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Sample records for versigonalia ruficauda walker

  1. Host-seeking behavior in larvae of the robber fly Mallophora ruficauda (Diptera: Asilidae).

    PubMed

    Castelo, Marcela K; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2004-04-01

    The robber fly Mallophora ruficauda is the most important pest of apiculture in the Pampas region of Argentina. Adults prey on honeybees and other insects, while larvae parasitize larvae of scarab beetles, which live underground. Females of M. ruficauda do not search for hosts but instead lay eggs in tall pastures. Once hatched, larvae drop to the ground and burrow underground to search for their hosts. We tested in the laboratory whether larvae of M. ruficauda actively search for their hosts using host and/or host-related chemical cues. We report that M. ruficauda detects its host using chemical cues that originate in the posterior half of the host's body, most likely from an abdominal exocrine structure. This particular host-searching strategy is described for the first time in Asilidae. PMID:15081826

  2. Agile Walker.

    PubMed

    Katz, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Agile Walker is to improve the outdoor mobility of healthy elderly people with some mobility limitations. It is a newly developed, all-terrain walker, equipped with an electric drive system and speed control that can assists elderly people to walk outdoors or to hike. The walker has a unique product design with an attractive look that will appeal to "active-agers" population. This paper describes product design requirements and the development process of the Agile Walker, its features and some preliminary testing results. PMID:26294513

  3. Host gut microorganisms' cues mediate orientation behaviour in the larva of the parasitoid Mallophora ruficauda.

    PubMed

    Groba, H F; Castelo, M K

    2016-02-01

    The robber fly Mallophora ruficauda is one of the most important apicultural pests in the Pampas region of Argentina. This species is a parasitoid of scarab beetle larvae. Females lay eggs away from the host, and the larvae perform active search behaviour toward Cyclocephala signaticollis third instar larvae, parasitoid's preferred host. This behaviour is mediated by host-related chemical cues produced in hosts' fermentation chamber. Also, C. signaticollis larvae are attracted to fermentation chamber extracts. As scarab larvae have microbe-rich fermentation chamber, it has been suggested that microorganisms could be involved in the production of these semiochemicals. The aims of this work were first to ascertain the presence of microorganisms in the fermentation chamber of C. signaticollis larvae and second to determine the role of microorganisms in the orientation response of parasitoid and host larvae. We found that microorganisms-free C. signaticollis larvae showed deterioration in their development and did not produce the attractive semiochemicals. Therefore, we isolated fermentation chamber microorganisms of host larvae by means of different cultures media, and then, assayed different microorganisms' stimuli by binary choice tests. We were able to isolate microorganisms and determine that M. ruficauda larvae are attracted to semiochemicals from protein degradation in the fermentation chamber. However, C. signaticollis larvae were not attracted to any semiochemicals associated with microorganisms' activity in the fermentation chamber. Although we were unable to elucidate the exact role of gut microorganisms in host behaviour, we discuss their relevance in parasitoid host-seeking behaviour and host conspecific interaction in M. ruficauda-C. signaticollis system. PMID:26521818

  4. Incidence of Non-Immunological Defenses of Soil White Grubs on Parasitism Success of Mallophora ruficauda Larva (Diptera: Asilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Castelo, Marcela K.; Crespo, José E.

    2012-01-01

    White grubs are larvae of Coleoptera of the family Scarabaeidae. They are known because of their intensive feeding habits on crop roots. Mallophora ruficauda (Diptera: Asilidae) is a dipteran parasitoid whose larva is a natural enemy for white grubs. This species is a solitary ectoparasitoid, where both female and larva realize different steps in the host location process. Female place its eggs in high grasslands and then, the larva finds and parasitizes the host in the ground. There are nine potential hosts in the area of action of this parasitoid; however a high preference for Cyclocephala signaticollis has been observed (87% of field parasitism). It is known that many insects have developed defensive and immunological mechanisms when attacked by a parasitoid, which can be behavioral, physiological, chemical or genetic. The objectives of this work were to investigate what kind of defense and non-immunological associated mechanisms the white grubs have against this parasitoid and to understand why M. ruficauda have such a high preference for masked chafer grubs or Cyclocephala species. In particular, for each white grub species, we asked: (1) If there is a differential behavioral reaction when a parasitoid attack is simulated; (2) If body attributes of white grubs species have influence on defense behavior, and particularly for the masked chafer C. signaticollis; and (3) Why this species is the most selected by M. ruficauda. It was found that behavioral defenses of white grubs would explain the parasitism pattern of M. ruficauda larvae and its preference for C. signaticollis. PMID:26466623

  5. Foldable Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Paraplegics, who number about 100,000 in the United States, depend on crutches for their mobility on level ground. But crutches are ineffective on stairways; for climbing or descending, the paraplegic needs a stable pair of rails to push against. Aluminum metal walkers are designed for use on level surfaces, hence they have little utility on stairs; and, although lightweight, they are too heavy to be carried by the paraplegic while walking on crutches. There exists a need for a walker specifically designed for stair use and made of material much lighter than aluminum.

  6. Compliant Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne; Crane, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Walker supports person with limited use of legs and back. Enables person to stand upright, move with minimum load, and rest at will taking weight off legs. Consists of wheeled frame with body harness connected compliantly to side structures. Harness supports wearer upright when wearer relaxes and takes weight off lower extremities. Assumes partial to full body weight at user's discretion.

  7. Compliant walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J. (Inventor); Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Crane, J. Allen (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A compliant walker is provided for humans having limited use of their legs and lower back. It includes an upright wheel frame which at least partially surrounds an upright user wearing a partial body harness. It is attached to the frame by means of cable compliant apparatus consisting of sets of cable segments and angle bracket members connected between opposite side members of the frame and adjacent side portions of the harness. Novelty is believed to exist in the combination of a wheeled frame including a side support structure, a body harness, and compliance means connecting the body harness to the side support structure for flexibility holding and supporting a person in a substantially upright position when the user sags in the frame when taking weight off the lower extremities.

  8. Walker's Eleodes (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type specimens of five species of Eleodes described by Francis Walker were studied in order to establish their true identity. The synonymy of Eleodes convexicollis Walker and Eleodes conjunctus Walker with E. obscurus (Say); that of Eleodes latiusculus Walker with E. humeralis LeConte; and that ...

  9. Host specificity in the host-seeking larva of the dipteran parasitoid Mallophora ruficauda and the influence of age on parasitism decisions.

    PubMed

    Barrantes, M E; Castelo, M K

    2014-06-01

    Larvae of the robber fly Mallophora ruficauda are ectoparasitoids of white grubs and adults are an important apiculture pest in Argentina. Females oviposit on tall grasses and the second instar larva actively searches and locates hosts. There are nine potential hosts in the distribution area of this parasitoid and Cyclocephala signaticollis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is the most parasitized in the field. However, M. ruficauda has a certain degree of behavioural flexibility towards different host species, and not being a strict specialist. The conditions under which the parasitoid orientates and accepts different hosts' species are unknown. We studied the host specificity of M. ruficauda towards three species of Cyclocephala genus and we determined whether this specificity depends on larval age. We also evaluated whether larva orientation towards Cyclocephala species changes with chemical cue concentration. We assessed host specificity measuring the orientation and acceptance behaviours towards kairomones extracts and live individuals of Cyclocephala species using M. ruficauda larvae of low and high life expectancy (i.e., young and aged second instar larvae). We observed that young larvae orientated only towards C. signaticollis chemical stimulus, whereas aged larvae orientated also towards C. modesta, and the same was observed with increasing stimuli's concentration. Both young and aged M. ruficauda larvae orientate towards live C. signaticollis and C. putrida species and rejected C. modesta. Also, we found that larvae accepted all Cyclocephala hosts. In conclusion, our results indicate that specificity in the laboratory, observed through host orientation and host acceptance behaviours, depends not only on the availability of host species, but also on the nature of the host's stimuli combined with parasitoid age. PMID:24548616

  10. Dissimilar bouncy walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomholt, Michael A.; Lizana, Ludvig; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of a one-dimensional system consisting of dissimilar hardcore interacting (bouncy) random walkers. The walkers' (diffusing particles') friction constants ξ _n, where n labels different bouncy walkers, are drawn from a distribution \\varrho (ξ _n). We provide an approximate analytic solution to this recent single-file problem by combining harmonization and effective medium techniques. Two classes of systems are identified: when \\varrho (ξ _n) is heavy-tailed, \\varrho (ξ _n)˜eq ξ _n^{-1-α } (0<α <1) for large ξ _n, we identify a new universality class in which density relaxations, characterized by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, t), follows a Mittag-Leffler relaxation, and the mean square displacement (MSD) of a tracer particle grows as t^δ with time t, where δ = α/(1 + α). If instead ϱ is light-tailed such that the mean friction constant exist, S(Q, t) decays exponentially and the MSD scales as t^{1/2}. We also derive tracer particle force response relations. All results are corroborated by simulations and explained in a simplified model.

  11. Dissimilar bouncy walkers.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, Michael A; Lizana, Ludvig; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2011-01-28

    We consider the dynamics of a one-dimensional system consisting of dissimilar hardcore interacting (bouncy) random walkers. The walkers' (diffusing particles') friction constants ξ(n), where n labels different bouncy walkers, are drawn from a distribution ϱ(ξ(n)). We provide an approximate analytic solution to this recent single-file problem by combining harmonization and effective medium techniques. Two classes of systems are identified: when ϱ(ξ(n)) is heavy-tailed, ϱ(ξ(n))≃ξ(n) (-1-α) (0<α<1) for large ξ(n), we identify a new universality class in which density relaxations, characterized by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, t), follows a Mittag-Leffler relaxation, and the mean square displacement (MSD) of a tracer particle grows as t(δ) with time t, where δ = α∕(1 + α). If instead ϱ is light-tailed such that the mean friction constant exist, S(Q, t) decays exponentially and the MSD scales as t(1/2). We also derive tracer particle force response relations. All results are corroborated by simulations and explained in a simplified model. PMID:21280802

  12. Microscopic Tribotactic Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    The translational motion of a rotating object near a surface is strongly dependent on the friction between the object and the surface. The process of friction is inherently directional and the friction coefficient can be anisotropic even in the absence of a net friction coefficient gradient. This is macroscopically observed in the ordering motif of some animal hair or scales and a microscopic analog can be imagined where the friction coefficient is determined by the strength and density of reversible bonds between a rotating object and the substrate. For high friction coefficients most of the rotational motion is converted into translational motion; conversely for low friction coefficients the object primarily rotates in place. We exploited this property to design and test a new class of motile system that displays tribotaxis, which is the process by which an object detects differences in the local friction coefficient and moves accordingly either to regions of higher or lower friction. These synthetic tribotactic microscopic walkers, composed of a pair of functionalized superparamagnetic beads, detect gradients in the spatial friction coefficient and migrate towards high friction areas when actuated in a random fashion. The effective friction between the walkers and the substrate is controlled by the local density of active receptors in the substrate. The tribotactic walkers also displayed trapping in high friction areas where the density of free receptors is higher.

  13. Light-Fueled Microscopic Walkers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Burresi, Matteo; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt

    2015-07-01

    The first microscopic artificial walker equipped with liquid-crystalline elastomer muscle is reported. The walker is fabricated by direct laser writing, is smaller than any known living terrestrial creatures, and is capable of several autonomous locomotions on different surfaces. PMID:26033690

  14. Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools for K-12 Educators Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers CC by Tomwsulcer Whether you’re walking ... routes or durations may need to be altered. Dog bites Always be careful when walking a dog ...

  15. Intelligently Controllable Walker with Magnetorheological Fluid Brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Tanida, Sosuke; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Kobayashi, Keigo; Mitobe, Kazuhisa

    Caster walkers are supporting frames with casters and wheels. These tools are regularly utilized as life support tools or walking rehabilitation tools in hospitals, nursing homes and individual residences. Users of the walkers can easily move it thanks to its wheels and casters. However falling accidents often happen when it moves without users. The falling accident is very serious problem and one of leading causes of secondary injuries. In the other case, it is hard to move to desired directions if users have imbalance in their motor functions or sensory functions, e.g., hemiplegic patients. To improve safeness and operability of the walkers, we installed compact MR fluid brakes on the wheels and controlled walking speed and direction of the walker. We named this intelligently controllable walker, “i-Walker” and discussed on the control methods and experimental results in this paper. Preliminary trials for direction control of the first-generation of the i-Walker (i-Walker1) are presented. On the basis of the results, we improved the control method and hardware of the i-Walker1, and developed the second-generation (i-Walker2). System description and experimental results of the i-Walker2 are also described. The i-Walker2 has better operability and lower energy consumption than that of the i-Walker1. The line-tracing controller of the i-Walker2 well controls human motions during walking experiments on the target straight line.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from mild to severe, and those with normal intelligence may have learning disabilities. Children with Dandy-Walker ... Dandy-Walker Malformation: A Clinical and Surgical Outcome Analysis. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2015 Jun;25( ...

  17. 4. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM IRRIGATED PASTURE BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM IRRIGATED PASTURE BETWEEN THE KLAMATH RIVER AND WALKER ROAD; FACING WEST. - Walker Bridge, Spanning Klamath River and connecting Highway 96 and Walker Road, Klamath River, Siskiyou County, CA

  18. Adjustable Walker for the Handicapped

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitts, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Front legs adjust at touch of lever for use on stairs or ramps. Spring loaded legs extend when lever is depressed by user. Legs lock in position when lever is released. Lever mounted on either side of walker or on both sides, so legs operated independently.

  19. Abstract models of molecular walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Oleg

    Recent advances in single-molecule chemistry have led to designs for artificial multi-pedal walkers that follow tracks of chemicals. The walkers, called molecular spiders, consist of a rigid chemically inert body and several flexible enzymatic legs. The legs can reversibly bind to chemical substrates on a surface, and through their enzymatic action convert them to products. We study abstract models of molecular spiders to evaluate how efficiently they can perform two tasks: molecular transport of cargo over tracks and search for targets on finite surfaces. For the single-spider model our simulations show a transient behavior wherein certain spiders move superdiffusively over significant distances and times. This gives the spiders potential as a faster-than-diffusion transport mechanism. However, analysis shows that single-spider motion eventually decays into an ordinary diffusive motion, owing to the ever increasing size of the region of products. Inspired by cooperative behavior of natural molecular walkers, we propose a symmetric exclusion process (SEP) model for multiple walkers interacting as they move over a one-dimensional lattice. We show that when walkers are sequentially released from the origin, the collective effect is to prevent the leading walkers from moving too far backwards. Hence, there is an effective outward pressure on the leading walkers that keeps them moving superdiffusively for longer times. Despite this improvement the leading spider eventually slows down and moves diffusively, similarly to a single spider. The slowdown happens because all spiders behind the leading spiders never encounter substrates, and thus they are never biased. They cannot keep up with leading spiders, and cannot put enough pressure on them. Next, we investigate search properties of a single and multiple spiders moving over one- and two-dimensional surfaces with various absorbing and reflecting boundaries. For the single-spider model we evaluate by how much the slowdown on newly visited sites, owing to catalysis, can improve the mean first passage time of spiders and show that in one dimension, when both ends of the track are an absorbing boundary, the performance gain is lower than in two dimensions, when the absorbing boundary is a circle; this persists even when the absorbing boundary is a single site. Next, we study how multiple molecular spiders influence one another during the search. We show that when one spider reaches the trace of another spider it is more likely not to follow the trace and instead explore unvisited sites. This interaction between the spiders gives them an advantage over independent random walkers in a search for multiple targets. We also study how efficiently the spiders with various gaits are able to find specific targets. Spiders with gaits that allow more freedom of leg movement find their targets faster than spiders with more restrictive gaits. For every gait, there is an optimal detachment rate that minimizes the time to find all target sites.

  20. How effective are brakes on infant walkers?

    PubMed

    Ridenour, M V

    1997-06-01

    62 children, between the ages of 9 and 18 months old, were observed in an instrumented walker to measure the peak horizontal pull forces. These pull forces were later used to evaluate an infant walker with a braking system that would stop on the top step of the stairs before falling down the stairs. This brake system is activated when part of the walker crosses over the edge of the top step. Using the range of horizontal pull forces generated by the 62 children, the horizontal brake system for walkers would not always prevent the walker from falling down the stairs. Four floor surfaces were compared: carpet, vinyl, glossy wood, and unfinished wood. The walker brake system did not always stop the walkers on these floor surfaces. Using the measured weights and horizontal forces of the 21 nonwalking children between 9 and 13 months old who represent children who typically fall down the stairs in a walker, a simulation procedure was completed to represent the worse possible force condition, the peak horizontal force, for each of the 21 children. During this simulation, brakes would have failed all the time for 18 of the 21 children, and at least half the time for the remaining 3 children. These brake systems may provide false security to parents who use these walkers, since there are no published standards regarding the performance of brake systems for infant walkers as a safety device. PMID:9172223

  1. Infant walker use, injuries, and motor development.

    PubMed Central

    Thein, M. M.; Lee, J.; Tay, V.; Ling, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of infant walker use on motor development and injuries. POPULATION: One hundred and eighty five parents or primary care givers who attended a Singapore government polyclinic from September 1993 to February 1994, with their infants between 7 to 10 months, for a developmental assessment session. SETTING: A government polyclinic in Singapore. METHODS: The parent or primary care giver answered questions pertaining to infant walker use and injuries attributed to its use. Each infant was then given the Singapore modified version of the Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST-S), along with a full clinical examination; both testers were blinded to walker use. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty seven (90%) of 185 infants used walkers regularly, and 21 (12.5%) of the users had one or more injuries. Most injuries were minor, such as bruises and swellings on the head, forehead, face, and cheeks. None of the children who did not use walkers showed any abnormal DDST-S results whereas 18 (10.8%) of the 167 walker users had either abnormal or questionable DDST-S results. CONCLUSIONS: 12.5% of walker users had one or more injuries and walker use may also delay the child's motor development. These findings will help the physician or nurse in primary care settings to advise parents about the potential hazards of walker use. PMID:9113852

  2. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  3. 8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM PASTURE SOUTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM PASTURE SOUTH OF THE KLAMATH RIVER; FACING NORTHEAST. - Walker Bridge, Spanning Klamath River and connecting Highway 96 and Walker Road, Klamath River, Siskiyou County, CA

  4. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker....

  5. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker....

  6. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker....

  7. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker....

  8. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker....

  9. Averaging Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Iain A.; Robbers, Georg; Behrend, Juliane E-mail: G.Robbers@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2009-04-15

    The cosmological backreaction arises when one directly averages the Einstein equations to recover an effective Robertson-Walker cosmology, rather than assuming a background a priori. While usually discussed in the context of dark energy, strictly speaking any cosmological model should be recovered from such a procedure. We apply the scalar spatial averaging formalism for the first time to linear Robertson-Walker universes containing matter, radiation and dark energy. The formalism employed is general and incorporates systems of multiple fluids with ease, allowing us to consider quantitatively the universe from deep radiation domination up to the present day in a natural, unified manner. Employing modified Boltzmann codes we evaluate numerically the discrepancies between the assumed and the averaged behaviour arising from the quadratic terms, finding the largest deviations for an Einstein-de Sitter universe, increasing rapidly with Hubble rate to a 0.01% effect for h = 0.701. For the {Lambda}CDM concordance model, the backreaction is of the order of {Omega}{sub eff}{sup 0} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, with those for dark energy models being within a factor of two or three. The impacts at recombination are of the order of 10{sup -8} and those in deep radiation domination asymptote to a constant value. While the effective equations of state of the backreactions in Einstein-de Sitter, concordance and quintessence models are generally dust-like, a backreaction with an equation of state w{sub eff} < -1/3 can be found for strongly phantom models.

  10. X-1A with pilot Joe Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    Cowboy Joe (NACA High-Speed Flight Station test pilot Joseph Walker) and his steed (Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1A) A happy Joe was photographed in 1955 at Edwards, California. The X-1A was flown six times by Bell Aircraft Company pilot Jean 'Skip' Ziegler in 1953. Air Force test pilots Maj. Charles 'Chuck' Yeager and Maj. Arthur 'Kit' Murray made 18 flights between 21 November 1953 and 26 August 1954. The X-1A was then turned over to the NACA. Joe Walker piloted the first NACA flight on 20 July 1955. Walker attemped a second flight on 8 August 1955, but an explosion damaged the aircraft just before launch. Walker, unhurt, climbed back into the JTB-29A mothership, and the X-1A was jettisoned over the Edwards AFB bombing range.

  11. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker Lane and that oblique components of displacement are of opposite sense along the Walker Lane (extension) and San Andreas (contraction), respectively. Despite the gross differences in fault pattern, the Walker Lane and San Andreas also share similarities in deformation style, including clockwise rotations of crustal blocks leading to development of structural basins and the partitioning of oblique components of slip onto subparallel strike-slip and dip-slip faults.

  12. Baby walkers . . . time to take a stand?

    PubMed Central

    Gleadhill, D N; Robson, W J; Cudmore, R E; Turnock, R R

    1987-01-01

    Experience in our hospital and figures from the Home Accident Surveillance System indicate that the number of accidents involving baby walkers is increasing. Safety specifications issued by the British Standards Institution are rarely, if ever, met in full by manufacturers. Home accident prevention measures have been shown to be of limited benefit. We advocate more stringent implementation of safety features in the design of baby walkers. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3606183

  13. The Walker Lane in northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Saucedo, G.J.; Wagner, D.L.; Grose, T.L.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Walker Lane (Locke and others, 1940) was defined as a narrow northwest-trending dextral fault zone that separates basin- and range topography on the east from diverse topography on the west that extends discontinuously from Lake Mead to Honey Lake. The term Walker Lane Belt (Steward, 1988) expands the feature to include a wide zone east of the Sierra Nevada. Pease (1969), Hannah (1977), and Grose (1986) suggested that the tectonic characteristics of Walker Lane continue into the Modoc Plateau. The authors believe that it is useful to recognize the Walker Lane or Walker Lane Belt in the Modoc Plateau. Within the Modoc Plateau, a 25-km wide (15-mile wide) zone of northwest-southeast faults herein recognized as the Walker Lane, trends N35{degree}W from Honey Lake Basin to Medicine Lake Highland. Mapping in the Eagle Lake area revealed northwest-southeast, north-south, and northeast-southwest late Quaternary faults and rifts, eruptive fissures, small tectonic depressions, and the large Eagle Lake volcano-tectonic depression. To the east is a remarkably unfaulted Neogene volcanic terrane extending 70 km (42 miles) eastward to the Dry Valley-Smoke Creek Desert fault system in Nevada. To the west in the Cascades complex late Pliocene-Quaternary faulting, linear basaltic cones, and andesite volcanoes are all aligned N15{degree}-30{degree}W. This Modoc part of the Walker Lane Belt displays blocks tilted mostly 3{degree}-10{degree}E bounded by west-dipping normal faults and right diagonal normal faults. Left stepping north-south trending rifts occur within northwest trending, straight right diagonal-slip fault zones.

  14. Soils of Walker Branch Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The soil survey of Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) utilized the most up-to-date knowledge of soils, geology, and geohydrology in building the soils data base needed to reinterpret past research and to begin new research in the watershed. The soils of WBW were also compared with soils mapped elsewhere along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation to (1) establish whether knowledge obtained elsewhere could be used within the watershed, (2) determine whether there were any soils restricted to the watershed, and (3) evaluate geologic formation lateral variability. Soils, surficial geology, and geomorphology were mapped at a scale of 1:1200 using a paper base map having 2-ft contour intervals. Most of the contours seemed to reasonably represent actual landform configurations, except for dense wooded areas. For example, the very large dolines or sinkholes were shown on the contour base map, but numerous smaller ones were not. In addition, small drainageways and gullies were often not shown. These often small but important features were located approximately as soil mapping progressed. WBW is underlain by dolostones of the Knox Group, but only a very small part of the surface area contains outcroppings of rock and most outcrops were located in the lower part. Soil mapping revealed the presence of both ancient alluvium and ancient colluvium deposits, not recognized in previous soil surveys, that have been preserved in high-elevation stable portions of present-day landforms. An erosional geomorphic process of topographic inversion requiring several millions of years within the Pleistocene is necessary to bring about the degree of inversion that is expressed in the watershed. Indeed, some of these ancient alluvial and colluvial remnants may date back into the Tertiary. Also evident in the watershed, and preserved in the broad, nearly level bottoms of dolines, are multiple deposits of silty material either devoid or nearly devoid of coarse fragments. Recent research indicates that most of this silty material is the result of slope wash processed during the Holocene Age. Residual soils of the watershed were related to the underlying geologic formations by their morphology and types of chert. Colluvial soils were identified and mapped whenever the colluvium thickness exceeded 20 in. (50 cm). Except for the ancient colluvial soils (colluvium without a present-day source area), colluvial soils were not separated according to their geologic age, but stacked colluvial deposits are located in low footslope landforms. Colluvial soils in the watershed were identified and mapped according to their morphologic properties that would influence the perching and subsurface movement of water. Alluvial soils were restricted to present floodplains, low fan terraces, and low fan deltas. Nearly all alluvial soils contained very young surficial sediments derived from slopewash resulting from land clearing and subsequent agricultural activities.

  15. Risks of Baby Walkers and Options for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Alnoor; McIntyre, Lynn; Khazen, Roch

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies have reported fatal head injuries associated with baby walkers. Skull fractures and hospital admissions are significantly higher for infants who have received head injuries while using a walker. Thirty to 50% of infants regularly placed in walkers experience an accident or injury related to the device. Most injuries are minor cuts, abrasions and contusions. While there are many hazards, no benefits have been documented. The walkers do not help children learn to walk. Options for preventing injury including banning baby walkers, product design regulations, and public education about the risks. An outright ban would be difficult, because walkers are not considered inherently dangerous; they become so when parental supervision is lacking. Although design specifications will decrease some walker-related injuries, they will not prevent severe or fatal head injuries associated with falls down stairs. Public awareness of hazards from baby walkers and discouragement of their use are recommended preventive measures at this time. PMID:21274133

  16. Walker of Time [and Teacher's Guide].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Helen Hughes

    Intended for adolescent readers, this award-winning book is the first in a time travel trilogy that blends ancient Sinagua and present-day Hopi Indian life with archaeology, social awareness, and adventure. The books relate the story of Walker Talayesva, a contemporary Hopi teenager who travels back in time 800 years to take his place as the…

  17. Walker River Paiutes: A Tribal History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Edward C.

    The Northern Paiute people of Nevada's Walker Lake area were known as the Agai Diccutta (Trout Eaters); they called themselves the Numa, or the People. For as long as anyone could recall, they had lived in the area, catching the huge trout from the lake and harvesting the pinon nuts and other foods from the surrounding desert. In the 1820's the…

  18. Walker River Paiutes: A Tribal History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Edward C.

    The Northern Paiute people of Nevada's Walker Lake area were known as the Agai Diccutta (Trout Eaters); they called themselves the Numa, or the People. For as long as anyone could recall, they had lived in the area, catching the huge trout from the lake and harvesting the pinon nuts and other foods from the surrounding desert. In the 1820's the

  19. Gender Recognition from Point-Light Walkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollick, Frank E.; Kay, Jim W.; Heim, Katrin; Stringer, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    Point-light displays of human gait provide information sufficient to recognize the gender of a walker and are taken as evidence of the exquisite tuning of the visual system to biological motion. The authors revisit this topic with the goals of quantifying human efficiency at gender recognition. To achieve this, the authors first derive an ideal

  20. Gender Recognition from Point-Light Walkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollick, Frank E.; Kay, Jim W.; Heim, Katrin; Stringer, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    Point-light displays of human gait provide information sufficient to recognize the gender of a walker and are taken as evidence of the exquisite tuning of the visual system to biological motion. The authors revisit this topic with the goals of quantifying human efficiency at gender recognition. To achieve this, the authors first derive an ideal…

  1. Vicious walkers, friendly walkers and Young tableaux: II. With a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krattenthaler, Christian; Guttmann, Anthony J.; Viennot, Xavier G.

    2000-12-01

    We derive new results for the number of star and watermelon configurations of vicious walkers in the presence of an impenetrable wall by showing that these follow from standard results in the theory of Young tableaux and combinatorial descriptions of symmetric functions. For the problem of n friendly walkers, we derive exact asymptotics for the number of stars and watermelons, both in the absence of a wall and in the presence of a wall.

  2. Obituary: Robert Mowbray Walker, 1929-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenherr, Neil T.

    2004-12-01

    Robert M. Walker, PhD, Professor of Physics in Arts & Sciences and a faculty fellow of the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, died of stomach cancer Thursday, 12 February 2004, in Brussels, Belgium. He was 75. Walker worked on the frontiers of space research for more than four decades. Robert Walker was born in Philadelphia on 6 February 1929. His mother was Dorothy Potter and he considered Roger Potter his father though he was not his biological father. His early years were spent in New York City and in upstate New York. He attended the Bronx High School of Science, earned his BS in physics from Union College and in 1954, he received his PhD in particle physics from Yale University. He subsequently joined the General Electric Laboratory in Schenectady, New York where he studied the radiation effects in solids. His work on defects in irradiated copper is still regarded as the definitive work on the topic. In the early 1960s, Walker's discovery of fossil nuclear particle tracks in minerals was instrumental to new developments in geo-chronology and cosmic ray physics. In particular, his discovery of tracks from nuclei heavier than iron opened a new frontier of cosmic ray physics. He subsequently pioneered the use of plastics to detect and count such nuclei in cosmic ray balloon flights. Beginning in 1966, when he moved to Washington University and became the first McDonnell Professor of Physics, his research interests turned more toward space physics. He was the inaugural director of the McDonnell Center, which was established in 1975 by a gift from aerospace pioneer James S. McDonnell. Walker was a member of the NASA committee that allocated samples of the first returned lunar materials, and his laboratory led the way in deciphering their record of lunar, solar system and galactic evolution. Together with Ghislaine Crozaz and other colleagues, Walker made path breaking laboratory studies of the first moon rocks revealing the history of solar radiation and cosmic rays within these samples. He and Dr. Crozaz were married in 1973. In the past two decades, he was a world leader of microanalytical studies of tiny grains preserved for eons in meteorites, culminating in their identification as stardust. More recent achievements include the design of micrometeorite capture cells that were flown aboard NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility; verification of the extraterrestrial origin of dust particles collected in the upper atmosphere; and the successful search for interstellar grains in meteorites. "Bob was such a dominant force for excellence in our department and the University over so many years, it is hard to grasp that he is gone," said John W. Clark, PhD, chair of physics, the Wayman Crow Professor and a faculty fellow of the McDonnell Center. "His passion for life and science was an inspiration to us all, and his legacy will endure in the work of his many colleagues and the extended family of his former students." Walker led the McDonnell Center, which includes one of the world's largest research groups dedicated to the search for and investigation of extraterrestrial materials, until 1999. "Washington University would be a lesser institution without the contributions of Bob Walker," said William H. Danforth, chancellor emeritus and vice chairman of the Board of Trustees. "He gave us inspiration, enthusiasm, great science and visionary leadership. He built the strength of the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences. He convinced others of the potential for the modern Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. He had always the respect and affection of us all." The last two decades of Walker's career were driven by his remarkable vision and his excitement at the prospect of profound discovery. His recognition of the potential importance of the ion microprobe for making isotopic measurements on microscopic samples, and his acquisition in 1982 of a state-of-the-art instrument for the University, led directly to a series of spectacular results. Chief among these was the identification and characterization of stellar condensates in meteorites, which opened a window into stellar evolution and the creation of the heavier elements. Always in pursuit of more powerful ways to analyze small amounts of material, Walker devoted the last years of his life to the implementation of nanoscale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) promoting the development, acquisition and application of the most advanced instrument of its kind. This effort was rewarded with the discovery, which he had forecast years earlier, of presolar silicate grains in interplanetary dust particles. The Robert M. Walker Symposium at the University in March 2003 honored his contributions and achievements. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1973. Among his other honors are the E.O. Lawrence Memorial Award of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, the J. Lawrence Smith medal of the National Academy of Sciences, the Leonard medal of the Meteoritical Society and the Antarctic Service Medal. He received honorary doctorates from Union College (1967), the French University of Clermont-Ferrand (1975) and Washington University (2004). He was also one of the founders, and first president, of VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance), an organization that provides technological expertise to third world countries. Walker and his wife maintained a residence in St. Louis County but in 2001, Bob became a part time visiting professor at the University of Brussels. It was in Brussels that his fatal illness was correctly diagnosed. In addition to his wife, Walker is survived by his sons, Eric and Mark Walker; and three grandchildren. His most important legacy will remain the sizable number of students, postdocs, and colleagues within the meteoritic and cosmochemist communities that he mentored and inspired. Portions of this obituary are based upon one given in the on-line Record of Washington University and another published by Floss, Sandford and Zinner in Meteoritics and Planetary Science (39:1409-1411, 2004).

  3. Vibrotactile Guidance for Wayfinding of Blind Walkers.

    PubMed

    Flores, German; Kurniawan, Sri; Manduchi, Roberto; Martinson, Eric; Morales, Lourdes M; Sisbot, Emrah Akin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a vibrotactile interface in the form of a belt for guiding blind walkers. This interface enables blind walkers to receive haptic directional instructions along complex paths without negatively impacting users' ability to listen and/or perceive the environment the way some auditory directional instructions do. The belt interface was evaluated in a controlled study with 10 blind individuals and compared to the audio guidance. The experiments were videotaped and the participants' behaviors and comments were content analyzed. Completion times and deviations from ideal paths were also collected and statistically analyzed. By triangulating the quantitative and qualitative data, we found that the belt resulted in closer path following to the expense of speed. In general, the participants were positive about the use of vibrotactile belt to provide directional guidance. PMID:25781953

  4. Space Walker - the Cognitive Visualization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarinskiy, S.; Vitkovskiy, V. V.; Gorohov, V.; Zakharevski, D.

    2008-08-01

    The data cognitive visualization system --- ``Space Walker'' is presented. The creation of program products requires the practical mastery of the entire complex of achievements in the field of mathematical statistics, theory of illegible sets, cognitive machine drawing, cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge. SW system base on the ground of possibility use already acting program software intellectual support adopted solution in task control complex system with deep a priori uncertainty.

  5. DNA machines: bipedal walker and stepper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2011-01-12

    The assembly of a "bipedal walker" and of a "bipedal stepper" using DNA constructs is described. These DNA machines are activated by H(+)/OH(-) and Hg(2+)/cysteine triggers. The bipedal walker is activated on a DNA template consisting of four nucleic acid footholds. The forward "walking" of the DNA on the template track is activated by Hg(2+) ions and H(+) ions, respectively, using the thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine complex or the i-motif structure as the DNA translocation driving forces. The backward "walking" is activated by OH(-) ions and cysteine, triggers that destroy the i-motif or thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine complexes. Similarly, the "bipedal stepper" is activated on a circular DNA template consisting of four tethered footholds. With the Hg(2+)/cysteine and H(+)/OH(-) triggers, clockwise or anticlockwise stepping is demonstrated. The operation of the DNA machines is followed optically by the appropriate labeling of the walker-foothold components with the respective fluorophores/quenchers units. PMID:21166467

  6. Prevention strategies for infant walker-related injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Trinkoff, A; Parks, P L

    1993-01-01

    The estimated number of walker-related injuries to infants increased during the 1980s, and standards for walker design safety remain voluntary with no monitoring to assess compliance. Although banning the walker has been proposed, this prevention strategy has not been employed. The most recent statistics available indicate that there were an estimated 27,804 walker-related injuries requiring emergency room attention among ages 0-4 years in 1991. Results of a survey of parents of 3-12-month-olds indicated considerable use of walkers, with greater use among parents with lower educational levels. Reported reasons for using walkers were for the infant's entertainment, enjoyment, and containment, as well as to help infants learn to walk. The authors recommend the consideration of a series of preventive strategies according to the epidemiologic framework for injury control and prevention designed by William Haddon, Jr. These include, but are not limited to, prohibiting the manufacture and sale of the walker, mandatory standards, redesign of the walker, design of an alternative to the walker, and consumer education to reduce use and to change patterns of use. PMID:8265765

  7. Remote Walker breakdown and coupling breaking in parallel nanowire systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnia, S.; Purnama, I.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-07-01

    In a multiple nanowire system, we show by micromagnetic simulations that a transverse domain wall in a current-free nanowire can undergo a remote Walker breakdown when it is coupled to a nearby current-driven domain wall. Moreover, for chirality combination with the highest coupling strength, the remote Walker breakdown preceded the current-induced Walker breakdown. The Walker breakdown limit of such coupled systems has also been shifted towards higher current densities, where beyond these, the coupling is shown to be broken.

  8. Quantum Cohomology via Vicious and Osculating Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Christian

    2014-07-01

    We relate the counting of rational curves intersecting Schubert varieties of the Grassmannian to the counting of certain non-intersecting lattice paths on the cylinder, so-called vicious and osculating walkers. These lattice paths form exactly solvable statistical mechanics models and are obtained from solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation. The eigenvectors of the transfer matrices of these models yield the idempotents of the Verlinde algebra of the gauged -WZNW model. The latter is known to be closely related to the small quantum cohomology ring of the Grassmannian. We establish further that the partition functions of the vicious and osculating walker model are given in terms of Postnikov's toric Schur functions and can be interpreted as generating functions for Gromov-Witten invariants. We reveal an underlying quantum group structure in terms of Yang-Baxter algebras and use it to give a generating formula for toric Schur functions in terms of divided difference operators which appear in known representations of the nil-Hecke algebra.

  9. 75 FR 51178 - Safety Standard for Infant Walkers; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... rule correctly noted that the warning is to apply if a walker has a parking brake (see 75 FR at 35271..., 2010 (75 FR 35266). The document established a standard for infant walkers. The Commission is... INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of June 21, 2010 (75 FR 35266), the Commission published a final...

  10. Novel findings in the Marden-Walker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Theys, Tom; Van Geet, Christel; Didgar, Mehrnaz

    2011-04-01

    Reports about the Marden-Walker syndrome mainly consist of sporadic cases. We describe a 14-year-old girl with the Marden-Walker syndrome who presented with a huge scalp hematoma. The case and the corresponding images demonstrate an association with a defective hemostasis, skin hyperlaxity, and impaired wound healing. PMID:21496524

  11. AmeriFlux US-WBW Walker Branch Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Tilden

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-WBW Walker Branch Watershed. Site Description - The stand is over 50 years old, having regenerated from agricultural land.This site is located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee near the Walker Branch Watershed.

  12. Older Homebound Women: Negotiating Reliance on a Cane or Walker

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Eileen J.; Benson, Jacquelyn J.; Matsuda, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Canes and walkers are commonly characterized as assistive devices and as devices that serve the same purpose, as walking aides. These general views were reappraised and tempered in this descriptive phenomenological study with 40 older women (aged 85-98) who were unable to leave their homes without help. The purpose was to describe the phenomena of negotiating reliance on canes and walkers as walking devices and the lifeworld context underlying each phenomenon. Relative to lifeworld, there were differences between coming to terms with using a cane and coming to terms with using a walker. Data revealed similarities and distinctions between the basic intentions of relying on canes and on walkers and the associated purposes served by canes and walkers. Participants did not view either device as consistently assistive. Findings evoke opportunities for dialogue among older persons, scholars, practitioners, and designers of these devices about coming to terms with such devices and relying on them. PMID:21041520

  13. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Chen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two “legs” for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated “on/off” electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers can move their two “legs” to achieve one-directional walking motion on a rough surface via repeated “on/off” electro-triggering cycles. Moreover, the hydrogel walkers loaded with very heavy cargo also exhibit excellent walking motion for cargo transport. Such hydrogel systems create new opportunities for developing electro-controlled soft systems with simple design/fabrication strategies in the soft robotic field for remote manipulation and transportation. PMID:26314786

  14. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Chen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-08-01

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two “legs” for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated “on/off” electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers can move their two “legs” to achieve one-directional walking motion on a rough surface via repeated “on/off” electro-triggering cycles. Moreover, the hydrogel walkers loaded with very heavy cargo also exhibit excellent walking motion for cargo transport. Such hydrogel systems create new opportunities for developing electro-controlled soft systems with simple design/fabrication strategies in the soft robotic field for remote manipulation and transportation.

  15. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Chen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two "legs" for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated "on/off" electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers can move their two "legs" to achieve one-directional walking motion on a rough surface via repeated "on/off" electro-triggering cycles. Moreover, the hydrogel walkers loaded with very heavy cargo also exhibit excellent walking motion for cargo transport. Such hydrogel systems create new opportunities for developing electro-controlled soft systems with simple design/fabrication strategies in the soft robotic field for remote manipulation and transportation. PMID:26314786

  16. Modeling walker synchronization on the Millennium Bridge.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Bruno; Ott, Edward; Strogatz, Steven H; Abrams, Daniel M; McRobie, Allan

    2007-02-01

    On its opening day the London Millennium footbridge experienced unexpected large amplitude wobbling subsequent to the migration of pedestrians onto the bridge. Modeling the stepping of the pedestrians on the bridge as phase oscillators, we obtain a model for the combined dynamics of people and the bridge that is analytically tractable. It provides predictions for the phase dynamics of individual walkers and for the critical number of people for the onset of oscillations. Numerical simulations and analytical estimates reproduce the linear relation between pedestrian force and bridge velocity as observed in experiments. They allow prediction of the amplitude of bridge motion, the rate of relaxation to the synchronized state and the magnitude of the fluctuations due to a finite number of people. PMID:17358316

  17. Modeling walker synchronization on the Millennium Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, Bruno; Ott, Edward; Strogatz, Steven H.; Abrams, Daniel M.; McRobie, Allan

    2007-02-01

    On its opening day the London Millennium footbridge experienced unexpected large amplitude wobbling subsequent to the migration of pedestrians onto the bridge. Modeling the stepping of the pedestrians on the bridge as phase oscillators, we obtain a model for the combined dynamics of people and the bridge that is analytically tractable. It provides predictions for the phase dynamics of individual walkers and for the critical number of people for the onset of oscillations. Numerical simulations and analytical estimates reproduce the linear relation between pedestrian force and bridge velocity as observed in experiments. They allow prediction of the amplitude of bridge motion, the rate of relaxation to the synchronized state and the magnitude of the fluctuations due to a finite number of people.

  18. David Alan Walker (1928-2012).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gerald E; Heber, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    David Alan Walker, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Sheffield, UK and Fellow of the Royal Society, died on February 13, 2012. David had a marvelous 60 year career as a scientist, during which he was a researcher, mentor, valued colleague, and a prolific writer in the field of photosynthesis. His career was marked by creative breakthroughs in isolation and analysis of chloroplast metabolism in vitro and simple but valuable technical advances for measurement of photosynthesis in vivo that remain relevant on a global scale to production of crops and biofuels, as well as plant responses to climate change. We include here personal remembrances by the authors (GEE and UH), and by (in alphabetical order): Zoran Cerovic (France), Bob Furbank (Australia), Geoffrey Hind (USA), John Humby (UK), Agu Laisk (Estonia), Peter Lea (UK), Ross Lilley (Australia), Barry Osmond (Australia), Simon Robinson (Australia) and Charles Stirling (UK). PMID:22638915

  19. Intelligent control of a smart walker and its performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grondin, Simon L; Li, Qingguo

    2013-06-01

    Recent technological advances have allowed the development of force-dependent, intelligently controlled smart walkers that are able to provide users with enhanced mobility, support and gait assistance. The purpose of this study was to develop an intelligent rule-based controller for a smart walker to achieve a smooth interaction between the user and the walker. This study developed a rule-based mapping between the interaction force, measured by a load cell attached to the walker handle, and the acceleration of the walker. Ten young, healthy subjects were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed controller compared to a well-known admittance-based control system. There were no significant differences between the two control systems concerning their user experience, velocity profiles or average cost of transportation. However, the admittance-based control system required a 1.2N lower average interaction force to maintain the 1m/s target speed (p = 0.002). Metabolic data also indicated that smart walker-assisted gait could considerably reduce the metabolic demand of walking with a four-legged walker. PMID:24187165

  20. Interacting walkers on the Cayley tree, and polymer statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Priezzhev, V.B.

    1986-09-01

    We obtain the generating function for an ensemble of random walkers on the Cayley tree of coordination number z. The pair interaction between walkers is taken into account. This forbids two walkers to occupy the same lattice point after an equal number of steps. Interacting polymer statistics results from this model if one associates time (or the number of steps) with an additional space coordinate. The limiting free energy appears in a form that corresponds to the phase transition of ''3/2 order.''

  1. Test pilots 1952 - Walker, Butchart, and Jones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1952-01-01

    This photo shows test pilots, (Left-Right) Joseph A. Walker, Stanley P. Butchart and Walter P. Jones, standing in front of the Douglas D-558-II Skystreak, in 1952. These three test pilots at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' High-Speed Flight Research Station probably were discussing their flights in the aircraft. Joe flew research flights on the D-558-I #3 (14 flights, first on June 29, 1951) investigating buffeting, tail loads, and longitudinal stability. He flew the D-558-II #2 (3 flights, first on April 29, 1955) and recorded data on lateral stability and control. He also made pilot check-out flights in the D-558-II #3 (2 flights, first on May 7, 1954). For fifteen years Walker served as a pilot at the Edwards flight research facility (today known as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center) on research flights as well as chase missions for other pilots on NASA and Air Force research programs. On June 8, 1966, he was flying chase in NASA's F-104N for the Air Force's experimental bomber, North American XB-70A, when he was fatally injured in a mid-air collision between the planes. Stan flew the D-558-I #3 (12 flights, first on October 19, 1951) to determine the dynamic longitudinal stability characteristics and investigations of the lateral stability and control. He made one flight in the D-558-II #3 on June 26, 1953, as a pilot check-out flight. Butchart retired from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, on February 27, 1976, after a 25-year career in research aviation. Stan served as a research pilot, chief pilot, and director of flight operations. Walter P. Jones was a research pilot for NACA from the fall of 1950 to July 1952. He had been in the U.S. Air Force as a pilot before joining the Station. Jones flew the D-558-I #3 (5 flights, first on February 13, 1951) to study buffeting, tail loads and longitudinal stability. Jones made research flights on the D-558-II #3 ( 7 flights, first on July 20, 1951). These flights investigated pitch-up and evaluated outboard wing fences. Walt also made research flights in the Northrop X-4 (14 flights, first on March 26, 1952) and the Bell X-5 (8 flights, first on June 20, 1952). In July 1952, Walt left NACA's High-Speed Flight Research Station to join Northrop Corporation as a pilot. Returning from a test mission in a Northrop YF-89D Scorpion he was fatally injured on October 20, 1953, near Edwards Air Force Base.

  2. Instability of Walker Propagating Domain Wall in Magnetic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B.; Wang, X. R.

    2013-07-01

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed.

  3. Pilot Joe Walker and the X-1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    Cowboy Joe (NACA High-Speed Flight Station test pilot Joseph Walker) and his steed (Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1A). A happy Joe was photographed in 1955 at Edwards, California. The X-1A was flown six times by Bell Aircraft Company pilot Jean 'Skip' Ziegler in 1953. Air Force test pilots Major Charles 'Chuck' Yeager and Major Arthur 'Kit' Murray made 18 flights between November 21, 1953 and August 26, 1954. The X-1A was then turned over to the NACA. Joe Walker piloted the first NACA flight on July 20, 1955. Walker attemped a second flight on August 8, 1955, but an explosion damaged the aircraft just before launch. Walker, unhurt, climbed back into the JTB-29A mothership, and the X-1A was jettisoned over the Edwards AFB bombing range.

  4. Lonomia obliqua Walker (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae): hemostasis implications.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Silviane; Faulhaber, Gustavo Adolpho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    In southern Brazil, since 1989, several cases of accidents produced by unwilling contact with the body of poisonous caterpillars of the moth species Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), were described. L. obliqua caterpillars have gregarious behavior and feed on leaves of host trees during the night, staying grouped in the trunk during the day, which favors the occurrence of accidents with the species. This caterpillar has the body covered with bristles that on contact with the skin of individuals, breaks and release their contents, inoculating the venom into the victim. The basic constitution of the venom is protein and its components produce physiological changes in the victim, which include disturbances in hemostasis. Hemorrhagic syndrome associated with consumption coagulopathy, intravascular hemolysis and acute renal failure are some of the possible clinical manifestations related to poisoning by L. obliqua. Specific laboratory tests for diagnosis of poisoning have not been described previously. The diagnosis of poisoning is made based on the patient's medical history, clinical manifestations, erythrocyte levels, and, primarily, parameters that evaluate blood coagulation. Treatment is performed with the use of supportive care and the administration of specific hyperimmune antivenom. Poisoning can be serious and even fatal. PMID:26248250

  5. The Walker Lane Belt in northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, T.L.T. . Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    The Walker Lane Belt (WLB) has been suspected to significantly project NW-ward into NE CA from the Pyramid Lake-Honey Lake area which has been generally regarded as its northwestern terminus. Within the WLB, most of the exposed rocks are Miocene to Late Quaternary (10--0.1 Ma) volcanics, mainly andesitic, but significantly rhyolitic and basaltic. The Hayden Hill Au mine within a Mid-Miocene NNW-SSE volcanotectonic depression and the Quaternary NE-SW Eagle lake volcanotectonic depression are confined within the WLB. Most of the faults are high-angle normal and right normal, W-dipping, NW- to N-trending, and locally left-stepping en echelon, and 2 to 18 km long. Dip slip varies from 10 to 200 m. Strike slip across the entire zone seems impossible to determine, but probably is less than 20 km since Mid-Miocene. Many faults localize volcanic vents, though most do not appear to. Tectonic tilt of beds within fault blocks is less than 10[degree]. Fault activity and volcanism both continued at a slow rate from Mid-Miocene to Late Quaternary. The WLB in NE CA is a transitional boundary between the Sierra Nevada-Cascade arc on the southwest and the Basin and Range-Modoc Plateau on the northeast.

  6. X-1E with Pilot Joe Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    A photo of the X-1E with pilot Joe Walker suited up at the NASA High-Speed Flight Station, Edwards, California. The dice and 'Little Joe' are prominently displayed under the cockpit area. (Little Joe is a dice players slang term for two deuces.) Five years later when Walker reached 354,200 feet in the X-15, that aircraft carried similar artwork - 'Little Joe the II.' Walker is shown in the photo above wearing an early partial pressure suit. This protected the pilot if cockpit pressure was lost above 50,000 feet. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on Jan. 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On Oct. 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager, became the first aircraft to exceed the speed of sound, reaching about 700 miles per hour (Mach 1.06) and an altitude of 43,000 feet. The number 2 X-1 was modified and redesignated the X-1E. The modifications included adding a conventional canopy, an ejection seat, a low-pressure fuel system of increased capacity, and a thinner high-speed wing. The X-1E was used to obtain in-flight data at twice the speed of sound, with particular emphasis placed on investigating the improvements achieved with the high-speed wing. These wings, made by Stanley Aircraft, were only 3 3/8-inches thick at the root and had 343 gauges installed in them to measure structural loads and aerodynamic heating. The X-1E used its rocket engine to power it up to a speed of 1,471 miles per hour (Mach 2.24) and to an altitude of 73,000 feet. Like the X-1 it was air-launched. The X-1 aircraft were almost 31 feet long and had a wingspan of 28 feet. The X-1 was built of conventional aluminum stressed-skin construction to extremely high structural standards. The X-1E was also 31 feet long but had a wingspan of only 22 feet, 10 inches. It was powered by a Reaction Motors, Inc., XLR-8-RM-5, four-chamber rocket engine. As did all X-1 rocket engines, the LR-8-RM-5 engine did not have throttle capability, but instead, depended on ignition of any one chamber or group of chambers to vary speed. The X-1A, X-1B, and the X-1D were growth versions of the X-1. They were almost five feet longer, almost 2,500 pounds heavier and had conventional canopies. The X-1A and X-1B were modified to have ejection seats. Their mission was to continue the X-1 studies at higher speeds and altitudes. The X-1A began this research after the X-1D was destroyed in an explosion on a captive flight before it made any research flights. On Dec. 12, 1953, Major Charles Yeager flew the X-1A up to a speed of 1,612 miles per hour (almost two-and-a-half times the speed of sound). Then on Aug. 26, 1954, Major Arthur Murray took the X-1A up to an altitude of 90,440 feet. Those two performances were the records for the X-1 program. Later the X-1A was also destroyed after being jettisoned from the carrier aircraft because of an explosion. The X-1B was fitted with 300 thermocouples for exploratory aerodynamic heating tests. installed on it. It also was the first aircraft to fly with a reaction control system, a prototype of the system used on the X-15. The X-1C was cancelled before production. All three of the Bell Aircraft Company-manufactured planes had 6,000-pound-thrust, XLR-11 four-chambered rocket engines. The XLR-11 was built by Reaction Motors, Inc. The aircraft were all air-launched from a carrier aircraft.

  7. Evidence for weakening of the Walker circulation from cloud observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Katinka; Clement, Amy C.

    2015-09-01

    Climate models simulate a weakening of the Walker circulation in response to increased greenhouse gases, but it has not been possible to detect this weakening with observations because there are not direct measurements of atmospheric circulation strength. Indirect measurements, such as equatorial gradients in sea level pressure (SLP), exhibit trends of inconsistent sign. In this study we estimate the change in midtropospheric velocity (ω500) from observed change in cloud cover, which we argue is more closely tied to the overturning circulation than indirect measurements of SLP at the surface. Our estimates suggest a weakening and eastward shift of the Walker circulation over the last century. Because changes in cloud cover in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project simulations forced with increased sea surface temperature are remarkably similar in pattern, sign, and magnitude, we assert that the observed changes in cloud cover and the associated weakening of Walker circulation are at least in part externally forced.

  8. Multiple Walkers in the Wang-Landau Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G

    2005-12-28

    The mean cost for converging an estimated density of states using the Wang-Landau algorithm is measured for the Ising and Heisenberg models. The cost increases in a power-law fashion with the number of spins, with an exponent near 3 for one-dimensional models, and closer to 2.4 for two-dimensional models. The effect of multiple, simultaneous walkers on the cost is also measured. For the one-dimensional Ising model the cost can increase with the number of walkers for large systems. For both the Ising and Heisenberg models in two-dimensions, no adverse impact on the cost is observed. Thus multiple walkers is a strategy that should scale well in a parallel computing environment for many models of magnetic materials.

  9. Dandy Walker Variant and Bipolar I Disorder with Graphomania

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş Uğurlu, Görkem; Çakmak, Selcen

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellum is known to play an important role in coordination and motor functions. In some resent studies it is also considered to be involved in modulation of mood, cognition and psychiatric disorders. Dandy Walker Malformation is a congenital malformation that is characterized by hypoplasia or aplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle and enlargement of the posterior fossa. When the volume of posterior fossa is normal, the malformation is called Dandy Walker Variant. Case is a 32 year old male with a 12 year history of Bipolar I Disorder presented with manic and depresive symptoms, including dysphoric and depressive affect, anhedonia, suicidal thoughts and behaviours, thoughts of fear about future, overtalkativeness and graphomania, increased energy, irregular sleep, loss of appetite, increased immersion in projects, irritability, agressive behavior, impulsivity. Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging was compatible to the morphological features of Dandy Walker Variant. PMID:25110509

  10. Mountain Trail Formation and the Active Walker Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilks, S. J.; Hague, J. P.

    We extend the active walker model to address the formation of paths on gradients, which have been observed to have a zigzag form. Our extension includes a new rule, which prohibits direct descent or ascent on steep inclines, simulating aversion to falling. Further augmentation of the model stops walkers from changing direction very rapidly as that would likely lead to a fall. The extended model predicts paths with qualitatively similar forms to the observed trails, but only if the terms suppressing sudden direction changes are included. The need to include terms into the model that stop rapid direction change when simulating mountain trails indicates that a similar rule should also be included in the standard active walker model.

  11. Optically Resolving the Dynamic Walking of a Plasmonic Walker Couple.

    PubMed

    Urban, Maximilian J; Zhou, Chao; Duan, Xiaoyang; Liu, Na

    2015-12-01

    Deterministic placement and dynamic manipulation of individual plasmonic nanoparticles with nanoscale precision feature an important step toward active nanoplasmonic devices with prescribed levels of performance and functionalities at optical frequencies. In this Letter, we demonstrate a plasmonic walker couple system, in which two gold nanorod walkers can independently or simultaneously perform stepwise walking powered by DNA hybridization along the same DNA origami track. We utilize optical spectroscopy to resolve such dynamic walking with nanoscale steps well below the optical diffraction limit. We also show that the number of walkers and the optical response of the system can be correlated. Our studies exemplify the power of plasmonics, when integrated with DNA nanotechnology for realization of advanced artificial nanomachinery with tailored optical functionalities. PMID:26571209

  12. 10. Photocopy of photograph showing the three Walker sisters ginning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph showing the three Walker sisters ginning cotton. Misses Hettie, Martha and Louisa are from left to right. The original photograph was taken on May 21, 1936 by Edouard E. Exline and is one of five photographs in the album, 'A Sketch of Mountain Life: Great Smoky Mountains National Park', compiled by Edouard E. Exline and C.S. Grossman. The album is on file at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park; the photograph number is III-A-HSE-9642. - Walker Family Farm (General views), Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  13. Exact Distribution of the Maximal Height of p Vicious Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schehr, Grégory; Majumdar, Satya N.; Comtet, Alain; Randon-Furling, Julien

    2008-10-01

    Using path-integral techniques, we compute exactly the distribution of the maximal height Hp of p nonintersecting Brownian walkers over a unit time interval in one dimension, both for excursions p watermelons with a wall, and bridges p watermelons without a wall, for all integer p≥1. For large p, we show that ⟨Hp⟩˜2p (excursions) whereas ⟨Hp⟩˜p (bridges). Our exact results prove that previous numerical experiments only measured the preasymptotic behaviors and not the correct asymptotic ones. In addition, our method establishes a physical connection between vicious walkers and random matrix theory.

  14. 78 FR 48301 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Walker, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ..., area, creating controlled airspace at Walker Municipal Airport (78 FR 25234) Docket No. FAA-2013-0266... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  15. Hazard Patterns and Injury Prevention with Infant Walkers and Strollers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishon, Phillip M.; And Others

    Mindful of the potential hazards associated with products intended for young children, this article examines pediatric accidents involving strollers and walkers. According to the latest figures available from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the United States (NEISS), more than 11,800 stroller injuries in 1987 were serious…

  16. 16 CFR 1216.2 - Requirements for infant walkers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Bar Harbor Drive, P... walker Wdrop weight = Drop weight = 8 lb μk = Dynamic coefficient of friction = 0.05 NCAMI = Normal force... Wdrop weight = Drop weight = 8 lb μk = Dynamic coefficient of friction = 0.05 NCAMI w/vest =...

  17. 16 CFR 1216.2 - Requirements for infant walkers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Bar Harbor Drive, P... walker Wdrop weight = Drop weight = 8 lb μk = Dynamic coefficient of friction = 0.05 NCAMI = Normal force... Wdrop weight = Drop weight = 8 lb μk = Dynamic coefficient of friction = 0.05 NCAMI w/vest =...

  18. 16 CFR 1216.2 - Requirements for infant walkers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Bar Harbor Drive, P... walker Wdrop weight = Drop weight = 8 lb μk = Dynamic coefficient of friction = 0.05 NCAMI = Normal force... Wdrop weight = Drop weight = 8 lb μk = Dynamic coefficient of friction = 0.05 NCAMI w/vest =...

  19. Roy Lee Walker Elementary School, McKinney ISD. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHW Group, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This 7:50-minute videotape describes the architectural design and structure of the Roy Lee Walker Elementary School, illustrating why the school is considered the most energy efficient and environmentally sound school ever built. The videotape highlights the sustainable, award-winning design features such as the innovative use of daylight to…

  20. Behavior of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Jambrina, L.

    2016-03-01

    In Stoica (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 55, 71-80, 2016) a regularization procedure is suggested for regularizing Big Bang singularities in Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetimes. We argue that this procedure is only appliable to one case of Big Bang singularities and does not affect other types of singularities.

  1. STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker chats with white room closeout crew members Bob Saulnier (left), Regulo Villalobos and closeout crew leader Travis Thompson prior to entering the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A.

  2. Alice Walker's Politics or the Politics of "The Color Purple."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Alice Walker's "The Color Purple" portrays Black women's oppression as the result of patriarchy, and proposes the acceptance of middle-class values--home ownership and entrepreneurship--as the solution to exploitation. She relies on stereotypes to characterize Black men and women, and depicts an ideology of submission. (BJV)

  3. Mary Edwards Walker: the soul ahead of her time.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atiq; Rahman, Naba G; Harris, Sharon M; Cheema, Faisal H

    2015-02-01

    Mary Edwards Walker was a gallant woman who stood for women's rights, embodied the true American spirit, and served the Union Army in the Civil War as a surgeon. She later became the first and only woman in United States history to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. PMID:25535874

  4. A new species of Culcua Walker (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) from Vietnam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species of Culcua Walker (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), C. lingafelteri Woodley, new species, is described from northern Vietnam. It is diagnosed relative to other species using the recent revision of the genus by Rozkošný and Kozánek (2007). This is the first species of Culcua reported from Viet...

