic conditions. Several physiological traits encoded in the analysed genomes were verified in laboratory experiments with both isolates. Besides the versatile metabolic abilities of both Pseudovibrio strains, our study reveals a number of open reading frames and gene clusters in the genomes that seem to be involved in symbiont–host interactions. Both Pseudovibrio strains have the genomic potential to attach to host cells, interact with the eukaryotic cell machinery, produce secondary metabolites and supply the host with cofactors. PMID:23601235

  1. Versatile data acquisition system and the ISOL facility TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, R.L.; Stelts, M.L.; Chrien, R.E.; Manzella, V.; Liou, H.I.; Shostak, S.

    1980-01-01

    The on-line mass separator, TRISTAN, is located at Brookhaven's High Flux Beam Reactor. A Nielsen-type ion source, which can contain up to 8g. of /sup 235/U in an external beam with a flux of approx. 2 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//sec is used to generate short-lived fission products. A Users Group has been formed to coordinate research between University groups and BNL. Developments planned for TRISTAN include FEBIAD, surface ionization and negative-surface ionization-type ion sources, and a He-jet system as well as construction of new experimental facilities. An off-line separator, ISTU, is available for the development program. A versatile, modular data acquisition system to service experiments on TRISTAN and other nuclear research facilities at the HFBR using Camac interfacing is described. Standard, commercially-available electronic instruments and computer programs, such as FORTRAN and system routines, are used throughout. Simple interfaces have been built to adapt non-Camac equipment to Camac input registers.

  2. Substrate versatility of polyhydroxyalkanoate producing glycerol grown bacterial enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Palmeiro-Sánchez, Tania; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2014-12-01

    Waste-based polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by bacterial enrichments generally follows a three step strategy in which first the wastewater is converted into a volatile fatty acid rich stream that is subsequently used as substrate in a selector and biopolymer production units. In this work, a bacterial community with high biopolymer production capacity was enriched using glycerol, a non-fermented substrate. The substrate versatility and PHA production capacity of this community was studied using glucose, lactate, acetate and xylitol as substrate. Except for xylitol, very high PHA producing capacities were obtained. The PHA accumulation was comparable or even higher than with glycerol as substrate. This is the first study that established a high PHA content (?70 wt%) with glucose as substrate in a microbial enrichment culture. The results presented in this study support the development of replacing pure culture based PHA production by bacterial enrichment cultures. A process where mixtures of substrates can be easily handled and the acidification step can potentially be avoided is described. PMID:25213684

  3. A versatile transgenic allele for mouse overexpression studies.

    PubMed

    Dolatshad, Hamid; Biggs, Daniel; Diaz, Rebeca; Hortin, Nicole; Preece, Christopher; Davies, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    For the analysis of gene function in vivo, gene overexpression in the mouse provides an alternative to loss-of-function knock-out approaches and can help reveal phenotypes where compensatory mechanisms are at play. Furthermore, when multiple lines overexpressing a gene-of-interest at varying levels are studied, the consequences of differences in gene dosage can be explored. Despite these advantages, inherent shortcomings in the methodologies used for the generation of gain-of-function transgenic mouse models have limited their application to functional gene analysis, and the necessity for multiple lines comes at a significant animal and financial cost. The targeting of transgenic overexpression constructs at single copy into neutral genomic loci is the preferred method for the generation of such models, which avoids the unpredictable outcomes associated with conventional random integration. However, despite the increased reliability that targeted transgenic methodologies provide, only one expression level results, as defined by the promoter used. Here, we report a new versatile overexpression allele, the promoter-switch allele, which couples PhiC31 integrase-targeted transgenesis with Flp recombinase promoter switching and Cre recombinase activation. These recombination switches allow the conversion of different overexpression alleles, combining the advantages of transgenic targeting with tunable transgene expression. With this approach, phenotype severity can be correlated with transgene expression in a single mouse model, providing a cost-effective solution amenable to systematic gain-of-function studies. PMID:26369329

  4. VMPLOT: A versatile analysis tool for mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Allen W.

    1993-01-01

    VMPLOT is a versatile analysis tool designed by the Magellan Spacecraft Team to graphically display engineering data used to support mission operations. While there is nothing revolutionary or innovative about graphical data analysis tools, VMPLOT has some distinguishing features that set it apart from other custom or commercially available software packages. These features include the ability to utilize time in a Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) or Spacecraft Clock (SCLK) format as an enumerated data type, the ability to automatically scale both axes based on the data to be displayed (including time), the ability to combine data from different files, and the ability to utilize the program either interactively or in batch mode, thereby enhancing automation. Another important feature of VMPLOT not visible to the user is the software engineering philosophies utilized. A layered approach was used to isolate program functionality to different layers. This was done to increase program portability to different platforms and to ease maintenance and enhancements due to changing requirements. The functionality of the unique features of VMPLOT as well as highlighting the algorithms that make these features possible are described. The software engineering philosophies used in the creation of the software tool are also summarized.

