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Sample records for vertical cup-to-disc ratio

  1. Associations between Optic Cup-to-disc Ratio and Systemic Factors in the Healthy Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Jae; Shim, Seong Hee; Bae, Jeong Hun; Park, Ki Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relationships between optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) and age, sex, and other demographic and health characteristics in the healthy Korean population. Methods The study design was retrospective and population-based. A total of 28,377 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2008 and 2011 were enrolled in this study. Participants underwent structured interviews as well as systemic and ophthalmic examinations. Patients with glaucoma who were diagnosed using the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology classification were excluded. Changes in vertical CDR were examined by age in relation to systemic variables on multiple regression analysis. Results The mean vertical CDR was 0.34 ± 0.12. The vertical CDR increased with age from subjects in their 20s to those in their 80s (p < 0.001). The mean CDR in males was significantly higher than that of females (p < 0.001). On multiple regression analysis, the vertical CDR was positively associated with age (p < 0.001), male sex (p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), and intraocular pressure (p < 0.001) but was negatively associated with body mass index (p < 0.001). Conclusions Greater vertical CDR was related to age, male sex, higher diastolic blood pressure, higher intraocular pressure, and lower body mass index in healthy Koreans. PMID:26457040

  2. Cup to disc ratio by optical coherence tomography is abnormal in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Syc, S.B.; Warner, C.V.; Saidha, S.; Farrell, S.K.; Conger, A.; Bisker, E.R.; Wilson, J.; Frohman, E.M.; Balcer, L.J.; Calabresi, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify and characterize cup to disc ratio (CDR) and related optic nerve head abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Background While CDR is routinely assessed by ophthalmologists in the evaluation of glaucoma, CDR and related optic nerve head metrics remain largely unexplored in MS. Design/Methods Cirrus-HD (high density) OCT was used to evaluate average CDR, vertical CDR, optic disc area, optic cup volume and neuro-retinal rim area in 105 MS patients and 88 age-matched healthy individuals. High-contrast (100%) visual acuity, 2.5% low-contrast letter acuity and 1.25% low-contrast letter acuity were assessed in 77 MS patients. Two-sample t-tests were used in the analysis of OCT-derived optic nerve head measures between healthy controls and MS patients. Multivariate regression (accounting for age and gender) was used to assess relationships between optic nerve head measures and visual function. Results Average CDR (p=0.007) and vertical CDR (p=0.005) was greater in MS patients compared to healthy controls, while neuro-retinal rim area was decreased in MS patients (p=0.001). CDR increased with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning (r=?0.29, p=0.001). 2.5% low-contrast (p=0.005) and 1.25% low-contrast letter acuity (p=0.03) were lower in MS patients with higher vertical CDR. Conclusions/Relevance CDR (as determined by spectral domain OCT), is abnormal in MS and correlates with visual function. OCT derived CDR and related optic nerve head metrics may represent an objective measure by which to monitor disease progression, and potentially neuroprotection, in therapeutic MS trials. PMID:21227470

  3. Optic Disc Change during Childhood Myopic Shift: Comparison between Eyes with an Enlarged Cup-To-Disc Ratio and Childhood Glaucoma Compared to Normal Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Kim, Sung Eum; Park, Chan Kee

    2015-01-01

    Background Progressive disc tilting and the development or enlargement of peripapillary atrophy (PPA) are observed during a myopic shift in children. This could be related to the changes around the optic nerve head during eyeball elongation. If the biomechanical properties at or around the optic nerve head are changed after exposure to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in glaucoma eyes, different response of the disc tilting and PPA changes could take place during eyeball elongation by myopic shift. On the basis of this background, the aim of this study was to compare the morphological changes in the optic disc induced by a myopic shift during childhood between normal control eyes, eyes from disc suspects with an enlarged cup-to-disc ratio (CDR), and eyes with childhood glaucoma. Methods Total of 82 eyes from 82 subjects younger than 14 years of age were included in the study. Serial disc photographs were classified into one of two groups: eyes with an optic nerve head (ONH) or peripapillary atrophy (PPA) change or without an ONH/PPA change. Using ImageJ software, the outlines of the optic disc and PPA were plotted, and the vertical disc diameter (VDD), horizontal disc diameter (HDD), and maximum PPA width (PPW) were measured. The changes in the ratios of these parameters and the relationships between the degree of myopic shift or the ONH/PPA change were analyzed. Results Twenty-five eyes with normal optic disc appearance, 36 eyes with enlarged cup-to-disc ratio, and 21 eyes of glaucoma patients were analyzed. The initial intraocular pressure (IOP) at diagnosis was significantly different among the groups (P<0.001). The degree of myopic shift during follow-up period was not significantly different among the groups (P=0.612). However, the changes in the HDD/VDD and PPW/VDD ratios were significantly greater in the disc suspect group and significantly smaller in the glaucoma group. Among the 42 eyes with an ONH/PPA change, 16 (38.1%) were from the normal control group, 24 (57.1%) were from the disc suspect group, and 2 (4.8%) were from the glaucoma group (P < 0.001). Conclusions and Relevance The optic disc change during childhood myopic shift was different in eyes with various conditions. Eyes of childhood glaucoma showed less change in the disc morphology during myopic shift compared to eyes with normal disc or enlarged cup-to-disc ratio. PMID:26147983

  4. Automated determination of cup-to-disc ratio for classification of glaucomatous and normal eyes on stereo retinal fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Early diagnosis of glaucoma, which is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, can halt or slow the progression of the disease. We propose an automated method for analyzing the optic disc and measuring the cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) on stereo retinal fundus images to improve ophthalmologists' diagnostic efficiency and potentially reduce the variation on the CDR measurement. The method was developed using 80 retinal fundus image pairs, including 25 glaucomatous, and 55 nonglaucomatous eyes, obtained at our institution. A disc region was segmented using the active contour method with the brightness and edge information. The segmentation of a cup region was performed using a depth map of the optic disc, which was reconstructed on the basis of the stereo disparity. The CDRs were measured and compared with those determined using the manual segmentation results by an expert ophthalmologist. The method was applied to a new database which consisted of 98 stereo image pairs including 60 and 30 pairs with and without signs of glaucoma, respectively. Using the CDRs, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.90 was obtained for classification of the glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous eyes. The result indicates potential usefulness of the automated determination of CDRs for the diagnosis of glaucoma.

  5. Automated segmentation of optic disc in SD-OCT images and cup-to-disc ratios quantification by patch searching-based neural canal opening detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menglin; Leng, Theodore; de Sisternes, Luis; Rubin, Daniel L; Chen, Qiang

    2015-11-30

    Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. Early detection of glaucoma is traditionally based on assessment of the cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio, an important indicator of structural changes to the optic nerve head. Here, we present an automated optic disc segmentation algorithm in 3-D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes to quantify this ratio. The proposed algorithm utilizes a two-stage strategy. First, it detects the neural canal opening (NCO) by finding the points with maximum curvature on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) boundary with a spatial correlation smoothness constraint on consecutive B-scans, and it approximately locates the coarse disc margin in the projection image using convex hull fitting. Then, a patch searching procedure using a probabilistic support vector machine (SVM) classifier finds the most likely patch with the NCO in its center in order to refine the segmentation result. Thus, a reference plane can be determined to calculate the C/D radio. Experimental results on 42 SD-OCT volumes from 17 glaucoma patients demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can achieve high segmentation accuracy and a low C/D ratio evaluation error. The unsigned border error for optic disc segmentation and the evaluation error for C/D ratio comparing with manual segmentation are 2.216 ± 1.406 pixels (0.067 ± 0.042 mm) and 0.045 ± 0.033, respectively. PMID:26698750

  6. Facile Route to Vertically Aligned High-Aspect Ratio Block Copolymer Films via Dynamic Zone Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Kulkarni, Manish; Yager, Kevin; Smilgies, Detlef; Bucknall, David; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-02-01

    Directed assembly of block copolymers (BCP) can be used to fabricate a diversity of nanostructures useful for nanotech applications. The ability to vertically orient etchable high aspect ratio (˜30) ordered BCP domains on flexible substrates via continuous processing methods are particularly attractive for nanomanufacturing. We apply sharp dynamic cold zone annealing (CZA-S) to create etchable, and predominantly vertically oriented 30nm cylindrical domains in 1 ?m thick poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate) films on low thermal conductivity rigid (quartz) and flexible (PDMS & Kapton) substrates. Under similar static conditions, temporally stable vertical cylinders form within a narrow zone above a critical temperature gradient. Primary ordering mechanism of CZA-S involves sweeping this vertically orienting zone created at maximum thermal gradient. An optimal speed is needed since the process competes with preferential surface wetting dynamics that favors parallel orientation. GISAXS of etched BCP films confirms internal morphology.

  7. Organic vertical field effect transistors: Achieving high on-off ratio and vertical integration with OLEDs (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyukyun; Kim, Mincheol; Cho, Hyunsu; Yoo, Seunghyup

    2015-10-01

    Organic vertical field effect transistors (VFETs) have been explored to enhance the output current level and device operation speed due to the inherent low carrier mobility of organic semiconductors. However, most of VFETs reported to date involve a complex source electrode patterning process owing to their operation mechanism. Here, we investigate on VFETs based on C60 that do not require complex source electrode patterning process by insulting the top surface of a source electrode embedded in C60 layer [1]. In a VFET structure studied in this work, current flow is controlled by the electric field between a gate and a source electrode embedded within an active layer which is called bottom active layer. Based on its operation mechanism, several geometrical parameters such as (i) bottom active layer thickness; (ii) presence of a charge blocking layer and its thickness ensuring insulating properties; and (iii) the width of electrodes are identified as key factors influencing device performance. Through the device optimization with these parameters, the proposed organic VFETs exhibit a large on/off ratio of 6×10^5 and output current that is greater than that of a conventional C60 based OTFT with a similar device dimension. In order to show the benefit of VFETs, a single-pixel organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is integrated vertically with the VFETs under study.

  8. Vertical split-ring resonator based anomalous beam steering with high extinction ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Wu, Pin Chieh; Chen, Jia-Wern; Chen, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Bo Han; Chen, Wei Ting; Huang, Yao-Wei; Liao, Chun Yen; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-06-01

    Metasurfaces created artificially with metal nanostructures that are patterned on surfaces of different media have shown to possess “unusual” abilities to manipulate light. Limited by nanofabrication difficulties, so far most reported works have been based on 2D metal structures. We have recently developed an advanced e-beam process that allowed for the deposition of 3D nanostructures, namely vertical split-ring resonators (VSRRs), which opens up another degree of freedom in the metasurface design. Here we explore the functionality of beam steering with phase modulation by tuning only the vertical dimension of the VSRRs and show that anomalous steering reflection of a wide range of angles can be accomplished with high extinction ratio using the finite-difference-time-domain simulation. We also demonstrate that metasurfaces made of 3D VSRRs can be made with roughly half of the footprint compared to that of 2D nano-rods, enabling high density integration of metal nanostructures.

  9. Vertical split-ring resonator based anomalous beam steering with high extinction ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Wu, Pin Chieh; Chen, Jia-Wern; Chen, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Bo Han; Chen, Wei Ting; Huang, Yao-Wei; Liao, Chun Yen; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces created artificially with metal nanostructures that are patterned on surfaces of different media have shown to possess “unusual” abilities to manipulate light. Limited by nanofabrication difficulties, so far most reported works have been based on 2D metal structures. We have recently developed an advanced e-beam process that allowed for the deposition of 3D nanostructures, namely vertical split-ring resonators (VSRRs), which opens up another degree of freedom in the metasurface design. Here we explore the functionality of beam steering with phase modulation by tuning only the vertical dimension of the VSRRs and show that anomalous steering reflection of a wide range of angles can be accomplished with high extinction ratio using the finite-difference-time-domain simulation. We also demonstrate that metasurfaces made of 3D VSRRs can be made with roughly half of the footprint compared to that of 2D nano-rods, enabling high density integration of metal nanostructures. PMID:26054048

  10. Realization of Vertically Aligned, Ultrahigh Aspect Ratio InAsSb Nanowires on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Anyebe, E A; Sanchez, A M; Hindmarsh, S; Chen, X; Shao, J; Rajpalke, M K; Veal, T D; Robinson, B J; Kolosov, O; Anderson, F; Sundaram, R; Wang, Z M; Falko, V; Zhuang, Q

    2015-07-01

    The monolithic integration of InAs(1-x)Sb(x) semiconductor nanowires on graphitic substrates holds enormous promise for cost-effective, high-performance, and flexible devices in optoelectronics and high-speed electronics. However, the growth of InAs(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires with high aspect ratio essential for device applications is extremely challenging due to Sb-induced suppression of axial growth and enhancement in radial growth. We report the realization of high quality, vertically aligned, nontapered and ultrahigh aspect ratio InAs(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires with Sb composition (xSb(%)) up to ?12% grown by indium-droplet assisted molecular beam epitaxy on graphite substrate. Low temperature photoluminescence measurements show that the InAs(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires exhibit bright band-to-band related emission with a distinct redshift as a function of Sb composition providing further confirmation of successful Sb incorporation in as-grown nanowires. This study reveals that the graphite substrate is a more favorable platform for InAs(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires that could lead to hybrid heterostructures possessing potential device applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26086785

  11. Magnetic alignment of high-aspect ratio microwires into vertical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardslee, Joseph

    Fundamental studies of magnetic alignment of highly anisotropic mesostructures can enable the clean-room-free fabrication of flexible, array-based solar and electronic devices, in which preferential orientation of nano- or microwire-type objects is desired. In this study, ensembles of 100 micron long Si microwires with ferromagnetic Ni and Co coatings are oriented vertically in the presence of magnetic fields. The degree of vertical alignment and threshold field strength depend on geometric factors, such as microwire length and ferromagnetic coating thickness, as well as interfacial interactions, which are modulated by varying solvent and substrate surface chemistry. Microwire ensembles with vertical alignment over 97% within 10 degrees of normal, as measured by X-ray diffraction, are achieved over square cm scale areas and set into flexible polymer films. A force balance model has been developed as a predictive tool for magnetic alignment, incorporating magnetic torque and empirically derived surface adhesion parameters. As supported by these calculations, microwires are shown to detach from the surface and align vertically in the presence of magnetic fields on the order of 100 gauss. Microwires aligned in this manner are set into a polydimethylsiloxane film where they retain their vertical alignment after the field has been removed and can subsequently be used as a flexible solar absorber layer. Finally, these microwires arrays can be protected for use in electrochemical cells by the conformal deposition of a graphene layer.

  12. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelling, M.; Hashim, N.O.; Grupen, C.; Luitz, S.; Maciuc, F.; Mailov, A.; Muller, A.-S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Tcaciuc, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2012-09-14

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

  13. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    E-print Network

    CosmoALEPH Collaboration; M. Schmelling; N. O. Hashim; C. Grupen; S. Luitz; F. Maciuc; A. Mailov; A. -S. Müller; H. -G. Sander; S. Schmeling; R. Tcaciuc; H. Wachsmuth; K. Zuber

    2011-10-19

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10^15 eV.

  14. Vertical distributions of (99)Tc and the (99)Tc/(137)Cs activity ratio in the coastal water off Aomori, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takahiro; Zheng, Jian; Aono, Tatsuo; Yamada, Masatoshi; Kusakabe, Masashi

    2011-08-01

    Using a sector-field ICP-MS the vertical distributions of the (99)Tc concentration and (99)Tc/(137)Cs activity ratio were measured in the coastal waters off Aomori Prefecture, Japan, where a spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant has begun test operation. The (99)Tc concentrations in surface water ranged from 1.8 to 2.4 mBq/m(3), no greater than the estimated background level. Relatively high (99)Tc/(137)Cs activity ratios (10-12 × 10(-4)) would be caused by the inflow of the high-(99)Tc/(137)Cs water mass from the Japan Sea. There is no observable contamination from the reprocessing plant in the investigated area. The (99)Tc concentration and the (99)Tc/(137)Cs activity ratio in water column showed gradual decreases with depth. Our results implied that (99)Tc behaves in a more conservative manner than (137)Cs in marine environments. PMID:21555170

  15. 1 Realization of Vertically Aligned, Ultrahigh Aspect Ratio InAsSb 2 Nanowires on Graphite

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Mark

    -catalyzed, molecular beam epitaxy, van der Waals, aspect ratio, graphite, graphene 32 InAs1-xSbx materials have long. Anyebe, Q. Zhuang,*, A. M. Sanchez, S. Hindmarsh, X. Chen,§ J. Shao,§ M. K. Rajpalke, 4 T. D. Veal, B. J

  16. Analysis and design of almost-periodic vertical-grating-assisted codirectional coupler filters with nonuniform duty ratios.

    PubMed

    Chern, G W; Wang, L A

    2000-09-01

    A systematic approach to the analysis of almost-periodic vertical-grating-assisted codirectional couplers with nonuniform duty ratios is presented. The Poisson sum formula is used to expand rigorously a nonuniform rectangular grating into a quasi-Fourier series, and local grating parameters such as period, width, and duty ratio can be defined unambiguously in such a procedure. On the basis of this expansion the coupled-local-mode formulation is the most natural extension for the analysis of such a nonuniform grating-assisted codirectional coupler filter. By transformation of the coupled-local-mode equations into the Zakharov-Shabat system the Gel'fand-Levintan-Marchenko inverse-scattering method is then used to synthesize special grating-assisted codirectional coupler filters. The design is illustrated by two typical examples: One is a third-order Butterworth filter, and the other is a linear filter. PMID:18350053

  17. Vertical Profiles and Isotopic Ratios in HCN and its Isotopologues from ALMA Observations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molter, Edward M.; Nixon, Conor A.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Serigano, Joseph; Teanby, Nicholas A.

    2015-11-01

    The photodissociation of methane (CH4) and molecular nitrogen (N2) provides the raw materials to create a suite of nitriles in Titan's atmosphere; the simplest and most abundant of these is hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The unprecedented sensitivity and spectral resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) permits the characterization of rotational transitions in this molecule and many of its isotopologues. In this study we leverage publicly available ALMA calibration observations of Titan taken between April and July 2014, each lasting around 160 seconds. We report the detection of a new HCN isotopologue on Titan, H13C15N, and use this along with high signal-to-noise observations of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, and DCN to determine the isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 15N/14N, and D/H. Isotopic ratios are known to diverge throughout the solar system in planetary atmospheres due to a variety of processes, including mass-dependent escape, photochemistry, and condensation. Therefore, accurate knowledge of isotopic ratios can provide important constraints on models of the origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres.

  18. Inventory and vertical migration of 90Sr fallout and 137Cs/90Sr ratio in Spanish mainland soils.

    PubMed

    Herranz, M; Romero, L M; Idoeta, R; Olondo, C; Valiño, F; Legarda, F

    2011-11-01

    In this paper the inventory of (90)Sr in 34 points distributed along the Spanish peninsular territory is presented. Obtained values range between 173 Bq/m(2) and 2047 Bq/m(2). From these data set and those (137)Cs data obtained in a previous work the (137)Cs/(90)Sr activity ratio has been established, laying this value between 0.9 and 3.6. Also the migration depth of both radionuclides has been analysed obtaining for (137)Cs an average value 57% lower than that obtained for (90)Sr. Additionally, this paper presents the results obtained in 11 sampling points in which the activity vertical profile has been measured. These profiles have been analysed to state the behaviour of strontium in soils and after, by using a convective-diffusive model, the parameters of the model which governs the vertical migration of (90)Sr in the soil, v (apparent convection velocity) and D (apparent diffusion coefficient) have been evaluated. Mean values obtained are 0.20 cm/year and 3.67 cm(2)/year, respectively. PMID:21820771

  19. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  20. Vertical distribution of Th-isotope ratios, 210Pb, 226Ra and 137Cs in sediment cores from an estuary affected by anthropogenic releases.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, E G; Bolívar, J P; García-Tenorio, R

    2004-01-01

    In an estuary system highly polluted by mining and industrial activities, the sections of sediment cores affected by anthropogenic inputs of U-series radionuclides (due to fertilizer plants releases) were determined through the vertical profiles of Th-isotopic ratio (230Th/232Th). Also, when possible, a modified version of the 210Pb dating method was applied in the uncontaminated sections of these cores. Using the information provided by the Th-isotopic ratio and 210Pb methods, we were able to establish confident chronologies, covering the last century, in several of the analysed sediment cores. These chronologies will be used in forthcoming research to study the time evolution of pollutant concentrations in the estuary. Additionally, and based on the established chronologies, we have found that sedimentation rates have drastically increased in some zones of the estuary since the commencement of several industrial activities in the surrounding environment and since the construction of two dikes in the area. PMID:14654281

  1. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wei X.; Braverman J.; Miranda, M.; Rosario, M.E.; Costantino, C.J.

    2015-02-25

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  2. Mapping bedrock surface contours using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method near the middle quarter srea, Woodbury, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Craig J.; Voytek, Emily B.; Lane, John W.; Stone, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    The bedrock surface contours in Woodbury, Connecticut, were determined downgradient of a commercial zone known as the Middle Quarter area (MQA) using the novel, noninvasive horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratio (HVSR) passive seismic geophysical method. Boreholes and monitoring wells had been drilled in this area to characterize the shallow subsurface to within 20 feet (ft) of the land surface, but little was known about the deep subsurface, including sediment thicknesses and depths to bedrock (Starn and Brown, 2007; Brown and others, 2009). Improved information on the altitude of the bedrock surface and its spatial variation was needed for assessment and remediation of chlorinated solvents that have contaminated the overlying glacial aquifer that supplies water to wells in the area.

  3. Isotopic ratio and vertical distribution of radionuclides in soil affected by the accident of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Saito, Takumi; Muroya, Yusa; Sawahata, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Yuji; Nagasaki, Shinya; Okamoto, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Katsumura, Yosuke; Tanaka, Satoru

    2012-11-01

    The results of ? analyses of soil samples obtained from 50 locations in Fukushima prefecture on April 20, 2011, revealed the presence of a spectrum of radionuclides resulted from the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). The sum ? radioactivity concentration ranged in more than 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the sampling locations. The contamination of soils in the northwest of the FDNPP was considerable. The (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratios of the soil samples plotted as a function of the distance from the F1 NPPs exhibited three distinctive patterns. Such patterns would reflect not only the different deposition behaviors of these radionuclides, but also on the conditions of associated release events such as temperature and compositions and physicochemical forms of released radionuclides. The (136)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio, on the other hand, was considered to only reflect the difference in isotopic compositions of source materials. Two locations close to the NPP in the northwest direction were found to be depleted in short-lived (136)Cs. This likely suggested the presence of distinct sources with different (136)Cs/(137)Cs isotopic ratios, although their details were unknown at present. Vertical ? activity profiles of (131)I and (137)Cs were also investigated, using 20-30 cm soil cores in several locations. About 70% or more of the radionuclides were present in the uppermost 2-cm regions. It was found that the profiles of (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratios showed maxima in the 2-4 cm regions, suggesting slightly larger migration of the former nuclide. PMID:22634028

  4. Horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios from a full-wavefield model of ambient vibrations generated by a distribution of spatially correlated surface sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunedei, Enrico; Albarello, Dario

    2015-05-01

    A new effective model is presented to compute horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) relative to ambient vibrations, under the assumption that these are originated by a distribution of spatially correlated random surface sources. The major novelty of this model lies in the description of both ground displacement and sources as stochastic fields defined on the Earth's surface, stationary in time and homogeneous in space. In this frame, the power spectral density of the displacement stochastic field can be written as a function of the power spectral density of the force stochastic field and of the subsoil properties, through the relevant Green's function. Spatial correlation between ambient vibration sources is shown to be a necessary condition to warrant convergence of the integrals defining the frequency power spectra of the displacement field that make up the HVSR curve. Furthermore, it is shown that this HVSR curve may be significantly affected by the effective range of the force-field correlation on the Earth's surface. This formalization reduces computational efforts with respect to the previous version of the model based on distributed surface sources and may provide synthetic HVSR-curve patterns that are in line with those given by that computationally more troublesome version, as well as with those deduced under the assumption that the ambient vibrations constitute a diffuse wavefield.

  5. Estimates of site response based on spectral ratio between horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibrations in the source zone of 2001 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Thulasiraman; Rajendran, Kusala

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the site response characteristics of Kachchh rift basin over the meizoseismal area of the 2001, Mw 7.6, Bhuj (NW India) earthquake using the spectral ratio of the horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibrations. Using the available knowledge on the regional geology of Kachchh and well documented ground responses from the earthquake, we evaluated the H/V curves pattern across sediment filled valleys and uplifted areas generally characterized by weathered sandstones. Although our H/V curves showed a largely fuzzy nature, we found that the hierarchical clustering method was useful for comparing large numbers of response curves and identifying the areas with similar responses. Broad and plateau shaped peaks of a cluster of curves within the valley region suggests the possibility of basin effects within valley. Fundamental resonance frequencies (f0) are found in the narrow range of 0.1-2.3 Hz and their spatial distribution demarcated the uplifted regions from the valleys. In contrary, low H/V peak amplitudes (A0 = 2-4) were observed on the uplifted areas and varying values (2-9) were found within valleys. Compared to the amplification factors, the liquefaction indices (kg) were able to effectively indicate the areas which experienced severe liquefaction. The amplification ranges obtained in the current study were found to be comparable to those obtained from earthquake data for a limited number of seismic stations located on uplifted areas; however the values on the valley region may not reflect their true amplification potential due to basin effects. Our study highlights the practical usefulness as well as limitations of the H/V method to study complex geological settings as Kachchh.

  6. A new significance on the vertical component ratio of the power spectra between two sites in the application of array methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinrui; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Array methods like spatial auto-correlation (SPAC) method and the centerless circular array (CCA) method have provided a convenient means of inferring the phase velocity of surface waves. However, these methods are under the assumption of horizontally layered medium (lateral homogeneity) while the ground structure is actually likely to be inclined. Hence, it is expected to obtain more detailed information of ground structure such as inclination by making better use of the records. In recent years, the seismic interferometry theory has also been widely used to estimate ground structure. According to seismic interferometry theory, the cross correlation of motion between two sites is proportional to the imaginary part of the Green's function (IOG) between the two sites in diffuse wavefield. In this study, we can obtain the ratio of IOG between two sites by taking the ratio of power spectra between the same two sites. We propose this ratio as an indicator of the lateral heterogeneity between two sites. Through numerical simulation and a field test, we demonstrate that the significance of ratio of power spectra can be interpreted from the sight of ratio of IOG successfully.

  7. Observation of picometer vertical emittance with a vertical undulator.

    PubMed

    Wootton, K P; Boland, M J; Dowd, R; Tan, Y-R E; Cowie, B C C; Papaphilippou, Y; Taylor, G N; Rassool, R P

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic. PMID:23215388

  8. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  9. Bedrock topography of western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, based on bedrock altitudes from geologic borings and analysis of ambient seismic noise by the horizontal-to-vertical spectral-ratio method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, Gillian M.; Lane, John W.; Voytek, Emily B.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a topographic map of the bedrock surface beneath western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, that was prepared for use in groundwater-flow models of the Sagamore lens of the Cape Cod aquifer. The bedrock surface of western Cape Cod had been characterized previously through seismic refraction surveys and borings drilled to bedrock. The borings were mostly on and near the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). The bedrock surface was first mapped by Oldale (1969), and mapping was updated in 2006 by the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE, 2006). This report updates the bedrock-surface map with new data points collected by using a passive seismic technique based on the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) of ambient seismic noise (Lane and others, 2008) and from borings drilled to bedrock since the 2006 map was prepared. The HVSR method is based on a relationship between the resonance frequency of ambient seismic noise as measured at land surface and the thickness of the unconsolidated sediments that overlie consolidated bedrock. The HVSR method was shown by Lane and others (2008) to be an effective method for determining sediment thickness on Cape Cod owing to the distinct difference in the acoustic impedance between the sediments and the underlying bedrock. The HVSR data for 164 sites were combined with data from 559 borings to bedrock in the study area to create a spatially distributed dataset that was manually contoured to prepare a topographic map of the bedrock surface. The interpreted bedrock surface generally slopes downward to the southeast as was shown on the earlier maps by Oldale (1969) and AFCEE (2006). The surface also has complex small-scale topography characteristic of a glacially eroded surface. More information about the methods used to prepare the map is given in the pamphlet that accompanies this plate.