  5. A stochastic DNA walker that traverses a microparticle surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Allen, P. B.; Ellington, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular machines have previously been designed that are propelled by DNAzymes, protein enzymes and strand displacement. These engineered machines typically move along precisely defined one- and two-dimensional tracks. Here, we report a DNA walker that uses hybridization to drive walking on DNA-coated microparticle surfaces. Through purely DNA:DNA hybridization reactions, the nanoscale movements of the walker can lead to the generation of a single-stranded product and the subsequent immobilization of fluorescent labels on the microparticle surface. This suggests that the system could be of use in analytical and diagnostic applications, similar to how strand exchange reactions in solution have been used for transducing and quantifying signals from isothermal molecular amplification assays. The walking behaviour is robust and the walker can take more than 30 continuous steps. The traversal of an unprogrammed, inhomogeneous surface is also due entirely to autonomous decisions made by the walker, behaviour analogous to amorphous chemical reaction network computations, which have been shown to lead to pattern formation.

  6. Quantum Analysis of k=-1 Robertson-Walker Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariescu, Ciprian; Dariescu, Marina-Aura

    2015-11-01

    The (k=-1)-Robertson-Walker spacetime is under investigation. With the derived Hamilton operator, we are solving the Wheeler-De Witt Equation and its Schrdinger-like extension, for physically important forms of the effective potential. The closed form solutions, expressed in terms of Heun's functions, allow us to comment on the occurrence of Universe from highly probable quantum states.

  7. Roy Lee Walker Elementary School, McKinney ISD. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHW Group, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This 7:50-minute videotape describes the architectural design and structure of the Roy Lee Walker Elementary School, illustrating why the school is considered the most energy efficient and environmentally sound school ever built. The videotape highlights the sustainable, award-winning design features such as the innovative use of daylight to

  8. Larval description of Copitarsia incommoda (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The last-instar larva of Copitarsia incommoda (Walker) is described for the first time. Specimens in this study were reared from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., Chenopodiaceae), Bolivia, La Paz, 4 km S Viacha, Quipaquipani, 3880 m. The larva of Copitarsia incommoda is compared with larvae of Copi...

  9. Finding the Right Formula: Edwin H. Walker Jr

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keels, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    Edwin H. Walker Jr earned his doctorate in chemistry at age 27 and has barely looked back. With 13 publications under his belt before coming out of graduate school, he has also given more than 20 poster presentations in national venues, most recently at the American Chemical Society. He can also include securing a half-million-dollar National…

  10. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, POURING OFF SLAG FROM LADLE AS SKIMMER, BRUCE ELLIOTT, RAKES THE SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Moments of vicious walkers and Möbius graph expansions.

    PubMed

    Katori, Makoto; Komatsuda, Naoaki

    2003-05-01

    A system of Brownian motions in one dimension all started from the origin and conditioned never to collide with each other in a given finite time interval (0,T] is studied. The spatial distribution of such vicious walkers can be described by using the repulsive eigenvalue statistics of random Hermitian matrices and it was shown that the present vicious walker model exhibits a transition from the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) statistics to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) statistics as the time t goes on from 0 to T. In the present paper, we characterize this GUE-to-GOE transition by presenting the graphical expansion formula for the moments of positions of vicious walkers. In the GUE limit t-->0, only the ribbon graphs contribute and the problem is reduced to the classification of orientable surfaces by genus. Following the time evolution of the vicious walkers, however, the graphs with twisted ribbons, called Möbius graphs, increase their contribution to our expansion formula, and we have to deal with the topology of nonorientable surfaces. Application of the recent exact result of dynamical correlation functions yields closed expressions for the coefficients in the Möbius expansion using the Stirling numbers of the first kind. PMID:12786137

  12. Moments of vicious walkers and Möbius graph expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Makoto; Komatsuda, Naoaki

    2003-05-01

    A system of Brownian motions in one dimension all started from the origin and conditioned never to collide with each other in a given finite time interval (0,T] is studied. The spatial distribution of such vicious walkers can be described by using the repulsive eigenvalue statistics of random Hermitian matrices and it was shown that the present vicious walker model exhibits a transition from the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) statistics to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) statistics as the time t goes on from 0 to T. In the present paper, we characterize this GUE-to-GOE transition by presenting the graphical expansion formula for the moments of positions of vicious walkers. In the GUE limit t→0, only the ribbon graphs contribute and the problem is reduced to the classification of orientable surfaces by genus. Following the time evolution of the vicious walkers, however, the graphs with twisted ribbons, called Möbius graphs, increase their contribution to our expansion formula, and we have to deal with the topology of nonorientable surfaces. Application of the recent exact result of dynamical correlation functions yields closed expressions for the coefficients in the Möbius expansion using the Stirling numbers of the first kind.

  13. A first-passage time problem for many random walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyrakis, Panos; Weiss, George H.

    2006-05-01

    The passage of ions through membrane channels plays an important role in many fields of biology. An earlier paper [M. Boguñá, A.M. Berezhkovskii, G.H. Weiss, Phys. Rev. E 62 (2000) 3250] developed a toy model for statistical properties of the occupancy of a single site by different numbers of lattice random walkers chosen from an infinite set. It was assumed there that the residence time in one sojourn at the origin differed from the residence time of points elsewhere. In this paper we derive some properties of the corresponding first-passage time to the occupancy of the special site by k(>1) random walkers in one or two dimensions. Results of our study were obtained from an extensive set of simulations.

  14. Real AlphaBeta-geometries and Walker geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Peter R.; Matsushita, Yasuo

    2013-03-01

    By a real αβ-geometry we mean a four-dimensional manifold M equipped with a neutral metric h such that (M,h) admits both an integrable distribution of α-planes and an integrable distribution of β-planes. We obtain a local characterization of the metric when at least one of the distributions is parallel (i.e., is a Walker geometry) and the three-dimensional distribution spanned by the α- and β-distributions is integrable. The case when both distributions are parallel, which has been called two-sided Walker geometry, is obtained as a special case. We also study real αβ-geometries for which the corresponding spinors are both multiple Weyl principal spinors. All these results have natural analogues in the context of the hyperheavens of complex general relativity.

  15. Friedman—Robertson—Walker Models with Late-Time Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussattar; Prajapati, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    In order to account for the observed cosmic acceleration, a modification of the ansatz for the variation of density in Friedman—Robertson—Walker (FRW) FRW models given by Islam is proposed. The modified ansatz leads to an equation of state which corresponds to that of a variable Chaplygin gas, which in the course of evolution reduces to that of a modified generalized Chaplygin gas (MGCG) and a Chaplygin gas (CG), exhibiting late-time acceleration.

  16. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELM CITY PLANT (A. FRANCIS WALKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELM CITY PLANT (A. FRANCIS WALKER, 1905-07) FROM SECOND AVENUE ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF ENTRANCE. THIS STRUCTURE WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT AS THE ELM CITY COTTON MILL OF CALLAWAY MILLS. NOTE RESERVOIR IN FOREGROUND. THIS PHOTOGRAPH IS THE LEFT SIDE OF A PANORAMA VIEW THAT INCLUDES HAER Nos. GA-128-2 AND GA-128-3. - Elm City Cotton Mill, 1000 Elm Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  17. Novel method to form adaptive internal impedance profiles in walkers.

    PubMed

    Escudero Morland, Maximilano F; Althoefer, Kaspar; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to improve walking in prosthetics, orthotics and robotics without closed loop controllers. The approach requires impedance profiles to be formed in a walker and uses state feedback to update the profiles in real-time via a simple policy. This approach is open loop and inherently copes with the challenge of uncertain environment. In application it could be used either online for a walker to adjust its impedance profiles in real-time to compensate for environmental changes, or offline to learn suitable profiles for specific environments. So far we have conducted simulations and experiments to investigate the transient and steady state gaits obtained using two simple update policies to form damping profiles in a passive dynamic walker known as the rimless wheel (RW). The damping profiles are formed in the motor that moves the RW vertically along a rail, analogous to a knee joint, and the two update equations were designed to a) control the angular velocity profile and b) minimise peak collision forces. Simulation results show that the velocity update equation works within limits and can cope with varying ground conditions. Experiment results show the angular velocity average reaching the target as well as the peak force update equation reducing peak collision forces in real-time. PMID:26738092

  18. Second order DTMR image segmentation using random walker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hilo, Saba; Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Atkins, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    Image segmentation is a method of separating an image into regions of interest, such as separating an object from the background. The random walker image segmentation technique has been applied extensively to scalar images and has demonstrated robust results. In this paper we propose a novel method to apply the random walker method to segmenting non-scalar diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) data. Moreover, we used a non-parametric probability density model to provide estimates of the regional distributions enabling the random walker method to successfully segment disconnected objects. Our approach utilizes all the information provided by the tensors by using suitable dissimilarity tensor distance metrics. The method uses hard constraints for the segmentation provided interactively by the user, such that certain tensors are labeled as object or background. Then, a graph structure is created with the tensors representing the nodes and edge weights computed using the dissimilarity tensor distance metrics. The distance metrics used are the Log-Euclidean and the J-divergence. The results of the segmentations using these two different dissimilarity metrics are compared and evaluated. Applying the approach to both synthetic and real DT-MRI data yields segmentations that are both robust and qualitatively accurate.

  19. Uranium transport in the Walker River Basin, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Leach, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    During the summer of 1976 waters from tributaries, rivers, springs and wells were sampled in the Walker River Basin. Snow and sediments from selected sites were also sampled. All samples were analyzed for uranium and other elements. The resulting data provide an understanding of the transport of uranium within a closed hydrologic basin as well as providing a basis for the design of geochemical reconnaissance studies for the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Spring and tributary data are useful in locating areas containing anomalous concentrations of uranium. However, agricultural practices obscure the presence of known uranium deposits and render impossible the detection of other known deposits. Uranium is extremely mobile in stream waters and does not appear to sorb or precipitate. Uranium has a long residence time (2500 years) in the open waters of Walker Lake; however, once it crosses the sediment-water interface, it is reduced to the U(IV) state and is lost from solution. Over the past two million years the amount of uranium transported to the terminal point of the Walker River system may have been on the order of 4 ?? 108 kg. This suggests that closed basin termini are sites for significant uranium accumulations and are, therefore, potential sites of uranium ore deposits. ?? 1979.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Methanogenesis at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, D.; Cook, A.; Malinverno, A.; Daigle, H.

    2014-12-01

    Methane migration is a crucial link between locations of methane generation and natural gas hydrate reservoirs, yet migration mechanisms are poorly understood in the natural environment. In this study, we evaluate constraints on methanogenesis and methane diffusion through the development of a 1-dimensional diagenetic model of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Site Walker Ridge 313 in the Gulf of Mexico. High saturation gas hydrate was confirmed at Walker Ridge from borehole logs, which measured both high compressional velocity and high resistivity in hydrate-bearing sand layers. Gas hydrate formation depends largely on organic matter concentration and methanogenesis rates. We will test how much organic matter is required to achieve gas hydrate saturations observed at Walker Ridge. Our model will incorporate methane generation around a sand layer as it is moves down through the sediment column. Variable porosity across the sediment column due to early diagenesis and sediment compaction will also be considered. Since methane solubility is higher in finer grained sediments due to smaller pore spaces, gas hydrate will form in the sand layer from methane transported by the relatively slow process of diffusion from finer grained layers. The results of this model are critical to the development of the basin scale simulation of overall methane flux based on the geometry of WR313. The simulation results will improve scientific characterization of how hydrates form and distribute within continental margin sediments.

  1. Cochlear implantation in patient with Dandy-walker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Adriana Kosma Pires; Hamerschmidt, Rogerio; Mocelin, Marcos; Rezende, Rodrigo K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Dandy Walker Syndrome is a congenital abnormality in the central nervous system, characterized by a deficiency in the development of middle cerebelar structures, cystic dilatation of the posterior pit communicating with the fourth ventricle and upward shift of the transverse sinuses, tentorium and dyes. Among the clinical signs are occipital protuberances, a progressive increase of the skull, bowing before the fontanels, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual impairment. Objectives: To describe a case of female patient, 13 years old with a diagnosis of this syndrome and bilateral hearing loss underwent cochlear implant surgery under local anesthesia and sedation. Case Report: CGS, 13 years old female was referred to the Otolaryngological Department of Otolaryngology Institute of Parana with a diagnosis of “Dandy-Walker syndrome” for Otolaryngological evaluation for bilateral hearing loss with no response to the use of hearing aids. Final Comments: The field of cochlear implants is growing rapidly. We believe that the presence of Dandy-Walker syndrome cannot be considered a contraindication to the performance of cochlear implant surgery, and there were no surgical complications due to neurological disorders with very favorable results for the patient who exhibits excellent discrimination. It has less need for lip reading with improvement in speech quality. PMID:25991966

  2. Simulation of the Lower Walker River Basin hydrologic system, west-central Nevada, using PRMS and MODFLOW models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fallowing of Walker River Indian Irrigation Project fields from 2007 to 2010 on Walker Lake inflow, level, and dissolved solids were evaluated. Fallowing resulted in a near doubling of Walker River inflow to Walker Lake during this period, an increase in Walker Lake level of about 1.4 feet, and a decrease in dissolved-solids concentration of about 540 mg/L.

  3. Model and Statistical Analysis of the Motion of a Tired Random Walker in Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Muktish

    The model of a tired random walker, whose jump-length decays exponentially in time, is proposed and the motion of such a tired random walker is studied systematically in one, two and three dimensional contin- uum. In all cases, the diffusive nature of walker, breaks down due to tiring which is quite obvious. In one dimension, the distribution of the displace- ment of a tired walker remains Gaussian (as observed in normal walker) with reduced width. In two and three dimensions, the probability distribution of displacement becomes nonmonotonic and unimodal. The most probable displacement and the deviation reduces as the tiring factor increases. The probability of return of a tired walker, decreases as the tiring factor increases in one and two dimensions. However, in three dimensions, it is found that the probability of return almost insensitive to the tiring factor. The prob- ability distributions of first return time of a tired random walker do not show the scale invariance as observed for a normal walker in continuum. The exponents, of such power law distributions of first return time, in all three dimensions are estimated for normal walker. The exit probability and the probability distribution of first passage time are found in all three dimensions. A few results are compared with available analytical calculations for normal walker.

  4. General mechanism for inchworm nanoscale track walkers: Analytical theory and realistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Fan, Dagong; Wang, Zhisong

    2007-06-01

    Nanomotors capable of directed transportation along an unlimited linear track are being vigorously pursued both theoretically and experimentally. This study generalizes a previously proposed mechanism for nanoscale track walkers by explicitly treating key molecular details of the walker-track systems. An energy-diagram analysis identifies pathways of energy flow through the walker's movement cycle, and thereby enables us to develop an analytical theory for the track-walking mechanism. Realistic simulations of the walker's movement cycles are also conducted. The results show that the walker's directionality, run length, and speed depend critically on several key dimensional parameters of the walker-track systems. Most notably, the walker's performance as a function of the binding site interval of the track exhibits an oscillating pattern, which is accurately reproduced by the analytical theory. The wealth of nanocontrol mechanisms identified in the proposed track-walker systems not only provides a framework for optimizing performance of the walker, but also clarifies major requirements for future experimental implementation.

  5. Field-dependent symmetries in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2015-05-01

    We consider effective actions of the cosmological Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) models and discuss their fermionic rigid BRST invariance. Further, we demonstrate the finite field-dependent BRST transformations as a limiting case of continuous field-dependent BRST transformations described in terms of continuous parameter κ. The Jacobian under such finite field-dependent BRST transformations is computed explicitly, which amounts an extra piece in the effective action within functional integral. We show that for a particular choice of a parameter the finite field-dependent BRST transformation maps the generating functional for FRW models from one gauge to another.

  6. Automatic Liver Segmentation Using the Random Walker Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, F.; Wimmer, A.; Soza, G.; Kaftan, J. N.; Fritz, D.; Dillmann, R.

    In this paper we present a new method for fully automatic liver segmentation in computed tomography images. First, an initial set of seed points for the random walker algorithm is created. In this context, voxels belonging to air, fat tissue and ribcage are labeled as background. Furthermore, depending on the shape of the ribcage and voxel intensities, several seed points inside the liver are automatically selected as foreground. This seed mask is then used to initialize the segmentation algorithm. Our method was successfully tested on data of 22 patients.

  7. Spatial and Lorentzian surfaces in Robertson-Walker space times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bang-Yen; Van der Veken, Joeri

    2007-07-01

    Let L14(f,c)=(I×fS,gfc) be a Robertson-Walker space time which does not contain any open subset of constant curvature. In this paper, we provide a general study of nondegenerate surfaces in L14(f,c). First, we prove the nonexistence of marginally trapped surfaces with positive relative nullity. Then, we classify totally geodesic submanifolds. Finally, we classify the family of surfaces with parallel second fundamental form and the family of totally umbilical surfaces with parallel mean curvature vector.

  8. Science to Sustain Terminal Lakes: The Walker River Basin Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2005-01-01

    Section 2507 of Public Law 107-171 (2002 Farm Bill) provided $200,000,000 to be used by the Secretary of the Interior, acting through the Commissioner of Reclamation, to provide water to at-risk natural desert terminal lakes. This bill was later amended under Public Law 108-7, Section 207 to include language 'Restoration of fish, wildlife, and associated habitats in watersheds of certain lakes'. The amendment specified that only Pyramid, Summit, and Walker Lakes in the State of Nevada were to be considered under Section 2507, Public Law 107-171.

  9. Pilot Joe Walker with the X-1E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    A photo of the nose section of the X-1E with pilot Joe Walker suited for a flight at the NASA High-Speed Flight Station, Edwards, California. The dice and Little Joe are prominently displayed under the cockpit area. NASA employees and the crew chief of the plane worked long hours preparing a craft for flight. A break from the tedious task was a welcome reprieve at times; hence the private joke between a crew and their pilot evolved. If you know the craps game you've figured it out! (Little Joe is a dice player's slang term for two deuces.)

  10. Noncommutative corrections to the Robertson-Walker metric

    SciTech Connect

    Fabi, S.; Harms, B.; Stern, A.

    2008-09-15

    Upon applying Chamseddine's noncommutative deformation of gravity, we obtain the leading order noncommutative corrections to the Robertson-Walker metric tensor. We get an isotropic inhomogeneous metric tensor for a certain choice of the noncommutativity parameters. Moreover, the singularity of the commutative metric at t=0 is replaced by a more involved space-time structure in the noncommutative theory. In a toy model we construct a scenario where there is no singularity at t=0 at leading order in the noncommutativity parameter. Although singularities may still be present for nonzero t, they need not be the source of all timelike geodesics and the result resembles a bouncing cosmology.

  11. Monocoque structure for the SKITTER three-legged walker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansek, Robert N.; Booth, Andrew J.; Daneman, Steven A.; Dresser, James A.; Haney, Todd G.; Johnson, Gregory R.; Lindzen, Eric C.; Montgomery, Robert C.; Warren, Andrew L.

    1988-06-01

    The SKITTER 2 design is a monocoque version of the proposed lunar three-legged walker. By the definition of monocoque, the body and legs are a shell with no internal ribbing or supports added for absorbing stresses. The purpose of the monocoque is to encase the elements used for power transmission, power supply, and control of the motion. The material for the structure is a vinyl ester resin, Derakane 8084. This material is easily formable and locally obtainable. The body consists of a hexagonally shaped cylinder with truncated hexagonal pyramids on the top and botton. The legs are eight inch diameter cylinders. The legs are comprised of a tibia section and a femur section. The SKITTER 2 is powered by six actuators which provide linear forces that are transformed into rotary torques by a series of chains and sprockets. The joints connect the femur to the body and the tibia to the femur. Surrounding the joints are flexible rubber hoses that fully encase the chains and sprockets. The SKITTER 2 is capable of walking upside down, righting itself after being overturned, and has the ability to perform in many environments. Applications for this walker include lunar transport or drilling, undersea exploration, and operation in severe surroundings such as arctic temperatures or high radiation.

  12. Monocoque structure for the SKITTER three-legged walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansek, Robert N.; Booth, Andrew J.; Daneman, Steven A.; Dresser, James A.; Haney, Todd G.; Johnson, Gregory R.; Lindzen, Eric C.; Montgomery, Robert C.; Warren, Andrew L.

    1988-01-01

    The SKITTER 2 design is a monocoque version of the proposed lunar three-legged walker. By the definition of monocoque, the body and legs are a shell with no internal ribbing or supports added for absorbing stresses. The purpose of the monocoque is to encase the elements used for power transmission, power supply, and control of the motion. The material for the structure is a vinyl ester resin, Derakane 8084. This material is easily formable and locally obtainable. The body consists of a hexagonally shaped cylinder with truncated hexagonal pyramids on the top and botton. The legs are eight inch diameter cylinders. The legs are comprised of a tibia section and a femur section. The SKITTER 2 is powered by six actuators which provide linear forces that are transformed into rotary torques by a series of chains and sprockets. The joints connect the femur to the body and the tibia to the femur. Surrounding the joints are flexible rubber hoses that fully encase the chains and sprockets. The SKITTER 2 is capable of walking upside down, righting itself after being overturned, and has the ability to perform in many environments. Applications for this walker include lunar transport or drilling, undersea exploration, and operation in severe surroundings such as arctic temperatures or high radiation.

  13. Dissemination of Walker 256 carcinoma cells to rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, H.; Hayashi, K.; Namba, T.; Grob, D.

    1986-03-05

    After injection of 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells labelled with /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into the tail vein, peak concentration in skeletal muscle was 46 cells/g at 60 minutes, which was lower than 169202, 1665, 555, 198 and 133 cells/g, respectively, at 30 or 60 minutes in lung, liver, spleen, kidney and heart. Because skeletal muscle constitutes 37.4% of body weight, the total number of tumor cells was 2323 cells, which was much greater than in spleen, kidney and heart with 238, 271, and 85 cells, respectively, and only less than in lung and liver, at 222857 and 11700 cells, respectively. The total number in skeletal muscle became greater than in liver at 4 hours and than in lung at 24 hours. Ten minutes after injection of 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the abdominal aorta of rats, a mean of 31 colony-forming cells were recovered from the gastrocnemius, while 106 cells were recovered from the lung after injection into the tail vein. These results indicate that a large number of viable tumor cells can be arrested in skeletal muscle through circulation. The rare remote metastasis of malignancies into skeletal muscle despite constantly circulating tumor cells does not appear to be due to poor dissemination of tumor cells into muscle but due to unhospitable environment of skeletal muscle.

  14. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment. PMID:26737102

  15. A 'water walkers' exercise program for the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Heyneman, C A; Premo, D E

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that older people, stereotyped as weak, frail, and inactive, demonstrate an equal capacity to reap the physical and psychological benefits of recreational exercise. A low cost aquatic exercise program is proposed that is geared towards those persons who, because of their physical limitations, are unable to participate in the more traditional walking or low-impact aerobics programs currently available for seniors. A water-based program would allow these people to gain all the advantages of land-based exercise with out stress or strain on arthritic joints. In addition, the use of water walkers (a buoyancy device which attaches easily around the waist) would allow total freedom of movement without fear of deep water. Those with various levels of disability could, therefore, participate at their own pace. Two programs, including transportation, would be provided twice a week for 8 weeks each. An individual 45-minute session would consist of a warm-up period with gentle stretching, a cardiovascular segment, a cool-down period, strength-training, and a final stretching time. All exercises would be conducted with participants wearing the water walkers, allowing total immersion to the shoulder. Free to move about the pool, they would be encouraged to interact socially with one another. The results of the program would be determined by measuring range of motion, cardiovascular endurance, and strength before and after each 8-week session. Participants' level of self confidence and life satisfaction will be estimated and any psychological improvement will be documented. PMID:1561306

  16. Optimal recruitment strategies for groups of interacting walkers with leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Ricardo; López, Cristóbal; Vazquez, Federico

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a model of interacting random walkers on a finite one-dimensional chain with absorbing boundaries or targets at the ends. Walkers are of two types: informed particles that move ballistically towards a given target and diffusing uninformed particles that are biased towards close informed individuals. This model mimics the dynamics of hierarchical groups of animals, where an informed individual tries to persuade and lead the movement of its conspecifics. We characterize the success of this persuasion by the first-passage probability of the uninformed particle to the target, and we interpret the speed of the informed particle as a strategic parameter that the particle can tune to maximize its success. We find that the success probability is nonmonotonic, reaching its maximum at an intermediate speed whose value increases with the diffusing rate of the uninformed particle. When two different groups of informed leaders traveling in opposite directions compete, usually the largest group is the most successful. However, the minority can reverse this situation and become the most probable winner by following two different strategies: increasing its attraction strength or adjusting its speed to an optimal value relative to the majority's speed.

  17. Evapotranspiration from the Lower Walker River Basin, West-Central Nevada, Water Years 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Smith, J. LaRue; Johnson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is the ultimate path of outflow of nearly all water from the Lower Walker River basin. Walker Lake is the terminus of the topographically closed Walker River basin, and the lake level has been declining at an average rate of about 1.6 feet per year (ft/yr) since 1917. As a result of the declining lake level, dissolved-solids concentrations are increasingly threatening the fishery and ecosystem health of the lake. Uncertainties in the water budget components of the Lower Walker River basin led the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, to undertake an investigation to refine estimates of the water budget. Evapotranspiration from the Lower Walker River basin represents a major component of this water budget. The specific objectives of this report are to provide estimates of total and net evapotranspiration for water years 2005-07 for areas in the Lower Walker River basin in which annual evapotranspiration exceeds annual precipitation, and to summarize these results for areas of similar vegetation and soil characteristics, hydrographic subareas, and Walker Lake and Weber Reservoir. The three hydrographic subareas include the area along Walker River north of Walker Lake, the area of and adjacent to Walker Lake, and the area south of Walker Lake. Areas of annual evapotranspiration exceeding annual precipitation were identified and mapped in the field and were further delineated using remote-sensing analysis. These areas were classified into 10 evapotranspiration units. A network of 11 evapotranspiration stations was operated in natural and agricultural vegetation and on Walker Lake. Measured evapotranspiration rates ranged from 0.5 ft/yr at a sparsely vegetated desert shrub site to 5.0 ft/yr from Walker Lake. The greatest evapotranspiration rate on land was 4.1 ft/yr at an irrigated alfalfa field, and the greatest rate for natural vegetation was 3.9 ft/yr in a riparian community along Walker River. At an evapotranspiration station in a saltcedar grove, measurements indicated a possible decrease in evapotranspiration of about 50 percent due to defoliation of the saltcedar by the saltcedar leaf beetle. Total evapotranspiration from the evapotranspiration units identified in the Lower Walker River basin was about 231,000 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr). Of this amount, about 45,000 acre-ft/yr originated from direct precipitation, resulting in net evapotranspiration of about 186,000 acre-ft/yr. More than 80 percent of net evapotranspiration in the Lower Walker River basin was through evaporation from Walker Lake. Total evaporation from Walker Lake was about 161,000 acre-ft/yr and net evaporation was about 149,000 acre-ft/yr. Some previous estimates of evaporation from Walker Lake based on water-budget analysis actually represent total evaporation minus ground-water inflow to the lake. Historical evaporation rates determined on the basis of water budget analysis were less than the evaporation rate measured directly during this study. The difference could represent ground-water inflow to Walker Lake of 16,000 to 26,000 acre-ft/yr or could indicate that ground-water inflow to Walker Lake is decreasing over time as the lake perimeter recedes.

  18. Two American Entrepreneurs: Madame C. J. Walker and J. C. Penney. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koman, Rita

    2000-01-01

    This lesson is based on the National Historic Landmark files, "Madame C. J. Walker Building" and "J. C. Penney Historic District," as well as other relevant sources. The lesson first discusses the Indianapolis (Indiana) site of Madame Walker's cosmetics business. The building is a 4-story brick structure completed in 1927. Another building built…

  19. GeoFrame Walker Lane: Overview, Rationale, and Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, D. F.

    2006-12-01

    GeoFrame is an integrative geologic initiative that takes a multi-dimensional view of the building and modification of the North American continent by systematic integration of geologic and geochronometric investigations and the results from unprecedented geophysical imaging as part of the Earthscope Program. The GeoFrame effort envisions these focus site investigations to entail map-scale arrays of passive source seismic receivers and associated active source seismic studies and complementary geophysics in conjunction with geologic-based synthesis and targeted studies. One of these focus sites is the Walker Lane region in eastern California and western Nevada, situated between the Basin and Range province and the unextended Sierra Nevada block. This GeoFrame focus site workshop is particularly timely given the deployment schedule of the USArray "BigFoot" array. The Walker Lane intraplate deformation zone accommodates nearly ~25% of present-day relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates and might represent an incipient plate boundary. It provides a world-class example of the present modification of continental lithosphere by the process of transcurrent faulting and rifting and offers the opportunity to seamlessly integrate surface geology, structural geology, petrology, geo- and thermochronology, and the history of the continental lithosphere with ongoing processes in the Earth's mantle. It affords opportunities to address a number of questions posed within Earthscope such as: mechanisms of strain transfer, the role of lithospheric rheology in strain localization and seismic response, the nature and timescales of transient fault behavior, and the role of magmas and fluids in deforming lithosphere. Implicit in the design and implementation of Earthscope is the recognition that progress on issues such as these requires an integrative geophysical and geological investigation of the Walker Lane. As such, it will open new avenues of collaboration and identify new research needs and opportunities. We anticipate the integration of results and efforts with ongoing Earthscope projects, such as Sierra Nevada efforts of SNEP as well as the NSF Margins Rupturing of Continental Lithosphere (RCL) initiative in the Gulf of California by continuing the work onshore from the Gulf of California to the north into Nevada.

  20. On Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model in conformal teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. G.; Santos, A. F.; Ulhoa, S. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we use the conformal teleparallel gravity to study an isotropic and homogeneous Universe which is settled by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. The conformal symmetry demands the existence of a scalar field which works as a dark field for this model. We solve numerically the field equations then we obtain the behavior of some cosmological parameters such as the scale factor, the deceleration parameter and the energy density of the perfect fluid which is the matter field of our model. The field equations, which we called modified Friedmann equations, allow us to define a dark fluid, with dark energy density and pressure, responsible for the acceleration in the Universe, once we defined an equation of state for the dark fluid.

  1. Effects of aging on identifying emotions conveyed by point-light walkers.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Justine M Y; Sekuler, Allison B; Bennett, Patrick J; Giese, Martin A; Pilz, Karin S

    2016-02-01

    The visual system is able to recognize human motion simply from point lights attached to the major joints of an actor. Moreover, it has been shown that younger adults are able to recognize emotions from such dynamic point-light displays. Previous research has suggested that the ability to perceive emotional stimuli changes with age. For example, it has been shown that older adults are impaired in recognizing emotional expressions from static faces. In addition, it has been shown that older adults have difficulties perceiving visual motion, which might be helpful to recognize emotions from point-light displays. In the current study, 4 experiments were completed in which older and younger adults were asked to identify 3 emotions (happy, sad, and angry) displayed by 4 types of point-light walkers: upright and inverted normal walkers, which contained both local motion and global form information; upright scrambled walkers, which contained only local motion information; and upright random-position walkers, which contained only global form information. Overall, emotion discrimination accuracy was lower in older participants compared with younger participants, specifically when identifying sad and angry point-light walkers. In addition, observers in both age groups were able to recognize emotions from all types of point-light walkers, suggesting that both older and younger adults are able to recognize emotions from point-light walkers on the basis of local motion or global form. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26765748

  2. Influence of temperature on current-induced domain wall motion and its Walker breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lvchao; Hu, Jingguo; Su, Yuanchang; Zhu, Jinrong

    2016-03-01

    The current-driven domain wall propagation along a thin ferromagnetic strip with thermal field is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the velocity of domain wall is almost independent of temperature until Walker breakdown happened. However the thermal field can suppress Walker breakdown and makes domain wall move faster. Further analysis indicates that the thermal field tends to keep the out-of-plane magnetic moment of the domain wall stay in high value, which can promote domain wall motion and suppress the Walker breakdown by breaking the period of domain wall transformation.

  3. X-15 #2 with test pilot Joe Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Joe Walker is seen here after a flight in front of the X-15 #2 (56-6671) rocket-powered research aircraft. Joseph A. Walker was a Chief Research Pilot at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center during the mid-1960s. He joined NACA in March 1945, and served as project pilot at the Edwards flight research facility on such pioneering research projects as the D-558-1, D-558-2, X-1, X-3, X-4, X-5, and the X-15. He also flew programs involving the F-100, F-101, F-102, F-104, and the B-47. Walker made the first NASA X-15 flight on March 25, 1960. He flew the research aircraft 24 times and achieved its highest altitude. He attained a speed of 4,104 mph (Mach 5.92) during a flight on June 27, 1962, and reached an altitude of 354,200 feet (67.08 miles) on August 22, 1963 (his last X-15 flight). This was one of three flights by Walker that achieved altitudes over 50 miles. Walker was killed on June 8, 1966, when his F-104 collided with the XB-70. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of rated thrust (actual thrust reportedly climbed to 60,000 lb). North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. Depending on the mission, the rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 sec of flight. The remainder of the normal 10 to 11 min. flight was powerless and ended with a 200-mph glide landing. Generally, one of two types of X-15 flight profiles was used: a high-altitude flight plan that called for the pilot to maintain a steep rate of climb, or a speed profile that called for the pilot to push over and maintain a level altitude. The X-15 was flown over a period of nearly 10 years--June 1959 to Oct. 1968--and set the world's unofficial speed and altitude records of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7) and 354,200 ft (over 67 mi) in a program to investigate all aspects of piloted hypersonic flight. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights and were manufactured by North American Aviation. X-15-1, serial number 56-6670, is now located at the National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC. North American X-15A-2, serial number 56-6671, is at the United States Air Force Museum, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The X-15-3, serial number 56-6672, crashed on 15 November 1967, resulting in the death of Maj. Michael J. Adams.

  4. 50. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWER MAIN STREET, WITH M.M. WALKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWER MAIN STREET, WITH M.M. WALKER COMPANY WAREHOUSE IN LEFT FOREGROUND AND THOMAS J. MULGREW COMPANY BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Dubuque Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  5. Spacetime emergence of the robertson-walker universe from a matrix model.

    PubMed

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, René; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2007-06-29

    Using a novel, string theory-inspired formalism based on a Hamiltonian constraint, we obtain a conformal mechanical system for the spatially flat four-dimensional Robertson-Walker Universe. Depending on parameter choices, this system describes either a relativistic particle in the Robertson-Walker background or metric fluctuations of the Robertson-Walker geometry. Moreover, we derive a tree-level M theory matrix model in this time-dependent background. Imposing the Hamiltonian constraint forces the spacetime geometry to be fuzzy near the big bang, while the classical Robertson-Walker geometry emerges as the Universe expands. From our approach, we also derive the temperature of the Universe interpolating between the radiation and matter dominated eras. PMID:17678078

  6. Spacetime Emergence of the Robertson-Walker Universe from a Matrix Model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, Rene; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2007-06-29

    Using a novel, string theory-inspired formalism based on a Hamiltonian constraint, we obtain a conformal mechanical system for the spatially flat four-dimensional Robertson-Walker Universe. Depending on parameter choices, this system describes either a relativistic particle in the Robertson-Walker background or metric fluctuations of the Robertson-Walker geometry. Moreover, we derive a tree-level M theory matrix model in this time-dependent background. Imposing the Hamiltonian constraint forces the spacetime geometry to be fuzzy near the big bang, while the classical Robertson-Walker geometry emerges as the Universe expands. From our approach, we also derive the temperature of the Universe interpolating between the radiation and matter dominated eras.

  7. ISS Update: Orion Recovery and Rescue Lead Tom Walker - Duration: 5 minutes, 3 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Tom Walker, Orion Recovery and Rescue Lead, about how the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is being used to train rescue and recovery personnel f...

  8. ISS Update: Astronaut Shannon Walker – 07.17.2012 - Duration: 19 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    In the International Space Station flight control room at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, ISS Update commentator Amiko Kauderer interviewed Shannon Walker, NASA astronaut and Expedition 24 ...

  9. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  10. Conformally Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2015-07-01

    In a Universe where, according to the standard cosmological models, some 97% of the total mass-energy is still ‘missing in action’, it behooves us to spend at least a little effort critically assessing and exploring radical alternatives. Among possible (dare we say plausible), nonstandard but superficially viable models, those spacetimes conformal to the standard Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) class of cosmological models play a very special role—these models have the unique and important property of permitting large non-perturbative geometric deviations from FLRW cosmology without unacceptably distorting the cosmic microwave background. Performing a ‘cosmographic’ analysis (that is, temporarily setting aside the Einstein equations, since the question of whether or not the Einstein equations are valid on galactic and cosmological scales is essentially the same question as whether or not dark matter/dark energy actually exist), and using both supernova data and information about galactic structure, one can nevertheless place some quite significant observational constraints on any possible conformal mode—however, there is still an extremely rich range of phenomenological possibilities for both cosmologists and astrophysicists to explore.

  11. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P.; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. PMID:25392396

  12. Multiple walker recognition using wireless distributed pyro-electric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nanxiang; Hao, Qi

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a wireless distributed pyroelectric sensor system, whose sensing visibilities are modulated by Frensnel lens arrays and coded masks, for multiple human walker recognition. One goal of our research is to make wireless distributed pyroelectric sensor nodes an alternative to the centralized infrared video sensors, with lower cost, lower detectability, lower power consumption and computation, and less privacy infringement. In our previous study, we succeeded in identifying individuals walking along the same path, or just randomly inside a room, with an identification rate higher than 80% for around 10 subjects, only using one wireless sensor node. To improve the identification rate and the number of subjects that can be recognized, one-by-one or simultaneously, we employ multiple sensor nodes to leverage the performance of the distributed sensor system. The fusion of pyroelectric biometrics from multiple nodes is performed at four different levels: sample, feature, score, and decision. The experimental results show that the proposed pyroelectric sensor system has potential to be a reliable biometric system for the verification/identification of a small group of human objects. Its applications include security monitoring, human-machine interfaces, and virtual environments.

  13. Physical Activity, Weight Status, and Neighborhood Characteristics of Dog Walkers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Karen J.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Conway, Terry L.; Sallis, James F.; Saelens, Brian E.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Cain, Kelli

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study examined how demographics, physical activity, weight status, and neighborhood characteristics varied among households with and without dogs. Method Participants aged 20 to 65 years (N = 2199, 52% male, 75% white, Mean age = 45) were recruited from 32 neighborhoods in the Seattle, WA and Baltimore, MD regions during 2002 – 2005. Dog ownership, dog walking, education, height, weight, and family income were self-reported. Minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured objectively by 7-day accelerometry. Results Dog walking was associated with a higher proportion of participants who met national recommendations for MVPA (53%) when compared to those who had but did not walk their dog (33%) and to non-dog owners (46%). There were significantly fewer obese dog walkers (17%) when compared to both owners who did not walk their dogs (28%) and non-owners (22%). Dog owners who walked their dogs were more likely to live in high-walkable neighborhoods when compared to dog owners who did not walk their dogs. Conclusion Dog walking may promote physical activity and contribute to weight control. Dog walking appears to be a mechanism by which residents of high-walkable neighborhoods obtain their physical activity. PMID:18572234

  14. [Accidents with caterpillar Lonomia obliqua (Walker, 1855). An emerging problem].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Matías N; Mignone Chagas, Mariana A; Casertano, Sergio A; Cavagnaro, Luis E; Peichoto, María E

    2015-01-01

    Lonomia obliqua (Walker, 1855) is a moth from the family Saturniidae, widely distributed in tropical rainforests of South America. In its larval stage (caterpillar) it is characterized by bristles that cover the animal's body. These structures are hard and branched spiny evaginations of the cuticle, underneath which a complex mixture of toxic molecules is stored. When spicules are brought into contact with the skin of people, toxins enter passively through the injury, causing not only local but also systemic poisoning (primarily hemorrhagic manifestations). When the whole animal is accidentally crushed, the insect's chitinous bristles are broken and the venomous secretions penetrate the human skin, reaching the blood circulation. Due to the numerous registered cases of erucism in Southern Brazil, the Butantan Institute has produced an antivenom able to neutralize the deleterious effects produced by contact with L. obliqua caterpillar bristles. In Argentina, these kinds of accidents are rare and restricted to the province of Misiones. Taking into account that to date there is no report in this country about clinical cases submitted to a specific treatment (antivenom), our aim is to communicate here six cases of Lonomia caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome that were treated in the Hospital SAMIC of Puerto Iguazú (Misiones, Argentina) during 2014 with the antilonomic serum produced in Brazil. It is worthy to note that all patients evolved favorably within the first few hours, and for this reason, the use of this antivenom is recommended to treat the cases of Lonomia erucism in Argentina. PMID:26502471

  15. Straight strings and Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.G. )

    1992-10-15

    The embeddability of a straight cosmic string in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe is examined. Although previous suggestions that an exact embedding for a string with longitudinal tension equal to energy density is impossible are substantiated, it is shown that the deviations of either the external metric from the exact FRW metric or of the internal structure of the string from the exact tension equals energy density are expected to be very small, of the order of the square of the ratio of the string diameter (or the evacuated shell around the string) to the Hubble radius. Thus the lack of an exact mathematical embedding leads to negligible physical consequences. The problem with solving for an exact embedding of a string in the manner of the Swiss-cheese model is examined in detail, and it is shown that the metric in the evacuated region around the string is unique. That metric is determined to lowest order in the ratio of the evacuated region over the Hubble radius. The implications of this uniqueness for the Swiss-cheese embedding of a string are discussed.

  16. Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

  17. Field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Edwards, N.T.; Huston, M.A.

    1994-10-06

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiments in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee USA to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil moisture is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall precipitation from one treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx} 2,000 subcanopy troughs (0.3 x 5 m) suspended above the forest floor of the dry plots ({approx} 33% of the ground area is covered) and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Percent soil water is being monitored with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both extremely dry and extremely wet conditions. Furthermore, comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil temperature measurements have documented the ability of the experimental design to produce these changes without changing the microclimate of the forest understory.

  18. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. PMID:25392396

  19. Design Principles of DNA Enzyme-Based Walkers: Translocation Kinetics and Photoregulation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Chen, Haorong; Robinson, Heather N; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-07-29

    Dynamic DNA enzyme-based walkers complete their stepwise movements along the prescribed track through a series of reactions, including hybridization, enzymatic cleavage, and strand displacement; however, their overall translocation kinetics is not well understood. Here, we perform mechanistic studies to elucidate several key parameters that govern the kinetics and processivity of DNA enzyme-based walkers. These parameters include DNA enzyme core type and structure, upper and lower recognition arm lengths, and divalent metal cation species and concentration. A theoretical model is developed within the framework of single-molecule kinetics to describe overall translocation kinetics as well as each reaction step. A better understanding of kinetics and design parameters enables us to demonstrate a walker movement near 5 ?m at an average speed of ?1 nm s(-1). We also show that the translocation kinetics of DNA walkers can be effectively controlled by external light stimuli using photoisomerizable azobenzene moieties. A 2-fold increase in the cleavage reaction is observed when the hairpin stems of enzyme catalytic cores are open under UV irradiation. This study provides general design guidelines to construct highly processive, autonomous DNA walker systems and to regulate their translocation kinetics, which would facilitate the development of functional DNA walkers. PMID:26151085

  20. Hydrologic Setting and Conceptual Hydrologic Model of the Walker River Basin, West-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Allander, Kip K.

    2009-01-01

    The Walker River is the main source of inflow to Walker Lake, a closed-basin lake in west-central Nevada. Between 1882 and 2008, agricultural diversions resulted in a lake-level decline of more than 150 feet and storage loss of 7,400,000 acre-ft. Evaporative concentration increased dissolved solids from 2,500 to 17,000 milligrams per liter. The increase in salinity threatens the survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a native species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. This report describes the hydrologic setting of the Walker River basin and a conceptual hydrologic model of the relations among streams, groundwater, and Walker Lake with emphasis on the lower Walker River basin from Wabuska to Hawthorne, Nevada. The Walker River basin is about 3,950 square miles and straddles the California-Nevada border. Most streamflow originates as snowmelt in the Sierra Nevada. Spring runoff from the Sierra Nevada typically reaches its peak during late May to early June with as much as 2,800 cubic feet per second in the Walker River near Wabuska. Typically, 3 to 4 consecutive years of below average streamflow are followed by 1 or 2 years of average or above average streamflow. Mountain ranges are comprised of consolidated rocks with low hydraulic conductivities, but consolidated rocks transmit water where fractured. Unconsolidated sediments include fluvial deposits along the active channel of the Walker River, valley floors, alluvial slopes, and a playa. Sand and gravel deposited by the Walker River likely are discontinuous strata throughout the valley floor. Thick clay strata likely were deposited in Pleistocene Lake Lahontan and are horizontally continuous, except where strata have been eroded by the Walker River. At Walker Lake, sediments mostly are clay interbedded with alluvial slope, fluvial, and deltaic deposits along the lake margins. Coarse sediments form a multilayered, confined-aquifer system that could extend several miles from the shoreline. Depth to bedrock in the lower Walker River basin ranges from about 900 to 2,000 feet. The average hydraulic conductivity of the alluvial aquifer in the lower Walker River basin is 10-30 feet per day, except where comprised of fluvial sediments. Fluvial sediments along the Walker River have an average hydraulic conductivity of 70 feet per day. Subsurface flow was estimated to be 2,700 acre-feet per year through Double Spring. Subsurface discharge to Walker Lake was estimated to be 4,400 acre-feet per year from the south and 10,400 acre-feet per year from the north. Groundwater levels and groundwater storage have declined steadily in most of Smith and Mason Valleys since 1960. Groundwater levels around Schurz, Nevada, have changed little during the past 50 years. In the Whisky Flat area south of Hawthorne, Nevada, agricultural and municipal pumpage has lowered groundwater levels since 1956. The water-level decline in Walker Lake since 1882 has caused the surrounding alluvial aquifer to drain and groundwater levels to decline. The Wabuska streamflow-gaging station in northern Mason Valley demarcates the upper and lower Walker River basin. The hydrology of the lower Walker River basin is considerably different than the upper basin. The upper basin consists of valleys separated by consolidated-rock mountains. The alluvial aquifer in each valley thins or pinches out at the downstream end, forcing most groundwater to discharge along the river near where the river is gaged. The lower Walker River basin is one surface-water/groundwater system of losing and gaining reaches from Wabuska to Walker Lake, which makes determining stream losses and the direction and amount of subsurface flow difficult. Isotopic data indicate surface water and groundwater in the lower Walker River basin are from two sources of precipitation that have evaporated. The Walker River, groundwater along the Wassuk Range, and Walker Lake plot along one evaporation line. Groundwater along th

  1. Glucagon degradation by a product of the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zepp, E.A.

    1986-03-05

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (125-150g) were implanted (im.) with the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. After both 7 and 10 days, plasma levels of glucagon in tumor-bearing rats were approximately half the level seen in control rats (P < 0.01) even though fasting plasma glucose levels were slightly (but not significantly) less in the tumor-bearing rats. To determine if the tumor degrades the hormone, tumor cells were incubated at room temperature with /sup 125/I-glucagon (0.075 ..mu..Ci, 2200 Ci/mmol) in 20mM TRIS-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) with 2.5% bovine serum albumin (total volume of 750 ..mu..l) for 45 min. After incubation with tumor cells, only about 25% of the total radiolabel was TCA-precipitable vs 97% in the control (minus tumor cells) incubations. It also appears that the tumor cells may release a substance which degrades hormone. If tumor cells are preincubated for 60 min at 37/sup 0/ then removed from the medium, the incubation medium contains a factor which degrades subsequently added /sup 125/I-glucagon (57% TCA-precipitable vs 98% in control incubations). That this factor is a protease is suggested by the results of another experiment in which aprotinin (a protease inhibitor, 1 mg/ml), when added along with the labeled glucagon, virtually eliminated degradation by a factor released from the tumor cells (79% TCA-precipitable in the absence of aprotinin vs 94% in its presence and 98% in controls).

  2. Electro-actuated hydrogel walkers with dual responsive legs.

    PubMed

    Morales, Daniel; Palleau, Etienne; Dickey, Michael D; Velev, Orlin D

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli responsive polyelectrolyte hydrogels may be useful for soft robotics because of their ability to transform chemical energy into mechanical motion without the use of external mechanical input. Composed of soft and biocompatible materials, gel robots can easily bend and fold, interface and manipulate biological components and transport cargo in aqueous solutions. Electrical fields in aqueous solutions offer repeatable and controllable stimuli, which induce actuation by the re-distribution of ions in the system. Electrical fields applied to polyelectrolyte-doped gels submerged in ionic solution distribute the mobile ions asymmetrically to create osmotic pressure differences that swell and deform the gels. The sign of the fixed charges on the polyelectrolyte network determines the direction of bending, which we harness to control the motion of the gel legs in opposing directions as a response to electrical fields. We present and analyze a walking gel actuator comprised of cationic and anionic gel legs made of copolymer networks of acrylamide (AAm)/sodium acrylate (NaAc) and acrylamide/quaternized dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA Q), respectively. The anionic and cationic legs were attached by electric field-promoted polyion complexation. We characterize the electro-actuated response of the sodium acrylate hydrogel as a function of charge density and external salt concentration. We demonstrate that "osmotically passive" fixed charges play an important role in controlling the bending magnitude of the gel networks. The gel walkers achieve unidirectional motion on flat elastomer substrates and exemplify a simple way to move and manipulate soft matter devices and robots in aqueous solutions. PMID:24651405

  3. Obituary: Richard L. (Dick) Walker, Jr., 1938-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Jeffrey R.; Mason, Brian

    2005-12-01

    Dick Walker, 67, died 30 March 2005 in Flagstaff, AZ, following a long illness. He was born on 9 March 1938 in Hampton, Iowa and grew up in Waterloo, Iowa. As a child, Dick was fascinated with astronomy and built his own telescope. He saved his pennies and bought and read every book on the subject he could find. He also raised pigeons, naming four of them Hertzsprung, Hoyle, Gamow, and Kron. In 1957, the year Sputnik was launched, Dick began his college studies at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls. In 1959, he transferred to the State University of Iowa (subsequently renamed the University of Iowa) in Iowa City, where he earned a BA degree in astronomy and physics in 1963. He joined the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, where he worked in the Time Service Division for a year before his assignment to the Astrometry and Astrophysics Division. Dick relocated to Flagstaff, AZ, in 1966 to continue his Naval Observatory service at the Flagstaff Station. His retirement in May 1999, ended a thirty-six-year career with USNO. Dick was first and foremost an observational astronomer. From the mid 1960s through the late 1970s, much of Dick's time was devoted to the measurement of binary stars, observing with the 12-inch and 26-inch refractors in Washington and later the 40-inch and 61-inch reflectors in Flagstaff. He also made many trips to Lick Observatory to work with the 36-inch Clark Refractor there. During this time he consulted with Charles Worley, who was observing on the 26-inch, to make sure time was well-spent examining doubles that could not be observed in Washington. This period of observing overlapped with the early years of speckle interferometry, and Dick's observations, made with the largest telescope used for micrometry at the time, were very important for ascertaining the veracity of this new technique. He was a studious and very careful observer of doubles and made over 8,000 measures, resulting in almost 3,000 mean positions. While measuring known systems for orbital analysis, he discovered 22 pairs (mostly additional components to these systems) and moving pairs, and his highlighting the rapid motion of these systems resulted in them being placed on many programs and led to the more definitive orbits of today. As a staff member of the Flagstaff Station, Dick was, for over 30 years, one of the principal observers on the 61-inch parallax program. He also ventured into other areas of astronomy, including planetary systems. He is credited with discovering the moon of Saturn, Epimetheus, in December 1966, with the USNO Flagstaff Station 61-inch Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector. He also obtained photographic plates to determine accurate positions of the outer planets for the Voyager 2 approaches to Uranus in 1986 and Neptune in 1989. It is interesting to note that Dick's career in observational astronomy spanned three different eras of astronomical instrumentation and technique. He began his career doing eyeball astronomy, using a filar micrometer to measure double star separations. Photographic astronomy then became dominant and he took many thousands of plates. During the last ten years of his career, electronic cameras, primarily CCDs, replaced photographic plates. He readily adapted to the changing technologies. A man of many interests, Dick was fascinated by the history of astronomy, especially archeoastronomy, as well as Egyptology. He taught himself the language of hieroglyphics. In 1977, having accumulated several weeks of vacation time, he set off on a trek to walk the Nile for 500 miles from Aswan to Cairo. One night, in the town Asyut along the Nile, he was brought into the police station. The local inhabitants found it hard to credit his story that he was simply on a walk and questioned him as a possible Israeli spy. Following his retirement from the Naval Observatory, Dick consulted in a couple of construction projects. He designed the analemma and the skywalk star fields for the Koch Center for Science, Math, and Technology at Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts. He also consulted with James Turrell, providing astronomical position information for the design of the Roden Crater Project outside of Flagstaff. While he will be remembered for his significant scientific contributions to the field of astronomy, those who knew Dick, both scientists and non-scientists alike, will probably remember him best for his humility, his humanity, and his loyal and abiding friendship. He was a man with a terrific sense of humor and an infectious laugh. It was always an honor and pleasure to be in his company. Richard L. Walker, Jr. is survived by his wife, Patricia, two daughters from his first marriage: Brenda Walker of Las Vegas, NV, and Pamela Hepburn of Holland, OH, as well as four children from Patricia's first marriage: Doug Browning of Lake Havasu City, AZ, Michael Browning of Kingman, AZ, Kim Bructo of Orient, OH, and Jennifer Brown of Lake Havasu City, AZ. He is also survived by ten grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his father Richard, mother Mary, and daughter, Paula Jean Elizabeth Stone.

  4. The fire-walker's high: affect and physiological responses in an extreme collective ritual.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ronald; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Mitkidis, Panagiotis; Reddish, Paul; Tok, Penny; Konvalinka, Ivana; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    How do people feel during extreme collective rituals? Despite longstanding speculation, few studies have attempted to quantify ritual experiences. Using a novel pre/post design, we quantified physiological fluctuations (heart rates) and self-reported affective states from a collective fire-walking ritual in a Mauritian Hindu community. Specifically, we compared changes in levels of happiness, fatigue, and heart rate reactivity among high-ordeal participants (fire-walkers), low-ordeal participants (non-fire-walking participants with familial bonds to fire-walkers) and spectators (unrelated/unknown to the fire-walkers). We observed that fire-walkers experienced the highest increase in heart rate and reported greater happiness post-ritual compared to low-ordeal participants and spectators. Low-ordeal participants reported increased fatigue after the ritual compared to both fire-walkers and spectators, suggesting empathetic identification effects. Thus, witnessing the ritualistic suffering of loved ones may be more exhausting than experiencing suffering oneself. The findings demonstrate that the level of ritual involvement is important for shaping affective responses to collective rituals. Enduring a ritual ordeal is associated with greater happiness, whereas observing a loved-one endure a ritual ordeal is associated with greater fatigue post-ritual. PMID:24586315

  5. Removable cast walker boots yield greater forefoot off-loading than total contact casts

    PubMed Central

    Gutekunst, David J.; Hastings, Mary K.; Bohnert, Kathryn L.; Strube, Michael J.; Sinacore, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated plantar loading has been implicated in the etiology of plantar ulceration in individuals with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Total contact casts and cast walker boots are common off-loading strategies to facilitate ulcer healing and prevent re-ulceration. The purpose of this study was to compare off-loading capabilities of these strategies with respect to plantar loading during barefoot walking. Methods Twenty-three individuals with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and plantar ulceration were randomly assigned to total contact cast (N=11) or removable cast walker boot (N=12). Each subject underwent plantar loading assessment walking barefoot and wearing the off-loading device. Analysis of covariance was used to compare loading patterns in the off-loading devices for the whole foot, hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot while accounting for walking speed and barefoot loading. Findings For the foot as a whole, there were no differences in off-loading between the two techniques. Subjects wearing cast walker boots had greater reductions in forefoot peak pressure, pressure-time integral, maximum force, and force-time integral with respect to barefoot walking. Healing times were similar between groups, but a greater proportion of ulcers healed in total contact casting compared to cast walker boots. Interpretation In subjects with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and plantar ulceration, cast walker boots provided greater load reduction in the forefoot, the most frequent site of diabetic ulceration, though a greater proportion of subjects wearing total contact casts experienced ulcer healing. Taken together, the less effective ulcer healing in cast walker boots despite superior forefoot off-loading suggests an important role for patient compliance in ulcer healing. PMID:21496977

  6. Presence of dynorphin-like immunoreactivity but not opiate binding in Walker-256 tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, H.U.; Conroy, W.G.; Isom, G.E.; Malven, P.V.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1985-07-15

    Walker-256 tumor tissue was removed from rats on day 8 of tumor growth. An acidified methanol extract of the tumor tissue was assayed for immunoreactive (ir) dynorphin-A 1-17 (DYN-17) and ir-dynorphin-A (DYN-8). Levels of ir-DYN-17 and ir-DYN-8 were nearly 4- and 8-fold higher, respectively, in tumors versus normal muscle. However, tumor homogenates did not exhibit specific /sup 3/H-naloxone binding. These results indicate that although the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma may produce opioids, it is unlikely that these ectopic substances have direct opioid actions on the tumor itself. 34 references, 1 figure.

  7. 77 FR 54567 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Requirements for Baby-Bouncers and Walker-Jumpers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 3700), the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC or Commission) published a notice in... COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Requirements for Baby-Bouncers and Walker-Jumpers... baby-bouncers and walker-jumpers in regulations codified at 16 CFR 1500.18(a)(6) and 1500.86(a)(4)....

  8. 77 FR 67811 - Porter-Walker LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Porter-Walker LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Porter-Walker...

  9. Multiple-Replica Strategies for Free-Energy Calculations in NAMD: Multiple-Walker Adaptive Biasing Force and Walker Selection Rules.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Phillips, James C; Schulten, Klaus; Chipot, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    From the most powerful supercomputers to multicore desktops and laptops, parallel computing architectures have been in the mainstream for some time. However, numerical schemes for calculating free energies in molecular systems that directly leverage this hardware paradigm, usually taking the form of multiple-replica strategies, are just now on the cusp of becoming standard practice. Here, we present a modification of the popular molecular dynamics program NAMD that is envisioned to facilitate the use of powerful multiple-replica strategies to improve ergodic sampling for a specific class of free-energy methods known as adaptive biasing force. We describe the software implementation in a so-called multiple-walker context, alongside the interface that makes the proposed approach accessible to the end users. We further evaluate the performance of the adaptive biasing force multiple-walker strategy for a model system, namely, the reversible folding of a short peptide, and show, in particular, in regions of the transition coordinate where convergence of the free-energy calculation is encumbered by hidden barriers, that the multiple-walker strategy can yield far more reliable results in appreciably less real time on parallel architectures, relative to standard, single-replica calculations. PMID:26583211

  10. [Needs, uses, cons-pros, good practices and opportunities about walker in elderly with loss of autonomy].

    PubMed

    Mézière, Anthony; Schonheit, Claire; Moreau, Caroline; Baudry, Elodie; Monié, Marguerite; Piette, François; Curtis, Valentine; Pasqui, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Non-use of the walker may be secondary to an initial inappropriate prescribing, a lack of adequate training, a lack of monitoring and side effects of using. Improving both stability and mobility in users is due to several biomechanical mechanisms. The benefits of walker are: general physiological effects, more confidence, better social life and decrease in the burden of care. The disadvantages of walker are: technical or practical aspects criticized by users, musculoskeletal disorders, delayed reaction time, fall risk and stigma. Few scientific data evaluating the interest of the walker concerning mobility exist, thus recommendations are low grade and are often taken from professional clinical experiences. The choice of technical walking assistance depends on the pathology and biomechanical mechanism. The walker robots are few distributed. PMID:25964157

  11. Walker Diffusion Method for Calculation of Transport Properties of Finite Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, Clinton D

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous medium may be represented by a scalar field of local transport coefficients (e.g., conductivity) or by a resistor network derived from that scalar field. In either case the effective (macroscopic) and local (microscopic) transport properties may be calculated by the walker diffusion method. Some sample calculations for disordered systems are presented to demonstrate the method.