  5. A versatile sample holder for single plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desmaison, Annaïck; Lorenzo, Corinne; Rouquette, Jacques; Ducommun, Bernard; Lobjois, Valérie

    2013-08-01

    Single Plane Illumination Microscopy is an emerging and powerful technology for live imaging of whole living organisms. However, sample handling that relies on specimen embedding in agarose or gel is often a key limitation, especially for time-lapse monitoring. To address this issue, we developed a new concept for a holder device allowing us to prepare a sample container made of hydrogel. The production process of this holder is based on 3D printing of both a frame and casting devices. The simplicity of production and the advantages of this versatile new sample holder are shown with time-lapse recording of multicellular tumour spheroid growth. More importantly, we also show that cell division is not impaired in contrast to what is observed with gel embedding. The benefit of this new holder for other sample types, applications and experiments remains to be evaluated, but this innovative concept of fully customizable sample holder preparation potentially represents a major step forward to facilitate the large diffusion of single plane illumination microscopy technology. PMID:23691992

  6. Ultrafast and versatile spectroscopy by temporal Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wei, Xiaoming; Marhic, Michel E; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2014-01-01

    One of the most remarkable and useful properties of a spatially converging lens system is its inherent ability to perform the Fourier transform; the same applies for the time-lens system. At the back focal plane of the time-lens, the spectral information can be instantaneously obtained in the time axis. By implementing temporal Fourier transform for spectroscopy applications, this time-lens-based architecture can provide orders of magnitude improvement over the state-of-art spatial-dispersion-based spectroscopy in terms of the frame rate. On the other hand, in addition to the single-lens structure, the multi-lens structures (e.g. telescope or wide-angle scope) will provide very versatile operating conditions. Leveraging the merit of instantaneous response, as well as the flexible lens structure, here we present a 100-MHz frame rate spectroscopy system - the parametric spectro-temporal analyzer (PASTA), which achieves 17 times zoom in/out ratio for different observation ranges. PMID:24939667

  7. Ultrafast and versatile spectroscopy by temporal Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Wei, Xiaoming; Marhic, Michel E.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-06-01

    One of the most remarkable and useful properties of a spatially converging lens system is its inherent ability to perform the Fourier transform; the same applies for the time-lens system. At the back focal plane of the time-lens, the spectral information can be instantaneously obtained in the time axis. By implementing temporal Fourier transform for spectroscopy applications, this time-lens-based architecture can provide orders of magnitude improvement over the state-of-art spatial-dispersion-based spectroscopy in terms of the frame rate. On the other hand, in addition to the single-lens structure, the multi-lens structures (e.g. telescope or wide-angle scope) will provide very versatile operating conditions. Leveraging the merit of instantaneous response, as well as the flexible lens structure, here we present a 100-MHz frame rate spectroscopy system - the parametric spectro-temporal analyzer (PASTA), which achieves 17 times zoom in/out ratio for different observation ranges.

  8. Ultrafast and versatile spectroscopy by temporal Fourier transform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Wei, Xiaoming; Marhic, Michel E.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most remarkable and useful properties of a spatially converging lens system is its inherent ability to perform the Fourier transform; the same applies for the time-lens system. At the back focal plane of the time-lens, the spectral information can be instantaneously obtained in the time axis. By implementing temporal Fourier transform for spectroscopy applications, this time-lens-based architecture can provide orders of magnitude improvement over the state-of-art spatial-dispersion-based spectroscopy in terms of the frame rate. On the other hand, in addition to the single-lens structure, the multi-lens structures (e.g. telescope or wide-angle scope) will provide very versatile operating conditions. Leveraging the merit of instantaneous response, as well as the flexible lens structure, here we present a 100-MHz frame rate spectroscopy system – the parametric spectro-temporal analyzer (PASTA), which achieves 17 times zoom in/out ratio for different observation ranges. PMID:24939667

  9. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  10. Bioactive factors for tissue regeneration: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Shinsuke; Hojo, Hironori; Chung, Ung-il

    2012-01-01

    Summary There are three components for the creation of new tissues: cell sources, scaffolds, and bioactive factors. Unlike conventional medical strategies, regenerative medicine requires not only analytical approaches but also integrative ones. Basic research has identified a number of bioactive factors that are necessary, but not sufficient, for organogenesis. In skeletal development, these factors include bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), transforming growth factor ? TGF-?, Wnts, hedgehogs (Hh), fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), SRY box-containing gene (Sox) 9, Sp7, and runt-related transcription factors (Runx). Clinical and preclinical studies have been extensively performed to apply the knowledge to bone and cartilage regeneration. Given the large number of findings obtained so far, it would be a good time for a multi-disciplinary, collaborative effort to optimize these known factors and develop appropriate drug delivery systems for delivering them. PMID:23738297