  10. VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST

    E-print Network

    Peters, Richard

    VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST Vertical greenery is not a new concept; it dates back thousands-growingvarietiesbecome established. Theneedforpermissionfromcouncil, strataetc. #12;VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST THE PLAN

  11. A common variant near TGFBR3 is associated with primary open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Allingham, R Rand; Nakano, Masakazu; Jia, Liyun; Chen, Yuhong; Ikeda, Yoko; Mani, Baskaran; Chen, Li-Jia; Kee, Changwon; Garway-Heath, David F; Sripriya, Sarangapani; Fuse, Nobuo; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Huang, Chukai; Namburi, Prasanthi; Burdon, Kathryn; Perera, Shamira A; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lin, Ying; Ueno, Morio; Ozaki, Mineo; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Krishnadas, Subbiah Ramasamy; Osman, Essam A; Lee, Mei Chin; Chan, Anita S Y; Tajudin, Liza-Sharmini A; Do, Tan; Goncalves, Aurelien; Reynier, Pascal; Zhang, Hong; Bourne, Rupert; Goh, David; Broadway, David; Husain, Rahat; Negi, Anil K; Su, Daniel H; Ho, Ching-Lin; Blanco, Augusto Azuara; Leung, Christopher K S; Wong, Tina T; Yakub, Azhany; Liu, Yutao; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Han, Jong Chul; Hon, Do Nhu; Shantha, Balekudaru; Zhao, Bowen; Sang, Jinghong; Zhang, NiHong; Sato, Ryuichi; Yoshii, Kengo; Panda-Jonas, Songhomita; Ashley Koch, Allison E; Herndon, Leon W; Moroi, Sayoko E; Challa, Pratap; Foo, Jia Nee; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Simmons, Cameron P; Bich Chau, Tran Nguyen; Sharmila, Philomenadin Ferdinamarie; Chew, Merwyn; Lim, Blanche; Tam, Pansy O S; Chua, Elaine; Ng, Xiao Yu; Yong, Victor H K; Chong, Yaan Fun; Meah, Wee Yang; Vijayan, Saravanan; Seongsoo, Sohn; Xu, Wang; Teo, Yik Ying; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Kang, Jae H; Haines, Jonathan L; Cheng, Ching Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Richards, Julia E; Ritch, Robert; Gaasterland, Douglas E; Pasquale, Louis R; Liu, Jianjun; Jonas, Jost B; Milea, Dan; George, Ronnie; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Mori, Kazuhiko; Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Girkin, Christopher A; Zhang, Mingzhi; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Vijaya, Lingam; Mackey, David A; Wong, Tien Yin; Craig, Jamie E; Sun, Xinghuai; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Wiggs, Janey L; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Yang, Zhenglin; Pang, Chi Pui; Wang, Ningli; Hauser, Michael A; Tashiro, Kei; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga N

    2015-07-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), a major cause of blindness worldwide, is a complex disease with a significant genetic contribution. We performed Exome Array (Illumina) analysis on 3504 POAG cases and 9746 controls with replication of the most significant findings in 9173 POAG cases and 26 780 controls across 18 collections of Asian, African and European descent. Apart from confirming strong evidence of association at CDKN2B-AS1 (rs2157719 [G], odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, P = 2.81 × 10(-33)), we observed one SNP showing significant association to POAG (CDC7-TGFBR3 rs1192415, ORG-allele = 1.13, Pmeta = 1.60 × 10(-8)). This particular SNP has previously been shown to be strongly associated with optic disc area and vertical cup-to-disc ratio, which are regarded as glaucoma-related quantitative traits. Our study now extends this by directly implicating it in POAG disease pathogenesis. PMID:25861811

  12. A common variant near TGFBR3 is associated with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Allingham, R. Rand; Nakano, Masakazu; Jia, Liyun; Chen, Yuhong; Ikeda, Yoko; Mani, Baskaran; Chen, Li-Jia; Kee, Changwon; Garway-Heath, David F.; Sripriya, Sarangapani; Fuse, Nobuo; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Huang, Chukai; Namburi, Prasanthi; Burdon, Kathryn; Perera, Shamira A.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lin, Ying; Ueno, Morio; Ozaki, Mineo; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Krishnadas, Subbiah Ramasamy; Osman, Essam A.; Lee, Mei Chin; Chan, Anita S.Y.; Tajudin, Liza-Sharmini A.; Do, Tan; Goncalves, Aurelien; Reynier, Pascal; Zhang, Hong; Bourne, Rupert; Goh, David; Broadway, David; Husain, Rahat; Negi, Anil K.; Su, Daniel H; Ho, Ching-Lin; Blanco, Augusto Azuara; Leung, Christopher K.S.; Wong, Tina T.; Yakub, Azhany; Liu, Yutao; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Han, Jong Chul; Hon, Do Nhu; Shantha, Balekudaru; Zhao, Bowen; Sang, Jinghong; Zhang, NiHong; Sato, Ryuichi; Yoshii, Kengo; Panda-Jonas, Songhomita; Ashley Koch, Allison E.; Herndon, Leon W.; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Challa, Pratap; Foo, Jia Nee; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Simmons, Cameron P.; Bich Chau, Tran Nguyen; Sharmila, Philomenadin Ferdinamarie; Chew, Merwyn; Lim, Blanche; Tam, Pansy O.S.; Chua, Elaine; Ng, Xiao Yu; Yong, Victor H.K.; Chong, Yaan Fun; Meah, Wee Yang; Vijayan, Saravanan; Seongsoo, Sohn; Xu, Wang; Teo, Yik Ying; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Kang, Jae H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Cheng, Ching Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Richards, Julia E.; Ritch, Robert; Gaasterland, Douglas E.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Liu, Jianjun; Jonas, Jost B.; Milea, Dan; George, Ronnie; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A.; Mori, Kazuhiko; Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Mingzhi; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Vijaya, Lingam; Mackey, David A.; Wong, Tien Yin; Craig, Jamie E.; Sun, Xinghuai; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Wiggs, Janey L.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Yang, Zhenglin; Pang, Chi Pui; Wang, Ningli; Hauser, Michael A.; Tashiro, Kei; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga N.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), a major cause of blindness worldwide, is a complex disease with a significant genetic contribution. We performed Exome Array (Illumina) analysis on 3504 POAG cases and 9746 controls with replication of the most significant findings in 9173 POAG cases and 26 780 controls across 18 collections of Asian, African and European descent. Apart from confirming strong evidence of association at CDKN2B-AS1 (rs2157719 [G], odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, P = 2.81 × 10?33), we observed one SNP showing significant association to POAG (CDC7–TGFBR3 rs1192415, ORG-allele = 1.13, Pmeta = 1.60 × 10?8). This particular SNP has previously been shown to be strongly associated with optic disc area and vertical cup-to-disc ratio, which are regarded as glaucoma-related quantitative traits. Our study now extends this by directly implicating it in POAG disease pathogenesis. PMID:25861811

  13. Network Centrality of Resting-State fMRI in Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma Before and After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Honghan; Jiang, Fei; Pei, Chonggang; Zhang, Xu; Zeng, Xianjun; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Using voxel-wise degree centrality (DC), as measured by resting-state fMRI, we aimed to study alterations in the brain functional networks in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) and to reveal the plastic trajectories of surgery. Methods A total of 23 preoperative PACG patients (49.48 ± 14.37 years old) were recruited to undergo a resting-state fMRI scan, and 9 of them were rescanned 3 months after surgery. All PACG patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including intraocular pressure (IOP), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, vertical cup to disc ratio (V C/D), and average cup to disc ratio (A C/D). Another 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls (48.18 ± 9.40 years old) underwent scanning once for comparison. The group difference in DC was calculated in each voxel, and the correlations between the DC value and each of the clinical variables were analyzed in the PACG patients. Results Preoperative PACG (pre-PACG) patients showed significantly decreased DC in the bilateral visual cortices but increased DC in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and caudate (p < 0.05, corrected) compared with the controls. Statistical analysis showed a significantly negative correlation between DC in the bilateral visual cortices and the IOP score and between DC in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and both the A C/D and V C/D scores in the pre-PACG patients. Three months after surgery, these postoperative PACG (post-PACG) patients showed a significantly increased DC in both the bilateral visual cortices and the left precentral gyrus compared with the pre-PACG patients. Conclusions Our results suggest that PACG may contribute to decreased functional centrality in the visual system and to increased degree centrality in cognition-emotional processing regions. Alterations in visual areas seem to parallel the cup to disc ratio, but not the duration of angle closure. The changes of functional centrality in PACG patients after operation may reveal the plasticity or degeneration of the visual-associated brain areas. Our findings may provide further understanding of the pathophysiology of PACG. PMID:26506229

  14. Sex ratios 

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart A; Reece, S E; Sheldon, Ben C

    2002-01-01

    Sex ratio theory attempts to explain variation at all levels (species, population, individual, brood) in the proportion of offspring that are male (the sex ratio). In many cases this work has been extremely successful, ...

  15. Vertical integration and market power

    SciTech Connect

    Maddigan, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the continuing debates of industrial organization surrounds the importance of market structure in determining a firm's performance. This controversy develops naturally from the difficulties in measuring the relevant variables and the hazards of statistical analysis. The focus of this empirical study is the relationship between vertical integration, as an element of market structure, and market power, as a component of a firm's performance. The model presented in this paper differs from previous efforts because vertical integration is measured by the Vertical Industry Connections (VIC) index. VIC is defined as a function of the relative net interactions among the industries in which a firm operates, and is calculated by use of the national input-output tables. A linear regression model is estimated by means of a random sample of firms selected from the Standard and Poor's COMPUSTAT data base for 1963, 1967, and 1972. Combined cross-sectional, time-series methods are employed. The dependent variable is the price-cost margin; the independent variables include not only VIC, but also the concentration ratio, diversification index, value of assets, capital-output ratio, and sales growth. The results indicate that VIC is significant in increasing the price-cost margin, and thus support the hypothesis that vertical integration is a strategy to enhance market power. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  16. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  17. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  18. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  19. Vertical constituent transport in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, Darrell F.; Summers, Michael E.; Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Deland, Matthew T.; Allen, Mark

    1987-01-01

    Ground-based microwave spectroscopy measurements of mesospheric CO and H2O vertical mixing ratio profiles are used to infer vertical mixing rates in the upper mesosphere. The CO and H2O data consistently imply vertical eddy diffusion coefficients in the 70- to 85-km region of 100,000-200,000 sq cm/s during spring through summer at midlatidues. Although chemical acceleration of vertical transport is substantial for O and O3, below the mesopause, the divergences of their associated fluxes are modest, with at most a factor of 2 effect on the concentrations of O and O3 for measured variability in gravity wave activity. Comparison of Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) O3 data with model results reinforces the conclusions of slow vertical mixing in the upper mesosphere as a consequence of the reduced HO(x) catalytic loss of odd oxygen. The changes in chemical rate constants recommended by Rusch and Eckman (1985), in conjunction with slow vertical mixing, yield good agreement with SME O3 data. The slow vertical mixing deduced in this study is consistent with upper limits obtained from studies of the mesospheric heat budget and could be construed as evidence for an advectively controlled mesosphere. A comparison of the vertical eddy diffusion coefficients for momentum stresses, constituent transport, and heat transport suggests that the eddy Prandtl number must be of order 10.

  20. Signatures of currency vertices

    E-print Network

    Holme, Petter

    2008-01-01

    Many real-world networks have broad degree distributions. For some systems, this means that the functional significance of the vertices is also broadly distributed, in other cases the vertices are equally significant, but in different ways. One example of the latter case is metabolic networks, where the high-degree vertices -- the currency metabolites -- supply the molecular groups to the low-degree metabolites, and the latter are responsible for the higher-order biological function, of vital importance to the organism. In this paper, we propose a generalization of currency metabolites to currency vertices. We investigate the network structural characteristics of such systems, both in model networks and in some empirical systems. In addition to metabolic networks, we find that a network of music collaborations and a network of e-mail exchange could be described by a division of the vertices into currency vertices and others.

  1. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  2. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  3. Vertically aligned carbon based varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanini, Farzan A.; Enoksson, Peter; Bengtsson, Stefan; Lundgren, Per

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives an assessment of vertically aligned carbon based varactors and validates their potential for future applications. The varactors discussed here are nanoelectromechanical devices which are based on either vertically aligned carbon nanofibers or vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays. A generic analytical model for parallel plate nanoelectromechanical varactors based on previous works is developed and is used to formulate a universal expression for their voltage-capacitance relation. Specific expressions for the nanofiber based and the nanotube based varactors are then derived separately from the generic model. This paper also provides a detailed review on the fabrication of carbon based varactors and pays special attention to the challenges in realizing such devices. Finally, the performance of the carbon based varactor is assessed in accordance with four criteria: the static capacitance, the tuning ratio, the quality factor, and the operating voltage. Although the reported performance is still far inferior to other varactor technologies, our prognosis which stems from the analytical model shows a promise of a high quality factor as well as a potential for high power handling for carbon based varactors.

  4. Sonic Anemometer Vertical Wind Speed Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, J.; Horst, T. W.; Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Meyers, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    In eddy covariance studies, errors in the measured vertical wind speed cause errors of a similar magnitude in the vertical fluxes of energy and mass. Several recent studies on the accuracy of sonic anemometer measurements indicate that non-orthogonal sonic anemometers used in eddy covariance studies underestimate the vertical wind speed. It has been suggested that this underestimation is caused by flow distortion from the interference of the structure of the anemometer itself on the flow. When oriented ideally with respect to the horizontal wind direction, orthogonal sonic anemometers that measure the vertical wind speed with a single vertically-oriented acoustic path may measure the vertical wind speed more accurately in typical surface-layer conditions. For non-orthogonal sonic anemometers, Horst et al. (2014) proposed that transducer shadowing may be a dominant factor in sonic flow distortion. As the ratio of sonic transducer diameter to path length and the zenith angle of the three transducer paths decrease, the effects of transducer shadowing on measurements of vertical velocity will decrease. An overview of this research and some of the methods available to correct historical data will be presented.

  5. Vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.S.

    1980-04-08

    A vertical axis windmill is described which involves a rotatable central vertical shaft having horizontal arms pivotally supporting three sails that are free to function in the wind like the main sail on a sail boat, and means for disabling the sails to allow the windmill to be stopped in a blowing wind.

  6. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  7. Vertical neck lifting.

    PubMed

    Jacono, Andrew A; Talei, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    The authors' vertical neck lifting procedure is an extended deep plane facelift, which elevates the skin and SMAS-platysma complex as a composite unit. The goal is to redrape cervicomental laxity vertically onto the face rather than laterally and postauricularly. The authors consider this an extended technique because it lengthens the deep plane flap from the angle of the mandible into the neck to release the cervical retaining ligaments that limit platysmal redraping. This technique does not routinely use midline platysmal surgery because it counteracts the extent of vertical redraping. A majority of aging face patients are good candidates for this procedure in isolation, but indications for combining vertical neck lifting with submental surgery are elucidated. PMID:24745389

  8. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  9. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (inventors)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  10. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  11. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100?nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-?m structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  12. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100?nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-?m structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  13. 'Endurance' All Around Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was taken on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as 'site 33.' Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into 'Endurance Crater.' The view is a vertical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  14. Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer and Macular Thicknesses in Adults with Hyperopic Anisometropic Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Yakar, Konuralp; Alan, Ayd?n; Alp, Mehmet Hanifi; Ceylan, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the macular and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thicknesses and optic nerves of eyes with reduced vision due to anisometropia with the contralateral healthy eyes in adults using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Atatürk State Hospital, Sinop, Turkey. Macular and RNFL thicknesses, optic nerve disc area, cup area, and horizontal and vertical cup-to-disc ratios obtained using a NIDEK RS-3000 SLO spectral domain OCT device were compared between the amblyopic and fellow eyes in 30 adults with anisometropic amblyopia 18–55 years old who were seen in our clinic with unilateral poor vision. Results. The mean macular thickness was 266.90 ± 23.22?µm in the amblyopic eyes and 263.90 ± 22.84?µm in the fellow eyes, and the mean RNFL thickness was 111.90 ± 12.9 and 109.70 ± 9.42?µm, respectively. The two thicknesses did not differ significantly between the amblyopic and fellow eyes. There were also no significant differences between the eyes in disc area, cup area, and horizontal-vertical cup/disc ratios. Conclusion. There does not seem to be a difference in macular thickness, peripapillary RNFL, or optic disc structures between the amblyopic and fellow eyes in adults. PMID:26064676

  15. Vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Rodríguez, P.; Tomé, F. Vera; Lozano, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS) and liquid scintillation counters (LKB Quantulus 1220™) were used in order to determine the activity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were selected with different levels of influence from the installation, in such a way that they had different levels of radioactive contamination. The vertical profiles in the soils (down to 40 cm depth) were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. The possible contamination of subsurface waters depends strongly on vertical migration, and the transfer to plants (herbs, shrubs, and trees) also will depend on the distribution of the radionuclides in the root zone. The study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same series allowed us to assess the differing behaviour of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for these radionuclides were different at each sampling point, showing the local impact of the installation. However, the profiles per point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the 238TJ series (238U, 234U, 230Th, and 226Ra). Also, a major disequilibrium was observed between 210Pb and 226Ra in the surface layer, due to 222Rn emanation and subsequent surface deposition of 210Pb.

  16. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to ? - ? determined by the isoscaling (? (?) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  17. High efficiency binary blazed grating coupler for perfectly-vertical and near-vertical coupling in chip level optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Liu, Lu; Zhou, Zhiping; Wang, Xingjun

    2015-11-01

    The high-efficiency binary blazed grating couplers with perfectly vertical and nearly vertical coupling are proposed. The efficiencies of them are much higher than those of other types of grating couplers without bottom mirrors under vertical and oblique incidence respectively. For perfectly vertical coupler with transverse-electric polarized incident light, the coupling efficiency, which is defined as the ratio between the power coupled to the fundamental mode of the chip waveguide and that carried by the fundamental mode of the input optical fiber, is 75%, while the nearly vertical coupler with the incident angle of 10.2° has a coupling efficiency of 84%. Rigorous coupled-wave diffraction analysis and a complete optimization method have been used to make the optimal design valid and unique.

  18. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  19. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  20. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-23

    The energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  1. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ?y=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  2. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  3. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  4. Flow effects in a vertical CVD reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G. W.; Hariharan, S. I.; Carnahan, R.

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented to simulate the non-Boussinesq flow in a vertical, two-dimensional, chemical vapor deposition reactor under atmospheric pressure. Temperature-dependent conductivity, mass diffusivity, viscosity models, and reactive species mass transfer to the substrate are incorporated. In the limits of small Mach number and small aspect ratio, asymptotic expressions for the flow, temperature, and species fields are developed. Soret diffusion effects are also investigated. Analytical solutions predict an inverse relationship between temperature field and concentration field due to Soret effects. This finding is consistent with numerical simulations, assisting in the understanding of the complex interactions amongst the flow, thermal, and species fields in a chemically reacting system.

  5. DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED

    E-print Network

    Devroye, Luc

    DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED GALTON­WATSON TREES LUC DEVROYE AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We consider a conditioned Galton­Watson tree and prove an estimate of a randomly labelled conditioned Galton­Watson tree converges in distribution, after suitable normalization

  6. DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED

    E-print Network

    Janson, Svante

    DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED GALTON--WATSON TREES LUC DEVROYE AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We consider a conditioned Galton--Watson tree and prove an estimate of a randomly labelled conditioned Galton--Watson tree converges in distribution, after suitable normalization

  7. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  8. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  9. Vertical Localization of the Malar Prominence

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, John S.; Markarian, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background: During reconstruction or augmentation, it is important to localize the malar complex in a symmetrical and aesthetically pleasing position. Few studies have determined the location of this feature and none related the location to gender, age, or ethnicity. Some of these have attempted to relate the position to the aesthetically pleasing Golden Ratio ?. Methods: We assessed the vertical location of the malar prominence relative to other facial landmarks, determined consistency among individuals, and compared this with values used in artistry. Study population consisted of a convenience sample of 67 patients taken from an otolaryngology practice at a large urban medical center. Coordinates of the malar prominence were referenced to distinct facial landmarks from which the ratio of chin-to-malar prominence to chin-to-eye canthus was determined. Results: Average chin-to-malar prominence distance was 0.793 ± 0.023 (SD) of the chin-to-eye canthus distance. Variability due to the specific image chosen [coefficient of variation (CV) = 1.19%] and combined inter/intrareader variability (CV = 1.71%) validate the methodology. Variability among individuals (CV = 2.84%) indicates population consistency. No difference was found between gender and age groups or between whites and Hispanics. Individuals of other/unknown ethnicities were within the range common to whites and Hispanics. Our population’s value is not different from the value of 0.809 used in artistry, which is based on the Golden Ratio ?. Conclusions: The vertical position of the malar prominence is consistent among individuals, is clinically well-approximated by the value based on the Golden Ratio, and may be useful as a reference for surgical reconstruction or augmentation. PMID:26180712

  10. Finite Element Surface Model for Flow around Vertical Wall Abutments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinas, A.; Hafez, Y. I.

    2000-07-01

    A two-dimensional finite element surface model is developed to determine velocities, depths, and turning angles around vertical wall abutments. The model solves the Reynolds-averaged turbulent flow equations along a horizontal plane passing through the average water surface. This approach is an improvement over the depth-averaged flow models where dispersion terms reflecting vertical effects are neglected. In the model, vertical gradient effects are accounted for through the use of power law for the vertical distribution of the longitudinal velocity; a similar treatment is applied to lateral turbulent shear stresses. The model is capable of computing the dynamic pressure distribution, which in turn is converted to water elevation values. The model, being two dimensional, is computationally efficient and practical to use. The numerical model was successfully verified using experimental data from vertical wall abutments and groins with protrusion ratios (ratio of protrusion length perpendicular to direction of flow to total channel width) of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3. The results show the occurrence of a high intensity velocity zone close to the upstream abutment nose similar to those observed experimentally. The effects of roughness, depth, and energy slope on the intensity of flow field is investigated and an analytical expression is developed. Numerical experiments indicate that grain roughness affects flow field around the abutment nose by controlling the magnitude of the lateral velocity component and by controlling the lateral extent of the affected zone. Velocity amplification at the abutment nose is found to be mainly related to the protrusion ratio and to the friction factor, and can be up to 1.75 times the approach velocities for protrusion ratios of 0.3. For a protrusion ratio of 0.3, for a typical range of roughness values the increase in nose velocities due to friction factor alone was found to be up to 20 percent.

  11. WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES

    E-print Network

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1 were carried out to study the aerodynamic performance of three vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs-stream turbulence intensity, at two tip speed ratios. Keywords: wind-tunnel experiment, VAWT, aerodynamic

  12. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  13. Visualize Vertical Connectedness (Middle Ground).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Allen, Lanny

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of vertical connectedness in K-12 education through references to journal articles and the author's own reflections. Suggests that middle school teachers may be leaders in a movement toward eliminating redundancy and gaps between grade levels. (TB)

  14. Vertically Aligned Nanocomposite Thin Films 

    E-print Network

    Bi, Zhenxing

    2012-07-16

    Vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) thin films have recently stimulated significant research interest to achieve better material functionality or multifunctionalities. In VAN thin films, both phases grow epitaxially in parallel on given...

  15. Place Value: A Vertical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Sandra P.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses children's place-value understanding, including initial learning interference, vertical number lines, and planned discourse. Describes a learning activity that can guide children from a concrete to a symbolic understanding of place value. (11 references) (MKR)

  16. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  17. CALIPSO Lidar Ratio Retrieval Over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josset, Damien B.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali H.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type

  18. Progress on relationships between horizontal and vertical dust flux: Mathematical, empirical and risk-based perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Breshears, David D.; Field, Jason P.

    2014-09-01

    Aeolian processes driving sediment flux and corresponding erosion are inherently 3-dimensional, but are primarily studied either with respect to the horizontal flux component, or to a lesser extent the vertical component. Understanding the relationship between horizontal flux and the vertical component of sediment and dust is critical to predicting fundamental processes such as erosion, and to assessing human and environmental risks associated with contaminated sediment and dust. Multiple mathematical approaches to calculate vertical flux of dust exist but are limited in their ability to predict vertical flux across a wide variety of landscapes and soil conditions. To address these issues, here we explore the relationship between horizontal and vertical fluxes from three perspectives: mathematical, based on existing equations; empirical, based on existing and new data; and risk-based, based on translating the former two into a risk context. Mathematical derivations suggest, depending on the approach, the two components could either be a constant ratio or that the vertical flux could be more dependent on the shear stress and particle size than horizontal flux. Empirical data highlight a wide range of ratios, varying by more than two orders of magnitude, though the ratios can be relatively similar within a given site and set of conditions. Risk-based assessment indicates the vertical flux component is relatively important in dose calculations, and consequently further improvement in mathematical and empirical relationships is needed. Collectively, these three perspectives expand insights on horizontal and vertical sediment fluxes and could aide future risk assessment from dust contaminants.

  19. Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

  20. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  2. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  3. The Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Colchin, R.J.; Carolan, P.G.; Duck, R.; Edlington, T.; Erents, S.K.; Ferreira, J.; Fielding, S.J.; Gibson, K.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Gryaznevich, M.; Hender, T.C.; Hugill, J.; Jenkins, I.; Li, J.; Manhood, S.J.; Parham, B.J.; Robinson, D.C.; Singleton, M.; Sykes, A.; Todd, T.N.; Turner, M.F.; Valovic, M.; Walsh, M.; Wilson, H.R. , Abingdon, Oxon )

    1993-07-01

    Low-aspect-ratio tokamaks offer both the economic advantage of smaller size and a number of physics advantages which are not available at conventional aspect ratio. The Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak (START) [[ital Fusion] [ital Technology] 1990, edited by B. E. Keen, M. Huguet, and R. Hemsworth (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1991), Vol. 1, p. 353] was conceived as a first substantial test of tokamak plasma behavior at low aspect ratio. It has achieved plasma currents up to 200 kA, peak densities of [similar to]2[times]10[sup 20] m[sup [minus]3] and central electron temperatures of [similar to]500 eV at an aspect ratio of 1.3--1.5. Central beta values of [similar to]13% have been measured and the volume-averaged beta [l angle][beta][r angle] can approach the Troyon limit. Plasmas are naturally elongated ([kappa][approx lt]2.0) and are vertically stable without feedback control. Major disruptions have not been observed at low aspect ratios ([ital A][le]2.0).

  4. Vertical vibration of a pile in transversely isotropic multilayered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Zhi Yong; Liu, Chun Lin

    2015-11-01

    A new method for the dynamic response of a vertically loaded single pile embedded in transversely isotropic multilayered soils is proposed in this paper. The dynamic response of the pile is governed by the one-dimensional (1D) vibration theory, and that of transversely isotropic multilayered soils is achieved by using an analytical layer-element method. Then, with the aid of the displacement compatibility and the contact forces equilibrium along the pile-soil contact surface, the dynamic pile-soil interaction problem is solved efficiently. The presented solution method is proved to be correct and efficient by comparing the obtained results with other existing solutions. Selected numerical results are presented to study the influence of mass density ratio, length-radius ratio, frequency of excitation, soil anisotropy and hard soil stratum on the pile vertical impedance.

  5. Vertical Motion and Dynamical Instabilities in Non-hydrostatic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacham, S.; Mahadevan, A.