  12. A Linguistic Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in Selected Narratives of Alice Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matunda, Robert Stephen Mokaya

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze rhetorical strategies of Alice Walker in four narratives, namely, "The Color Purple, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and Now Is the Time To Open Your Heart". As such, this study helps to expand the body of investigation relating linguistics to literature and medium

  13. Writing a Rationale for a Controversial Common Reading Book: Alice Walker's "The Color Purple."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Pepper

    1985-01-01

    Offers a rationale that can be used to defend the assignment of Alice Walker's controversial novel for class reading. Indicates four issues that might evoke calls for censorship: (1) subject matter, (2) vocabulary, (3) grammar, and (4) the epistolary form of the work. (RBW)

  14. Promoting Ambulation Responses among Children with Multiple Disabilities through Walkers and Microswitches with Contingent Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Castagnaro, Francesca; Groeneweg, Jop

    2010-01-01

    Children with severe or profound intellectual and motor disabilities often present problems of balance and ambulation and spend much of their time sitting or lying, with negative consequences for their development and social status. Recent research has shown the possibility of using a walker (support) device and microswitches with preferred…

  15. Description of three new species of Arescon Walker (Hymenoptera, Mymaridae) from China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiang-Xiang; Li, Cheng-De; Yang, Jian-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Three new species of Arescon Walker, 1846, Arescon gaoligongensis Jin & Li, sp. n., Arescon sparsiciliatus Jin & Li, sp. n. and Arescon stenopterus Jin & Li, sp. n. are described. A key to the Chinese species is given and photomicrographs are provided to illustrate morphological characters. All the specimens are deposited in the insect collections of Northeast Forestry University, China. PMID:27199596

  16. A systematic study of Ichneumonosoma Meijere, Pelmatops Enderlein, Pseudopelmatops Shiraki and Soita Walker (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four fruit fly genera, Ichneumonosoma Meijere, Pelmatops Enderlein, Pseudopelmatops Shiraki and Soita Walker, were studied and 19 species are recognized. Three new species, S. infuscata Chen et Norrbom n. sp., I. quadripunctata Chen et Freidberg, n. sp. and I. triangularis Chen et Norrbom, n. sp. ar...

  17. 75 FR 35282 - Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Infant Walkers: Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... section 14(a) of the CPSA in a notice published in the Federal Register on February 9, 2009 (74 FR 6396... December 28, 2009, the Commission published a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 68588) revising the... lifting the stay with regard to these CPSC regulations for infant walkers. This notice of requirements...

  18. If the Song Sounds the Same Check for Static: A Reply to Walker and Frimer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The "care challenge" is shown to be both broader and more successful than Walker and Frimer's (this issue, pp. 53-68) critique allows. The main philosophical and psychological tenets of the care challenge foreshadowed the direction of twenty-first century moral psychology.

  19. Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckermann, Martin J.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Schmitt, Regina; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth HC; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul MG

    2015-05-01

    The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of ∼18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker’s momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet.

  20. Variables of the Touch Technique that Influence the Safety of Cane Walkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bongers, Raoul M.; Schellingerhout, Roelef; van Grinswen, Roland; Smitsman, Ad W.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated variables that determined the safety of 15 cane users who were using the touch technique. The results showed that none of the walkers used a touch technique as described and recommended in the literature, that the detection of obstacles was related mainly to the height of the cane tip during the sweep, and that the early…

  1. The Legal Dimension of RTI--Confusion Confirmed: A Response to Walker and Daves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of "Learning Disability Quarterly" (LDQ), Professors Daves and Walker reply to my earlier LDQ article on confusion in the cases and commentary about the legal dimension of RTI. In this brief rejoinder, I show that their reply confirms rather than resolves the confusion in their original commentary in 2010. This persistent problem…

  2. Collateral Damage: Veterans and Domestic Violence in Mari Sandoz's "The Tom-Walker"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    "The Tom-Walker" combines the best of Sandoz's realism with her worst attempts at moralizing. Unable to divine exactly what political configuration right-wing post-World War II sentiments might take, Sandoz nevertheless feared a fascist uprising in this country. Perhaps because these concerns dominated her thoughts at the time, she allowed her…

  3. 75 FR 24753 - The Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, OH; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration The Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, OH; Notice of Negative... the State of Ohio requested administrative reconsideration of the Department's negative determination... workers of the subject firm. The negative determination was signed on January 8, 2010. The...

  4. 21 CFR 890.3790 - Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads. 890.3790 Section 890.3790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3790...

  5. 21 CFR 890.3790 - Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads. 890.3790 Section 890.3790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3790...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3790 - Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads. 890.3790 Section 890.3790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3790...

  7. Variability in the Length and Frequency of Steps of Sighted and Visually Impaired Walkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Sarah J.; Legge, Gordon E.; Kallie, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    The variability of the length and frequency of steps was measured in sighted and visually impaired walkers at three different paces. The variability was low, especially at the preferred pace, and similar for both groups. A model incorporating step counts and step frequency provides good estimates of the distance traveled. Applications to

  8. Statement of Facts for 1977 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Walker Thomas v. Sam Nomad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a civil case over an automobile accident. Walker Thomas is suing Sam Nomad for damages that resulted from a collision, for which both parties blame the other. The handout clarifies the laws and…

  9. High Performance Sustainable School Design: Roy Lee Walker Elementary, McKinney, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHW Group, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This document describes the sustainable features of the Roy Lee Walker Elementary School (Texas), a prototype "Eco Education" school that blends the physical environment with the student learning process while protecting the site. The document also presents the process of integrating sustainability criteria in all phases of the school's life…

  10. 78 FR 37706 - Safety Standards for Infant Walkers and Infant Swings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... for Infant Walkers, with 22 modifications to make the standard more stringent. 75 FR 35266. ASTM..., with two modifications to make the standard more stringent. 77 FR 66703. ASTM notified CPSC that the... adverse comment. See 60 FR 43108 (August 18, 1995). Thus, the Commission is publishing this rule as...

  11. Strengthening of the Walker circulation under globalwarming in an aqua-planet general circulation model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tim; Zhang, Lei; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Most climate models project a weakening of theWalker circulation under global warming scenarios. It is argued, based on a global averaged moisture budget, that this weakening can be attributed to a slower rate of rainfall increase compared to that of moisture increase, which leads to a decrease in ascending motion. Through an idealized aqua-planet simulation in which a zonal wavenumber-1 SST distribution is prescribed along the equator, we find that the Walker circulation is strengthened under a uniform 2-K SST warming, even though the global mean rainfall-moisture relationship remains the same. Further diagnosis shows that the ascending branch of the Walker cell is enhanced in the upper troposphere but weakened in the lower troposphere. As a result, a "double-cell" circulation change pattern with a clockwise (anti-clockwise) circulation anomaly in the upper (lower) troposphere forms, and the upper tropospheric circulation change dominates. The mechanism for the formation of the "double cell" circulation pattern is attributed to a larger (smaller) rate of increase of diabatic heating than static stability in the upper (lower) troposphere. The result indicates that the future change of the Walker circulation cannot simply be interpreted based on a global mean moisture budget argument.

  12. Description of three new species of Arescon Walker (Hymenoptera, Mymaridae) from China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang-Xiang; Li, Cheng-De; Yang, Jian-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of Arescon Walker, 1846, Arescon gaoligongensis Jin & Li, sp. n., Arescon sparsiciliatus Jin & Li, sp. n. and Arescon stenopterus Jin & Li, sp. n. are described. A key to the Chinese species is given and photomicrographs are provided to illustrate morphological characters. All the specimens are deposited in the insect collections of Northeast Forestry University, China. PMID:27199596

  13. Sex Differences in Moral Reasoning: Response to Walker's (1984) Conclusion That There Are None.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumrind, Diana

    1986-01-01

    Takes issue with Lawrence Walker's literature review on developmental and individual differences in moral reasoning which found no consistent evidence for sex differences in moral development. Argues instead that the source and specific nature of these differences have yet to be established. (HOD)

  14. A Linguistic Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in Selected Narratives of Alice Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matunda, Robert Stephen Mokaya

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze rhetorical strategies of Alice Walker in four narratives, namely, "The Color Purple, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and Now Is the Time To Open Your Heart". As such, this study helps to expand the body of investigation relating linguistics to literature and medium…

  15. Origin of the Pinenuts and Other Stories from the Walker River Paiute Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Wuzzie; And Others

    The four stories gathered from Paiute Tribal Elders through the Ethnic Heritage Studies Program have been changed from the original telling insofar as it was necessary to make them suitable to the elementary level. The short stories, meant to be spoken orally, relate how the Walker Lake Paiutes got pinenuts away from the Owyhee area ("Origin of…

  16. An Open Letter to Suzanne deCastell and Tom Walker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assinck, Beverly Belvin

    1993-01-01

    Responds to "Identity, Metamorphosis, and Ethnographic Research: What Kind of Story Is Ways with Words?" by Suzanne deCastell and Tom Walker (1991). Describes the author's reaction to "Ways with Words--Language, Life and Work in Communities and Classrooms" by Shirley Brice Heath (1983). (SLD)

  17. Joseph Walker, a Black Playwright, Exhorts Counselors and Black People to Deal With Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joseph

    1976-01-01

    This is an interview with Joseph Walker, black playwright. He attempts to reflect back to the black community their experience in a white controlled world. In this interview, he discusses his views of the black experience, the pressures on man-woman relationships, and the role of black psychiatry. (NG)

  18. Use of the charcot restraint orthotic walker in treatment of neuropathic foot ulcers: a case series.

    PubMed

    Keast, David H; Vair, Audra H

    2013-12-01

    Although the total contact cast is the criterion standard for the pressure redistribution of challenging foot ulcers, in practice it is not often feasible. The following is a case series that demonstrates an encouraging possibility for the Charcot restraint orthotic walker as a device to be used in more challenging forefoot ulcers. PMID:24253211

  19. 21 CFR 890.3790 - Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads. 890.3790 Section 890.3790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3790...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3790 - Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cane, crutch, and walker tips and pads. 890.3790 Section 890.3790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3790...

  1. Issues in the Effective Use of Walker Problem Behavior Identification Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, John E.; And Others

    The interrater reliability of the Walker Problem Behavior Identification Checklist subscale scores was examined. An attempt was also made to determine whether the background, experience, or training of the rater-teacher influenced the scores given. Two independent raters, the regular classroom teacher and a teacher of the emotionally disturbed,

  2. Cloning, purification and crystallization of a Walker-type Pyrococcus abyssi ATPase family member

    SciTech Connect

    Uhring, Muriel; Bey, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Cavarelli, Jean; Moras, Dino; Poch, Olivier

    2005-10-01

    The Walker-type ATPase PABY2304 of P. abyssi has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from selenomethionine-derivative crystals have been collected to 2.6 Å. The structure has been solved by MAD techniques. Several ATPase proteins play essential roles in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in archaea. Walker-type ATPases are defined by their conserved Walker A and B motifs, which are associated with nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis. A family of 28 ATPase proteins with non-canonical Walker A sequences has been identified by a bioinformatics study of comparative genomics in Pyrococcus genomes. A high-throughput structural study on P. abyssi has been started in order to establish the structure of these proteins. 16 genes have been cloned and characterized. Six out of the seven soluble constructs were purified in Escherichia coli and one of them, PABY2304, has been crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from selenomethionine-derivative crystals using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.41, b = 48.63, c = 108.77 Å, and diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution.

  3. Interinstrument Consistency of the Yamax Digi-Walker Pedometer in Elementary School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Rowe, David A.; Michael, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    A pedometer is a practical, inexpensive tool used to measure physical activity. Bassett et al. (1996) found that interinstrument consistency of the Yamax Digi-Walker was higher than four other pedometers when measuring distance walked in adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interinstrument consistency of the Yamax pedometer in…

  4. 33 CFR 165.102 - Security Zone: Walkers Point, Kennebunkport ME.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone: Walkers Point... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.102...

  5. [Prenatal diagnosis of the Dandy-Walker syndrome using sonography and computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Tölly, E; Ebner, F; Oberbauer, R W

    1984-07-01

    A case of Dandy-Walker-syndrome is presented, comparing the value of sonography and CT in intrauterine diagnosis. Together with a review of the literature of the subject, pathogenesis, morphology and prognosis in regard to the psychomotoric development are discussed. PMID:6431517

  6. GPS constraints on shear accommodation in the northern Walker Lane, western Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    The Walker Lane is a zone of active intracontinental transtension that accommodates approximately 10 mm/yr of right-lateral deformation, up to 20-25% of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. Between Walker Lake and Lake Tahoe, the Walker Lane lacks optimally oriented strike-slip faults to accommodate northwest-directed dextral shear. In this region Quaternary deformation appears to be concentrated in a northwest-trending series of north-striking, normal fault-bounded basins. To address the question of how shear is transferred through this portion of the Walker Lane, we combine GPS data from the University of Nevada, Reno’s semi-continuous MAGNET GPS network with observations from EarthScope’s Plate Boundary Observatory to present a new velocity field for the Walker Lane with an average station spacing of 20 km. Measurements in MAGNET (http://geodesy.unr.edu/networks) began in January 2004 and now provide time series of up to 6 years for the longest running sites and >3 years for all sites. Together with recent improvements in GPS data processing models using the GIPSY-OASIS II software, this allows us to estimate rates with uncertainty well below 1 mm/yr. These recent improvements include the use of reprocessed GPS orbits from the IGS Analysis Center at JPL. Our GPS processing now includes satellite and station antenna calibrations, random-walk tropospheric zenith delay and gradients using the GMF mapping function, second-order ionospheric corrections, global-scale ambiguity resolution using our custom Ambizap software, and our custom Great Basin spatially-filtered reference frame. The velocity solution shows a smooth and continuous increase in shear across the Walker Lane in addition to NW-SE directed extension. We use a block model driven by GPS velocities to estimate the role that vertical axis rotation of fault-bounded blocks and slip on basin-bounding faults play in shear accommodation. The block model also allows us to incorporate published geologic fault slip rates and thus test the compatibility of the available geodetic and geologic datasets for the northern Walker Lane.

  7. Obituary: Alastair Graham Walker Cameron, 1925-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truran, James W.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Cowan, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    Alastair Graham Walker Cameron, one of the most creative and influential astrophysicists of his generation, passed away on 3 October 2005, at the age of 80, at his home in Tucson. Subsequent to his retirement from Harvard University, where he had been a member of the faculty from 1973 through 1999, Cameron remained active as a Senior Research Scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory of the University of Arizona. Cameron had a distinguished career during which he made outstanding contributions both in scientific research and in public service to science. Notable among the latter are the years he spent as Chairman of the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences from 1976 to 1982. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the recipient of a number of awards for his diverse contributions to the sciences, including the J. Lawrence Smith Medal of the National Academy of Sciences in 1988, the Leonard Medal of the American Meteoritical Society in 1994, the Henry Norris Russell Lectureship of the American Astronomical Society in 1997, and the Hans A. Bethe prize of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society for 2006, for outstanding work in nuclear physics and astrophysics. He was enormously active in the organization of conferences and workshops and in an editorial capacity, for a number of journals in astronomy, astrophysics, and space physics. Over the course of his career, he made seminal contributions to such diverse areas of astronomical and astrophysical research as nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, meteoritics, stellar evolution, neutron stars, the origin of the Solar System, the physics of planets and planetary atmospheres, and the origin of the Moon. Born on 21 June 1925 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Cameron received his undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba and his doctorate in nuclear physics from the University of Saskatchewan in 1952. He taught for two years at Iowa State and then spent seven years as a Senior Research Officer at Chalk River. It was from this period that his important early contributions to nuclear astrophysics emerged. His research addressed a broad range of problems concerning the origin of the elements, culminating in the publication in 1957 of a discussion of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis which, together with the paper by E.M. Burbidge, G.F. Burbidge, W.A. Fowler, and F. Hoyle, substantially defined the field of nucleosynthesis as we understand it today. Cameron joined the staff of the NASA Institute for Space Studies in New York and served as a Senior Scientist from 1961 to 1966, then continued on to the Belfer Graduate School of Science of Yeshiva University in New York, prior to moving to Harvard. Working with an increasing number of graduate students and postdocs, Cameron continued his studies in nuclear physics, concentrating on building systematics of nuclear mass formulae, nuclear level densities, thermonuclear reaction rates, and weak interaction rates. These nuclear systematics, coupled to early calculations of supernova explosions, enabled the first detailed numerical investigations of explosive nucleosynthesis from which the identification of 56Ni as the dominant product emerged. During these years, Cameron's research activities and interests expanded considerably to encompass broad areas of space physics, including specifically the origin of the Solar System. Notable here is the significant role he played in the early formulation and development of the impact theory for the origin of the Moon. This theory posits - and early numerical simulations by Cameron and his collaborators confirmed - that the collision of a large, Mars sized object with the Earth early in its history yields debris from which the Moon can coalesce, and can account for both an iron-depleted Moon and the masses and angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system. Cameron was an extremely imaginative and productive scientist whose contributions profoundly influenced many areas of research in what he liked to refer to as cosmogony. The proceedings of the symposium which celebrated his sixtieth birthday were indeed published, at his request, under the title "Cosmogonical Processes." He was also a strong early advocate of distributed computing, as anyone who visited his research office at Harvard will well remember. To those who worked closely with him, as students, postdocs, or colleagues, he will be remembered for his encouragement of young scientists, his enthusiastic acceptance of new ideas, and his pure enjoyment of his science.

  8. Ground reaction force and 3D biomechanical characteristics of walking in short-leg walkers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songning; Clowers, Kurt G; Powell, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Short-leg walking boots offer several advantages over traditional casts. However, their effects on ground reaction forces (GRF) and three-dimensional (3D) biomechanics are not fully understood. The purpose of the study was to examine 3D lower extremity kinematics and joint dynamics during walking in two different short-leg walking boots. Eleven (five females and six males) healthy subjects performed five level walking trials in each of three conditions: two testing boot conditions, Gait Walker (DeRoyal Industries, Inc.) and Equalizer (Royce Medical Co.), and one pair of laboratory shoes (Noveto, Adidas). A force platform and a 6-camera Vicon motion analysis system were used to collect GRFs and 3D kinematic data during the testing session. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate selected kinematic, GRF, and joint kinetic variables (p<0.05). The results revealed that both short-leg walking boots were effective in minimizing ankle eversion and hip adduction. Neither walker increased the bimodal vertical GRF peaks typically observed in normal walking. However, they did impose a small initial peak (<1BW) earlier in the stance phase. The Gait Walker also exhibited a slightly increased vertical GRF during midstance. These characteristics may be related to the sole materials/design, the restriction of ankle movements, and/or the elevated heel heights of the tested walkers. Both walkers appeared to increase the demand on the knee extensors while they decreased the demand of the knee and hip abductors based on the joint kinetic results. PMID:16414263

  9. Active transtensional intracontinental basins: Walker Lane in the western Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, Angela S.; Bursik, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The geometry and dimensions of sedimentary basins within the Walker Lane are a result of Plio-Pleistocene transtensive deformation and partial detachment of the Sierra Nevada crustal block from the North American plate. Distinct morpho-tectonic domains lie within this active transtensive zone. The northeast end of the Walker Lane is partly buried by active volcanism of the southern Cascades, and adjacent basins are filled or poorly developed. To the south, the basin sizes are moderate, 25–45km × 15–10 km, with narrow 8-12km wide mountain ranges mainly oriented N-S to NNE. These basins form subparallel arrays in discrete zones trending about 300° and have documented clockwise rotation. This is succeeded to the south by a releasing stepover domain ∼85-100km wide, where the basins are elongated E-W to ENE, small (∼15-30km long, 5-15km wide), and locally occupied by active volcanic centers. The southernmost part of the Walker Lane is structurally integrated, with high to extreme relief. Adjacent basins are elongate, 50-200km long and ∼5 -20km wide. Variations in transtensive basin orientations in the Walker Lane are largely attributable to variations in strain partitioning. Large basins in the Walker Lane have 2-6km displacement across basin bounding faults with up to 3 km of clastic accumulation based on gravity and drill hole data. The sedimentary deposits of the basins may include interbedded volcanic deposits with bimodal basaltic and rhyolitic associations. The basins may include lacustrine deposits that record a wide range of water chemistry from cold fresh water conditions to saline-evaporative

  10. Late Quaternary seismic stratigraphic framework and paleolimnology of Walker Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friday, M.; Scholz, C. A.; Junium, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Lake deposits can be used to assess past hydrological and atmospheric conditions and aid in understanding regional climate of the western Basin and Range. Walker Lake, Nevada has a maximum water depth of ~35 m and is situated in a half-graben basin that formed during late Cenozoic transtension, in the Walker Lane tectonic belt. Small-scale climatic variations are preserved in the sediments of this hydrologically closed lake basin. Ten Kullenberg sediment cores (~2 to ~10 m in length), and ~300 km of CHIRP seismic reflection data were collected in Walker Lake to assess late-Quaternary stratigraphic framework and paleoclimate history. Core 4A is one of the longest cores acquired (9.19 m) and contains the oldest recovered sediments. Analyses of total inorganic carbon, total organic carbon, carbon and nitrogen abundances, and carbon stable isotopes from core 4A yield a valuable multi-proxy paleoclimate record. This record documents changes in effective moisture in the eastern Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range. Sediments range from laminated to massive mud with three tephra deposits 0.5 - 4 cm thick. Total percentage of calcium carbonate, ranging from 3 to 35%, shows oscillations we interpret to be millennial forcings. The average C/N ratio of core 4A is 7.71 (2.5 - 11.3 range), and the stable carbon isotope measurements range from -21.0 to -25.3‰, and average -23.8‰. At ~3.7 m depth a basin-wide angular unconformity is observed in the seismic data and is also reflected in the geochemical data. An estimated age of this surface, 2000-2500 ka, is consistent with previous interpretations of partial diversion of the Walker River into the Carson sink. A δ13Corganic excursion, -25 to -20.8‰, occurs at the depth of the unconformity. We interpret this to be a result of enhanced deposition of aquatic organic matter during the Walker Lake drawdown. From 3.7 to 7.5 m depth, the carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopes are surprisingly consistent down core and may be the result of protracted stability. Below 7.5 m depth the carbon and nitrogen abundances decrease, as do %CaCO3 and δ13Corganic values. These signatures may reflect past connectivity between Walker Lake and other Lahontan sub-basins. AMS radiocarbon analyses are underway, which will help constrain the paleolimnologic history of the basin.

  11. Birth of a fault: Connecting the Kern County and Walker Pass, California, earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, G.W.; Michael, A.J.; Kellogg, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    A band of seismicity transects the southern Sierra Nevada range between the northeastern end of the site of the 1952 MW (moment magnitude) 7.3 Kern County earthquake and the site of the 1946 MW 6.1 Walker Pass earthquake. Relocated earthquakes in this band, which lacks a surface expression, better delineate the northeast-trending seismic lineament and resolve complex structure near the Walker Pass mainshock. Left-lateral earthquake focal planes are rotated counterclockwise from the strike of the seismic lineament, consistent with slip on shear fractures such as those observed in the early stages of fault development in laboratory experiments. We interpret this seismic lineament as a previously unrecognized, incipient, currently blind, strike-slip fault, a unique example of a newly forming structure.

  12. Sex differences in moral reasoning: response to Walker's (1984) conclusion that there are none.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, D

    1986-04-01

    Data from the Family Socialization and Developmental Competence Project are used to probe Walker's conclusion that there are no sex differences in moral reasoning. Ordinal and nominal nonparametric statistics result in a complex but theoretically meaningful network of relationships among sex, educational level, and Kohlberg stage score level, with the presence and direction of sex differences in stage score level dependent on educational level. The effects on stage score level of educational level and working status are also shown to differ for men and women. Reasons are considered for not accepting Walker's dismissal of studies that use (a) a pre-1983 scoring manual, or (b) fail to control for education. The problems presented to Kohlberg's theory by the significant relationship between educational and stage score levels in the general population are discussed, particularly as these apply to the postconventional level of moral reasoning. PMID:3956321

  13. Schizophrenia-Like Psychosis and Dandy-Walker Variant Comorbidity: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kıvılcım, Yiğit; İzci, Filiz; Semiz, Umit Basar

    2014-01-01

    Dandy-Walker variant is a developmental malformation consisting of cerebellar hypoplasia and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Previous research has proposed a possible role for the cerebellum in cognition and in schizophrenia. In this paper we report a schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder in a 30 year-old woman with Dandy-Walker variant. The patient was treated with risperidone 6 mg/day, biperiden 4 mg/day and risperidone depot 50 mg injections fortnightly, and most of the symptoms were ameliorated within 2 months. The similar cognitive profile to populations with cerebellar pathology and rarity of the condition strongly suggests that there may be direct relationship between cerebellar pathology and appearence of psychotic symptoms. PMID:24605131

  14. Schizophrenia-like psychosis and dandy-walker variant comorbidity: case report.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt Zincir, Selma; Kıvılcım, Yiğit; Izci, Filiz; Semiz, Umit Basar

    2014-01-01

    Dandy-Walker variant is a developmental malformation consisting of cerebellar hypoplasia and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Previous research has proposed a possible role for the cerebellum in cognition and in schizophrenia. In this paper we report a schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder in a 30 year-old woman with Dandy-Walker variant. The patient was treated with risperidone 6 mg/day, biperiden 4 mg/day and risperidone depot 50 mg injections fortnightly, and most of the symptoms were ameliorated within 2 months. The similar cognitive profile to populations with cerebellar pathology and rarity of the condition strongly suggests that there may be direct relationship between cerebellar pathology and appearence of psychotic symptoms. PMID:24605131

  15. Decoherence induced by a chaotic enviroment: A quantum walker with a complex coin

    SciTech Connect

    Ermann, Leonardo; Paz, Juan Pablo; Saraceno, Marcos

    2006-01-15

    We study the differences between the processes of decoherence induced by chaotic and regular environments. For this we analyze a family of simple models that contain both regular and chaotic environments. In all cases the system of interest is a ''quantum walker,'' i.e., a quantum particle that can move on a lattice with a finite number of sites. The walker interacts with an environment which has a D-dimensional Hilbert space. The results we obtain suggest that regular and chaotic environments are not distinguishable from each other in a (short) time scale t*, which scales with the dimensionality of the environment as t*{proportional_to}log{sub 2}(D). However, chaotic environments continue to be effective over exponentially longer time scales while regular environments tend to reach saturation much sooner. We present both numerical and analytical results supporting this conclusion. The family of chaotic evolutions we consider includes the so-called quantum multibaker map as a particular case.

  16. Impulsive Behavior and Recurrent Major Depression Associated with Dandy-Walker Variant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Young Chil; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Reported herein is a case of recurrent major depression with impulse control difficulty in a 33-year-old man with Dandy-Walker variant. He was diagnosed as having major depressive disorder a year before he presented himself to the authors' hospital, and had a history of three-time admission to a psychiatric unit in the previous 12 months. He was readmitted and treated with sodium valporate 1,500 mg/day, mirtazapine 45 mg/day, and quetiapine 800 mg/day during the three months that he was confined in the authors' hospital, and the symptoms were reduced within three months but remained thereafter. This is the only case so far reporting recurrent depression with impulse control difficulty associated with Dandy-Walker variant. This case implies that any cerebellar lesion may cause the appearance of recurrent depression with impulse control difficulty in major depressive disorder. PMID:24302956

  17. ARG-walker: inference of individual specific strengths of meiotic recombination hotspots by population genomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Meiotic recombination hotspots play important roles in various aspects of genomics, but the underlying mechanisms for regulating the locations and strengths of recombination hotspots are not yet fully revealed. Most existing algorithms for estimating recombination rates from sequence polymorphism data can only output average recombination rates of a population, although there is evidence for the heterogeneity in recombination rates among individuals. For genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of recombination hotspots, an efficient algorithm that estimates the individualized strengths of recombination hotspots is highly desirable. Results In this work, we propose a novel graph mining algorithm named ARG-walker, based on random walks on ancestral recombination graphs (ARG), to estimate individual-specific recombination hotspot strengths. Extensive simulations demonstrate that ARG-walker is able to distinguish the hot allele of a recombination hotspot from the cold allele. Integrated with output of ARG-walker, we performed GWAS on the phased haplotype data of the 22 autosome chromosomes of the HapMap Asian population samples of Chinese and Japanese (JPT+CHB). Significant cis-regulatory signals have been detected, which is corroborated by the enrichment of the well-known 13-mer motif CCNCCNTNNCCNC of PRDM9 protein. Moreover, two new DNA motifs have been identified in the flanking regions of the significantly associated SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), which are likely to be new cis-regulatory elements of meiotic recombination hotspots of the human genome. Conclusions Our results on both simulated and real data suggest that ARG-walker is a promising new method for estimating the individual recombination variations. In the future, it could be used to uncover the mechanisms of recombination regulation and human diseases related with recombination hotspots. PMID:26679564

  18. The Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Big Bang Singularities are Well Behaved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2016-01-01

    We show that the Big Bang singularity of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker model does not raise major problems to General Relativity. We prove a theorem showing that the Einstein equation can be written in a non-singular form, which allows the extension of the spacetime before the Big Bang. The physical interpretation of the fields used is discussed. These results follow from our research on singular semi-Riemannian geometry and singular General Relativity.

  19. Exact solutions to Elko spinors in spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.M. Hoff da; Pereira, S.H. E-mail: shpereira@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present exact solutions to the so-called Elko spinors for three models of expanding universe, namely the de Sitter, linear and the radiation type evolution. The study was restricted to flat, homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds. Starting with an Elko spinor we present the solutions for these cases and compare to the case of Dirac spinors. Besides, an attempt to use Elko spinors as a dark energy candidate in the cosmological context is investigated.

  20. Women in History--Madame C. J. Walker 1867-1919

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Germaine W.

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles Madame C. J. Walker. Sarah Breedlove was born on December 23, 1867, the fifth of six children of Owen and Minerva Breedlove. Sarah was the first of the Breedlove children to be born after the end of slavery. Her parents died when she was six or seven years of age. At age fourteen she married Moses McWilliams, who also died in

  1. Women in History--Madame C. J. Walker 1867-1919

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Germaine W.

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles Madame C. J. Walker. Sarah Breedlove was born on December 23, 1867, the fifth of six children of Owen and Minerva Breedlove. Sarah was the first of the Breedlove children to be born after the end of slavery. Her parents died when she was six or seven years of age. At age fourteen she married Moses McWilliams, who also died in…

  2. Can intermittent long-range jumps of a random walker compensate for lethargy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, Mauro; Ahat, Yasin; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    We study the dynamics of a lazy random walker who is inactive for extended times and tries to make up for her laziness with very large jumps. She remains in a condition of rest for a time τ derived from a waiting-time distribution \\psi (\\tau )\\propto 1/\\tau ^{\\mu _{W}}, with μW < 2, thereby making jumps only from time to time from a position x to a position x' of a one-dimensional path. However, when the random walker jumps, she moves by quantities l = |x - x'| derived randomly from a distribution \\pi (l)\\propto 1/l^{\\mu _{\\xi }}, with μξ > 1. The most convenient choice to make up for the random walker laziness would be to select μξ < 3, which in the ordinary case μW > 2 would produce Lévy flights with scaling δ = 1/(μξ - 1) and consequently super-diffusion. According to the Sparre Andersen theorem, the distribution density of the first times to go from xA to xB > xA has the inverse power law form f(t)\\propto \\frac{1}{t^{\\mu _{_{FPT}}}} with μFPT = μSA = 1.5. We find the surprising result that there exists a region of the phase space (μξ, μW) with μW < 2, where μFPT > μSA and the lazy walker compensates for her laziness. There also exists an extended region breaking the Sparre Andersen theorem, where the lazy runner cannot compensate for her laziness. We make conjectures concerning the possible relevance of this mathematical prediction, supported by numerical calculations, for the problem of animal foraging.

  3. Motility of Colonial Choanoflagellates and the Statistics of Aggregate Random Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkegaard, Julius B.; Marron, Alan O.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-01-01

    We illuminate the nature of the three-dimensional random walks of microorganisms composed of individual organisms adhered together. Such aggregate random walkers are typified by choanoflagellates, eukaryotes that are the closest living relatives of animals. In the colony-forming species Salpingoeca rosetta we show that the beating of each flagellum is stochastic and uncorrelated with others, and the vectorial sum of the flagellar propulsion manifests as stochastic helical swimming. A quantitative theory for these results is presented and species variability discussed.

  4. Toward improving our understanding of climate change during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly using hydrologic models of the Walker River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Barth, C.; Bassett, S.; Garner, C.

    2013-12-01

    Walker lake, similar to other closed basin lakes in the mid-latitudinal dry lands, serves as an indicator of past climate change before the hydrologic system of the basin was altered through agricultural activities beginning in the mid to late 1800s. There have been a number of studies aimed at collecting a diverse set of proxy data to better understand the lake level fluctuations of Walker Lake during the Holocene. These data sets include biological proxies such as diatom, ostracod, pollen sources, isotope dating of sediment cores, sediment chemistry, paleomagnetic susceptibility, the dating of tufa deposits and analysis of stromatolites from the lake shores, near lake tree stump and shrub evidence, and geomorphological evidence of various lake stages. Lake level chronologies have been developed and reported based on this diverse set of proxy information. In this study, a simple, spatially distributed hydrologic model was applied to the Walker River Basin from the headwaters in the Sierra Nevada to the terminus at Walker Lake to simulate the watershed and lake responses associated with changes in precipitation and temperature. Experiments were conducted with the model to better understand how the climate might have been different (compared with the modern 30-year normal values) during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA). The model was also used to investigate previously reported hypotheses that at times during or near the MCA, the Walker River may have been diverted through Adrian Gap into the Carson Sink leading to decreasing lake levels and even desiccation of Walker Lake. Our modeling results indicate that the MCA low stand lake levels can be sustained with 60% to 70% of modern precipitation and that it is unlikely that the low levels of Walker Lake during the MCA were a result of a breakout of the Walker River at Adrian Gap.

  5. Sequence walkers: a graphical method to display how binding proteins interact with DNA or RNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T D

    1997-01-01

    A graphical method is presented for displaying how binding proteins and other macromolecules interact with individual bases of nucleotide sequences. Characters representing the sequence are either oriented normally and placed above a line indicating favorable contact, or upside-down and placed below the line indicating unfavorable contact. The positive or negative height of each letter shows the contribution of that base to the average sequence conservation of the binding site, as represented by a sequence logo. These sequence 'walkers' can be stepped along raw sequence data to visually search for binding sites. Many walkers, for the same or different proteins, can be simultaneously placed next to a sequence to create a quantitative map of a complex genetic region. One can alter the sequence to quantitatively engineer binding sites. Database anomalies can be visualized by placing a walker at the recorded positions of a binding molecule and by comparing this to locations found by scanning the nearby sequences. The sequence can also be altered to predict whether a change is a polymorphism or a mutation for the recognizer being modeled. PMID:9336476

  6. Reliability of the Walker Cranial Nonmetric Method and Implications for Sex Estimation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cheyenne J; Garvin, Heather M

    2016-05-01

    The cranial trait scoring method presented in Buikstra and Ubelaker (Standards for data collection from human skeletal remains. Fayetteville, AR: Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series No. 44, 1994) and Walker (Am J Phys Anthropol, 136, 2008 and 39) is the most common nonmetric cranial sex estimation method utilized by physical and forensic anthropologists. As such, the reliability and accuracy of the method is vital to ensure its validity in forensic applications. In this study, inter- and intra-observer error rates for the Walker scoring method were calculated using a sample of U.S. White and Black individuals (n = 135). Cohen's weighted kappas, intraclass correlation coefficients, and percentage agreements indicate good agreement between trials and observers for all traits except the mental eminence. Slight disagreement in scoring, however, was found to impact sex classifications, leading to lower accuracy rates than those published by Walker. Furthermore, experience does appear to impact trait scoring and sex classification. The use of revised population-specific equations that avoid the mental eminence is highly recommended to minimize the potential for misclassifications. PMID:27122414

  7. Neurovascular Coupling is Impaired in Slow Walkers: The MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Sorond, Farzaneh A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Galica, Andrew; Moscufo, Nicola; Serrador, Jorge M.; Iloputaife, Ike; Egorova, Svetlana; Dell'Oglio, Elisa; Meier, Dominik; Newton, Elizabeth; Milberg, William P.; Guttmann, Charles; Lipsitz, Lewis A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neurovascular coupling may be involved in compensatory mechanisms responsible for preservation of gait speed in elderly people with cerebrovascular disease. Our study examines the association between neurovascular coupling in the middle cerebral artery and gait speed in elderly individuals with impaired cerebral vasoreactivity. Methods Twenty-two fast and 20 slow walkers in the lowest quartile of cerebral vasoreactivity were recruited from the MOBILIZE Boston Study. Neurovascular coupling was assessed in bilateral middle cerebral arteries by measuring cerebral blood flow during the N-Back Task. Cerebral white matter hyperintensities were measured for each group using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Neurovascular coupling was attenuated in slow compared to fast walkers (2.8% [CI95%: −0.9–6.6] vs. 8.2% [CI95%: 4.7–11.8]; p=0.02). The odds of being a slow walker were 6.4 (CI95%: 1.7–24.9, p=0.007) if there was a high burden of white matter hyperintensity, however, this risk increased to 14.5 (CI95%: 2.3–91.1, p=0.004) if neurovascular coupling was also attenuated. Interpretation Our results suggest that intact neurovascular coupling may help preserve mobility in elderly people with cerebral microvascular disease. PMID:21674588

  8. Two-walker discrete-time quantum walks on the line with percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigovacca, L.; di Franco, C.

    2016-02-01

    One goal in the quantum-walk research is the exploitation of the intrinsic quantum nature of multiple walkers, in order to achieve the full computational power of the model. Here we study the behaviour of two non-interacting particles performing a quantum walk on the line when the possibility of lattice imperfections, in the form of missing links, is considered. We investigate two regimes, statical and dynamical percolation, that correspond to different time scales for the imperfections evolution with respect to the quantum-walk one. By studying the qualitative behaviour of three two-particle quantities for different probabilities of having missing bonds, we argue that the chosen symmetry under particle-exchange of the input state strongly affects the output of the walk, even in noisy and highly non-ideal regimes. We provide evidence against the possibility of gathering information about the walkers indistinguishability from the observation of bunching phenomena in the output distribution, in all those situations that require a comparison between averaged quantities. Although the spread of the walk is not substantially changed by the addition of a second particle, we show that the presence of multiple walkers can be beneficial for a procedure to estimate the probability of having a broken link.

  9. Two-walker discrete-time quantum walks on the line with percolation.

    PubMed

    Rigovacca, L; Di Franco, C

    2016-01-01

    One goal in the quantum-walk research is the exploitation of the intrinsic quantum nature of multiple walkers, in order to achieve the full computational power of the model. Here we study the behaviour of two non-interacting particles performing a quantum walk on the line when the possibility of lattice imperfections, in the form of missing links, is considered. We investigate two regimes, statical and dynamical percolation, that correspond to different time scales for the imperfections evolution with respect to the quantum-walk one. By studying the qualitative behaviour of three two-particle quantities for different probabilities of having missing bonds, we argue that the chosen symmetry under particle-exchange of the input state strongly affects the output of the walk, even in noisy and highly non-ideal regimes. We provide evidence against the possibility of gathering information about the walkers indistinguishability from the observation of bunching phenomena in the output distribution, in all those situations that require a comparison between averaged quantities. Although the spread of the walk is not substantially changed by the addition of a second particle, we show that the presence of multiple walkers can be beneficial for a procedure to estimate the probability of having a broken link. PMID:26912102

  10. Two-walker discrete-time quantum walks on the line with percolation

    PubMed Central

    Rigovacca, L.; Di Franco, C.

    2016-01-01

    One goal in the quantum-walk research is the exploitation of the intrinsic quantum nature of multiple walkers, in order to achieve the full computational power of the model. Here we study the behaviour of two non-interacting particles performing a quantum walk on the line when the possibility of lattice imperfections, in the form of missing links, is considered. We investigate two regimes, statical and dynamical percolation, that correspond to different time scales for the imperfections evolution with respect to the quantum-walk one. By studying the qualitative behaviour of three two-particle quantities for different probabilities of having missing bonds, we argue that the chosen symmetry under particle-exchange of the input state strongly affects the output of the walk, even in noisy and highly non-ideal regimes. We provide evidence against the possibility of gathering information about the walkers indistinguishability from the observation of bunching phenomena in the output distribution, in all those situations that require a comparison between averaged quantities. Although the spread of the walk is not substantially changed by the addition of a second particle, we show that the presence of multiple walkers can be beneficial for a procedure to estimate the probability of having a broken link. PMID:26912102

  11. Lifelong exposure to dietary fish oil alters macrophage responses in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Bonatto, Sandro J R; Folador, Alessandra; Aikawa, Júlia; Yamazaki, Ricardo K; Pizatto, Nathalia; Oliveira, Heloisa H P; Vecchi, Rodrigo; Curi, Rui; Calder, Philip C; Fernandes, Luiz C

    2004-01-01

    Supplementation of the diet with fish oil (FO) decreases growth of the Walker 256 tumor and decreases the cachexia associated with tumor-bearing. The mechanisms by which FO inhibits tumor growth and cachexia are unknown. Macrophages are very important in host defence against tumors since they produce several anti-tumor agents which in turn have been shown to be modified by dietary FO, but rarely in the setting of tumor bearing and never in relation to lifelong exposure. In this study, we compared the effects of supplementation of the diet of pregnant and lactating rats and subsequent supplementation of the offspring with coconut fat or FO on macrophage activities involved in anti-tumor defence. FO supplementation was able to induce an increase in phagocytosis, in O2-, H2O2, nitric oxide, and TNF-alpha production by macrophages and in lysosomal volume in non-tumor-bearing rats. However, phagocytosis, production of O2- and H2O2 and lysosomal volume were not affected by the FO diet when rats were bearing tumors, although nitric oxide production was higher in these animals. It appears that tumor bearing activates the innate immune system and that dietary FO has little effect on innate immunity in the presence of Walker 256 tumors. Thus, it is still unclear how FO decreases the growth of Walker 256 tumors and the associated cachexia. PMID:15919370

  12. HitWalker2: visual analytics for precision medicine and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K.; Wilmot, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The lack of visualization frameworks to guide interpretation and facilitate discovery is a potential bottleneck for precision medicine, systems genetics and other studies. To address this we have developed an interactive, reproducible, web-based prioritization approach that builds on our earlier work. HitWalker2 is highly flexible and can utilize many data types and prioritization methods based upon available data and desired questions, allowing it to be utilized in a diverse range of studies such as cancer, infectious disease and psychiatric disorders. Availability and implementation: Source code is freely available at https://github.com/biodev/HitWalker2 and implemented using Python/Django, Neo4j and Javascript (D3.js and jQuery). We support major open source browsers (e.g. Firefox and Chromium/Chrome). Contact: wilmotb@ohsu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Additional information/instructions are available at https://github.com/biodev/HitWalker2/wiki PMID:26708334

  13. Quantifying Walker River stream temperature variability using distributed temperature sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. J.; Null, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nevada's Walker River historically supported Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi), although today Lahontan cutthroat trout are listed as a federally threatened species and limited to isolated headwater reaches. Much of the lower Walker River is impaired for native aquatic species because of elevated stream temperatures and nutrients, and low streamflow and dissolved oxygen levels. We deployed a 1 kilometer single-ended fiber-optic Raman spectra distributed temperature sensing (DTS) cable in the Wabuska drain outlet and surrounding Walker River for one week in June 2014 to improve fine-scale understanding of stream temperatures. These data identify and quantify thermal variability of micro-habitat that standard temperature monitoring and modeling do not capture. Results indicate stream temperatures exceeded 26°C and a return flow channel exhibited greater thermal variability with both warmer daytime temperatures and cooler nighttime temperatures - possibly providing more complex thermal habitat during some flow conditions. Fine-scale DTS data complement ongoing stream temperature modeling by bounding thermal variability within model reaches that are 250 m long and where stream temperature is assumed to be well-mixed within each reach.

  14. Upper-Ocean Heat Balance Processes and the Walker Circulation in CMIP5 Model Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, C. C.; Lyon, B.; Ricciardulli, L.

    2012-12-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains as to the importance of mechanisms governing decadal and longer variability of the Walker Circulation, its connection to the tropical climate system, and prospects for tropical climate change in the face of anthropogenic forcing. Most contemporary climate models suggest that in response to elevated CO2 and a warmer but more stratified atmosphere, the required upward mass flux in tropical convection will diminish along with the Walker component of the tropical mean circulation as well. Alternatively, there is also evidence to suggest that the shoaling and increased vertical stratification of the thermocline in the eastern Pacific will enable a muted SST increase there-- preserving or even enhancing some of the dynamical forcing for the Walker cell flow. Over the past decade there have been observational indications of an acceleration in near-surface easterlies, a strengthened Pacific zonal SST gradient, and globally-teleconnected dislocations in precipitation. But is this evidence in support of an "ocean dynamical thermostat process" posited to accompany anthropogenic forcing, or just residual decadal fluctuations associated with variations in warm and cold ENSO events and other stochastic forcing? From a modeling perspective we try to make headway on this question by examining zonal variations in surface energy fluxes and dynamics governing tropical upper ocean heat content evolution in the WCRP CMIP5 model projections. There is some diversity among model simulations; for example, the CCSM4 indicates net ocean warming over the IndoPacific region while the CSIRO model concentrates separate warming responses over the central Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. The models, as with observations, demonstrate strong local coupling between variations in column water vapor, downward surface longwave radiation and SST; but the spatial patterns of changes in the sign of this relationship differ among models and, for models as a whole, with observations. Our analysis focuses initially on probing the inter-model differences in energy fluxes / transports and Walker Circulation response to forcing. We then attempt to identify statistically the El Nino- / La Nina-related ocean heat content variability unique to each model and regress out the associated energy flux, ocean heat transport and Walker response on these shorter time scales for comparison.

  15. Upper-Ocean Heat Balance Processes and the Walker Circulation in CMIP5 Model Projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, C.; Lyon, B.; Ricciardulli, L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains as to the importance of mechanisms governing decadal and longer variability of the Walker Circulation, its connection to the tropical climate system, and prospects for tropical climate change in the face of anthropogenic forcing. Most contemporary climate models suggest that in response to elevated CO2 and a warmer but more stratified atmosphere, the required upward mass flux in tropical convection will diminish along with the Walker component of the tropical mean circulation as well. Alternatively, there is also evidence to suggest that the shoaling and increased vertical stratification of the thermocline in the eastern Pacific will enable a muted SST increase there-- preserving or even enhancing some of the dynamical forcing for the Walker cell flow. Over the past decade there have been observational indications of an acceleration in near-surface easterlies, a strengthened Pacific zonal SST gradient, and globally-teleconnected dislocations in precipitation. But is this evidence in support of an ocean dynamical thermostat process posited to accompany anthropogenic forcing, or just residual decadal fluctuations associated with variations in warm and cold ENSO events and other stochastic forcing? From a modeling perspective we try to make headway on this question by examining zonal variations in surface energy fluxes and dynamics governing tropical upper ocean heat content evolution in the WCRP CMIP5 model projections. There is some diversity among model simulations; for example, the CCSM4 indicates net ocean warming over the IndoPacific region while the CSIRO model concentrates separate warming responses over the central Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. The models, as with observations, demonstrate strong local coupling between variations in column water vapor, downward surface longwave radiation and SST; but the spatial patterns of changes in the sign of this relationship differ among models and, for models as a whole, with observations. Our analysis focuses initially on probing the inter-model differences in energy fluxes / transports and Walker Circulation response to forcing. We then attempt to identify statistically the El Nino- / La Nina-related ocean heat content variability unique to each model and regress out the associated energy flux, ocean heat transport and Walker response on these shorter time scales for comparison to that of the anthropogenic signals.

  16. Limitations of child injury data from the CPSC's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System: the case of baby walker related data.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H. B.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) is a primary source for children's consumer product injury surveillance data in the US. Differing interpretations of the emergency department based NEISS baby walker data by various parties prompted this detailed examination, reclassification, and analysis of the NEISS data to explain these discrepancies. METHODS: Case selection was performed by searching the NEISS 1982-91 database for the baby walker product code and various text strings for children less than 24 months old. False negative and false positive cases were identified and reclassified. Adjusted population rates were computed and the types and locations of hospitals contributing to the sample were examined. RESULTS: One per cent false positive and 4% false negative misclassification rates were observed. In 1991, two children's hospitals reported 14% of the baby walker related injuries, though these hospitals made up just 2% of the sample frame. Through random allocation, one state currently contains four acute care hospitals and the only two children's hospitals reporting to the NEISS system. These six hospitals contributed 18% of the walker cases whereas the state represents only 3% of the US infant population. CONCLUSIONS: Misclassification in NEISS baby walker reports is minimal, with false negatives outweighing false positives. For trend analysis of product related injuries at the frequency of occurrence observed for baby walkers, NEISS suffers from low sensitivity due to sampling error. For children's injuries, NEISS' estimates have been affected by children's hospitals coming in and out of the sample and currently reflects a random geographic imbalance because one state contributes both of the reporting children's hospitals. To overcome these problems improved multiple product coding, a unique baby walker code, and stratification of children's hospitals in an enlarged NEISS sample is recommended. PMID:9346058

  17. Siting of Large Volcanic Centers at Releasing Fault Stepovers, Walker Lane Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, C.

    2011-12-01

    The transtensional eastern boundary of the Sierran microplate (Walker Lane rift) represents the northernmost extension of the Gulf of California rift, and it forms an onland analog in several ways. It formed at the same time (about 12 Ma), by a similar mechanism: transtension within the thermally- and structurally-weakened axis of a subduction-related arc. The two segments show similar structural trends: NE oblique slip normal faults (Walker Lane) or seafloor spreading centers (Gulf of California), connected by long NNW strike slip faults. However, the process of continental rupture has not yet been completed in the Walker Lane, so the structural controls on transtensional rift volcanism can be directly observed on land. The Walker Lane segment also differs from the Gulf of California segment by showing a northward time-transgressive transition from arc rift magmatism to continental rift magmatism, following the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ). The effect of MTJ migration has been previously recognized in arc to rift geochemical transitions, but not in the timing of development of large arc volcanic fields. For the past ~11-12 Ma, the biggest arc rift and continental rift volcanic centers or fields have been sited on major releasing fault stepovers on the trailing edge of the Sierran microplate. Additionally, major transtensional arc rift centers or fields appear to have progressively migrated northward with time, in advance of the TMJ, although gaps exist in detailed map and age data. These large transtensional arc volcanic fields/centers are, from south to north (oldest to youngest): (1) A ~11 - 9 Ma arc volcanic field that lies along the Sierran crest and rangefront in the Sonora Pass - Bridgeport area of the central Sierra Nevada. Its transtensional structural setting and its size (~ 50 X 50 km) had not been appreciated prior to my field efforts with students, although a modest-sized caldera in this volcanic field had long been recognized ("Little Walker caldera" of Priest, 1979). At this center, "flood andesites" were erupted from 6-8 km long fault-controlled fissures and ponded in grabens, to thicknesses of 400 m, with single flows up to 25 km3 in volume. Total volume is difficult to estimate due to Pleistocene glacial erosion, but it is >200 km3. (2) The Ebbetts Pass center, which formed at ~5-4 Ma (dating in progress with Paul Renne, BGC). This large center had not been recognized prior to our mapping; it appears to be a complex central volcano with a large footprint (>16 km diameter, glacially eroded). Its original volume may be better estimated after its collapse deposits are mapped and dated, because it appears to have repeatedly collapsed into range-front half grabens. (3) The active Lassen arc volcanic center, which formed at <3.5 Ma in a transtensional environment "favorable to the development of major volcanic centers" (Muffler et al., 2008, EOS 8-53). The active Long Valley rift volcanic field south of the MTJ also formed in a releasing bend in the Walker Lane transtensional rift (since ~4.5 Ma); the structure of this field (Jayko and Bursik, in press) is remarkably similar to that of the ~11-9 Ma arc rift volcanic field at Sonora Pass (Busby, in press; both in Tectonics of Sedimentary Basins, Wiley Blackwell, 2012).

  18. An appraisal of the water resources of the Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Donald H.

    1980-01-01

    Increasing interest in expanding the livestock and agricultural operations on the Walker River Indian Reservation, Nev., has prompted the Walker River Paiute Tribe to have the present and available water resources of the reservation appraised and proposed sites for new wells evaluated. Flow of the Walker River into the reservation averages about 113,000 acre-feet a year. Of this amount, about 42,000 acre-feet is used on the reservation, recharging the gound-water system and supplying irrigation water for alfalfa and pasture crops. The water quality of the river water is well suited for these purposes, and the possibility of expanding surface-water use exists. A mathematical model of the ground-water system was constructed to test various assumptions about recharge and discharge rates. The model generated water-level contours that agreed reasonably well with measured water levels, median deviation was 12 feet. With additional data , the model could be used in the future to test the feasibility of evapotranspiration salvage at the seven proposed sites for new stock and irrigation wells. The primary users of ground water on the reservation are phreatophytes and playa surfaces. They allow ground water to be lost to evaporation. About 19,000 acre-feet per year is lost through this mechanism. Domestic and livestock uses account for only about 250 acre-feet per year. Total recharge to the ground-water system amounts to about 30 ,000 acre-feet per year, and the possibility of more extensive use of ground water on the reservation exists. Quality of the ground water in most areas is suitable for all intended purposes. (USGS)

  19. Optimal search strategies of space-time coupled random walkers with finite lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, D.; Abad, E.; Méndez, V.; Yuste, S. B.; Lindenberg, K.

    2015-05-01

    We present a simple paradigm for detection of an immobile target by a space-time coupled random walker with a finite lifetime. The motion of the walker is characterized by linear displacements at a fixed speed and exponentially distributed duration, interrupted by random changes in the direction of motion and resumption of motion in the new direction with the same speed. We call these walkers "mortal creepers." A mortal creeper may die at any time during its motion according to an exponential decay law characterized by a finite mean death rate ωm. While still alive, the creeper has a finite mean frequency ω of change of the direction of motion. In particular, we consider the efficiency of the target search process, characterized by the probability that the creeper will eventually detect the target. Analytic results confirmed by numerical results show that there is an ωm-dependent optimal frequency ω =ωopt that maximizes the probability of eventual target detection. We work primarily in one-dimensional (d =1 ) domains and examine the role of initial conditions and of finite domain sizes. Numerical results in d =2 domains confirm the existence of an optimal frequency of change of direction, thereby suggesting that the observed effects are robust to changes in dimensionality. In the d =1 case, explicit expressions for the probability of target detection in the long time limit are given. In the case of an infinite domain, we compute the detection probability for arbitrary times and study its early- and late-time behavior. We further consider the survival probability of the target in the presence of many independent creepers beginning their motion at the same location and at the same time. We also consider a version of the standard "target problem" in which many creepers start at random locations at the same time.

  20. Synthesis of benzoxazole derivatives of honokiol as insecticidal agents against Mythimna separata Walker.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel benzoxazole compounds derived from a naturally occurring neolignan honokiol were prepared. Their insecticidal activity was tested against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata Walker) in vivo. Most of the tested derivatives exhibited more potential insecticidal activity than their precursor honokiol at the concentration of 1mg/mL. Especially compound 6e, containing 4-acetyloxyphenyl groups at the C8 and C8' positions, displayed the most potent insecticidal activity with the final mortality rate of 62.1%. PMID:25872985

  1. Insight into reduction of obacunone, and their ester derivatives as insecticidal agents against Mythimna separata Walker.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Ding, Guodong; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Here we have prepared a series of ester compounds of obacunone, a naturally occurring limonoid, isolated from plants such as Citrus and Dictamnus angustifolius. Their insecticidal activity was evaluated at 1 mg/mL against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata Walker), a typical lepidopteran pest. When obacunone reacted with NaBH?, the ratio of two reduction products, C7?-hydroxyobacunone (2) and C7?-hydroxyobacunone (3), was related to the reaction mixing solvents. C7?-Propionyloxybacunone (4b) and C7?-(n)heptanoyloxybacunone (5g) exhibited the more promising insecticidal activity than their precursor obacunone and toosendanin. PMID:25465171

  2. Local inhomogeneities in a Robertson-Walker background. I. General framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, K.

    1980-09-15

    A complete generalization of the ''Swiss cheese'' type of locally inhomogeneous cosmologies is given. Neither the explicity form of the spherically symmetric interior metric nor the spatial curvature and equation of state of the Robertson-Walker background is restricted a priori. The history, mass, and mass growth rate of any timelike inhomogeneity is developed in terms of a single function characteristic of the inhomogeneity. Recent results which have generalized the standard ''Swiss cheese'' case of a Vaidra interior metric follow immediately from the framework given here.

  3. A hydrochemical reconnaissance study of the Walker River basin, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Spencer, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    During 1975 and 1976, a large number of water and sediment samples were collected from the Walker River Basin. Additional surface water samples were collected during 1980 and 1981. Data are given herein for chemical analyses of snowmelt, tributary, river, spring, well, lake, reservoir, lake sediment pore fluid, tufa, lake and river sediment samples. These data provide the basis for consideration of processes which govern the chemical evolution of large closed basin hydrologic systems in the Basin and Range Province of the Southwestern United States.

  4. Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models do not require zero active mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Young; Lasenby, Anthony N.; Hobson, Michael P.

    2016-04-01

    The Rh = ct cosmological model has received considerable attention in recent years owing to claims that it is favoured over the standard Λ cold dark mater (ΛCDM) model by most observational data. A key feature of the Rh = ct model is that the zero active mass condition ρ + 3p = 0 holds at all epochs. Most recently, Melia (2016b) has claimed that this condition is a requirement of the symmetries of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. We demonstrate that this claim is false and results from a flaw in the logic of Melia's argument.

  5. Computation of partially invariant solutions for the Einstein Walker manifolds' identifying equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadjafikhah, Mehdi; Jafari, Mehdi

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, partially invariant solutions (PISs) method is applied in order to obtain new four-dimensional Einstein Walker manifolds. This method is based on subgroup classification for the symmetry group of partial differential equations (PDEs) and can be regarded as the generalization of the similarity reduction method. For this purpose, those cases of PISs which have the defect structure δ=1 and are resulted from two-dimensional subalgebras are considered in the present paper. Also it is shown that the obtained PISs are distinct from the invariant solutions that obtained by similarity reduction method.

  6. Analysis of Confined Random Walkers with Applications to Processes Occurring in Molecular Aggregates and Immunological Systems.

    PubMed

    Chase, Matthew; Spendier, Kathrin; Kenkre, V M

    2016-03-31

    Explicit solutions are presented in the Laplace and time domains for a one-variable Fokker-Planck equation governing the probability density of a random walker moving in a confining potential. Illustrative applications are discussed in two unrelated physical contexts: quantum yields in a doped molecular crystal or photosynthetic system, and the motion of signal receptor clusters on the surface of a cell encountered in a problem in immunology. An interesting counterintuitive effect concerning the consequences of confinement is found in the former, and some insights into the driving force for microcluster centralization are gathered in the latter application. PMID:26885727

  7. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant

    PubMed Central

    Gathwala, Geeta; Silayach, Joginder; Bhakhari, Bhanu Kiran; Narwal, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature. PMID:24891907

  8. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, Geeta; Silayach, Joginder; Bhakhari, Bhanu Kiran; Narwal, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature. PMID:24891907

  9. Motility of Colonial Choanoflagellates and the Statistics of Aggregate Random Walkers.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Julius B; Marron, Alan O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2016-01-22

    We illuminate the nature of the three-dimensional random walks of microorganisms composed of individual organisms adhered together. Such aggregate random walkers are typified by choanoflagellates, eukaryotes that are the closest living relatives of animals. In the colony-forming species Salpingoeca rosetta we show that the beating of each flagellum is stochastic and uncorrelated with others, and the vectorial sum of the flagellar propulsion manifests as stochastic helical swimming. A quantitative theory for these results is presented and species variability discussed. PMID:26849616

  10. Unitary vector fields are Fermi-Walker transported along Rytov-Legendre curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crasmareanu, Mircea; Frigioiu, Camelia

    2015-07-01

    Fix ξ a unitary vector field on a Riemannian manifold M and γ a non-geodesic Frenet curve on M satisfying the Rytov law of polarization optics. We prove in these conditions that γ is a Legendre curve for ξ if and only if the γ-Fermi-Walker covariant derivative of ξ vanishes. The cases when γ is circle or helix as well as ξ is (conformal) Killing vector filed or potential vector field of a Ricci soliton are analyzed and an example involving a three-dimensional warped metric is provided. We discuss also K-(para)contact, particularly (para)Sasakian, manifolds and hypersurfaces in complex space forms.