  11. Bioactive metabolites from Cnidoscolus souzae and Acmella pilosa.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Estrella, Hiatzy E; Sánchez-Pardenilla, Azeret D M; García-Sosa, Karlina; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; de Campos-Buzzi, Fátima; Meira-Quintão, Nara Lins; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M

    2014-09-01

    The bioassay-guided purification of the ethanol extracts of Acmella pilosa and Cnidoscolus souzae, two plants of the native flora of the Yucatan Peninsula used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation and pain, resulted in the identification of rosmarinic acid (1) and caffeic acid (2) as the bioactive metabolites from A. pilosa, and of 7-deoxynimbidiol (4) as the major bioactive metabolite from C. souzae. Metabolites 1, 2, and 4 proved to be responsible for the antioxidant activity originally detected in the corresponding organic crude extracts; 7-deoxynimbidiol (4) showed good analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, inhibiting the pain induced by PGE2 and reducing the edema induced by carrageenan, respectively. PMID:25918802

  12. Sulfated polysaccharides as bioactive agents from marine algae.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-11-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid by consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in nutraceuticals. Marine algae are considered as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Marine algae are rich in sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) such as carrageenans in red algae, fucoidans in brown algae and ulvans in green algae. These SPs exhibit many health beneficial nutraceutical effects such as antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anticancer and anticoagulant activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential to be further developed as medicinal food products or nutraceuticals in the food industry. This contribution presents an overview of nutraceutical effects and potential health benefits of SPs derived from marine algae. PMID:23994790

  13. Polysaccharides from Chinese tea: recent advance on bioactivity and function.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) has a long history of medicinal use in Asian countries such as China, Japan, India and Thailand as ancient as 500,000 years ago. Tea is globally one of the most popular and lowest cost beverages, next only to water. Tea leaves are popularly consumed with unfermented (green tea), semi-fermented (oolong tea), and fermented (black and puerh) forms. The chemical composition of tea mainly includes polyphenols (TPP), proteins, polysaccharides (TPS), chlorophyll, and alkaloids. Great advances have been made in chemical and bioactive studies of catechins and polyphenols from tea in recent decades. However, polysaccharides from tea materials have received much less consideration than TPP. Recently, TPS from tea leaves and flowers have attracted great interest. The number of relevant publications has increased rapidly in recent years. Herein, the bioactivities and function aspects of TPS from Chinese tea were reviewed. PMID:23994784

  14. Essential oils: extraction, bioactivities, and their uses for food preservation.

    PubMed

    Tongnuanchan, Phakawat; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2014-07-01

    Essential oils are concentrated liquids of complex mixtures of volatile compounds and can be extracted from several plant organs. Essential oils are a good source of several bioactive compounds, which possess antioxidative and antimicrobial properties. In addition, some essential oils have been used as medicine. Furthermore, the uses of essential oils have received increasing attention as the natural additives for the shelf-life extension of food products, due to the risk in using synthetic preservatives. Essential oils can be incorporated into packaging, in which they can provide multifunctions termed "active or smart packaging." Those essential oils are able to modify the matrix of packaging materials, thereby rendering the improved properties. This review covers up-to-date literatures on essential oils including sources, chemical composition, extraction methods, bioactivities, and their applications, particularly with the emphasis on preservation and the shelf-life extension of food products. PMID:24888440

  15. Production of Bioactive Compounds by Actinomycetes and Their Antioxidant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Janardhan, Avilala; Kumar, Arthala Praveen; Viswanath, Buddolla; Saigopal, D. V. R.; Narasimha, Golla

    2014-01-01

    An actinomycete was isolated from mangrove soil collected from Nellore region of Andhra Pradesh, India, and screened for its ability to produce bioactive compounds. The cultural, morphological, and biochemical characters and 16S rRNA sequencing suggest that the isolated strain is Nocardiopsis alba. The bioactive compounds produced by this strain were purified by column chromatography. The in vitro antioxidant capacity of the isolated compounds (fractions) was estimated and fraction F2 showed very near values to the standard ascorbic acid. The potential fraction obtained by column chromatography was subjected to HPLC for further purification, then this purified fraction F2 was examined by FTIR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy to elucidate its chemical structure. By spectral data, the structure of the isolated compound was predicted as “(Z)-1-((1-hydroxypenta-2,4-dien-1-yl)oxy)anthracene-9,10-dione.” PMID:24790761

  16. Study on bioactive compounds from Streptomyces sp. ANU 6277.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kolla J P; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Krishna, Palakodety S J