    2002-05-01

    The ocean exhibits many strong, dynamically active frontal features. When the fronts are sufficiently narrow and the potential vorticity gradient sufficiently strong, non-hydrostatic effects modify the stability characteristics of these strongly sheared flows and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of perturbations to these flows. In this talk, we first discuss the linear instabilities of simple model shear flows in the presence of non-hydrostatic effects. We then use a non-hydrostatic coastal circulation model to examine the impact of non-hydrostatic effects on the non-linear evolution of unstable perturbations to an idealized representation of a shelf-break front. When the front is linearly unstable, growing meanders are associated with localized cells of vertical motion and three-dimensional Lagarangian pathways through the frontal system. When the front is stable, finite-amplitude perturbations such as those associated with Gulf Stream rings and filaments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight can produce similar effects. Vertical motion can be a significant transport mechanism for nutrients. The largest vertical motions seem to arise under transient conditions. We evaluate the mean vertical velocity field for a stable jet subject to persistent transient forcing. We also evaluate the differences in vertical velocity fields and meander evolution between hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic simulations. As one would anticipate from aspect ratio arguments, these are generally small in a slowly evolving system but, for some types of motion, a significant difference is seen.

  6. Wind tunnel investigation of a 14 foot vertical axis windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. J.; Guillotte, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale wind tunnel investigation was made to determine the performance characteristics of a 14 ft diameter vertical axis windmill. The parameters measured were wind velocity, shaft torque, shaft rotation rate, along with the drag and yawing moment. A velocity survey of the flow field downstream of the windmill was also made. The results of these tests along with some analytically predicted data are presented in the form of generalized data as a function of tip speed ratio.

  7. Vertical Sextants give Good Sights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark

    Many texts stress the need for marine sextants to be held precisely vertical at the instant that the altitude of a heavenly body is measured. Several authors lay particular emphasis on the technique of the instrument in a small arc about the horizontal axis to obtain a good sight. Nobody, to the author's knowledge, however, has attempted to quantify the errors involved, so as to compare them with other errors inherent in determining celestial position lines. This paper sets out to address these issues and to pose the question: what level of accuracy of vertical alignment can reasonably be expected during marine sextant work at sea ?When a heavenly body is brought to tangency with the visible horizon it is particularly important to ensure that the sextant is held in a truly vertical position. To this end the instrument is rocked gently about the horizontal so that the image of the body describes a small arc in the observer's field of vision. As Bruce Bauer points out, tangency with the horizon must be achieved during the process of rocking and not a second or so after rocking has been discontinued. The altitude is recorded for the instant that the body kisses the visible horizon at the lowest point of the rocking arc, as in Fig. 2. The only other visual clue as to whether the sextant is vertical is provided by the right angle made by the vertical edge of the horizon glass mirror with the horizon. There may also be some input from the observer's sense of balance and his hand orientation.

  8. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred J.

    2014-03-01

    Wrinkles occur when a compressive strain is imposed on a bilayer system composed of a stiff thin top film and a soft substrate. Wrinkle aspect ratio (wrinkle height divided by wavelength) is perhaps the most critical parameter for many promising wrinkle-based technologies; however, the current accessible range of aspect ratio has been restricted from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or ridges. Here, we demonstrate the ability to delay this transition and ultimately expand the range of aspect ratios. Building upon recently developed models which link this transition to the asymmetric traction forces between the wrinkle crests and valleys for non-linear strain energy functions, we experimentally quantify the critical strain for both ridge and fold localizations as a function of the substrate material properties, initial stretch ratio, as well as film properties and geometry. Collectively, we demonstrate the ability to achieve wrinkle aspect ratios as large as 0.8, demonstrating significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  9. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  10. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  11. Towards a New Vertical Datum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, D. R.; Li, X.; Holmes, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is responsible for maintaining and improving the National Spatial Reference System. This paper particularly focuses on developments leading to a new vertical datum to replace the existing North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). This new model will be developed from a combination of satellite, airborne, and terrestrial gravity data to define a gravimetric geoid height model. In particular, the aerogravity data collected as a part o the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) Project are intended to help achieve the goal of a cm-level accurate geoid model to serve as the new vertical datum. The different data sources have been melded into a single gravity field model consistent across the entire spectrum to about 2 km resolution. A previous comparison developed a localized model over just the southern Texas region, where the Geoid Slope Validation Study for 2011 (GSVS 11) demonstrated that it was possible to achieve the desired accuracy. This new model was developed using methodology consistent at regional to national scales following techniques used to make USGG2009 and USGG2012, but now incorporating aerogravity. This new model proves out the basic concepts behind GRAV-D in that the aeorgravity bridge the spectral gap between satellite and terrestrial data and provide the requisite improvements to the derived gravimetric geoid height model - all without artificially targeting a solution to a specific test area. Additional comparisons were made to tidal bench mark data observed by GPS in combination with ocean topography models to validate the behavior of the model in the coastal regions.

  12. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  13. Vertical Integration and Technology: Theory and Evidence

    E-print Network

    Acemoglu, Daron

    We study the determinants of vertical integration. We first derive a number of predictions regarding the relationship between technology intensity and vertical integration from a simple incomplete contracts model. Then, ...

  14. Vertical silicon nanowire arrays for gas sensing

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Hangbo

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research was to fabricate and characterize vertically aligned silicon nanowire gas sensors. Silicon nanowires are very attractive for gas sensing applications and vertically aligned silicon nanowires are ...

  15. Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon (Earthworm Phase) Mac Callaham Corey Babb in each treatment Sampling #12;Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon (millipede phase) Plans for the Future: #12;

  16. Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon (UPDATE) Mac Callaham Corey Babb Paul vertical transport of litter derived carbon-millipede phase More germane to upland sites Sampled uplands for worms (and found one) Plans for the Future: #12;

  17. Vertical velocity spectra from a Doppler Sodar

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, K.H.; Coulter, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of Acoustic Doppler Radars or sodars to describe local vertical velocity statistics was evaluated. Sodar was used to monitor the local vertical velocity field to altitudes of 1000 meters in an attempt to study the vertical velocity field associated with cloud formation, maintenance and decay. 5 reference, 6 figures. (ACR)

  18. 46 CFR 108.160 - Vertical ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vertical ladders. 108.160 Section 108.160 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.160 Vertical ladders. (a) Each vertical ladder must...

  19. 46 CFR 108.160 - Vertical ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vertical ladders. 108.160 Section 108.160 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.160 Vertical ladders. (a) Each vertical ladder must have rungs that are— (1) At least...

  20. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  1. ?Vertical Sextants give Good Sights?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Michael

    Mark Dixon suggests (Forum, Vol. 50, 137) that nobody thus far has attempted to quantify the errors from tilt that arise while observing with the marine sextant. The issue in fact, with the related problem of what exactly is the axis about which the sextant is rotated whilst being (to define the vertical), was the subject of a lively controversy in the first two volumes of this Journal some fifty years ago. Since the consensus of opinion seems to have been that the maximum error does not necessarily occur at 45 degrees, whereas Dixon's table suggests that it does, some reiteration of the arguments may be in order.

  2. Granular segregation under vertical tapping

    E-print Network

    M. Pica Ciamarra; M. D. De Vizia; A. Fierro; M. Tarzia; A. Coniglio; M. Nicodemi

    2006-01-13

    We present extensive Molecular Dynamics simulations on species segregation in a granular mixture subject to vertical taps. We discuss how grain properties, e.g., size, density, friction, as well as, shaking properties, e.g., amplitude and frequency, affect such a phenomenon. Both Brazil Nut Effect (larger particles on the top, BN) and the Reverse Brazil Nut Effect (larger particles on the bottom, RBN) are found and we derive the system comprehensive ``segregation diagram'' and the BN to RBN crossover line. We also discuss the role of friction and show that particles which differ only for their frictional properties segregate in states depending on the tapping acceleration and frequency.

  3. Neighbourly polytopes with few vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Devyatov, Rostislav A

    2011-10-31

    A family of neighbourly polytopes in R{sup 2d} with N=2d+4 vertices is constructed. All polytopes in the family have a planar Gale diagram of a special type, namely, with exactly d+3 black points in convex position. These Gale diagrams are parametrized by 3-trees (trees with a certain additional structure). For all polytopes in the family, the number of faces of dimension m containing a given vertex A depends only on d and m. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  4. Vertical diffusivities of active and passive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and R ? (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, R ?. In doubly stable regimes (DS, ? T/?z > 0, ?S/? z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of R ? < 0 and Ri > 0. In DC regimes (diffusive convection, ? T/? z < 0, ? S/? z < 0, R ? > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. In SF regimes (salt fingers, ? T/? z > 0, ? S/? z > 0, R ? < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO 2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  5. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  6. Laser tracking for vertical control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Peter; Torrence, Mark; Pavlis, Erricos; Kolenkiewicz, Ron; Smith, David

    1993-01-01

    The Global Laser Tracking Network has provided LAGEOS ranging data of high accuracy since the first MERIT campaign in late 1983 and we can now resolve centimeter-level three dimensional positions of participating observatories at monthly intervals. In this analysis, the station height estimates have been considered separately from the horizontal components, and can be determined by the strongest stations with a formal standard error of 2 mm using eight years of continuous observations. The rate of change in the vertical can be resolved to a few mm/year, which is at the expected level of several geophysical effects. In comparing the behavior of the stations to that predicted by recent models of post-glacial rebound, we find no correlation in this very small effect. Particular attention must be applied to data and survey quality control when measuring the vertical component, and the survey observations are critical components of the geodynamic results. Seasonal patterns are observed in the heights of most stations, and the possibility of secular motion at the level of several millimeters per year cannot be excluded. Any such motion must be considered in the interpretation of horizontal inter-site measurements, and can help to identify mechanisms which can cause variations which occur linearly with time, seasonally, or abruptly.

  7. Plug cementing: Horizontal to vertical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, D.G.; Heathman, J.F.; Griffith, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an in-depth study of cement plug placement that was conducted with large-scale models for the improvement of plug cementing practices and plug integrity. Common hole and workstring geometries were examined with various rheology and density ratios between the drilling fluid and cement. The critical conditions dictating the difference between success and failure for various wellbore angles and conditions were explored, and the mechanisms controlling slurry movement before and after placement are now better understood. An understanding of these mechanisms allows the engineer to better tailor a design to specific hole conditions. Controversial concepts regarding plug-setting practices have been examined and resolved. The cumulative effects of density, rheology, and hole angle are major factors affecting plug success. While the Boycott effect and an extrusion effect were observed to be predominant in inclined wellbores, a spiraling or {open_quotes}roping{close_quotes} effect controls slurry movement in vertical wellbores. Ultimate success of a cement plug can be obtained if allowances are made for these effects in the job design, provided all other previously published recommended placement practices are followed. Results of this work can be applied to many sidetracking and plug-to-abandon operations. Additionally, the understanding of the fluid movement (creep) mechanisms holds potential for use in primary and remedial cementing work, and in controlling the placement of noncementitious fluids in the wellbore.

  8. Turbulent vertical diffusivity in the sub-tropical stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, I.; Legras, B.

    2008-02-01

    Vertical (cross-isentropic) mixing is produced by small-scale turbulent processes which are still poorly understood and paramaterized in numerical models. In this work we provide estimates of local equivalent diffusion in the lower stratosphere by comparing balloon borne high-resolution measurements of chemical tracers with reconstructed mixing ratio from large ensembles of random Lagrangian backward trajectories using European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analysed winds and a chemistry-transport model (REPROBUS). We focus on a case study in subtropical latitudes using data from HIBISCUS campaign. An upper bound on the vertical diffusivity is found in this case study to be of the order of 0.5 m2 s-1 in the subtropical region, which is larger than the estimates at higher latitudes. The relation between diffusion and dispersion is studied by estimating Lyapunov exponents and studying their variation according to the presence of active dynamical structures.

  9. Turbulent vertical diffusivity in the sub-tropical stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, I.; Legras, B.

    2007-05-01

    Vertical (cross-isentropic) mixing is produced by small-scale turbulent processes which are still poorly understood and parametrized in numerical models. In this work we provide estimates of local equivalent diffusion in the lower stratosphere by comparing balloon borne high-resolution measurements of chemical tracers with reconstructed mixing ratio from large ensembles of random Lagrangian backward trajectories using European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analysed winds and a chemistry-transport model (REPROBUS). We have investigated cases in subtropical latitudes using data from HIBISCUS campaign. Upper bound on the vertical diffusivity is found to be of the order of 0.5 m2 s-1 in the subtropical region, which is larger than the estimates at higher latitudes. The relation between diffusion and dispersion is studied by estimating Lyapunov exponents and studying their variation according to the presence of active dynamical structures.

  10. Vertical ?13C and ?15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term ?13C and ?15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of ?13C and ?15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in ?13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in ?15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰?Litter ?13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect ?15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of ?15N in the early succession stages ? 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be affected by a change of hydrology, nutrient limitations, secondary minerals and root impacts. The investigation of vertical changes of soil organic matter (SOM) stable isotope ratios provides the opportunity to detect combined processes that enhance our understanding of terrestrial ecosystem functioning and pedogenetic processes leading to stabilization/destabilization in soil and therefore addressing the soil's sink/source function.

  11. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds. PMID:12148751

  12. Plasma vertical stabilisation in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, Y.; Kavin, A.; Lukash, V.; Khayrutdinov, R.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Snipes, J. A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the progress in analysis of the ITER plasma vertical stabilisation (VS) system since its design review in 2007-2008. Two indices characterising plasma VS were studied. These are (1) the maximum value of plasma vertical displacement due to free drift that can be stopped by the VS system and (2) the maximum root mean square value of low frequency noise in the dZ/dt measurement signal used in the VS feedback loop. The first VS index was calculated using the PET code for 15 MA plasmas with the nominal position and shape. The second VS index was studied with the DINA code in the most demanding simulations for plasma magnetic control of 15 MA scenarios with the fastest plasma current ramp-up and early X-point formation, the fastest plasma current ramp-down in a divertor configuration, and an H to L mode transition at the current flattop. The studies performed demonstrate that the VS in-vessel coils, adopted recently in the baseline design, significantly increase the range of plasma controllability in comparison with the stabilising systems VS1 and VS2, providing operating margins sufficient to achieve ITER's goals specified in the project requirements. Additionally two sets of the DINA code simulations were performed with the goal of assessment of the capability of the PF system with the VS in-vessel coils: (i) to control the position of runaway electrons generated during disruptions in 15 MA scenarios and (ii) to trigger ELMs in H-mode plasmas of 7.5 MA/2.65 T scenarios planned for the early phase of ITER operation. It was also shown that ferromagnetic structures of the vacuum vessel (ferromagnetic inserts) and test blanket modules insignificantly affect the plasma VS.

  13. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  14. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  15. The vertical file enters the electronic age.

    PubMed

    Carleton, M O; Cheves, C G

    1989-01-01

    Vertical files are revered institutions in many libraries. The reference staff at the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah automated their vertical file and made the information in it accessible via the Library's Integrated Library System. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) were applied to vertical files and simple records leading to them were entered in the Library's online catalog. Electronic access to the vertical file increases the availability of concepts too new to be in medical books and permits the Library to meet the needs of lay patrons searching for basic information on popular health care topics. PMID:10296845

  16. Thick single crystal silicon MEMS with high aspect ratio vertical air-gaps

    E-print Network

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    (SCS), Polysilicon (poly), HARPSS, Accelerometer, Tunable capacitor, Tuning fork gyroscope, Low-gravity accele rometers, low voltage tunable capacitors, and high- resolution gyroscopes that require aspect have been shown earlier to achieve high-resolution gyroscopes.9 Poly springs have been used to suspend

  17. Inequalities and Monotonicity of the Ratio of the Geometric Means of a Positive Arithmetic Sequence with Unit Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qi, Feng

    2003-01-01

    For any nonnegative integer "k" and natural numbers "n" and "m," the equations presented in this paper demonstrate the inequalities obtained on the ratio for the geometric means of a positive arithmetic sequence with unit difference, where alpha epsilon [vertical bar]0,1[vertical bar] is a constant. Using the ideas and methods of Chen (2002),…

  18. Assessment of gene expression in many samples using vertical arrays

    PubMed Central

    Risques, Rosa Ana; Rondeau, Gaelle; Judex, Martin; McClelland, Michael; Welsh, John

    2008-01-01

    Microarrays and high-throughput sequencing methods can be used to measure the expression of thousands of genes in a biological sample in a few days, whereas PCR-based methods can be used to measure the expression of a few genes in thousands of samples in about the same amount of time. These methods become more costly as the number of biological samples increases or as the number of genes of interest increases, respectively, and these factors constrain experimental design. To address these issues, we introduced ‘vertical arrays’ in which RNA from each biological sample is converted into multiple, overlapping cDNA subsets and spotted on glass slides. These vertical arrays can be queried with single gene probes to assess the expression behavior in thousands of biological samples in a single hybridization reaction. The spotted subsets are less complex than the original RNA from which they derive, which improves signal-to-noise ratios. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative capabilities of vertical arrays, including the sensitivity and accuracy of the method and the number of subsets needed to achieve this accuracy for most expressed genes. PMID:18474526

  19. Structural and Electrical Investigation of C60-Graphene Vertical Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanpyo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Santos, Elton J G; Jo, Pil Sung; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-06-23

    Graphene, with its unique electronic and structural qualities, has become an important playground for studying adsorption and assembly of various materials including organic molecules. Moreover, organic/graphene vertical structures assembled by van der Waals interaction have potential for multifunctional device applications. Here, we investigate structural and electrical properties of vertical heterostructures composed of C60 thin film on graphene. The assembled film structure of C60 on graphene is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which reveals a uniform morphology of C60 film on graphene with a grain size as large as 500 nm. The strong epitaxial relations between C60 crystal and graphene lattice directions are found, and van der Waals ab initio calculations support the observed phenomena. Moreover, using C60-graphene heterostructures, we fabricate vertical graphene transistors incorporating n-type organic semiconducting materials with an on/off ratio above 3 × 10(3). Our work demonstrates that graphene can serve as an excellent substrate for assembly of molecules, and attained organic/graphene heterostructures have great potential for electronics applications. PMID:26027690

  20. Convective instabilities in a rotating vertical Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keke; Liao, Xinhao; Zhan, Xiaoya; Zhu, Rixiang

    2006-12-01

    Convective instabilities driven by vertical buoyancy in a Boussinesq fluid in a rotating vertical Hele-Shaw cell, a long channel with rectangular cross section of finite height h and small width ?h with ? ?1, are investigated both analytically and numerically. The problem is characterized by the Taylor number T, the Rayleigh number R, and the aspect ratio ?. Explicit asymptotic solutions describing convective instabilities are derived for ?T1/6?1, where T is assumed to be large compared to unity. Comparison between the asymptotic and fully numerical solutions shows a satisfactory quantitative agreement. It is found that an overall condition for convective instabilities becomes optimal when ?T1/6=O (1). Direct three-dimensional simulations for strongly nonlinear convection are also carried out in the regime 0<(R-Rc)/Rc?O(10), where Rc denotes the critical Rayleigh number. As a consequence of both the geometric and dynamic constraints imposed by the narrow channel (geometric) and rapid rotation (dynamic), the nonlinear flow remains temporally stationary and spatially simple and is comprised primarily of vertically long thin convection cells that transport heat all the way from the bottom to the top of the channel.

  1. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  2. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  3. Vertical combustor for particulate refuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L.

    1981-03-01

    A one-dimensional model is constructed of a vertical combustor for refuse particle combustion in order to analyze it for waste energy recovery. The three components of the model, fuel particles, inert solid particles and the gaseous mixture are described by momentum, energy, and mass conservation equations, resulting in three different flow velocities and temperatures for the medium. The gaseous component is further divided into six chemical species that evolve in combustion at temperatures below about 1367 K. A detailed description is given of the fuel particle combustion through heating, devolatilization, and combustion of the volatile gas in the boundary layer, return of the flame sheet to the fuel surface, and char combustion. The solutions show the combustor to be viable for U.S. refuse which consists of combustibles that can be volatilized up to 85 to 95% below 1366 K. Char combustion, however, is found to be too slow to be attempted in the combustor, where the fuel residence time is of the order of 2 s.

  4. INVESTIGATING THERMODYNAMICS OF VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY TRANSPORT

    E-print Network

    INVESTIGATING THERMODYNAMICS OF VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY TRANSPORT Wei Wu and Yangang Liu National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Thermodynamics of vertical atmospheric energy. Potential thermodynamic constraint(s) for the Earth's climate system are also explored from these simple

  5. A Vertically Resolved Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Increase of the vertical resolution of the GLAS Fourth Order General Circulation Model (GCM) near the Earth's surface and installation of a new package of parameterization schemes for subgrid-scale physical processes were sought so that the GLAS Model GCM will predict the resolved vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) for all grid points.

  6. Temperature-insensitive line ratios

    E-print Network

    Kesich, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We develop method to extract elemental abundance ratios using temperature-insensitive ratios of x-ray line fluxes for a collisionally ionized plasma. This method is then refined using more realistic plasma models for coronae ...

  7. Robust multi-scale superpixel classification for optic cup localization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ngan-Meng; Xu, Yanwu; Goh, Wooi Boon; Liu, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an optimal model integration framework to robustly localize the optic cup in fundus images for glaucoma detection. This work is based on the existing superpixel classification approach and makes two major contributions. First, it addresses the issues of classification performance variations due to repeated random selection of training samples, and offers a better localization solution. Second, multiple superpixel resolutions are integrated and unified for better cup boundary adherence. Compared to the state-of-the-art intra-image learning approach, we demonstrate improvements in optic cup localization accuracy with full cup-to-disc ratio range, while incurring only minor increase in computing cost. PMID:25453464

  8. Inclusion of Vertical Dynamics in Vertically-integrated Models for CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mathematical models of different complexity are needed to answer a range of questions for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). One category of simplified models is based on vertical integration, which reduces the three-dimensional problem to two dimensions. Usually, these models assume that brine and CO2 are in vertical equilibrium. This type of model is useful and accurate for simulation times that are large relative to the time for buoyant segregation. But, vertical-equilibrium models are inappropriate in some situations, for instance, in the early stage of injection, when brine and CO2 have not fully segregated. Therefore, for these situations, the vertical equilibrium assumption needs to be relaxed and vertical dynamics needs to be included in the governing equations. To avoid significant increases of computational effort due to the inclusion of vertical dynamics, a multi-scale algorithm can be constructed where the vertically integrated equations are still used to model the (dominant) horizontal flow processes with the vertical reconstruction included as a dynamic problem. Such an approach allows each vertical column of grid cells to be solved independently, as a one-dimensional problem, during the dynamic reconstruction step. Because the top and bottom boundaries usually correspond to impermeable caprock, the total flow for these one-dimensional problems is zero and counter-current flow driven only by buoyancy and capillarity is involved. Solutions for this kind of problem are relatively simple and require little computational effort. With careful coupling between the vertical calculations and the horizontally integrated equations, an efficient algorithm can be developed to simulate a fairly wide range of problems including those with significant vertical dynamics. When vertical dynamics become insignificant, then usual vertical equilibrium reconstruction is used in the vertically integrated models. This new algorithm provides an intermediate choice in model complexity between full three-dimensional models and vertical-equilibrium two-dimensional models.

  9. Modeling of leachate recirculation using vertical wells in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Cao, Ben-Yi; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Hai-Jian

    2015-06-01

    Leachate recirculation (LR) in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills operated as bioreactors offers significant economic and environmental benefits. The subsurface application method of vertical wells is one of the most common LR techniques. The objective of this study was to develop a novel two-dimensional model of leachate recirculation using vertical wells. This novel method can describe leachate flow considering the effects of MSW settlement while also accounting separately for leachate flow in saturated and unsaturated zones. In this paper, a settlement model for MSW when considering the effects of compression and biodegradation on the MSW porosity was adopted. A numerical model was proposed using new governing equations for the saturated and unsaturated zones of a landfill. The following design parameters were evaluated by simulating the recirculated leachate volume and the influence zones of waste under steady-state flow conditions: (1) the effect of MSW settlement, (2) the effect of the initial void ratio, (3) the effect of the injected head, (4) the effect of the unit weight, (5) the effect of the biodegradation rate, and (6) the effect of the compression coefficient. The influence zones of LR when considering the effect of MSW settlement are smaller than those when neglecting the effect. The influence zones and LR volume increased with an increase in the injection pressure head and initial void ratio of MSW. The proposed method and the calculation results can provide important insight into the hydrological behavior of bioreactor landfills. PMID:25874416

  10. Cooling Requirements for the Vertical Shear Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical shear instability (VSI) offers a potential hydrodynamic mechanism for angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). The VSI is driven by a weak vertical gradient in the disk’s orbital motion, but must overcome vertical buoyancy, a strongly stabilizing influence in cold disks, where heating is dominated by external irradiation. Rapid radiative cooling reduces the effective buoyancy and allows the VSI to operate. We quantify the cooling timescale tc needed for efficient VSI growth, through a linear analysis of the VSI with cooling in vertically global, radially local disk models. We find the VSI is most vigorous for rapid cooling with {t}{{c}}\\lt {{{? }}}{{K}}-1h| q| /(? -1) in terms of the Keplerian orbital frequency, {{{? }}}{{K}}, the disk’s aspect-ratio, h\\ll 1, the radial power-law temperature gradient, q, and the adiabatic index, ?. For longer tc, the VSI is much less effective because growth slows and shifts to smaller length scales, which are more prone to viscous or turbulent decay. We apply our results to PPD models where tc is determined by the opacity of dust grains. We find that the VSI is most effective at intermediate radii, from ?5 to ?50 AU with a characteristic growth time of ?30 local orbital periods. Growth is suppressed by long cooling times both in the opaque inner disk and the optically thin outer disk. Reducing the dust opacity by a factor of 10 increases cooling times enough to quench the VSI at all disk radii. Thus the formation of solid protoplanets, a sink for dust grains, can impede the VSI.

  11. Emission Ratios from SCIAMACHY simultaneous measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystova, Iryna; Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.; Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    The spectra of reflected and backscattered solar radiation as measured by SCIAMACHY in nadir observation mode in the UV/visible/near-infrared/short-wave-infrared spectral region contain information on the vertical columns of numerous air pollutants and therefore provide a large-scale perspective on spacious and uncertain pollution sources like biomass burnings. It will be shown that under a number of reasonable assumptions we can obtain a quantitative charac-teristics of biomass burning emissions in terms of emission ratios (ER) using only the averages of the atmospheric gas columns retrieved from the space-based simultaneous measurements. Considering for example the SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide (CO), taken as a reference car-bon component, together with the SCIAMACHY formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns in the scope of a well established emission quantification method we calcu-late the emission ratios, CO/HCHO and CO/NO2, over large biomass burning events in 2004 (established with the help of the AATSR fire counts product). We show that the calculated ER values are in reasonable agreement with the values obtained locally over similar biomass burning events reported in the literature. In addition, we discuss the relatively large values over the boreal forest fires in Alaska and Siberia, where ER values from local measurements were not yet reported.

  12. Curved motions in horizontal and vertical orientations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J G; Ogeil, R P

    2010-10-01

    A consideration of handwriting demonstrates that motions can be remarkably constant, even when performed with different effectors. Nevertheless, the transposition of writing from horizontal to vertical orientations, as occurs when writing on blackboards, poses additional problems for the constraint of movement. Motions in horizontal and vertical planes potentially challenge the mechanisms responsible for motor constancy. Gravitational fields impose different accelerative forces on vertical (up/down) compared with horizontal (left/right) motions. A 1/3 power law linking tangential velocity and radius of curvature is sometimes invoked to explain how equivalent motions can be performed by different effectors. To evaluate the operation of the power law when movements are performed in different orientations, 12 participants drew ellipses in horizontal and vertical planes at about 1 or 2 Hz. Mean tangential velocity, radius of curvature and the strength of the 1/3 power law were analyzed. The power law was strongest for curved motions at faster speeds. The power law was weakest at slower speeds in the vertical orientation. As participants controlled their movement periodicity, this placed tighter constraints upon curvature in the vertical orientations than the horizontal orientations. Speed of motion had a greater effect upon curvatures in the horizontal than the vertical orientation. The data offer insights into variations in the strength of the power law under different orientations, and indicate a limited role for the 1/3 power law in motor constancy. PMID:20800304

  13. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  14. Effects of vertical rotation on Arabidopsis development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Dahl, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Various gross morphological end points of Arabidopsis development are examined in an attempt to separate the effects of growth on the horizontal clinostat into a component caused by rotation alone and another component caused by the altered position with respect to the direction of the g-vector. In a series of tests which involved comparisons between vertical stationary plants, vertical rotated plants, and plants rotated on clinostats, certain characters were consistently influenced by vertical rotation alone. The characters for which this effect was statistically significant were petiole length and leaf blade width.