  11. A tropical - extratropical cloud albedo control on the warm pool, cold tongue, Walker circulation complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burls, Natalie; Fedorov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    What determines the strength of the warm pool, cold tongue, and Walker circulation (WCWC) within the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere system is a central question in tropical climate dynamics. Using a comprehensive coupled model (CESM) we demonstrate how the reflectivity of extratropical, as well as tropical, clouds plays a central role in setting the WCWC strength. In particular, we show that the gradient in cloud albedo between the tropics and mid-latitudes (Δα) sets the mean east-west SST gradient in the equatorial Pacific. Our experiments reveal a near linear dependence between Δα and the warm pool to cold tongue temperature gradient, which is also seen to hold across the CMIP5 preindustrial control simulations. This relationship is critically dependent on the existence of the oceanic bridge (the oceanic Subtropical Cells), as well as atmospheric coupling between the tropics and mid-latitudes. We explain the close relation between the two variables using an energy balance model incorporating the essential dynamics of the warm pool, cold tongue Walker circulation complex and the influence of the extratropics.

  12. NetWalker: a contextual network analysis tool for functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Functional analyses of genomic data within the context of a priori biomolecular networks can give valuable mechanistic insights. However, such analyses are not a trivial task, owing to the complexity of biological networks and lack of computational methods for their effective integration with experimental data. Results We developed a software application suite, NetWalker, as a one-stop platform featuring a number of novel holistic (i.e. assesses the whole data distribution without requiring data cutoffs) data integration and analysis methods for network-based comparative interpretations of genome-scale data. The central analysis components, NetWalk and FunWalk, are novel random walk-based network analysis methods that provide unique analysis capabilities to assess the entire data distributions together with network connectivity to prioritize molecular and functional networks, respectively, most highlighted in the supplied data. Extensive inter-operability between the analysis components and with external applications, including R, adds to the flexibility of data analyses. Here, we present a detailed computational analysis of our microarray gene expression data from MCF7 cells treated with lethal and sublethal doses of doxorubicin. Conclusion NetWalker, a detailed step-by-step tutorial containing the analyses presented in this paper and a manual are available at the web site http://netwalkersuite.org. PMID:22732065

  13. Analysis of growth directions of columnar stromatolites from Walker Lake, western Nevada.

    PubMed

    Petryshyn, V A; Corsetti, F A

    2011-09-01

    Samples of digitate, branching, columnar stromatolites were collected from the steep sides and near horizontal top of four in situ boulders located on the southwestern side of Walker Lake, Nevada, to test the widely held assumption that stromatolite column formation represents a phototropic response. We would predict that the columns on the steeply dipping sides of the boulder would bend upwards toward the light during growth if phototropism was significant during stromatolite morphogenesis. Angle of growth measurements on >300 stromatolites demonstrate that the stromatolites grew nearly normal to their growth surface, regardless of the inclination of their growth surface. No significant differences in the distribution of growth angles between north-, south-, east-, or west-facing samples were observed, and stromatolite lamina thickness did not systematically vary with position on the boulder. The lack of a strong phototropic response does not rule out a biological origin for the Walker Lake structures, but it does suggest that phototropic growth was not a dominant factor controlling stromatolite morphogenesis in these stromatolites and that column formation cannot be uniquely attributed as a phototropic response in stromatolites. It is interesting to note that the morphology of the stromatolites on the top of the boulder is identical to stromatolites on the steep sides. Stromatolite morphogenetic models that predict branching typically require a vertically directed sedimentary component, a feature that would have likely affected the stromatolites on the tops of the boulders, but not the sides, suggesting that other factors may be important in stromatolite morphogenesis. PMID:21884363

  14. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4.

    PubMed

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  15. Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker displays inhibition on hepatocellular carcinoma through regulating cell growth and metastasis signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhan, Yingzhuan; Zhang, Dongdong; Dai, Bingling; Ma, Weina; Qi, Junpeng; Liu, Rui; He, Langchong

    2014-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are responsible for most cancer patients' deaths. Here, we report that eupolyphaga sinensis walker has an essential role in resisting hepatocellular carcinoma growth and metastasis. Compared with proliferation, colony formation, transwell assay and transplantable tumor in nude mouse in vitro and vivo, eupolyphaga sinensis walker extract (ESWE) showed good inhibition on the SMMC-7721 cell growth and metastasis. Using genome-wide microarray analysis, we found the down-regulated growth and metastasis factors, and selected down-regulated genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. Knockdown of a checkpoint PKCβ by siRNA significantly attenuated tumor inhibition and metastasis effects of ESWE. Moreover, our results indicate ESWE inhibits HCC growth by not only downregulating the signaling of PKCβ, Akt, m-TOR, Erk1/2, MEK-2, Raf and JNK-1, but also increasing cyclin D1 protein levels and decreasing amount of cyclin E, cyclin B1 and cdc2 of the cycle proteins. At the same time, ESWE reduced MMP2, MMP9 and CXCR4, PLG, NFκB and P53 activities. Overall, our studies demonstrate that ESWE is a key factor in growth and metastasis signaling inhibitor targeting the PKC, AKT, MAPK signaling and related metastasis signaling, having potential in cancer therapy. PMID:24980220

  16. Heat balance and isotopic composition in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) of a mock- walker circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Z.; Blossey, P. N.; Romps, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Cloud-resolving model simulations over a large-scale gradient in sea surface temperature (SST), dubbed a mock "Walker" circulation, connects the convection over warm SSTs to the subsiding flow over cooler SSTs and provides a framework for exploring the effects of tropical convection and the large-scale circulation on the TTL. The focus of the present work is on a series of simulations in this framework, performed using the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM, Khairoutdinov & Randall 2003) in two-dimensional domains with widths of up to 8192 km, horizontal grid sizes of 1-2 km, and vertical grid sizes of 300-400 m in the tropopause layer. A reverse circulation above the mock-Walker circulation in the troposphere is found, and its effect on the maintenance of the TTL is explored. In addition, simulations that include stable water isotopes (HDO and H218O) of water vapor and all hydrometeors (cloud water, cloud ice, rain, snow and graupel) and their microphysical interactions and fractionation are detailed. The roles of fast (convection) and slow (advection) processes in fixing the fractionation of water vapor in the TTL is explored.

  17. New perspectives on quaternary faulting in the southern Walker Lane, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Reheis, M.C.; Noller, J.S.

    1987-12-31

    A preliminary survey of aerial photographs of the southern Walker Lane began in late 1986. The purpose of this survey is to determine the nature and scope of future studies required to ascertain whether the apparent concentration of Quaternary faults in and near the Nevada Test Site is real or is simply a result of the greater effort invested in mapping Quaternary deposits in that area, and determine whether faults in the southern Walker Lane are active and could produce significant earthquakes. The survey is focused on the area extending south from Lone Mountain to Pahrump Valley and east from the Furnace Creek fault zone to an irregular line passing through the Cactus Range and Pahute Mesa. Lineaments and scraps were identified on stereopairs of black-and-white aerial photographs at scales of 1:80,000 or 1:60,000. The lineaments and and scarps were plotted on 1:24,000- and 1:62,500-scale topographic maps using a PG-2 plotter, and were color-coded according to distinctness and occurrence in Quaternary or Tertiary deposits (age assignments based on appearance in aerial photographs and on existing geologic maps). Additional lineaments identified on the topographic maps were also plotted. Areas of particular interest were selected for more detailed study using larger-scale aerial photographs. Most of the lineaments and scraps identified in the survey, although referred to as faults in this paper, have not been checked in the field. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Changes in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen in Forests of Walker Branch Watershed 1972-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Jr, Donald E; Johnson, Dale W.; Trettin, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Changes in soil C and N concentrations and contents in four samplings during a 32-yr period on Walker Branch watershed in Tennessee were determined and compared with previously measured C and N fluxes and with changes in ecosystem C and N pools during this period. Soils showed significant increases in C and N concentrations in surface horizons from 1972 to 2004, and most of this increase occurred between 1972 and 1982. A previously observed decline in soil C and N contents between 1982 and 1993 was reversed in 2004 such that the latter increased to near 1982 values. The changes in soil C content could be approximately accounted for by previously measured litterfall and soil CO{sub 2}-C fluxes. Changes in soil N could not be accounted for by leaching, increments in vegetation, or by laboratory bias, changes during sample storage, or reasonable estimates of field sampling errors. We conclude that, although vegetation C and N pools increased steadily during the sampling period in most cases, changes in soil C and N pools on Walker Branch watershed are highly variable in both space and time, and there has been no unidirectional trend during the time period of this study.

  19. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  20. Distribution of the time at which N vicious walkers reach their maximal height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambeau, Joachim; Schehr, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    We study the extreme statistics of N nonintersecting Brownian motions (vicious walkers) over a unit time interval in one dimension. Using path-integral techniques we compute exactly the joint distribution of the maximum M and of the time τM at which this maximum is reached. We focus in particular on nonintersecting Brownian bridges (“watermelons without wall”) and nonintersecting Brownian excursions (“watermelons with a wall”). We discuss in detail the relationships between such vicious walkers models in watermelon configurations and stochastic growth models in curved geometry on the one hand and the directed polymer in a disordered medium (DPRM) with one free end point on the other hand. We also check our results using numerical simulations of Dyson’s Brownian motion and confront them with numerical simulations of the polynuclear growth model (PNG) and of a model of DPRM on a discrete lattice. Some of the results presented here were announced in a recent letter [J. Rambeau and G. Schehr, Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/91/60006 91, 60006 (2010)].

  1. Accommodation of missing shear strain in the Central Walker Lane, western North America: Constraints from dense GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Jayne M.; Hammond, William C.; Kreemer, Corné; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    We present 264 new interseismic GPS velocities from the Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada Transtension (MAGNET) and continuous GPS networks that measure Pacific-North American plate boundary deformation in the Central Walker Lane. Relative to a North America-fixed reference frame, northwestward velocities increase smoothly from ∼4 mm/yr in the Basin and Range province to 12.2 mm/yr in the central Sierra Nevada resulting in a Central Walker Lane deformation budget of ∼8 mm/yr. We use an elastic block model to estimate fault slip and block rotation rates and patterns of deformation from the GPS velocities. Right-lateral shear is distributed throughout the Central Walker Lane with strike-slip rates generally <1.5 mm/yr predicted by the block model, but extension rates are highest near north-striking normal faults found along the Sierra Nevada frontal fault system and in a left-stepping, en-echelon series of asymmetric basins that extend from Walker Lake to Lake Tahoe. Neotectonic studies in the western Central Walker Lane find little evidence of strike-slip or oblique faulting in the asymmetric basins, prompting the suggestion that dextral deformation in this region is accommodated through clockwise block rotations. We test this hypothesis and show that a model relying solely on the combination of clockwise block rotations and normal faulting to accommodate dextral transtensional strain accumulation systematically misfits the GPS data in comparison with our preferred model. This suggests that some component of oblique or partitioned right-lateral fault slip is needed to accommodate shear in the asymmetric basins of the western Central Walker Lane. Present-day clockwise vertical axis rotation rates in the Bodie Hills, Carson Domain, and Mina Deflection are between 1-4°/Myr, lower than published paleomagnetic rotation rates, suggesting that block rotation rates have decreased since the Late to Middle Miocene.

  2. Reaction diffusion dynamics and the Schryer-Walker solution for domain walls of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguria, R. D.; Depassier, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of the equation obtained by Schryer and Walker for the motion of domain walls. The reduced equation is a reaction diffusion equation for the angle between the applied field and the magnetization vector. If the hard-axis anisotropy Kd is much larger than the easy-axis anisotropy Ku, there is a range of applied fields where the dynamics does not select the Schryer-Walker solution. We give an analytic expression for the speed of the domain wall in this regime and the conditions for its existence.

  3. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  4. Cenozoic evolution of the central Walker Lane Belt, west-central Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronis, Michael S.

    This dissertation is a collection of four papers that investigate deformation along the North America/Pacific plate boundary, geomagnetic field behavior, and aspects of volcanism in the western part of the Basin and Range Province. Active deformation along the America/Pacific plate boundary is distributed eastward across a wide zone of the western margin of the North American plate, from the San Andreas Fault eastward into the western Basin and Range province an area referred to as the Walker Lane Belt. Chapter three and four investigate aspects of deformation that has been transferred inboard of the continental plate boundary since the mid-Cenozoic inception of the system by investigating a key areas of the central Walker Lane Belt, west-central Nevada (Mina Deflection and southwest Silver Peak Range), where a significant component of the residual strain is being distributed. Deformation in these two areas is being accommodated along a system of late Cenozoic faults with strain partitioned into components of extension, strike slip faulting, and rotation of crustal blocks between the fault systems in the region. The results of this study allow for an assessment of late Tertiary deformation, which leads to a better understanding of the kinematics of deformation in this important part of the Walker Lane Belt. Chapter two investigates the transport direction of the Candelaria pyroclastic sequence by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) technique. The AMS data are spatially variable across the region and indicate variable transport directions of the three regionally extensive ignimbrite deposits. The AMS fabric data indicate that the Candelaria pyroclastic sequence was erupted from distinct source areas likely separated by several kilometers. Chapter one investigates unusual geomagnetic field behavior at 25.7 Ma and 23.8 Ma preserved in volcanic rocks in the Mina Deflection. Paleomagnetic data indicate that parts of two transitional field records or reversal excursions are recorded. The observation that the virtual paleomagnetic poles (VGP) maintained a preferred location during separate high amplitude events supports the hypothesis that preferred VPG clusters and thus persistent non-dipole field components can factor into the behavior of the geomagnetic field during full reversals or reversal excursions.

  5. Fostering Locomotor Behavior of Children with Developmental Disabilities: An Overview of Studies Using Treadmills and Walkers with Microswitches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Manfredi, Francesco; Putignano, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Basili, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of studies using programs with treadmills or walkers with microswitches and contingent stimulation to foster locomotor behavior of children with developmental disabilities. Twenty-six studies were identified in the period 2000-2008 (i.e., the period in which research in this area has actually taken shape).…

  6. Impact of Favorite Stimuli Automatically Delivered on Step Responses of Persons with Multiple Disabilities during Their Use of Walker Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Campodonico, Francesca; Piazzolla, Giorgia; Scalini, Lorenza; Oliva, Doretta

    2005-01-01

    Favorite stimuli were automatically delivered contingent on the performance of steps by two persons (a boy and a woman) with multiple disabilities during their use of support walker devices. The study lasted about 4 months and was carried out according to a multiple baseline design across participants. Recording concerned the participants'…

  7. Life table studies of rachiplusia nu (guenée) and chrysodeixis (= pseudoplusia) includens (Walker) (lepidoptera: noctuidae) on artificial diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rachiplusia nu (Guenée) and Chrysodeixis (= Pseudoplusia) includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are two economically important species in soybean in northern Argentina. Life cycle, reproductive and population parameters of R. nu and C. includens reared on artificial diet were determined under ...

  8. Confirmation of the Old World species Phricanthes flexilineana (Walker) in the New World tropics (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae: Phricanthini)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old World species Phricanthes flexilinena (Walker) is reported from Costa Rica and Panama for the first time, confirming a nearly century-old report that the species occurs in the New World (i.e., Guyana). Two new larval host plants are reported for the species in Costa Rica: Tetracera volubilis...

  9. "It's Not so Much a Job but a Relationship": A Response to Romer and Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, John

    2013-01-01

    Romer and Walker's "Appreciative Inquiry," which obtained input from 16 capable personal assistants, challenges some influential assumptions about personal assistance and opens a way to think about the demanding work of developing capable and committed personal assistants. Attempts to depersonalize the relationship between people

  10. 75 FR 49517 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Walker Ridge Wind Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Ridge Wind Project, Lake and Colusa Counties, CA Agency: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... the Draft EIS. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments related to the Walker Ridge Wind Project by any of... applicant, AltaGas Renewable Energy Pacific, Inc., has requested a right-of-way (ROW) to construct...

  11. 75 FR 19880 - Safety Zone; BW PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... safety zone around the FPSO significantly reduces the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases of... center point. The safety zone will reduce significantly the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases... PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico in the Federal Register (74...

  12. There Is a Difference between Living in a Dream and Living a Dream: A Response to Romer and Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strully, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a response to Romer and Walker from two distinct perspectives: the field of developmental disabilities and a parent of children with developmental disabilities. Jeffrey Strully describes his current role managing a moderate-sized agency in Los Angeles that provides individualized and personalized supports as well as his work…

  13. Description of a new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Bernardo A.; Janzen, Daniel H.; WinnieHallwachs; J.BollingSullivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker are described from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala. Images of males and females and their genitalia are provided. Locality information and distribution maps for Costa Rica and for Guatemala are included. The biology and phylogeny of Idalus are discussed. PMID:23730178

  14. "It's Not so Much a Job but a Relationship": A Response to Romer and Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, John

    2013-01-01

    Romer and Walker's "Appreciative Inquiry," which obtained input from 16 capable personal assistants, challenges some influential assumptions about personal assistance and opens a way to think about the demanding work of developing capable and committed personal assistants. Attempts to depersonalize the relationship between people…

  15. Renormalizability of the functional Schroedinger picture in Robertson--Walker space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O. ); Pi, S.; Samiullah, M.

    1989-07-01

    We study free and self-interacting scalar quantum field theories in a flat Robertson-Walker metric in the functional Schroedinger picture. We discuss Schroedinger picture quantization, relating it to conventional Heisenberg picture quantization. For the interacting theory, we introduce the time-dependent Gaussian approximation to study time evolution of pure and mixed states and we establish renormalizability of the approximation. We also study the question of computing a finite, renormalized energy-momentum tensor for both the free and the interacting theory in the Gaussian appproximation. Using the adiabatic expansion, we show that the entire subtration necessary to make the the energy-momentum tensor finite in the free theory can be written in terms of covariantly conserved tensors. We further show that the same subtraction is sufficient to make the energy-momentum tensor finite in the Gaussian approximation for the interacting theory provided that the mass and coupling constants are renromalized. {copyright} 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  16. The collapse of voids in a Roberston-Walker universe with nonzero spatial curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, M. K.; Chaudhuri, S.; Banerji, S.

    2000-06-01

    We consider the model of a spherical void (or its precursor) with heat conducting perfect fluid in Region I with Maiti metric (1982) surrounded by a spherical shell filled with radiation (Region II) having Vaidya metric. The combination is embedded in Robertson-Walker (RW) Universe in Region III. Earlier, Mandal and Banerji (1998) took RW Universe with zero spatial curvature and showed that to an observer, a little away from the boundary in Region III, the void appears to collapse provided the arrow of time is future directed in all the regions. In this paper we show that the same result holds also for the case of non-zero spatial curvature of Region III. The rate of collapse is the fastest for k = +1, moderate for k = 0, and the slowest for k = -1.

  17. A Review of the Genus Miresa Walker in China (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Sheng; Solovyev, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    Eight species of the genus Miresa Walker are recognized in China including two new species, M. fangae Wu & Solovyev and M. polargenta Wu & Solovyev, described herein. M. burmensis Hering species is reported for the first time in China. The M. argentifera kwangtungensis Hering, 1931 taxon is raised to full specific status. The lectotypes are designated for the following 5 taxa: M. bracteata Butler, 1880 (♂, Natural History Museum, London); M. fulgida Wileman, 1910 (♂, Natural History Museum, London); M. bracteata var. orientis Strand, 1915 (♂, Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie, Leiden); M. argentifera kwangtungensis Hering, 1931 (♂, Zoologisches Museum der Humboldt Universität zu Berlin) and M. urga Hering, 1933 (♂, Zoologisches Museum der Humboldt Universität zu Berlin). The photographs of moths and their genitalia are given, a key to the Chinese species of the genus is provided, and the distributional maps are also given. PMID:21529254

  18. Collineations of (2+1)-Dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camci, Ugur

    2004-10-01

    Conformal Killing and Ricci collineation equations for (2+1)-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetimes are solved. These spacetimes are classified according to their Ricci conformal collineations (RCCs) and Ricci collineations (RCs). In the non-degenerate and degenerate cases of the Ricci tensor (the cases det(Rab) ≠ 0 and det(Rab) = 0, respectively), the general forms of the vector fields generating RCCs and RCS are obtained. When the Ricci tensor is degenerate, the special cases are classified and it is shown that there are many cases of RCCs and RCs with infinite degrees of freedom. Furthermore, it is found that when the Ricci tensor is non-degenerate, the groups of RCCs and RCs are finite-dimensional, and we have always 10-parameter group of RCCs and 6-parameter group of RCs which are the maximal possible dimension for three-dimensional spacetime manifold. The results obtained are compared with conformal Killing vectors and Killing vectors.

  19. Interactions of ozone and antineoplastic drugs on rat lung fibroblasts and Walker rat carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, D.G.; Morgan, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Cultured rat lung fibroblasts (F-cells) and Walker rat carcinoma cells (WRC-cells) labeled with /sup 51/Cr were exposed to the following antitumor drugs alone or with O/sub 3/: carmustine (BCNU), doxorubicin (Dox), cisplatin (CPt), mitomycin C (Mit C) or vitamin K/sub 3/ (Vit K). Release of /sup 51/Cr (cell injury) was greater for F-cells than WRC-cells with any single treatment. Pretreatment with any drug (400 microM), except for Vit K with WRC-cells, did not significantly increase O/sub 3/-induced loss of /sup 51/Cr. Co-exposure of F-cells to drugs and O/sub 3/ resulted in a marked potentiation of O/sub 3/-induced injury with Vit K, and an inhibition with Dox.

  20. Effects of field interactions upon particle creation in Robertson-Walker universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrell, N. D.; Davies, P. C. W.; Ford, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    Particle creation due to field interactions in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe is investigated. A model in which pseudoscalar mesons and photons are created as a result of their mutual interaction is considered, and the energy density of created particles is calculated in model universes which undergo a bounce at some maximum curvature. The free-field creation of non-conformally coupled scalar particles and of gravitons is calculated in the same space-times. It is found that if the bounce occurs at a sufficiently early time the interacting particle creation will dominate. This result may be traced to the fact that the model interaction chosen introduces a length scale which is much larger than the Planck length.

  1. Large Scale Dynamics of the Persistent Turning Walker Model of Fish Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Motsch, Sébastien

    2008-06-01

    This paper considers a new model of individual displacement, based on fish motion, the so-called Persistent Turning Walker (PTW) model, which involves an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process on the curvature of the particle trajectory. The goal is to show that its large time and space scale dynamics is of diffusive type, and to provide an analytic expression of the diffusion coefficient. Two methods are investigated. In the first one, we compute the large time asymptotics of the variance of the individual stochastic trajectories. The second method is based on a diffusion approximation of the kinetic formulation of these stochastic trajectories. The kinetic model is a Fokker-Planck type equation posed in an extended phase-space involving the curvature among the kinetic variables. We show that both methods lead to the same value of the diffusion constant. We present some numerical simulations to illustrate the theoretical results.

  2. "It feels good to be measured": clinical role-play, Walker Percy, and the tingles.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitin K

    2013-01-01

    A large online community has recently formed around autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), a pleasant and poorly understood somatic reaction to specific interpersonal triggers. Its web-based manifestations include a variety of amateur videos designed to elicit the reaction, many of which feature protracted imitations of a clinician's physical exam. This analysis considers through a literary lens the proximity of this phenomenon to clinical diagnostics, focusing in particular on characterizations of spiritual isolation elaborated in Love in the Ruins (1971), the third novel by physician-writer Walker Percy (1916-1990). Within this speculative framework, the tendency to derive pleasure from clinical milieus, real or constructed, may be interpreted as a quality particular to the postmodern psyche. Viewing web-based clinical role-play in light of Percy's writing also underscores the possibility that routine diagnostic assessments may have independent therapeutic implications. PMID:24375123

  3. Associative learning of Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera:Pteromalidae) to methyldisulfanylmethane.

    PubMed

    Frederickx, Christine; Verheggen, François J; Brostaux, Yves; Haubruge, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Traditional methods of volatile detection used by police typically consist of reliance on canine olfaction. However, dogs have some limitations such as cost of training and time of conditioning. The possibility of using parasitic wasps for detecting explosives and narcotics has been developed. Moreover, wasps are cheap to produce and can be conditioned with impressive speed for a specific chemical detection task. We examined the ability of Nasonia vitripennis Walker to learn and respond to methyldisulfanylmethane (DMDS), a volatile discriminator of cadaver. The training aimed to form an association between an unconditioned stimulus (pupae) and the conditioned stimulus (odor source). After the training, the time spent by conditioned wasps in the DMDS chamber was measured. Statistical analysis showed that the increasing concentrations involved an increase in the time spent in the chamber containing DMDS. This study indicates that N. vitripennis can respond to DMDS, which provide further support for its development as a biological sensor. PMID:24313637

  4. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Bo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hui-Xian; Shen, Wei-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Jin-E; Meng, Zhi-Qi

    2015-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which is one of the serious cereal pests in Asia and Australia. The circular genome of 15,332 bp in length contains 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and a non-coding A+T-rich region. Its gene content and order are typical of lepidopteran mitochondrial genomes described to date. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with an ATN codon except for cox1 and nad1, which use CGA and TTG as their start codon, respectively. Ten PCGs use complete stop codon TAA, whereas three PCGs end with single T. The A+T-region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 374 bp. The mitochondrial genome sequence benefits future studies of molecular phylogenetics and pest control. PMID:24409861

  6. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, D.C.; Orr, F.W.; Shiu, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, the authors evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-(/sup 3/H)P in Hanks balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-(/sup 3/H)P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP.

  7. Assessment of Bathymetry and Sediment Accumulation of Walker Lake, PA with Multiple Frequency GPR Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhab, A.; Booterbaugh, A.; Beren, M.

    2012-12-01

    Silting within all man-made reservoirs, can be a major problem. Exploring bathymetry with electromagnetic prospection tools is one way to identify the magnitude of sediment accumulation in lakes and reservoirs. In this study, the bathymetry and sediment accumulation of Walker Lake, PA was explored via multi-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. Walker Lake is located on the North Branch Middle Creek, which is a tributary to Middle Creek within the Susquehanna River basin. The technique developed in this study included two antennas positioned on a medium size inflatable boat towed by a 14' flat-bottom Jon Boat. Both 400 and 100 MHz antennas were deployed and sediment thickness and distribution throughout the lake were identified. A total of eighteen transects were taken along the entire length of the lake. A new method with multiple approaches including RADAN 7, GPR Viewer, SAS 9.1.3 and MATLAB was developed to generate three-Dimensional and contour surface of the pre-1971 Topography and bathymetry based on GPR reflection readings. As a result, depth, accumulation and rate of sedimentation in the lake were successfully measured. The lake was found to vary between 0.5 to 9 meters in depth. Sediment accumulation and distribution were calculated from the difference between the surveyed bathymetry and the 1971 pre-existent landscape topography. Sediment was found to accumulate thickest within the old channel of Middle Creek however, the bulk of the sediment volume lied outside this channel. Sediment deposition accumulates mainly upstream near the inlet to the lake and gradually decreases toward the dam inversely proportional to the depth of the lake.

  8. 1989 Walker Branch Watershed Surveying and Mapping Including a Guide to Coordinate Transformation Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, S.

    1991-01-01

    Walker Branch Watershed is a forested, research watershed marked throughout by a 264 ft grid that was surveyed in 1967 using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10) coordinate system. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) prepared a contour map of the watershed in 1987, and an ARC/INFO{trademark} version of the TVA topographic map with the X-10 grid superimposed has since been used as the primary geographic information system (GIS) data base for the watershed. However, because of inaccuracies observed in mapped locations of some grid markers and permanent research plots, portions of the watershed were resurveyed in 1989 and an extensive investigation of the coordinates used in creating both the TVA map and ARC/INFO data base and of coordinate transformation procedures currently in use on the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducted. They determined that the positional errors resulted from the field orientation of the blazed grid rather than problems in mapmaking. In resurveying the watershed, previously surveyed control points were located or noted as missing, and 25 new control points along the perimeter roads were surveyed. In addition, 67 of 156 grid line intersections (pegs) were physically located and their positions relative to mapped landmarks were recorded. As a result, coordinates for the Walker Branch Watershed grid lines and permanent research plots were revised, and a revised map of the watershed was produced. In conjunction with this work, existing procedures for converting between the local grid systems, Tennessee state plane, and the 1927 and 1983 North American Datums were updated and compiled along with illustrative examples and relevant historical information. Alternative algorithms were developed for several coordinate conversions commonly used on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  9. Movement strategies and sensory reweighting in tandem stance: differences between trained tightrope walkers and untrained subjects.

    PubMed

    Honegger, F; Tielkens, R J M; Allum, J H J

    2013-12-19

    Does skill with a difficult task, such as tightrope walking, lead to improved balance through altered movement strategies or through altered weighting of sensory inputs? We approached this question by comparing tandem stance (TS) data between seven tightrope walkers and 12 untrained control subjects collected under different sensory conditions. All subjects performed four TS tasks with eyes open or closed, on a normal firm or foam surface (EON, ECN, EOF, ECF); tightrope walkers were also tested on a tightrope (EOR). Head, upper trunk and pelvis angular velocities were measured with gyroscopes in pitch and roll. Power spectral densities (PSDs) ratios, and transfer function gains (TFG) between these body segments were calculated. Center of mass (CoM) excursions and its virtual time to contact a virtual base of support boundary (VTVBS) were also estimated. Gain nonlinearities, in the form of decreased trunk to head and trunk to pelvis PSD ratios and TFGs, were present with increasing sensory task difficulty for both groups. PSD ratios and TFGs were less in trained subjects, though, in absolute terms, trained subjects moved their head, trunk, pelvis and CoM faster than controls, and had decreased VTVBS. Head roll amplitudes were unchanged with task or training, except above 3Hz. CoM amplitude deviations were not less for trained subjects. For the trained subjects, EOR measures were similar to those of ECF. Training standing on a tightrope induces a velocity modification of the same TS movement strategy used by untrained controls. More time is spent exploring the limits of the base of support with an increased use of fast trunk movements to control balance. Our evidence indicates an increased reliance on neck and pelvis proprioceptive inputs. The similarity of TS on foam to that on the tightrope suggests that the foam tasks are useful for effective training of tightrope walking. PMID:24090964

  10. The Silver Peak Volcanic Center: Shoshonitic Volcanism in the Walker Lane, Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. T.; Zhou, M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Ma, C.; Gao, J.

    2012-12-01

    Shoshonitic and high-K volcanism is widespread in the Sierra Nevada and western Nevada. The Silver Peak center, located in the Walker Lane, just east of the White Mountains, lies within the Silver Peak detachment. It consists of a subcircular volcanic complex about 15 km in diameter, with a central caldera. Volcanic activity spanned a period of 1myr from 6.0±0.5 to 4.8±0.6 Ma. The lavas range from trachybasalt to rhyolite and plot in the shoshonite field on the SiO2-K2O diagram. Oxide trends indicate relatively continuous fractionation of a parental basaltic magma. Fractionation took place in a subvolcanic magma chamber, which was periodically injected with new batches of basalt, leading to two major explosive events and resetting the fractionation processes. The first event, which erupted voluminous rhyolite ashflows, resulted in an elliptical caldera 12 by 9 km; the second produced highly feldspar-phyric trachyandesite ashflows and lavas. The most mafic lava is a trachybasalt with about 49 wt% SiO2, 7.5 wt% MgO and 2.5 wt% K2O, which contains olivine phenocrysts of Fo85. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of the lavas show flat HREE, strong enrichment in LREE (LaN/SmN =3.5-7.7; aver. = 4.7) and variable negative Eu anomalies ranging from .21-.85. In-situ 87Sr/86Sr compositions of plagioclase grains are quite uniform, mostly between 0.7060 and 0.7070, similar to the whole-rock values (0.7061) and indicating little if any crustal contamination. We suggest that the parental magma was derived from a metasomatised mantle source by small degrees of partial melting. It was mixed periodically with new pulses of mafic magma and underwent fractional crystallization to produce the observed range of compositions. . Melting was probably triggered by transtensional deformation in the Walker Lane.

  11. Walker use, but not falls, is associated with lower physical functioning and health of residents in an assisted-living environment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Daniel A; Roos, Bernard A; Stanziano, Damian C; Gonzalez, Natasha M; Signorile, Joseph F

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between perceived health and walker use has seldom been addressed. Concerns over falls and falls risk are precursors to walker use. We compared the SF-36 scores of 26 women and 14 men, mean age 86.8 6.0 years based on walker use and faller status. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with age as the covariate, compared groups for the SF-36 constructs and totals score. Significant differences were noted between walker users and nonusers in physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, general health, and the total SF-36 score. Pairwise comparisons favored nonusers, while no differences were seen due to faller status. Walker use is associated with lower self-perceptions of physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, and general health in assisted-living residents. Faller status is not associated with self-perceived health status. Although walker use aids mobility and lowers the probability of falls, further research is needed to determine if the prescription of assistive devices has a more negative impact on self-perceived health than does falling. This possibility could be explained, in part, by the greater activity levels of those individuals who do not depend on walkers. PMID:18044085

  12. Late Pleistocene displacement and slip rate for the Breckenridge fault, Walker Basin, southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossy, C. C.; Baldwin, J. N.; Kelson, K. I.; Rood, D. H.; Kozlowicz, B.; Simpson, D.; Ticci, M.; Amos, C. B.; Kozaci, O.; Lutz, A.

    2010-12-01

    The north-striking Breckenridge fault occurs along the 11-km-long western margin of Walker Basin, a west-tilted intermontane alluvial basin in the southern Sierra Nevada. This east-dipping normal fault has prominent geomorphic expression in the form of east-facing fault scarps on alluvial-fan deposits and distinct triangular facets of granitic bedrock along the range front. Steep, east-draining valleys are incised into bedrock west of the fault and are associated with inset or overlapping alluvial fan surfaces east of the fault. Detailed analysis of lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) and field geomorphic mapping suggest that a 2-km-wide series of small right-stepovers separate the Breckenridge fault from the Holocene-active Kern Canyon fault to the north. Directly south of Walker Basin, prominent geomorphic expression of the Breckenridge fault dies out in an area of complex and distributed microseismicity, suggesting that the fault does not connect with the active White Wolf fault to the south. Herein, on the basis of geologic and geomorphic mapping, DEM interpretation, and cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) dating, we report the first documented evidence for late Pleistocene normal faulting on the Breckenridge fault. At the Oak Tree site (38.431N, 118.545W), two alluvial-fan deposits (Qf1 and Qf3) exhibit east-down normal fault displacement. The active channel is entrenched about 8 and 14 m below these abandoned surfaces. Topographic profiles generated from DEMs along the extensive Qf1 and Qf3 surfaces show that fault scarp heights are progressively lower on younger surfaces. The oldest surface (Qf1) shows vertical separation of ~7 m, and the intermediate Qf3 surface exhibits ~4 m of vertical separation. The next youngest surface (Qf4) appears undeformed across the fault trace. Samples from granitic boulders exposed on the Qf1, Qf3, and Qf4 surfaces were collected for 10Be exposure dating. The CRN dates are consistent with stratigraphic position and yield ages (assuming zero inheritance and no erosion) of 68 ± 7 ka (1 sigma, n=3) for Qf1, 35 ± 2 ka (1 sigma, n=3) for Qf3, and 12 ± 2 ka (1 sigma, n=3) for Qf4. Using measured vertical separations, these data provide preliminary average late Pleistocene slip rates for the Breckenridge fault of ~0.1 mm/yr over ~68 and ~35 ky timescales. These data permit a relatively constant slip rate for the late Pleistocene on the Breckenridge fault that is lower than the Kern Canyon fault to the north. In addition, the 12 ± 2 ka age of the apparently undeformed Qf4 surface constrains the minimum age for the most-recent surface deformation and is consistent with the absence of fault scarps across young alluvial fan surfaces along most of the range front. These ages confirm previous analyses suggesting that the Breckenridge fault has controlled Quaternary deposition in the Walker Basin, and shows that the east-down normal displacement has continued to at least 35 ka and possibly 12 ka.

  13. Field Studies of Streamflow Generation Using Natural and Injected Tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, D.

    1992-01-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate [Rn]{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and {sup 222}Rn volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of [Rn]{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach. The method was first applied to a 34 m stream reach at Bickford during baseflow; results suggested that {ge} 70% of the lateral inflow could be considered vadose zone water (water which had been in a saturated zone for less than a few days), and the remainder ''soil groundwater'' or ''saturated zone water'' (which had a longer residence time in a soil saturated zone). The method was then applied to two stream reaches on the West Fork of Walker Branch over a wide range of flow conditions; four springs were also investigated. It was found that springwater and inflow to the stream could be viewed as a mixture of water from three end members: the two defined at Bickford (vadose zone water and soil groundwater) and a third (bedrock groundwater) to account for the movement of water through fractured dolomite bedrock. Calcium was used as a second naturally-occurring tracer to distinguish bedrock groundwater from the other two end members. The behavior indicated by the three-end-member mixing model (e.g., increased importance of the two soil end members with increasing flow, and the differences between the stream reaches and among some of the springs) were consistent with a wide variety of environmental observations, including temperature and flow variations at springs, water table responses, the general lack of saturated zones on hillslopes and even near the stream in some places, and the importance of water movement through bedrock.

  14. B-29 mothership with pilots - Payne, Butchart, Walker, Littleton, and Moise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    This photo shows the B-29 in the background with Dick Payne, Stan Butchart, and Joe Walker standing in front of it, Charles Littleton and John Moise squatting. The Boeing B-29 was the first U.S. aircraft to be modified to serve as an airborne launch vehicle. Last operated by the NASA High-Speed Flight Station (now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California), the B-29 aircraft was used to launch the X-1 series aircraft, including the X-1-1, the X-1-2 (later redesignated the X-1E), the X-1A, and the X-1B. The B-29, which was accepted by the Air Force on Aug. 2, 1945, was operated by the NACA, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and the Bell Aircraft Company. The Air Force transferred the B-29 to Bell Aircraft Company where it was modified to act as a carrier, or 'mothership,' for the first X-1. After modification, the aircraft flew to Pinecastle Army Air Base, Florida, where it made aeronautical history on Jan. 25, 1946, with its air launch of the first X-1. It then performed 10 drops of the X-1 at Pinecastle before flying to Edwards Air Force Base, California, in September 1946 where it dropped the X-1 for its first powered flight on Dec. 9, 1946. On Oct. 14, 1947, the B-29 again participated in a major aeronautical advance when it air launched the X-1 aircraft, which proceeded to exceed the speed of sound (Mach 1) for the first time. Air Force Pilot Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager was at the controls of the X-1 that day. A mid-air explosion in the 'captive' X-1A almost ended the career of the B-29 on Aug. 8, 1955. But pilot Stanley P. Butchart dropped the X-1A to its destruction in the desert after X-1A pilot, Joseph A. Walker, had scrambled back into the B-29. The B-29's 14-year career ended on July 1, 1959, when it was flown from the NASA High-Speed Flight Station to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, for retirement. The aircraft was made obsolete as a mothership by the advent of the X-15 Program, which required a larger, faster launch vehicle, the B-52. In the meantime, from 1950 to 1956, the NACA had used a P2B-1S (a Navy version of the B-29) to launch the rocket-powered versions of the D-558-2 research aircraft.

  15. TIMING, EXTENT, AND SPATIAL PROGRESSION OF NEOGENE DISPLACEMENT TRANSFER, SOUTHERN WALKER LANE, WESTERN GREAT BASIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Oldow, J. S.; Stockli, D. F.; Grow, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Displacement transfer through structural stepovers linking misaligned segments of large-magnitude intracontinental transcurrent faults involve components of translational and rotational displacement and strain accommodated by complex three-dimensional arrays of structures. Although vertical-axis rotation of large spatial domains is well documented in many structural stepovers, the degree to which rotation is accommodated by rigid block and/or by distributed strain is not adequately resolved. Similarly, it is seldom established whether or to what degree translational and rotational deformation occur simultaneously over broad regions or if they are parts of a tectonic process involving different components of translational and rotational deformation occurring in spatially and temporally discrete domains. Our current understanding suggests that the displacement transfer system linking faults of the northern Eastern California Shear Zone and central Walker Lane during the mid-Miocene through the mid-Pliocene involves the development of three detachment fault systems underlying a NW-SE trending region stretching from the region east of Death Valley to beyond the northern end of the White Mountains and encompassing southern Walker Lane in Nevada. Integrated geologic mapping, paleomagnetic, thermochronologic ((U-Th)/HE), and structural analysis provides insight into the history and kinematics of transcurrent, high-angle normal faulting and slip on low-angle detachment faults and their relation to differential rotation of upper-plate, and locally lower-plate, rocks. Two extensional systems (Funeral - Bullfrog - Bare Mountain and Silver Peak - Lone Mountain) broadly share an inception age but the age of the third (Gold Mountain) is unknown. The extensional complexes apparently show a progressive decrease in the age at which exhumation ceased from SE to NW, over a duration of about 5 Ma. In contrast, the magnitude of clockwise rotation of upper-plate, and locally of lower-plate, rocks increases from NW to SE from ~20°, ~50, and up to 90°. Our observations improve on our understanding of the spatial and temporal pattern of deformation and supply the constraints to differentiate coeval and serial translational and rotational deformation histories in this nascent plate boundary zone.

  16. Sonographic findings in a case of tetrasomy 9p associated with increased nuchal translucency and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Cima, Luciana Carneiro do; Llerena, Juan Clinton; Guerra, Fernando Antonio Ramos; Peixoto-Filho, Fernando Maia

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of a 23-year-old pregnant woman, who underwent amniocentesis after ultrasound (US) examination in the first trimester which revealed a nuchal translucency thickness of 2.9 mm. Cytogenetic analysis revealed complete tetrasomy of the short arm of chromosome 9. Further US evaluation in the second trimester revealed Dandy-Walker malformation, ventriculomegaly, bilateral clubfoot, lip and palate clefts, arthrogryposis and hyperechoic kidneys with bilateral pelvic dilatation. At 30 weeks of gestation, a placental abruption was noted and a Cesarean section was performed. The infant died shortly after birth. A review of previous cases of tetrasomy 9p shows that the remarkable sonographic findings are ventriculomegaly, intrauterine growth restriction, genitourinary anomaly, Dandy-Walker malformation, cleft lip/palate and limb malformation, but the association of tetrasomy 9p and increased nuchal translucency had not been reported. PMID:19655321

  17. Modern strain localization in the central Walker Lane, western United States: Implications for the evolution of intraplate deformation in transtensional settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surpless, Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 25% of the differential motion between the Pacific and North American plates occurs in the Walker Lane, a zone of dextral motion within the western margin of the Basin and Range province. At the latitude of Lake Tahoe, the central Walker Lane has been considered a zone of transtension, with strain accommodated by dip-slip, strike-slip, and oblique-slip faults. Geologic data indicate that extension and strike-slip motion are partitioned across the central Walker Lane, with dip-slip motion resulting in E-W to ESE-WNW extension along the present-day western margin of the central Walker Lane since approximately 15 Ma, and dextral strike-slip motion across a zone further east since as early as 24 Ma. GPS velocity data suggest that present-day strain continues to be strongly partitioned and localized across the same regions established by geologic data. Velocity data across the central Walker Lane suggest a minimum of 2 mm/yr extensional strain focused along the western margin of the belt, with very little extension across either the central or eastern portions of the Walker Lane. These data indicate very little dextral motion across the central and western portions of the domain, with dextral motion of 3-5 mm/yr presently focused along a discrete zone of the eastern part of the central Walker Lane, coincident with existing, mapped strike-slip faults. Historic seismic data reveal little seismic activity in areas of Late Holocene dip-slip motion in the west or dextral motion in the east, suggesting a period of quiescence in the earthquake cycle and the likelihood of future activity in both areas. Based on this and previous studies, it is likely that a combination of pre-Cenozoic crustal structure, a relatively weak lithosphere beneath the Walker Lane, and long-term low stress ratios in the crust have permitted the long-term partitioning of dextral and extensional strain exhibited across the central Walker Lane. The present-day location of dextral strain in the central Walker Lane is subparallel with dextral deformation documented in the northern Walker Lane, suggesting that as strain continues to accumulate, these two discrete zones could become a continuous strike-slip system which will play a more important role in the future accommodation of relative Pacific-North American plate motion.

  18. Gaussian approximation of lambdaphi/sup 4/ theory in (3+1)-dimensional spatially flat Robertson-Walker space

    SciTech Connect

    Pohle, H.

    1989-03-15

    We investigate lambdaphi/sup 4/ theory within the Gaussian approximation in spatially flat Robertson-Walker space in 3+1 dimensions. After having performed an adiabatic expansion for one of the ansatz functions, we find that the renormalization of the energy-momentum tensor provides two additional constraints which have to be satisfied by the bare couplings. These conditions force the theory to be trivial after renormalization.

  19. Nonlinear structural analysis of a turbine airfoil using the Walker viscoplastic material model for B1900 + Hf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, T. G.; Hill, J. T.; Weber, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    A viscoplastic material model for the high temperature turbine airfoil material B1900 + Hf was developed and was demonstrated in a three dimensional finite element analysis of a typical turbine airfoil. The demonstration problem is a simulated flight cycle and includes the appropriate transient thermal and mechanical loads typically experienced by these components. The Walker viscoplastic material model was shown to be efficient, stable and easily used. The demonstration is summarized and the performance of the material model is evaluated.

  20. Revision of the genus Ortopla Walker, [1859] with description of two new species from Southeast Asia (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Pantheinae). Revision of Pantheinae, contribution X.

    PubMed

    Behounek, G; Han, H L; Kononenko, V S

    2013-01-01

    The pantheine genus Ortopla Walker, [1859] 1858 is revised. Two new species, Ortopla witti sp. n. from the Philippines and O. longiuncus sp. n. from Nepal, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and South China are described. The name O. commutanda Warren, 1891 (syn. n.) is synonymised with O. iarbasalis Walker, [1859] 1858. The distribution of species in East Asia is clarified. A checklist of the genus Ortopla is presented. Imagines, male and female genitalia of all species are illustrated. PMID:25113477

  1. Mutations in PIEZO2 Cause Gordon Syndrome, Marden-Walker Syndrome, and Distal Arthrogryposis Type 5

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Margaret J.; Beck, Anita E.; Chong, Jessica X.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Gildersleeve, Heidi I.S.; Aracena, Mariana I.; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Bitoun, Pierre; Carey, John C.; Clericuzio, Carol L.; Crow, Yanick J.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Everman, David B.; Fryer, Alan; Gibson, Kate; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Graham, John M.; Hall, Judith G.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Heidenreich, Randall A.; Hurst, Jane A.; Irani, Sarosh; Krapels, Ingrid P.C.; Leroy, Jules G.; Mowat, David; Plant, Gordon T.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schorry, Elizabeth K.; Scott, Richard H.; Seaver, Laurie H.; Sherr, Elliott; Splitt, Miranda; Stewart, Helen; Stumpel, Constance; Temel, Sehime G.; Weaver, David D.; Whiteford, Margo; Williams, Marc S.; Tabor, Holly K.; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Gordon syndrome (GS), or distal arthrogryposis type 3, is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by cleft palate and congenital contractures of the hands and feet. Exome sequencing of five GS-affected families identified mutations in piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2) in each family. Sanger sequencing revealed PIEZO2 mutations in five of seven additional families studied (for a total of 10/12 [83%] individuals), and nine families had an identical c.8057G>A (p.Arg2686His) mutation. The phenotype of GS overlaps with distal arthrogryposis type 5 (DA5) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWS). Using molecular inversion probes for targeted sequencing to screen PIEZO2, we found mutations in 24/29 (82%) DA5-affected families and one of two MWS-affected families. The presence of cleft palate was significantly associated with c.8057G>A (Fisher’s exact test, adjusted p value < 0.0001). Collectively, although GS, DA5, and MWS have traditionally been considered separate disorders, our findings indicate that they are etiologically related and perhaps represent variable expressivity of the same condition. PMID:24726473

  2. Fitness test profiles and trainng intensities in skilled race-walkers.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, T.; Hopkins, J.; Howlett, N.

    1979-01-01

    A broad profile of national standard race-walkers was obtained. Subjects were taller and had more body fat than competitive runners of comparable distance as found in the literature. Pulmonary function, blood pressure and maximal heart rates were similar to normal sedentary values. The group's somatotype was 2.5 : 3 : 4, low mesomorphy being reflected in inferior strength measures. Haematological status corresponded to the runners of Brotherhood et al (1975). Predicted VO2 max (x = 70 ml kg min-1) was not related to performance. Time to exhaustion on a treadmill test correlated with 20 km race time (R = -.94; p less than .001). Multiple regression equations derived to predict race performance from combinations of 4 to 6 personality traits were non-significant. Mean heart rate in typical training regimes was 167 beats min-1 for interval training at 13 kmh-1 on the track and 134 beats min-1 over a 2.1 h road walk at 10.3 kmh-1. Physiological strain was greater in uphill than in level or downhill walking (P less than .001). PMID:465913

  3. The relation of oxygen intake and velocity of walking and running, in competition walkers

    PubMed Central

    Menier, D. R.; Pugh, L. G. C. E.

    1968-01-01

    1. The oxygen intake of four Olympic walkers was measured while walking and running at varying velocities on a treadmill at an altitude of 1800 m. 2. The relation between O2 intake and running at speeds between 8 km/hr and 21 km/hr was linear. The relation for walking at speeds up to 8 km/hr followed an upward concave curve. These findings were similar to results obtained at sea level by other investigators. 3. For walking at speeds between 8 km/hr and 14·5 km/hr the relation of O2 intake and velocity was a straight line having a slope twice that of running. 4. Maximum O2 intake in walking averaged 60·0 ml./kg/min (range 55·8-64·1 ml./kg/min) compared with 57·4 ml./kg/min (range 55·2-60·2 ml./kg/min) in running. An international class long distance runner serving as a control reached a maximum O2 intake of 70 ml./kg/min. PMID:5666183

  4. The relation of oxygen intake and velocity of walking and running, in competition walkers.

    PubMed

    Menier, D R; Pugh, L G

    1968-08-01

    1. The oxygen intake of four Olympic walkers was measured while walking and running at varying velocities on a treadmill at an altitude of 1800 m.2. The relation between O(2) intake and running at speeds between 8 km/hr and 21 km/hr was linear. The relation for walking at speeds up to 8 km/hr followed an upward concave curve. These findings were similar to results obtained at sea level by other investigators.3. For walking at speeds between 8 km/hr and 14.5 km/hr the relation of O(2) intake and velocity was a straight line having a slope twice that of running.4. Maximum O(2) intake in walking averaged 60.0 ml./kg/min (range 55.8-64.1 ml./kg/min) compared with 57.4 ml./kg/min (range 55.2-60.2 ml./kg/min) in running. An international class long distance runner serving as a control reached a maximum O(2) intake of 70 ml./kg/min. PMID:5666183

  5. South China Sea hydrological changes and Pacific Walker Circulation variations over the last millennium

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Sun, Liguang; Oppo, Delia W.; Wang, Yuhong; Liu, Zhonghui; Xie, Zhouqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Cheng, Wenhan

    2011-01-01

    The relative importance of north–south migrations of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) versus El Niño-Southern Oscillation and its associated Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) variability for past hydrological change in the western tropical Pacific is unclear. Here we show that north–south ITCZ migration was not the only mechanism of tropical Pacific hydrologic variability during the last millennium, and that PWC variability profoundly influenced tropical Pacific hydrology. We present hydrological reconstructions from Cattle Pond, Dongdao Island of the South China Sea, where multi-decadal rainfall and downcore grain size variations are correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index during the instrumental era. Our downcore grain size reconstructions indicate that this site received less precipitation during relatively warm periods, AD 1000–1400 and AD 1850–2000, compared with the cool period (AD 1400–1850). Including our new reconstructions in a synthesis of tropical Pacific records results in a spatial pattern of hydrologic variability that implicates the PWC. PMID:21522137

  6. Intensified convection over East Africa during shifts in Walker circulation 140-60 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, A. G.; Deino, A. L.; Thorpe, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Thick (up to 5m) diatomite beds deposited during the penultimate interglacial 140-60 ka document intervals where deep freshwater lakes filled large parts of the Central Kenya Rift, East Africa. Palaeohydrological reconstructions of the lake highstands are based on diatom analyses and δ18Odiatom. The chronology of the diatomite deposits is established through precise 40Ar/39Ar dating of intercalated pumice tuffs. The paleolakes experienced multiple hydrological fluctuations on sub-orbital (~1,500 to 2,000 years) time scales. The magnitude of the δ18Odiatom change (±3 permil) and significant changes in the plankton-littoral ratio of the diatom assemblage (±25%) suggest that the paleolake records can be interpreted in the context of long-term climate shifts in East Africa. Using 40Ar/39Ar age control and nominal diatomite-sedimentation rates, we suggest that paleohydrological conditions in equatorial East Africa during the late Pleistocene were primarily influenced by the latitudinal displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Extreme insolation at the eccentricity maximum, and weakened zonal air-pressure gradients in the tropics, favored intensified convection over East Africa and deep freshwater lake conditions. Considering that these scenarios may relate to present-day, ENSO-related shifts in the Walker circulation, we discuss a possible connection between long-term El-Niño-like climate forcing and tropical hydrological change on glacial-Interglacial timescales.

  7. Population decrease of Scirpophaga incertulas Walker (Lepidoptera Pyralidae) under climate warming

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peijian; Zhong, Ling; Sandhu, Hardev S; Ge, Feng; Xu, Xiaoming; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Scirpophaga incertulas Walker is an important agricultural pest in Asia. Only few studies are available on its long-term population dynamics under climate warming. In this study, we used the linear and generalized additive models (GAMs) to analyze the historical dataset of >50 years on this pest at Xinfeng County of Jiangxi Province, China. The main objective of this study was to explore the effects of density (delayed) dependence and minimum annual temperature (MAT), which indirectly reflects climate warming, on the population dynamics of this pest. We found that both density dependence and MAT have significant influence on the annual population growth rate. The GAMs had relatively better applicability to the dataset than the linear models. Nonparametric model provided satisfactory goodness-of-fit (R2 > 0.5). At Xinfeng County, the MAT had a significant effect on the annual population growth rate of S. incertulas. The annual population growth rate of S. incertulas decreased with increase in MAT. Therefore, S. incertulas population becomes smaller and smaller in Southern China due to climate warming. The current study has two contributions: (1) providing a suitable method for predicting the annual population growth rate of S. incertulas, and (2) demonstrating that climate warming could decrease the S. incertulas population. PMID:22408726

  8. Increased nitric oxide levels in cerebellum of cachectic rats with Walker 256 solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Fabio Leandro; Guarnier, Flavia Alessandra; Bernardes, Sara Santos; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    In cancer cachexia, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the central nervous system remains unclear. Cerebellar degeneration has been reported in cancer patients, but the participation of NO has not been studied. Thus, this study investigated the mechanism of oxidative cerebellar injury in a time-course cancer cachexia experimental model. The cachexia index is progressive and evident during the evolution of the tumor. Nitric oxide and lipid hydroperoxidation quantification was performed using a very sensitive and precise chemiluminescence method, which showed that both analyzed parameters were increased after tumor implantation. In the day 5 group, NO was significantly increased, and this experimental time was chosen to treat the rats with the NO inhibitors N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and aminoguanidine (AG). When treated with NO inhibitors, a significant decrease in both NO and lipid hydroperoxide levels occurred in the cerebellum. 3-nitrotyrosine was also analyzed in cerebellar tissue by immunohistochemistry; it was increased at the three experimental time points studied, and decreased when treated with L-NAME and AG. Besides demonstrating that lipid hydroperoxidation in the cerebellum of rats with cachexia increases in a time-dependent manner, this study is the first to describe the participation of NO and its oxidized product 3-NT in the cerebellum of cachectic rats bearing the Walker 256 solid tumor. PMID:26216116

  9. Occurrence and characterization of a tetrahedral nucleopolyhedrovirus from Spilarctia obliqua (Walker).

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, C M; Jacob, T K; Devasahayam, S; D'Silva, Sharon; Jinsha, J; Rajna, S

    2015-11-01

    Spilarctia obliqua Walker (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) is a polyphagous insect pest damaging pulses, oil seeds, cereals, vegetables and medicinal and aromatic plants in India. The pest also infests turmeric and ginger sporadically in Kerala. We observed an epizootic caused by a nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) in field populations of the insects in December 2013. The NPV was purified and characterized. The isolate was tetrahedral in shape and belonged to multicapsid NPV. The REN profile of the SpobNPV genome with Pst I, Xho I and HindIII enzymes showed a genome size of 99.1±3.9 kbp. Partialpolh, lef-8 and lef-9 gene sequences of the isolate showed a close relationship with HycuNPV and SpphNPV. Phylogram and K-2-P distances between similar isolates suggested inclusion of the present SpobNPV isolate to group I NPV. The biological activity of the isolate was tested under laboratory conditions against third instar larvae of S. obliqua and the LC50 was 4.37×10(3)OBs/ml occlusion bodies (OBs) per ml. The median survival time (ST50) was 181 h at a dose of 1×10(6)OBs/ml and 167 h at a dose of 1×10(8)OBs/ml. SpobNPV merits further field evaluation as a potential biological control agent of S. obliqua, a serious pest of many agriculturally important crops in the Oriental region. PMID:26449395

  10. Neuropathological analysis of an asymptomatic adult case with Dandy-Walker variant.

    PubMed

    Notaridis, G; Ebbing, K; Giannakopoulos, P; Bouras, C; Kövari, E

    2006-06-01

    The Dandy-Walker (DW) complex is a rare posterior fossa malformation, usually observed during the prenatal period or the early infancy. Clinically, it is characterized by mental retardation, seizures, cerebellar ataxia as well as symptoms of hydrocephalus. Structural imaging reveal a hypoplasia or agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, enlargement of the fourth ventricle with a posterior fossa cyst. Additional neurodevelopmental changes such as agenesis of the corpus callosum, lissencephaly and cortical dysplasia are also present. We report the first neuropathological analysis of an adult asymptomatic DW case. Brain computerized tomography showed a massive posterior fossa cyst and hypoplasia of the cerebellum. An Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV characterized by repetitive intestinal perforations and a saccular aneurysm on the left posterior communicating artery was also present. Macroscopic brain examination revealed hypoplasia of both cerebellar hemispheres and posterior part of the vermis, as well as dilatation of the fourth ventricle without hydrocephalus. The posterior fossa cyst wall was formed by an external arachnoid layer, middle layer with loose connective tissue and an internal layer of ependymal cells. There were two foci of cerebellar cortical dysplasia but no ectopic neurons, neuronal loss or gliosis in both cerebellum and cerebral cortex. No vascular or significant neurodegenerative lesions were observed. In comparison with previous reports in DW infants, this adult case displayed milder brain abnormalities compatible with a diagnosis of DW variant. The preservation of the cortical cytoarchitecture as well as the paucity of additional neurodevelopmental changes may explain the absence of clinical expression. PMID:16640653

  11. Analysis on origin recognition complex containing Orc5p with defective Walker A motif.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yamairi, Fumiko; Makise, Masaki; Takenaka, Hitomi; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Mizushima, Tohru

    2004-02-27

    Orc5p is one of six proteins that make up the origin recognition complex (ORC), a candidate initiator of chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotes. To investigate the role of ATP binding to Orc5p in cells, we constructed orc5-A, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having a mutation in the Walker A motif of Orc5p (K43E). The strain showed temperature-sensitive growth. Incubation at a nonpermissive temperature (37 degrees C) caused accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content. Overproduction of Orc4p, another subunit of ORC, suppresses this temperature sensitivity, but overproduction of other subunits did not. Overproduction of Orc4p did not suppress the temperature sensitivity of another orc5 mutant, orc5-1, whose mutation, L331P, is outside the ATP-binding motif. These results suggest that Orc4p is specifically involved in ATP binding to Orc5p itself or its function in DNA replication. Immunoblotting experiments revealed that in the orc5-A strain at a nonpermissive temperature, all ORC subunits gradually disappeared, suggesting that ORC5-A becomes degraded at nonpermissive temperatures. We therefore consider that ATP binding to Orc5p is involved in efficient ORC formation and that Orc4p is involved in this process. PMID:14625297

  12. The Non-Diagonal Models of the Robertson-Walker Universe in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloushko, Konstantin; Karbanovski, Valeri; Belenkova, Anastasiya

    As is known, the Robertson-Walker metric describe a homogeneous and isotropic universe. For this metric recorded in diagonal form, the equations of general relativity (GR) give the energy-momentum tensor (EMT), which will also have a diagonal form. In [1] it was shown that nondegenerate coordinate transformations can lead metric to non-diagonal mean that allows to get non-diagonal components of the EMT. This allows: begin{enumerate} build a model of the Universe of "ordinary" matter without resorting to the "exotic"; enter into the model the observed cosmic microwave background, which correspond to non-diagonal components of the EMT (energy flux density and components of stress tensor); reconcile heterogeneous distribution of matter with overall homogeneity of space-time geometry. The task of constructing the model is reduced to the choice of the type of metric functions, which will ensure the implementation of the standard physical conditions and allowed to clarify the evolution of the universe. Reference begin{enumerate} V.V. Karbanovski et al. - JETP, 112 (2011), 60.

  13. [Risk predictive model for damage caused by the spittlebug Aeneolamiapostica (Walker) Fennah (Hemiptera: Cercopidae)].