    2008-01-01

    An attempt was made to study the bioactive compounds from a terrestrial Streptomyces sp. ANU 6277 isolated from laterite soil. Four active fractions were recovered from the solvent extracts obtained from the culture broth of five day-old strain. Three bioactive compounds were purified and identified as 3-phenylpropionic acid, anthracene-9,10-quinone and 8-hydroxyquinoline. The components of the partially purified fourth active fraction were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and identified as benzyl alcohol, phenylethyl alcohol and 2H-1, 4-benzoxazin-3 (4H)-one. Four active fractions were screened for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi including phytopathogenic, toxigenic and dermatophytic genera. Among these metabolites, 8-hydroxyquinoline exhibited strong antibacterial and antifungal activity as compared to 3-phenylpropionic acid and anthracene-9,10-quinone. PMID:18610654

  17. Variation of bioactive compounds content of 14 oriental strawberry cultivars.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kyeom; Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Dae Young; Chun, Changhoo

    2015-10-01

    Variation in bioactive compounds content was assessed in antioxidant rich June-bearing strawberry cultivars. Ascorbic acid, anthocyanin, and ellagic acid content were analyzed in ripe fruits of 14 cultivars. The bioactive content in strawberry fruit was found to vary significantly among cultivars and from year to year. The highest ascorbic acid content was found in 'Sugyeong'. The 'Red Pearl' and 'Sachinoka' had three to fourfold higher amounts of pelargonidin 3-glucoside than other cultivars. For cyanidin 3-glucoide and pelargonidin 3-rutinoside, two other characterized anthocyanins, 'Dahong' and 'Keumhyang' had the highest contents among all the tested cultivars. The ellagic acid content of 'Dahong' was generally all within the upper ranges. These results can be used for the validation of fruit antioxidant capacity and in addition, provide useful information for breeding programs looking to enhance the antioxidant capacity in strawberry fruit. PMID:25872444

  18. Fermentation and dry fractionation increase bioactivity of cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus).

    PubMed

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Nohynek, Liisa; Juvonen, Riikka; Kössö, Tuija; Truchado, Pilar; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Leppänen, Tiina; Moilanen, Eeva; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2016-04-15

    Phenolic composition and bioactivity of cloudberry was modified by bioprocessing, and highly bioactive fractions were produced by dry fractionation of the press cake. During fermentation polymeric ellagitannins were partly degraded into ellagic acid derivatives. Phenolic compounds were differentially distributed in seed coarse and fine fractions after dry fractionation process. Tannins concentrated in fine fraction, and flavonol derivatives were mainly found in coarse fraction. Ellagic acid derivatives were equally distributed between the dry fractions. Fermentation and dry fractionation increased statistically significantly anti-adhesion and anti-inflammatory activity of cloudberry. The seed fine fraction showed significant inhibition of P fimbria-mediated haemagglutination assay of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The seed coarse fraction significantly reduced NO and IL-6 production and iNOS expression in activated macrophages. Fermentation did not affect antimicrobial activity, but slight increase in activity was detected in dry fractions. The results indicate the potential of cloudberry in pharma or health food applications. PMID:26617039

  19. Starch digestibility and bioactivity of high altitude hulless barley.

    PubMed

    Moza, Jessy; Gujral, Hardeep Singh

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of growth altitude (97-3500m) on the starch digestibility and bioactivity of hulless barley cultivars grown in India. All the high altitude cultivars (between 1200 and 3500m above sea level) displayed 7.5-30.8% higher levels of total ?-glucan, 39.8-68.6% higher arabinoxylan content, 11.0-60.9% higher total anthocyanin content and 16.6-43.2% higher metal chelating activity than the cultivars grown in plains (97-126m altitude). The soluble ?-glucan and arabinoxylan content of cultivars ranged from 2.0% to 2.8% and 0.08% to 0.19%. A positive correlation between slowly digestible starch (SDS) and insoluble ?-glucan and total arabinoxylan content was observed. Cultivars grown at higher altitudes exhibited higher bioactive potential and may find better utilization in nutraceutical foods. PMID:26471593

  20. In-fiber photo-immobilization of a bioactive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Yong, Derrick; Yu, Xia; Li, Hao; Chan, Chi Chiu

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the first in-fiber light-induced bioactive biotin-functionalization via photobleaching fluorophore-conjugated biotin. Photobleaching the fluorophores generated free radicals that bind to the albumin-passivated inner surface of pure silica photonic crystal fiber. The subsequent attachment of dye-conjugated streptavidin to the bound biotin qualified the photo-immobilization process and demonstrated a potential for the construction of in-fiber macromolecular assemblies or multiplexes. Compared with other in-fiber bioactive coating methods, the proposed light-induced technique requires only a low-power light source, without the need for additional preactivation steps or toxic chemical reagents. This method, hence, enables a simple and compact implementation for potential biomedical applications.