  15. Vertical transport of ozone and CO during super cyclones in the Bay of Bengal as detected by Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fadnavis, S; Beig, G; Buchunde, P; Ghude, Sachin D; Krishnamurti, T N

    2011-02-01

    Vertical profiles of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone retrieved from Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer have been analyzed during two super cyclone systems Mala and Sidr. Super cyclones Mala and Sidr traversed the Bay of Bengal (BOB) region on April 24-29, 2006 and November 12-16, 2007 respectively. The CO and ozone plume is observed as a strong enhancement of these pollutants in the upper troposphere over the BOB, indicating deep convective transport. Longitude-height cross-section of these pollutants shows vertical transport to the upper troposphere. CO mixing ratio ~90 ppb is observed near the 146-mb level during the cyclone Mala and near 316 mb during the cyclone Sidr. Ozone mixing ratio ~60-100 ppb is observed near the 316-mb level during both the cyclones. Analysis of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis vertical winds (omega) confirms vertical transport in the BOB. PMID:20652426

  16. Effects of volume averaging on the line spectra of vertical velocity from multiple-Doppler radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Chen, T.; Wyngaard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of the ratio of the true one-dimensional spectrum of vertical velocity and that measured with multiple-Doppler radar beams are presented. It was assumed that the effects of pulse volume averaging and objective analysis routines is replacement of a point measurement with a volume integral. A u and v estimate was assumed to be feasible when orthogonal radars are not available. Also, the target fluid was configured as having an infinite vertical dimension, zero vertical velocity at the top and bottom, and having homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The ratio obtained indicated that equal resolutions among radars yields a monotonically decreasing, wavenumber-dependent response function. A gain of 0.95 was demonstrated in an experimental situation with 40 levels. Possible errors introduced when using unequal resolution radars were discussed. Finally, it was found that, for some flows, the extent of attenuation depends on the number of vertical levels resolvable by the radars.

  17. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  18. Vertically stacked multi-heterostructures of layered materials for logic transistors and complementary inverters

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Hailong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yang; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    The layered materials such as graphene have attracted considerable interest for future electronics. Here we report the vertical integration of multi-heterostructures of layered materials to enable high current density vertical field-effect transistors (VFETs). An n-channel VFET is created by sandwiching few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the semiconducting channel between a monolayer graphene and a metal thin film. The VFETs exhibit a room temperature on-off ratio >103, while at same time deliver a high current density up to 5,000 A/cm2, sufficient for high performance logic applications. This study offers a general strategy for the vertical integration of various layered materials to obtain both p- and n-channel transistors for complementary logic functions. A complementary inverter with larger than unit voltage gain is demonstrated by vertically stacking the layered materials of graphene, Bi2Sr2Co2O8 (p-channel), graphene, MoS2 (n-channel), and metal thin film in sequence. The ability to simultaneously achieve high on-off ratio, high current density, and logic integration in the vertically stacked multi-heterostructures can open up a new dimension for future electronics to enable three-dimensional integration. PMID:23241535

  19. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  20. Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves

    E-print Network

    Giannitsis, Constantine

    The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

  1. Vertical Glider Robots for Subsea Equipment Delivery

    E-print Network

    Reed, Brooks L.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an underwater vehicle that offers significant performance improvements over existing sub sea elevators. Our Vertical Glider Robot falls under its own weight to a precise location on the seafloor, employing ...

  2. Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles

    E-print Network

    Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

  3. 30. BEARING SHOE / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / UPPER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. BEARING SHOE / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / UPPER AND LOWER CHORD DETAIL OF DECK TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  4. 23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL BRACING DETAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  5. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  6. Vertical-axis wind-turbine program

    SciTech Connect

    Braasch, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    During the interval since the Fourth Biennial Wind Energy Conference, the vertical axis wind turbine program has experienced significant progress. The purpose of this paper is to review that progress in aerodynamics research, structural dynamics research, and machine development.

  7. Vertically Aligned Nanocomposites in Magnetic Thin Films 

    E-print Network

    Abdel-Raziq, Haron

    2013-02-11

    With the advent of ferromagnetic materials for magnetic memory among other applications, increased attention has been given to understanding the properties of these ferromagnets. Here, a vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) system is examined...

  8. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift lasting a few hundred thousand years as the island migrates over a broad flexural arch related to isostatic compensation of a nearby active volcano. The arch is located about 190±30 km away from the center of volcanic activity and is also related to the rejuvenated volcanic stage on the islands. Reefs on Oahu that are uplifted several tens of m above sea level are the primary evidence for uplift as the islands over-ride the flexural arch. At the other end of the movement spectrum, both in terms of magnitude and length of response, are the rapid uplift and subsidence that occurs as magma is accumulated within or erupted from active submarine volcanoes. These changes are measured in days to years and are of cm to m variation; they are measured using leveling surveys, tiltmeters, EDM and GPS above sea level and pressure gauges and tiltmeters below sea level. Other acoustic techniques to measure such vertical movement are under development. Elsewhere, evidence for subsidence of volcanoes is also widespread, ranging from shallow water carbonates on drowned Cretaceous guyots, to mapped shoreline features, to the presence of subaerially-erupted (degassed) lavas on now submerged volcanoes. Evidence for uplift is more limited, but includes makatea islands with uplifted coral reefs surrounding low volcanic islands. These are formed due to flexural uplift associated with isostatic loading of nearby islands or seamounts. In sum, oceanic volcanoes display a long history of subsidence, rapid at first and then slow, sometimes punctuated by brief periods of uplift due to lithospheric loading by subsequently formed nearby volcanoes.

  9. 47 CFR 73.160 - Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(θ). 73.160...Stations § 73.160 Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?). (a) The vertical plane radiation characteristics show the...

  10. 47 CFR 73.160 - Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(θ). 73.160...Stations § 73.160 Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?). (a) The vertical plane radiation characteristics show the...

  11. 47 CFR 73.160 - Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(θ). 73.160...Stations § 73.160 Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?). (a) The vertical plane radiation characteristics show the...

  12. 47 CFR 73.160 - Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(θ). 73.160...Stations § 73.160 Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?). (a) The vertical plane radiation characteristics show the...

  13. 47 CFR 73.160 - Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(θ). 73.160...Stations § 73.160 Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?). (a) The vertical plane radiation characteristics show the...

  14. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  15. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  16. First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

    2010-07-15

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

  17. Vertical distribution of (241)Pu in the southern Baltic Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Strumi?ska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2014-12-15

    The vertical distribution of plutonium (241)Pu in marine sediments can assist in determining the deposition history and sedimentation process of analyzed regions. In addition, (241)Pu/(239+240)Pu activity ratio could be used as a sensitive fingerprint for radioactive source identification. The present preliminary studies on vertical distribution of (241)Pu in sediments from four regions of the southern Baltic Sea are presented. The distribution of (241)Pu was not uniform and depended on sediment geomorphology and depth as well as location. The highest concentrations of plutonium were found in the surface layers of all analyzed sediments and originated from the Chernobyl accident. PMID:25455816

  18. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  19. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  20. The Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness With Blood Pressure in a Chinese Hypertensive Population

    PubMed Central

    Gangwani, Rita A.; Lee, Jacky W.Y.; Mo, H.Y.; Sum, Rita; Kwong, Alfred S.K.; Wang, Jenny H.L.; Tsui, Wendy W.S.; Chan, Jonathan C.H.; Lai, Jimmy S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and blood pressure (BP) in subjects with systemic hypertension. Subjects with systemic hypertension on anti-hypertensive medications were screened by fundus photography and referred for glaucoma work-up if there was enlarged vertical cup-to-disc (VCDR) ratio ?0.6, VCDR asymmetry ?0.2, or optic disc hemorrhage. Workup included a complete ophthalmological examination, Humphrey visual field test, and RNFL thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. The intraocular pressure (IOP) and RNFL thicknesses (global and quadrant) were averaged from both eyes and the means were correlated with: the systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using Pearson correlation. Among 4000 screened hypertensive subjects, 133 were referred for glaucoma workup and 110 completed the workup. Of the 4000 screened subjects, 1.3% had glaucoma (0.9% had normal tension glaucoma [NTG], 0.2% had primary open angle glaucoma, and 0.2% had primary angle closure glaucoma), whereas 0.3% were NTG suspects. The SBP was negatively correlated with the mean superior RNFL thickness (P?=?0.01). The DBP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P?=?0.03), superior (P?=?0.02), and nasal (P?=?0.003) RNFL thickness. The MAP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P?=?0.01), superior (P?=?0.002), and nasal (P?=?0.004) RNFL thickness while positively correlated with the mean IOP (P?=?0.02). In medically treated hypertensive subjects, glaucoma was present in 1.3%, with NTG being most prevalent. MAP control may help with IOP lowering and RNFL preservation, although future prospective studies will be needed. PMID:26061324

  1. Stereo Photo Measured ONH Shape Predicts Development of POAG in Subjects With Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Mark; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Tang, Li; Gordon, Mae O.; Kass, Michael A.; Budenz, Donald L.; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify objective, quantitative optic nerve head (ONH) structural features and model the contributions of glaucoma. Methods Baseline stereoscopic optic disc images of 1635 glaucoma-free participants at risk for developing primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were collected as part of the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study. A stereo correspondence algorithm designed for fundus images was applied to extract the three-dimensional (3D) information about the ONH. Principal component analysis was used to identify ONH 3D structural features and the contributions of demographic features, clinical variables, and disease were modeled using linear regression and linear component analysis. The computationally identified features were evaluated based on associations with glaucoma and ability to predict which participants would develop POAG. Results The computationally identified features were significantly associated with future POAG, POAG-related demographics (age, ethnicity), and clinical measurements (horizontal and vertical cup-to-disc ratio, central corneal thickness, and refraction). Models predicting future POAG development using the OHTS baseline data and STEP features achieved an AUC of 0.722 in cross-validation testing. This was a significant improvement over using only demographics (age, sex, and ethnicity), which had an AUC of 0.599. Conclusions Methods for identifying objective, quantitative measurements of 3D ONH structure were developed using a large dataset. The identified features were significantly associated with POAG and POAG-related variables. Further, these features increased predictive model accuracy in predicting future POAG. The results indicate that the computationally identified features might be useful in POAG early screening programs or as endophenotypes to investigate POAG genetics. PMID:26193923

  2. Nanoscale High Aspect Ratio Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Jonathan; Davis, Robert; Vanfleet, Richard; Conley, Hiram

    2008-10-01

    Nanoscale high aspect ratio structures have possible applications in microfluidic channels, batteries, and fuel cells, among others. We present methods we have been trying to create 3:1 aspect ratio structures in transparent materials that will withstand temperatures needed for CVD or ALD processes; including contact molding, spin and etch back, and replica molding.

  3. The sex ratio at birth.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E

    1967-10-01

    Several aspects of the disparity in birth ratio of males over females are discussed including variations among different races, variations by order of birth, by age of the parent, and in multiple births. Avenues of statistical exploration are suggested in an attempt to indicate certain peculiarities in nature. The Negro population in the United States has a sex ratio of 102 males to 100 females as opposed to 105:100 for whites, a highly significant difference. Inferences from these statistics are suggested for study of the sex ratios of mixed unions. The group classified as Mulatto show a lower sex ratio and further analysis of this was suggested including examination of slave records. For the white population sex ratio declines from 106.2 to 102.9 between 1st order and 7th order births. This is highly significant. However, nonwhite determinations were more irregular. Data limitations on sex ratio by age of parent prevented conclusive results. Multiple births among whites show a decline from 105.3 for single live births to 103.2 for twins and 86.1 for all other plural deliveries. Among nonwhites these ratios are 102.3, 99.7, and 102.6 respectively. Further information should be developed using the multiple facts relating to the sex ratio at birth. PMID:12275623

  4. Radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclone derived from dropsondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yifang

    The scopes of this thesis research are two folds: the first one is to the construct the intensity-based composite radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclones (TC) using GPS-based dropsonde observations and the second one is to identify the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices against the dropsonde composites of TCs. The intensity-based dropsonde composites of TCs advances our understanding of the dynamic and thermal structure of TCs of different intensity along the radial direction in and above the boundary layer where lies the devastating high wind that causes property damages and storm surges. The identification of the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices in representing the radial-vertical profiles of TC of different intensity helps to improve numerical predictions of TCs since most operational TC forecast models need to utilize bogus vortices, such as Mathur vortices, to initialize TC forecasts and simulations. We first screen all available GPS dropsonde data within and round 35 named TCs over the tropical Atlantic basin from 1996 to 2010 and pair them with TC parameters derived from the best-track data provided by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and select 1149 dropsondes that have continuous coverage in the lower troposphere. The composite radial-vertical profiles of tangential wind speed, temperature, mixing ratio and humidity are based for each TC category ranging from "Tropical Storm" (TS) to "Hurricane Category 1" (H1) through "Hurricane Category 5" (H5). The key findings of the dropsonde composites are: (i) all TCs have the maximum tangential wind within 1 km above the ground and a distance of 1-2 times of the radius of maximum wind (RMW) at the surface; (ii) all TCs have a cold ring surrounding the warm core near the boundary layer at a distance of 1-3 times of the RMW and the cold ring structure gradually diminishes at a higher elevation where the warm core structure prevails along the radial direction; (iii) the existence of such shallow cold ring outside the RMW explains why the maximum tangential wind is within 1 km above the ground and is outside the RMW, as required by the hydrostatic and gradient wind balance relations; (iv) one of the main differences among TCs of different intensity, besides the speed of the maximum tangential wind, is the vertical extent of near-saturated moisture air layer inside the core. A weaker TC tends to have a deep layer of the near-saturated moisture air layer whereas a stronger TC has a shallow one; (v) another main difference in the thermal structure among TCs of different intensity is the intensity and vertical extent of the warm core extending from the upper layer to the lower layer. In general, a stronger TC has a stronger warm core extending downward further into lower layer and vice versa. The features (iv) and (v) are consistent with the fact that a stronger TC tends to have stronger descending motion inside the core. The main deficiencies of Mathur vortices in representing the radial-vertical profiles of TC of different intensity are (i) Mathur vortices of all categories have the maximum wind at the surface; (ii) none of Mathur vortices have a cold ring outside the warm core near the boundary layer; (iii) Mathur vortices tend to overestimate warm core structure in reference to the horizontal mean temperature profile; (iv) Mathur vortices tend to overestimate the vertical depth of the near-saturated air layer near the boundary layer.

  5. Up-down asymmetry in vertical vection.

    PubMed

    Seya, Yasuhiro; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Nakaura, Yoshiya

    2015-12-01

    To investigate whether up-down asymmetry similar to that reported in vertical optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), that is, larger OKN responses for upward motion than for downward motion, would appear in vertical vection, we conducted three experiments. In all three experiments, participants viewed a vertically moving random-dot pattern. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants reported vection using a joystick. After each trial, they were also asked to rate the vection magnitude experienced during the stimulus presentation. In Experiment 3, eye movements and vection magnitude (rated after each trial) in response to the stimulus were measured. The results of Experiment 1 showed larger vection magnitude for the upward motion of the stimulus than for the downward motion of it. However, vection onset latency did not change much with stimulus motion direction. Experiment 2 revealed that the up-down asymmetry in vection manifested progressively during the latter part of the stimulus presentation period. Experiment 3 showed clear up-down asymmetry in both OKN and vection magnitude. These results not only indicate that up-down asymmetry similar to that reported in vertical OKN appears in vertical vection, but they also support the notion that the mechanisms underlying vection and OKN are closely related to each other. PMID:26518744

  6. Thermal Impacts of Vertical Greenery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safikhani, Tabassom; Abdullah, Aminatuzuhariah Megat; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Baharvand, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    - Using vertical greenery systems to reduce heat transmission is becoming more common in modern architecture. Vertical greenery systems are divided into two main categories; green facades and living walls. This study aims to examine the thermal performance of vertical greenery systems in hot and humid climates. An experimental procedure was used to measure indoor temperature and humidity. These parameters were also measured for the gap between the vertical greenery systems and wall surfaces. Three boxes were used as small-scale rooms. Two boxes were provided with either a living wall or a green facade and one box did not have any greenery (benchmark). Blue Trumpet Vine was used in the vertical greenery systems. The data were recorded over the course of three sunny days in April 2013. An analyses of the results showed that the living wall and green facade reduced indoor temperature up to 4.0 °C and 3.0 °C, respectively. The living wall and green facade also reduced cavity temperatures by 8.0 °C and 6.5 °C, respectively.

  7. Optimization of blade motion of vertical axis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi-yang; Han, Duan-feng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed to improve the energy efficiency of the vertical axis turbine. First of all, a single disk multiple stream-tube model is used to calculate individual fitness. Genetic algorithm is adopted to optimize blade pitch motion of vertical axis turbine with the maximum energy efficiency being selected as the optimization objective. Then, a particular data processing method is proposed, fitting the result data into a cosine-like curve. After that, a general formula calculating the blade motion is developed. Finally, CFD simulation is used to validate the blade pitch motion formula. The results show that the turbine's energy efficiency becomes higher after the optimization of blade pitch motion; compared with the fixed pitch turbine, the efficiency of variable-pitch turbine is significantly improved by the active blade pitch control; the energy efficiency declines gradually with the growth of speed ratio; besides, compactness has lager effect on the blade motion while the number of blades has little effect on it.

  8. The Wake of a Single Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) pose various advantages over traditional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs), including their smaller size and footprint, quiet operation, and ability to produce power under a greater variety of wind directions and wind speeds. To determine the optimal spacing of an array of VAWTs for maximum power output, an understanding of the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT is needed. This study is among the first attempts to experimentally visualize the wake of a VAWT using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). A scale VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel and a motor rotates the scale model at a constant rotational speed. Wake data at several Reynolds numbers and tip speed ratios indicate that vortices are shed by each blade of the spinning VAWT, demonstrating significant differences between the wake of a VAWT and a spinning cylinder.

  9. Single transverse mode selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; GEIB,KENT M.; BRIGGS,RONALD D.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; HINDI,JANA JO

    2000-04-26

    Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) which operate in multiple transverse optical modes have been rapidly adopted into present data communication applications which rely on multi-mode optical fiber. However, operation only in the fundamental mode is required for free space interconnects and numerous other emerging VCSEL applications. Two device design strategies for obtaining single mode lasing in VCSELs based on mode selective loss or mode selective gain are reviewed and compared. Mode discrimination is attained with the use of a thick tapered oxide aperture positioned at a longitudinal field null. Mode selective gain is achieved by defining a gain aperture within the VCSEL active region to preferentially support the fundamental mode. VCSELs which exhibit greater than 3 mW of single mode output power at 850 nm with mode suppression ratio greater than 30 dB are reported.

  10. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrode arrays for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Yu, Edmond; Riviere, Roger; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-10-01

    We present electrochemical detection of DNA targets that corresponds to Escherichia coli O157:H7 16S rRNA gene using a nanoelectrode array consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) electrodes. Parylene C is used as gap filling 'matrix' material to avoid high temperature processing in electrode construction. This easy to deposit film of several micron heights provides a conformal coating between the high aspect ratio VACNFs with negligible pin-holes. The low background currents show the potential of this approach for ultra-sensitive detection. Consistent and reproducible electrochemical-signals are achieved using a simple electrode preparation. This simple, reliable and low-cost approach is a forward step in developing practical sensors for applications like pathogen detection, early cancer diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  11. Coupling Correction and Beam Dynamics at Ultralow Vertical Emittance in the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, Christoph; Robin, D.; Wolski, A.; Portmann, G.; Safranek, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    For synchrotron light sources and for damping rings of linear colliders it is important to be able to minimize the vertical emittance and to correct the spurious vertical dispersion. This allows one to maximize the brightness and/or the luminosity. A commonly used tool to measure the skew error distribution is the analysis of orbit response matrices using codes like LOCO. Using the new Matlab version of LOCO and 18 newly installed power supplies for individual skew quadrupoles at the ALS the emittance ratio could be reduced below 0.1% at 1.9 GeV yielding a vertical emittance of about 5 pm. At those very low emittances, additional effects like intra beam scattering become more important, potentially limiting the minimum emittance for machine like the damping rings of linear colliders.

  12. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  13. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  14. Pressure Relations and Vertical Equilibrium in the Turbulent, Multiphase ISM

    E-print Network

    H. Koyama; E. C. Ostriker

    2008-12-10

    We use numerical simulations of turbulent, multiphase, self-gravitating gas orbiting in model disk galaxies to study the relationships among pressure, the vertical gas distribution, and the ratio of dense to diffuse gas. We show that the disk height and mean midplane pressure are consistent with effective hydrostatic equilibrium, provided that the turbulent vertical velocity dispersion and gas self-gravity are included. Mass-weighted pressures are an order of magnitude higher than the midplane pressure because self-gravity concentrates gas and increases the pressure in clouds. We also investigate the ratio Rmol=M(H2)/M(HI) for our simulations. Blitz and Rosolowsky (2006) showed that Rmol is proportional to the estimated midplane pressure. For model series in which the epicyclic frequency, kappa, and gas surface density, Sigma, are proportional, we recover the empirical relation. For other model series in which kappa and Sigma are independent, the midplane pressure and Rmol are not well correlated. We conclude that the molecular fraction -- and star formation rate -- of a galactic disk inherently depends on its rotational state, not just the local values of Sigma and the stellar density rho*. The empirical correlation between Rmol and midplane pressure implies that the "environmental parameters" kappa, Sigma, and rho* are interdependent in real galaxies, presumably as a consequence of evolution toward states with Toomre Q near unity. We note that Rmol in static models far exceeds both the values in our turbulent simulations and observed values, implying that turbulence is crucial to obtaining a realistic molecular fraction in the ISM.

  15. Binocular contributions to linear vertical vection.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert S; Ash, April; Palmisano, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Compelling illusions of self-motion, known as vection, can be produced in a stationary observer by visual stimulation alone. The role of binocular vision and stereopsis in these illusions was explored in a series of three experiments. Previous research had provided evidence of stereoscopic enhancements for linear vection in depth (e.g., Palmisano, 1996, 2002). Here we examined for the first time the effects of binocular vision and stereopsis on linear vertical vection. Vertical vection was induced by the upward or downward translation of large stereoscopic surfaces. These surfaces were horizontally oriented depth corrugations produced by disparity modulation of patterns of persistent or short lifetime dot elements. We found that binocular viewing of such surfaces significantly increased the magnitudes and decreased the onset delays of vertical vection. Experiments utilizing short lifetime dot stereograms demonstrated that these particular binocular enhancements of vection were due to the motion of stereoscopically defined features. PMID:25761282

  16. Purification process for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Delziet, Lance; Matthews, Kristopher; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Individual, free-standing, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes or nanofibers are ideal for sensor and electrode applications. Our plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques for producing free-standing and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers use catalyst particles at the tip of the fiber. Here we present a simple purification process for the removal of iron catalyst particles at the tip of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers derived by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The first step involves thermal oxidation in air, at temperatures of 200-400 degrees C, resulting in the physical swelling of the iron particles from the formation of iron oxide. Subsequently, the complete removal of the iron oxide particles is achieved with diluted acid (12% HCl). The purification process appears to be very efficient at removing all of the iron catalyst particles. Electron microscopy images and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the purification process does not damage the graphitic structure of the nanotubes.

  17. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  18. Vertical vibration analysis for elevator compensating sheave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Seiji; Okawa, Takeya; Nakazawa, Daisuke; Fukui, Daiki

    2013-07-01

    Most elevators applied to tall buildings include compensating ropes to satisfy the balanced rope tension between the car and the counter weight. The compensating ropes receive tension by the compensating sheave, which is installed at the bottom space of the elevator shaft. The compensating sheave is only suspended by the compensating ropes, therefore, the sheave can move vertically while the car is traveling. This paper shows the elevator dynamic model to evaluate the vertical motion of the compensating sheave. Especially, behavior in emergency cases, such as brake activation and buffer strike, was investigated to evaluate the maximum upward motion of the sheave. The simulation results were validated by experiments and the most influenced factor for the sheave vertical motion was clarified.

  19. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  20. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  1. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  2. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  3. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  4. Turbulence in vertical axis wind turbine canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Matthias; Araya, Daniel B.; Dabiri, John O.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results from three different full scale arrays of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) under natural wind conditions are presented. The wind velocities throughout the turbine arrays are measured using a portable meteorological tower with seven, vertically staggered, three-component ultrasonic anemometers. The power output of each turbine is recorded simultaneously. The comparison between the horizontal and vertical energy transport for the different turbine array sizes shows the importance of vertical transport for large array configurations. Quadrant-hole analysis is employed to gain a better understanding of the vertical energy transport at the top of the VAWT arrays. The results show a striking similarity between the flows in the VAWT arrays and the adjustment region of canopies. Namely, an increase in ejections and sweeps and decrease in inward and outward interactions occur inside the turbine array. Ejections are the strongest contributor, which is in agreement with the literature on evolving and sparse canopy flows. The influence of the turbine array size on the power output of the downstream turbines is examined by comparing a streamwise row of four single turbines with square arrays of nine turbine pairs. The results suggest that a new boundary layer forms on top of the larger turbine arrays as the flow adjusts to the new roughness length. This increases the turbulent energy transport over the whole planform area of the turbine array. By contrast, for the four single turbines, the vertical energy transport due to turbulent fluctuations is only increased in the near wake of the turbines. These findings add to the knowledge of energy transport in turbine arrays and therefore the optimization of the turbine spacing in wind farms.

  5. Top-down vertical itemset mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mohammad Karim; Ghods, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Vertical itemset mining is an important frequent pattern mining problem with broad applications. It is challenging since one may need to examine a combinatorial explosive number of possible patterns of items of a dataset in a traditional horizontal algorithm. Since high dimensional datasets typically contain a large number of columns and a small number of rows, vertical itemset mining algorithms, which extract the frequent itemsets of dataset by producing all combination of rows ids, are a good alternative for horizontal algorithms in mining frequent itemsets from high dimensional dataset. Since a rowset can be simply produced from its subsets by adding a new row id to a sub rowset, many bottom up vertical itemset mining algorithms are designed and represented in the literature. However, bottom up vertical mining algorithms suffer from a main drawback. Bottom-up algorithms start the process of generating and testing of rowsets from the small rowsets and go on to the larger rowsets, whereas the small rowsets cannot produce a frequent itemsets because they contain less than minimum support threshold number of rows. In this paper, we described a new efficient vertical top down algorithm called VTD (Vertical Top Down) to conduct mining of frequent itemsets in high dimensional datasets. Our top down approach employed the minimum support threshold to prune the rowsets which any itemset could not be extracted from them. Several experiments on real bioinformatics datasets showed that VTD is orders of magnitude better than previous closed pattern mining algorithms. Our performance study showed that this algorithm outperformed substantially the best former algorithms.

  6. European Vertical Reference System Influence in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celms, A.; Re?e, I.; Ratkevi?s, A.

    2015-11-01

    Till 1 December, 2014, in Latvia the heights were determined in Baltic Normal Height System 1977. The national height system is determined by the Cabinet of Ministers and internal laws. Now for the change of the national height system to reconcile it with the European Vertical Reference System, amendments to the laws and regulations have been developed, but so far only the amendment to the Geospatial Information Law is in force, the amendment to the regulation of the Cabinet of Ministers is still not approved. This amendment declares the Latvia Height System based on the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia as the national height system. For height transformation, there is a transformation formula for each European country. After calculations it is seen that height difference between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and European Vertical Reference System depends on point location in the territory (coordinates). This unequal height difference between both height systems will cause unequal height values on border connection points between Baltic countries. The aim of the research is to evaluate the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia. To reach the aim the following tasks are set: 1) to evaluate the components of transformation formulas; 2) using the transformation formulas to calculate height differences between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the European Vertical Reference System realization EVRF2007 for the territory of Latvia and also between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the Latvia Normal Height System; 3) to get height differences in the European Vertical Reference System on the borderlines of Latvia - Estonia and Latvia - Lithuania.