    PubMed

    García-García, Carlos G; López-Collado, José; Nava-Tablada, Martha E; Villanueva-Jiménez, Juan A; Vera-Graziano, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluated the risk that Aenolamia postica (Walker) Fennah populations reach the economic threshold in sugar cane fields in Veracruz, México. A risk deductive model was constructed to include the sequence of events leading to damaging populations, considered the top event or critical failure in the crop. Model events were identified and quantified, and model was validated on field conditions. The model components and their state values were identified as: temperature e" 28 degrees C, precipitation e" 45% during June and July, soil clay content e" 40%, infested adjoining fields, deficient weed control, wind dominance, crop phenology and variety, deficient chemical and biological control, and irrigation. Sensitivity analysis showed that the most important events triggering high densities of A. postica were high temperatures and precipitation, previous field infestation, nymph and weed presence. Event probability estimates were combined using Boolean algebra to compute the minimum, mean and maximum probabilities for the top event, yielding values of 0.417, 0.563, y 0.734 respectively. Model was tested in field, by selecting sugar cane fields having the model properties and compared to fields without these features. Fields were sampled in both conditions during 2004 year and high-risk fields had significantly (F = 13, 4, gl = 1, 18, P = 0,0018) higher densities (2.4 adults m(-1)) than low-risk plots (0.4 adults m(-1)) thus agreeing with the model forecast. PMID:17144142

  14. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  15. Integrating SLAM with existing evidence: Comment on Walker and Hickok (2015).

    PubMed

    Goldrick, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Walker and Hickok (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review doi:10.3758/s13423-015-0903-7, 2015) used simulations to compare a novel proposal, the semantic-lexical-auditory-motor model (SLAM), to an existing account of speech production, the two-step interactive account (TSIA; Foygel & Dell, Journal of Memory and Language, 43:182-216, doi:10.1006/jmla.2000.2716, 2000). This commentary critically examines their assessment of SLAM. The cases in which SLAM outperforms TSIA largely reflect SLAM's ability to (poorly) approximate an existing theory of speech production incorporating two stages of phonological processing (the lexical + postlexical account). The fact that SLAM and TSIA can exhibit equivalent fits to the overall response distribution of a set of aphasic patients is unsurprising, since previous work has shown that overall response distributions do not reliably discriminate theoretical alternatives. Finally, SLAM inherits issues associated with TSIA's assumption of strong feedback between levels of representation. This suggests that SLAM does not represent an advance over existing theories of speech production. PMID:26555757

  16. Staurosporine shows insecticidal activity against Mythimna separata Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) potentially via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Songlin; Yang, Xing; Yang, Mingjun; Xu, Wenping; Li, Yaxiao; Tao, Liming

    2016-03-01

    Staurosporine (STS), a wide-spectrum kinase inhibitor, is widely used in studies of apoptosis in mammalian cells. However, its physiological and mechanistic effects have never been clearly defined in insect cells, and other applications of STS have rarely been reported. The present study reveals the insecticidal activity of STS on larvae of Mythimna separata Walker, and the apoptotic mechanism induced by STS on lepidopteran Sf9 cell lines. We demonstrate that the viability of Sf9 cells is inhibited by STS in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular biochemical assays show that STS-induced apoptosis of Sf9 cells coincides with a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, a significant increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and a marked activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These results indicate that a mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic pathway contributes to STS induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in Sf9 cells which is homologous to the mechanisms in mammalian cells. This study contributes to our understanding of the mechanism of insect cell apoptosis and suggests a possible new application of STS as a potential insecticide against Lepidopteran insect pests in agriculture. PMID:26969438

  17. Effect of methotrexate on perfusion and nitrogen-13 glutamate uptake in the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, W.H.; Panzer, M.; Helus, F.; Layer, K.; Sinn, H.J.; Ostertag, H.

    1988-02-01

    The tissue uptake of (/sup 13/N)glutamate (glu) was related to that of (/sup 11/C)butanol (but), a highly diffusible perfusion tracer. In 25 rats bearing Walker-256 carcinomas tumor-to-muscle glu uptake averaged 6.34 +/- 2.84 (s.d.) prior to interventions and the respective uptake of but was 6.79 +/- 3.08 (y = 0.03 + 0.94x). One hour after selective intraarterial administration of methotrexate (mtx), glu uptake fell by 47%, whereas blood flow remained within the pretreatment range (N = 9). Four hours after mtx, perfusion was reduced by approximately 40%, and 2 days later both perfusion and glu uptake reached extremely low levels. No significant difference in the effect of 10 and 50 mg/kg mtx was observed. Regional tissue mtx uptake estimations using /sup 77/Br-labeled bromomethotrexate did not reveal any significant uptake in muscle. The relationship between tumor-to-muscle uptake of glu and but (/sup 13/N//sup 11/C-index) was 0.94 +/- 0.015 (s.e.m., N = 25) before intervention. After methotrexate (1 hr, 4 hr, and 2 days) this index was 0.58 +/- 0.06 (N = 9), and 0.85 +/- 0.04 (N = 11) and 1.03 +/- 0.05 (N = 5), respectively. These values demonstrate an early mtx-induced uncoupling of glu uptake with respect to perfusion.

  18. Long-term follow-up of successful treatment for dandy-walker syndrome (DWS)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Liang, Guobiao; Liang, Yong; Kou, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various managements of Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) from open excision of the cysts to CSF diversion have been reported. However, optimal treatment for DWS remains elusive. Methods: Cyst fenestration was employed firstly, but failed 15 days after the surgery. Then a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt was inserted and the patient discharged from hospital 13 days after the second surgery. During the 12-year follow-up, CT scanning, MRI, and X-radiation were performed. Results: CT scanning showed that the size of ventricular system gradually returned to normal. MRI revealed similar changes of the ventricular system, and further revealed the development of supratentorial brain. The results of X-radiation during the follow-up years showed that the peritoneal end of the shunt might be already out of the abdominal cavity. Slow refilling of the shunt valve may suggest that the shunt could be probably not functional. Conclusion: The treatment of the patient was successfully, and the abnormal cerebral ventricle system gradually recovered during the 12-year follow-up. Because the patient might be probably independent on the shunt, further choice of the shunt removal should be thinking thoroughly, considering both safety and quality of life for the patient. PMID:26770421

  19. South China Sea hydrological changes and Pacific Walker Circulation variations over the last millennium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Sun, Liguang; Oppo, Delia W; Wang, Yuhong; Liu, Zhonghui; Xie, Zhouqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Cheng, Wenhan

    2011-01-01

    The relative importance of north-south migrations of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) versus El Niño-Southern Oscillation and its associated Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) variability for past hydrological change in the western tropical Pacific is unclear. Here we show that north-south ITCZ migration was not the only mechanism of tropical Pacific hydrologic variability during the last millennium, and that PWC variability profoundly influenced tropical Pacific hydrology. We present hydrological reconstructions from Cattle Pond, Dongdao Island of the South China Sea, where multi-decadal rainfall and downcore grain size variations are correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index during the instrumental era. Our downcore grain size reconstructions indicate that this site received less precipitation during relatively warm periods, AD 1000-1400 and AD 1850-2000, compared with the cool period (AD 1400-1850). Including our new reconstructions in a synthesis of tropical Pacific records results in a spatial pattern of hydrologic variability that implicates the PWC. PMID:21522137

  20. Current-induced magnetic domain wall motion below intrinsic threshold triggered by Walker breakdown.

    PubMed

    Koyama, T; Ueda, K; Kim, K-J; Yoshimura, Y; Chiba, D; Yamada, K; Jamet, J-P; Mougin, A; Thiaville, A; Mizukami, S; Fukami, S; Ishiwata, N; Nakatani, Y; Kohno, H; Kobayashi, K; Ono, T

    2012-10-01

    Controlling the position of a magnetic domain wall with electric current may allow for new types of non-volatile memory and logic devices. To be practical, however, the threshold current density necessary for domain wall motion must be reduced below present values. Intrinsic pinning due to magnetic anisotropy, as recently observed in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowires, has been shown to give rise to an intrinsic current threshold J(th)(0). Here, we show that domain wall motion can be induced at current densities 40% below J(th)(0) when an external magnetic field of the order of the domain wall pinning field is applied. We observe that the velocity of the domain wall motion is the vector sum of current- and field-induced velocities, and that the domain wall can be driven against the direction of a magnetic field as large as 2,000 Oe, even at currents below J(th)(0). We show that this counterintuitive phenomenon is triggered by Walker breakdown, and that the additive velocities provide a unique way of simultaneously determining the spin polarization of current and the Gilbert damping constant. PMID:22961306

  1. Description and field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment: 1993--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Huston, M.A.; Joslin, J.D.; Croker, J.L.; Auge, R.M.

    1998-04-01

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiment in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil water content is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall from one 6400-m{sup 2} treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx}1850 subcanopy troughs suspended above the forest floor of the dry plot and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Soil water content is being monitored at two depths with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both dry and wet conditions. Maximum soil water content differentials between wet and dry plots in the 0- to 0.35-m horizon were 8 to 10% during summers with abundant precipitation and 3 to 5% during drought periods. Treatment impacts on soil water potential were restricted to the surface soil layer. Comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil and litter temperature measurements showed the ability of the experimental design to produce changes in soil water content and water potential without creating large artifacts in the forest understory environment.

  2. Morphological descriptions on the larvae of Hypopygiopsis fumipennis (Walker, 1856) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Heo, C C; Latif, B; Silahuddin, S A; Nazni, W A; Omar, B

    2015-03-01

    The study on biodiversity of forensically important Diptera in the tropical rain forest in Malaysia is scarce. Thus, a preliminary survey was conducted at a jungle fringe near Kampung Bahagia Bukit Lagong, Sungai Buloh, Selangor. A rat carcass was offered to attract carrion flies and we collected an adult female calliphorid, Hypopygiopsis fumipennis (Walker, 1856) during the fresh stage of carcass decomposition. The female fly was allowed to oviposit on chicken liver in a container and the resulting larvae were reared to the adult stage. Along the developmental process, several individuals from each instar were collected and preserved in 70% ethanol and then processed on the slides. We recorded the duration of development for each instar and described its larval features for the first time. The third instar larvae of H. fumipennis showed accessory oral sclerite present, anterior spiracle with 13-15 papillae, intersegmental spines mostly unicuspid with pointed end, and posterior spiracles heavily sclerotized with inter-slit projections. Some larval differences between H. fumipennis and Hypopygiopsis violacea were noted. PMID:25801265

  3. Founder Fukutin mutation causes Walker-Warburg syndrome in four Ashkenazi Jewish families†

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wendy; Winder, Thomas L.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Simpson, Lynn L.; Millar, William S.; Dungan, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Norman; Plaga, Stacey; Moore, Steven A.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a genetically heterogeneous congenital muscular dystrophy caused by abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that is associated with brain malformations and eye anomalies. The Fukutin (FKTN) gene, which causes autosomal recessively inherited WWS is most often associated with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in Japan. We describe the clinical features of four nonconsanguinous Ashkenazi Jewish families with WWS and identify the underlying genetic basis for WWS. Method We screened for mutations in POMGnT1, POMT1, POMT2, and FKTN, genes causing WWS, by dideoxy sequence analysis. Results We identified an identical homozygous c.1167insA mutation in the FKTN gene on a common haplotype in all four families and identified 2/299 (0.7%) carriers for the c.1167insA mutation among normal American Ashkenazi Jewish adults. Conclusion These data suggest that the c.1167insA FKTN mutation described by us is a founder mutation that can be used to target diagnostic testing and carrier screening in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. PMID:19266496

  4. Airborne SAR determination of relative ages of Walker Valley moraines, eastern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, A.; Isacks, B.; Bloom, A.; Fielding, E.; Mcmurry, D.

    1991-01-01

    A regional study of the distribution and elevations of Pleistocene moraines in the Andes requires a method of determining relative age from space. One of our primary objectives is to establish the relative chronology of major climatic events responsible for glaciation in the Andes and other regions that are difficult to access on the ground and where suitable material for absolute age determination is lacking. The sensitivity of radar to surface roughness makes it possible to develop a remotely-based relative dating technique for landforms for which surface age and roughness can be correlated. We are developing such a technique with Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) imagery of the eastern Sierra Nevada where independent evidence is available for the ages and physical characteristics of moraines. The Sierra Nevada moraines are similar in form and environmental setting to Andean moraines that we have targeted for study during the pending Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) mission. SAR imagery is used to differentiate the ages of five moraine sequences of Walker Valley in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  5. Walker devices and microswitch technology to enhance assisted indoor ambulation by persons with multiple disabilities: three single-case studies.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca; Buono, Serafino

    2013-07-01

    These three single-case studies assessed the use of walker devices and microswitch technology for promoting ambulation behavior among persons with multiple disabilities. The walker devices were equipped with support and weight lifting features. The microswitch technology ensured that brief stimulation followed the participants' ambulation responses. The participants were two children (i.e., Study I and Study II) and one man (i.e., Study III) with poor ambulation performance. The ambulation efforts of the child in Study I involved regular steps, while those of the child in Study II involved pushing responses (i.e., he pushed himself forward with both feet while sitting on the walker's saddle). The man involved in Study III combined his poor ambulation performance with problem behavior, such as shouting or slapping his face. The results were positive for all three participants. The first two participants had a large increase in the number of steps/pushes performed during the ambulation events provided and in the percentages of those events that they completed independently. The third participant improved his ambulation performance as well as his general behavior (i.e., had a decline in problem behavior and an increase in indices of happiness). The wide-ranging implications of the results are discussed. PMID:23643772

  6. Hybridization between multi-objective genetic algorithm and support vector machine for feature selection in walker-assisted gait.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria; Costa, Lino; Frizera, Anselmo; Ceres, Ramón; Santos, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Walker devices are often prescribed incorrectly to patients, leading to the increase of dissatisfaction and occurrence of several problems, such as, discomfort and pain. Thus, it is necessary to objectively evaluate the effects that assisted gait can have on the gait patterns of walker users, comparatively to a non-assisted gait. A gait analysis, focusing on spatiotemporal and kinematics parameters, will be issued for this purpose. However, gait analysis yields redundant information that often is difficult to interpret. This study addresses the problem of selecting the most relevant gait features required to differentiate between assisted and non-assisted gait. For that purpose, it is presented an efficient approach that combines evolutionary techniques, based on genetic algorithms, and support vector machine algorithms, to discriminate differences between assisted and non-assisted gait with a walker with forearm supports. For comparison purposes, other classification algorithms are verified. Results with healthy subjects show that the main differences are characterized by balance and joints excursion in the sagittal plane. These results, confirmed by clinical evidence, allow concluding that this technique is an efficient feature selection approach. PMID:24444751

  7. Geophysical characterization of transtensional fault systems in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M.; Keranen, K. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Feldman, J. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) and Walker Lane belt (WL) accommodate ~25% of plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. Faults within the Mina deflection link the ECSZ and the WL, transferring strain from the Owens Valley and Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault systems to the transcurrent faults of the central Walker Lane. During the mid to late Miocene the majority of strain between these systems was transferred through the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain (SPLM) extensional complex via a shallowly dipping detachment. Strain transfer has since primarily migrated north to the Mina Deflection; however, high-angle faults bounding sedimentary basins and discrepancies between geodetic and geologic models indicate that the SPLM complex may still actively transfer a portion of the strain from the ECSZ to the WL on a younger set of faults. Establishing the pattern and amount of active strain transfer within the SPLM region is required for a full accounting of strain accommodation, and provides insight into strain partitioning at the basin scale within a broader transtensional zone. To map the active structures in and near Clayton Valley, within the SPLM region, we collected seismic reflection and refraction profiles and a dense grid of gravity readings that were merged with existing gravity data. The primary goals were to determine the geometry of the high-angle fault system, the amount and sense of offset along each fault set, connectivity of the faults, and the relationship of these faults to the Miocene detachment. Seismic reflection profiles imaged the high-angle basin-bounding normal faults and the detachment in both the footwall and hanging wall. The extensional basin is ~1 km deep, with a steep southeastern boundary, a gentle slope to the northwest, and a sharp boundary on the northwest side, suggestive of another fault system. Two subparallel dip-slip faults bound the southeast (deeper) basin margin with a large lateral velocity change (from ~2.0 km/sec in the basin fill to 4.5-5.5 km/sec in the footwall) across the basin-bounding normal fault system. Very fast (approaching 6.0 km/sec) basement underlies the basin fill. The residual gravity anomaly indicates that Clayton Valley is divided into a shallower northern basin, imaged by the seismic lines, and a deeper, more asymmetric southern basin. Faults within Clayton Valley are curvilinear in nature, similar to faults observed in other step-over systems (e.g., the Mina Deflection). Gravity profiles support the seismic reflection interpretation and indicate a high angle fault (>60 degrees) bounding the northern sub-basin on its southeast margin, with a shallower fault bounding it to the northwest. A basement high trends west-northwest and separates the northern and southern basins, and is likely bounded on its southern edge by a predominantly strike-slip fault crossing the valley. Much of the strain accommodated within the southern sub-basin appears to be transferred into southern Big Smoky Valley, northwest of Clayton Valley, via these dextral strike-slip faults that obliquely cross Clayton Valley.

  8. Population genetics of Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and the implications for management using biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Y; Mitchell, A; Le Rü, B P; Conlongs, D E

    2010-01-01

    The African sugarcane stalk borer, Eldona saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa and is an important insect pest of maize and sugarcane. The insect shows significant variation in behaviour, host plant and natural enemy guild in different regions. Several attempts to redistribute the natural enemies of E. saccharina from West Africa to South Africa were unsuccessful. The significant behavioural, host plant and natural enemy variations as well as failures of biocontrol attempts evoked a hypothesis of genetic diversification. To evaluate this hypothesis a molecular analysis was conducted on geographically isolated populations of E. saccharina from East, North, South and West Africa, using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) region of the mitochondrial genome. The results revealed that E. saccharina populations are separated into four major units corresponding to the West Africa, Rift Valley, South/East Africa and southern African populations. Mitochondrial DNA divergence among the four populations ranged from 1% to 4.98%. To examine the impact of the observed genetic variation on the fertility of inter-population crosses, a mating experiment was conducted between the Rift valley and South African population to produce an F1 generation, and these were backcrossed with the South African parent population. Fertility of eggs produced by the F1/parent population cross was significantly reduced when compared to fertility of the "true" South African line, and the F1/F1 cross. The contributions of the observed genetic differences and inter population incompatibility for the failure of previous biocontrol attempts are discussed and recommendations on future biocontrol practices are given. PMID:21539263

  9. Determination of Gas Exchange Rate Constants for a Small Stream on Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genereux, David P.; Hemond, Harold F.

    1992-09-01

    The steady state tracer gas method was used to determine gas exchange rate constants (k) for a small stream (annual average flow ≤1 m3/min) draining the West Fork of Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee. Chloride was used as a conservative tracer to account for dilution by lateral inflow, and propane and ethane were used as volatile tracers. Gas exchange rate constants for propane (kp) were about 100 d-1 over a wide range of flow conditions, while those for ethane (ke) were about 117 d1; an equivalent rate constant for O2 (KO2) would be about 118-139 d-1, depending on the method used for its calculation. These rate constants are much larger than those typically found in rivers and large streams. Much lower kp values (about 50d-1) were found during one experiment conducted at low flow with much of the stream surface covered with floating leaves. Nineteen previously published empirical equations were used to predict kO2 values for one 72m stream reach; agreement between the predicted and measured values was generally very poor, underscoring the importance of field-measured gas exchange rates in studies of the transport and fate of volatile compounds. Because ethane and propane have similar gas exchange rates and similar aqueous diffusion coefficients (ke/kp and De/Dp are both close to 1, where D is the compound's diffusion coefficient), accurate determination of the exponent n in the relationship ke/Kp- (De/Dp)n was not possible. The ratio ke/kp (1.17) is much closer to De/Dp (1.24) than to He/Hp (0.82, where H is the compound's Henry's law constant), suggesting that stripping of dissolved volatiles by air bubbles was not a dominant mode of gas exchange for the study stream.

  10. Walker Lake 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area California and Nevada: data report

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, W.M.; Jones, P.L.

    1980-03-01

    This data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Walker Lake 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 797 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 20 square kilometers (eight square miles). Ground water samples were collected at 77 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 220 square kilometers (87 square miles). Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites (on microfiche in pocket) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites (also on microfiche in pocket) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulatedn Symbol plot maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th and U/Hf ratios, and scintillometer readings are included on the microfiche.

  11. Cenozoic strike-slip faults in the northern Wassuk Range, Walker Lane

    SciTech Connect

    Dilles, J.H. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The N. Wassuk Ra. yields estimates of right-lateral Cenozoic strain in a portion of the northwest-trending Walker Lane, which has a total estimated right-lateral strain of 48--60 km (Ekren et al., 1984). The net right-lateral strain is < 10 km within an east-west 50 km-long segment extending from the N. Wassuk Ra. west to the Pine Nut Mts on the basis of continuous Jurassic plutonic units: Yerington batholith and quartz monzodiorite porphyry dikes. One of two dikes in the N. Wassuk Ra. may correlate easterly to Gillis Ra., suggesting [approximately]10 or 25 km right-lateral offset (Diles and R. Hardyman, unpub). In the N. Wassuk Ra. there are several ages of northwesterly striking faults. The oldest are [approximately]N45[degree]W striking, steeply dipping faults including the White Mt. and Wassuk Spur faults that step left to the northwest. Associated moderately dipping faults have tilted Oligocene tuffs to the W or SW to the SW of the fault zone, and both E and W on the NW; based on offset of the Jurassic porphyry dike and slickensides, these faults were dominantly oblique-slip normal faults with WNW-ESE slip. No lateral offsets can be directly measured across the steeply dipping faults; however, they juxtapose different Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and different thicknesses of Oligocene ignimbrites, suggesting significant lateral offset. Bingler's (1978) proposal that the White Mt. fault had left-laterally offset the White Mt. granite (WMG) from granite of Black Mountain (BMG) is unreasonable because the BMG intrudes the Wassuk Range diorite and contain biotite aplites, whereas the WMG intrudes metavolcanic rocks and contains tourmaline-muscovite aplites.

  12. Twenty-year changes in biomass and nutrient distribution in forests of Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Olson, R.J.; Mann, L.K.; Todd, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in biomass and nutrient distribution in forests of Walker Branch Watershed from 1967 to 1987 are reviewed. There have been major changes in species composition in certain forest types: yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) has largely been replaced by shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) in what was formerly the pine forest type, and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus) appears to be replacing hickory in the oak-hickory forest type. In both cases, insect attacks (bark beetles and borers) precipitated the changes by inducing heavy mortality in native pines and hickory species in the 1970s. Subsoil (Bt horizon) exchangeable Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ have decreased markedly over a period of only 11 years in certain poor, upper-slope stands with oak and oak-hickory vegetation. From nutrient flux and mass balance analyses, we conclude that the Ca/sup 2 +/ changes can be attributed primarily to the sequestering of calcium in biomass. The situation with respect to Mg/sup 2 +/ is less clear; leaching was low relative to uptake in the one plot where Mg/sup 2 +/ decreases were statistically significant (95% level, t-test), yet it was clearly the dominant mechanism of Mg/sup 2 +/ export in all other plots where less significant (85% level, t-test) decreases were noted. It is noteworthy that leaching is dominated by SO/sub 4//sup 2/minus//, implying that acid deposition may be a major cause of the subsoil exchangeable Mg/sup 2 +/ decreases in some cases. 31 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Changes in aboveground biomass and nutrient content on Walker Branch Watershed from 1967 to 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Henderson, G.S.; Harris, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    The increment of forest biomass and nutrient content on Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee, from 1967 to 1983 was interrupted by two insect outbreaks. An outbreak of the southern pine beetle in the early 1970s and an outbreak of the hickory borer in the late 1970s to early 1980s killed a number of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) and hickory (Carya spp.), respectively. Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) growth increased over this 16-year period, especially in response to the mortality of shortleaf pine. The net result of these events was little change in total biomass but a substantial shift in species composition (from pine to yellow-poplar) in the Pine forest type over this period. No species has yet responded to the mortality of hickory. Due to the shift in species composition in the Pine type, calcium and magnesium accumulation rates in biomass increased but foliage biomass decreased over the inventory period. There was little change in foliage biomass or nutrient content in other forest types, despite hickory mortality, since mortality occurred primarily among large trees having low foliage-to-woody-biomass ratios. The insect attacks, combined with apparently natural self-thinning, caused a large increase in standing dead biomass and in nutrient return via tree fall. This increased rate of return will substantially alter forest floor nutrient content and availability, especially with regard to calcium (where the calcium content of standing dead currently equals forest floor calcium content) and nitrogen (where inputs of woody litter will substantially alter carbon to nitrogen ratios). 23 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A taxonomic revision of the genus Edosa Walker, 1886 from China (Lepidoptera, Tineidae, Perissomasticinae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Wang, Shuxia; Li, Houhun

    2014-01-01

    The genus Edosa Walker, 1886 is revised in China. Of the 31 recognized species, 23 are described as new: Edosa aurea sp. nov., E. baculiformis sp. nov., E. bicolor sp. nov., E. bifurcata sp. nov., E. carinata sp. nov., E. conchata sp. nov., E. cornuta sp. nov., E. curvidorsalis sp. nov., E. dentata sp. nov., E. digitata sp. nov., E. duoprojecta sp. nov., E. elongata sp. nov., E. eminens sp. nov., E. hamata sp. nov., E. longicornis sp. nov., E. minuta sp. nov., E. robinsoni sp. nov., E. robustispina sp. nov., E. semicircularis sp. nov., E. torta sp. nov., E. truncatula sp. nov., E. uncusella sp. nov., and E. varians sp. nov.; Edosa gaedikei nom. nov. is proposed as a replacement name for Edosa spinosa Gaedike, 2012, a junior homonym of Edosa spinosa Gaedike, 1984; four species are newly recorded for China: E. hendrixella Robinson, 2008, E. crayella Robinson, 2008, E. orphnodes (Meyrick, 1911) and E. smithaella Robinson, 2008; the female of E. hendrixella is described for the first time. Phylogenetic relationships of the Chinese species, except E. malthacopis (Meyrick, 1936), are postulated based on 42 morphological characters. The phylogenetic analysis of the morphology matrix yielded one most parsimonious tree (length 121 steps, CI = 0.56, RI = 0.81), based on which seven species-groups are proposed: the hemichrysella-group, the subochraceella-group, the pyrochra-group, the duoprojecta-group, the eminens-group, the crayella-group and the uncusella-group. The whole body structures of the genus are presented and photographs of adults and genitalia are provided, along with a key to all the known Chinese species and maps to show the distribution of Edosa in China. A world checklist of Edosa is given as an appendix, in which 41 new combinations are included. PMID:24871620

  15. Evidence for Interannual to Decadal Variations in Hadley and Walker Circulations and Links to Water and Energy Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin; Bosilovich, Michael; Miller, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Mass and energy transports associated with the Hadley and Walker circulations are important components of the earth s climate system and are strongly linked to hydrologic processes. Interannual to decadal variation in these flows likely signify a combination of natural climate noise as well as a response to anthropgenic forcing. There remains considerable uncertainty in quantifying variations in these flows. Evidence in the surface pressure record supports a weakening of the Walker circulation over the Pacific in recent decades. Conversely the NCEP / NCAR and ERA 40 reanalyses indicate that the Hadley circulation has increased in strength over the last two decades, though these analyses depict significantly different mass circulation changes. Interestingly, the NCEP - II / DOE reanalysis contains essentially no Hadley circulation changes. Most climate model integrations anticipate a weakening of both tropical circulations associated with stronger static stability. Clearly there is much uncertainty not only with the mass transports, but also how they are linked to water and energy balance of the planet through variations in turbulent heat and radiative fluxes and horizontal exports / imports of energy. Here we examine heat and water budget variations from a number of reanalysis products and focus on the linear and nonlinear response of ENSO warm and cold events as opportunities to study budget variations over the past 15-20 years. Our analysis addresses such questions as To what extent do Hadley and Walker Cell variations compensate each other on mass and energy transport? Do static stability adjustments appear to constrain fractional precipitation response vs. fractional water vapor response? We appeal to constraints offered by GPCP precipitation, SSWI ocean evaporation estimates, and ISCCP-FD radiative fluxes, and other satellite data sets to interpret and confirm reanalysis-based diagnostics. Using our findings we also attempt to place in context the recent findings that tropical ocean evaporation increased by order 5% or more during the 1990s, reconciling this with GPCP precipitation variations.

  16. [Fragile X syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant: a clinical study of oral and written communicative manifestations].

    PubMed

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Ferraz, Plínio Marcos Duarte Pinto; Ferreira, Amanda Tragueta; Prado, Lívia Maria do; Abramides, Dagma Venturini Marquez; Gejão, Mariana Germano

    2011-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of inherited intellectual disability. The Dandy-Walker variant is a specific constellation of neuroradiological findings. The present study reports oral and written communication findings in a 15-year-old boy with clinical and molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome and neuroimaging findings consistent with Dandy-Walker variant. The speech-language pathology and audiology evaluation was carried out using the Communicative Behavior Observation, the Phonology assessment of the ABFW - Child Language Test, the Phonological Abilities Profile, the Test of School Performance, and the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities. Stomatognathic system and hearing assessments were also performed. It was observed: phonological, semantic, pragmatic and morphosyntactic deficits in oral language; deficits in psycholinguistic abilities (auditory reception, verbal expression, combination of sounds, auditory and visual sequential memory, auditory closure, auditory and visual association); and morphological and functional alterations in the stomatognathic system. Difficulties in decoding the graphical symbols were observed in reading. In writing, the subject presented omissions, agglutinations and multiple representations with the predominant use of vowels, besides difficulties in visuo-spatial organization. In mathematics, in spite of the numeric recognition, the participant didn't accomplish arithmetic operations. No alterations were observed in the peripheral hearing evaluation. The constellation of behavioral, cognitive, linguistic and perceptual symptoms described for Fragile X syndrome, in addition to the structural central nervous alterations observed in the Dandy-Walker variant, caused outstanding interferences in the development of communicative abilities, in reading and writing learning, and in the individual's social integration. PMID:21829935

  17. Impact of favorite stimuli automatically delivered on step responses of persons with multiple disabilities during their use of walker devices.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Campodonico, Francesca; Piazzolla, Giorgia; Scalini, Lorenza; Oliva, Doretta

    2005-01-01

    Favorite stimuli were automatically delivered contingent on the performance of steps by two persons (a boy and a woman) with multiple disabilities during their use of support walker devices. The study lasted about 4 months and was carried out according to a multiple baseline design across participants. Recording concerned the participants' frequencies of steps and their indices of happiness during baseline and intervention sessions. Data showed that both participants had a significant increase in each of these two measures during the intervention phase. Implications of the findings and new research issues are discussed. PMID:15590239

  18. [Occurrence of accidents caused by Lonomia obliqua Walker, in the State of Paraná between 1989 and 2001].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Claudia Moreira; Danni-Oliveira, Inês Moresco

    2007-01-01

    The present article aimed to show the distribution of accidents involving the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua, Walker, 1855, in the State of Paraná between 1989 and 2001. The data were obtained from the Environmental Health Department of Paraná. The information collected was mapped using the Arcview program, and maps of the seasonal occurrence of accidents were generated. This seasonality was correlated with the insects life cycle and summer was shown to be the period with greatest incidence of accidents. The greatest concentrations occurred in the central-southern, southeastern and southwestern regions of the State. PMID:17568899

  19. Synthesis and insecticidal activity of new oxime derivatives of podophyllotoxin-based phenazines against Mythimna separata Walker.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyan; Yang, Chun; Yu, Xiang; Xu, Hui

    2014-12-15

    To discover new natural-product-based insecticidal agents, a series of novel oxime derivatives of podophyllotoxin-based phenazines modified in the C, D and E rings of podophyllotoxin were prepared and tested as insecticidal agents against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker) in vivo at 1 mg/mL. The steric configuration of IIIc was unambiguously confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds IIIa-d, and IIIi exhibited an equal or higher insecticidal activity than toosendanin. PMID:25467160

  20. On the initial value problem for the wave equation in Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–times

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Bilal; Craig, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The propagator W(t0,t1)(g,h) for the wave equation in a given space–time takes initial data (g(x),h(x)) on a Cauchy surface {(t,x) : t=t0} and evaluates the solution (u(t1,x),∂tu(t1,x)) at other times t1. The Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–times are defined for t0,t1>0, whereas for t0→0, there is a metric singularity. There is a spherical means representation for the general solution of the wave equation with the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker background metric in the three spatial dimensional cases of curvature K=0 and K=−1 given by S. Klainerman and P. Sarnak. We derive from the expression of their representation three results about the wave propagator for the Cauchy problem in these space–times. First, we give an elementary proof of the sharp rate of time decay of solutions with compactly supported data. Second, we observe that the sharp Huygens principle is not satisfied by solutions, unlike in the case of three-dimensional Minkowski space–time (the usual Huygens principle of finite propagation speed is satisfied, of course). Third, we show that for 00 emanating from the space–time singularity at t=0. Under reflection t→−t, the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker metric gives a space–time metric for t<0 with a singular future at t=0, and the same solution formulae hold. We thus have constructed solutions u(t,x) of the wave equation in Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–times which exist for all −∞

  1. Comment on 'Quantization of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation'

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo; Aranda, Alfredo; Cervantes, Mayra; Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2007-03-15

    The quantization of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime in the presence of a negative cosmological constant was used in a recent paper to conclude that there are solutions that avoid singularities (big bang-big crunch) at the quantum level. We show that a proper study of their model does not indicate that it prevents the occurrence of singularities at the quantum level, in fact the quantum probability of such event is larger than the classical one. Our numerical simulations based on the powerful variational sinc collocation method (VSCM) also show that the precision of the results of that paper is much lower than the 20 significant digits reported by the authors.

  2. Comment on ``Quantization of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore, Paolo; Aranda, Alfredo; Cervantes, Mayra; Díaz-Cruz, J. L.; Fernández, Francisco M.

    2007-03-01

    The quantization of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime in the presence of a negative cosmological constant was used in a recent paper to conclude that there are solutions that avoid singularities (big bang big crunch) at the quantum level. We show that a proper study of their model does not indicate that it prevents the occurrence of singularities at the quantum level, in fact the quantum probability of such event is larger than the classical one. Our numerical simulations based on the powerful variational sinc collocation method (VSCM) also show that the precision of the results of that paper is much lower than the 20 significant digits reported by the authors.

  3. On the initial value problem for the wave equation in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-times.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Bilal; Craig, Walter

    2014-09-01

    The propagator W(t 0,t 1)(g,h) for the wave equation in a given space-time takes initial data (g(x),h(x)) on a Cauchy surface {(t,x) : t=t 0} and evaluates the solution (u(t 1,x),∂ t u(t 1,x)) at other times t 1. The Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-times are defined for t 0,t 1>0, whereas for t 0→0, there is a metric singularity. There is a spherical means representation for the general solution of the wave equation with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background metric in the three spatial dimensional cases of curvature K=0 and K=-1 given by S. Klainerman and P. Sarnak. We derive from the expression of their representation three results about the wave propagator for the Cauchy problem in these space-times. First, we give an elementary proof of the sharp rate of time decay of solutions with compactly supported data. Second, we observe that the sharp Huygens principle is not satisfied by solutions, unlike in the case of three-dimensional Minkowski space-time (the usual Huygens principle of finite propagation speed is satisfied, of course). Third, we show that for 00 emanating from the space-time singularity at t=0. Under reflection t→-t, the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric gives a space-time metric for t<0 with a singular future at t=0, and the same solution formulae hold. We thus have constructed solutions u(t,x) of the wave equation in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-times which exist for all [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where in conformally regularized coordinates, these solutions are continuous through the singularity t=0 of space-time, taking on specified data u(0,⋅)=g(⋅) at the singular time. PMID:25197255

  4. Epidemic modeling with discrete-space scheduled walkers: extensions and research opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This exploratory paper outlines an epidemic simulator built on an agent-based, data-driven model of the spread of a disease within an urban environment. An intent of the model is to provide insight into how a disease may reach a tipping point, spreading to an epidemic of uncontrollable proportions. Methods As a complement to analytical methods, simulation is arguably an effective means of gaining a better understanding of system-level disease dynamics within a population and offers greater utility in its modeling capabilities. Our investigation is based on this conjecture, supported by data-driven models that are reasonable, realistic and practical, in an attempt to demonstrate their efficacy in studying system-wide epidemic phenomena. An agent-based model (ABM) offers considerable flexibility in extending the study of the phenomena before, during and after an outbreak or catastrophe. Results An agent-based model was developed based on a paradigm of a 'discrete-space scheduled walker' (DSSW), modeling a medium-sized North American City of 650,000 discrete agents, built upon a conceptual framework of statistical reasoning (law of large numbers, statistical mechanics) as well as a correct-by-construction bias. The model addresses where, who, when and what elements, corresponding to network topography and agent characteristics, behaviours, and interactions upon that topography. The DSSW-ABM has an interface and associated scripts that allow for a variety of what-if scenarios modeling disease spread throughout the population, and for data to be collected and displayed via a web browser. Conclusion This exploratory paper also presents several research opportunities for exploiting data sources of a non-obvious and disparate nature for the purposes of epidemic modeling. There is an increasing amount and variety of data that will continue to contribute to the accuracy of agent-based models and improve their utility in modeling disease spread. The model developed here is well suited to diseases where there is not a predisposition for contraction within the population. One of the advantages of agent-based modeling is the ability to set up a rare event and develop policy as to how one may mitigate damages arising from it. PMID:19922684

  5. Physical constraints, fundamental limits, and optimal locus of operating points for an inverted pendulum based actuated dynamic walker.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Lalit; Umanand, Loganathan

    2015-12-01

    The inverted pendulum is a popular model for describing bipedal dynamic walking. The operating point of the walker can be specified by the combination of initial mid-stance velocity (v0) and step angle (φm) chosen for a given walk. In this paper, using basic mechanics, a framework of physical constraints that limit the choice of operating points is proposed. The constraint lines thus obtained delimit the allowable region of operation of the walker in the v0-φm plane. A given average forward velocity vx,avg can be achieved by several combinations of v0 and φm. Only one of these combinations results in the minimum mechanical power consumption and can be considered the optimum operating point for the given vx,avg. This paper proposes a method for obtaining this optimal operating point based on tangency of the power and velocity contours. Putting together all such operating points for various vx,avg, a family of optimum operating points, called the optimal locus, is obtained. For the energy loss and internal energy models chosen, the optimal locus obtained has a largely constant step angle with increasing speed but tapers off at non-dimensional speeds close to unity. PMID:26502096

  6. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  7. Buses, Cars, Bicycles and Walkers: The Influence of the Type of Human Transport on the Flight Responses of Waterbirds

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Emily M.; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Taysom, Alice J.; Robinson, Randall W.; Weston, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    One way to manage disturbance to waterbirds in natural areas where humans require access is to promote the occurrence of stimuli for which birds tolerate closer approaches, and so cause fewer responses. We conducted 730 experimental approaches to 39 species of waterbird, using five stimulus types (single walker, three walkers, bicycle, car and bus) selected to mimic different human management options available for a controlled access, Ramsar-listed wetland. Across species, where differences existed (56% of 25 cases), motor vehicles always evoked shorter flight-initiation distances (FID) than humans on foot. The influence of stimulus type on FID varied across four species for which enough data were available for complete cross-stimulus analysis. All four varied FID in relation to stimuli, differing in 4 to 7 of 10 possible comparisons. Where differences occurred, the effect size was generally modest, suggesting that managing stimulus type (e.g. by requiring people to use vehicles) may have species-specific, modest benefits, at least for the waterbirds we studied. However, different stimulus types have different capacities to reduce the frequency of disturbance (i.e. by carrying more people) and vary in their capacity to travel around important habitat. PMID:24367498

  8. Redescription of Argizala brasiliensis Walker, 1869 (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Trigonidiidae: Nemobiinae: Pteronemobiini) and consideration of its morphological proximity to other Pteronemobiini Nearctic genera.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; De P Martins, Luciano; Fernandes, Maria Luiza; Zefa, Edison; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Although male crickets provide more informative characters for the delimitation of species and genera, many taxonomic descriptions are based only on females. This is the case for Argizala Walker, 1869 and its two valid species, A. brasiliensis Walker, 1869 and A. hebardi Rehn, 1915. We provide herein a redescription of A. brasiliensis based on a male collected in the Pampa Biome, Capão do Leão municipality, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. We present photographs of epitype and male genitalia, and discuss the diagnostic features of the genus and its morphological proximity to other Pteronemobiini Nearctic genera. PMID:26249883

  9. Seasonal Nutrient Dynamics of Foliage and Litterfall on Walker Branch Watershed, a Deciduous Forest Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Grizzard, T. Henderson, G.S. Clebsch, E.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed twelve-month study of litterfall, live foliage biomass, and seasonal nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, sodium, and magnesium) dynamics in tree components was performed for forest types on Walker Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Biomass and nutrient content of foliage, reproductive parts and branches were examined for ten dominant trees in order to assess the relative importance of litterfall in returning nutrients to the forest floor in four different forest types. Litterfall, measured in pine, pine-oak-hickory, oak-hickory, and mesophytic hardwood forests, was separated into three components (leaves, reproductive parts, and branches). Seasonal comparisons of those forest types were made for biomass and nutrient inputs for each component and for total litterfall. Each forest types was characterized by total annual input to the forest floor of biomass and individual nutrients for each component as well as total litterfall. Canonical analysis was performed on the yearly totals to test for significant differences among the forest types. Live foliage from the ten predominant species of trees on the watershed, determined by order of total basal area, was analyzed for biomass, nutrient concentration, and changes in nutrient content through the growth season. Seasonal trends for these variables, including the ranking of nutrient concentrations for spring versus fall, were discussed in relation to differential growth, translocation, and leaching factors. Most of the litterfall in all forest types (77-85%) was in leaves with fall maximum. Reproductive parts (8-14% with spring and fall maxima) and branches (8-11% with no seasonal trend) contributed the remainder. The ranking of nutrient content in litterfall was similar in spring and fall, except for the replacement of nitrogen by calcium in autumn as the predominant nutrient (followed by K > Mg > P > Na). Comparisons were made between weight and nutrient content for living leaves and leaf litter input in litterfall. The ranking of total nutrient content per leaf in spring foliage was N > K > Ca > Mg > P > Na. The autumn foliage ranking was the same as that for autumn leaf litterfall (Ca > N > K > Mg > P > Na), the change being due to differing behavior of the particular nutrients (translocation, biomass dilution and removal by leaching). In the four forest types analyzed, significant differences occurred in the biomass and individual nutrients recycled to the forest floor. The greatest litterfall and amounts of nitrogen input occurred in the pine forest type. Oak-hickory forests had the greatest litter inputs of magnesium and potassium. Calcium return was greatest in the mesophytic hardwood forest. No marked differences in the amounts of sodium and phosphorus return in the forest floor occurred among mesophytic hardwoods and oak-hickory forest types, which were consistently higher than pine and pine-oak-hickory forest values.

  10. Relationships of pinon juniper woodland expansion and climate trends in the Walker Basin, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald, Jonathon

    Landscapes are in constant flux. Vegetation distributions have changed in conjunction with climate, driven by factors such as Milankovitch cycles and atmospheric composition. Until recently, these changes have occurred gradually. Human populations are altering Earth's systems, including atmospheric composition and land use. This is altering vegetation distributions at landscape scales due to changes in species potential niche, as well as current and historical alteration of their realized niche. Vegetation shifts have the potential to be more pronounced in arid and mountainous environments as resources available to plants such as soil moisture are more limiting. In the Great Basin physiographic region of the western United States, woody encroachment of pinon juniper (Pinus monophylla & Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands is well known, but the drivers of its expansion are not well understood across elevational gradients. Predominant theories of future vegetation distribution change due to a changing climate, predict that montane species will move upslope in response to increasing temperatures. In pinon juniper woodlands, the focus has been on downslope movement of woodlands into other ecosystem types. The drivers for this are typically thought to be historical land uses such as grazing and fire exclusion. However, infilling and establishment is occurring throughout its distribution and relatively little attention has been paid to woodland movement uphill. This study focuses on two mountain ranges within the Walker Lake Basin, so as to understand changes occurring along the full gradient of pinon juniper woodlands, from lower to upper treeline, on both the western and eastern side of the ranges. The overall goal of this study was to understand trends of change (increasing, decreasing canopy density) in pinon juniper woodlands and determine if these trends were related to climate change trends. Trends in both vegetation and climate were analyzed for the entire distribution of pinon juniper within the study area, and aggregated by ecologically pertinent zones of woodlands. Climate is highly variable and difficult to accurately represent at fine spatial scales, so aggregation to pertinent zones such as lower ecotones, upper ecotones, and main distribution of woodlands, allowed for meaningful inferences of how the amount of change among climatic variables over time were related to densification of pinon juniper canopy. The Mann-Kendall test of trend is able to detect trends in time series stacks of spectral vegetation indexes and discern between both large and small magnitude trends. Within the study area, pinon juniper woodlands showed the greatest increases in canopy density at upper ecotones, followed by lower ecotones. The amount of change corresponds to an increase of about 25% in canopy density over the 30 year time period in the upper ecotones, and about 18% increase at lower ecotones. Larger change at the upper ecotone suggests that pinon juniper is responding to climatic change in line with theories of vegetation response to climate. This is best explained by small increases in winter precipitation and larger increases in minimum temperature. These conditions would favor increased canopy by promoting seedling establishment. Weaker correlations with changes in climatic variables at the lower ecotone suggest that other factors, especially historic land use effects, are likely influencing pinon juniper to a greater degree. This follows others findings concerning encroachment, but suggests that the amount of change among climatic variables directly relates to overall rates of establishment and increasing canopy density. Encroachment at the lower bound of pinon juniper distribution is likely a response to artificial reduction of the realized niche.

  11. Interpretation of simple and cloud-resolving simulations of moist convection radiation interaction with a mock-Walker circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Peters, Matthew E.

    2006-11-01

    An idealized two-dimensional mock-Walker circulation in the tropical atmosphere forced by prescribed horizontal gradients in sea-surface temperature (SST) is discussed. This model problem includes feedbacks between cumulus convection and tropical large-scale circulations that have proved challenging for global climate models to predict accurately. Three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations that explicitly simulate turbulent circulations within individual cloud systems across 4,096 and 1,024 km-wide Walker circulations are compared with a simple theoretical model, the Simplified Quasiequilibrium Tropical Circulation Model (SQTCM). This theoretical model combines the weak-temperature-gradient approximation with a unimodal truncation of tropospheric vertical structure coupled to highly simplified formulations of moist precipitating cumulus convection and its cloud-radiative feedbacks. The rainfall, cloud and humidity distribution, circulation strength, energy fluxes and scaling properties are compared between the models. The CRM-simulated horizontal distribution of rainfall and energy fluxes are adequately predicted by the SQTCM. However, the humidity distribution (drier subsidence regions and high-humidity boundary layers in the CRM), vertical structure and domain-size scaling of the circulation differ significantly between the models. For the SQTCM, the concept of gross moist stability related to advection of moist static energy (MSE) out of tropospheric columns by the mean divergent circulation is used to explain the width and intensity of the rainy region. Column MSE budgets averaged across the ascent branch of the simulated Walker circulation provide similar insight into the cloud-resolving simulations after consideration of the more complex horizontal and vertical circulation structure and the role of transient eddies. A nondimensional ascent-region moist stability ratio ?, analogous to the SQTCM gross moist stability, is developed. One term of ? is related to the vertical profiles of ascent-region mean vertical motion and ascent-region edge MSE; a second term is proportional to eddy export from the ascent region. Smaller ? induces a narrower, rainier ascent region. The sensitivity of the SQTCM and CRM to a uniform 2 K increase in SST is compared, and the rainy upward branch of the circulation narrows in both models. MSE budget arguments are used to explain this behavior. In the simple model, the gross moist stability is a decreasing function of tropospheric temperature. Hence gross moist stability reduces and the ascent region narrows as the SST increases. In the CRM, increased atmospheric radiative cooling due to the warmer and moister troposphere destabilizes the MSE profile and decreases ?, inducing a narrower ascent region. In the CRM, and to a lesser extent in the SQTCM, intensified shortwave cloud forcing in the warmer climate causes a negative radiative feedback on the SST change.

  12. The treatment of fresh fruit from California with methyl bromide for postharvest control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), in fresh fruit exports. To simulate external feeding, larvae were contained in gas-permeable cages and distributed throughout loads of peaches, plums, nectarines...

  13. Collecting at night at the old porch light: Discovery of the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), is a highly polyphagous species that is an important pest of apple and citrus in many parts of the world, primarily Australia and New Zealand. The potential threat of LBAM to North American agriculture was recognized formally in 1957 ...

  14. A new species of Gadirtha Walker (Nolidae: Collomeninae): a proposed biological control agent of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera (L.) Small) (Euphorbiaceae) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gadirtha fusca, new species, is described from Hong Kong. Adult, male and female genitalia, larva, and pupa are described, illustrated, and compared with Gadirtha impingens Walker. Species is a possible biological control agent for Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera (L.) Small, Euphorbiaceae) in the ...

  15. Postharvest treatment of fresh fruit from California with methyl bromide for postharvest control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), in fresh fruit exports. To simulate external feeding, larvae were contained in gas-permeable cages and distributed throughout loads of peaches, plums, nectarines...

  16. Relative roles of differential SST warming, uniform SST warming and land surface warming in determining the Walker circulation changes under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Most of CMIP5 models projected a weakened Walker circulation in tropical Pacific, but what causes such change is still an open question. By conducting idealized numerical simulations separating the effects of the spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) warming, extra land surface warming and differential SST warming, we demonstrate that the weakening of the Walker circulation is attributed to the western North Pacific (WNP) monsoon and South America land effects. The effect of the uniform SST warming is through so-called "richest-get-richer" mechanism. In response to a uniform surface warming, the WNP monsoon is enhanced by competing moisture with other large-scale convective branches. The strengthened WNP monsoon further induces surface westerlies in the equatorial western-central Pacific, weakening the Walker circulation. The increase of the greenhouse gases leads to a larger land surface warming than ocean surface. As a result, a greater thermal contrast occurs between American Continent and equatorial Pacific. The so-induced zonal pressure gradient anomaly forces low-level westerly anomalies over the equatorial eastern Pacific and weakens the Walker circulation. The differential SST warming also plays a role in driving low-level westerly anomalies over tropical Pacific. But such an effect involves a positive air-sea feedback that amplifies the weakening of both east-west SST gradient and Pacific trade winds.

  17. Effect of gossypol and gossypol related compounds on mulberry pyralid (diaphania pyloalis walker, lepidoptera: pyralidae), a pest of the Mulberry Tree

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gossypol, gossypurpurin and diaminogossypol were tested for inhibitory effects against feeding mulberry pyralid larvae (Diaphania pyloalis Walker, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). The inclusion of very low concentrations of these compounds (10, 50 or 100 µmoles/g) in artificial diets increased the number of...

  18. Peace Education: Perspectives from Brazil and India. An Interview with Anima Bose (India) and Zlmarian Jeanne Walker (Brazil). Reprints and Miniprints No. 683.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerstedt, Ake

    As a means of studying ways to help children and young people deal constructively with questions of peace and war, Anima Bose and Zlmarian Jeanne Walker, who have worked to promote peace education in India and Brazil respectively, are interviewed. The influence of Gandhi on the concept of peace in India is emphasized. One cannot teach peace, it…

  19. Determining thermotolerance of fifth-instar Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) by three different methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermotolerance of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), were studied using two water immersion methods and one dry heat method. The two water immersion methods were: 1) directly immersing in hot w...

  20. Host range of Tetramesa romana Walker (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), a potential biological control of giant reed, Arundo donax L. in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eurytomid wasp, Tetramesa romana Walker, was evaluated as a potential biological control agent of the invasive reed grass, Arundo donax in North America. No-choice tests and timed behavioral studies were used to determine the fundamental host range of two genotypes of the wasp collected from Gr...

  1. Quantization of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Monerat, G.A.; Silva, E.V. Correa; Oliveira-Neto, G.

    2006-02-15

    In the present work, we quantize three Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation. The models differ from each other by the constant curvature of their spatial sections, which may be positive, negative or zero. They give rise to Wheeler-DeWitt equations for the scale factor which have the form of the Schroedinger equation for the quartic anharmonic oscillator. We find their eigenvalues and eigenfunctions by using a method first developed by Chhajlany and Malnev. After that, we use the eigenfunctions in order to construct wave packets for each case and evaluate the time-dependent expectation value of the scale factors, which are found to oscillate between finite maximum and minimum values. Since the expectation values of the scale factors never vanish, we have an initial indication that these models may not have singularities at the quantum level.

  2. The influence of ocean surface temperature gradient and continentality on the Walker circulation. II - Prescribed global changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, P. H.; Chervin, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The series of experiments presently used to investigate the mechanisms responsible for forcing the global Walker circulation features worldwide changes in ocean surface temperatures (OSTs), topography, and/or continents. The primary factor affecting circulation is noted to be the global distribution of continents and oceans; while OST gradients are also important, topography emerges as comparatively unimportant. Continentality and OST gradients force the model atmosphere through the introduction of zonal variations in surface heating. The vertical motions to which they give rise yield moisture convergence and condensation variations which reinforce vertical motions. The forcing by OST gradients is partly nonlocal, and the atmospheric response is effected by continentality. In all cases, vertical motion zonal variations correlate with precipitation.

  3. Interstitial deletion of 8q21{yields}22 associated with minor anomalies, congenital heart defect, and Dandy-Walker variant

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, M.L.; Ryan, R.M.

    1995-03-13

    We describe an infant with a deletion of 8q21{yields}22 who had distinct clinical manifestations including minor facial anomalies, a congenital heart defect, a Dandy-Walker variant, and mild to moderate developmental delay. Her facial characteristics included small, wide-spaced eyes, asymmetric bilateral epicanthal folds, a broad nasal bridge, a {open_quotes}carp-shaped{close_quotes} mouth, micrognathia, and prominent, apparently low-set ears. Three other reports describe children with larger proximal deletions of 8q that include 8q21 and q22. These four children all have similar facial appearance. Of the others reported, one had a congenital heart defect and one had craniosynostosis. This case, in addition to the previously noted three cases, helps in delineating a recognizable syndrome. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Towards a better understanding of the impacts of climate change on agricultural productivity and economics in the Walker River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. J.; Boyle, D. P.; Garner, C.; Bassett, S.

    2014-12-01

    A significant decrease in seasonal precipitation and a general increase in air temperature over the last three years have resulted in extreme to exceptional drought conditions in much of the southwestern U.S., where water resources are becoming scarcer. In many cases, the impacts of the drought on the agricultural productivity has been severe, as farmers have struggled to maintain the crop water requirements with limited resources available from surface water deliveries and groundwater pumping. In this study, we aim to identify the impacts of climate change on agricultural productivity in the Walker River Basin. In order to develop a better understand of the regional agricultural economic impacts and potential mitigation strategies, we quantify the value of surface water along with supplemental groundwater pumping. Specifically, we analyze changes in potential crop production (both quantity and revenue) and the associated conjunctive use of available surface water and groundwater in both dry and warm climates.

  5. Hydrologic model based on deep test data from the Walker O No. 1 well, Terminal Geyser, California

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, J.J.

    1981-10-01

    The Shasta Forest No. 1 Well (renamed Walker O No. 1) at Terminal Geyser, California, was reentered and deepened from 1258 to 4008 feet. Temperature logs indicate the well penetrated a laterally flowing thermal aquifer between 1400 and 2200 feet. Large amounts of drilling fluids were lost in that zone. Maximum temperature in the well (10 months after drilling) was 348/sup 0/F at 2000 feet. A large reversed temperature gradient zone occurs below 2400 feet. Bottom hole temperature is 256/sup 0/F. After completion, the well was flowed for about five hours with nitrogen injection at 2000 feet. Samples taken throughout the flow indicate that fluids lost during drilling were not completely recovered. Salinity increased steadily during the flow period. Ratios of Na, K, and Ca were nearly constant, however, and application of Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers indicate these fluids were in equilibrium with rocks at a temperature of 448-449/sup 0/F.

  6. Analog model of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in Bose-Einstein condensates: Application of the classical field method

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Piyush; Weinfurtner, Silke; Visser, Matt; Gardiner, C. W.

    2007-09-15

    Analog models of gravity have been motivated by the possibility of investigating phenomena not readily accessible in their cosmological counterparts. In this paper, we investigate the analog of cosmological particle creation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe by numerically simulating a Bose-Einstein condensate with a time-dependent scattering length. In particular, we focus on a two-dimensional homogeneous condensate using the classical field method via the truncated Wigner approximation. We show that for various forms of the scaling function the particle production is consistent with the underlying theory in the long wavelength limit. In this context, we further discuss the implications of modified dispersion relations that arise from the microscopic theory of a weakly interacting Bose gas.

  7. Evaluation of geodetic and geologic datasets in the Northern Walker Lane-Summary and recommendations of the Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Richard W.; Hammond, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The Northern Walker Lane comprises a complex network of active faults in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California bound on the west by the Sierra Nevada and on the east by the extensional Basin and Range Province. Because deformation is distributed across sets of discontinuous faults, it is particularly challenging to integrate geologic and geodetic data in the NWL to assess the region's seismic hazard. Recent GPS measurements show that roughly one centimeter per year of relative displacement is accumulating across a zone about 100 km wide at the latitude of Reno, Nevada, but it is not clear where or how much of this strain might ultimately be released in damaging earthquakes. Despite decades of work in the region, the sum of documented late Pleistocene to recent slip rates is distinctly less than the GPS-measured relative displacement.

  8. New Insights into Strain Accumulation and Release in the Central and Northern Walker Lane, Pacific-North American Plate Boundary, California and Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Jayne M.

    The Walker Lane is a 100 km-wide distributed zone of complex transtensional faulting that flanks the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada. Up to 25% of the total Pacific-North American relative right-lateral plate boundary deformation is accommodated east of the Sierra Nevada, primarily in the Walker Lane. The results of three studies in the Central and Northern Walker Lane offer new insights into how constantly accumulating plate boundary shear strain is released on faults in the Walker Lane and regional earthquake hazards. This research is based on the collection and analysis of new of geologic and geodetic datasets. Two studies are located in the Central Walker Lane, where plate boundary deformation is accommodated on northwest trending right-lateral faults, east-northeast trending left-lateral faults, and north trending normal faults. In this region, a prominent set of left-stepping, en-echelon, normal fault-bounded basins between Walker Lake and Lake Tahoe fill a gap in Walker Lane strike slip faults. Determining how these basins accommodate shear strain is a primary goal of this research. Paleoseismic and neotectonic observations from the Wassuk Range fault zone in the Walker Lake basin record evidence for at least 3 Holocene surface rupturing earthquakes and Holocene/late Pleistocene vertical slip rates between 0.4-0.7 mm/yr on the normal fault, but record no evidence of right-lateral slip along the rangefront fault. A complementary study presents new GPS velocity data that measures present-day deformation across the Central Walker Lane and infers fault slip and block rotation rates using an elastic block model. The model results show a clear partitioning between distinct zones of strain accommodation characterized by (1) right-lateral translation of blocks on northwest trending faults, (2) left-lateral slip and clockwise block rotations between east and northeast trending faults, and (3) right-lateral oblique normal slip with minor clockwise block rotations on north trending faults. Block model results show that a component of right-lateral slip in the normal-fault bounded basins is required to adequately fit the GPS data. New GPS data from the Northern Walker Lane constrains present-day slip rates on the Mohawk Valley, Grizzly Valley, and Honey Lake fault zones. Block model results predict right-lateral slip rates of 2.2 +/- 0.2 mm/yr for the Mohawk Valley fault and 1.1 +/- 0.4 mm/yr for the Honey Lake fault. The GPS data do not require slip on the Grizzly Valley fault, although right-lateral slip rates up to 1.2 mm/yr are allowed without increasing the block model misfit. The present-day distribution of slip between the Honey Lake and Mohawk Valley faults is opposite that predicted by latest Quaternary and Holocene geologic slip rate estimates. A temporally variable Wallace-type strain release model that includes 104-year timescale variations in fault slip rate could reconcile both datasets.