  7. Vertical Trabeculae are Thinned More Than Horizontal Trabeculae in Skeletal-Unloaded Rats.

    PubMed

    Vegger, Jens Bay; Brüel, Annemarie; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal unloading results in a rapid thinning of the trabecular bone network, but it is unknown whether vertical and horizontal trabeculae are equally affected. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether horizontal and vertical trabeculae were thinned similarly during skeletal unloading in rats. Fifty-seven 16-week-old female Wistar rats were randomized into six groups: baseline; control 4 weeks; botulinum toxin A (BTX) 4 weeks; control 8 weeks; BTX 8 weeks; and two BTX injections 8 weeks (BTX + BTX8). The BTX animals were injected in the right hind limb with 4 IU BTX at the start of the study, while the BTX + BTX8 were also injected with 2 IU BTX after 4 weeks. The animals were killed after 0, 4, or 8 weeks. The distal femoral metaphyses were ?CT scanned, and the strengths of the femoral necks, mid-diaphyses, and distal femoral metaphyses were ascertained. Disuse resulted in a significant loss of BV/TV, thinning of the trabeculae, and decrease in the degree of anisotropy, and in a significant reduced bone strength after both 4 and 8 weeks. The ratio of horizontal to vertical trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.horz/Tb.Th.vert) and the ratio of horizontal to vertical bone volume (BV.horz/BV.vert) were significantly higher in BTX animals than in control animals. In addition, the horizontal and vertical trabecular thickness probability density functions were more similar in BTX animals than in control animals. In conclusion, skeletal unloading decreased BV/TV, Tb.Th, the degree of anisotropy, and mechanical strength, while BV.horz/BV.vert and Tb.Th.horz/Tb.Th.vert were increased. This indicates that the more loaded vertical trabeculae are pronouncedly more thinned than the less loaded supporting horizontal trabeculae during unloading. PMID:26163234

  8. Distribution and vertical dynamics of planktonic communities at Sofala Bank, Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, M. C.; Sá, C.; Nordez, S.; Brotas, V.; Paula, J.

    2009-10-01

    Coastal ecosystem processes are largely influenced by the interaction of different factors operating at various temporal and spatial scales, specifically those responsible for primary production patterns that modulate zooplankton and subsequent trophic levels. Hydrological processes, such as tidal cycles and coastal currents, nutrients availability, phytoplankton groups (studied through algal pigment signatures analysed by HPLC), and zooplankton abundance and distribution were investigated at the Sofala Bank (Mozambique), with special emphasis on their horizontal distribution and vertical dynamics (48 h). Horizontal distribution has shown inshore-offshore gradients in all analysed parameters, as well as inshore waters intrusion probably related to Zambezi River delta runoff. Tidal currents were responsible for major hydrological vertical variations and for horizontal and vertical advection of phytoplankton biomass in the surface and deepest layers, respectively. Nutrient concentrations were typical from oligotrophic regions, and nutrient ratios were strongly influenced by depleted nitrate + nitrite concentrations, indicating low estuarine discharges typical from the dry season. The very low N:P ratio obtained suggests strong nitrogen limitation to phytoplankton communities, supporting the low phytoplankton abundance observed. Both phytoplankton pigments and zooplankton were found mainly near the bottom (40 m depth), despite the latter displayed vertical migrations triggered by light variations. Phytoplankton community was dominated by microflagellates, specifically prymnesiophyceans, and behaved as a whole, except Cyanobacteria that displayed vertical distribution movements different from other phytoplankton groups, being mainly concentrated at mid-water column depths (10-20 m). This investigation enhances physico-chemical phenomena and their importance determining the planktonic communities vertical dynamics at Sofala Bank, a tropical coastal ecosystem of the Western Indian Ocean where planktonic dynamics are still poorly described and understood.

  9. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  10. Photochemistry and vertical mixing. [in Uranus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Sandel, B. R.; Romani, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    Earth-based observations relevant to the question of photochemistry and vertical mixing are discussed. Phytolysis of methane, the only known photochemically active volatile in the Uranian atmosphere, produces heavier hydrocarbons, the most abundant of which are ethane, acetylene, and the polyacetylenes. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, these hydrocarbon products condense at the low temperatures prevalent in the middle atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Voyager notion that the atmosphere of Uranus is remarkable clear, it is found that the aerosols are widely and extensively distributed. Despite its photodestruction, methane remains stable in the Uranian atmosphere. The vertical mixing on Uranus is found to be the least efficient of any of the planetary atmospheres.

  11. CIRSS vertical data integration, San Bernardino study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, W.; Christenson, J.; Michel, R. (principal investigators)

    1982-01-01

    The creation and use of a vertically integrated data base, including LANDSAT data, for local planning purposes in a portion of San Bernardino County, California are described. The project illustrates that a vertically integrated approach can benefit local users, can be used to identify and rectify discrepancies in various data sources, and that the LANDSAT component can be effectively used to identify change, perform initial capability/suitability modeling, update existing data, and refine existing data in a geographic information system. Local analyses were developed which produced data of value to planners in the San Bernardino County Planning Department and the San Bernardino National Forest staff.

  12. Concepts for generating optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms for generating optimum vertical profiles are derived and examined. These algorithms form the basis for the design of onboard flight management concepts. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff weight, and range-to-destination are presented. Further considerations for mechanizing two different onboard methods of computing near-optimum flight profiles are then outlined. Finally, the results are summarized, and recommendations are made for further work. Technical details of optimum trajectory design, steering requirements for following these trajectories, and off-line computer programs for testing the concepts are included.

  13. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  14. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  15. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  16. Continually variable transmission having fixed ratio and variable ratio mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Moan, R.D

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a transmission for producing a stepless, continually variable range of ratios of the speed of its output to its input comprising: a fluid coupling having an impeller adapted for connection to a power source and a turbine hydrodynamically connected to the impeller; as planetary gearset having a ring gear, a sun gear, a first set of planet pinions meshing with the sun gear, a second set of planet pinions meshing with the first set of pinions and with the ring gear, and a pinion carrier on which the first and second sets of pinions are rotatably supported; first drive means drivable connecting the turbine and the sun gear for producing a variable speed ratio therebetween having a range between an underdrive ratio and an overdrive ratio; second drive means drivably connecting the impeller and the ring gear for producing a fixed speed ratio therebetween; a first clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the ring gear and the second drive means; and a second clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the first drive means and the pinion carrier.

  17. Stability and control characteristics of an airplane model having a 45.1 degree swept-back wing with aspect ratio 2.50 and taper ratio 0.42 and a 42.8 degree swept-back horizontal tail with aspect ratio 3.87 and taper ratio 0.49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuldenfrei, Marvin; Comisarow, Paul; Goodson, Kenneth W

    1947-01-01

    Tests were made of an airplane model having a 45.1 degree swept-back wing with aspect ratio 2.50 and taper ratio 0.42 and a 42.8 degree swept-back horizontal tail with aspect ratio 3.87 and taper ratio 0.49 to determine its low-speed stability and control characteristics. The test Reynolds number was 2.87 x 10(6) based on a mean aerodynamic chord of 2.47 feet except for some of the aileron tests which were made at a Reynolds number of 2.05 x 10(6). With the horizontal tail located near the fuselage juncture on the vertical tail, model results indicated static longitudinal instability above a lift coefficient that was 0.15 below the lift coefficient at which stall occurred. Static longitudinal stability, however, was manifested throughout the life range with the horizontal tail located near the top of the vertical tail. The use of 10 degrees negative dihedral on the wing had little effect on the static longitudinal stability characteristics. Preliminary tests of the complete model revealed an undesirable flat spot in the yawing-moment curves at low angles of attack, the directional stability being neutral for yaw angles of plus-or-minus 2 degrees. This undesirable characteristic was improved by replacing the thick original vertical tail with a thin vertical tail and by flattening the top of the dorsal fairing.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AMMONIA FLUXES OVER SOYBEAN USING MODIFIED BOWEN-RATIO TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of bi-directional ammonia exchange over a fertilized soybean canopy are presented for an 8-week period during the summer of 2002. The modified Bowne-ratio approach was used to determine fluxes from vertical NH3 and temperature gradients in combination with eddy covar...

  19. Analysis of vertical precipitation characteristics using by Vertical Pointing Radar and Optical Disdrometer in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    cha, J.; Chang, K.; Choi, Y.; Yum, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the vertical precipitation structure by using the vertical pointing radar (MRR, Micro Rain Radar, OTT Inc.) and optical disdrometer (PARSIVEL, PARticle SIze and VELocity, METEK Inc.) set, established in the coastal and mountainous regions of South Korea. The observational factors measured by both instruments are precipitation drop size distribution (DSD), rain rate, and liquid water content. The MRR's DSD at its low level shows good agreement with that of PARSIVEL. We retrieve the vertical rain rate and liquid water content from MRR under melting layer, calculated by Cha et al's method, in Daegwallyeong (37°41' N,128°45' E, 843 m ASL, mountain area) and Haenam (34°33' N,126°34' E, 4.6 m ASL, coast area). The vertical variations of rain rate and liquid water content in Daegwallyeong are smaller than those in Haenam. We think that this different vertical rain rate characteristic for both sites is due to the vertical different cloud type (convective and stratiform cloud seem dominant at Haenam and Daegwallyeong, respectively). This suggests that the statistical precipitation DSD model, for the application of weather radar and numerical simulation of precipitation processes, be considered differently for the region. More detailed analysis of vertical DSD and microphysical structure of precipitation measured by MRR will be presented at the conference.

  20. Higher Education Vertical Infrastructure Maintenance Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, Theodore J.

    To assist higher education facility officers in documenting their financial needs for renewing and renovating existing physical facilities, this study examined the accuracy against observed conditions of the tools used to identify vertical infrastructure maintenance needs in a large public university. Data developed for U.S. Army facilities is…

  1. A Vertical Approach to Math Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojak, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of mathematics standards, whether they are Common Core State Standards or other state standards, effective vertical mathematics teams offer an opportunity for teachers to grow professionally through shared experiences, for leadership to grow among the faculty, and for the school to change its perspective on the teaching and…

  2. Viewing Vertical Objects with an Overhead Projector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of an overhead projector for the deflection of a vertical image to a screen. Describes three demonstrations: magnetizing of a steel ball bearing and paper clip; convection currents of a hot liquid within a cold liquid; and oscillation of concentrated salt solution into fresh water. (YP)

  3. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  4. Hinged-Blade, Vertical-Shaft Windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultz, B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Vertical-shaft windmill concept calls for hinged, flapping blades to increase energy-conversion efficiency by reducing wind-energy loss. Hinged Blade Halves unfold to catch wind when moving with it, then fold away from wind when moving against it.

  5. Food Supply Chains with Vertical Integration

    E-print Network

    Nagurney, Anna

    Food Supply Chains with Vertical Integration SOM 822 Research Paper Diogo Souza-Monteiro Dep. of Resource Economics 05/10/2004 #12;Introduction Food Supply chains are becoming increasingly complex in different tiers of food chains. Barkena and Drabenstott (1995) claim that contracts are quickly taking

  6. Polysilicon Vertical Actuator Powered with Waste Heat

    E-print Network

    Hamoui, Anas

    Polysilicon Vertical Actuator Powered with Waste Heat J. Varona1 , M. Tecpoyotl-Torres1 , and A. A and electronic circuitry together on the same substrate that can be manufactured in high volumes and low cost due, for example in the automotive industry and in every application using electronic circuitry that dissipates

  7. Electrostatic comb drive for vertical actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1997-07-10

    The electrostatic comb finger drive has become an integral design for microsensor and microactuator applications. This paper reports on utilizing the levitation effect of comb fingers to design vertical-to-the-substrate actuation for interferometric applications. For typical polysilicon comb drives with 2 {micro}m gaps between the stationary and moving fingers, as well as between the microstructures and the substrate, the equilibrium position is nominally 1-2 {micro}m above the stationary comb fingers. This distance is ideal for many phase shifting interferometric applications. Theoretical calculations of the vertical actuation characteristics are compared with the experimental results, and a general design guideline is derived from these results. The suspension flexure stiffnesses, gravity forces, squeeze film damping, and comb finger thicknesses are parameters investigated which affect the displacement curve of the vertical microactuator. By designing a parallel plate capacitor between the suspended mass and the substrate, in situ position sensing can be used to control the vertical movement, providing a total feedback-controlled system. Fundamentals of various capacitive position sensing techniques are discussed. Experimental verification is carried out by a Zygo distance measurement interferometer.

  8. Vertical root fractures and their management

    PubMed Central

    Khasnis, Sandhya Anand; Kidiyoor, Krishnamurthy Haridas; Patil, Anand Basavaraj; Kenganal, Smita Basavaraj

    2014-01-01

    Vertical root fractures associated with endodontically treated teeth and less commonly in vital teeth represent one of the most difficult clinical problems to diagnose and treat. In as much as there are no specific symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical detection of this condition by endodontists is becoming more frequent, where as it is rather underestimated by the general practitioners. Since, vertical root fractures almost exclusively involve endodontically treated teeth; it often becomes difficult to differentiate a tooth with this condition from an endodontically failed one or one with concomitant periodontal involvement. Also, a tooth diagnosed for vertical root fracture is usually extracted, though attempts to reunite fractured root have been done in various studies with varying success rates. Early detection of a fractured root and extraction of the tooth maintain the integrity of alveolar bone for placement of an implant. Cone beam computed tomography has been shown to be very accurate in this regard. This article focuses on the diagnostic and treatment strategies, and discusses about predisposing factors which can be useful in the prevention of vertical root fractures. PMID:24778502

  9. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  10. Vertical nanopillars for highly localized fluorescence imaging

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yi

    of observation volume is required. Here, we demonstrate the use of vertically aligned silicon dioxide nanopillars much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, a transparent silicon dioxide nanopillar embedded-diffraction nano-bio interface The rapidly evolving field of nanotechnology creates new frontiers for biological

  11. Optic Disc and Optic Cup Segmentation Methodologies for Glaucoma Image Detection: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Almazroa, Ahmed; Burman, Ritambhar; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of loss of vision in the world. Examining the head of optic nerve (cup-to-disc ratio) is very important for diagnosing glaucoma and for patient monitoring after diagnosis. Images of optic disc and optic cup are acquired by fundus camera as well as Optical Coherence Tomography. The optic disc and optic cup segmentation techniques are used to isolate the relevant parts of the retinal image and to calculate the cup-to-disc ratio. The main objective of this paper is to review segmentation methodologies and techniques for the disc and cup boundaries which are utilized to calculate the disc and cup geometrical parameters automatically and accurately to help the professionals in the glaucoma to have a wide view and more details about the optic nerve head structure using retinal fundus images. We provide a brief description of each technique, highlighting its classification and performance metrics. The current and future research directions are summarized and discussed. PMID:26688751

  12. Optic disc boundary segmentation from diffeomorphic demons registration of monocular fundus image sequences versus 3D visualization of stereo fundus image pairs for automated early stage glaucoma assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Vijay; Hill, Jason; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current availability in resource-rich regions of advanced technologies in scanning and 3-D imaging in current ophthalmology practice, world-wide screening tests for early detection and progression of glaucoma still consist of a variety of simple tools, including fundus image-based parameters such as CDR (cup to disc diameter ratio) and CAR (cup to disc area ratio), especially in resource -poor regions. Reliable automated computation of the relevant parameters from fundus image sequences requires robust non-rigid registration and segmentation techniques. Recent research work demonstrated that proper non-rigid registration of multi-view monocular fundus image sequences could result in acceptable segmentation of cup boundaries for automated computation of CAR and CDR. This research work introduces a composite diffeomorphic demons registration algorithm for segmentation of cup boundaries from a sequence of monocular images and compares the resulting CAR and CDR values with those computed manually by experts and from 3-D visualization of stereo pairs. Our preliminary results show that the automated computation of CDR and CAR from composite diffeomorphic segmentation of monocular image sequences yield values comparable with those from the other two techniques and thus may provide global healthcare with a cost-effective yet accurate tool for management of glaucoma in its early stage.

  13. The optic disc is minimal in children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shuan; Trimboli, Carmelina; Buncic, J Raymond

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to characterize the optic disc morphology, particularly the cup-to-disc ratio of the optic nerve head in children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The medical charts and digital optic disc photos of children with confirmed diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed retrospectively. The optic disc area, cup area, and cup-to-disc ratio were measured digitally using VISUPAC software, and the mean values of those parameters were compared to the published norms. Of children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, 83% had absence of the physiological cup of the optic disc, compared to 10% of children in the general population of the same age. The median disc area was 2.2 mm(2), and median cup area was 0.0mm(2), compared to the published norms of 2.69 mm(2) and 0.44 mm(2), respectively. There is very significantly high prevalence of small optic disc cups in children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, with the cup being absent on majority of cases in our patient cohort. This may signal an underlying systemic predisposition to the development of intracranial hypertension. PMID:23034982

  14. Morphologic assessment for glaucoma in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Altaweel, Michael M.; Peng, Qian; Friedman, David S.; Rao, P. Kumar; Foster, C. Stephen; Kim, Rosa Y.; Reed, Susan B.; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Wong, Ira G.; Kempen, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare Reading Center (RC) cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) assessment from stereoscopic photographs with clinician estimation in a uveitis clinical trial. Methods Clinical estimation of CDR was performed by ophthalmologists via dilated biomicroscopy. Photographic evaluation was performed at an independent RC by masked, certified evaluators. Quality control was performed by repeat grading of 77 randomly selected images. Results Among 481 eyes with uveitis, 353 eyes had clinical and photographic grades for CDR. Agreement between clinical and RC grading was fair, with exact agreement in 29%. Agreement within 0.1 and 0.2 CDR were 70% and 93%, respectively (wkappa=0.34). Inter-grader reproducibility at the RC was better (wkappa=0.59, ICC 0.74). Conclusion Morphologic assessment of cup to disc ratio is an important outcome and safety measure for determining glaucomatous damage in clinical trials. Masked RC measurements are more likely to be accurate than biomicroscopic grading in identifying meaningful anatomical change associated with glaucoma. PMID:21770805

  15. Investigation on effectiveness of a prefabricated vertical drain during cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indraratna, B.; Ni, J.; Rujikiatkamjorn, C.

    2010-06-01

    The effectiveness of prefabricated vertical drains (PVDs) in enhancing the stability of soft soils during cyclic loading was investigated using triaxial cyclic loading tests. Both undrained and with PVD tests were employed to study the associated excess pore pressure and accumulated strain under the repeated loading condition. The loading frequency and cyclic stress ratio have been chosen to be the variables which influence the performance of soft clays. The experimental results illustrate that with PVDs, the excess pore water pressure generation during cyclic loading decreases significantly. It is found that the excess pore water pressure build up depends on both loading frequency and cyclic stress ratio. The excess pore water pressure will increase when each of them is increased. Furthermore, when the loading frequency is 0.1 Hz, the ratio of coefficient of consolidation under cyclic loading to that under static loading is almost one. With the increasing loading frequency, this ratio increases accordingly.

  16. Jamming of Monodisperse Cylindrical Grains in Featureless Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Nicholas; Baxter, G. William

    2014-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains falling through a featureless vertical channel under the influence of gravity. These grains have an aspect-ratio less than two (H/D < 2) and resemble aspirin tablets, 35mm film canisters, poker chips, or coins. Monodisperse grains are allowed to fall under the influence of gravity through a uniform channel of square cross-section where the channel width is greater than the grain size and constant along the length of the channel. No combination of grain heights and diameters is equal to the channel width. Collections of grains sometimes form jams, stable structures in which the grains are supported by the channel walls and not by grains or walls beneath them. The probability of a jam occurring and the jam's strength are influenced by the grain dimensions and channel width. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  17. The vertical-mill stage : design of a vertical movement stage for surface machining

    E-print Network

    Herrera, Juan, Jr

    2007-01-01

    To allow the widespread use of three dimensional patterns on walls, the manufacturing cost must be reduced. The goal of this project is to design a machine for vertical axis movement which can be measured and controlled. ...

  18. Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Vertical Cylinder Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Alan; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Gill, Tracy R.; Tri, Terry O.; Toups, Larry; Howard, Robert I.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Cavanaugh, Stephen; Langford, William M.; Dorsey, John T.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Architecture Team defined an outpost scenario optimized for intensive mobility that uses small, highly mobile pressurized rovers supported by portable habitat modules that can be carried between locations of interest on the lunar surface. A compact vertical cylinder characterizes the habitat concept, where the large diameter maximizes usable flat floor area optimized for a gravity environment and allows for efficient internal layout. The module was sized to fit into payload fairings for the Constellation Ares V launch vehicle, and optimized for surface transport carried by the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) mobility system. Launch and other loads are carried through the barrel to a top and bottom truss that interfaces with a structural support unit (SSU). The SSU contains self-leveling feet and docking interfaces for Tri-ATHLETE grasping and heavy lift. A pressurized module needed to be created that was appropriate for the lunar environment, could be easily relocated to new locations, and could be docked together in multiples for expanding pressurized volume in a lunar outpost. It was determined that horizontally oriented pressure vessels did not optimize floor area, which takes advantage of the gravity vector for full use. Hybrid hard-inflatable habitats added an unproven degree of complexity that may eventually be worked out. Other versions of vertically oriented pressure vessels were either too big, bulky, or did not optimize floor area. The purpose of the HDU vertical habitat module is to provide pressurized units that can be docked together in a modular way for lunar outpost pressurized volume expansion, and allow for other vehicles, rovers, and modules to be attached to the outpost to allow for IVA (intra-vehicular activity) transfer between them. The module is a vertically oriented cylinder with a large radius to allow for maximal floor area and use of volume. The modular, 5- m-diameter HDU vertical habitat module consists of a 2-m-high barrel with 0.6-mhigh end domes forming the 56-cubicmeter pressure vessel, and a 19-squaremeter floor area. The module has up to four docking ports located orthogonally from each other around the perimeter, and up to one docking port each on the top or bottom end domes. In addition, the module has mounting trusses top and bottom for equipment, and to allow docking with the ATHLETE mobility system. Novel or unique features of the HDU vertical habitat module include the nodelike function with multiple pressure hatches for docking with other versions of itself and other modules and vehicles; the capacity to be carried by an ATHLETE mobility system; and the ability to attach inflatable 'attic' domes to the top for additional pressurized volume.

  19. A Ratio Explanation for Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riss, Pam Helfers

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on physical anthropology activities for teaching students about evolution. Using evidence found in hominid skulls, students conduct investigations that involve calculating ratios. Eight full-page photographs of skulls from the program Stones and Bones are included. (PR)

  20. Lunar vertical-shaft mining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Introne, Steven D. (editor); Krause, Roy; Williams, Erik; Baskette, Keith; Martich, Frederick; Weaver, Brad; Meve, Jeff; Alexander, Kyle; Dailey, Ron; White, Matt

    1994-01-01

    This report proposes a method that will allow lunar vertical-shaft mining. Lunar mining allows the exploitation of mineral resources imbedded within the surface. The proposed lunar vertical-shaft mining system is comprised of five subsystems: structure, materials handling, drilling, mining, and planning. The structure provides support for the exploration and mining equipment in the lunar environment. The materials handling subsystem moves mined material outside the structure and mining and drilling equipment inside the structure. The drilling process bores into the surface for the purpose of collecting soil samples, inserting transducer probes, or locating ore deposits. Once the ore deposits are discovered and pinpointed, mining operations bring the ore to the surface. The final subsystem is planning, which involves the construction of the mining structure.

  1. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  2. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

  3. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling. PMID:26544156

  4. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics

    PubMed Central

    Quercia, Patrick; Quercia, Madeleine; Feiss, Léonard J; Allaert, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH) in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females) aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females) aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter) VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor spatial localization of visual and auditory information. This dysfunction might also explain the motor disorders concomitant to dyslexia. PMID:26445526

  5. Present day vertical deformation in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Wallace, Laura; Litchfield, Nicola; D'Anastasio, Elisabetta; Denys, Paul; Pearson, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    New Zealand is tectonically very active. It lies along the oblique convergent plate boundary between the Pacific and Australian plate. In the North Island active tectonics is dominated by westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the eastern North Island at the Hikurangi Trench, strike-slip faulting in the upper plate, and back-arc rifting in the central North Island. A series of very large strike-slip faults run through the South Island (Marlborough Fault System and the Alpine Fault) connecting with the Puysegur subduction zone in the south. The present day uplift rates are evaluated by analyzing data from continuous GPS stations in New Zealand. The up to 20 years of continuous GPS gives us a snapshot into the deformation rate. The average velocity is corrected for significant coseismic offsets, but the data can also be influenced by postseismic deformation, slow slip events along the Hikurangi subduction zone, volcanic deformation, as well as none tectonic local affects such as water extraction. We evaluate the interseismic vertical rate. We exclude data significantly affected by postseismic deformation from recent earthquakes and provide vertical rates both with and without correcting for slow slip events. Outside the Taupo rift zone the vertical rates are range from -6 to +6 mm/yr with uplift observed across the Alpine fault, few mm/yr uplift around the Raukumara Peninsula, northeast North Island, and subsidence along the southeast North Island, reflecting variation in plate locking. We compare the present day vertical deformation to the long-term motion along the coast determined primarily from 125,000 years old marine geological markers. The largest proportion of the New Zealand coastline (45%) is undergoing long-term tectonic uplift. Small stretches of the coastline (15%) are undergoing long-term subsidence. Areas farthest from the plate boundary (northern North Island and southeastern South Island) are assessed to be tectonically stable, in agreement with the continuous GPS data.

  6. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Quercia, Patrick; Quercia, Madeleine; Feiss, Léonard J; Allaert, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH) in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females) aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females) aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter) VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor spatial localization of visual and auditory information. This dysfunction might also explain the motor disorders concomitant to dyslexia. PMID:26445526

  7. Vertical Carbon Nanotube Device in Nanoporous Templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maschmann, Matthew Ralph (Inventor); Fisher, Timothy Scott (Inventor); Sands, Timothy (Inventor); Bashir, Rashid (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A modified porous anodic alumina template (PAA) containing a thin CNT catalyst layer directly embedded into the pore walls. CNT synthesis using the template selectively catalyzes SWNTs and DWNTs from the embedded catalyst layer to the top PAA surface, creating a vertical CNT channel within the pores. Subsequent processing allows for easy contact metallization and adaptable functionalization of the CNTs and template for a myriad of applications.

  8. The Effective Vertical Advection-Diffusion Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M.; Tailleux, R.; Ferreira, D.; Kuhlbrodt, T.; Gregory, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The capacity of the world ocean to transfer heat to deeper levels is a crucial factor in setting the magnitude and temporal evolution of the global temperature response under transient climate change. A traditional framework to discuss the vertical ocean heat balance is the classic upwelling-diffusive model of Munk [1966] between upwelling of cold abyssal waters and downward diffusion of warm waters. This simple framework is also often used to interpret (and predict) transient heat uptake under climate change. However, this is done in an ad-hoc manner, with little acknowledgment of the complex physics hidden behind the vertical velocity w and diffusivity k? of the classic model (advection of heat by the mean and eddy circulation, diffusion along and across surfaces of constant density, deep convection). Here, we derive an effective vertical velocity and an effective diffusivity for each advective and diffusive process from the steady-state temperature tendencies of two models, an eddy-parameterizing (HadCM3) and an eddy-permitting climate model (HiGEM). For both models, we find that both the effective vertical velocity and diffusivity change sign in mid-depth, highlighting the two physical regimes in which the residual advection is balanced by diapycnal diffusion (deep ocean) and isopycnal diffusion (upper to mid-depths). These findings are at odds with common practices which assume that w and k? are positive constants (in space and time), but is consistent with previous studies of the modeled heat balance. We further present the time-evolution of the effective quantities under an idealized transient climate change simulation. We demonstrate that these spatial and time variations are key to evaluate the transient heat uptake. Implications for the use of simple upwelling-diffusive models to interpret transient heat uptake will be discussed.

  9. Spirit 360-Degree View, Sol 388 (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on Spirit's 388th martian day, or sol (Feb. 4, 2005). Spirit had driven about 13 meters (43 feet) uphill toward 'Cumberland Ridge' on this sol. This location is catalogued as Spirit's Site 102, Position 513. The view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

  10. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    E-print Network

    Taksu Cheon; Pavel Exner; Ondrej Turek

    2011-04-06

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale invariant (or F\\"ul\\H{o}p-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  11. Centro-lateral subperiosteal vertical midface lift

    PubMed Central

    Hönig, Johannes Franz; Knutti, Daniel; Hasse, Frank Michael

    2014-01-01

    The use of fiberendoscopic video-assisted technique in facial rejuvenation is one of the most advances in aesthetic plastic surgery of the face. It substitutes the coronal incision without the necessity of skin resection and allows a vertical reposition of the mobile soft tissue of the midface in indicated cases. It can easily be done through a small incision of the scalp just behind the coronal incision and in the temporal area. PMID:26504715

  12. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  13. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  14. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej; Exner, Pavel

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of the Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale-invariant (or Fueloep-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  15. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ? (10?4–10?2)(r/ AU)?2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ?1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10?8 M? yr?1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  16. Vertical flight path steering system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a vertical flight path angle steering system for aircraft, utilizing a digital flight control computer which processes pilot control inputs and aircraft response parameters into suitable elevator commands and control information for display to the pilot on a cathode ray tube. The system yields desirable airplane control handling qualities and responses as well as improvements in pilot workload and safety during airplane operation in the terminal area and under windshear conditions.

  17. Vertical leaf pressure filter LVAzh 225

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V.I.; Abramov, V.P.; Gutin, Y.V.

    1984-01-01

    A new vertical lead pressure filter LVAzh 225 has been developed with an arrangement for hydraulic coke removal. Industrial trials of the filter, however, showed the service life of the rubber seals of the butterfly valves to be short, so that butterfly valves were replaced by shut-off valves with a pneumatic drive. The prototype of the LVAzh 225 leaf filter has been recommended for series production.

  18. Orthogonal Thin Film Photovoltaics on Vertical Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ahnood, Arman; Zhou, H; Suzuki, Y; Sliz, R; Fabritius, T; Nathan, Arokia; Amaratunga, G A J

    2015-12-01

    Decoupling paths of carrier collection and illumination within photovoltaic devices is one promising approach for improving their efficiency by simultaneously increasing light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Orthogonal photovoltaic devices are core-shell type structures consisting of thin film photovoltaic stack on vertical nanopillar scaffolds. These types of devices allow charge collection to take place in the radial direction, perpendicular to the path of light in the vertical direction. This approach addresses the inherently high recombination rate of disordered thin films, by allowing semiconductor films with minimal thicknesses to be used in photovoltaic devices, without performance degradation associated with incomplete light absorption. This work considers effects which influence the performance of orthogonal photovoltaic devices. Illumination non-uniformity as light travels across the depth of the pillars, electric field enhancement due to the nanoscale size and shape of the pillars, and series resistance due to the additional surface structure created through the use of pillars are considered. All of these effects influence the operation of orthogonal solar cells and should be considered in the design of vertically nanostructured orthogonal photovoltaics. PMID:26676997

  19. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    E-print Network

    Russo, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, is wound up by the disk shear, and is pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and Ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field $B_r \\sim (10^{-4}$-$10^{-2})(r/{\\rm AU})^{-2}$ G. Careful attention is giv...

  20. Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion.

    PubMed

    Nesti, Alessandro; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Macneilage, Paul R; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-01-01

    Perceiving vertical self-motion is crucial for maintaining balance as well as for controlling an aircraft. Whereas heave absolute thresholds have been exhaustively studied, little work has been done in investigating how vertical sensitivity depends on motion intensity (i.e., differential thresholds). Here we measure human sensitivity for 1-Hz sinusoidal accelerations for 10 participants in darkness. Absolute and differential thresholds are measured for upward and downward translations independently at 5 different peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2 m/s(2). Overall vertical differential thresholds are higher than horizontal differential thresholds found in the literature. Psychometric functions are fit in linear and logarithmic space, with goodness of fit being similar in both cases. Differential thresholds are higher for upward as compared to downward motion and increase with stimulus intensity following a trend best described by two power laws. The power laws' exponents of 0.60 and 0.42 for upward and downward motion, respectively, deviate from Weber's Law in that thresholds increase less than expected at high stimulus intensity. We speculate that increased sensitivity at high accelerations and greater sensitivity to downward than upward self-motion may reflect adaptations to avoid falling. PMID:24158607

  1. ostglacial rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald .

    1996-01-01

    I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan, 1995] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier, 1995].

  2. Performance of a well with lateral and vertical wellbores 

    E-print Network

    Abdat, Toriq

    2002-01-01

    angles only up to 60°. Further increasing the well angle will not make the well performance better than a vertical well. We have modeled and analyzed performance of combination wells. We compared the performance of vertical, slanted, and combination...

  3. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support ?, isentropic ? vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  4. Signal Threshold Adaptation for Vertical Handoff in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    E-print Network

    Liang, Ben

    Signal Threshold Adaptation for Vertical Handoff in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks Ahmed H. Zahran. Keywords: heterogeneous wireless networks, seamless integration, vertical handoff, application signal in heterogeneous wireless system Mobility management is a main challenge in the converged network. It ad- dresses

  5. Functionality Tuning in Vertically Aligned Nanocomposite Thin Films 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Aiping

    2013-04-04

    Vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) oxide thin films are unique nanostructures with two-phase self-assembled, heteroepitaxially grown on single-crystal substrates. Both phases tend to grow vertically and simultaneously ...

  6. Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment

    E-print Network

    Weiss, Samuel Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

  7. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  8. Vertical variations in wood CO2 efflux for live emergent trees in a Bornean tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ayumi; Kume, Tomonori; Komatsu, Hikaru; Ohashi, Mizue; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ichihashi, Ryuji; Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Otsuki, Kyoichi

    2014-05-01

    Difficult access to 40-m-tall emergent trees in tropical rainforests has resulted in a lack of data related to vertical variations in wood CO2 efflux, even though significant variations in wood CO2 efflux are an important source of errors when estimating whole-tree total wood CO2 efflux. This study aimed to clarify vertical variations in wood CO2 efflux for emergent trees and to document the impact of the variations on the whole-tree estimates of stem and branch CO2 efflux. First, we measured wood CO2 efflux and factors related to tree morphology and environment for seven live emergent trees of two dipterocarp species at four to seven heights of up to ? 40 m for each tree using ladders and a crane. No systematic tendencies in vertical variations were observed for all the trees. Wood CO2 efflux was not affected by stem and air temperature, stem diameter, stem height or stem growth. The ratios of wood CO2 efflux at the treetop to that at breast height were larger in emergent trees with relatively smaller diameters at breast height. Second, we compared whole-tree stem CO2 efflux estimates using vertical measurements with those based on solely breast height measurements. We found similar whole-tree stem CO2 efflux estimates regardless of the patterns of vertical variations in CO2 efflux because the surface area in the canopy, where wood CO2 efflux often differed from that at breast height, was very small compared with that at low stem heights, resulting in little effect of the vertical variations on the estimate. Additionally, whole-tree branch CO2 efflux estimates using measured wood CO2 efflux in the canopy were considerably different from those measured using only breast height measurements. Uncertainties in wood CO2 efflux in the canopy did not cause any bias in stem CO2 efflux scaling, but affected branch CO2 efflux. PMID:24876294

  9. Ozone variability in the atmospheric boundary layer in Maryland and its implications for vertical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming; Doughty, David C.; Sanchez, Kevin J.; Joseph, Everette; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2012-01-01

    Although much research has focused on daytime ozone (O 3) distribution in the atmospheric boundary layer, there remain many unresolved processes related to O 3 transport in the residual layer. To address such unresolved questions, a field study was conducted in Beltsville, MD during the summer of 2010 to study the spatial and temporal distribution of O 3 and other pollutants using ground-based gas analyzers and ozonesondes. During elevated pollution events in the daytime, the convective boundary layer, which reached a maximum depth of about 2 km, had nearly uniform O 3 levels of almost 100 parts per billion (ppbv). Due to intermittent and intense vertical turbulent motion, the residual layer became "leaky" and permitted vertical transport to enhance ground-level O 3 mixing ratios by as much as 10-30 ppbv in a span of 0.5-3 h. Model simulations, using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem), were carried out to investigate the impact of different treatments of vertical mixing on the simulation of O 3 in the nocturnal boundary layer and residual layer. WRF/Chem model simulations provided realistic O 3 vertical distribution during the daytime. During the nighttime, in the residual layer, model outputs resulted in higher O 3 levels compared with the in-situ observations. Model sensitivity analyses showed that increasing the turbulent length scales and improved stability functions yielded improvements in the vertical transport of O 3 within the residual layer. One key conclusion of this study is that models such as WRF/Chem require improved numerical algorithms to properly account for the nocturnal vertical transport of O 3 in the residual region of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  10. Optomechanical Raman-ratio thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, T. P.; Yu, P.-L.; Kampel, N. S.; Peterson, R. W.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the asymmetry between Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering can be exploited for self-calibrating, optically based thermometry. In the context of cavity optomechanics, we observe the cavity-enhanced scattering of light interacting with the standing-wave drumhead modes of a Si3N4 membrane mechanical resonator. The ratio of the amplitude of Stokes to anti-Stokes scattered light is used to measure temperatures of optically cooled mechanical modes, down to the level of a few vibrational quanta. We demonstrate that the Raman-ratio technique allows the measurement of the physical temperature of our device over a range extending from cryogenic temperatures to within an order of magnitude of room temperature.

  11. Sex ratios in bumble bees

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    The median proportion of investment in females among 11 populations of seven bumble bee (Bombus) species was 0.32 (range 0.07 to 0.64). By contrast, two species of workerless social parasites in the related genus Psithyrus had female-biased sex allocation, the reasons for which remain unclear. Male-biased sex allocation in Bombus contradicts the predictions of Trivers and Hare's sex ratio model for the social Hymenoptera, which are that the population sex investment ratio should be 0.5 (1:1) under queen control and 0.75 (3:1 females:males) under worker control (assuming single, once-mated, outbred queens and non-reproductive workers). Male bias in Bombus does not appear to be either an artefact, or purely the result of symbiotic sex ratio distorters. According to modifications of the Trivers–Hare model, the level of worker male-production in Bombus is insufficient to account for observed levels of male bias. There is also no evidence that male bias arises from either local resource competition (related females compete for resources) or local mate enhancement (related males cooperate in securing mates). Bulmer presented models predicting sexual selection for protandry (males are produced before females) in annual social Hymenoptera and, as a consequence (given some parameter values), male-biased sex allocation. Bumble bees fit the assumptions of Bulmer's models and are protandrous. These models therefore represent the best current explanation for the bees' male-biased sex investment ratios. This conclusion suggests that the relative timing of the production of the sexes strongly influences sex allocation in the social Hymenoptera.

  12. Relation between geoidal undulation, deflection of the vertical and vertical gravity gradient revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    The vertical gradients of gravity anomaly and gravity disturbance can be related to horizontal first derivatives of deflection of the vertical or second derivatives of geoidal undulations. These are simplified relations of which different variations have found application in satellite altimetry with the implicit assumption that the neglected terms—using remove-restore—are sufficiently small. In this paper, the different simplified relations are rigorously connected and the neglected terms are made explicit. The main neglected terms are a curvilinear term that accounts for the difference between second derivatives in a Cartesian system and on a spherical surface, and a small circle term that stems from the difference between second derivatives on a great and small circle. The neglected terms were compared with the dynamic ocean topography (DOT) and the requirements on the GOCE gravity gradients. In addition, the signal root-mean-square (RMS) of the neglected terms and vertical gravity gradient were compared, and the effect of a remove-restore procedure was studied. These analyses show that both neglected terms have the same order of magnitude as the DOT gradient signal and may be above the GOCE requirements, and should be accounted for when combining altimetry derived and GOCE measured gradients. The signal RMS of both neglected terms is in general small when compared with the signal RMS of the vertical gravity gradient, but they may introduce gradient errors above the spherical approximation error. Remove-restore with gravity field models reduces the errors in the vertical gravity gradient, but it appears that errors above the spherical approximation error cannot be avoided at individual locations. When computing the vertical gradient of gravity anomaly from satellite altimeter data using deflections of the vertical, the small circle term is readily available and can be included. The direct computation of the vertical gradient of gravity disturbance from satellite altimeter data is more difficult than the computation of the vertical gradient of gravity anomaly because in the former case the curvilinear term is needed, which is not readily available.

  13. 47 CFR 73.160 - Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(θ). 73.160 Section 73.160 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.160 Vertical plane radiation characteristics, f(?). (a) The vertical plane...

  14. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon Hyunsung Park & Kenneth B. Crozier

    E-print Network

    of PDMS-embedded vertical silicon nanowires is attached to a monochrome image sensor (Fig. 1a). The unitMultispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires Hyunsung Park & Kenneth B. Crozier School the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Metabolic and Mechanical Energy Costs of Reducing Vertical

    E-print Network

    because of greater mechanical work performed at the hip, knee, and ankle joints. Thus, reducing vertical in joint work associated with increasing and decreasing vertical COM move- ment during gait. Design vertical and lateral COM displace- ments, joint torques, and work. In addition, we collected oxy- gen

  16. Marine vertical cable multiple attenuation beyond up/down separation 

    E-print Network

    Tran, Andre

    2001-01-01

    fixed vertical receiver arrays as for VSP. A small vessel carries only the source and is very flexible. The vertical cable receivers are in a quiet environment, which can explain the data quality. One main concern with vertical cable data is to remove...

  17. Vertical Velocity from LADCP Data A. M. Thurnherr

    E-print Network

    Thurnherr, Andreas

    Vertical Velocity from LADCP Data A. M. Thurnherr Division of Ocean and Climate Physics Lamont--Vertical velocity is important for ocean dynamics on a vast range of scales, from isotropic turbulence to the global, vertical- velocity measurements in the ocean are scarce. In an effort to remedy this situation, a new

  18. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coupler vertical restraint system. 179.14 Section... General Design Requirements § 179.14 Coupler vertical restraint system. (a) Performance standard. Each... be equipped with couplers having this vertical restraint capability. (b) Test verification. Except...

  19. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coupler vertical restraint system. 179.14 Section... General Design Requirements § 179.14 Coupler vertical restraint system. (a) Performance standard. Each... be equipped with couplers having this vertical restraint capability. (b) Test verification. Except...

  20. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coupler vertical restraint system. 179.14 Section... General Design Requirements § 179.14 Coupler vertical restraint system. (a) Performance standard. Each... be equipped with couplers having this vertical restraint capability. (b) Test verification. Except...

  1. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coupler vertical restraint system. 179.14 Section... TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.14 Coupler vertical restraint system. (a) Performance... not be equipped with couplers having this vertical restraint capability. (b) Test verification....

  2. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coupler vertical restraint system. 179.14 Section... General Design Requirements § 179.14 Coupler vertical restraint system. (a) Performance standard. Each... be equipped with couplers having this vertical restraint capability. (b) Test verification. Except...

  3. Diel Vertical Migration Thresholds of Karenia brevis (Dinophyceae).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Light and nutrient availability change throughout dinoflagellate diel vertical migration (DVM) and/or with subpopulation location in the water column along the west Florida shelf. Typically, the vertical depth of the shelf is greater than the distance a subpopulation can vertical...

  4. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668... (5) Excludes from the ratio calculations Federal funds...funds are excluded from the ratio calculations. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under...

  5. Vertical heterostructure of two-dimensional MoS? and WSe? with vertically aligned layers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jung Ho; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Hong, Seung Sae; Kong, Desheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Haotian; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Shuang; Cui, Yi

    2015-02-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials consist of covalently bonded 2D atomic layers stacked by van der Waals interactions. Such anisotropic bonding nature gives rise to the orientation-dependent functionalities of the 2D layered materials. Different from most studies of 2D materials with their atomic layers parallel to substrate, we have recently developed layer vertically aligned 2D material nanofilms. Built on these developments, here, we demonstrate the synthesis of vertical heterostructure of n-type MoS2 and p-type WSe2 with vertically aligned atomic layers. Thin film of MoS2/WSe2 vertical structure was successfully synthesized without significant alloy formation. The heterostructure synthesis is scalable to a large area over 1 cm(2). We demonstrated the pn junction diode behavior of the heterostructure device. This novel device geometry opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of electronic and optoelectronic devices, complementary to the recent interesting vertical heterostructures with horizontal atomic layers. PMID:25590995

  6. Charge-to-mass Ratio of Saltating Particles in Wind-Blown Sand

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Xiao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The electrification of sand particles plays an important role in aeolian events. In this paper, the charge-to-mass ratio vertical profiles of saltating particles in wind-blown sand were measured by a field experiments. By combining the results of field measurements with our previous wind-tunnel measurements, we discussed the factors affecting the charge-to-mass ratio of saltating particles. It reveals that the magnitude of the charge-to-mass ratio increases exponentially with height above the surface. In addition, the charge polarity of saltating particles depends on the relative size between saltating and creeping particles, and the magnitude of charge-to-mass ratio is determined by wind velocity and the relative size difference ratio between saltating and creeping particles. PMID:24998641

  7. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsiz

  8. A novel flexure-based vertical nanopositioning stage with large travel range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Wen, Zhijie; Ren, Jiaqi; Liu, Pinkuan

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the design of a novel flexure-based vertical (or Z-axis) nanopositioning stage driven by a piezoelectric actuator (PZT), which is capable of executing large travel range. The proposed stage consists mainly of a hybrid displacement amplification mechanism (DAM), a motion guiding mechanism, and a decoupling mechanism. The hybrid DAM with amplification ratio of 12.1 is developed to transfer the transverse motion of the PZT actuator into the vertical motion. The motion guiding mechanism is introduced to avoid cross coupling at the output end. The decoupling mechanism can significantly reduce the cross coupling at the driving end to protect the PZT. The stiffness and dynamics of the proposed stage are improved by these mechanisms. Analytical modeling and finite element analysis (FEA) are then adopted to optimize dimensions of the stage. Finally, a prototype of the stage is fabricated and tested for verification. The results of static and dynamic tests show that the proposed stage is capable of vertical travel range of 214 ?m with resolution of 8 nm, and the first two resonance frequencies are 205 Hz and 1206 Hz, respectively. Cross coupling tests under various lateral loads (0 g-1000 g) show that the maximum variances of the lateral and angular cross couplings are less than 0.78 ?m and 95 ?rad, respectively, indicating good decoupling capability. In addition, the low-profile structure of the stage is well suited to be used in limited vertical space.

  9. A novel flexure-based vertical nanopositioning stage with large travel range.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Wen, Zhijie; Ren, Jiaqi; Liu, Pinkuan

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the design of a novel flexure-based vertical (or Z-axis) nanopositioning stage driven by a piezoelectric actuator (PZT), which is capable of executing large travel range. The proposed stage consists mainly of a hybrid displacement amplification mechanism (DAM), a motion guiding mechanism, and a decoupling mechanism. The hybrid DAM with amplification ratio of 12.1 is developed to transfer the transverse motion of the PZT actuator into the vertical motion. The motion guiding mechanism is introduced to avoid cross coupling at the output end. The decoupling mechanism can significantly reduce the cross coupling at the driving end to protect the PZT. The stiffness and dynamics of the proposed stage are improved by these mechanisms. Analytical modeling and finite element analysis (FEA) are then adopted to optimize dimensions of the stage. Finally, a prototype of the stage is fabricated and tested for verification. The results of static and dynamic tests show that the proposed stage is capable of vertical travel range of 214 ?m with resolution of 8 nm, and the first two resonance frequencies are 205 Hz and 1206 Hz, respectively. Cross coupling tests under various lateral loads (0 g-1000 g) show that the maximum variances of the lateral and angular cross couplings are less than 0.78 ?m and 95 ?rad, respectively, indicating good decoupling capability. In addition, the low-profile structure of the stage is well suited to be used in limited vertical space. PMID:26520989

  10. Computation of vertically averaged velocities in irregular sections of straight channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, E.; Tucciarelli, T.; Sinagra, M.; Sammartano, V.; Corato, G.

    2015-09-01

    Two new methods for vertically averaged velocity computation are presented, validated and compared with other available formulas. The first method derives from the well-known Huthoff algorithm, which is first shown to be dependent on the way the river cross section is discretized into several subsections. The second method assumes the vertically averaged longitudinal velocity to be a function only of the friction factor and of the so-called "local hydraulic radius", computed as the ratio between the integral of the elementary areas around a given vertical and the integral of the elementary solid boundaries around the same vertical. Both integrals are weighted with a linear shape function equal to zero at a distance from the integration variable which is proportional to the water depth according to an empirical coefficient ?. Both formulas are validated against (1) laboratory experimental data, (2) discharge hydrographs measured in a real site, where the friction factor is estimated from an unsteady-state analysis of water levels recorded in two different river cross sections, and (3) the 3-D solution obtained using the commercial ANSYS CFX code, computing the steady-state uniform flow in a cross section of the Alzette River.

  11. Importance of light, temperature, zooplankton, and fish in predicting the nighttime vertical distribution of Mysis diluviana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Marilyn K.; Robert O'Gorman; Boscarino, Brent T.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Eillenberger, June L.

    2009-01-01

    The opossum shrimp Mysis diluviana (formerly M. relicta) performs large amplitude diel vertical migrations in Lake Ontario and its nighttime distribution is in?uenced by temperature, light and the distribution of its predators and prey. At one location in southeastern Lake Ontario, we measured the vertical distribution of mysids, mysid predators (i.e. planktivorous ?shes) and mysid prey (i.e. zooplankton), in addition to light and temperature, on 8 occasions from May to September, 2004 and 2005. We use these data to test 3 different predictive models of mysid habitat selection, based on: (1) laboratoryderived responses of mysids to different light and temperature gradients in the absence of predator or prey cues; (2) growth rate of mysids, as estimated with a mysid bioenergetics model, given known prey densities and temperatures at different depths in the water column; (3) ratio of growth rates (g) and mortality risk (?) associated with the distribution of predatory ?shes. The model based on light and temperature preferences was a better predictor of mysid vertical distribution than the models based on growth rate and g:?on all 8 occasions. Although mysid temperature and light preferences probably evolved as mechanisms to reduce predation while increasing foraging intake, the response to temperature and light alone predicts mysid vertical distribution across seasons in Lake Ontario.

  12. Importance of light, temperature, zooplankton and fish in predicting the nighttime vertical distribution of Mysis diluviana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boscarino, B.T.; Rusdtam, L.G.; Eillenberger, J.L.; O'Gorman, R.

    2009-01-01

    The opossum shrimp Mysis diluviana (formerly M. relicta) performs large amplitude diel vertical migrations in Lake Ontario and its nighttime distribution is influenced by temperature, light and the distribution of its predators and prey. At one location in southeastern Lake Ontario, we measured the vertical distribution of mysids, mysid predators (i.e. planktivorous fishes) and mysid prey (i.e. zooplankton), in addition to light and temperature, on 8 occasions from May to September, 2004 and 2005. We use these data to test 3 different predictive models of mysid habitat selection, based on: (1) laboratory-derived responses of mysids to different light and temperature gradients in the absence of predator or prey cues; (2) growth rate of mysids, as estimated with a mysid bioenergetics model, given known prey densities and temperatures at different depths in the water column; (3) ratio of growth rates (g) and mortality risk (??) associated with the distribution of predatory fishes. The model based on light and temperature preferences was a better predictor of mysid vertical distribution than the models based on growth rate and g:?? on all 8 occasions. Although mysid temperature and light preferences probably evolved as mechanisms to reduce predation while increasing foraging intake, the response to temperature and light alone predicts mysid vertical distribution across seasons in Lake Ontario. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  13. Strain-induced vertical self-organization of semiconductor quantum dots: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Shtinkov, N.

    2013-12-28

    Atomistic strain simulations based on the valence force field method are employed to study the vertical arrangements of semiconductor quantum dot (QD) multilayers. The effects of the QD shape, dimensions, and materials parameters are systematically investigated, varying independently the following parameters: spacer width H, QD lateral spacing D, base b, and height h, slope of the side facets, elastic properties of the dot and the substrate materials, and lattice mismatch between the dot and the substrate. The transition between vertically aligned and anti-aligned structures is found to be determined mainly by the ratios H/D and b/D, as well as by the strain anisotropy of the substrate and to a lesser extent of the QD. The dependence on the QD height h is significant only for steep side facets and large aspect ratios h/b, and the effects of the lattice mismatch strain and the bulk elastic moduli are found to be negligible. The comparison with experimental data shows an excellent agreement with the results from the simulations, demonstrating that the presented analysis results in precise theoretical predictions for the vertical self-organization regime in a wide range of QD materials systems.

  14. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febriyani, Caroline; Prijatna, Kosasih; Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  15. Centropages behaviour: Swimming and vertical migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert

    2007-02-01

    The evolutionary success of any species living in a variable environment depends on its capacity to enhance the probability of finding food and mates, and escaping predators. In the case of copepods of the genus Centropages, as in all planktonic copepods, their swimming behaviour is closely tied to these vital aspects, and shows a high degree of plasticity and adaptive capacity. Swimming mechanisms of Centropages change radically during development, mainly in the transition between naupliar stages to the 1st copepodite; nauplii do not produce feeding currents, whereas copepodites do. Adults and late developmental stages of C. typicus, C. hamatus and C. velificatus spend most of the time in slow swimming and resting breaks, with occasional and brief fast swimming (escape reactions) and grooming events. Slow swimming is closely related to the creation of feeding currents, and results from the beating of the cephalic appendages in a “fling and clap” manner. The proportion of time allocated to the different swimming activities depends on sensory cues like type and concentration of food, presence of potential mates, light intensity, hydrodynamic flow, etc. The responses of Centropages to changes in flow velocity fluctuations (small-scale turbulence) are similar to the escape responses (fast swimming) triggered by the presence of potential predators. Centropages generally have standard nocturnal vertical migration patterns involving considerable vertical displacements. This behaviour is closely related to the narrow spectral sensitivity and the low intensity threshold of the genus, and has important consequences for the active vertical transport of matter and energy. The variety of responses of Centropages to environmental changes, and in general all the aspects related to its swimming behaviour seem to be controlled by the trade-off between energetic gains (food intake), losses (swimming energy expenditure), and predation risk. Behavioural plasticity and adaptation appear to be the most relevant characteristics for the success of the genus in a wide range of marine environments.

  16. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8?mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5?mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25?mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  17. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  18. Low aspect ratio wing experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mike; Seegmiller, H. Lee

    1994-01-01

    This test was initiated to provide validation data on low aspect ratio wings at transonic speeds. The test was conducted so that the data obtained would be useful in the validation of codes, and all boundary condition data required would be measured as part of the test. During the conduct of the test, the measured quantities were checked for repeatability, and when the data would not repeat, the cause was tracked down and either eliminated or included in the measurement uncertainty. The accuracy of the data was in the end limited by wall imperfections of the wind tunnel in which the test was run.

  19. Vertical Isolation for Photodiodes in CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement in complementary metal oxide/semi conduct - or (CMOS) image detectors, two additional implants in each pixel would effect vertical isolation between the metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the photodiode of the pixel. This improvement is expected to enable separate optimization of the designs of the photodiode and the MOSFETs so as to optimize their performances independently of each other. The purpose to be served by enabling this separate optimization is to eliminate or vastly reduce diffusion cross-talk, thereby increasing sensitivity, effective spatial resolution, and color fidelity while reducing noise.

  20. Numerical modeling of vertical cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Hadley, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a diode laser whose optical cavity is formed by growing or depositing DBR mirror stacks that sandwich an active gain region. The resulting short cavity supports lasing into a single longitudinal mode normal to the wafer, making these devices ideal for a multitude of applications, ranging from high-speed communication to high-power sources (from 2D arrays). This report describes the development of a numerical VCSEL model, whose goal is to both further their understanding of these complex devices and provide a tool for accurate design and data analysis.