  9. A systematic study of Ichneumonosoma de Meijere, Pelmatops Enderlein,Pseudopelmatops Shiraki and Soita Walker (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Lin; Norrbom, Allen; Freidberg, Amnon; Chesters, Douglas; Islam, Md Sajedul; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Four fruit fly genera, Ichneumonosoma de Meijere, Pelmatops Enderlein, Pseudopelmatops Shiraki and Soita Walker, were studied and 19 species are recognized. Three new species, Soita infuscata Chen & Norrbom, Ichneumonosoma quadripunctata Chen & Freidberg, and I. triangularis Chen & Norrbom are described and illustrated. Ichneumonosoma and Soita are revised, and keys to all the species are provided. Ichneumonosoma imitans (de Meijere) is newly recorded from Thailand. One new synonym is established: Soita Walker = Xaniosternum Enderlein, and Xaniosternum ophioneum Enderlein is moved from Xaniosternum to Soita (n. comb.). In addition, new morphological, geographic and biological information for two stalk-eyed fruit fly genera, Pelmatops and Pseudopelmatops, are provided. Pelmatops fukienensis Zia & Chen is newly recorded from Burma, Pelmetops ichneumoneus (Westwood) is newly recorded from Thailand and Burma, Pseudopelmatops angustifasciatus Zia & Chen is newly recorded from Vietnam, and the male of P. angustifasciatus is described and illustrated for the first time. The morphology of the compound eye and occipital protuberance of Pelmatops and Pseudopelmatops is described and illustrated for the first time. A cladistic analysis based on morphological characters of adults, a partial molecular analysis using the nuclear 28S rDNA (28S) and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) genes and a combined dataset were conducted to reconstruct the phylogeny of the four genera and their species. The results showed good support for monophyly of each of the four genera and the clade of the stalk-eyed fruit flies (Pelmatops + Pseudopelmatops). However, relationships of the stalk-eyed fruit flies with Soita and Ichneumonosoma are not clearly resolved, with the morphological analysis indicating that Ichneumonosoma is the sister group of the stalk-eyed fruit flies, but the 28S analysis and the combined analysis group Soita closer to the stalk-eyed fruit flies. Regarding relationships amongst congeners, Pelmatops was well resolved; Ichneumonosoma and Soita were partly resolved, and Pseudopelmatops was unresolved. In addition, a hypothesis about the biology of Pseudopelmatops and its relationship with Sesiidae (Lepidoptera) is discussed. PMID:26623901

  10. How Do Ants Make Sense of Gravity? A Boltzmann Walker Analysis of Lasius niger Trajectories on Various Inclines

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Anaïs; Lecheval, Valentin; Fournier, Richard; Blanco, Stéphane; Weitz, Sébastian; Bezian, Jean-Jacques; Gautrais, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to describe accurately how the directional information given by support inclinations affects the ant Lasius niger motion in terms of a behavioral decision. To this end, we have tracked the spontaneous motion of 345 ants walking on a 0.5×0.5 m plane canvas, which was tilted with 5 various inclinations by rad ( data points). At the population scale, support inclination favors dispersal along uphill and downhill directions. An ant's decision making process is modeled using a version of the Boltzmann Walker model, which describes an ant's random walk as a series of straight segments separated by reorientation events, and was extended to take directional influence into account. From the data segmented accordingly ( segments), this extension allows us to test separately how average speed, segments lengths and reorientation decisions are affected by support inclination and current walking direction of the ant. We found that support inclination had a major effect on average speed, which appeared approximately three times slower on the incline. However, we found no effect of the walking direction on speed. Contrastingly, we found that ants tend to walk longer in the same direction when they move uphill or downhill, and also that they preferentially adopt new uphill or downhill headings at turning points. We conclude that ants continuously adapt their decision making about where to go, and how long to persist in the same direction, depending on how they are aligned with the line of maximum declivity gradient. Hence, their behavioral decision process appears to combine klinokinesis with geomenotaxis. The extended Boltzmann Walker model parameterized by these effects gives a fair account of the directional dispersal of ants on inclines. PMID:24204636

  11. Present-Day Rates of Deformation Across the Southern Walker Lane From a Densified Regional GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Z. M.; Frankel, K. L.; Newman, A. V.; Foy, T. A.; Feng, L.; Johnson, C.; Dixon, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Walker Lane is a diffuse region of right-lateral shear in western Nevada and eastern California that accommodates ~25% (9.3 ± 0.2 mm/yr) of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. The region is characterized by discontinuous NNW-trending right-lateral strike-slip faults, and NE-trending, down-to-the-NW normal faults. The late Quaternary cumulative slip across the southern Walker Lane is only 1/3 the observed regional geodetic rate of right-lateral shear. We address this discrepancy between geologic and modern geodetic rates by installing and surveying a denser network of GPS monuments than previously existed. The higher spatial resolution will allow us to better define deformation rates in this complex tectonic setting. Our GPS data will be combined with accompanying fault kinematic and geochronologic data to determine deformation rates across multiple time scales, from late Quaternary to the present. We conducted a campaign GPS survey covering approximately 10,000 square kilometers encompassing the White Mountains, Fish Lake Valley, Clayton Valley, and the Silver Peak Range. We occupied 23 sites, including 10 newly installed monuments, which are spaced approximately 15-20 km apart. The existing sites used in this survey include the UNR-NEARNET sites, as well as a number of other campaign networks archived at UNAVCO. Stations with the longest history (including sites first surveyed as early as 1992) are expected to yield the most accurate results, while newer sites will help identify spatial patterns of strain partitioning. Monuments will be reoccupied annually and combined with past campaign survey data to determine modern crustal velocities. Initial results from this survey will be presented, which have important implications for understanding strain distribution along this important segment of the Pacific-North America boundary.

  12. Global design of satellite constellations: a multi-criteria performance comparison of classical walker patterns and new design patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansard, Erick; Frayssinhes, Eric; Palmade, Jean-Luc

    Basically, the problem of designing a multisatellite constellation exhibits a lot of parameters with many possible combinations: total number of satellites, orbital parameters of each individual satellite, number of orbital planes, number of satellites in each plane, spacings between satellites of each plane, spacings between orbital planes, relative phasings between consecutive orbital planes. Hopefully, some authors have theoretically solved this complex problem under simplified assumptions: the permanent (or continuous) coverage by a single and multiple satellites of the whole Earth and zonal areas has been entirely solved from a pure geometrical point of view. These solutions exhibit strong symmetry properties (e.g. Walker, Ballard, Rider, Draim constellations): altitude and inclination are identical, orbital planes and satellites are regularly spaced, etc. The problem with such constellations is their oversimplified and restricted geometrical assumption. In fact, the evaluation function which is used implicitly only takes into account the point-to-point visibility between users and satellites and does not deal with very important constraints and considerations that become mandatory when designing a real satellite system (e.g. robustness to satellite failures, total system cost, common view between satellites and ground stations, service availability and satellite reliability, launch and early operations phase, production constraints, etc.). An original and global methodology relying on a powerful optimization tool based on genetic algorithms has been developed at ALCATEL ESPACE. In this approach, symmetrical constellations can be used as initial conditions of the optimization process together with specific evaluation functions. A multi-criteria performance analysis is conducted and presented here in a parametric way in order to identify and evaluate the main sensitive parameters. Quantitative results are given for three examples in the fields of navigation, telecommunication and multimedia satellite systems. In particular, a new design pattern with very efficient properties in terms of robustness to satellite failures is presented and compared with classical Walker patterns.

  13. The application of active-source seismic imaging techniques to transtensional problems the Walker Lane and Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, Anna Marie

    The plate margin in the western United States is an active tectonic region that contains the integrated deformation between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly focused plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates within the northern Gulf of California gives way north of the Salton Trough to more diffuse deformation. In particular a large fraction of the slip along the southernmost San Andreas fault ultimately bleeds eastward, including about 20% of the total plate motion budget that finds its way through the transtensional Walker Lane Deformation Belt just east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Fault-bounded ranges combined with intervening low-lying basins characterize this region; the down-dropped features are often filled with water, which present opportunities for seismic imaging at unprecedented scales. Here I present active-source seismic imaging from the Salton Sea and Walker Lane Deformation Belt, including both marine applications in lakes and shallow seas, and more conventional land-based techniques along the Carson range front. The complex fault network beneath the Salton Trough in eastern California is the on-land continuation of the Gulf of California rift system, where North American-Pacific plate motion is accommodated by a series of long transform faults, separated by small pull-apart, transtensional basins; the right-lateral San Andreas fault bounds this system to the north where it carries, on average, about 50% of total plate motion. The Salton Sea resides within the most youthful and northerly "spreading center" in this several thousand-kilometer-long rift system. The Sea provides an ideal environment for the use of high-data-density marine seismic techniques. Two active-source seismic campaigns in 2010 and 2011 show progression of the development of the Salton pull-apart sub-basin and the northerly propagation of the Imperial-San Andreas system through time at varying resolutions. High fidelity seismic imagery documents the timing of strain transfer from the Imperial fault onto the San Andreas fault through the application of sequence stratigraphy. Evidence shows that the formation of the Salton and Mesquite sub-basins and the associated change of strain partitioning occurred within the last 20-40 k.y., essentially modifying a broader zone of transtension bounding the Imperial and San Andreas faults into two smaller zones of focused extension. The north-central Walker Lane contains a diffuse network of both strike-slip and normal faults, with some degree of strain partitioning characterized by normal faulting to the west along the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, and strike-slip faults to the east that define a diffuse boundary against the Basin and Range proper. A seismic study across the Mount Rose fault zone, bounding the Carson Range near Reno, Nevada, was carried out to investigate slip across a potential low-angle normal fault. A hammer seismic reflection and refraction profile combined with airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) imagery highlights fault scarp modification through minor slumping/landslides, providing a better understanding of the nature of slip on this fault. The northeastern margin of the Walker Lane is a region where both "Basin and Range" style normal faults and dextral strike-slip faults contribute to the northward propagation of the Walker Lane (essentially parallel to an equivalent northward propagation of the Mendocino triple junction). Near this intersection lies Pyramid Lake, bounded to the southwest by the dextral Pyramid Lake fault and to the northeast by the normal Lake Range fault. A high-resolution (sub-meter) seismic CHIRP survey collected in 2010 shows intriguing relationships into fault architecture beneath Pyramid Lake. Over 500 line-km of seismic data reveal a polarity flip in basin structure as down-to-the-east motion at the northern end of the Pyramid Lake fault rapidly gives way to down-to-the-west normal motion along the Lake Range fault. Alternating patterns of asymmetric and symmetric stratal patterns west of the Lake Range fault provides some evidence for segmentation of total slip along this large normal fault. Using dated sediment cores, slip rate for the Lake Range fault was found to be approximately 1 mm/yr during the Holocene. A complex zone of transtenstion was also observed in seismic CHIRP data in the northwest quadrant of the lake, where short, discontinuous faults hint at the development of a nascent shear zone trending to the northwest. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. Pamidronate corrects the down-regulation of the renal parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor mRNA in rats bearing Walker tumors.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobian, J; Morieux, C; Denne, M A; Bouizar, Z; Ureña, P; de Vernejoul, M C

    1998-05-01

    Human hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) is generally due to the release into the circulation of parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). PTHrP stimulates osteoclastic bone resorption and renal calcium reabsorption through the activation of a receptor similar to that of PTH (PTH-R). However, there is scarce information about the PTH-R regulation in the setting of the hypercalcemia. In the present study, we assessed the molecular basis of renal PTH-R regulation in Walker tumor-bearing rats either treated or not by a bisphosphonate, pamidronate. Twenty-seven 6-week-old rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: WC- APD- (9 control rats), WC+ APD- (9 Walker tumor-bearing rats), and WC+ APD+ (9 Walker tumor-bearing rats receiving 15 mg/kg/day of sodium pamidronate every day for seven days). Pamidronate induced a significant decrease in the mean tumor weight (9.3+/-0.8 vs 6.3+/-0.6 g). Seven days after the subcutaneous implantation of the Walker cells, plasma total calcium was 10.8+/-0.4, 16.8+/-0.6, and 12.9+/-0.6 mg/dl in WC- APD-, WC+ APD-, and WC+ APD+, respectively. Plasma PTHrP concentration was undetectable, 15.9+/-2.6, and 7.2+/-1.4 pmol/l, respectively. Bone histomorphometric results showed high resorption in WC+ APD-, which returned below the basal level of the WC- APD- with pamidronate treatment. Densitometric analysis of Northern blots revealed that the renal PTH-R mRNA expression in WC+ WPD- rats was a quarter of the levels in the WC- APD- and WC+ APD+ groups. WC+ APD- also had a decreased PTH-stimulated cAMP production in renal membranes. The PTH-R was expressed in the Walker tumor and it was not modified by pamidronate treatment. In conclusion, the expression of PTH-R receptor mRNA is significantly reduced in the kidney of rats bearing Walker carcinoma tumor. Its regulation is tissue-specific: pamidronate, which partially corrected the hypercalcemia and elevated circulating PTHrP, normalized the PTH-R mRNA expression in the kidney but not in the tumor. PMID:9660083

  15. Studying methane migration mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D methane hydrate reservoir modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Mohanty, Kishore; Cook, Ann; Hillman, Jess

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ microbial methanogenesis, the influence of pore size contrast on solubility gradients, and the impact of salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on dissolved methane equilibrium in pore water. Using environmental parameters from Walker Ridge in the Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. We find that with sufficient methane being supplied by organic methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x pore size contrast between clays and sands allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of methane hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand layer, a phenomenon that is observed in well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for the increase in sand-clay solubility contrast with depth from about 1.6% near the top of the sediment column to 8.6% at depth, which leads to a progressive strengthening of the diffusive flux of methane with time. By including an exponentially decaying organic methanogenesis input to the clay lithology with depth, we see a decrease in the aqueous methane supplied to the clays surrounding the sand layer with time, which works to further enhance the contrast in hydrate saturation between the sand and surrounding clays. Significant diffusive methane transport is observed in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand layer and about 4m below it, which matches well log observations. The clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to completely eliminate hydrate (as observed in logs), because the diffusive flux of aqueous methane due to a contrast in pore size occurs slower than the rate at which methane is supplied via organic methanogenesis. Therefore, it is likely that additional mechanisms are at play, notably bound water activity reduction in clays. Three-dimensionality allows for inclusion of lithologic heterogeneities, which focus fluid flow and subsequently allow for heterogeneity in the methane migration mechanisms that dominate in marine sediments at a local scale. Incorporating recently acquired 3D seismic data from Walker Ridge to inform the lithologic structure of our modeled reservoir, we show that even with deep adjective sourcing of methane along highly permeable pathways, local hydrate accumulations can be sourced either by diffusive or advective methane flux; advectively-sourced hydrates accumulate evenly in highly permeable strata, while diffusively-sourced hydrates are characterized by thin strata-bound intervals with high clay-sand pore size contrasts.

  16. Developmental changes in point-light walker processing during childhood and adolescence: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Watanabe, S; Honda, Y; Kakigi, R

    2009-06-16

    To investigate developmental changes in the neural responses to a biological motion stimulus, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) in 50 children aged from 7 to 14 years, and 10 adults. Two kinds of visual stimuli were presented: a point-light walker (PLW) stimulus and a scrambled point-light walker (sPLW) stimulus as a control. The sPLW stimulus had the same number of point-lights and the same velocity vector of point-lights as the PLW stimulus, but the initial starting positions were randomized. Consistent with previous ERP studies, one positive peak (P1) and two negative peaks (N1 and N2) were observed at around 130, 200 and 330 ms, respectively, in bilateral occipitotemporal regions, in all age groups. The latency of the P1 component was significantly shorter for the PLW than sPLW stimulus in all age groups, whereas the amplitude was significantly larger for the PLW than sPLW stimulus only for the 7-year-old group. The P1 amplitude and N1 latency were linearly decreased with age. The negative amplitudes of both N1 and N2 components of the PLW stimulus were significantly larger than those of the sPLW stimulus in all age groups. P1-N1 amplitude was changed by development, but not N2 amplitude. These results suggest that the intensity (P1) and timing (N1) of early visual processing for the PLW stimulus changed linearly throughout childhood and P1-N1 amplitude at occipitotemporal electrodes and N1 latency in 10-year-olds, but not 11-year-olds, was significantly larger than that in adults. For the amplitudes of the N2 component in response to PLW and sPLW stimuli in 7-8-year-old subjects were not statistically different from those in adults at occipitotemporal electrodes. These results suggest that the neural response to the PLW stimulus has developed by 10 years of age at the occipitotemporal electrode. PMID:19303916

  17. Changes in Energy Cost and Total External Work of Muscles in Elite Race Walkers Walking at Different Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Chwała, Wiesław; Klimek, Andrzej; Mirek, Wacław

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess energy cost and total external work (total energy) depending on the speed of race walking. Another objective was to determine the contribution of external work to total energy cost of walking at technical, threshold and racing speed in elite competitive race walkers. The study involved 12 competitive race walkers aged 24.9 4.10 years with 6 to 20 years of experience, who achieved a national or international sports level. Their aerobic endurance was determined by means of a direct method involving an incremental exercise test on the treadmill. The participants performed three tests walking each time with one of the three speeds according to the same protocol: an 8-minute walk with at steady speed was followed by a recovery phase until the oxygen debt was repaid. To measure exercise energy cost, an indirect method based on the volume of oxygen uptake was employed. The gait of the participants was recorded using the 3D Vicon opto-electronic motion capture system. Values of changes in potential energy and total kinetic energy in a gate cycle were determined based on vertical displacements of the centre of mass. Changes in mechanical energy amounted to the value of total external work of muscles needed to accelerate and lift the centre of mass during a normalised gait cycle. The values of average energy cost and of total external work standardised to body mass and distance covered calculated for technical speed, threshold and racing speeds turned out to be statistically significant (p 0.001). The total energy cost ranged from 51.2 kJ.m-1 during walking at technical speed to 78.3 kJ.m-1 during walking at a racing speed. Regardless of the type of speed, the total external work of muscles accounted for around 25% of total energy cost in race walking. Total external work mainly increased because of changes in the resultant kinetic energy of the centre of mass movement. PMID:25713673

  18. Dandy Walker Syndrome with Tessier 7 Cleft-a Rare Case Report and a Surgical Note on the Use of Vermilion Flap and Lazy W-Plasty.

    PubMed

    Dhupar, Vikas; Kumar, Praveen; Akkara, Francis; Kumar, Ananth

    2012-09-01

    The Dandy-Walker syndrome is a malformation of the brain that involves the mal-development of the cerebellum, associated with a cystic enlargement of this area, and frequently hydrocephalus. This malformation occurs in ~1 in 30,000 babies. It is seen mostly in females. Developmental anomalies like cleft lip, cleft palate, and cardiac malformation, orthopaedic and urinary structural abnormalities may also occur in 30% of the individuals. We report a case of Dandy Walker syndrome with Tessier 7 facial cleft with paramedian cleft palate in a 6 month old child. Surgical methods used to correct this anomaly include commissuroplasty, myoplasty of the orbicularis oris, and closure of the cleft cheek. Authors report a vermilion square flap technique that combines a lower lip mucocutaneous vermilion border flap with a lazy W-plasty to ensure a natural commissure and skin closure. PMID:23997496

  19. Placing the 2012-2015 California-Nevada drought into a paleoclimatic context: Insights from Walker Lake, California-Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchett, Benjamin J.; Boyle, Douglas P.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Bassett, Scott D.

    2015-10-01

    Assessing regional hydrologic responses to past climate changes can offer a guide for how water resources might respond to ongoing and future climate change. Here we employed a coupled water balance and lake evaporation model to examine Walker Lake behaviors during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), a time of documented hydroclimatic extremes. Together, a 14C-based shoreline elevation chronology, submerged subfossil tree stumps in the West Walker River, and regional paleoproxy evidence indicate a ~50 year pluvial episode that bridged two 140+ year droughts. We developed estimates of MCA climates to examine the transient lake behavior and evaluate watershed responses to climate change. Our findings suggest the importance of decadal climate persistence to elicit large lake-level fluctuations. We also simulated the current 2012-2015 California-Nevada drought and found that the current drought exceeds MCA droughts in mean severity but not duration.

  20. On the taxonomy of the genera Proneca Swinhoe, 1890, Ctenane Swinhoe, 1905 and Selca Walker, 1866 (Lepidoptera, Nolidae, Nolinae), with the description of two new species from Sumatra.

    PubMed

    László, Gyula M; Ronkay, Gábor; Ronkay, László

    2015-01-01

    Present paper contains the characterisation of the genera Proneca Swinhoe, 1890, Ctenane Swinhoe, 1905, and Selca Walker, 1866, and their species, with the description of two new species, Proneca brunneostriata sp. n. and Ctenane         michaeli sp. n., from Sumatra. Two new combinations and a new synonymy are established. With 32 colour photos and 24 genitalia figures. PMID:26624747

  1. Treatment of Walker ascites tumor cells by combination of photodynamic therapy with cyclophosphamide and interleukin-2 entrapped in liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Ionescu, Mircea D.; Balotescu, Carmen; Dima, V. S.

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the beneficial and adverse local effects of PDT associated with chemoimmunotherapy on rats bearing Walker ascites tumor cells. Experiments were performed on five batches of Wistar inbred rats with ascites tumor cells receiving intraperitoneally PDT (Photofrin II and 18 hrs later HeNe laser irradiation); Cyclophosphamide (CY); interleukin-2 (IL-2) or associated therapy (PDT+CY+IL-2). The control batch consisted of untreated rats (HBSS). The following results were noticed: (a) sole administration of PDT, IL-2 or CY reduced tumor growth, gave survival rates between 28.4 and 56.5% and cure rates ranging from 12.4 to 33.3%; (b) combined therapy (PDT+CY+IL-2) decreased tumor growth, increased survival rates (88.5%) and cure rates were 73.1% forty-two days post-transplantation. Summing up, in this study we noticed that PDT associated with chemoimmunotherapy reduced mortality as well as tumor volumes and increased cure rates in rats with ascites tumor cells. This approach points to the need for further evaluation in patients with peritoneal malignancies.

  2. A rat model of bone cancer pain induced by intra-tibia inoculation of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mao-Ying, Q.-L.; Zhao Jun; Dong Zhiqiang; Wang Jun; Yu Jin; Yan Minfen; Zhang Yuqiu; Wu Gencheng; Wang Yanqing . E-mail: wangyanqing@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    This study described a modified rat model of bone cancer pain. Syngeneic Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were injected into the tibia medullary cavity via intercondylar eminence. Series of tests were carried out including bone radiology, bone histology, ambulatory pain, thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, weight bearing ability, and electrophysiological recording from primary afferent fibers. The rats inoculated with carcinoma cells showed significant ambulatory pain, mechanical allodynia, and reduction in weight bearing, as well as increased incidence of spontaneous activity in A{beta} fibers in affected limb, whereas PBS (vehicle) or heat-killed cells (sham) injected rats showed no significant difference in comparison to normal rats. The pain hypersensitive behaviors were aggravated with time and destruction of bone. Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was also observed in the contralateral limb, indicating the involvement of 'mirror image' pain in bone cancer pain. In summary, the present study provided a useful and easily established rat model of bone cancer pain which will contribute to further study of the mechanisms underlying cancer pain.

  3. Investigation of a potential force-generation machinery driven by a cytoskeletal Walker-type ATPase in prokaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbe, Andeas; Hou, Sing-Yi; Chen, Chen-Yun; Lin, Yi-Lih; Shen, Jie-Pan; Lin, Li-Jing; Chou, Chia-Fu; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2008-03-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are often involved in generating mechanical force to drive various cellular processes. A subgroup of the Walker-type ATPases acts as cytoskeletal proteins that show highly dynamic behavior in bacterial cells. One of the most prominent examples is MinD that works with other cellular components to prevent cell division at unwanted polar sites through cycles of pole-to-pole oscillation in E. coli cells. We use fluorescence microscopy techniques to study the process of MinD assembly and disassembly on a lipid bilayer membrane surface and any possible change of membrane properties caused by MinD association with the membrane. To form a supported bilayer membrane, vesicles of the polar or total extract of E. coli membrane or synthetic lipids of defined composition are adsorbed to a treated glass coverslip. Ca^2+ is added to enable vesicle fusion to form a continuous bilayer on a glass surface. Formation of a bilayer is examined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The results on the protein assembly on membranes present an important step in understanding the intermediate stages that occur during the dynamic movement of MinD in cells.

  4. Histopathological effects and immunolocalization of periplocoside NW from Periploca sepium Bunge on the midgut epithelium of Mythimna separata Walker larvae.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingxing; Shi, Baojun; Zhao, Yanchao; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Periplocoside NW (PSNW) with pregnane glycoside skeleton is a novel insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium Bunge. This compound has a potent stomach poisoning activity against several insect pests. In this study, we observed the intoxication symptoms, investigated the histopathological effects and carried out immuno-electron microscopic localization of PSNW on the midgut epithelium of oriental armyworm Mythimna separata Walker larvae for better understanding its action mechanism against insects. Ultrastructural observations showed that cell damages caused by PSNW in the midgut of M. separata larvae are related to the degeneration of brush border microvilli. The dissolution of cytoskeletal structures in the interior and on the surface of microvilli was responsible for the decrease in size and eventual disappearance of microvilli when bubbles of cytoplasmic substances protrude into the midgut lumen of M. separata, thus resulting in cell death. The immuno-electron microscopic localization research showed that gold particle appeared on the microvilli layer of the midgut of M. separate larvae firstly. The density of gold particle gradually added with the time, and finally microvilli layer was destructed severely. Meantime, the gold particles were also presented to the intracellular organelle membrane and the organelles also were destructed. Therefore, we proposed that this membrane system on insect midgut epithelium cells is the initial acting site of PSNW against insects. PMID:25307468

  5. Theory of the transmission of infection in the spread of epidemics: interacting random walkers with and without confinement.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, V M; Sugaya, S

    2014-12-01

    A theory of the spread of epidemics is formulated on the basis of pairwise interactions in a dilute system of random walkers (infected and susceptible animals) moving in [Formula: see text] dimensions. The motion of an animal pair is taken to obey a Smoluchowski equation in [Formula: see text]-dimensional space that combines diffusion with confinement of each animal to its particular home range. An additional (reaction) term that comes into play when the animals are in close proximity describes the process of infection. Analytic solutions are obtained, confirmed by numerical procedures, and shown to predict a surprising effect of confinement. The effect is that infection spread has a non-monotonic dependence on the diffusion constant and/or the extent of the attachment of the animals to the home ranges. Optimum values of these parameters exist for any given distance between the attractive centers. Any change from those values, involving faster/slower diffusion or shallower/steeper confinement, hinders the transmission of infection. A physical explanation is provided by the theory. Reduction to the simpler case of no home ranges is demonstrated. Effective infection rates are calculated, and it is shown how to use them in complex systems consisting of dense populations. PMID:25403272

  6. New Test of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Metric Using the Distance Sum Rule.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Syksy; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    We present a new test of the validity of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric, based on comparing the distance from redshift 0 to z(1) and from z(1) to z(2) to the distance from 0 to z(2). If the Universe is described by the FLRW metric, the comparison provides a model-independent measurement of spatial curvature. The test relies on geometrical optics, it is independent of the matter content of the Universe and the applicability of the Einstein equation on cosmological scales. We apply the test to observations, using the Union2.1 compilation of supernova distances and Sloan Lens ACS Survey galaxy strong lensing data. The FLRW metric is consistent with the data, and the spatial curvature parameter is constrained to be -1.22<Ω(K0)<0.63, or -0.08<Ω(K0)<0.97 with a prior from the cosmic microwave background and the local Hubble constant, though modeling of the lenses is a source of significant systematic uncertainty. PMID:26382671

  7. Replacement by Caenis diminuta walker (ephemeroptera:caenidae) in the mayfly community structure of a thermally-stressed, southeastern stream

    SciTech Connect

    Poff, N L; Matthews, R A

    1984-01-01

    Mayfly community structure on sycamore and sweetgum leaf packs in a thermally-stressed, post-thermal and an unstressed stream were compared. Leaves were colonized over an 11 wk (77 d) period from December 1982 to March 1983. Degree-days (> 0/sup 0/C) accumulated were 1014, 638 and 627 for the thermally-stressed, post-thermal and unstressed streams, respectively. Significant differences in mayfly community structure were found between the thermally-stressed vs. the post-thermal and unstressed streams with respect to both Stenonema spp. and Caenis diminuta Walker. No significant differences in community structure were found between the two leaf species. Stenonema spp. dominated the mayfly fauna over the sampling period for both the unstressed (68%) and post-thermal (98%) streams; however, C. diminuta replaced Stenonema spp. as the dominant mayfly (88%) within leaf packs from the stream receiving thermal effluent. Additional data suggest C. diminuta is tolerant of rapidly fluctuating thermal regimes (..delta.. T of up to 11/sup 0/C in 1 h) and high temperatures (up to 40/sup 0/C). 30 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Exploring the Midgut Transcriptome and Brush Border Membrane Vesicle Proteome of the Rice Stem Borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chuanhua; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Lin, Yongjun

    2012-01-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is one of the most detrimental pests affecting rice crops. The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins has been explored as a means to control this pest, but the potential for C. suppressalis to develop resistance to Bt toxins makes this approach problematic. Few C. suppressalis gene sequences are known, which makes in-depth study of gene function difficult. Herein, we sequenced the midgut transcriptome of the rice stem borer. In total, 37,040 contigs were obtained, with a mean size of 497 bp. As expected, the transcripts of C. suppressalis shared high similarity with arthropod genes. Gene ontology and KEGG analysis were used to classify the gene functions in C. suppressalis. Using the midgut transcriptome data, we conducted a proteome analysis to identify proteins expressed abundantly in the brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Of the 100 top abundant proteins that were excised and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis, 74 share high similarity with known proteins. Among these proteins, Western blot analysis showed that Aminopeptidase N and EH domain-containing protein have the binding activities with Bt-toxin Cry1Ac. These data provide invaluable information about the gene sequences of C. suppressalis and the proteins that bind with Cry1Ac. PMID:22666467

  9. Minimum of PDOP and its applications in inter-satellite links (ISL) establishment of Walker-δ constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songhui; Gui, Qingming; Li, Guozhong; Du, Yuanlu

    2014-08-01

    Within the next decade, there will be a number of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) available, i.e. modernized GPS, Galileo, restored GLONASS, BeiDou and many other regional GNSS augmentation systems. Thus, measurement redundancies and geometry of the satellites can be improved. GDOP (Geometric Dilution of Precision) and PDOP (Position Dilution of Precision) are associated with the constellation geometry of satellites, and they are the geometrically determined factors that describe the effect of geometry on the relationship between measurement error and position error. GDOP and PDOP are often used as standards for selecting good satellites to meet the desired positioning precision. In this paper, the related conclusions of minimum of GDOP which was discussed are given, and it is used to study the minimum of PDOP for two cases that the receiver is on the earth’s surface and the receiver is on satellite. The corresponding theorem and constructive solutions of minimum of PDOP are given. Then, the rationality of the ISL (inter-satellite link) establishment criteria in Walker-δ constellation is discussed by using the theory of minimum of PDOP. Finally, the minimum of PDOP is calculated when the number of satellites is 4-10, and these results are verified by using Monte Carlo method.

  10. Effects of Total Ginsenosides on the Feeding Behavior and Two Enzymes Activities of Mythimna separata (Walker) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Hua; Tan, Shi-Qiang; Zhao, Yan; Lei, Feng-Jie; Zhang, Lian-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenosides, the main effective components of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer and Panax quinquefolius L., are important allelochemicals of ginseng. Although many studies have targeted the pharmacological, chemical, and clinical properties of ginsenosides, little is known about their ecological role in ginseng population adaptation and evolution. Pests rarely feed on ginseng, and it is not known why. This study investigated the effects of total ginsenosides on feeding behavior and activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione s-transferase (GST) in Mythimna separata (Walker) larvae. The results showed that the total ginsenosides had significant antifeeding activity against M. separata larvae, determined by nonselective and selective antifeeding bioassays. In addition, the total ginsenosides had inhibitory effects on the activities of GST and AChE. The antifeeding ratio was the highest at 8 h, then decreased, and was the lowest at 16 h. Both GST and AChE activities decreased from 0 h to 48 h in all total ginsenosides treatments but increased at 72 h. Total ginsenosides had antifeeding activity against M. separata larvae and inhibitory effects on the activities of GST and AChE. PMID:26074991

  11. New Test of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Metric Using the Distance Sum Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Syksy; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    We present a new test of the validity of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric, based on comparing the distance from redshift 0 to z1 and from z1 to z2 to the distance from 0 to z2. If the Universe is described by the FLRW metric, the comparison provides a model-independent measurement of spatial curvature. The test relies on geometrical optics, it is independent of the matter content of the Universe and the applicability of the Einstein equation on cosmological scales. We apply the test to observations, using the Union2.1 compilation of supernova distances and Sloan Lens ACS Survey galaxy strong lensing data. The FLRW metric is consistent with the data, and the spatial curvature parameter is constrained to be -1.22 <ΩK 0<0.63 , or -0.08 <ΩK 0<0.97 with a prior from the cosmic microwave background and the local Hubble constant, though modeling of the lenses is a source of significant systematic uncertainty.

  12. Animal asymmetry and human heredity: dextrality, tool use and language in evolution--10 years after Walker (1980).

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, J L

    1991-02-01

    At the time of the last major review on this subject in the British Journal of Psychology (Walker, 1980) there was, with a few notable exceptions, little evidence of anatomical or behavioural asymmetries in non-human species at all comparable to our own. In the past decade the picture has changed dramatically, and now includes invertebrates from the Cambrian formations of half a billion years ago, many species of birds, rats and mice, antelopes, cats, dogs, whales, and primates. Asymmetries may differ as a function of sex (including hormone status-females of many species including humans appearing more lateralized at a motor level), developmental status and environmental influences. Effects may be manifest anatomically (limb or brain dimensions), or at a sensory, cognitive or motor level (paw preference, turning biases). A recurring observation across species is that the right hemisphere seems to be weakly specialized for spatial and emotional roles, and the left for learning, discriminatory and communicatory functions. Three million years ago our hominid ancestors were more or less fully bipedal, developed the first stone tools and were dextral in manipulating them. However, tool use seems not to have driven the evolution of language, our other strongly lateralized capacity. Evolutionary scenarios for bipedalism, tool use and language are discussed, together with the question of whether human language is continuous, in an evolutionary sense, with earlier primate call systems. PMID:2029604

  13. Competitive Interactions between Immature Stages of Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) and Bactrocera tau (Walker) (Diptera: Tephritidae) under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shen, K; Hu, J; Wu, B; An, K; Zhang, J; Liu, J; Zhang, R

    2014-08-01

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), and the pumpkin fly, Bactrocera tau (Walker), are economically important pests that attack mainly cucurbitacean fruits. The two fruit fly species have similar natural distributions, host ranges, and population growth capacities. This study was designed to assess the asymmetrical competitions through resource exploitation between the larvae of B. cucurbitae and B. tau at different density levels and temperatures, and on different hosts by comparing the relative effects of interspecific and intraspecific interactions on four life history parameters: survival rate, puparial mass, puparial duration, and developmental duration. Our results showed that intraspecific and interspecific competitions occurred under some laboratory conditions, and B. cucurbitae took advantage over B. tau at the high-density level and at low and high temperatures on pumpkin, bitter gourd, and bottle gourd when interspecific competition took place. Intraspecific and interspecific competitions mainly affected the puparial mass and the survival rate of the two fruit fly species but had no marked effect on the puparial duration or development duration. PMID:27193811

  14. Late Neogene slip transfer and extension within the curved Whisky Flat fault system central Walker Lane, west-central Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biholar, Alexander Kenneth Casian

    In Whisky Flat of west-central Nevada, northwest-striking faults in the Walker Lane curve to east-northeast orientations at the northern limits of the Mina deflection. This curve in strike results in the formation of ˜685 m deep depression bounded by north-south convex to the east range-front faults that at the apex of fault curvature are bisected at a high angle by a structural stepover. We use the vertical offset of a late Miocene erosional surface mapped in the highlands and inferred from gravity depth inversion in the basin to measure the magnitude of displacement on faults. A N65°W extensional axis determined through fault-slip inversion is used to constrain the direction in displacement models. Through the use of a forward rectilinear displacement model, we document that the complex array of faults is capable of developing with broadly contemporaneous displacements on all structures since the opening of the basin during the Pliocene.

  15. Chemical composition and antimicrobial and allelopathic activity of Tunisian Conyza sumatrensis (Retz.) E.WALKER essential oils.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Samia; Salah, Karima Bel Hadj; Elaissi, Ameur; Jlaiel, Lobna; Jannet, Hichem Ben; Aouni, Mahjoub; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2013-02-01

    Conyza sumatrensis (Retz.) E.WALKER (Asteraceae) is a spontaneous annual herb, fairly widespread throughout Tunisia, which has rarely been studied or valued in any sector. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of different parts (flower heads, leaves, stems, and roots) of C. sumatrensis plants, which were collected in autumn (November 2007) at the flowering stage in the area of Monastir, Tunisia. In total, 98 compounds, representing 88.1-99.3% of the oil composition, were identified by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The root essential oil was distinguished by its high content in acetylenes (matricaria ester, 4; 74.3%), while those from flower heads and leaves were dominated by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (61.1 and 50.3%, resp.). The oils of C. sumatrensis from Tunisia belonged to a matricaria ester/caryophyllene oxide chemotype. All the oils were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, and allelopathic activities. The results indicate that the leaf oil exhibited significant in vitro antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Proteus mirabilis and that the C. sumatrensis oils isolated from the aerial parts presented high mycelia-growth inhibition of Candida albicans and the filamentous fungi tested. Moreover, the essential oils of the different plant parts inhibited the shoot and root growth of Raphanus sativus (radish) seedlings. Indeed, the inhibition of the hypocotyl growth varied from 28.6 to 90.1% and that of the radicle from 42.3 to 96.2%. PMID:23418168

  16. Effects of Fraxinellone on the Midgut Enzyme Activities of the 5th Instar Larvae of Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata Walker

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Min; Wu, Wenjun; Liu, Huixia

    2014-01-01

    Isolated from Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz., fraxinellone exhibited multiple bioactivities against insects. In the present paper, the changes of digestive enzymes and detoxification enzymes of Mythimna separata Walker (5th instar larvae), treated with fraxinellone, were investigated. Compared with those of the control, the α-amylase activity of the fraxinellone-treated 5th instar larvae was inhibited, whereas the level of their protease activity was increased. Based upon further studies on the specific proteases, the levels of the active alkaline trypsin-like enzyme (BApNA as the substrate) and the chymotrypsin-like enzyme (BTEE as the substrate) activities of the treated larvae were declined; however, the level of activity of the weak alkaline trypsin-like enzyme (TAME as the substrate) of the treated ones was increased. Meanwhile, the activities of two detoxification enzymes, such as carboxylesterase (CarE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), of the treated larvae were increased to some extent, but the activities of NADPH-P450 reductase and O-demethylase of the treated ones declined. Therefore, protease (especially the weak alkaline trypsin-like enzyme), CarE and GST played important roles in the metabolism of fraxinellone in the midgut of Mythimna separata (M. separata). PMID:25216084

  17. Effect of a high-intensity exercise training on the metabolism and function of macrophages and lymphocytes of walker 256 tumor bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Belmonte, Mônica Aparecida; Navarro, Francisco; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Araújo, Ronaldo Carvalho; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that moderately intense training promotes augmented immune function, whereas strenuous exercise can cause immunosupression. Because the combat of cancer requires high immune function, high-intensity exercise could negatively affect the host organism; however, despite the epidemiologic data, there is a lack of experimental evidence to show that high-intensity training is harmful to the immune system. Therefore, we tested the influence of high-intensity treadmill training (10 weeks, 5 days/week, 30 mins/day, 85% VO(2)max) on immune system function and tumor development in Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats. The metabolism of glucose and glutamine in lymphocytes and macrophages was assessed, in addition to some functional parameters such as hydrogen peroxide production, phagocytosis, and lymphocyte proliferative responses. The metabolism of Walker 256 cells was also investigated. Results demonstrated that high-intensity training increased the life span of tumor-bearing rats, promoted a reduction in tumor mass, and prevented indicators of cachexia. Several changes, such as a reduction in body weight and food intake and activation of glutamine metabolism in macrophages and lymphocytes induced by the presence of Walker 256 tumor, were prevented by high intensity training. The reduction in tumor growth was associated with an impairment of tumor cell glucose and glutamine metabolism. These data suggest that high-intensity exercise training may be a viable strategy against tumors. PMID:17959841

  18. Spatial and temporal variability in faulting along a Quaternary fault transect across the Northern Walker Lane, California-Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, R. D.; Briggs, R. W.; Crone, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    What are the temporal and spatial patterns of faulting across shear zones with overlapping parallel faults that are preferentially oriented to accommodate regional shear? How should earthquake hazard be modeled if these systems have variable earthquake recurrence? We explore these questions in the Northern Walker Lane, a 100-km-wide zone of dextral shear along the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada, which accommodates ~15% of the 50 mm/yr of relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. We used high-resolution airborne Light Distance and Ranging (LiDAR) data to create surficial geologic maps, conducted paleoseismic trenching, applied Quaternary geochronology, and collected high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles along a fault-perpendicular transect across the principal, subparallel, northwest-striking Mohawk Valley, Grizzly Valley, Honey Lake, and Warm Springs Valley dextral-slip faults. Key results along this transect from southwest-to-northeast are: (1) trenching at the Sulphur Creek Sidehill Bench site on the Mohawk Valley fault system indicates four surface-rupturing earthquakes since ~14 ka, which is fewer events than inferred from the slip rate of 2.9 mm/yr from geodetic block-models. To reconcile these results, we suggest that strain is widely distributed on numerous uncharacterized fault strands or that the contemporary (geodetic block model) rate is a young phenomena and hasn't been sustained since 14 ka. (2) High-resolution shallow seismic-reflection imaging and topographic analysis using the LiDAR data provide the first conclusive evidence that the Grizzly Valley fault system is an active Quaternary structure, with probable motion in the latest Quaternary. This result is significant because this fault system is not presently included in the USGS Quaternary fault-and-fold database, is not specified as a seismic source in most regional hazard models, and is also not defined as a boundary in regional geodetic block models. (3) New analysis of faulted, post-Lahontan fluvial terrace risers along the Honey Lake fault system suggests an average slip rate of 2.3 mm/yr since 15.8 ka, but the rate may have slowed to 1.3 mm/yr since the mid Holocene. The latter rate is consistent with geodetic block models. (4) A late Quaternary slip record for the Warm Springs Valley fault system suggests that, the fault had a slip rate of 2.5-3.8 mm/yr from ~50-15 ka, but since 15.8 ka, the rate has been <0.2 mm/yr. We speculate that the slip-rate variability may be linked to co-varying slip with the overlapping and adjacent Honey Lake fault, but additional late Quaternary slip-rate data are needed for the Honey Lake fault to test this hypothesis. In summary, the results along this transect led to identification of new, active Quaternary faults and revealed evidence for spatial and temporal slip-rate variability on parallel and overlapping strike-slip faults in the Northern Walker Lane. We propose that the recognition of new active structures and temporal variations in slip rates may help explain discrepancies between long-term geologic and modern geodetic slip rates across this region. We now need to determine whether a long-term slip rate or the recent record of the last few thousand years is most representative of a fault's near-term earthquake potential.

  19. Lidar-Based Mapping of Late Quaternary Faulting Along the Grizzly Valley Fault, Walker Lane Seismic Belt, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, C. S.; Hoirup, D. F.; Barry, G.; Pearce, J.; Glick, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault (GVF) is located within the northern Walker Lane, a zone of right-lateral shear between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range in Plumas County. The GVF extends southeasterly from near Mt. Ingalls along the eastern side of Lake Davis. It may partially connect with the Hot Creek fault within Sierra Valley and extend south to Loyalton with an overall approximate length of 50 km. Comparison of high-resolution topography developed from LiDAR data with published bedrock geologic mapping documents the presence of geomorphic features that provide information on fault activity of the GVF. Field mapping verified tectonically deformed and offset late Quaternary surfaces identified on bare-earth LiDAR imagery across the GVF within glacial deposits on the eastern margin of Lake Davis, and alluvial deposits in Sierra Valley. Along the GVF, conspicuous geomorphic and hydrologic features include scarps in alluvial surfaces, elongated depressions aligned with adjacent linear escarpments, truncated bedrock spurs, closed depressions, linear swales, right-lateral deflections of creeks and river courses, and shutter ridges, as well as springs and linear seeps consistent with right-lateral strike-slip faulting. The discontinuous nature of observed fault traces combined with the apparent down-to-the-west offset of alluvial surfaces at the southern and northern ends of the eastern margin of Lake Davis are consistent with a broad bend or step over in the fault. Scarp profiles of apparently faulted surfaces extracted from LiDAR data document vertical offsets of up to 14 m. Our study suggest that the GVF is an oblique, right-lateral fault that has been active in the late Quaternary. This study complements on-going investigations by DWR to assess the impact of seismic hazards on State Water Project infrastructure.

  20. A Deletion in the VLDLR Gene in Eurasier Dogs with Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation (DWLM)

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Martina; Fischer, Andrea; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bernardino, Filipa; Manz, Eberhard; Matiasek, Kaspar; Rentmeister, Kai; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker-like malformation (DWLM) is the result of aberrant brain development and mainly characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia. DWLM affected dogs display a non-progressive cerebellar ataxia. Several DWLM cases were recently observed in the Eurasier dog breed, which strongly suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in this breed. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 9 cases and 11 controls and found the best association of DWLM with markers on chromosome 1. Subsequent homozygosity mapping confirmed that all 9 cases were homozygous for a shared haplotype in this region, which delineated a critical interval of 3.35 Mb. We sequenced the genome of an affected Eurasier and compared it with the Boxer reference genome and 47 control genomes of dogs from other breeds. This analysis revealed 4 private non-synonymous variants in the critical interval of the affected Eurasier. We genotyped these variants in additional dogs and found perfect association for only one of these variants, a single base deletion in the VLDLR gene encoding the very low density lipoprotein receptor. This variant, VLDLR:c.1713delC is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.W572Gfs*10). Variants in the VLDLR gene have been shown to cause congenital cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation in human patients and Vldlr knockout mice also display an ataxia phenotype. Our combined genetic data together with the functional knowledge on the VLDLR gene from other species thus strongly suggest that VLDLR:c.1713delC is indeed causing DWLM in Eurasier dogs. PMID:25668033

  1. In-stream biotic control on nutrient biogeochemistry in a forested sheadwater tream, West Fork of Walker Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Brian J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates the importance of in-stream processing in regulating nutrient export, yet the influence of temporal variability in stream metabolism on net nutrient uptake has not been explicitly addressed. Streamwater DIN and SRP concentrations in Walker Branch, a first-order deciduous forest stream in eastern Tennessee, show a repeated pattern of annual maxima in summer and biannual minima in spring and autumn. Temporal variations in catchment hydrologic flowpaths result in lower winter and higher summer nutrient concentrations, but do not explain the spring and autumn nutrient minima. Ambient nutrient uptake rates were measured 2-3 times per week over an 18-mo period and compared to daily rates of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) to examine the influence of in-stream biotic activity on nutrient export. GPP and ER rates explained 85% of the variation in net DIN retention with high net NO3- uptake (and lower net NH4+ release) rates occurring during spring and autumn and net DIN release in summer. Diel nutrient concentration patterns were examined several times throughout the year to determine the relative importance of autotrophic and heterotrophic activity on net nutrient uptake. High spring GPP corresponded to daily decreases in NO3- over the illuminated hours resulting in high diel NO3- amplitude which dampened as the canopy closed. GPP explained 91% of the variance in diel NO3- amplitude. In contrast, the autumn nutrient minima was largely explained by heterotrophic respiration since GPP remained low and little diel NO3- variation was observed during the autumn.

  2. A westward extension of the warm pool leads to a westward extension of the Walker circulation, drying eastern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, A. Park; Funk, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Observations and simulations link anthropogenic greenhouse and aerosol emissions with rapidly increasing Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Over the past 60 years, the Indian Ocean warmed two to three times faster than the central tropical Pacific, extending the tropical warm pool to the west by ~40° longitude (>4,000 km). This propensity toward rapid warming in the Indian Ocean has been the dominant mode of interannual variability among SSTs throughout the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans (55°E–140°W) since at least 1948, explaining more variance than anomalies associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In the atmosphere, the primary mode of variability has been a corresponding trend toward greatly increased convection and precipitation over the tropical Indian Ocean. The temperature and rainfall increases in this region have produced a westward extension of the western, ascending branch of the atmospheric Walker circulation. Diabatic heating due to increased mid-tropospheric water vapor condensation elicits a westward atmospheric response that sends an easterly flow of dry air aloft toward eastern Africa. In recent decades (1980–2009), this response has suppressed convection over tropical eastern Africa, decreasing precipitation during the ‘long-rains’ season of March–June. This trend toward drought contrasts with projections of increased rainfall in eastern Africa and more ‘El Niño-like’ conditions globally by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Increased Indian Ocean SSTs appear likely to continue to strongly modulate the Warm Pool circulation, reducing precipitation in eastern Africa, regardless of whether the projected trend in ENSO is realized. These results have important food security implications, informing agricultural development, environmental conservation, and water resource planning.

  3. A westward extension of the warm pool leads to a westward extension of the Walker circulation, drying eastern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Christopher C.; Williams, A. Park

    2011-01-01

    Observations and simulations link anthropogenic greenhouse and aerosol emissions with rapidly increasing Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Over the past 60 years, the Indian Ocean warmed two to three times faster than the central tropical Pacific, extending the tropical warm pool to the west by ~40° longitude (>4,000 km). This propensity toward rapid warming in the Indian Ocean has been the dominant mode of interannual variability among SSTs throughout the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans (55°E–140°W) since at least 1948, explaining more variance than anomalies associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In the atmosphere, the primary mode of variability has been a corresponding trend toward greatly increased convection and precipitation over the tropical Indian Ocean. The temperature and rainfall increases in this region have produced a westward extension of the western, ascending branch of the atmospheric Walker circulation. Diabatic heating due to increased mid-tropospheric water vapor condensation elicits a westward atmospheric response that sends an easterly flow of dry air aloft toward eastern Africa. In recent decades (1980–2009), this response has suppressed convection over tropical eastern Africa, decreasing precipitation during the ‘long-rains’ season of March–June. This trend toward drought contrasts with projections of increased rainfall in eastern Africa and more ‘El Niño-like’ conditions globally by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Increased Indian Ocean SSTs appear likely to continue to strongly modulate the Warm Pool circulation, reducing precipitation in eastern Africa, regardless of whether the projected trend in ENSO is realized. These results have important food security implications, informing agricultural development, environmental conservation, and water resource planning.

  4. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern Walker Lane and Basin and Range from GPS velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, William C.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné

    2011-04-01

    We infer rates of crustal deformation in the northern Walker Lane (NWL) and western Basin and Range using data from the Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada transtension, and other continuous GPS networks including the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory. We present 224 new GPS velocities, correct them for the effects of viscoelastic postseismic relaxation, and use them to constrain a block model to estimate fault slip rates. The data segregate the NWL into domains based on differences in deformation rate, pattern, and style. Deformation is transtensional, with highest rates near the western and eastern edges of the NWL. Some basins, e.g., Tahoe, experience shear deformation and extension. Normal slip is distributed throughout the NWL and Basin and Range, where 11 subparallel range-bounding normal fault systems have an average horizontal extension rate of 0.1 mm/yr. Comparison between geologic and geodetic slip rates indicates that out of 12 published geologic rates, 10 agree with geodetic rates to within uncertainties. This suggests that smaller crustal blocks move steadily, similar to larger lithospheric plates, and that geodetic measurements of slip rates are reliable in zones of complex crustal deformation. For the two slip rates that disagree, geologic rates are greater. The vertical axis rotation rate of the Carson domain is -1.3 ± 0.1°/My clockwise, lower than the 3° to 6°/My obtained in paleomagnetic measurements. This suggests that vertical axis rotation rates may have decreased over the last 9-13 My as the role of faulting has increased at the expense of rigid rotations.

  5. Enhancement of photodynamic therapy due to hyperbaric hyperoxia: an experimental study of Walker 256 tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Jorge H.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Nicola, Ester M. D.; Metze, Konradin

    1997-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is now an approved treatment for many types of cancers, is based on the simultaneous involvement of three factors, namely: tumor tissue retention of a specific photosensitizer; local illumination of the lesion with a visible light source and the occurrence of oxygen in the triplet state. Theoretically, a change in any one of these factors may be compensated by a change in the other two factors, leading to the same therapeutic result. In practice, this is not true, since we are dealing with living tissue, but we may expect to find an ideal combination of these three factors which may give the best clinical results. In this work we present experimental results of PDT under Hyperbaric hyperoxia (HBO) in tumor masses of the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats. These tumors were created by previous inoculation of 'Walker 256' neoplastic cells Hematoporphyrin Ester (HpE) was administered as the photosensitizer. The rats were pressurized at up to 3 atm with a 100 percent continuous oxygen ventilation environment in a specially designed hyperbaric chamber. The skin area above the tumor was photosensitized for 45 minutes with a 7 mw HeNe laser. Twenty four hours later, the tumor was removed for study. In all the animals treated with PDT/HBO histology revealed a very important reduction in the number of tumor cells as compared with the PDT controls in normal atmospheric condition, showing numerous apoptotic as well as necrotic cells at the border of the radiated area. The observed enhancement in the PDT for this situation is, of course, related to the extra oxygen in the circulatory system.

  6. Abscopal antitumor immune effects of magnet-mediated hyperthermia at a high therapeutic temperature on Walker-256 carcinosarcomas in rats

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUI; ZHANG, LI; SHI, YINGRUI; JAVIDIPARSIJANI, SARA; WANG, GUIRONG; LI, XIAO; OUYANG, WEIWEI; ZHOU, JUMEI; ZHAO, LINGYUN; WANG, XIAOWEN; ZHANG, XIAODONG; GAO, FUPING; LIU, JINGSHI; LUO, JUNMING; TANG, JINTIAN

    2014-01-01

    The abscopal effect has previously been described in various tumors and is associated with radiation therapy and hyperthermia, with possible underlying mechanisms explaining each observed case. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor effects of magnet-mediated hyperthermia on Walker-256 carcinosarcomas in rats at two different temperature ranges (4246C and 5055C). We also aimed to identify whether a higher therapeutic temperature of magnetic-mediated hyperthermia improves the abscopal antitumor effects, where localised irradiation of the tumor causes not only the irradiated tumor to shrink, but also tumors located far from the area of irradiation. Following induction of carcinosarcoma in both sides of the body, magnet-mediated hyperthermia was applied to one side only, leaving the other side as a control. The changes in tumor growth were observed. Our results demonstrated that magnet-mediated hyperthermia at a higher temperature inhibited the growth of carcinosarcoma at the site of treatment. Furthermore, the growth of the carcinosarcoma on the untreated side was also inhibited. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen were decreased in the hyperthermia group, which was more significant in the higher temperature test group. Flow cytometric analysis showed an increased number of CD4- and CD8-positive T cells, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed increased levels of interferon-? and interleukin-2 in the higher temperature group. These results suggested that magnet-mediated hyperthermia at a higher temperature (5055C) can improve the abscopal antitumor effects and stimulate a greater endogenous immune response in carcinosarcoma-bearing rats. PMID:24527084

  7. A province-scale block model of Walker Lane and western Basin and Range crustal deformation constrained by GPS observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Bormann, J.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Walker Lane in the western Great Basin of the western United States is an 800 km long and 100 km wide zone of active intracontinental transtension that absorbs ~10 mm/yr, about 20% of the Pacific/North America plate boundary relative motion. Lying west of the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate (SNGV) and adjoining the Basin and Range Province to the east, deformation is predominantly shear strain overprinted with a minor component of extension. The Walker Lane responds with faulting, block rotations, structural step-overs, and has distinct and varying partitioned domains of shear and extension. Resolving these complex deformation patterns requires a long term observation strategy with a dense network of GPS stations (spacing ~20 km). The University of Nevada, Reno operates the 373 station Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada transtension (MAGNET) semi-continuous network that supplements coverage by other networks such as EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory, which alone has insufficient density to resolve the deformation patterns. Uniform processing of data from these GPS mega-networks provides a synoptic view and new insights into the kinematics and mechanics of Walker Lane tectonics. We present velocities for thousands of stations with time series between 3 to 17 years in duration aligned to our new GPS-based North America fixed reference frame NA12. The velocity field shows a rate budget across the southern Walker Lane of ~10 mm/yr, decreasing northward to ~7 mm/yr at the latitude of the Mohawk Valley and Pyramid Lake. We model the data with a new block model that estimates rotations and slip rates of known active faults between the Mojave Desert and northern Nevada and northeast California. The density of active faults in the region requires including a relatively large number of blocks in the model to accurately estimate deformation patterns. With 49 blocks, our the model captures structural detail not represented in previous province-scale models, and improves our ability to compare results to geologic fault slip rates. Modeling the kinematics on this scale has the advantages of 1) reducing the impact of poorly constrained boundaries on small geographically limited models, 2) consistent modeling of rotations across major structural step-overs near the Mina deflection and Carson domain, 3) tracking the kinematics of the south-to-north varying budget of Walker Lane deformation by solving for extension in the Basin and Range to the east, and 4) using a contiguous SNGV as a uniform western kinematic boundary condition. We compare contemporary deformation to geologic slip rates and longer term rotation rates estimated from rock paleomagnetism. GPS-derived block rotation rates are somewhat dependent on model regularization, but are generally within 1° per million years, and tend to be slower than published paleomagnetic rotations rates. GPS data, together with neotectonic and rock paleomagnetism studies provide evidence that the relative importance of Walker Lane block rotations and fault slip continues to evolve, giving way to a more through-going system with slower rotation rates and higher slip rates on individual faults.

  8. A pyroelectric infrared biometric system for real-time walker recognition by use of a maximum likelihood principal components estimation (MLPCE) method.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian-Shuen; Hao, Qi; Brady, David J; Guenther, Bob D; Hsu, Ken Y

    2007-03-19

    This paper presents a novel biometric system for real-time walker recognition using a pyroelectric infrared sensor, a Fresnel lens array and signal processing based on the linear regression of sensor signal spectra. In the model training stage, the maximum likelihood principal components estimation (MLPCE) method is utilized to obtain the regression vector for each registered human subject. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are also investigated to select a suitable threshold for maximizing subject recognition rate. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed pyroelectric sensor system in recognizing registered subjects and rejecting unknown subjects. PMID:19532568

  9. A pyroelectric infrared biometric system for real-time walker recognition by use of a maximum likelihood principal components estimation (MLPCE) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jian-Shuen; Hao, Qi; Brady, David J.; Guenther, Bob D.; Hsu, Ken Y.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel biometric system for real-time walker recognition using a pyroelectric infrared sensor, a Fresnel lens array and signal processing based on the linear regression of sensor signal spectra. In the model training stage, the maximum likelihood principal components estimation (MLPCE) method is utilized to obtain the regression vector for each registered human subject. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are also investigated to select a suitable threshold for maximizing subject recognition rate. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed pyroelectric sensor system in recognizing registered subjects and rejecting unknown subjects.

  10. A revision of the genus Belciana Walker, 1862 with description of three new species (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae: Pantheinae) from East and South East Asia. Revision of Pantheinae, contribution XII.

    PubMed

    Behounek, G; Han, H L; Kononenko, V S

    2015-01-01

    The Oriental Pantheinae genus Belciana Walker, 1862 is revised. Three new species, B. hreblayi sp. n., B. sulawesiana sp. n., B. pinratanai sp. n., from Taiwan, Indonesia and Thailand, are described. Five new combinations in the genus Diphteroides Bethune-Baker, 1906 are proposed: Diphteroides caerulea (Hampson, 1926) comb. n., D. habroscia (Prout, 1924) comb. n., D. patricolor (Prout, 1924) comb. n., D. serrata Bethune-Baker, 1906, D. subserrata (Prout, 1924) comb. n. and D. sophronia (Prout, 1924) comb. n. The extensive diagnoses of known species of Belciana are given. The imagines, male and female genitalia are illustrated. The checklist of the genus Belciana in East Asia is presented. PMID:26624184

  11. Wormhole spectrum of a quantum Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology minimally coupled to a power-law scalar field and the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.P. Department of Physics Education, College of Education, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 ); Page, D.N. )

    1992-05-15

    The expansion of the wave function of a quantum Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology minimally coupled to a scalar field with a power-law potential by its scalar-field part decouples the gravitational-field part into an infinite system of linear homogeneous differential equations (equivalent to a matrix equation). The solutions for the gravitational-field part are found in the product integral formulation. It is shown that there exists a spectrum of the wave functions exponentially damped for large three-geometries under the condition that the cosmological constant should vanish. These are interpeted as the Hawking-Page wormholes.