  1. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  2. Vertical engine for walk behind lawn mower

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Oguri, K.

    1988-03-01

    This patent describes a lawn mower or other similar walk behind type of implement that is designed to be operated in a normally erect position and which is tilted to the side for servicing. An engine is provided for the lawn mower having an output shaft rotatable about a vertically extending axis. The engine includes a lubricating system incorporating a crankcase in which the engine output shaft rotates and a crankcase ventilating system. The crankcase ventilating system is designed so as to prevent lubricant from flowing into the induction system when the engine is tilted on its side.

  3. Propulsion systems for vertical flight aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present evaluation of VTOL airframe/powerplant integration configurations combining high forward flight speed with safe and efficient vertical flight identifies six configurations that can be matched with one of three powerplant types: turboshafts, convertible-driveshaft lift fans, and gas-drive lift fans. The airframes configurations are (1) tilt-rotor, (2) folded tilt-rotor, (3) tilt-wing, (4) rotor wing/disk wing, (5) lift fan, and (6) variable-diameter rotor. Attention is given to the lift-fan VTOL configuration. The evaluation of these configurations has been conducted by both a joint NASA/DARPA program and the NASA High Speed Rotorcraft program. 7 refs.

  4. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting near 1.5 {mu}m with Sb-based reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    We describe use of AlAsSb/AlGaAsSb lattice matched to InP for distributed Bragg reflectors. These structures are integral to several surface normal devices, in particular vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. The high refractive index ratio of these materials allows formation of a highly reflective mirror with relatively few mirror pairs. As a result, we have been able to show for the first time the 77K CW operation of an optically pumped, monolithic, all-epitaxial vertical cavity laser, emitting at 1.56 {mu}m.

  5. Two-stage epitaxial growth of vertically-aligned SnO2 nano-rods on(001) ceria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Wu, Li-jun; Rupich, Martin W.; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Qiang

    2014-09-20

    Growth of high-aspect ratio oriented tin oxide, SnO2, nano-rods is complicated by a limited choice of matching substrates. We show that a (001) cerium oxide, CeO2, surface uniquely enables epitaxial growth of tin-oxide nano-rods via a two-stage process. First, (100) oriented nano-wires coat the ceria surface by lateral growth, forming a uniaxially-textured SnO2 deposit. Second, vertical SnO2nano-rods nucleate on the deposit by homoepitaxy. We demonstrate growth of vertically oriented 1-2 ?m long nano-rods with an average diameter of ?20 nm.

  6. Mass Spectrometry in Jupiter's Atmosphere: Vertical Variation of Volatile Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-05-01

    The Galileo Probe made the first and only in situ measurements of composition in Jupiter's atmosphere, led by the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer, or GPMS [1]. The major contribution from this instrument was the measurement of abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases, as well as the volatile gases CH4, NH3, H2O, and H2S [2,3]. These initial results were further refined by detailed laboratory calibrations for the noble gases [4] and the volatiles [5]. The probe measurements resulted in the first determination of the heavy element abundances (except carbon that was known previously) and He/H ratio, which provide critical constraints to models of the formation of Jupiter and the origin of its atmosphere [6,7]. The condensable volatiles, or CVs (ammonia, H2S, and water), increased with depth in the probe entry site. This vertical variation was observed at levels much deeper than the modeled cloud bases, as predicted by one-dimensional chemical equilibrium models. The discrepancy is due to the probe's entry into a dry region known as a 5-?m hot spot. The 5-?m hot spots are part of an atmospheric wave system that encircles Jupiter just north of the equator. Despite the anomalous meteorology, the bulk abundances of NH3 and H2S were measured by the probe, and found to be enriched with respect to solar composition (similarly to the non-condensable volatile CH4). The deepest water mixing ratio, however, was observed to be depleted relative to solar composition. We review an updated context for the CV vertical profiles measured by the GPMS, based on the latest results from remote sensing, simulation, and reinterpretation of Galileo Probe measurements. In particular, we find that (1) the bulk abundance of water in Jupiter's atmosphere must be greater than the subsolar abundance derived from the deepest GPMS measurements [8], and that (2) CV mixing ratios are controlled by a range of processes in addition to condensation of the ices NH3, NH4SH, and H2O [5-9]. Both bulk abundances and spatial variation of these species will be further constrained by the Juno mission, scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in 2016. References: [1] Niemann, H.B. et al. 1992, SSRv 60, 111-142 [2] Niemann, H.B. et al. 1996, Science 272, 846-849 [3] Niemann, H.B. et al. 1998, JGR 103, 22831-22845 [4] Mahaffy, P.R. et al. 2000, JGR 105, 15061-15071 [5] Wong, M.H. et al. 2004, Icarus 171, 153-170 [6] Atreya, S.K. et al., 1999, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1243-1262 [7] Atreya, S.K. et al., 2003, Planet. Space Sci. 451, 105-112 [8] Wong, M.H. et al., 2008, in Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry, vol. 68. Mineralogical Society of America, Chantilly, VA, pp. 219-246 [9] Wong, M.H., 2009, Icarus 199, 231-235

  7. Massively-Parallel Ultra-High-Aspect-Ratio Nanochannels as Mesoporous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon

    2009-01-01

    Many fabrication technologies have been used to build nano/mesoporous materials/filters with a good size control, but the integration of these systems into a microsystem format has been a challenge. Microfabricated nanofilters suffer from small open volume and low throughput. In this paper, we developed a novel fabrication strategy for massively-parallel, regular vertical nanochannel membranes with a uniform, well-controlled gap size of ~50 nm and a depth up to ~40 ?m, by using only standard semiconductor fabrication techniques. The vertical nanofilter membranes were fabricated into an anisotropic nanofilter array, which demonstrates the ability to integrate nanofilters and micron-sized channels/pores seamlessly. We demonstrated efficient continuous-flow separation of large DNAs and small molecules in a two-dimensional vertical nanochannel array device. These ultrahigh-aspect-ratio nanochannels have the advantage of large open volume, enabling for high-throughput applications. PMID:19190794

  8. GRB brightness ratio distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laros, J. G.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this analysis is to obtain insight into whether positionally close pairs of GRBs are due to repetitions, clustering, or random chance. We consider the Brightness Ratio Distribution (BRD) of pairs of events. Here, brightness is used as a generic term for any quantity related to the observed intensity of an event. The BRD has the interesting property that if one can select pairs whose components are at the same distance-such as, by considering only close-together pairs-then the distance dependence ``drops out'' of each brightness ratio and the BRD becomes narrower because its width no longer has a component caused by the sources' differing distances. We have begun to apply this analysis to the BATSE events for which location and brightness data are available, comparing the BRD for close-together event pairs to the BRDs for the other (presumedly unrelated) pairs. Preliminary results do not show any clear indication that close-together pairs are related. However, this work is at a very early stage with regard to optimizing the method and understanding its properties.

  9. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOEpatents

    Brulle, Robert V. (St. Louis County, MO)

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  10. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    1999-12-07

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  11. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Brulle, R.V.

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90/sup 0/ and 270/sup 0/ to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  12. Thunderstorm vertical velocities estimated from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R. F.; Fenn, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared geosynchronous satellite data with an interval of 5 min between images are used to estimate thunderstorm top ascent rates on two case study days. A mean vertical velocity of 3.4 m/sec for 23 clouds is calculated at a height of 8.7 km. This upward motion is representative of an area of approximately 10 km on a side. Thunderstorm mass flux of approximately 2 times 10 to the 8th power kg/sec is calculated, which compares favorably with previous estimates. There is a significant difference in the mean calculated vertical velocity between elements associated with severe weather reports (omega = 4.9 m/sec) and those with no such reports (2.4 m/sec). Calculations were made using a velocity profile for an axially symmetric jet to estimate the peak updraft velocity. For the largest observed omega value of 7.8 m/sec the calculation indicates a peak updraft of approximately 50 m/sec.

  13. Vertical Slot Convection: A linear study

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, A.; Steinolfson, R.; Tajima, T.

    1992-11-01

    The linear stability properties of fluid convection in a vertical slot were studied. We use a Fourier-Chebychev decomposition was used to set up the linear eigenvalue problems for the Vertical Slot Convection and Benard problems. The eigenvalues, neutral stability curves, and critical point values of the Grashof number, G, and the wavenumber were determined. Plots of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues as functions of G and {alpha} are given for a wide range of the Prandtl number, Pr, and special note is made of the complex mode that becomes linearly unstable above Pr {approximately} 12.5. A discussion comparing different special cases facilitates the physical understanding of the VSC equations, especially the interaction of the shear-flow and buoyancy induced physics. Making use of the real and imaginary eigenvalues and the phase properties of the eigenmodes, the eigenmodes were characterized. One finds that the mode structure becomes progressively simpler with increasing Pr, with the greatest complexity in the mid ranges where the terms in the heat equation are of roughly the same size.

  14. Vertical Slot Convection: A linear study

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, A. ); Steinolfson, R. ); Tajima, T. . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1992-11-01

    The linear stability properties of fluid convection in a vertical slot were studied. We use a Fourier-Chebychev decomposition was used to set up the linear eigenvalue problems for the Vertical Slot Convection and Benard problems. The eigenvalues, neutral stability curves, and critical point values of the Grashof number, G, and the wavenumber were determined. Plots of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues as functions of G and [alpha] are given for a wide range of the Prandtl number, Pr, and special note is made of the complex mode that becomes linearly unstable above Pr [approximately] 12.5. A discussion comparing different special cases facilitates the physical understanding of the VSC equations, especially the interaction of the shear-flow and buoyancy induced physics. Making use of the real and imaginary eigenvalues and the phase properties of the eigenmodes, the eigenmodes were characterized. One finds that the mode structure becomes progressively simpler with increasing Pr, with the greatest complexity in the mid ranges where the terms in the heat equation are of roughly the same size.

  15. Trends in the Vertical Distribution of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of satellite, ground-based, and balloon measurements allow updated estimates of trends in the vertical profile of ozone since 1979. The results show overall consistency among several independent measurement systems, particularly for northern hemisphere midlatitudes where most balloon and ground-based measurements are made. Combined trend estimates over these latitudes for the period 1979-96 show statistically significant negative trends at all altitudes between 10 and 45 km, with two local extremes: -7.4 plus or minus 2.0% per decade at 40 km and -7.3 plus or minus -4.6% per decade at 15 km altitude. There is a strong seasonal variation in trends over northern midlatitudes in the attitude range of 10 to 18 km, with the largest ozone loss during winter and spring. The profile trends are in quantitative agreement with independently measured trends in column ozone, the amount of ozone in a column above the surface. The vertical profiles of ozone trends provide a fingerprint for the mechanisms of ozone depletion over the last two decades.

  16. Trends in the Vertical Distribution of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Randel, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of satellite, ground-based, and balloon measurements allow updated estimates of trends in the vertical profile of ozone since 1979. The results show overall consistency among several independent measurement systems, particularly for northern hemisphere midlatitudes where most balloon and ground-based measurements are made. Combined trend estimates over these latitudes for the period 1979-96 show statistically significant negative trends at all attitudes between 10 and 45 km, with two local extremes: -7.4 +/- 2.0% per decade at 40 km and -7.3 +/- 4.6% per decade at 15 km attitude. There is a strong seasonal variation in trends over northern midlatitudes in the attitude range of 10 to 18 km. with the largest ozone loss during winter and spring. The profile trends are in quantitative agreement with independently measured trends in column ozone, the amount of ozone in a column above the surface. The vertical profiles of ozone trends provide a fingerprint for the mechanisms of ozone depletion over the last two decades,

  17. Trends in the Vertical Distribution of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of satellite, ground-based, and balloon measurements allow updated estimates of trends in the vertical profile of ozone since 1979. The results show overall consistency among several independent measurement systems, particularly for northern hemisphere midlatitudes where most balloon and ground-based measurements are made. Combined trend estimates over these latitudes for the period 1979-96 show statistically significant negative trends at ail attitudes between 10 and 45 km, with two local extremes: -7.4 +/- 2.0% per decade at 40 km and -7.3 +/- 4.6% per decade at 15 km attitude. There is a strong seasonal variation in trends over northern midlatitudes in the altitude range of 10 to 18 km, with the largest ozone loss during winter and spring. The profile trends are in quantitative agreement with independently measured trends in column ozone, the amount of ozone in a column above the surface. The vertical profiles of ozone trends provide a fingerprint for the mechanisms of ozone depletion over the last two decades.

  18. Marsh vertical accretion via vegetative growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, John A.; Walters, Russel J.; Delaune, Ronald D.; Patrick, William H., Jr.

    2006-09-01

    Coastal marshes accrete vertically in response to sea-level rise and subsidence. Inadequate accretion and subsequent conversion of coastal marshes to open water generally is attributed to inadequate mineral sedimentation because mineral sedimentation is widely assumed to control accretion. Using 137Cs dating to determine vertical accretion, mineral sedimentation, and organic matter accumulation, we found that accretion varied with organic accumulation rather than mineral sedimentation across a wide range of conditions in coastal Louisiana, including stable marshes where soil was 80% mineral matter. These results agreed with previous research, but no mechanism had been proposed to explain accretion via vegetative growth. In an exploratory greenhouse experiment, we found that flooding stimulated root growth above the marsh surface. These results indicated the need for additional work to determine if flooding controls accretion in some marshes by stimulating root growth on the marsh surface, rather than by mineral accumulation on the marsh surface. Restoration or management that focus on mineral sedimentation may be ineffective where a relationship between accretion and mineral sedimentation is assumed rather than tested.

  19. Vertical Profiling of Air Pollution at RAPCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Bowdle, David A.; Johnson, Steven; Knupp, Kevin; Gillani, Noor; Biazar, Arastoo; Mcnider, Richard T.; Burris, John

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between local and regional pollution levels occurs at the interface of the Planetary Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. Measuring the vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols, and winds with high temporal and vertical resolution is essential to diagnose the nature of this interchange and ultimately for accurately forecasting ozone and aerosol pollution levels. The Regional Atmospheric Profiling Center for Discovery, RAPCD, was built and instrumented to address this critical issue. The ozone W DIAL lidar, Nd:YAG aerosol lidar, and 2.1 micron Doppler wind lidar, along with balloon- borne ECC ozonesondes form the core of the W C D instrumentation for addressing this problem. Instrumentation in the associated Mobile Integrated Profiling (MIPS) laboratory includes 91 5Mhz profiler, sodar, and ceilometer. The collocated Applied particle Optics and Radiometry (ApOR) laboratory hosts an FTIR along with MOUDI and optical particle counters. With MODELS-3 analysis by colleagues in the National Space Science and Technology Center on the UAH campus and the co- located National Weather Service Forecasting Office in Huntsville, AL we are developing a unique facility for advancing the state of the science of pollution forecasting.

  20. [Vertical Distribution Characteristics and Analysis in Sediments of Xidahai Lake].

    PubMed

    Duan, Mu-chun; Xiao, Hai-feng; Zang, Shu-ying

    2015-07-01

    The organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), the morphological changes of phosphorus and the particle size in columnar sediment core of Xidahai Lake were analyzed, to discuss the vertical distribution characteristics and influencing factors. The results showed that the contents of OM, TN and TP were 0. 633% -2. 756%, 0. 150% -0. 429% and 648. 00 - 1 480.67 mg . kg-1 respectively. The contents of Ca-P, IP and OM changed less, the contents of Fe/Al-P, OP, TP and TN fluctuated from 1843 to 1970; The contents of Ca-P, IP and TP tended to decrease, the contents of Fe/Al-P, OP and OM first decreased and then increased to different degree, TN fluctuated largely from 1970 to 1996; The nutrient elements contents showed relatively large fluctuation from 1996 to 2009, the average contents of Fe/Al-P, OP and OM were the highest in the three stages. The sediment core nutrients pollution sources were mainly from industrial wastewater, sewage and the loss of fertilizers of Xidahai Lake. The ratio of C/N in the sediments showed that organic matter was mainly from aquatic organisms. The sediment particle size composition was dominated by clay and fine silt. The correlation studies showed that Ca-P, IP and TP were significantly positively correlated, showing that the contribution of Ca-P to IP and TP growth was large. PMID:26489314

  1. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Featureless Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Barr, Nicholas; Weible, Seth; Friedl, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains falling through a featureless vertical channel. With a grain height less than the grain diameter, these grains resemble aspirin tablets, poker chips, or coins. Unidisperse grains are allowed to fall under the influence of gravity through a uniform channel of square cross-section where the channel width is greater than the grain size and constant along the length of the channel. Channel widths are chosen so that no combination of grain heights and diameters is equal to the channel width. Collections of grains sometimes form jams, stable structures in which the grains are supported by the channel walls and not by grains or walls beneath them. The probability of a jam occurring and the jam's strength are influenced by the grain dimensions and channel width. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College

  2. Mixed turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical ducts: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, I.; Swanson, L.

    1988-07-01

    A recently developed heat transfer correlation can help determine acceptable water temperatures during a severe overcooling of the reactor vessel downcomer. This study contributes to an ongoing effort to prevent thermally induced cracking in reactor vessels. Thermally induced cracking develops when cold water suddenly contacts hot metal walls. This phenomenon could occur during certain PWR transients. Following an extensive literature survey, investigators built an experimental test facility to simulate the heat transfer phenomena found in a PWR reactor downcomer. The facility design emphasized reproducing the horizontal and vertical aspect ratios and the correct flow boundary conditions. The investigators selected Freon 113 as a working fluid to attain correct buoyancy forces with minimal wall heating. They then used the facility to test several inlet flows and temperature distributions using a wide range of Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers. Thermocouples distributed at various elevations and distances from the walls measured heat fluxes and temperature profiles. The experimental observations allowed a detailed analysis of turbulent flow in the downcomer, from which the team developed a theoretical model of the heat transfer mechanisms. Surface renewal theory provided a starting point for the theoretical investigation. The key product of this study is a heat transfer correlation that accurately represents the impact of the parameters. This correlation fits the experimental data within 7% over Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers spanning the thermal-hydraulic conditions commonly found in PWRs. 35 refs., 31 figs.

  3. Vertical Structure of Magnetized Accretion Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, Carlos; Lizano, Susana

    2016-01-01

    We model the vertical structure of magnetized accretion disks subject to viscous and resistive heating, and irradiation by the central star. We apply our formalism to the radial structure of magnetized accretion disks threaded by a poloidal magnetic field dragged during the process of star formation developed by Shu and coworkers. We consider disks around low mass protostars, T Tauri, and FU Orionis stars. We consider two levels of disk magnetization, ?sys = 4 (strongly magnetized disks), and ?sys = 12 (weakly magnetized disks). The rotation rates of strongly magnetized disks have large deviations from Keplerian rotation. In these models, resistive heating dominates the thermal structure for the FU Ori disk. The T Tauri disk is very thin and cold because it is strongly compressed by magnetic pressure; it may be too thin compared with observations. Instead, in the weakly magnetized disks, rotation velocities are close to Keplerian, and resistive heating is always less than 7% of the viscous heating. In these models, the T Tauri disk has a larger aspect ratio, consistent with that inferred from observations. All the disks have spatially extended hot atmospheres where the irradiation flux is absorbed, although most of the mass (~ 90 - 95 %) is in the disk midplane.

  4. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3? method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries. PMID:26284489

  5. Wet gas flow modeling for a vertically mounted Venturi meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Wanlu; Li, Xiaomin

    2012-04-01

    Venturi meters are playing an increasingly important role in wet gas metering in natural gas and oil industries. Due to the effect of liquid in a wet gas, the differential pressure over the converging section of a Venturi meter is higher than that when a pure gas flows through with the same flow rate. This phenomenon is referred to as over-reading. Thus, a correction for the over-reading is required. Most of the existing wet gas models are more suitable for higher pressure (>2 MPa) than lower pressure (<1 MPa). Much attention has been paid on higher quality (>0.5) than lower quality (<0.5) in recent years. However, conditions of lower pressure and lower quality also widely exist in the gas and oil industries. By comparing the performances of eight existing wet gas models in low-pressure range of 0.26-0.86 MPa and low-quality range of 0.07-0.36 with a vertically mounted Venturi meter of diameter ratio 0.45, de Leeuw's model was proven to perform best. Derived from de Leeuw's model, a modified model with better performance for the low-pressure and low-quality ranges was obtained. Experimental data showed that the root mean square of the relative errors of the over-reading was 2.30%.

  6. ALMA observations of Titan : Vertical and spatial distribution of nitriles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, R.; Lellouch, E.; Vinatier, S.; Gurwell, M.; Moullet, A.; Lara, L. M.; Hidayat, T.

    2015-10-01

    We report submm observations of Titan performed with the ALMA interferometer centered at the rotational frequencies of HCN(4-3) and HNC(4-3), i.e. 354 and 362 GHz. These measurements yielded disk-resolved emission spectra of Titan with an angular resolution of ~0.47''. Titan's angular surface diameter was 0.77''. Data were acquired in summer 2012 near the greatest eastern and western elongations of Titan at a spectral resolution of 122 kHz (?/d ? = 3106). We have obtained maps of several nitriles present in Titan' stratosphere: HCN, HC3N, CH3CN, HNC, C2H5CNand other weak lines (isotopes, vibrationnally excited lines).We will present radiative transfer analysis of the spectra acquired. With the combination of all these detected rotational lines, we will constrain the atmospheric temperature, the spatial and vertical distribution of these species, as well as isotopic ratios. Moreover, Doppler lineshift measurements will enable us to constrain the zonal wind flow in the upper atmosphere.

  7. Comparison of aerodynamic models for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão Ferreira, C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Barone, M.; Roscher, B.; Deglaire, P.; Arduin, I.

    2014-06-01

    Multi-megawatt Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are experiencing an increased interest for floating offshore applications. However, VAWT development is hindered by the lack of fast, accurate and validated simulation models. This work compares six different numerical models for VAWTS: a multiple streamtube model, a double-multiple streamtube model, the actuator cylinder model, a 2D potential flow panel model, a 3D unsteady lifting line model, and a 2D conformal mapping unsteady vortex model. The comparison covers rotor configurations with two NACA0015 blades, for several tip speed ratios, rotor solidity and fixed pitch angle, included heavily loaded rotors, in inviscid flow. The results show that the streamtube models are inaccurate, and that correct predictions of rotor power and rotor thrust are an effect of error cancellation which only occurs at specific configurations. The other four models, which explicitly model the wake as a system of vorticity, show mostly differences due to the instantaneous or time averaged formulation of the loading and flow, for which further research is needed.

  8. Depth Estimation of Simple Causative Sources from Gravity Gradient Tensor Invariants and Vertical Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruç, Bülent

    2010-10-01

    The gravity gradient tensor (GGT) is deduced from products of second-order derivatives of the gravitational potential. A new method based on the invariants of the GGT has been proposed in this research to interpret gravity data due to sphere, infinite horizontal cylinder and semi-infinite vertical cylinder. The method estimates the depth of these simple causative sources from the multiplication of the maximum of the gravity vertical component by the maximum value of the invariants I 1 to I 2 ratio. To show the reliability and correctness of the estimated depths on 3-D models, the method has been tested using theoretical data with and without random noise. In addition, I have applied the method to a field-data example in Texas, USA and the depth obtained by the present method is compared with those published in the literature.

  9. Bifurcation and stability of low-order steady flows in horizontally and vertically forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, D. A.; Shirer, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    A nonlinear spectral model of two-dimensional, shallow Boussinesq convection which responds to heating in both the horizontal and vertical directions is examined. The governing partial differential system is converted to an infinite set of ordinary differential equations and truncated to a small set to permit detailed study of the number and types of transitions from one flow configuration to another. The Hadley number and the Rayleigh number are defined as the horizontal and vertical thermal forcing mechanisms, respectively, for inclusion in the nonlinear spectral model, which is composed of three equations. The model is then used to describe steady states, linearly stable solutions, and balancing factors in unstable stratification. The number and the distribution of the steady states are found to be qualitatively independent of the aspect ratio and the Prandtl number.

  10. Electrostatic environment near lunar vertical hole: 3D plasma particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Nishino, Masaki N.

    2015-11-01

    The dayside electrostatic environment near the lunar surface is governed by interactions among the solar wind plasma, photoelectrons, and the charged lunar surface, providing topologically complex boundaries to the plasma. Three-dimensional, particle-in-cell simulations are applied to recently discovered vertical holes on the Moon, which have spatial scales of tens of meters and greater depth-to-diameter ratios than typical impact craters. The vertical wall of the hole introduces a new boundary for both photo and solar wind electrons. The current balance condition established at a hole bottom is altered by the limited solar wind electron penetration into the hole due to loss at the wall and photoelectron current path connecting the hole bottom and wall surfaces. The self-consistent modeling not only reproduces intense differential charging between sunlit and shadowed surfaces, but also reveals the potential difference between sunlit surfaces inside and outside the hole, demonstrating the uniqueness of the near-hole electrostatic environment.

  11. CALIPSO Observations of Transatlantic Dust: Vertical Stratification and Effect of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Kostinski, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    We use CALIOP nighttime measurements of lidar backscatter, color and depolarization ratios, as well as particulate retrievals during the summer of 2007 to study transatlantic dust properties downwind of Saharan sources, and to examine the influence of nearby clouds on dust. Our analysis suggests that (1) under clear skies, while lidar backscatter and color ratio do not change much with altitude and longitude in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), depolarization ratio increases with altitude and decreases westward in the SAL (2) the vertical lapse rate of dust depolarization ratio, introduced here, increases within SAL as plumes move westward (3) nearby clouds barely affect the backscatter and color ratio of dust volumes within SAL but not so below SAL. Moreover, the presence of nearby clouds tends to decrease the depolarization of dust volumes within SAL. Finally, (4) the odds of CALIOP finding dust below SAL next to clouds are about of those far away from clouds. This feature, together with an apparent increase in depolarization ratio near clouds, indicates that particles in some dust volumes loose asphericity in the humid air near clouds, and cannot be identified by CALIPSO as dust.

  12. CALIPSO Observations of Transatlantic Dust: Vertical Stratification and Effect of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Kostinski, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    CALIOP nighttime measurements of lidar backscatter, color and depolarization ratios during the summer of 2007 are used to study transatlantic dust properties downwind of Saharan sources, and to examine the interaction of clouds and dust. We discuss the following findings: (1) while lidar backscatter doesn't change much with altitude in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), depolarization and color ratios both increase with altitude in the SAL; (2) lidar backscatter and color ratio increase as dust is transported westward in the SAL; (3) the vertical lapse rate of dust depolarization ratio increases within SAL as plumes move westward; (4) nearby clouds barely affect the backscatter and color ratio of dust volumes within SAL but not so below SAL. Finally, (5) the odds of CALIOP finding dust below SAL next to clouds are about 2/3 of those far away from clouds. This feature, together with an apparent increase in depolarization ratio near clouds, indicates that particles in some dusty volumes lose asphericity in the humid air near clouds, and cannot be identified by CALIPSO as dust.