  12. Recent crustal movements in the Sierra Nevada-Walker lane region of California-Nevada: Part i, rate and style of deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slemmons, D.B.; Wormer, D.V.; Bell, E.J.; Silberman, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    This review of geological, seismological, geochronological and paleobotanical data is made to compare historic and geologic rates and styles of deformation of the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The main uplift of this region began about 17 m.y. ago, with slow uplift of the central Sierra Nevada summit region at rates estimated at about 0.012 mm/yr and of western Basin and Range Province at about 0.01 mm/yr. Many Mesozoic faults of the Foothills fault system were reactivated with normal slip in mid-Tertiary time and have continued to be active with slow slip rates. Sparse data indicate acceleration of rates of uplift and faulting during the Late Cenozoic. The Basin and Range faulting appears to have extended westward during this period with a reduction in width of the Sierra Nevada. The eastern boundary zone of the Sierra Nevada has an irregular en-echelon pattern of normal and right-oblique faults. The area between the Sierra Nevada and the Walker Lane is a complex zone of irregular patterns of ho??rst and graben blocks and conjugate normal-to right- and left-slip faults of NW and NE trend, respectively. The Walker Lane has at least five main strands near Walker Lake, with total right-slip separation estimated at 48 km. The NE-trending left-slip faults are much shorter than the Walker Lane fault zone and have maximum separations of no more than a few kilometers. Examples include the 1948 and 1966 fault zone northeast of Truckee, California, the Olinghouse fault (Part III) and possibly the almost 200-km-long Carson Lineament. Historic geologic evidence of faulting, seismologic evidence for focal mechanisms, geodetic measurements and strain measurements confirm continued regional uplift and tilting of the Sierra Nevada, with minor internal local faulting and deformation, smaller uplift of the western Basin and Range Province, conjugate focal mechanisms for faults of diverse orientations and types, and a NS to NE-SW compression axis (??1) and an EW to NW-SE extension axis (??3). ?? 1979.

  13. Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Brian D; Mulholland, Patrick J; Bernhardt, Emily

    2012-01-01

    We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter) than the long-term mean. Future changes in the incidence of storm events, as well as the number and duration of droughts, have the potential to significantly alter watershed nutrient losses. Our analysis indicates that changing climates can differentially affect watershed element cycles either through changes in biogeochemical process rates or through changes in catchment hydrology. Furthermore, climate change can include both long-term trending in mean climate variables, as well as changes in the frequency and intensity of storms and droughts, with each of these types of change having distinct effects on the biological and geochemical processes governing different solutes.

  14. Constraints from GPS on Block Kinematics of the Transition between the Southern Walker Lane and the Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2008-12-01

    The southern Walker Lane (SWL) is a part of the Eastern California Shear Zone that lies north of the Mojave region, bounded by the Garlock Fault to the south, the Sierra Nevada to the west, the Basin and Range to the east and by Mono Lake to the north. The region includes many northwest striking right-lateral strike slip and sub-parallel normal faults (e.g. Death Valley/Furnace Creek, Fish Lake Valley, Owens Valley), which together accommodate ~25% of the Pacific/North American relative motion. For many of these faults, and the system as a whole, there appears to be a discrepancy between geodetically and geologically inferred fault slip rates. Since the installation of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and the Nevada Earthquake Response Network (NEARNET) of the University of Nevada, Reno, many recently obtained high- precision GPS data are now available to place improved constraints on the pattern and rates of crustal deformation of this region. In this study we use a block modeling methodology to estimate block motions and fault slip rates from GPS velocities of PBO, NEARNET and BARGEN continuous sites. Time series were obtained from raw RINEX data that we processed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory together with the Ambizap software for ambiguity resolution. We have additionally included earlier published campaign-style velocities, in those areas where we do not have better coverage from other continuous/semi-continuous networks. Geologic slip rates have been obtained from the published literature. We solve for the motion of blocks using the GPS velocities that have been adjusted based on the viscoelastic modeling to estimate long term motion. To evaluate the consistency between the geologic and geodetic data, we compare long-term fault slip to slip rates inferred from geodetic results obtained over <10 years. We account for transient earthquake cycle effects by modeling the viscoelastic postseismic relaxation following major historic earthquakes in the region. In particular we model the 1999 Hector Mine, 1992 Landers, 1952 Kern County, and 1872 Owens Valley earthquakes. GPS velocities adjusted for transient effects indicate that there is a distinct NW trend in the motions of the blocks with rates decreasing to the east. However, deformation rates are greater than zero east of the SWL in the Basin and Range. The preliminary results obtained from the block model indicate significant slip at the easternmost edge of the model, in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain and the Stateline fault.

  15. Immune and metabolic responses of Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae to an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron.

    PubMed

    Mirhaghparast, Seyyedeh Kimia; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali; Hoda, Hassan; Fazeli-Dinan, Mahmoud

    2015-11-01

    Efficient control of Chilo suppressalis Walker is always controversial due to highly economic damage, resistance to insecticides and environmental pollutions. So, combination of safe pest controls e.g. biocontrol agents and insect growth regulators seems to be promising via integrated pest management program. Bioassay of hexaflumuron on 4th larval instars revealed concentrations of 44.34, 179.74 and 474.94µg/ml as LC10-50 values. Numbers of total hemocytes, plasmatocytes and granulocytes as well as phenoloxidase activity increased in the different time intervals following treatment by hexaflumuron. Combined effects of hexaflumuron and Beauveria bassiana Vuillemin also increased hemocyte numbers and phenoloxidase activity at different time intervals using all concentrations. Activities of general esterases assayed by α- and β-naphtyl acetate and glutathione S-transferase using CDNB and DCNB increased 1-12h post-treatment. Activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transferase and aldolase increased in the larvae treated by hexaflumuron. However enhanced activity of lactate dehydrogenase was only obtained by treating 180 and 470µg/ml concentrations of hexaflumuron. Activities of ACP and ALP were found to be higher than control for all time intervals even 1-12h post-treatment. The amounts of HDL and LDL increased in the highest concentrations of hexaflumuron after 12-24h of post-treatment. Amount of triglyceride was higher than that of control after 1 and 3h but it was lower in other time intervals. Amounts of glycogen and protein were lower than those of control for all time intervals except for 6 and 12h of post-treatment in case of protein. Results of the current study revealed negative effects of hexaflumuron on intermediary metabolism of Chilo suppressalis but it increased the number of hemocytes and activity of phenoloxidase which are responsible for spore removal from hemolymph. It can be concluded that hexaflumuron is able to decrease survival and biological performance of C. suppressalis via intervening in intermediary metabolism but the given results showed incompatibility of the IGR with possible microbial control. PMID:26615153

  16. Late quaternary slip-rate variations along the Warm Springs Valley fault system, northern Walker Lane, California-Nevada border

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; dePolo, Craig; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which faults exhibit temporally varying slip rates has important consequences for models of fault mechanics and probabilistic seismic hazard. Here, we explore the temporal behavior of the dextral‐slip Warm Springs Valley fault system, which is part of a network of closely spaced (10–20 km) faults in the northern Walker Lane (California–Nevada border). We develop a late Quaternary slip record for the fault using Quaternary mapping and high‐resolution topographic data from airborne Light Distance and Ranging (LiDAR). The faulted Fort Sage alluvial fan (40.06° N, 119.99° W) is dextrally displaced 98+42/-43 m, and we estimate the age of the alluvial fan to be 41.4+10.0/-4.8 to 55.7±9.2  ka, based on a terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be depth profile and 36Cl analyses on basalt boulders, respectively. The displacement and age constraints for the fan yield a slip rate of 1.8 +0.8/-0.8 mm/yr to 2.4 +1.2/-1.1 mm/yr (2σ) along the northern Warm Springs Valley fault system for the past 41.4–55.7 ka. In contrast to this longer‐term slip rate, shorelines associated with the Sehoo highstand of Lake Lahontan (~15.8  ka) adjacent to the Fort Sage fan are dextrally faulted at most 3 m, which limits a maximum post‐15.8 ka slip rate to 0.2  mm/yr. These relations indicate that the post‐Lahontan slip rate on the fault is only about one‐tenth the longer‐term (41–56 ka) average slip rate. This apparent slip‐rate variation may be related to co‐dependent interaction with the nearby Honey Lake fault system, which shows evidence of an accelerated period of mid‐Holocene earthquakes.

  17. Using a walker

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your weak leg first. If you had surgery on both legs, start with the leg that feels weaker. Then step forward with your other leg, placing it in front of the weaker leg. Repeat steps 1 through 4 to move forward. Go ...

  18. Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The key features of this syndrome are an enlargement of the fourth ventricle (a small channel that ... early infancy, include slow motor development and progressive enlargement of the skull. In older children, symptoms of ...

  19. Clustering of velocities in a GPS network spanning the Sierra Nevada Block, the northern Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt, California-Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The deformation across the Sierra Nevada Block, the Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt (CNSB) between 38.5°N and 40.5°N has been analyzed by clustering GPS velocities to identify coherent blocks. Cluster analysis determines the number of clusters required and assigns the GPS stations to the proper clusters. The clusters are shown on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. Four significant clusters are identified. Those clusters are strips separated by (from west to east) the Mohawk Valley-Genoa fault system, the Pyramid Lake-Wassuk fault system, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. The strain rates within the westernmost three clusters approximate simple right-lateral shear (~13 nstrain/a) across vertical planes roughly parallel to the cluster boundaries. Clustering does not recognize the longitudinal segmentation of the Walker Lane Belt into domains dominated by either northwesterly trending, right-lateral faults or northeasterly trending, left-lateral faults.

  20. From precocious fame to mature obscurity: David Walker (1837-1917) MD, LRCSI, surgeon and naturalist to the Fox Arctic Expedition of 1857-59.

    PubMed

    Froggatt, Peter; Walker, Brian M

    2012-11-01

    The Belfast-born David Walker was the 19-year-old surgeon and naturalist on the epic Fox Arctic Expedition (1857-59) that established the fate of Sir John Franklin's unsuccessful (1845) search for the North-West Passage. On return the crew were fêted as heroes and decorated, and shared in a £5000 government bounty: Walker was also received by the Queen and (in Ireland) by the Lord Lieutenant, was honoured by the principal British and Irish natural history societies and his portrait was exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery, London. This paper describes his adventurous life, including the Fox Expedition, which from 1862 was spent abroad and included time in the Cariboo gold fields, service in the United States Army, practice in a notorious Californian frontier town and, in later life, the comparative quiet of general and occupational medical practice in Portland, Oregon. Once a household name, his death went unrecorded in the British and Irish medical and lay press. PMID:23143316

  1. GPR profiles of Saddle Mountain scoria deposits on Walker Lake Crater tuff ring in Arizona help understanding of geomorphological response to wildland fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Hackert, B.; Schwartz, C.; Williams, K.

    2009-05-01

    Walker Lake tuff ring in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona, experienced a significant forest fire in 1996. Extensive event scale studies suggested a highly increased (by two orders of magnitude) erosion rate both due to raindrop impact and overland flow. However, the 2.3 million year old cone's materials are partially covered by a 15,000-year-old scoria cone deposit from nearby Saddle Mountain. Although previous studies of the geomorphology of Walker Lake crater provided insight into the Saddle Mountain deposit, new studies have actually shown the extent and depth of the deposit on the cone. We present data obtained with ground penetrating radar (GPR) that gives a clearer data set on the depth (4-7m) of the younger deposit in one of the more extensively studied areas. Data were collected along longitudinal and horizontal profiles along the southwestern part of the cone where the deposit is clearly recognizable on the surface and the wild land fire devastation is enormous. Future analysis will shed quantitative light on the effect that the younger, less cohesive materials has on the increased erosion rates in the event scale to decadal scale erosion rates after wildland fire.

  2. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Walker Lake 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John Harris; Chaffee, M.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; John, D.A.; Kistler, R.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.; Menzie, W.D.; Plouff, Donald; Rowan, L.C.; Silberling, Norman J.

    1984-01-01

    The Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle in eastern California and western Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle.

  3. Exploring Western and Eastern Pacific contributions to the 21st century Walker circulation intensification and teleconnected precipitation declines (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C. C.; Hoerling, M. P.; Hoell, A.; Verdin, J. P.; Robertson, F. R.; Alured, D.; Liebmann, B.

    2013-12-01

    As the earth's population, industry, and agricultural systems continue to expand and increase demand for limited hydrologic resources, developing better tools for monitoring, analyzing and perhaps even predicting decadal variations in precipitation will enable the climate community to better inform important policy and management decisions. To this end, in support of the development and humanitarian relief efforts of the US Agency for International Development, USGS, NOAA, UC Santa Barbara, and NASA scientists have been exploring global precipitation trends using observations and new ensembles of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations from the ECHAM5, GFSv2, CAM4 and GMAO models. This talk summarizes this work, and discusses how combined analyses of AGCM simulations and observations might lead to credible decadal projections, for some regions and seasons, based on the strength of the Indo-Pacific warming signal. Focusing on the late boreal spring, a critical period for food insecure Africa, we begin by linearly decomposing 1900-2012 sea surface temperatures (SST) into components loading strongly in the Indo-Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific. Eastern Pacific (EP) SST variations are based on regressions with three time series: the first and second principal components of equatorial Pacific SST and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. These influences are removed from Indo-Pacific SSTs, and the Indo-Western Pacific (IWP) SST variations are defined by the 1st principal component of the residuals, which we refer to as the Indo-West Pacific Warming Signal (IWPWS). The pattern of IWPWS SST changes resembles recent assessments of centennial warming, and identifies rapid warming in the equatorial western Pacific and north and south Pacific convergence zones. The circulation impacts of IWP and EP SST forcing are explored in two ways. First, assuming linear SST forcing relationships, IWP and EP decompositions of ECHAM5, GFS, CAM4 and GMAO AGCM simulations are presented. These results suggest that a substantial component of the recent Walker circulation intensification has been related to the IWPWS. The IWPWS warming extends from just north of Papua New Guinea to just west of Hawaii, and appears associated with SLP, wind and rainfall responses consistent with enhanced Indo-Pacific convection. These decomposition results are compared with a set of numerical simulation experiments based on the ECHAM5 and GFS models forced with characteristic IWP and EP SST for 1983-1996 and 1999-2012. The talk concludes with a tentative discussion of the decadal predictability associated with the IWPWS. Using both observed and model-simulated precipitation, we briefly explore potential IWPWS drought teleconnection regions in the Americas, Asia, Middle East, and Eastern Africa. Figure 1. Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific SST changes between 1999-2012 and 1983-1996. Figure 2. Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific GPCP precipitation changes between 1999-2012 and 1983-1996.

  4. Geodetic vs. Geologic Measures of Fault Slip Rates in the Northern Walker Lane, Basin and Range Province, Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2008-05-01

    Quantifying faults slip rates and styles is an important objective in the study of crustal deformation. Fault slip rates are used to quantify seismic hazard associated with active faults, and are an important input into the U.S.G.S. seismic hazard maps. However, when multiple types of data (e.g. geologic, seismic and geodetic) are used to measure slip rates, results from the different techniques can be corroborative, complementary, or in direct conflict. Geologic methods provide some of the only constraints on slip rates of individual faults over hundreds to tens of thousands of years, time scales that are significant with respect to observed deformation patterns, and likely representative of modern hazard. On the other hand geodetic measurements provide strong constraints on the medium to long spatial wavelength (>50 km) budgets of deformation, and on geographic changes in deformation style, and have the potential to provide geographically complete measurements of surface deformation. However, geodetic measurements can be influenced by earthquake cycle effects, e.g. owing to interseismic fault locking and postseismic relaxation, which limit their ability to resolve individual slip rates, especially in complex systems with many closely spaced faults. The northern Walker Lane (NWL), in the western Basin and Range Province (BRP) of the United States, is an example of a complex system of dextral, normal and sinestral faults that work together to accommodate approximately 10 mm/yr of relative motion between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley block and the central part of the BRP. To exploit the strengths of each dataset, we have built a detailed model of NWL crustal blocks and are using geodetic and geologic data to resolve patterns of crustal deformation. We use a block modeling technique that incorporates the strengths of both targeted geologic investigations of slip rates on individual faults and longer wavelength constraints offered by GPS geodesy. To constrain these models we use a compilation of GPS data from our own 163-site MAGNET GPS network plus regional continuous GPS sites from the Plate Boundary Observatory and BARGEN networks, and published USGS campaign velocities. For geologic data we have tabulated slip rate estimates into two categories, 1) published studies with quantitative rates valid in the Quaternary, and 2) the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold Database that is a comprehensive web-available database with many reconnaissance level estimates of fault slip rate. Our modeling helps unravel the slip rate debate by distinguishing between system-wide discrepancies in integrated moment rate across the NWL, and point-wise discrepancies in individual fault slip rates. Our modeling shows that on the systemic level, even a single reliable geologic slip rate can improve the condition of the modeling, and on the individual fault level geodetic constraints can eliminate feasibility of some very high slip rates allowed by the geologic data. We conclude that for the NWL, the rate disagreement is attributable to an incomplete catalog of geologic slip rates and not to systematic underestimation of slip rates in the individual studies.

  5. Mach's principle: Exact frame-dragging via gravitomagnetism in perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes with K=({+-}1,0)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Christoph

    2009-03-15

    We show that there is exact dragging of the axis directions of local inertial frames by a weighted average of the cosmological energy currents via gravitomagnetism for all linear perturbations of all Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universes and of Einstein's static closed universe, and for all energy-momentum-stress tensors and in the presence of a cosmological constant. This includes FRW universes arbitrarily close to the Milne Universe and the de Sitter universe. Hence the postulate formulated by Ernst Mach about the physical cause for the time-evolution of inertial axes is shown to hold in general relativity for linear perturbations of FRW universes. - The time-evolution of local inertial axes (relative to given local fiducial axes) is given experimentally by the precession angular velocity {omega}-vector{sub gyro} of local gyroscopes, which in turn gives the operational definition of the gravitomagnetic field: B-vector{sub g}{identical_to}-2{omega}-vector{sub gyro}. The gravitomagnetic field is caused by energy currents J-vector{sub {epsilon}} via the momentum constraint, Einstein's G{sup 0-}circumflex{sub i-circumflex} equation, (-{delta}+{mu}{sup 2})A-vector{sub g}=-16{pi}G{sub N}J-vector{sub {epsilon}} with B-vector{sub g}=curl A-vector{sub g}. This equation is analogous to Ampere's law, but it holds for all time-dependent situations. {delta} is the de Rham-Hodge Laplacian, and {delta}=-curl curl for the vorticity sector in Riemannian 3-space. - In the solution for an open universe the 1/r{sup 2}-force of Ampere is replaced by a Yukawa force Y{sub {mu}}(r)=(-d/dr)[(1/R)exp(-{mu}r)], form-identical for FRW backgrounds with K=(-1,0). Here r is the measured geodesic distance from the gyroscope to the cosmological source, and 2{pi}R is the measured circumference of the sphere centered at the gyroscope and going through the source point. The scale of the exponential cutoff is the H-dot radius, where H is the Hubble rate, dot is the derivative with respect to cosmic time, and {mu}{sup 2}=-4(dH/dt). Analogous results hold in closed FRW universes and in Einstein's closed static universe.--We list six fundamental tests for the principle formulated by Mach: all of them are explicitly fulfilled by our solutions.--We show that only energy currents in the toroidal vorticity sector with l=1 can affect the precession of gyroscopes. We show that the harmonic decomposition of toroidal vorticity fields in terms of vector spherical harmonics X-vector{sub lm}{sup -} has radial functions which are form-identical for the 3-sphere, the hyperbolic 3-space, and Euclidean 3-space, and are form-identical with the spherical Bessel-, Neumann-, and Hankel functions. - The Appendix gives the de Rham-Hodge Laplacian on vorticity fields in Riemannian 3-spaces by equations connecting the calculus of differential forms with the curl notation. We also give the derivation the Weitzenboeck formula for the difference between the de Rham-Hodge Laplacian {delta} and the ''rough'' Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2} on vector fields.

  6. Kinematics of Deformation in West-Central Walker Lane; Paleomagnetic Testing of Fault-Block Rotation and Doming Models, Eastern California and Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, S. M.; Pluhar, C. J.; Carlson, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Walker Lane is a broad (~100-200 km) zone of dextral shear located between the Sierra Nevada microplate and the Basin and Range Province. We consider Bodie Hills a part of the greater Walker Lane because it has experienced clockwise, vertical-axis rotation of crustal blocks due to dextral shear accommodation. This strain is variable, resulting in rotations ranging from ~10°-70° depending on location. The Miocene Eureka Valley Tuff (EVT) is an ideal strain marker, because it is a geologically instantaneous and laterally extensive unit. We use paleomagnetic analysis of ignimbrites to improve the resolution of strain domain boundaries as well as test for doming in Bodie Hills. EVT site mean directions were compared to reference directions of the Tollhouse Flat and By Day Members collected from the stable Sierra Nevada to determine magnitudes of vertical-axis rotation. Three new sites and three previously sampled sites define a high-rotation domain including Bridgeport Valley and the East Walker River Canyon with an average clockwise rotation of ~50°-60°. We define the eastern boundary of this high-rotation domain as coinciding with a mapped fault exhibiting 11.7°×7.9° rotation of the presumed footwall. Our data corroborates and improves on Carlson's (2012) kinematic model in which the greater Bodie Hills has rotated clockwise ~30° since EVT emplacement. Eutaxitic textures, dipping up to 90°, are gross indicators of true tilt, but are also influenced by original dips in some localities, complicating interpretations. John et al. (2012) describe a simple doming model of Bodie Hills since EVT emplacement, supported by the high elevation of outflow channels compared to source areas. Our paleomagnetic data does not support simple doming, suggesting that there is either no doming of Bodie Hills, or that vertical crustal displacements have occurred without large-scale folding. John et al. (2012) dated undifferentiated EVT in Bodie Hills at ~9.4 Ma; using paleomagnetism, we show the dated outcrops to be Tollhouse Flat Member, substantially improving age constraints on EVT.

  7. Assessment of Prey Preference by the Generalist Predator, Mallada basalis (Walker), When Offered Two Species of Spider Mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida and Panonychus citri (McGregor) on Papaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated potential prey preference of the generalist predator Mallada basalis (Walker) when offered two mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida and Panonychus citri (McGregor), both important pests on papaya. Laboratory choice tests revealed that none of the three larval instars of M. basalis sho...

  8. Tracking discourse complexity preceding Alzheimer's disease diagnosis: a case study comparing the press conferences of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Herbert Walker Bush.

    PubMed

    Berisha, Visar; Wang, Shuai; LaCross, Amy; Liss, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Changes in some lexical features of language have been associated with the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Here we describe a method to extract key features from discourse transcripts, which we evaluated on non-scripted news conferences from President Ronald Reagan, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1994, and President George Herbert Walker Bush, who has no known diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Key word counts previously associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease were extracted and regression analyses were conducted. President Reagan showed a significant reduction in the number of unique words over time and a significant increase in conversational fillers and non-specific nouns over time. There was no significant trend in these features for President Bush. PMID:25633673

  9. Process evaluation of the project P.A.T.H.S. (secondary 2 program): findings based on the co-walker scheme.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Tam, Suet-yan

    2009-01-01

    To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 2 Curriculum) of the P.A.T.H.S. Project, process evaluation was carried out by co-walkers through classroom observation of 195 units in 131 schools. Results showed that the overall level of program adherence was generally high with an average of 84.55%, and different factors of the implementation process were evaluated as positive. Quality of program implementation and achievement of program objectives were predicted by students' participation and involvement, strategies to enhance students' motivation, opportunity for reflection, time management, and class preparation. Success in program implementation was predicted by students' participation and involvement, classroom control, interactive delivery method, strategies to enhance students' motivation, opportunity for reflection, and lesson preparation. PMID:20432602

  10. Walker Gilmore: a stratified Woodland period occupation in eastern Nebraska. A report of the 1968 excavations. Final report 1968-83

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Excavations at Walker Gilmore were designed to test the ill-defined concept of 'Sterns Creek culture' in the Central Plains subarea. Five Woodland period levels produced evidence for 48 tool classes, flora and fauna, and 762 features including structural remains. Level 1 is poorly recorded and relatively unknown. Levels 2 - 4 contain abundant evidence of subsistence, structure, and settlement. Broad spectrum hunting/gathering and horticulture are represented. Site structures includes food preparation areas associated with storage/drying facilities, hearths, and trash pits. Settlements appear to be semi-permanent, and involved in diverse procurement activities spanning two or more seasons. Level 2 habitation is radiocarbon dated between A.D. 1116 to 1255, which indicates contemporary development with Central Plains Tradition complexes, as well as Loseke Creek/Missouri Bluffs Woodland groups. Level 5 evidences settlement change as probable interaction with Central Plains Tradition complexes.

  11. [Intravenous Sedation and Repeated "the Same Day General Anesthesia" for a School-age Boy with Dandy-Walker Syndrome and Dentinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hitosugi, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Masanori; Fujiwara, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is characterized by perfect or partial defect of the cerebellum vermis and cystic dilatation of the posterior fossa communicating with the fourth ventricle. Common clinical signs are mental retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and those of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). Associated congenital anomalies are craniofacial, cardiac, renal, and skeletal abnormalities. We experienced a case of intravenous sedation and six times of "the same day" general anesthesia for a school-aged boy (10-13 years old) with DWS and hypodentinogenesis. The patient underwent an examination and dental treatments. We had to pay attention to airway management tracheal tube selection and control of ICP. In addition, we should prevent tooth injuries through mishaps during tracheal intubations, since all-tooth-hypoplasia with fragile dental crowns was strongly suggested in this case. Detailed postoperative care is also required for general anesthesia afflicted with DWS. PMID:27097514

  12. An Automated Three-Dimensional Detection and Segmentation Method for Touching Cells by Integrating Concave Points Clustering and Random Walker Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hui; Chen, Shangbin; Zhang, Bin; Ding, Wenxiang; Luo, Qingming; Li, Anan

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing cytoarchitecture is crucial for understanding brain functions and neural diseases. In neuroanatomy, it is an important task to accurately extract cell populations' centroids and contours. Recent advances have permitted imaging at single cell resolution for an entire mouse brain using the Nissl staining method. However, it is difficult to precisely segment numerous cells, especially those cells touching each other. As presented herein, we have developed an automated three-dimensional detection and segmentation method applied to the Nissl staining data, with the following two key steps: 1) concave points clustering to determine the seed points of touching cells; and 2) random walker segmentation to obtain cell contours. Also, we have evaluated the performance of our proposed method with several mouse brain datasets, which were captured with the micro-optical sectioning tomography imaging system, and the datasets include closely touching cells. Comparing with traditional detection and segmentation methods, our approach shows promising detection accuracy and high robustness. PMID:25111442

  13. Role of female-produced sex pheromone in behavioral reproductive isolation betweenTrichoplusia ni (Hübner) andPseudoplusia includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, plusiinae).

    PubMed

    Landolt, P J; Heath, R R

    1987-05-01

    In laboratory flight tunnel bioassays, response rates of male cabbage looper,Trichoplusia ni (Hübner), to female soybean looper,Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), were similar to response rates of maleT. ni to conspecific females for plume tracking and source contact. Male soybean loopers, however, exhibited a greatly reduced response to female cabbage loopers compared to conspecific females. Similar differences were observed in male responses to extracts of female abdominal tips. Studies of flight tunnel responses of male soybean loopers to the different chemicals known to be components of the female cabbage looper sex pheromone indicated that the reduction in response was due to inhibitory effects of (Z)-5-dodecen-1-ol acetate and (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol acetate, when added singly to (Z)-7-dodecen-1-ol acetate (major component of both species) at release rates and at ratios close to those observed in female cabbage loopers. PMID:24302128

  14. Potential indicator species of climate changes occurring in Québec, Part 1: the small brown lacewing fly Micromus posticus (Walker) (Neuroptera: Hemerobiidae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Micromus posticus (Walker) is a small brown lacewing fly rarely collected in Canada and represented in collections by only a limited number of specimens. Indeed, fewer than 50 specimens were captured in Québec and Ontario over the last century, all within a small area delimited by the northern shore of Lake Erie, Ottawa and Montréal. Aylmer, located on the north shore of the Ottawa River, northwest of Ottawa, is a new, most southwestern locality record of this species for Québec. The Aylmer specimens were collected 1-7 days later than any of the known specimens collected elsewhere in Québec or in Ontario, and 16-22 days later than in the neighbouring localities, indicating an apparent phenological shift. PMID:24723766

  15. Stromatolites provide a terrestrial record of a ~35ka warming event in Walker Lake, a remnant of the Pleistocene Lake Lahontan (Western Nevada, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez Rivera, M.; Agić, H.; Ward, L.; Kerrigan, Z.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Frantz, C. M.; Tripati, A.; Corsetti, F. A.; Spear, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Walker Lake is a closed-basin remnant of the large Pleistocene glacial Lake Lahontan that has experienced drastic changes in water level. Carbonate structures, such as stromatolites, precipitated from the lake and were studied as potential sources for historical climate change. A 16.7 cm long stromatolite was collected from a paleoshoreline approximately 58 meters above the present Walker Lake surface elevation. Radiocarbon dating revealed that the stromatolite spans approximately 2,000 years of growth, from 35,540 to 33,580 Calibrated YBP (IntCal13). Distinct laminae were drilled along the growth axis, and the resulting powders were collected for clumped isotope analyses, which uses the amount of heavy CO2 "clumps" (13C-18O-16O, or ∆47) generated from the dissolution of carbonate in acid to measure the temperature of formation of a rock. Using this method, we tracked the change in lake temperature and δ18Ofluid during stromatolite formation. Our results show that the stromatolite experienced an overall increase in temperature and δ18Ofluid values during the course of accretion. The resulting data were input to a Rayleigh distillation model for water evaporation in order to estimate the magnitude of lake level and volume fluctuations. Our modeling results show that, during the course of stromatolite accretion, the lake experienced a volume decrease of ~5 Km3, corresponding to lake level fall of ~14 meters. This study shows that lacustrine material (such as stromatolites or other tufas) can potentially be used to reconstruct the timing and magnitude of terrestrial climate change during important transitions in Earth history.

  16. Investigation of the Origins of Modern Firmgrounds in Walker Lake, Nevada: Implications for Lacustrine Climate Records and Hardgrounds in the Rock Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, L. G.; Lau, K. V.; Stewart, L. C.; Loyd, S. J.; Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Stevenson, B. S.; Stamps, B. W.; Spear, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, contains locally abundant Pleistocene and Holocene carbonate structures, including tufas, stromatolites, and lithified carbonate hardgrounds. Hardgrounds are classically interpreted as forming via geobiological processes in shallow sediments. To better understand the origins of ancient hardgrounds, we investigated modern firmgrounds which we hypothesized to be incipient hardgrounds. The studied firmgrounds were brown, 1-2 cm thick with a mm-scale white or brown crust, cohesive enough to retain sharp erosional features, and were located on the western shoreline where alluvial fans enter the lake. We analyzed the elemental composition of the lakewater and porewaters in order to model mineral saturation states under lake conditions. In addition, we analyzed 16S rRNA gene diversity of the firmgrounds, porewater of adjacent sediments, and lakewater to investigate potential biological involvement. This, combined with SEM imaging, XRD analyses, and EDS analyses indicate that the firmgrounds are likely dominated by clays and granitic minerals rather than carbonate like the ancient hardgrounds. We suggest that Walker Lake firmgrounds are formed by weathering of unstable granitic minerals with no clear biological influence, likely resulting from physio-chemical processes related to groundwater-lake water mixing. Such firmgrounds may undergo subsequent replacement by calcium carbonate to form hardgrounds, resulting in carbonates with δ13C and δ18O compositions that do not reflect the lake water in which they formed. Given the apparent influence of groundwater on their formation, our work suggests that caution should be used when interpreting lacustrine hardground isotopic records as indicators of lakewater chemistry and climate.

  17. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Ginsenoside Rg3 and Ginsenoside Rh2 after Oral Administration of Ginsenoside Rg3 in Normal and Walker 256 Tumor-bearing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fan, He; Xiao-ling, Sun; Yaliu, Su; Ming-ming, Lu; Xue, Feng; Xian-sheng, Meng; Li, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ginseng is Chinese traditional herbal medicine, and the ginsenoside Rg3 is the main bioactive ingredient for the anti-tumor effect. However, there is no study on pharmacokinetics (PKs) of ginsenoside Rg3 and its main metabolite after oral ginsenoside Rg3 in tumor-bearing plasma. The aim of this study was to investigate the PK profiles of ginsenoside Rg3 and ginsenoside Rh2 after oral administration of pure ginsenoside Rg3 were administered, and compare the difference of the PK profiles between normal and Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. Materials and Methods: The concentrations of two ginsenosides in plasma were determined by using a simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography. All the rats were divided randomly into two groups (Walker 256 tumor-bearing and normal groups). Each group received oral administration of 50 mg/kg ginsenoside Rg3. Results: The results showed that ginsenoside Rh2, possibly as a glycosylation hydrolysis product of ginsenoside Rg3, were found in plasma after oral administration of ginsenoside Rg3 to rats. Ginsenoside Rg3 had shown better absorption than ginsenoside Rh2, whether the oral administration of ginsenoside Rg3, normal rats showed better absorption than tumor-bearing rats. Discussion and Conclusion: The PKs properties of the ginsenoside Rg3 and ginsenoside Rh2 differed between tumor-bearing rats and normal rats, including area under the plasma level/time curve and concentration maximum (P < 0.05). SUMMARY Ginsenoside Rh2 was found in plasma after oral administration of ginsenoside Rg3 to ratsHPLC could be used to determine simultaneously, the concentration of ginsenoside Rg3 and ginsenoside Rh2 in rat plasma after oral administration of ginsenoside Rg3Normal rats showed better absorption than tumor-bearing rats after oral administration of ginsenoside Rg3.0. PMID:27019557

  18. Toward a better understanding of the impacts from climate change on a modern agricultural system in the Walker River Basin: A paleo perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. J.; Barth, C.; Boyle, D. P.; Garner, C.; Bassett, S.

    2013-12-01

    As the Earth continues to warm from increasing emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gasses, many different research groups continue using global climate models to better understand and predict the associated spatial and temporal changes in temperature and precipitation patterns on the landscape. Although the models are generally in agreement that, as the emissions continue the planet will continue to warm, there is still considerable disagreement and uncertainty among the models on the changes in precipitation patterns in many regions, particularly in the western U.S. where significant agricultural activities exist that are extremely sensitive to changes in precipitation. There is, however, a significant body of research that has focused on further understanding how the climate has changed in the past through paleolake studies in the arid and semiarid regions of the western U.S. and other similar locations throughout the world. In particular, several studies have estimated reductions in annual precipitation by as much as 60% of modern values during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA). In this study, we utilize a detailed, high spatial resolution hydrologic model of the Walker River Basin to conduct a number of climate change studies aimed at assessing the impacts of a wide range of changes in climate variables (i.e. precipitation and temperature) on important agricultural variables (e.g., surface water irrigation, ground water pumping, crop yield, etc.) from the watershed to the farm scale. Specifically, we explore the impacts and resiliency of the modern Walker River watershed and agricultural systems under the climatic conditions that existed during the MCA and those that are forecasted to occur in the future based on popular emission studies using global climate models.

  19. Surface faulting and paleoseismic history of the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake area, west-central Nevada, and implications for modern tectonics of the Walker Lane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.W.; DePolo, C.M.; Ramelli, A.R.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Meyer, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake (Ms 7.2) was one of the largest historical events in the Walker Lane region of western Nevada, and it produced a complicated strike-slip rupture pattern on multiple Quaternary faults distributed through three valleys. Primary, right-lateral surface ruptures occurred on north-striking faults in Monte Cristo Valley; small-scale lateral and normal offsets occurred in Stewart Valley; and secondary, normal faulting occurred on north-northeast-striking faults in the Gabbs Valley epicentral region. A reexamination of the surface ruptures provides new displacement and fault-zone data: maximum cumulative offset is estimated to be 2.7 m, and newly recognized faults extend the maximum width and end-to-end length of the rupture zone to 17 and 75 km, respectively. A detailed Quaternary allostratigraphic chronology based on regional alluvialgeomorphic relationships, tephrochronology, and radiocarbon dating provides a framework for interpreting the paleoseismic history of the fault zone. A late Wisconsinan alluvial-fan and piedmont unit containing a 32-36 ka tephra layer is a key stratigraphic datum for paleoseismic measurements. Exploratory trenching and radiocarbon dating of tectonic stratigraphy provide the first estimates for timing of late Quaternary faulting along the Cedar Mountain fault zone. Three trenches display evidence for six faulting events, including that in 1932, during the past 32-36 ka. Radiocarbon dating of organic soils interstratified with tectonically ponded silts establishes best-fit ages of the pre-1932 events at 4, 5,12,15, and 18 ka, each with ??2 ka uncertainties. On the basis of an estimated cumulative net slip of 6-12 m for the six faulting events, minimum and maximum late Quaternary slip rates are 0.2 and 0.7 mm/yr, respectively, and the preferred rate is 0.4-0.5 mm/yr. The average recurrence (interseismic) interval is 3600 yr. The relatively uniform thickness of the ponded deposits suggests that similar-size, characteristic rupture events may characterize late Quaternary slip on the zone. A comparison of event timing with the average late Quaternary recurrence interval indicates that slip has been largely regular (periodic) rather than temporally clustered. To account for the spatial separation of the primary surface faulting in Monte Cristo Valley from the epicenter and for a factor-of-two-to-three disparity between the instrumentally and geologically determined seismic moments associated with the earthquake, we hypothesize two alternative tectonic models containing undetected subevents. Either model would adequately account for the observed faulting on the basis of wrench-fault kinematics that may be associated with the Walker Lane. The 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake is considered an important modern analogue for seismotectonic modeling and estimating seismic hazard in the Walker Lane region. In contrast to most other historical events in the Basin and Range province, the 1932 event did not occur along a major range-bounding fault, and no single, throughgoing basement structure can account for the observed rupture pattern. The 1932 faulting supports the concept that major earthquakes in the Basin and Range province can exhibit complicated distributive rupture patterns and that slip rate may not be a reliable criterion for modeling seismic hazard.

  20. Assessment of forearm and plantar foot load in the elderly using a four-wheeled walker with armrest and the effect of armrest height

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chang-Yong; Kim, Sol-Bi; Choi, Hyuk-Jae; Chang, Yunhee; Kang, Sungjae; Heo, Yoon; Ryu, Jeicheong; Kim, Gyoosuk; Mun, Museong

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with hand and/or wrist pathology are recommended to have a four-wheeled walker with an arm rest (FWW-AR) rather than a standard walker or a standard four-wheeled walker (FWW). However, only a few quantitative studies have been performed to compare upper and lower extremity weight bearing. The aim of this study was to evaluate forearm and foot weight bearing using a FWW-AR and the effect of the armrest height. Methods Eleven elderly women (mean age 80.1±5.3 years; mean height 148.5±4.0 cm; mean weight 51.2±9.0 kg) were enrolled. The subjects walked with an FWW-AR, with the elbow in either 90 degree (D90) or 130 degree (D130) flexion, for a distance of 10 m. Surface electromyographic signals were recorded for the upper, middle, and lower trapezius, anterior deltoid, and erector spinae muscles; walking velocity was measured with the subjects weight bearing on their feet and forearms while walking. Simultaneously, the maximum plantar and forearm loads during walking with an FWW-AR were measured. Results The normalized foot plantar loads were lower at D90 than at D130, while the normalized forearm load was higher at D90 than at D130 (all P<0.05; left foot, 7.9±0.1 N/kg versus 8.8±0.1 N/kg; right foot, 8.6±0.2 N/kg versus. 9.6±0.1 N/kg; left forearm, 1.8±0.5 N/kg versus 0.8±0.2 N/kg; and right forearm, 2.0±0.5 N/kg versus 1.0±0.2 N/kg, respectively). The surface electromyographic activity of the muscles involved in shoulder elevation and the walking velocity were both lower with the elbow at D90 than at D130 (all P<0.05; left upper trapezius, 98.7%±19.5% versus 132.6%±16.9%; right upper trapezius, 83.4%±10.6% versus 108.1%±10.5%; left anterior deltoid, 94.1%±12.8% versus 158.6%±40.4%; right anterior deltoid, 99.1%±15.0% versus 151.9%±19.4%; and velocity, 0.6±0.1 m/sec versus 0.7±0.1 m/sec, respectively). Conclusion Weight bearing on the lower extremities is significantly reduced when the upper extremities are supported during walking with an FWW-AR. Furthermore, the weight bearing profile is dependent on the armrest height. PMID:25342894

  1. High-Precision Locations and the Stress Field from Instrumental Seismicity, Moment Tensors, and Short-Period Mechanisms through the Mina Deflection, Central Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, C. J.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Mina Deflection (MD) region of the central Walker Lane of eastern California and western Nevada, is a complex zone of northeast-trending normal, and primarily left-lateral strike-slip to oblique-slip faulting that separates the Southern Walker Lane (SWL) from a series of east-tilted normal fault blocks in the Central Walker Lane (CWL) (Faulds and Henry, 2008; Surpless, 2008). The MD accommodates the transfer of right-lateral strike-slip motion from northwest-striking faults in the SWL to a series of left-stepping northwest-striking right-lateral strike-slip faults in the CWL, east of the Wassuk Range near Hawthorne, NV. The ~50 km wide ~80 km long right-step is a distinct transition in regional physiography that has been attributed to strain accommodation through pre-Cenozoic lithospheric structures. Several slip transfer mechanisms have been proposed within the MD, from clockwise rotation of high-angle fault blocks (Wesnousky, 2005), to low-angle displacement within the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain complex (Oldow et al., 2001), and curved fault arrays associated with localized basins and tectonic depressions (Ferranti et al., 2009). The region has been a regular source of M4+ events, the most recent being an extended sequence that included twenty-seven M 3.5+ earthquakes (largest event M 4.6) south of Hawthorne in 2011. These earthquakes (< 5 km depth) define shallow W-dipping (dip ~56°) and NW-dipping (dip ~70°) normal faulting constrained by moment tensor (MT) solutions and earthquake relocations. Temporary stations deployed in the source area provide good control. A distributed sequence in 2004, between Queen Valley and Mono Lake, primarily associated with the Huntoon Valley fault, included three M 5+ left-lateral strike-slip faulting events. A 1997 sequence in northern Fish Lake Valley (east of the White Mountains), with mainshock Mw 5.3 (Ichinose et al., 2003), also showed high-angle northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip motion. Historical events include the 1934 M 6.5 Excelsior Mountains event south of Mina, NV, and the 1932 M 7.1 Cedar Mountains earthquake east of the Pilot Mountains. Another persistent feature in the seismicity is an ~40 km long arcuate distribution of activity extending from approximately Queen Valley, north of the White Mountains, to Mono Lake that appears to reflect a southwestern boundary to northeast-striking structures in the MD. Here we develop high-precision relocations of instrumental seismicity in the MD from 1984 through 2012, including relocations of the 2004 sequence, and account for the historical seismic record. MT solutions from published reports and computed from recent M 3.5+ earthquakes as well as available and developed short-period focal mechanisms are compiled to evaluate the stress field to assess mechanisms of slip accommodation. Based on the complex distribution of fault orientations, the stress field varies locally northward from the SWL throughout the MD; however, in many cases, fault plane alignments can be isolated from high-precision locations, providing better constraints on stress and slip orientations.

  2. West End Walkers 65+: A randomised controlled trial of a primary care-based walking intervention for older adults: Study rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Scotland, older adults are a key target group for physical activity intervention due to the large proportion who are inactive. The health benefits of an active lifestyle are well established but more research is required on the most effective interventions to increase activity in older adults. The 'West End Walkers 65+' randomised controlled trial aims to examine the feasibility of delivering a pedometer-based walking intervention to adults aged ≥65 years through a primary care setting and to determine the efficacy of this pilot. The study rationale, protocol and recruitment process are discussed in this paper. Methods/Design The intervention consisted of a 12-week pedometer-based graduated walking programme and physical activity consultations. Participants were randomised into an immediate intervention group (immediate group) or a 12-week waiting list control group (delayed group) who then received the intervention. For the pilot element of this study, the primary outcome measure was pedometer step counts. Secondary outcome measures of sedentary time and physical activity (time spent lying/sitting, standing or walking; activPAL™ monitor), mood (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule), functional ability (Perceived Motor-Efficacy Scale for Older Adults), quality of life (Short-Form (36) Health Survey version 2) and loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale) were assessed. Focus groups with participants and semi-structured interviews with the research team captured their experiences of the intervention. The feasibility component of this trial examined recruitment via primary care and retention of participants, appropriateness of the intervention for older adults and the delivery of the intervention by a practice nurse. Discussion West End Walkers 65+ will determine the feasibility and pilot the efficacy of delivering a pedometer-based walking intervention through primary care to Scottish adults aged ≥65 years. The study will also examine the effect of the intervention on the well-being of participants and gain an insight into both participant and research team member experiences of the intervention. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN70658148 PMID:21333020

  3. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (5–40 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

  4. Enzymatic properties of alpha-amylase in the midgut and the salivary glands of mulberry moth, Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Yezdani, Elham; Sendi, Jalal Jalali; Zibaee, Arash; Ghadamyari, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The pyralid moth, Glyphode pyloalis Walker, is an important pest of the mulberry. Amylases are the hydrolytic enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the alpha-D-(1,4)-glucan linkage in glycogen and other related carbohydrates. Laboratory-reared fifth stadium larvae were randomly selected; the midgut (MG) and the salivary glands (SG) were removed by dissection under a dissecting microscope and alpha-amylase activity was assayed using the dinitrosalicylic acid procedure. The activity of alpha-amylase in the MG and the SG were 0.011 and 0.0018 micromol/min, respectively. The optimal pH and temperature for alpha-amylase were 9 for MG at 37-40 degrees C and 10 for SG at 37 degrees C respectively. Various concentrations of compounds (NaCl, KCl, MgCl(2), Urea, EDTA, SDS and CaCl(2)) had differential effects on the enzyme activity. Plant amylase inhibitors may play an important role against insect pests. Hence, the characterization of digestive enzymes and the examination of their inhibitors may be a useful tool in future management of this important mulberry pest. PMID:20176331

  5. Ethnically diverse causes of Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS): FCMD mutations are a more common cause of WWS outside of the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Manzini, M Chiara; Gleason, Danielle; Chang, Bernard S; Hill, R Sean; Barry, Brenda J; Partlow, Jennifer N; Poduri, Annapurna; Currier, Sophie; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Shapiro, Lawrence R; Schmidt, Karen; Davis, Jessica G; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Seidahmed, Mohamed Z; Salih, Mustafa A M; Dobyns, William B; Walsh, Christopher A

    2008-11-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, cobblestone lissencephaly, and ocular malformations. Mutations in six genes involved in the glycosylation of á-dystroglycan (POMT1, POMT2, POMGNT1, FCMD, FKRP and LARGE) have been identified in WWS patients, but account for only a portion of WWS cases. To better understand the genetics of WWS and establish the frequency and distribution of mutations across WWS genes, we genotyped all known loci in a cohort of 43 WWS patients of varying geographical and ethnic origin. Surprisingly, we reached a molecular diagnosis for 40% of our patients and found mutations in POMT1, POMT2, FCMD and FKRP, many of which were novel alleles, but no mutations in POMGNT1 or LARGE. Notably, the FCMD gene was a more common cause of WWS than previously expected in the European/American subset of our cohort, including all Ashkenazi Jewish cases, who carried the same founder mutation. PMID:18752264

  6. Ethnically Diverse Causes of Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS): FCMD Mutations Are a More Common Cause of WWS Outside of the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, M. Chiara; Gleason, Danielle; Chang, Bernard S.; Hill, R. Sean; Barry, Brenda J.; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Poduri, Annapurna; Currier, Sophie; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Shapiro, Lawrence R.; Schmidt, Karen; Davis, Jessica G.; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Seidahmed, Mohamed Z.; Salih, Mustafa A. M.; Dobyns, William B.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, cobblestone lissencephaly, and ocular malformations. Mutations in six genes involved in the glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (POMT1, POMT2, POMGNT1, FCMD, FKRP and LARGE) have been identified in WWS patients, but account for only a portion of WWS cases. To better understand the genetics of WWS and establish the frequency and distribution of mutations across WWS genes, we genotyped all known loci in a cohort of 43 WWS patients of varying geographical and ethnic origin. Surprisingly, we reached a molecular diagnosis for 40% of our patients and found mutations in POMT1, POMT2, FCMD and FKRP, many of which were novel alleles, but no mutations in POMGNT1 or LARGE. Notably, the FCMD gene was a more common cause of WWS than previously expected in the European/American subset of our cohort, including all Ashkenazi Jewish cases, who carried the same founder mutation. PMID:18752264

  7. Characterization of calcium transport in the luminal and the basolateral membrane from kidney cortex of hypercalcemic rats bearing the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, F; Esbrit, P

    1993-10-01

    The Walker 256 (W256) carcinosarcoma did not significantly modify calcium uptake by brush border membrane (BBM) vesicles in the kidney of the host rat, compared with that in membranes isolated from control animals. However, it showed a tendency to increase at near equilibrium in W256 tumor-host rats, associated with a decreased BBM protein content. ATP-dependent calcium influx by basolateral membrane (BLM) vesicles from W256 tumor-bearing rats was also increased compared with that in control BLM. This stimulation was due to a decreased Km for calcium. Passive calcium permeability or the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger were unchanged in BLM from W256 tumor-host rats compared with control BLM. Pre-stimulation of control rat cortical tubules with either 10(-7) M parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) (1-34) or 10(-4) M N6,2'-O-dibutiryl cyclic AMP before BLM isolation, did not modify the ATP-dependent calcium uptake by BLM vesicles compared with control membranes. However, our results do not rule out that the stimulated ATP-dependent calcium influx in BLM from W256 tumor-host rats could be mediated by the interaction among PTHrP and other humoral factors. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism for the increased renal calcium reabsorption in this animal model for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. PMID:8274881

  8. De novo pure 12q22q24.33 duplication: first report of a case with mental retardation, ADHD, and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    PubMed

    Cappellacci, S; Martinelli, S; Rinaldi, R; Martinelli, E; Parisi, P; Mancini, B; Pescosolido, R; Grammatico, P

    2006-06-01

    We present a patient with a de novo 12q nonmosaic pure duplication characterized by multiple minor anomalies and Dandy-Walker malformation. A neurological and behavioral assessment revealed psychomotor retardation and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with neurobehavioral abnormalities (auto- and heteroaggressive behavior). Fluoxetine therapy in this case markedly improved the neurobehavioral profile, with a decreased level of aggression. To define the extension of the duplicated region, we performed FISH analyses by using YAC probes. The analyses revealed a tandem duplication of the 12q22q24.33 region, with the proximal breakpoint located between 96.5 and 97.6 cM and the distal one between 154 and 161 cM. This is the first case of pure de novo duplication involving the 12q22q24.33 region. To better define the clinical phenotype associated with 12q partial duplication, we compared our case with the four patients with similar pure duplications previously described. PMID:16652357

  9. Populational parameters of Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) on Pupae of Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) treated with two strains of Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuil. (Deuteromycetes).

    PubMed

    Lecuona, Roberto; Crespo, Diana; La Rossa, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The parasitoid Spalangia endius Walker is an efficient controller of Dipteran pupae, such as Musca domestica L. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuil. is a regulator of insect populations, including these synanthropic pests. The aim of this work was to explore the possibilities of utilizing both agents in a combined form for the biocontrol of the domestic fly. Recently formed M. domestica pupae were inoculated by immersion in conidia suspension (10(8) conidia/ml) with two strains of B. bassiana (Bb6 and Bb10). The inoculated pupae were offered to the female parasitoid. In one bioassay they were offered pupae inoculated a single day and in other, pupae inoculated the following day as well. In both bioassays non inoculated (control) pupae were offered to the parasitoids until their death. Thirty females of S. endius were used for each strain and bioassay. From the study of the parasitoid offspring, life tables were built and the reproduction net rate (R(0)) and intrinsic natural increase (r(m)) were obtained among other demographic parameters; the parasitism percentages and sex ratios were also analyzed. B. bassiana did not affect significantly the biodemography of the parasitoid when pupae were inoculated a single time. On the other hand the R0 and the rm were smaller than that of the control without the fungus when pupae were inoculated twice, although sporulation was not observed in the cadavers of S. endius. PMID:17934618

  10. On the identity of Prochyliza nigrimana (Meigen) and Prochyliza nigricornis (Meigen) (Diptera: Piophilidae), with a synopsis of Prochyliza Walker and description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vega, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    With representatives distributed throughout the Holarctic and Neotropical regions, the genus Prochyliza Walker (Diptera: Piophilidae) is known from eight species. There has been, however, considerable controversy over the identity of two of them: the common, synanthropic species Prochyliza nigrimana (Meigen), and the rarely collected Prochyliza nigricornis (Meigen). The described differences between both species were only based on body colouration but, since a wide colour variation has been documented among P. nigrimana individuals, several authors had suggested that both taxa might be just extreme colour variants of the same species. Recent collections from central Spain showed that the colouration characters described for P. nigricornis certainly apply to dark P. nigrimana individuals, but also to other Prochyliza specimens showing distinct morphological characters and genitalia. In order to solve this controversy, the holotypes of both P. nigrimana and P. nigricornis were studied, concluding that both specimens are conspecific and instating P. nigricornis as a subjective junior synonym (syn. nov.). A new species, Prochyliza georgekaplani sp. nov., is described from specimens collected in central Spain. A synopsis and an updated identification key to the known species of the genus Prochyliza are also provided. PMID:25544523

  11. An approach for reconstructing past streamflows using a water balance model and tree-ring records in the upper West Walker River basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittori, J. C.; Saito, L.; Biondi, F.

    2010-12-01

    Historical streamflows in a given river basin can be useful for determining regional patterns of drought and climate, yet such measured data are typically available for the last 100 years at most. To extend the measured record, observed streamflows can be regressed against tree-ring data that serve as proxies for streamflow. This empirical approach, however, cannot account for or test factors that do not directly affect tree-ring growth but may influence streamflow. To reconstruct past streamflows in a more mechanistic way, a seasonal water balance model has been developed for the upper West Walker River basin that uses proxy precipitation and air temperature data derived from tree-ring records as input. The model incorporates simplistic relationships between precipitation and other components of the hydrologic cycle, as well as a component for modeling snow, and operates at a seasonal time scale. The model allows for flexibility in manipulating various hydrologic and land use characteristics, and can be applied to other watersheds. The intent is for the model to investigate sources of uncertainty in streamflow reconstructions, and how factors such as wildfire or changes in vegetation cover could impact estimates of past flows, something regression-based models are not able to do. In addition, the use of a mechanistic water balance model calibrated against proxy climate records can provide information on changes in various components of the water cycle, including the interaction between evapotranspiration, snowmelt, and runoff under warmer climatic regimes.

  12. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  13. Inferior Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation in Purebred Eurasier Dogs with Familial Non-Progressive Ataxia: A Retrospective and Prospective Clinical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A.; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A.; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5 – 6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  14. Efficacy of five volatile oils and their mixtures against the soft scale insect, Saissetia coffeae (Walker) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) infesting the Sago palm, Cycas revoluta in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, H A; Nagda, A El Sayed; Mourad, A K; Abdel-Razak, I Soad; Samar, E Abd El-Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Five tested plant volatile oils and their mixtures were evaluated for controlling the coccid, Saissetia coffeae (Walker) on growing Sago palms Cycas revoluta in Antoniades public gardens, Alexandria, Egypt. The tested volatile oils at concentration rates of 0.5, 1 and 1.5% (v/v) were: Camphor 20%, Dill 20%, Rose 30%, Peppermint 20% and Clove 30% (v/v). Their mixtures were : Camphor/Peppermint, Camphor/Rose at a rate of 1:1, Camphor/Rose/Peppermint at 1:1:2 rate and Camphor/Rose/Dill at 2:1:1 rate. The results, as a general mean of residual reduction percent for the whole inspection intervals of the test lasted 2 days up to 9 days post treatment, indicated that the superior volatile oils in reducing the insect were both Camphor and Rose, followed by Dill, Peppermint and the least efficient one was the Clove oil. The evaluated mixtures of the volatile oils showed that each of Camphor/Rose/Peppermint, Camphor/Rose and Camphor/Peppermint mixtures attained a higher rank of efficiency against that of the assigned soft scale insect. PMID:21539257

  15. Cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker 3-brane, late-time cosmic acceleration, and the cosmic coincidence.

    PubMed

    Doolin, Ciaran; Neupane, Ishwaree P

    2013-04-01

    A late epoch cosmic acceleration may be naturally entangled with cosmic coincidence--the observation that at the onset of acceleration the vacuum energy density fraction nearly coincides with the matter density fraction. In this Letter we show that this is indeed the case with the cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) 3-brane in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. We derive the four-dimensional effective action on a FLRW 3-brane, from which we obtain a mass-reduction formula, namely, M(P)(2) = ρ(b)/|Λ(5)|, where M(P) is the effective (normalized) Planck mass, Λ(5) is the five-dimensional cosmological constant, and ρ(b) is the sum of the 3-brane tension V and the matter density ρ. Although the range of variation in ρ(b) is strongly constrained, the big bang nucleosynthesis bound on the time variation of the effective Newton constant G(N) = (8πM(P)(2))(-1) is satisfied when the ratio V/ρ ≳ O(10(2)) on cosmological scales. The same bound leads to an effective equation of state close to -1 at late epochs in accordance with astrophysical and cosmological observations. PMID:25166976

  16. Expression of the Murine Pomt1 Gene in Both the Developing Brain and Adult Muscle Tissues and Its Relationship with Clinical Aspects of Walker-Warburg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Belén; Peña, Almudena; Cotarelo, Rocío P.; Valero, M. Carmen; Cruces, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is the most severe of a group of congenital disorders that have in common defects in the O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. WWS is characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy coupled with severe ocular and brain malformations. Moreover, in at least one-fifth of the reported cases, mutations in the POMT1 gene are responsible for this disease. During embryonic development (E8.5 to E11.5), the mouse Pomt1 gene is expressed in the tissues most severely affected in WWS, the muscle, eye, and brain. In this study, we show that mPomt1 expression is maintained in the muscle and eye in later developmental stages and, notably, that its expression is particularly strong in regions of brain and cerebellum that, when affected, could generate the defects observed in patients with WWS. We show that the Pomt1 protein is localized to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle tissue cells in adult mice, where α-dystroglycan is O-glycosylated. Furthermore, the Pomt1 protein is localized to the acrosome of maturing spermatids, where α-dystroglycan is not glycosylated, so that Pomt1 might have a different target for O-mannosylation in the testes. This expression pattern in the testes could also be related to the gonadal anomalies observed in some patients with WWS. PMID:17456771

  17. ATP Regulation of Type-1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Activity Does Not Require Walker A-type ATP-binding Motifs*

    PubMed Central

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.; Wagner, Larry E.; Park, Hyung Seo; Yule, David I.

    2009-01-01

    ATP is known to increase the activity of the type-1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R1). This effect is attributed to the binding of ATP to glycine rich Walker A-type motifs present in the regulatory domain of the receptor. Only two such motifs are present in neuronal S2+ splice variant of InsP3R1 and are designated the ATPA and ATPB sites. The ATPA site is unique to InsP3R1, and the ATPB site is conserved among all three InsP3R isoforms. Despite the fact that both the ATPA and ATPB sites are known to bind ATP, the relative contribution of these two sites to the enhancing effects of ATP on InsP3R1 function is not known. We report here a mutational analysis of the ATPA and ATPB sites and conclude neither of these sites is required for ATP modulation of InsP3R1. ATP augmented InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from permeabilized cells expressing wild type and ATP-binding site-deficient InsP3R1. Similarly, ATP increased the single channel open probability of the mutated InsP3R1 to the same extent as wild type. ATP likely exerts its effects on InsP3R1 channel function via a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:19386591

  18. Revision of the species of Jaliscoa Bouček within a review of the identity, relationships and membership of Jaliscoa, Catolaccus Thomson, Eurydinoteloides Girault, Lyrcus Walker and Trimeromicrus Gahan (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary A P

    2013-01-01

    The limits of Lyrcus Walker (1842), Catolaccus Thomson (1878), Eurydinoteloides Girault (1913a), Trimeromicrus Gahan (1914), and Jaliscoa Bouček (1993) are re-evaluated and redefined to better reflect observed distribution of morphological features. Nine of 13 New World species of Catolaccus are transferred to other genera and photographs of the primary type specimens are given to assist future recognition. New features are provided to assist identification of the remaining four Nearctic species of Catolaccus and these are compared to European species, with the observation that C. kansensis (Girault 1917c) could be a junior synonym of C. crassiceps (Masi 1911). Trimeromicrus is removed from synonymy under Lyrcus for the single species T. maculatus Gahan (1914) rev. comb. Newly synonymized under Lyrcus is the Australasian genus Neocylus Bouček (1988) n. syn. Ten species are newly transferred to Lyrcus-L. nigraeneus (Girault 1915) n. comb. (from Neocylus), L. helice (Walker 1843) n. comb. and L. cyaneus (Girault 1911) n. comb. (from Catolaccus), and L. albiclavus (Girault 1917c) n. comb., L. capitis (Burks 1955) n. comb., L. chalcis (Burks 1955) n. comb., L. coeliodis (Ashmead 1896) n. comb., L. deuterus (Crawford 1911) n. comb., L. nigroaeneus (Ashmead 1894a)n. comb. and L. rosaecolis (Burks 1955) n. comb. (from Zatropis Crawford 1908). Catolaccus pallipes Ashmead (1894b) is newly transferred to Pteromalus Swederus (1795) as Pteromalus pallipes (Ashmead) n. comb. and Catolaccus fragariae Rohwer (1934) to Lariophagus Crawford (1909) as Lariophagus fragariae (Rohwer) n. comb. Nine species are newly transferred to Eurydinoteloides-E. tepicensis (Ashmead 1895) n. comb. (from Catolaccus), E. dymnus (Walker 1847) n. comb., E. hermeas (Walker 1847) n. comb., E. incerta (Ashmead 1893) n. comb., E. orontas (Walker 1847) n. comb., E. perdubia (Girault 1916) n. comb., E. platensis (De Santis in De Santis et al. 1979) n. comb. and E. timaea (Walker 1847)n. comb. (from Lyrcus), and E. eudubia (Özdikmen 2011) n. comb. (from Spintherus Thomson 1878). Four species are newly transferred to Jaliscoa-J. grandis (Burks 1954) n. comb. and J. hunteri (Crawford 1908) n. comb. (from Catolaccus), and J. townsendi (Crawford 1912) n. comb. and J. vulgaris (Ashmead 1894b) n. comb. (from Pteromalus). The species of Jaliscoa are revised to include J. nudipennis Bouček 1993, J. bouceki n. sp., J. hunteri and J. vulgaris. Re-established in synonymy under J. hunteri is J. townsendi n. comb. One new species of Pteromalus, P. grisselli n. sp., is described as an egg predator in the egg sacs of Dictyna coloradensi Chamberlin (Araneae: Dictynidae) and compared to Catolaccus species and other pteromalids that are predators of spider eggs. Lectotypes are designated for Pteromalus helice Walker (1843), Catolaccus pallipes Ashmead (1894b) and Catolaccus vulgaris Ashmead (1894b). Diagnoses are given to differentiate Catolaccus, Eurydinoteloides, Jaliscoa, Lyrcus and Trimeromicrus from each other, and more extensive descriptions given to help differentiate these genera from other Pteromalinae. Morphological features are illustrated through macrophotography and scanning electron photomicrography. PMID:24699811

  19. Concealed Quaternary strike-slip fault resolved with airborne lidar and seismic reflection: The Grizzly Valley fault system, northern Walker Lane, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jack K.; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony J.; Angster, Stephen J.

    2013-07-01

    Grizzly Valley fault system (GVFS) strikes northwestward across Sierra Valley, a low-relief basin situated within a network of active dextral slip faults in the northern Walker Lane, California. Quaternary motion along the Grizzly Valley fault system has not been previously documented. We used high-resolution (0.25 m) airborne lidar data in combination with high-resolution, P wave, seismic reflection imaging to evaluate Quaternary deformation associated with the GVFS. We identified suspected tectonic lineaments using the lidar data and collected seismic reflection data along six profiles across the lineaments. The seismic reflection images reveal a deformed basal marker that we interpret to be the top of Tertiary volcanic rocks overlain by a 120-450 m thick suite of subhorizontal reflectors that we interpret to be Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine deposits. Three profiles image features that we interpret to be the principal active trace of the GVFS, which is a steeply dipping fault zone that vertically offsets the volcanic rocks and the lacustrine basin fill. These data suggest that the GVFS may have been active in latest Quaternary time because (1) the lidar data show subtle surficial geomorphic features that are typical of youthful faulting, including a topographic lineament marked by an ~1 m high ridge composed of discontinuous, left-stepping lobes, and (2) the seismic profiles demonstrate shallow faulting of the lacustrine strata that coincides with the left-stepping ridge. This investigation illustrates the potential for unidentified, low-rate, strike-slip faults in basins and emphasizes the value of high-resolution topographic data and subsurface imaging as a means of identifying these structures.

  20. Re-assigned diagnosis of D4ST1-deficient Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome) after initial diagnosis of Marden-Walker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winters, Kevin A; Jiang, Zhijie; Xu, Weihong; Li, Shibo; Ammous, Zineb; Jayakar, Parul; Wierenga, Klaas J

    2012-11-01

    We report on a 16-year-old female originally diagnosed with Marden-Walker syndrome due to features such as facial dysmorphism, several musculoskeletal anomalies, and atrial septal defect in addition to hypoplasia of the inferior vermis with normal-sized cerebellum and absence of the septum pellucidum. However, an SNP array performed at age 15 years detected a total of 142?Mb of long runs of homozygosity (ROH), and put the diagnosis in doubt. Using the Genomic Oligoarray and SNP array evaluation tool (http://www.ccs.miami.edu/ROH), CHST14 provided a "hit" as a gene mapping to the largest ROH region associated with a phenotype matching our patient's (if mutated). At that time, she was a cognitively intact, thin female with growth parameters below the 3rd percentile. Craniofacial features included microcephaly, midface hypoplasia, blepharophimosis, entropion, myopia, microretrognathia, and dental malocclusion. Musculoskeletal features included kyphoscoliosis, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, and rocker-bottom feet with interphalangeal contractures. Her skin displayed large ecchymoses and poorly healed atrophic scars. Sequencing of CHST14 revealed a complex homozygous frameshift mutation involving a 7-bp deletion and an 11-bp insertion predicted to produce a truncated protein. This mutation was not seen in 100 controls of various ethnicities. Thus, our patient represents not only a novel (homozygous) mutation in CHST14, but is also the first patient with dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase 1-deficient Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome) (DD-EDS ATCS) documented in the Western Hemisphere. Furthermore, our patient's central nervous system anomalies have not before been described in DD-EDS (ATCS). PMID:22987394

  1. Uncaria tomentosa exerts extensive anti-neoplastic effects against the Walker-256 tumour by modulating oxidative stress and not by alkaloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida Dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg(-1)) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  2. Uncaria tomentosa Exerts Extensive Anti-Neoplastic Effects against the Walker-256 Tumour by Modulating Oxidative Stress and Not by Alkaloid Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg−1) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  3. Transcriptomics and Identification of the Chemoreceptor Superfamily of the Pupal Parasitoid of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuping; Zheng, Yuan; Li, Dunsong; Fan, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Background The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, causes serious losses to fruit production and is one of the most economically important pests in many countries, including China, Spalangia endius Walker is a pupal parasitoid of various dipteran hosts, and may be considered a potentially important ectoparasitic pupal parasitoid of B. dorsalis. However, lack of genetic information on this organism is an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms behind its interaction with this host. Analysis of the S. endius transcriptome is essential to extend the resources of genetic information on this species and, to support studies on S. endius on the host B. dorsalis. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed de novo assembly RNA-seq of S. endius. We obtained nearly 10 Gbp of data using a HiSeq platform, and 36319 high-quality transcripts using Trinity software. A total of 22443 (61.79%) unigenes were aligned to homologous sequences in the jewel wasp and honeybee (Apis florae) protein set from public databases. A total of 10037 protein domains were identified in 7892 S. endius transcripts using HMMER3 software. We identified expression of six gustatory receptor and 21 odorant receptor genes in the sample, with only one gene having a high expression level in each family. The other genes had a low expression level, including two genes regulated by splicing. This result may be due to the wasps being kept under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a total of 3727 SSR markers were predicted, which could facilitate the identification of polymorphisms and functional genes within wasp populations. Conclusion/Significance This transcriptome greatly improves our genetic understanding of S. endius and provides a large number of gene sequences for further study. PMID:24505315

  4. Crustal deformation across the Sierra Nevada, northern Walker Lane, Basin and Range transition, western United States measured with GPS, 2000-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, William C.; Thatcher, Wayne

    2007-05-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in campaigns in 2000 and 2004 were processed and interpreted with other GPS data in the western Basin and Range province to provide new constraints on the rate, style, and pattern of deformation of the central and northern Walker Lane (WL), which lies near the western boundary of the Basin and Range. Across the central WL, near 38°N latitude, the velocities with respect to North America increase westward by ˜10 mm/yr inducing dextral shear. Farther north between 40° and 41°N latitude, a western zone of ˜7 mm/yr relative motion undergoes dextral shear, and an eastern zone of ≤3 mm/yr relative motion undergoes extension and shear. These data show that the northern WL is essentially a dextral shear zone experiencing minor net dilatation (ɛΔ = 2.6 ± 0.8 nstrain/yr). Near most Holocene normal faults, dilatation inferred from the velocity field is not greater than the uncertainties. However, near the central Nevada seismic belt we detect significant dilatation expressed as extension in a direction approximately normal to the range fronts (ɛΔ = 23.0 ± 3.9 nstrain/yr), some of which is attributable to transient postseismic deformation following large historic earthquakes. A block model constrained by velocities corrected for transient effects shows that the sum of dextral slip rates across the Honey Lake, Warm Springs, east Pyramid fault system, and Mohawk Valley faults is ˜7 mm/yr. The WL is a zone whose width and dilatation rate increase northwestward, consistent with counterclockwise rotation of the Sierra Nevada microplate and transfer of deformation into the Pacific Northwest.

  5. AP1S2 is mutated in X-linked Dandy-Walker malformation with intellectual disability, basal ganglia disease and seizures (Pettigrew syndrome).

    PubMed

    Cacciagli, Pierre; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Girard, Nadine; Delepine, Marc; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Lévy, Nicolas; Ledbetter, David H; Dobyns, William B; Villard, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    MRXS5 or Pettigrew syndrome was described 20 years ago in a four generation family including nine affected individuals presenting with facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, Dandy-Walker malformation and inconstant choreoathetosis. Four individuals had iron deposition in the basal ganglia seen on MRI or at autopsy. The mutation causing Pettigrew has remained elusive since the initial description of the condition. We report the identification of a mutation in the X-linked AP1S2 gene in the original Pettigrew syndrome family using X-chromosome exome sequencing. We report additional phenotype details for several of the affected individuals, allowing us to further refine the phenotype corresponding to this X-linked intellectual disability syndrome. The AP1S2 c.426+1 G>T mutation segregates with the disease in the Pettigrew syndrome family and results in loss of 46 amino acids in the clathrin adaptor complex small chain domain that spans most of the AP1S2 protein sequence. The mutation reported here in AP1S2 is the first mutation that is not predicted to cause a premature termination of the coding sequence or absence of the AP1S2 protein. Although most of the families affected by a mutation in AP1S2 were initially described as having different disorders assigned to at least three different OMIM numbers (MIM 300629, 300630 and 304340), our analysis of the phenotype shows that they are all the same syndrome with recognition complicated by highly variable expressivity that is seen within as well as between families and is probably not explained by differences in mutation severity. PMID:23756445

  6. Tradeoffs between impact loading rate, vertical impulse and effective mass for walkers and heel strike runners wearing footwear of varying stiffness.

    PubMed

    Addison, Brian J; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-05-01

    Humans experience repetitive impact forces beneath the heel during walking and heel strike running that cause impact peaks characterized by high rates and magnitudes of loading. Impact peaks are caused by the exchange of momentum between the ground and a portion of the body that comes to a full stop (the effective mass) during the period of the impact peak. A number of factors can influence this exchange of momentum, including footwear stiffness. This study presents and tests an impulse-momentum model of impact mechanics which predicts that effective mass and vertical impulse is greater in walkers and heel strike runners wearing less stiff footwear. The model also predicts a tradeoff between impact loading rate and effective mass, and between impact loading rate and vertical impulse among individuals wearing footwear of varying stiffness. We tested this model using 19 human subjects walking and running in minimal footwear and in two experimental footpads. Subjects walked and ran on an instrumented treadmill and 3D kinematic data were collected. As predicted, both vertical impulse (walking: F(2,54)=52.0, p=2.6E-13; running: F(2,54)=25.2, p=1.8E-8) and effective mass (walking: F(2,54)=12.1, p=4.6E-5; running: F(2,54)=15.5, p=4.7E-6) increase in less stiff footwear. In addition, there is a significant inverse relationship between impact loading rate and vertical impulse (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.78, p<0.0001) and between impact loading rate and effective mass (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.82, p<0.0001). The tradeoff relationships documented here raise questions about how and in what ways the stiffness of footwear heels influence injury risk during human walking and running. PMID:25814181

  7. A wrist-walker exhibiting no "Uner Tan Syndrome": a theory for possible mechanisms of human devolution toward the atavistic walking patterns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Uner

    2007-01-01

    After discovering two families with handicapped children exhibiting the "Uner Tan syndrome," the author discovered a man exhibiting only wrist-walking with no primitive mental abilities including language. According to his mother, he had an infectious disease with high fever as a three months old baby; as a result, the left leg had been paralyzed after a penicilline injection. This paralysis most probably resulted from a viral disease, possibly poliomyelitis. He is now (2006) 36 years old; the left leg is flaccid and atrophic, with no tendon reflexes; however, sensation is normal. The boy never stood up on his feet while maturing. The father forced him to walk upright using physical devices and making due exercises, but the child always rejected standing upright and walking in erect posture; he always preferred wrist-walking; he expresses that wrist-walking is much more comfortable for him than upright-walking. He is very strong now, making daily body building exercises, and walking quite fast using a "three legs," although he cannot stand upright. Mental status, including the language and conscious experience, is quite normal. There was no intra-familiar marriage as in the two families mentioned earlier, and there is no wrist-walking in his family and relatives. There were no cerebellar signs and symptoms upon neurological examination. The brain-MRI was normal; there was no atrophy in cerebellum and vermis. It was concluded that there may be sporadic wrist-walkers exhibiting no "Uner Tan Syndrome." The results suggest that the cerebellum has nothing to do with human wrist-walking, which may rather be an atavistic trait appearing from time to time in normal individuals, indicating a live model for human reverse evolution. It was concluded that pure quadrupeds may sporadically appear due to random fluctuations in genotypes and/or environmental factors (hormonal or nutritional); the human development following the human evolution may be stopped in the stage of transition from quadrupedality to bipedality. That is, the activity of the philogenetically youngest supraspinal centers for bipedal walking responsible for suppression of the older supraspinal centers for quadrupedal gait may be interrupted at the atavistic level due to genetic and/or environmental factors. Consequently, it is assumed that these individuals prefer their natural wrist-walking to move around more quickly and efficiently. PMID:17365105

  8. Translation vs. Rotation: The Battle for Accommodation of Dextral Shear at the Northern Terminus of the Central Walker Lane, Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, C. W.; Faulds, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Positioned between the Sierra Nevada microplate and Basin and Range in western North America, the Walker Lane (WL) accommodates ~20% of the dextral motion between the North American and Pacific plates on predominately NW-striking dextral and ENE to E-W-striking sinistral fault systems. The Terrill Mountains (TM) lie at the northern terminus of a domain of dextral faults accommodating translation of crustal-blocks in the central WL and at the southeast edge of sinistral faults accommodating oroclinal flexure and CW rotation of blocks in the northern WL. As the mechanisms of strain transfer between these disparate fault systems are poorly understood, the thick Oligocene to Pliocene volcanic strata of the TM area make it an ideal site for studying the transfer of strain between regions undergoing differing styles of deformation and yet both accommodating dextral shear. Detailed geologic mapping and paleomagnetic study of ash-flow tuffs in the TM region has been conducted to elucidate Neogene strain accommodation for this transitional region of the WL. Strain at the northernmost TM appears to be transferred from a system of NW-striking dextral faults to a system of ~E-W striking sinistral faults with associated CW flexure. A distinct ~23 Ma paleosol is locally preserved below the tuff of Toiyabe and provides an important marker bed. This paleosol is offset with ~6 km of dextral separation across the fault bounding the NE flank of the TM. This fault is inferred as the northernmost strand of the NW-striking, dextral Benton Spring fault system, with offset consistent with minimums constrained to the south (6.4-9.6 km, Gabbs Valley Range). Paleomagnetic results suggest counter-intuitive CCW vertical-axis rotation of crustal blocks south of the domain boundary in the system of NW-striking dextral faults, similar to some other domains of NW-striking dextral faults in the northern WL. This may result from coeval dextral shear and WNW-directed extension within the left-stepping system of dextral fault. The left steps are analogous to Riedel shears developing above a more through-going shear zone at depth. However, a site directly adjacent to the Benton Springs fault is rotated ~30° CW, likely due to fault drag. These results show the complex and important contribution of vertical-axis rotations in accommodation of dextral shear.

  9. Fault Slip Partitioning in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt: Pliocene to Late Pleistocene Contraction Across the Mina Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Stockli, D.; Gosse, J.

    2007-12-01

    Two different mechanisms have been proposed for fault slip transfer between the subparallel NW-striking dextral- slip faults that dominant the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ)-Walker Lane Belt (WLB). In the northern WLB, domains of sinistral-slip along NE-striking faults and clockwise block rotation within a zone of distributed deformation accommodated NW-dextral shear. A somewhat modified version of this mechanism was also proposed for the Mina deflection, southern WLB, whereby NE-striking sinistral faults formed as conjugate faults to the primary zone of NW-dextral shear; clockwise rotation of the blocks bounding the sinistral faults accommodated dextral slip. In contrast, in the northern ECSZ and Mina deflection, domains of NE-striking pure dip-slip normal faults, bounded by NW-striking dextral-slip faults, exhibited no rotation; the proposed mechanism of slip transfer was one of right-stepping, high angle normal faults in which the magnitude of extension was proportional to the amount of strike-slip motion transferred. New geologic mapping, tectonic geomorphologic, and geochronologic data from the Queen Valley area, southern Mina deflection constrain Pliocene to late Quaternary fault geometries, slip orientations, slip magnitudes, and slip rates that bear on the mechanism of fault slip transfer from the relatively narrow northern ECSZ to the broad deformation zone that defines the Mina deflection. Four different fault types and orientations cut across the Queen Valley area: (1) The NE-striking normal-slip Queen Valley fault; (2) NE-striking sinistral faults; (3) the NW-striking dextral Coyote Springs fault, which merges into (4) a set of EW-striking thrust faults. (U-Th)/He apatite and cosmogenic radionuclide data, combined with magnitude of fault offset measurements, indicate a Pliocene to late Pleistocene horizontal extension rate of 0.2-0.3 mm/yr across the Queen Valley fault. Our results, combined with published slip rates for the dextral White Mountain fault zone (0.3-0.8 mm/yr) and the eastern sinistral Coaldale fault (0.4 mm/yr) suggest that transfer of dextral slip from the narrow White Mountains fault zone is explained best by a simple shear couple whereby slip is partitioned into three different components: horizontal extension along the Queen Valley fault, dominantly dextral slip along the Coyote Springs fault, and dominantly sinistral slip along the Coaldale fault. A velocity vector diagram illustrating fault slip partitioning predicts contraction rates of <0.1 to 0.5 mm/yr across the Coyote Springs and western Coaldale faults. The predicted long-term contraction across the Mina deflection is consistent with present-day GPS data.

  10. Antitumor and anti-cachectic effects of shark liver oil and fish oil: comparison between independent or associative chronic supplementation in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Shark liver oil (SLOil) and fish oil (FOil), which are respectively rich in alkylglycerols (AKGs) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), are able to reduce the growth of some tumors and the burden of cachexia. It is known that FOil is able to reduce proliferation rate and increase apoptotic cells and lipid peroxidation of tumor cells efficiently. However, there are few reports revealing the influence of SLOil on these parameters. In the current study, effects of FOil chronic supplementation on tumor growth and cachexia were taken as reference to compare the results obtained with SLOil supplementation. Also, we evaluated if the association of SLOil and FOil was able to promote additive effects. Methods Weanling male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: fed regular chow (C), supplemented (1 g/kg body weight) with SLOil (CSLO), FOil (CFO) and both (CSLO + FO). After 8 weeks half of each group was inoculated with Walker 256 cells originating new groups (W, WSLO, WFO and WSLO + FO). Biochemical parameters of cachexia, tumor weight, hydroperoxide content, proliferation rate and percentage of apoptotic tumor cells were analysed. Fatty acids and AKG composition of tumor and oils were obtained by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed by unpaired t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Tukey test. Results Fourteen days after inoculation, SLOil was able to restore cachexia parameters to control levels, similarly to FOil. WSLO rats presented significantly lower tumor weight (40%), greater tumor cell apoptosis (~3-fold), decreased tumor cell proliferation (35%), and higher tumor content of lipid hydroperoxides (40%) than observed in W rats, but FOil showed more potent effects. Supplementation with SLOil + FOil did not promote additive effects. Additionally, chromatographic results suggested a potential incorporation competition between the n-3 fatty acids and the AKGs in the tumor cells’ membranes. Conclusions SLOil is another marine source of lipids with similar FOil anti-cachectic capacity. Furthermore, despite being less potent than FOil, SLOil presented significant in vivo antitumor effects. These results suggest that the chronic supplementation with SLOil may be adjuvant of the anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24131597

  11. Construction and analysis of antennal cDNA library from rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and expression profiles of putative odorant-binding protein and chemosensory protein genes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Su; Jiang, Yan-Dong; Zhou, Wen-Wu; Liang, Qing-Mei; Cheng, Jiaan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Zhu, Zeng-Rong; Gurr, Geoff M

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we constructed a high-quality cDNA library from the antennae of the Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). A total of 1,235 colonies with inserts greater than 0.7 kb were sequenced and analyzed. Homology searching coupled with bioinformatics analysis identified 15 and 7 cDNA sequences, respectively, encoding putative odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs). A phylogenetic tree of CsupCSPs showed that each CsupCSP has orthologs in Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori with strong bootstrapping support. One CSP was either very specific or more related to the CSPs of another species than to conspecific CSP. The expression profiles of the OBPs and CSPs in different tissues were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The results revealed that of the 11 OBP genes, the transcript levels of CsupOBP1, CsupOBP5, and CsupOBP7 were higher in both male and female antennae than those in other tissues. And CsupCSP7 was highly expressed in both male and female antennae. Based on these results, the possible physiological functions of CsupOBPs and CsupCSPs were discussed. PMID:25639603

  12. On the Move with the Waukesha Walkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gissal, Mary L.; Ray, Robert O.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a research study, a fitness trail was designed for older adults to increase their physical fitness and cardiovascular health. Exercise stations placed at quarter-mile intervals introduced exercises effective in improving flexibility, muscular strength, endurance, balance, and coordination. (JN)

  13. Common Runners/Walkers Foot Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Ihlers, Matt; Haar, Calin; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This is my 35th year of running most days a year. That was correct most days a year not a week. Running is my first priority each day. Developing a routine will assist those who want exercise to become a habit. After I awake I drink a glass of water and a cup of coffee then my dog "Jazz" and I hit the streets for a 3-4 mile run. Later in…

  14. Do Exercise Walkers Need Special Walking Shoes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Lan

    1987-01-01

    The emergence of exercise walking as a popular fitness activity has spurred sales of shoes designed and marketed specifically for walking. Consumers may find comfort and stability in these shoes--but certain other shoes may work as well. (Author)

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Walker-Warburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the brain, it helps direct the movement (migration) of nerve cells (neurons) during early development. Mutations ... skeletal muscles. Defective α-dystroglycan also affects the migration of neurons during the early development of the ...

  16. Dynamical correlations among vicious random walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Taro; Katori, Makoto; Tanemura, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    Nonintersecting motion of Brownian particles in one dimension is studied. The system is constructed as the diffusion scaling limit of Fisher's vicious random walk. N particles start from the origin at time t=0 and then undergo mutually avoiding Brownian motion until a finite time t= T. In the short time limit t≪ T, the particle distribution is asymptotically described by Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE) of random matrices. At the end time t= T, it is identical to that of Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE). We show that the most general dynamical correlations among arbitrary number of particles at arbitrary number of times are written in the forms of quaternion determinants. Asymptotic forms of the correlations in the limit N→∞ are evaluated and a discontinuous transition of the universality class from GUE to GOE is observed.

  17. Valsalnicola D. Walker & Rossman, gen. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Valsonectria is based on a species that was described in the genus Valsa. Although it resembles Valsa in having allantoid ascospores, the ascospores of Valsalnicola are one-septate while the majority of species of Valsa and the closely related Leucostoma and Valsella have non-septate ascospores. How...

  18. Activated Random Walkers: Facts, Conjectures and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald; Rolla, Leonardo T.; Sidoravicius, Vladas

    2010-02-01

    We study a particle system with hopping (random walk) dynamics on the integer lattice ℤ d . The particles can exist in two states, active or inactive (sleeping); only the former can hop. The dynamics conserves the number of particles; there is no limit on the number of particles at a given site. Isolated active particles fall asleep at rate λ>0, and then remain asleep until joined by another particle at the same site. The state in which all particles are inactive is absorbing. Whether activity continues at long times depends on the relation between the particle density ζ and the sleeping rate λ. We discuss the general case, and then, for the one-dimensional totally asymmetric case, study the phase transition between an active phase (for sufficiently large particle densities and/or small λ) and an absorbing one. We also present arguments regarding the asymptotic mean hopping velocity in the active phase, the rate of fixation in the absorbing phase, and survival of the infinite system at criticality. Using mean-field theory and Monte Carlo simulation, we locate the phase boundary. The phase transition appears to be continuous in both the symmetric and asymmetric versions of the process, but the critical behavior is very different. The former case is characterized by simple integer or rational values for critical exponents ( β=1, for example), and the phase diagram is in accord with the prediction of mean-field theory. We present evidence that the symmetric version belongs to the universality class of conserved stochastic sandpiles, also known as conserved directed percolation. Simulations also reveal an interesting transient phenomenon of damped oscillations in the activity density.

  19. Competitive Brownian and Lévy walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinsalu, E.; Hernández-García, E.; López, C.

    2012-04-01

    Population dynamics of individuals undergoing birth and death and diffusing by short- or long-range two-dimensional spatial excursions (Gaussian jumps or Lévy flights) is studied. Competitive interactions are considered in a global case, in which birth and death rates are influenced by all individuals in the system, and in a nonlocal but finite-range case in which interaction affects individuals in a neighborhood (we also address the noninteracting case). In the global case one single or few-cluster configurations are achieved with the spatial distribution of the bugs tied to the type of diffusion. In the Lévy case long tails appear for some properties characterizing the shape and dynamics of clusters. Under nonlocal finite-range interactions periodic patterns appear with periodicity set by the interaction range. This length acts as a cutoff limiting the influence of the long Lévy jumps, so that spatial configurations under the two types of diffusion become more similar. By dividing initially everyone into different families and following their descent it is possible to show that mixing of families and their competition is greatly influenced by the spatial dynamics.

  20. Dynamics of Robertson–Walker spacetimes with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Alho, A.; Calogero, S.; Machado Ramos, M.P.; Soares, A.J.

    2015-03-15

    We study the dynamics of spatially homogeneous and isotropic spacetimes containing a fluid undergoing microscopic velocity diffusion in a cosmological scalar field. After deriving a few exact solutions of the equations, we continue by analyzing the qualitative behavior of general solutions. To this purpose we recast the equations in the form of a two dimensional dynamical system and perform a global analysis of the flow. Among the admissible behaviors, we find solutions that are asymptotically de-Sitter both in the past and future time directions and which undergo accelerated expansion at all times.

  1. Coupled uncertainty provided by a multifractal random walker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohi Lai, Z.; Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Movahed, S. M. S.; Jafari, G. R.

    2015-10-01

    The aim here is to study the concept of pairing multifractality between time series possessing non-Gaussian distributions. The increasing number of rare events creates "criticality". We show how the pairing between two series is affected by rare events, which we call "coupled criticality". A method is proposed for studying the coupled criticality born out of the interaction between two series, using the bivariate multifractal random walk (BiMRW). This method allows studying dependence of the coupled criticality on the criticality of each individual system. This approach is applied to data sets of gold and oil markets, and inflation and unemployment.

  2. 75 FR 38833 - Walker River Basin Acquisition Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ..., 2007 (72 FR 54456). Public scoping meetings on the EIS were held in October 2007 and meetings on the... Availability of the Draft EIS on July 24, 2009 (74 FR 36737) and a notice to reopen the comment period for review of the Draft EIS on September 23, 2009 (74 FR 48596). In 2008, DOI promulgated its regulations...

  3. Evaluation of a technology enabled garment for older walkers.

    PubMed

    Burns, William P; Nugent, Chris D; McCullagh, Paul J; Finlay, Dewar D; Cleland, Ian; Scotney, Bryan W; McClean, Sally I; McCann, Jane; Gueldenring, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Walking is often cited as the best form of activity for persons over the age of 60. In this paper we outline the development and evaluation of a smart garment system that aims to monitor the wearer's wellbeing and activity regimes during walking activities. Functional requirements were ascertained using a combination of questionnaires and two workshops with a target cohort. The requirements were subsequently mapped onto current technologies as part of the technical design process. In this paper we outline the development and second round of evaluations of a prototype as part of a three-phase iterative development cycle. The evaluation was undertaken with 6 participants aged between 60 and 73 years of age. The results of the evaluation demonstrate the potential role that technology can play in the promotion of activity regimes for the older population. PMID:23366335

  4. Taxonomic Study of the Genus Apalacris Walker (Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z M; Lin, L L; Niu, Y

    2016-02-01

    The research history of the genus Apalacris is reviewed; a key to all known species of the genus is given, and one new species, Apalacris eminifronta n. sp., and one new combination, Apalacris maculifemura (Lin & Zheng), are described. The new species is very closely related to Apalacris antennata Liang, but differs in the following characters: (1) tegmen longer, reaching apex of hind femur; (2) basal part of inner side of hind femur orange red; (3) frontal ridge more protruded, obviously depressed under median ocellus in lateral view; and (4) epiphallus bridge prominent, ancora shorter than anterior projection. PMID:26514365

  5. A Space Station robot walker and its shared control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yangsheng; Brown, Ben; Aoki, Shigeru; Yoshida, Tetsuji

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we first briefly overview the update of the self-mobile space manipulator (SMSM) configuration and testbed. The new robot is capable of projecting cameras anywhere interior or exterior of the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and will be an ideal tool for inspecting connectors, structures, and other facilities on SSF. Experiments have been performed under two gravity compensation systems and a full-scale model of a segment of SSF. This paper presents a real-time shared control architecture that enables the robot to coordinate autonomous locomotion and teleoperation input for reliable walking on SSF. Autonomous locomotion can be executed based on a CAD model and off-line trajectory planning, or can be guided by a vision system with neural network identification. Teleoperation control can be specified by a real-time graphical interface and a free-flying hand controller. SMSM will be a valuable assistant for astronauts in inspection and other EVA missions.

  6. Systematics of the Copitarsia Incommoda (Walker) pest complex (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phylogenetic relationships of four pest species in the noctuid genus Copitarsia were investigated using adult morphology and mitochondrial DNA (COI). Separate analyses of morphological and COI data provide the same topology of relationships. Adult morphology provides useful characters for separating...

  7. Effective trapping of random walkers in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S; Lee, D-S; Kahng, B

    2012-04-01

    Exploring the World Wide Web has become one of the key issues in information science, specifically in view of its application to the PageRank-like algorithms used in search engines. The random walk approach has been employed to study such a problem. The probability of return to the origin (RTO) of random walks is inversely related to how information can be accessed during random surfing. We find analytically that the RTO probability for a given starting node shows a crossover from a slow to a fast decay behavior with time and the crossover time increases with the degree of the starting node. We remark that the RTO probability becomes almost constant in the early-time regime as the degree exponent approaches two. This result indicates that a random surfer can be effectively trapped at the hub and supports the necessity of the random jump strategy empirically used in the Google's search engine. PMID:22680541

  8. Effective trapping of random walkers in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2012-04-01

    Exploring the World Wide Web has become one of the key issues in information science, specifically in view of its application to the PageRank-like algorithms used in search engines. The random walk approach has been employed to study such a problem. The probability of return to the origin (RTO) of random walks is inversely related to how information can be accessed during random surfing. We find analytically that the RTO probability for a given starting node shows a crossover from a slow to a fast decay behavior with time and the crossover time increases with the degree of the starting node. We remark that the RTO probability becomes almost constant in the early-time regime as the degree exponent approaches two. This result indicates that a random surfer can be effectively trapped at the hub and supports the necessity of the random jump strategy empirically used in the Google's search engine.

  9. Passive walker that can walk down steps: simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Tianshu

    2008-10-01

    A planar passive walking model with straight legs and round feet was discussed. This model can walk down steps, both on stairs with even steps and with random steps. Simulations showed that models with small moments of inertia can navigate large height steps. Period-doubling has been observed when the space between steps grows. This period-doubling has been validated by experiments, and the results of experiments were coincident with the simulation.

  10. Neotectonics, Geodesy and Seismic Hazard in the Northern Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, S. G.; Kreemer, C. W.; Hammond, W. C.; Bormann, J. M.; Brune, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    The establishment of fleets of large numbers of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) capable of recording for more than a year has made it possible to study Earth structure beneath the oceans using seismic observations in much greater resolution than previously possible. However, shallow water poses strong challenges for OBS deployments, with much higher noise levels from waves and currents. The on-going Cascadia Initiative, a major OBS community project directed at studying the Cascadia subduction zone with its megathrust earthquake potential and broad continental shelf, includes OBS deployments at depths as shallow as 50 m. Before the Cascadia deployment, there was a valid fear that the data from the shallowest sites would be useless for seismic observations. The shallow Cascadia OBS deployments feature shielding to protect the sensors from the flow of ocean floor currents (and trawling), The first year data show that the shielding can reduce horizontal component noise levels (due to currents) by more than 20dB permitting good SNR for horizontal phases even at shelf depths. Noise from deformation under ocean wave loading has been found to be very large at the shallowest sites. High amplitude ocean waves cause the differential pressure gauges (DPG) and unshielded seismic sensors at a few sites to sometimes clip, but shielded seismic sensors and pressure measurements from absolute pressure gauges (APGs) remain unclipped even at the shallowest sites. The study demonstrates pressure gauge records can be used to predict and remove the noise from the deformation under ocean wave loading in the spectral domain, potentially improving signal to noise for long period seismic phases by up to 40dB. A FIR digital filter can be created from the pressure to acceleration transfer function that when convolved with the pressure record accurately predicts the wave loading signal allowing removal of about 30dB of this noise. These results show that with proper shielding, good quality seismometer observations can be obtained from shallow water, opening up this critical part of the seafloor to observations for the first time. The data also show that without the use of pressure gauges to remove the wave loading noise, and without shielding, the shallow water, long period (>10s) data are almost useless for seismology.

  11. Myopic random walkers and exclusion processes: Single and multispecies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Kerry A.; Fernando, Anthony E.

    2011-10-01

    A motility mechanism based on a simple exclusion process, where the probability of movement of an agent depends on the number of unoccupied nearest-neighbor sites is considered. Such interacting agents are termed myopic. This problem is an extension of the famous blind or myopic ant in a labyrinth problem. For the interacting agent models considered here, each agent plays the role of an ant in a labyrinth, where the paths of allowed sites though the labyrinth consist of sites not occupied by other agents. We derive a nonlinear diffusion equation for the average occupancy of the discrete agent-based model for myopic agents. In contrast, interacting blind agents have a constant probability of movement to each of their nearest-neighbor sites, giving rise to a linear diffusion equation. Insight into the various terms in the nonlinear diffusion coefficient is obtained from a study of multiple subpopulations of interacting myopic agents, where an advection-diffusion equation for each subpopulation is derived, and from tracking an individual agent within the crowd, where a motility coefficient is extracted. Averaged discrete simulation data compares very well with the solution to the continuum models. We also compare the behavior of myopic and blind agents. The myopic motility mechanism is biologically motivated to emulate information an individual cell gathers from environment cues. The multispecies model developed and investigated here assists with the interpretation of experimental data involving the tracking subpopulations of cells within a total cell population.

  12. 75 FR 35265 - Safety Standard for Infant Walkers: Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...Section 104(b) of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (``CPSIA'') requires the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (``CPSC'' or ``Commission'') to promulgate consumer product safety standards for durable infant or toddler products. These standards are to be ``substantially the same as'' applicable voluntary standards or more stringent than the voluntary standard if......

  13. Lamellipodia and Membrane Blebs Drive Efficient Electrotactic Migration of Rat Walker Carcinosarcoma Cells WC 256

    PubMed Central

    Sroka, Jolanta; Krecioch, Izabela; Zimolag, Eliza; Lasota, Slawomir; Rak, Monika; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Borowicz, Pawel; Gajek, Marta; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous electric field (EF) may provide an important signal for directional cell migration during wound healing, embryonic development and cancer metastasis but the mechanism of cell electrotaxis is poorly understood. Additionally, there is no research addressing the question on the difference in electrotactic motility of cells representing various strategies of cell movement—specifically blebbing vs. lamellipodial migration. In the current study we constructed a unique experimental model which allowed for the investigation of electrotactic movement of cells of the same origin but representing different modes of cell migration: weakly adherent, spontaneously blebbing (BC) and lamellipodia forming (LC) WC256 cells. We report that both BC and LC sublines show robust cathodal migration in a physiological EF (1–3 V/cm). The directionality of cell movement was completely reversible upon reversing the field polarity. However, the full reversal of cell direction after the change of EF polarity was much faster in the case of BC (10 minutes) than LC cells (30 minutes). We also investigated the distinct requirements for Rac, Cdc42 and Rho pathways and intracellular Ca2+ in electrotaxis of WC256 sublines forming different types of cell protrusions. It was found that Rac1 is required for directional movement of LC to a much greater extent than for BC, but Cdc42 and RhoA are more crucial for BC than for LC cells. The inhibition of ROCK did not affect electrotaxis of LC in contrast to BC cells. The results also showed that intracellular Ca2+ is essential only for the electrotactic reaction of BC cells. Moreover, inhibition of MLCK and myosin II did not affect the electrotaxis of LC in contrast to BC cells. In conclusion, our results revealed that both lamellipodia and membrane blebs can efficiently drive electrotactic migration of WC 256 carcinosarcoma cells, however directional migration is mediated by different signalling pathways. PMID:26863616

  14. Spatial foraging in free ranging bearded sakis: traveling salesmen or Lévy Walkers?

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher A

    2014-05-01

    According to optimal foraging theory and most current models of primate socioecology, primate foraging involves a series of decisions concerning when is the most optimal time to leave a food patch, how to travel to the next patch in an efficient manner, and how to minimize the time and distance traveled to all patches throughout the course of the day. In this study, I assess how bearded sakis solve these challenges by presenting data on their patch use, distance minimization, and by comparing their movements with non-deterministic foraging patterns. The study group, composed of 38 ± 15 individuals, fed significantly longer in higher quality patches (quality defined by patch size and productivity) and in those that contained ripe fruit pulp. However, group size was not a significant predictor of patch occupancy. Bearded sakis traveled relatively directly between food patches, sometimes over distances > 300 m. In addition, they chose the optimal daily path among all patches visited on 9 of 17 occasions, and on average traveled only 21% more than the least distance route. Bearded saki step lengths were consistent with a Brownian rather than a Lévy Walk pattern while waiting times were consistent with a Lévy pattern. However, the distribution of their turning angles indicated a high degree of directional persistence between patches. These results suggest that bearded sakis exploit food patches that are randomly distributed spatially but heterogenous in patch quality. They appear to encode the locations of high quality food patches and minimize travel between them, despite opportunistically feeding from more abundant and randomly distributed, lower quality patches en route. PMID:24166852

  15. Local inhomogeneities in a Robertson-Walker background. II. Flux conditions at boundary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, K.

    1980-12-15

    Energy flux doncitions imposed on spherical boundary surfaces are examined. The zero flux restriction which is the hallmark of the standard ''Swiss cheese'' type construction, is relaxed. We discuss a class of locally inhomogeneous exact solutions to the Einstein equations which admit an effectively Newtonian accretion mode.

  16. A Reply to Walker, Mertens, and Hendrix on the Creation-Evolution Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Stanley L.

    1977-01-01

    The function of the science teacher is to teach science and not to intrude on religion especially when concerned with the creation-evolution issue. The teacher can stress that science and religion are parallel but different approaches to understanding the world. The student decides from there. (Author/MA)

  17. Variability in Stepping Direction Explains the Veering Behavior of Blind Walkers

    PubMed Central

    Kallie, Christopher S.; Schrater, Paul R.; Legge, Gordon E.

    2008-01-01

    Walking without vision results in veering, an inability to maintain a straight path that has important consequences for blind pedestrians. We addressed whether the source of veering in the absence of visual and auditory feedback is better attributed to errors in perceptual encoding or undetected motor error. Three experiments had the following results: no significant differences in the shapes of veering trajectories were found between blind and blindfolded participants; accuracy in detecting curved walking paths was not correlated with simple measures of veering behavior; and explicit perceptual cues to initial walking direction did not reduce veering. We present a model that accounts for the major characteristics of our participants' veering behavior by postulating three independent sources of undetected motor error: initial orientation, consistent biases in step direction, and most importantly variable error in individual steps. PMID:17311487

  18. Characterization of phenoloxidase activity in venom from the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael; Rivers, David B

    2007-02-01

    Crude venom isolated from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis was found to possess phenoloxidase (PO) activity. Enzyme activity was detected by using a modified dot blot analysis approach in which venom samples were applied to nylon membranes and incubated with either L-DOPA or dopamine. Dot formation was most intense with dopamine as the substrate and no activators appeared to be necessary to evoke a melanization reaction. No melanization occurred when venom was incubated in Schneider's insect medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum or when using tyrosine as a substrate, but melanization did occur when larval or pupal plasma from the fly host, Sarcophaga bullata, was exposed to tyrosine. Only fly larval plasma induced an enzyme reaction with the Schneider's insect medium. The PO inhibitor phenylthiourea (PTU) and serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF) abolished PO activity in venom and host plasma samples, but glutathione (reduced) only inhibited venom PO. Elicitors of PO activity (sodium dodecyl sulfate and trypsin) had no or a modest effect (increase) on the ability of venom, or larval and pupal plasma to trigger melanization reactions. SDS-PAGE separation of crude venom followed by in-gel staining using L-DOPA as a substrate revealed two venom proteins with PO activity with estimated molecular weights of 68 and 160 kDa. In vitro assays using BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells were performed to determine the importance of venom PO in triggering cellular changes and evoking cell death. When cell monolayers were pre-treated with 10 mM PTU or PMSF prior to venom exposure, the cells were protected from the effects of venom intoxication as evidenced by no observable cellular morphological changes and over 90% cell viability by 24 h after venom treatment. Simultaneous addition of inhibitors with venom or lower concentrations of PMSF were less effective in affording protection. These observations collectively argue that wasp venom PO is unique from that of the fly hosts, and that the venom enzyme is critical in the intoxication pathway leading to cell death. PMID:17054979

  19. Navel Orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) (Walker) and Obliquebanded Leafroller (Choristoneura rosaceana)(Harris) as Pests of Pistachio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The navel orangeworm moved into California in 1942 from Mexico and by 1949 was present throughout the state. This moth is the primary pest of pistachios and almonds in California and causes direct damage by feeding on the kernel. Infestation reduces yield, increases aflatoxin contamination, primaril...

  20. 78 FR 25234 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Walker, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959... comments a self-addressed, stamped postcard on which the following statement is made: ``Comments to...

  1. Interacting quantum walkers: two-body bosonic and fermionic bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Luck, J. M.; Mallick, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of bound states of two interacting particles, either bosons or fermions, performing a continuous-time quantum walk on a one-dimensional lattice. We consider the situation where the distance between both particles has a hard bound, and the richer situation where the particles are bound by a smooth confining potential. The main emphasis is on the velocity characterizing the ballistic spreading of these bound states, and on the structure of the asymptotic distribution profile of their center-of-mass coordinate. The latter profile generically exhibits many internal fronts.

  2. Recognition of Turkish Vowels by Probabilistic Neural Networks Using Yule-Walker AR Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Erdem; Topuz, Vedat

    In this work, recognition of vowels in Turkish Language by probabilistic neural networks is implemented using a spectral analysis method. Power spectral density of the phones obtained from speakers is estimated. Then weighted power spectrum is calculated after power spectral density of that phone is passed through a number of band pass filters. In this way, estimated power spectrums of the phones which are obtained from speakers approximate to a mel scale. Mel scale coefficients obtained, form the feature vector of the phone that is pronounced. These feature vectors constitute the database of the related speaker. Thus and so, every speaker has its own database. When it comes to recognize a phone pronounced by a speaker later, a probabilistic neural network model is created using the database belonging to that speaker. The feature vector of the phone which is to be recognized is computed as mentioned above. In this study, speaker-dependent recognition of Turkish vowels has been realized with an accuracy rate of over 95 percent.

  3. Model task for the dynamics of an underwater two-legged walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beletskiy, V. V.; Golubkov, V. V.; Stepanova, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A model task of two-legged underwater walking was examined. Characteristics of the walking were established. The underwater walking device is a substantial sphere, which moves on dual-member legs. The dynamics of the device were investigated with the calculation of the buoyancy of Archimedes, and the force of hydrodynamic resistance.

  4. 75 FR 35279 - Revocation of Regulations Banning Certain Baby-Walkers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... (``FHSA''), 15 U.S.C. 1261-1278 (available at http://www.cpsc.gov/businfo/fhsa.pdf ). 36 FR 21809 (Nov. 16.... 74 FR 45704. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, the Commission is issuing a new safety... a rule to revoke 16 CFR 1500.18(a)(6) and 1500.86(a)(4). 74 FR 45714. 3. The voluntary standard...

  5. Comment on ''Walker diffusion method for calculation of transport properties of composite materials''

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, In Chan; Cule, Dinko; Torquato, Salvatore; Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544

    2000-04-01

    In a recent paper [C. DeW. Van Siclen, Phys. Rev. E 59, 2804 (1999)], a random-walk algorithm was proposed as the best method to calculate transport properties of composite materials. It was claimed that the method is applicable both to discrete and continuum systems. The limitations of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. We show that the algorithm does not capture the peculiarities of continuum systems (e.g., ''necks'' or ''choke points'') and we argue that it is the stochastic analog of the finite-difference method. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Variability in Stepping Direction Explains the Veering Behavior of Blind Walkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallie, Christopher S.; Schrater, Paul R.; Legge, Gordon E.

    2007-01-01

    Walking without vision results in veering, an inability to maintain a straight path that has important consequences for blind pedestrians. In this study, the authors addressed whether the source of veering in the absence of visual and auditory feedback is better attributed to errors in perceptual encoding or undetected motor error. Three…

  7. On the relevance of q-distribution functions: the return time distribution of restricted random walker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zand, Jaleh; Tirnakli, Ugur; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    There exists a large literature on the application of q-statistics to the out-of-equilibrium non-ergodic systems in which some degree of strong correlations exists. Here we study the distribution of first return times to zero, PR (0, t), of a random walk on the set of integers {0, 1, 2,..., L} with a position dependent transition probability given by {| n/L| }a. We find that for all values of a\\in [0,2] PR(0, t) can be fitted by q-exponentials, but only for a = 1 is PR (0, t) given exactly by a q-exponential in the limit L\\to ∞ . This is a remarkable result since the exact analytical solution of the corresponding continuum model represents PR (0, t) as a sum of Bessel functions with a smooth dependence on a from which we are unable to identify a = 1 as of special significance. However, from the high precision numerical iteration of the discrete master equation, we do verify that only for a = 1 is PR(0, t) exactly a q-exponential and that a tiny departure from this parameter value makes the distribution deviate from q-exponential. Further research is certainly required to identify the reason for this result and also the applicability of q-statistics and its domain.

  8. Regulation of thyrotropin secretion in rats bearing the Walker 256 carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumara-Siri, M.H.; Lee, K.; Surks, M.I.

    1981-11-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms whereby serum TSH was maintained in the normal range in tumor-bearing rats in association with decreased serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations, we studied the regulation of TSH secretion in groups of control (C) and T rats. The pituitary TSH contents were similar in the two groups of animals, and an iv injection of TRH (5 ..mu..g/100 g BW) resulted in a 10-fold increase in plasma TSH concentrations in the control group 15 min after injection. The TSH concentrations achieved after TRH injection were significantly greater in T rats than in the C group. A progressive 5- to 8-fold increase in plasma TSH was noted in both C and T rats after thyroidectomy. There was no difference in the integrated TSH response between these groups. Similarly, a smaller stimulus to TSH secretion did not produce significantly different effects on plasma TSH between groups of C and T rats. This was demonstrated in a study in which both groups of rats were fed 1-methyl-2-mercaptoimidazole (methimazole(MMI)) (10 ..mu..g/ml) in their drinking water. 5 days after the addition of MMI the mean plasma T/sub 4/ level decreased from 3.6 +/- 0.5 to 2.7 +/- 0.6 (SEM) ..mu..g/dl (P<0.01). The mean plasma TSH level increased significantly (P<0.001) from 150 +/- 20 to 629 +/- 135 ng/ml in C rats and from 208 +/- 58 to 868 +/- 196 ng/ml in T rats after MMI treatment. The local production of T/sub 3/ from T/sub 4/ was studied in homogenates of pituitaries obtained from C and T rats. A mean 2.1-fold increase in the rate of T/sub 3/ formation from T/sub 4/ was noted in tissue from T rats. Lastly, the concentration of pituitary T/sub 3/ in C and T rats was determined directly by RIA. The mean T/sub 3/ content of T rats (18 +/- 1 pg/pituitary) was significantly decreased (P<0.001) from that of C rats (41 +/- pg/pituitary).

  9. Thinking while walking: experienced high-heel walkers flexibly adjust their gait.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Sabine; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    Theories of motor-skill acquisition postulate that attentional demands of motor execution decrease with practice. Hence, motor experts should experience less attentional resource conflict when performing a motor task in their domain of expertise concurrently with a demanding cognitive task. We assessed cognitive and motor performance in high-heel experts and novices who were performing a working memory task while walking in gym shoes or high heels on a treadmill. Surprisingly, neither group showed lower working memory performance when walking than when sitting, irrespective of shoe type. However, high-heel experts adapted walking regularity more flexibly to shoe type and cognitive load than novices, by reducing the variability of time spent in the single-support phase of the gait cycle in high heels when cognitively challenged. We conclude that high-heel expertise is associated with more flexible adjustments of movement patterns. Future research should investigate whether a more demanding walking task (e.g., wearing high heels on uneven surfaces and during gait perturbations) results in expertise-related differences in the simultaneous execution of a cognitive task. PMID:23760158

  10. Random walkers in one-dimensional random environments: Exact renormalization group analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Monthus, Cécile; Fisher, Daniel S.

    1999-05-01

    Sinai's model of diffusion in one dimension with random local bias is studied by a real space renormalization group, which yields exact results at long times. The effects of an additional small uniform bias force are also studied. We obtain analytically the scaling form of the distribution of the position x(t) of a particle, the probability of it not returning to the origin, and the distributions of first passage times, in an infinite sample as well as in the presence of a boundary and in a finite but large sample. We compute the distribution of the meeting time of two particles in the same environment. We also obtain a detailed analytic description of the thermally averaged trajectories by computing quantities such as the joint distribution of the number of returns and of the number of jumps forward. These quantities obey multifractal scaling, characterized by generalized persistence exponents θ(g) which we compute. In the presence of a small bias, the number of returns to the origin becomes finite, characterized by a universal scaling function which we obtain. The full statistics of the distribution of successive times of return of thermally averaged trajectories is obtained, as well as detailed analytical information about correlations between directions and times of successive jumps. The two-time distribution of the positions of a particle, x(t) and x(t') with t>t', is also computed exactly. It is found to exhibit ``aging'' with several time regimes characterized by different behaviors. In the unbiased case, for t-t'~t'α with α>1, it exhibits a ln t/ln t' scaling, with a singularity at coinciding rescaled positions x(t)=x(t'). This singularity is a novel feature, and corresponds to particles that remain in a renormalized valley. For closer times α<1, the two-time diffusion front exhibits a quasiequilibrium regime with a ln(t-t')/ln t' behavior which we compute. The crossover to a t/t' aging form in the presence of a small bias is also obtained analytically. Rare events corresponding to intermittent splitting of the thermal packet between separated wells which dominate some averaged observables are also characterized in detail. Connections with the Green function of a one-dimensional Schrödinger problem and quantum spin chains are discussed.

  11. The geodynamo as a random walker: A view on reversal statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Fabian, Karl

    2012-03-01

    The sequence of durations of the geomagnetic polarity intervals is often described in terms of a nonhomogenous Poisson process with time-dependent reversal rate, reflecting the nonstationarity of the underlying geodynamo process. This view has recently been challenged, and here we show that the first-passage time statistics of random walks taking place on a flat potential relief yields a much more consistent interpretation of the distribution of geomagnetic polarity intervals. A possible physical explanation suggests that the stability of a polarity chron of the Earth's magnetic field is controlled by a sum of statistically independent, randomly behaving, dynamo processes in the outer core. The random-walk hypothesis naturally includes the observed occurrences of very long superchrons, and it provides a new, considerably longer statistical estimate for the total duration of the present Brunhes chron predicting that the probability for a geomagnetic field reversal within the next 30 Ka is ≈5% and the probability that we live in a chron longer than 2 Ma is about 30%.

  12. Analytical solution and scaling of fluctuations in complex networks traversed by damped, interacting random walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaneh, Mehdi Bagheri; Haber, Jonah; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2015-11-01

    A general model for random walks (RWs) on networks is proposed. It incorporates damping and time-dependent links, and it includes standard (undamped, noninteracting) RWs (SRWs), coalescing RWs, and coalescing-branching RWs as special cases. The exact, time-dependent solutions for the average numbers of visits (w ) to nodes and their fluctuations (σ2) are given, and the long-term σ -w relation is studied. Although σ ∝w1 /2 for SRWs, this power law can be fragile when coalescing-branching interaction is present. Damping, however, often strengthens it but with an exponent generally different from 1 /2 .

  13. New Walkers with Down Syndrome Use Cautious but Effective Strategies for Crossing Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Genna M.; Kubo, Masayoshi; Chang, Chia-Lin; Ulrich, Beverly D.

    2011-01-01

    Perception of affordances research in children with developmental disabilities has only examined well practiced skills. Ten toddlers with Down syndrome and 10 with typical development walked across a GAITRite mat, with and without an obstacle. We coded the toddlers' behaviors after 1 and 3 months of walking experience when they encountered the…

  14. Phase transitions in optimal search times: How random walkers should combine resetting and flight scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç

    2015-12-01

    Recent works have explored the properties of Lévy flights with resetting in one-dimensional domains and have reported the existence of phase transitions in the phase space of parameters which minimizes the mean first passage time (MFPT) through the origin [L. Kusmierz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 220602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.220602]. Here, we show how actually an interesting dynamics, including also phase transitions for the minimization of the MFPT, can also be obtained without invoking the use of Lévy statistics but for the simpler case of random walks with exponentially distributed flights of constant speed. We explore this dynamics both in the case of finite and infinite domains, and for different implementations of the resetting mechanism to show that different ways to introduce resetting consistently lead to a quite similar dynamics. The use of exponential flights has the strong advantage that exact solutions can be obtained easily for the MFPT through the origin, so a complete analytical characterization of the system dynamics can be provided. Furthermore, we discuss in detail how the phase transitions observed in random walks with resetting are closely related to several ideas recurrently used in the field of random search theory, in particular, to other mechanisms proposed to understand random search in space as mortal random walks or multiscale random walks. As a whole, we corroborate that one of the essential ingredients behind MFPT minimization lies in the combination of multiple movement scales (regardless of their specific origin).

  15. Forest nutrient and carbon pools at Walker Branch Watershed: Changes during a 21-year period

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Todd, D.E. Jr.

    1999-10-01

    A 21-yr perspective on changes in nutrient and C pools on undisturbed upland forest sites is provided. Plots originally representing four cover types have been sampled three times. On each plot, forest biomass, forest floor, and soil, to a depth of 60 cm, were measured, sampled, and analyzed for Ca, Mg, C, N, and P. Exchangeable soil Ca and Mg have declined in most soils. Despite the low exchangeable Ca, cumulative sequestration in the biomass has exceeded the soil pool, suggesting that soil supplies below 60 cm are satisfying the biomass demand. Extractable soil P also declined, with means ranging from 4.2 to 18.2 kg ha{sup {minus}1}, as a result of reductions in the mineral soil and Oi horizon. The loss of extractable soil P exceeded biomass sequestration in all but one plot, suggesting abiotic soil processes as the removal mechanism. Soil C and N were either stable, although highly variable, or declined, which was unexpected in these undisturbed sites. The net C balance of these sites was controlled by aboveground sequestration, which offset changes in the soil and forest floor. Soil parent material and geomorphic setting strongly influenced the changes in soil properties during the 21-yr period, reflecting the importance of those factors in assessing soil nutrient and C cycles over that of forest cover type. The variability encountered in the periodic soil measurements highlights the difficulty in detecting temporal changes in soil chemical properties.

  16. Analytical solution and scaling of fluctuations in complex networks traversed by damped, interacting random walkers.

    PubMed

    Hamaneh, Mehdi Bagheri; Haber, Jonah; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2015-11-01

    A general model for random walks (RWs) on networks is proposed. It incorporates damping and time-dependent links, and it includes standard (undamped, noninteracting) RWs (SRWs), coalescing RWs, and coalescing-branching RWs as special cases. The exact, time-dependent solutions for the average numbers of visits (w) to nodes and their fluctuations (σ2) are given, and the long-term σ-w relation is studied. Although σ ∝ w(1/2) for SRWs, this power law can be fragile when coalescing-branching interaction is present. Damping, however, often strengthens it but with an exponent generally different from 1/2. PMID:26651740

  17. Tightrope Walkers and Solidarity Sisters: Critical Workplace Educators in the Garment Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Tara

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the complex negotiations of critical workplace educators positioned amongst contradictory agendas and discourses in the workplace. While philosophically aligned with critical pedagogical agendas of transformation and collective action for workplace change, these educators perform an array of pedagogic articulations in…

  18. Lamellipodia and Membrane Blebs Drive Efficient Electrotactic Migration of Rat Walker Carcinosarcoma Cells WC 256.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Jolanta; Krecioch, Izabela; Zimolag, Eliza; Lasota, Slawomir; Rak, Monika; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Borowicz, Pawel; Gajek, Marta; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous electric field (EF) may provide an important signal for directional cell migration during wound healing, embryonic development and cancer metastasis but the mechanism of cell electrotaxis is poorly understood. Additionally, there is no research addressing the question on the difference in electrotactic motility of cells representing various strategies of cell movement-specifically blebbing vs. lamellipodial migration. In the current study we constructed a unique experimental model which allowed for the investigation of electrotactic movement of cells of the same origin but representing different modes of cell migration: weakly adherent, spontaneously blebbing (BC) and lamellipodia forming (LC) WC256 cells. We report that both BC and LC sublines show robust cathodal migration in a physiological EF (1-3 V/cm). The directionality of cell movement was completely reversible upon reversing the field polarity. However, the full reversal of cell direction after the change of EF polarity was much faster in the case of BC (10 minutes) than LC cells (30 minutes). We also investigated the distinct requirements for Rac, Cdc42 and Rho pathways and intracellular Ca2+ in electrotaxis of WC256 sublines forming different types of cell protrusions. It was found that Rac1 is required for directional movement of LC to a much greater extent than for BC, but Cdc42 and RhoA are more crucial for BC than for LC cells. The inhibition of ROCK did not affect electrotaxis of LC in contrast to BC cells. The results also showed that intracellular Ca2+ is essential only for the electrotactic reaction of BC cells. Moreover, inhibition of MLCK and myosin II did not affect the electrotaxis of LC in contrast to BC cells. In conclusion, our results revealed that both lamellipodia and membrane blebs can efficiently drive electrotactic migration of WC 256 carcinosarcoma cells, however directional migration is mediated by different signalling pathways. PMID:26863616

  19. Assaults, murders and walkers: The impact of violent crime on physical activity.

    PubMed

    Janke, Katharina; Propper, Carol; Shields, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We investigate an underexplored externality of crime: the impact of violent crime on individuals' participation in walking. For many adults walking is the only regular physical activity. We use a sample of nearly 1 million people in 323 small areas in England between 2005 and 2011 matched to quarterly crime data at the small area level. Within area variation identifies the causal effect of local violent crime on walking and a difference-in-difference analysis of two high-profile crimes corroborates our results. We find a significant deterrent effect of violent crime on walking that translates into a drop in overall physical activity. PMID:26928438

  20. Random walkers with extreme value memory: modelling the peak-end rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Rosemary J.

    2015-05-01

    Motivated by the psychological literature on the ‘peak-end rule’ for remembered experience, we perform an analysis within a random walk framework of a discrete choice model where agents’ future choices depend on the peak memory of their past experiences. In particular, we use this approach to investigate whether increased noise/disruption always leads to more switching between decisions. Here extreme value theory illuminates different classes of dynamics indicating that the long-time behaviour is dependent on the scale used for reflection; this could have implications, for example, in questionnaire design.