  13. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  14. [Dynamic rule of organic matter removal in vertical-flow constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian-feng; Xu, Zu-xin; Li, Huai-zheng

    2008-08-01

    Based upon the analysis of the removal rate and form change of the organic pollutants with the different height of the vertical-flow constructed wetland, it comes to the conclusion of the average longitudinal removal rate of variant forms organics and presents the influent concentration and the hydraulic load curve. The results indicated that: Under this experimental condition, the reduction of the organics in the vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland mainly occurred within the 0-10 cm substrate below the pipe distributor. In the meantime, the smaller the hydraulic load of influent, the higher the removal ratio of the organic pollutants in the substrate section. Under the condition that the vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland used the coarse sands as the substrate and kept the influent hydraulic load less than or equal to 0.5 m3/(m2 x d), the effective height of the organics removal was 60 cm. It also showed that the average degradation rate of different kinds of the organic pollutants has a maximum value in the 0-10 cm substrate section below the pipeline. Moreover, the degradation ratio of different kinds of the organics is in significant decreasing tendency with increasing the depth of the longitudinal direction along the pipe. Using sands as the substrate in the vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland, the relationship of the influent concentration and influent hydraulic load can be expressed by formula:(c(in) - c(out)) x q = 1107.02-2.96 c(in) x q. PMID:18839567

  15. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  16. Ocular torsion and the function of the vertical extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Jampel, R S

    1975-02-01

    The vertical corneal meridia are not kept perpendicular to the horizon in human and nonhuman primates when the head or body is tilted, i.e., compensatory counter-rolling of the eyes does not occur. The slight torsional displacement of the vertical corneal meridia noted by many observers may be the result of rotation around an axis or to translation of the globe. The neurologic and structural systems that control the actions of the vertical muscles in human and nonhuman primates do not appear to provide a mechanism for wheel-rotation of the eyes around the pupillary axis. Ocular torsion is not a normal function of the vertical extraocular muscles. Their function is probably the reverse, i.e., the inhibition or prevention of ocular torsion and the stabilization of the eyes when the head or body inclines. Torsional displacement of a vertical corneal meridian occurs only when there is an abnormal muscle imbalance. Wheel-like movements (cycloduction) around the pupillary axis or visual line do not occur. Torsional displacement of a vertical corneal meridian occurs only with a simultaneous vertical movement. The vertical rectus and the oblique muscles in man work together to produce vertical ocular movements regardless of head position of body posture while maintaining the vertical corneal meridia parallel to the sagittal plane of the head. The vestibular apparatus may be responsible for distributing innervation among these muscles, enabling them to function in this manner. PMID:803789

  17. Characterizing the impacts of vertical transport and photochemical ozone production on an exceedance area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Austerberry, David; Pierce, R. Bradley; Roby, Matthew C.; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Loewenstein, Max; Gore, Warren

    2015-05-01

    Offshore and inland vertical profiles of ozone (O3) were measured from an aircraft during 16 flights from January 2012 to January 2013 over the northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and over the Pacific Ocean. Analysis of in situ measurements presents an assessment of the seasonality and magnitude of net O3 production and transport within the lower troposphere above the SJV. During the high O3 season (May-October), the Dobson Unit sum of O3 in the 0-2 km above sea level (km.a.s.l.) layer above the SJV exceeds that above the offshore profile by up to 20.5%, implying net O3 production over the SJV or vertical transport from above. During extreme events (e.g. Stratosphere-to-troposphere transport) vertical features (areas of enhanced or depleted O3 or water vapor) are observed in the offshore and SJV profiles at different altitudes, demonstrating the scale of vertical mixing during transport. Correlation analysis between offshore O3 profiles and O3 surface sites in the SJV lends further support the hypothesis of vertical mixing. Correlation analysis indicates that O3 mixing ratios at surface sites in the northern and middle SJV show significant correlations to the 1.5-2 km.a.s.l. offshore altitude range. Southern SJV O3 surface sites show a shift towards maximum correlations at increased time-offsets, and O3 surface sites at elevated altitudes show significant correlations with higher offshore altitudes (2.5-4 km.a.s.l.).

  18. Vertical tail buffeting of fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2000-04-01

    Vertical tail buffeting at high angles of attack is a phenomenon associated with the impact of vortical flows generated by the aircraft on the fins. This poses a serious problem for both single- and twin-tail fighter aircraft from the point of view of combat maneuverability and structural integrity. The research activities to understand the flow physics with an aim to alleviate buffet loads were quite intense during the period from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Most of the investigations were carried out on the F/A-18 mainly because of two international programs involving countries that operate the F/A-18 in their air force. This review begins with a description of the water tunnel experiments showing some flow visualization results of the leading-edge extension (LEX) burst vortical flows. Wind tunnel studies on a 1/9 scale F/A-18 model in Australia, a 1/6.65 scale model in the United Kingdom, a 6% scale model in Canada, 12%, 16% and full-scale models in the United States are summarized. Scale effects can be deduced from the various sub- and full-scale models tested. Flight test results conducted on the High Alpha Research Vehicle in the United States and on an instrumented CF-18 test aircraft in Canada are presented. The accuracy of analytical methods utilizing wind tunnel data to predict buffet loads at flight conditions is discussed. The use of CFD to compute vertical fin buffeting is challenging and requires a large amount of computing power. A brief exposure to the methodology is given and results from the only available computational case study carried out by NASA Ames are compared with wind tunnel and flight test data. A short introduction to statistical non-stationary effects is given. Hysteresis effect of the LEX vortex burst on the buffet loads is discussed, and a statistical non-stationary buffet prediction method is outlined. This review provides a useful reference to the results collected from the High Alpha Technology Program, The Technical Cooperation Program and the International Follow-On Structural Test Project which together form an extremely valuable data base for vertical tail buffeting studies.

  19. Predicting Vertical Jump Height from Bar Velocity

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s-2). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r2 = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r2 = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key points Vertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer. The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s-2 and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement. Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  20. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  1. Dynamic analysis of a vertically deploying/retracting cantilevered pipe conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yinlei; Wang, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Hamilton's principle, the differential equation of a vertical cantilevered pipe conveying fluid is derived when the pipe has deploying or retracting motion. The resulting equation is discretized via the Galerkin method in which the eigenfunctions of a clamped-free Euler-Bernoulli beam are utilized. Then, the dynamic responses and stability are discussed with regard to the deploying or retracting speed, mass ratio, and fluid velocity. Numerical results reveal that the dynamical behavior of the system is mainly affected by the flow velocity, instantaneous length of pipe, gravity, and mass ratio. For the small flow velocity, the fluid and higher mass ratio helps to stabilize the transverse vibration of the cantilevered pipe conveying fluid in both deployment and retraction modes, and the system will lose stability with the further increase of flow velocity. The critical flow velocity is mainly influenced by the instantaneous length of pipe. The additional restoring force due to gravity causes critical flow velocity to be higher for the vertically cantilevered pipe conveying fluid. Therefore, gravity is conducive to the stability the transverse vibration of the system in both deployment and retraction modes.

  2. Modular low aspect ratio-high beta torsatron

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V. (Hopewell, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ)

    1984-02-07

    A fusion reactor device in which the toroidal magnetic field and at least a portion of the poloidal magnetic field are provided by a single set of modular coils. The coils are arranged on the surface of a low aspect ratio toroid in planes having the cylindrical coordinate relationship .phi.=.phi..sub.i +kz where k is a constant equal to each coil's pitch and .phi..sub.i is the toroidal angle at which the i'th coil intersects the z=o plane. The device may be described as a modular, high beta torsation whose screw symmetry is pointed along the systems major (z) axis. The toroid defined by the modular coils preferably has a racetrack minor cross section. When vertical field coils and preferably a toroidal plasma current are provided for magnetic field surface closure within the toroid, a vacuum magnetic field of racetrack shaped minor cross section with improved stability and beta valves is obtained.

  3. Modular low-aspect-ratio high-beta torsatron

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1982-04-01

    A fusion-reactor device is described which the toroidal magnetic field and at least a portion of the poloidal magnetic field are provided by a single set of modular coils. The coils are arranged on the surface of a low-aspect-ratio toroid in planed having the cylindrical coordinate relationship phi = phi/sub i/ + kz, where k is a constant equal to each coil's pitch and phi/sub i/ is the toroidal angle at which the i'th coil intersects the z = o plane. The toroid defined by the modular coils preferably has a race track minor cross section. When vertical field coils and, preferably, a toroidal plasma current are provided for magnetic-field-surface closure within the toroid, a vacuum magnetic field of racetrack-shaped minor cross section with improved stability and beta valves is obtained.

  4. Approximate Formula of Peak Frequency of H/V Ratio Curve in Multilayered Model and Its Use in H/V Ratio Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Tran Thanh; Vinh, Pham Chi; Malischewsky, P.; Aoudia, Abdelkrim

    2015-05-01

    The main peak frequency of the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) ratio curve is the key factor used in the H/V ratio technique since the resonance frequency of the transmission response of the site is estimated from this frequency. However, there has not been explicit formula of the main peak frequency of the H/V ratio curve in multilayered models. In the present study, an approximate explicit equation of the peak frequency of H/V ratio is derived for the multilayered models of high impedance contrast between the half-space and surface layers. This approximate equation is then generalized for model of an functionally graded material (FGM) layer over half-space. Then, the approximate equation is used to obtain an explicit approximate formula of the main peak frequency of H/V ratio curve. The principle formula of H/V ratio technique is used along with the obtained approximate formula of the main peak frequency to formulate a new average formula of the shear-wave velocity of a composite layer composed of an arbitrary number of horizontal, homogeneous layers. The new average formula is shown to be more suitable in the use of H/V ratio technique than the currently used ones in the sense that it takes into account the effect of the mass density and the position of sublayers. Finally, some numerical calculation to illustrate the application of the peak formula and the new average formula of shear-wave velocity is presented.

  5. Moving-base simulation evaluation of thrust margins for vertical landing for the NASA YAV-8B Harrier aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.; Stortz, Michael W.

    1993-01-01

    A simulation experiment was conducted on Ames Research Center's Vertical Motion Simulator to evaluate the thrust margin for vertical landing required for the YAV-8B Harrier. Two different levels of ground effect were employed, representing the aircraft with or without lift improvement devices installed. In addition, two different inlet temperature profiles were included to cover a wide range of hot gas ingestion. For each ground effect and hot gas ingestion variant, vertical landings were performed at successively heavier weights, with the pilot assessing the acceptability of the operation in each case. Results are presented as a function of hover weight ratio and a metric of the mean ground effect and ingestion that reflect the increase in thrust margin required to provide acceptable control of sink rate during the descent to touchdown with increasing suck down and hot gas ingestion.

  6. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  7. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  8. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  9. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye. PMID:23955156

  10. Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  11. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  12. [The hyoid bone and vertical dimension].

    PubMed

    Doual, A; Léger, J L; Doual, J M; Hadjiat, F

    2003-09-01

    Located at the center of the neck and the pharyngeal column and, thanks to its attachments, tied to the base of the skull, to the mandible, to the tongue, to the larynx, and to the scapular belt, the hyoid bone is intimately related to an extensive tendino-muscular complex. From this strategic position, the hyoid bone participates in all functional and nutritional activities of the oro-facial complex. Heavily involved in the physiology of the pharyngeal column, it appears to enjoy a remarkable stability in relation to its surrounding structures as it participates in the critical process of vertical ontogenetic development. Deceptively simple in its shape and location it is anything but. While it would be easy to scorn it as a vestigial organ of little importance, the hyoid bone is actually an ancient witness of the evolution of the first human vertebrae and a vestige of the 2nd and 3rd brachial arches. Like a toy buffeted by powerful groups of muscles and tendons, the hyoid bone occupies a crossroads position where it is solicited by many vital functions, the most critical of which is respiration. Its functional behavior seems to have evolved considerably over the course of phylogeny. By piecing together the conceptions of many authors, we can conclude that the similarities--and, later, the differences--existing between the human fetus and those of other primates, and, then between young children and young primates, are related to an essentially different status quo, which modifies the delicate equilibrium of the pharyngeal region. In metamorphosing from a sagittal equilibrium to one that is vertical, this very status quo maintains an open respiratory airway during each time frame, continuously permitting the articulation and modulation of sounds, particularly during the vertical period. The hyoid bone is unpaired, in a mid-line position, symmetrical, and located just below the mandible with which it shares, to an astonishing extent, certain morphological characteristics. Its maturation and its ossification occur slowly and late even though it migrates much more rapidly to a vertical position than does the bulk of the cervical complex. True articulations between the body and the horns of the hyoid bone persist for a very long time; and so the junction between the small horns doesn't fully calcify until about the age of 50; and, in spite of its appearance, the hyoid bone is extremely supple, a quality that allows it to make substantial contributions to functional activity. If the hyoid bone itself scarcely moves during normal respiration, modern research attributes an increasing role to it in the maintenance of the equilibrium of the pharyngeal column. It seems to be called upon to respond to a number of demands that it manages to satisfy as it helps to maintain the permeability of the pharyngeal column and thus make respiration possible. In so doing, the hyoid bone adjusts its positioning, and, perhaps most important, its orientation to the physiological requirements imposed by pharyngeal obstruction and mouth breathing. Intimately connected to the larynx, the hyoid bone plays a part in phonation that has long been recognized. Recent studies now also show that the contribution the hyoid bone makes to respiratory equilibrium is far more important than its small size would suggest. PMID:15301368

  13. Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    McNerney, G.M.

    1981-08-01

    Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  14. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  15. Shocks in Vertically Oscillated Granular Layers

    E-print Network

    J. Bougie; Sung Joon Moon; J. B. Swift; Harry L. Swinney

    2003-09-18

    We study shock formation in vertically oscillated granular layers, using both molecular dynamics simulations and numerical solutions of continuum equations to Navier-Stokes order. A flat layer of grains is thrown up from an oscillating plate during each oscillation cycle and collides with the plate later in the cycle. The collisions produce layer compaction near the plate and a high temperature shock front that rapidly propagates upward through the layer. The shock is highly time-dependent, propagating through the layer in only a quarter of the cycle. We compare numerical solutions of the continuum equations to molecular dynamics simulations that assume binary, instantaneous collisions between frictionless hard spheres. The two simulations yield results for the shock position, shape, and speed that agree well. An investigation of the effect of inelasticity shows that the shock velocity increases continuously with decreasing inelasticity; the elastic limit is not singular.

  16. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitatesmore »specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.« less

  17. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-08-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye.

  18. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H. )

    1992-12-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on a rigid, straight, vertical wall retaining a semi-infinite, uniform viscoelastic layer of constant thickness. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are developed, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. These solutions are then compared with those obtained by use of a simple model proposed previously by Scott, and the accuracy of this model is assessed. Finally, two versions of an alternative model are proposed which better approximate the action of the system. In the first, the properties of the model are defined by frequency-dependent parameters, whereas in the second, which is particularly helpful in analyses of transient response, they are represented by frequency-independent, constant parameters.

  19. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  20. Vertical Transport in Ferroelectric/Superconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begon-Lours, Laura; Trastoy, Juan; Bernard, Rozenn; Jacquet, Eric; Carretero, Cecile; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fusil, Stephane; Garcia, Vincent; Xavier, Stephane; Girod, Stephanie; Deranlot, Cyrile; Bibes, Manuel; Barthelemy, Agnes; Villegas, Javier E.

    2015-03-01

    We study electric field-effects in superconducting films by measuring vertical transport in ferroelectric/superconductor heterostructures. These are based on ultrathin (4 to 8 nm thick) BiFeO3-Mn grown on YBa2Cu3O7 by pulsed laser deposition. Nanoscale contacts are defined on the BiFeO3 via a series of nanofabrication steps which include e-beam lithography, metal deposition (Nb or Co capped with Pt) and lift-off. Conductive-tip atomic force microscopy and piezoresponse force microscopy are used to characterize the transport across the ferroelectric barrier as a function of its polarization (up/down). The observed electro-resistance, measured at various temperatures, allows studying the different electric-field screening in the normal and superconducting states. Work supported by DIM Oxymore.

  1. Oceanography. Vertical mixing in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Webb, D J; Suginohara, N

    2001-01-01

    The thermohaline circulation of the ocean results primarily from downwelling at sites in the Nordic and Labrador Seas and upwelling throughout the rest of the ocean. The latter is often described as being due to breaking internal waves. Here we reconcile the difference between theoretical and observed estimates of vertical mixing in the deep ocean by presenting a revised view of the thermohaline circulation, which allows for additional upwelling in the Southern Ocean and the separation of the North Atlantic Deep Water cell from the Antarctic Bottom Water cell. The changes also mean that much less wind and tidal energy needs to be dissipated in the deep ocean than was originally thought. PMID:11343103

  2. Stripe stabilization in vertical Bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. C.; Katti, R. R.; Stadler, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Long, partial rectangular grooves have been made to reside below the stripe-confinement groove on a garnet surface, in order to stabilize minor loop stripes in a vertical Bloch-line memory. The test chip contained, in addition to either 10 or 20 minor-loop grooves, 10 read/write gate grooves and a major line groove; both 10 and 20 micron groove periods were tested. As the bias field was gradually decreased, bubbles began to stripe out. These stripes were stable at bias fields in the 70-80 Oe range. When stripes escaped from the groove, the even occurred from the end which does not face a read/write gate groove.

  3. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye. PMID:23955156

  4. Matrix model and dimensions at hypercube vertices

    E-print Network

    Morozov, A; Popolitov, A

    2015-01-01

    In hypercube approach to correlation functions in Chern-Simons theory (knot polynomials) the central role is played by the numbers of cycles, in which the link diagram is decomposed under different resolutions. Certain functions of these numbers are further interpreted as dimensions of graded spaces, associated with hypercube vertices. Finding these functions is, however, a somewhat non-trivial problem. In arXiv:1506.07516 it was suggested to solve it with the help of the matrix model technique, in the spirit of AMM/EO topological recursion. In this paper we further elaborate on this idea and provide a vast collection of non-trivial examples, related both to ordinary and virtual links and knots. Remarkably, most powerful versions of the formalism freely convert ordinary knots/links to virtual and back -- moreover, go beyond the knot-related set of the (2,2)-valent graphs.

  5. Matrix model and dimensions at hypercube vertices

    E-print Network

    A. Morozov; An. Morozov; A. Popolitov

    2015-08-08

    In hypercube approach to correlation functions in Chern-Simons theory (knot polynomials) the central role is played by the numbers of cycles, in which the link diagram is decomposed under different resolutions. Certain functions of these numbers are further interpreted as dimensions of graded spaces, associated with hypercube vertices. Finding these functions is, however, a somewhat non-trivial problem. In arXiv:1506.07516 it was suggested to solve it with the help of the matrix model technique, in the spirit of AMM/EO topological recursion. In this paper we further elaborate on this idea and provide a vast collection of non-trivial examples, related both to ordinary and virtual links and knots. Remarkably, most powerful versions of the formalism freely convert ordinary knots/links to virtual and back -- moreover, go beyond the knot-related set of the (2,2)-valent graphs.

  6. Integrated Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R. R.; Wu, J. C.; Stadler, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) Memory is a recently conceived, integrated, solid state, block access, VLSI memory which offers the potential of 1 Gbit/sq cm areal storage density, data rates of hundreds of megabits/sec, and submillisecond average access time simultaneously at relatively low mass, volume, and power values when compared to alternative technologies. VBLs are micromagnetic structures within magnetic domain walls which can be manipulated using magnetic fields from integrated conductors. The presence or absence of BVL pairs are used to store binary information. At present, efforts are being directed at developing a single chip memory using 25 Mbit/sq cm technology in magnetic garnet material which integrates, at a single operating point, the writing, storage, reading, and amplification functions needed in a memory. The current design architecture, functional elements, and supercomputer simulation results are described which are used to assist the design process.

  7. Verticality perception during and after galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Volkening, Katharina; Bergmann, Jeannine; Keller, Ingo; Wuehr, Max; Müller, Friedemann; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    The human brain constructs verticality perception by integrating vestibular, somatosensory, and visual information. Here we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has an effect on verticality perception both during and after application, by assessing the subjective verticals (visual, haptic and postural) in healthy subjects at those times. During stimulation the subjective visual vertical and the subjective haptic vertical shifted towards the anode, whereas this shift was reversed towards the cathode in all modalities once stimulation was turned off. Overall, the effects were strongest for the haptic modality. Additional investigation of the time course of GVS-induced changes in the haptic vertical revealed that anodal shifts persisted for the entire 20-min stimulation interval in the majority of subjects. Aftereffects exhibited different types of decay, with a preponderance for an exponential decay. The existence of such reverse effects after stimulation could have implications for GVS-based therapy. PMID:25157799

  8. Infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity for depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Kaneko, Hirohiko; Kanazawa, So; Otsuka, Yumiko; Shirai, Nobu; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2013-05-01

    Both horizontal and vertical binocular disparities produce depth perception in adults. In developmental studies, infants aged around 4 to 6 months were shown to perceive depth from horizontal disparity. However, infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity has not been shown clearly. To examine the sensitivity in infants, this study measured preferential looking behavior of infants aged 20 to 27 weeks. Results showed a significant preference for the stimulus with vertical disparity, providing the first evidence of infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity. The infants in the same age group did not show preference for stimulus with horizontal disparity when the stimulus were comparable to the stimulus with vertical disparity, while their sensitivity to horizontal disparity was confirmed with the stimuli used in a previous study. Our results would suggest that properties in processing horizontal and vertical disparities are different in infancy, and that the sensitivity to horizontal disparity are still premature in 27 weeks after birth.

  9. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  10. Influence of grid aspect ratio on planetary boundary layer turbulence in large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, S.; Yashiro, H.; Sato, Y.; Miyamoto, Y.; Tomita, H.

    2015-10-01

    We examine the influence of the grid aspect ratio of horizontal to vertical grid spacing on turbulence in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) in a large-eddy simulation (LES). In order to clarify and distinguish them from other artificial effects caused by numerical schemes, we used a fully compressible meteorological LES model with a fully explicit scheme of temporal integration. The influences are investigated with a series of sensitivity tests with parameter sweeps of spatial resolution and grid aspect ratio. We confirmed that the mixing length of the eddy viscosity and diffusion due to sub-grid-scale turbulence plays an essential role in reproducing the theoretical -5/3 slope of the energy spectrum. If we define the filter length in LES modeling based on consideration of the numerical scheme, and introduce a corrective factor for the grid aspect ratio into the mixing length, the theoretical slope of the energy spectrum can be obtained; otherwise, spurious energy piling appears at high wave numbers. We also found that the grid aspect ratio has influence on the turbulent statistics, especially the skewness of the vertical velocity near the top of the PBL, which becomes spuriously large with large aspect ratio, even if a reasonable spectrum is obtained.

  11. Robotic platform for traveling on vertical piping network

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A; Vrettos, Nick J; Krementz, Daniel; Marzolf, Athneal D

    2015-02-03

    This invention relates generally to robotic systems and is specifically designed for a robotic system that can navigate vertical pipes within a waste tank or similar environment. The robotic system allows a process for sampling, cleaning, inspecting and removing waste around vertical pipes by supplying a robotic platform that uses the vertical pipes to support and navigate the platform above waste material contained in the tank.

  12. Lorentz resonances and the vertical structure of dusty rings - Analytical and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, Les; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    The Schaffer and Burns (1987) linear theory of Lorentz resonances (LRs) in planetary rings is extended in order to accurately compute LR locations and to elucidate the nature of grain trajectories within the LR zones. Using the perturbation theory and energy arguments, it is shown that an increase in the inclination or eccentricity of a grain must be accompanied by a shift in the mean orbital radius of the particle. This shift alters the epicyclic frequencies in such a way that the infinite response of the linear resonance theory is suppressed. Chaotic motion is found for the range of charge-to-mass ratios that cause the vertical and horizontal LRs to overlap.

  13. Vapor detection performance of vertically aligned, ordered arrays of silicon nanowires with a porous electrode.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher R; In, Hyun Jin; Begue, Nathan J; Pehrsson, Pehr E

    2011-06-15

    Vertically aligned, ordered arrays of silicon nanowires capped with a porous top electrode are used to detect gas phase ammonia and nitrogen dioxide in humidified air. The sensors had very fast response times and large signal-to-noise ratios. Calibration curves were created using both an initial slope method and a fixed-time point method. The initial-slope method had a power law dependence that correlates well with concentration, demonstrating a viable alternative for eventual quantitative vapor detection and enabling shorter sampling and regeneration times. PMID:21563827

  14. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-pulse lidar systems (MPL) were used to measure aerosol properties during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship RN Ronald H. Brown, and the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) in the Maldives. Sunphotometers were used to provide aerosol optical depths (AOD) needed to calibrate the MPL. This study focuses on the height distribution and optical properties (at 523 nm) of aerosols observed during the campaign. The height of the highest aerosols (top height) was calculated and found to be below 4 km for most of the cruise. The marine boundary layer (MBL) top was calculated and found to be less than 1 km. MPL results were combined with air mass trajectories, radiosonde profiles of temperature and humidity, and aerosol concentration and optical measurements. Humidity varied from approximately 80% near the surface to 50% near the top height during the entire cruise. The average value and standard deviation of aerosol optical parameters were determined for characteristic air mass regimes. Marine aerosols in the absence of any continental influence were found to have an AOD of 0.05 +/- 0.03, an extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S-ratio) of 33 +/- 6 sr, and peak extinction values around 0.05/km (near the MBL top). The marine results are shown to be in agreement with previously measured and expected values. Polluted marine areas over the Indian Ocean, influenced by continental aerosols, had AOD values in excess of 0.2, S-ratios well above 40 sr, and peak extinction values approximately 0.20/km (near the MBL top). The polluted marine results are shown to be similar to previously published values for continental aerosols. Comparisons between MPL derived extinction near the ship (75 m) and extinction calculated at ship-level using scattering measured by a nephelometer and absorption using a PSAP were conducted. The comparisons indicated that the MPL algorithm (using a constant S-ratio throughout the lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.

  15. Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers for interfacing with live systems

    SciTech Connect

    Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Desikan, Ramya; McKnight, Timothy E; Klein, Kate L; Rack, P. D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to synthesize carbon nanofibers with a high degree of control over their geometry, location, and structure via catalytic plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition has expanded the possibility of new applications. The nanoscale dimensions and high aspect ratio of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs), along with favorable physical and chemical characteristics, has provided a nanostructured material with properties that are well-suited for interfacing with live cells and tissues. This review surveys the aspects of synthesis, integration, and functionalization of VACNFs, followed by examples of how VACNFs have been used to interface with live systems for a variety of advanced nanoscale biological applications.

  16. Cu-Ni composition gradient for the catalytic synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Kate L; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Rack, Philip D; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Meyer III, Harry M; Simpson, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The influence of catalyst alloy composition on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers was studied using Cu-Ni thin films. Metals were co-sputtered onto a substrate to form a thin film alloy with a wide compositional gradient, as determined by Auger analysis. Carbon nanofibers were then grown from the gradient catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The alloy composition produced substantial differences in the resulting nanofibers, which varied from branched structures at 81%Ni-19%Cu to high aspect ratio nanocones at 80%Cu-20%Ni. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques also revealed segregation of the initial alloy catalyst particles at certain concentrations.

  17. Growth of undoped indium phosphide by OMVPE in an inverted-vertical reactor using trimethylindium and tertiarybutylphosphine and phosphine

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.D.; Oatis, K.; Wu, J.; Chaddha, A.K.; Hahn, S.R.; Chen, H.S.; Wild, S.; Deng, C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics); Plant, T.; Marlia, J. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The as-grown morphologies and background carrier concentrations of undoped InP epilayers grown at 650 C were determined as a function of phosphorus source [tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) or phosphine (PH[sub 3])] and V:III ratio in an inverted-vertical (IV) metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor. Specular surface morphology was obtained over the entire growth surface (16.6 cm[sup 2]) at a minimum PH[sub 3] to trimethylindium (TMIn) ratio of 10, and at a minimum TBP to TMIn ratio of 33. Below these V:III ratios, the area of the InP epilayer surfaces exhibiting specular morphology decreased as the V:III ratio was reduced; however, the layer thicknesses remained uniform. All undoped InP epilayers were n-type. The carrier concentration (N[sub d]-N[sub A]) obtained with PH[sub 3] in the specular area of the InP epilayers was on the order of 1.5 [times] 10[sup 14] cm[sup [minus]3] at V:III ratios up to ca. 20; at a V:III ratio of 40, N[sub D]-N[sub A] decreased to 10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3]. The carrier concentration obtained with TBP in the specular area of the InP epilayers was about 3.6 [times] 10[sup 15] cm[sup [minus]3] at V:III ratios up to 33. The relation of V:III ratio to morphology and the distribution of visible phosphorus deposition on the reactor tube walls during growth indicated that the decomposition characteristics of PH[sub 3] and TBP are considerably different in the inverted vertical reactor than in other system configurations. The decomposition characteristics observed here are empirically correlated with decomposition mechanism unique to the IV geometry.

  18. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  19. Poisson`s ratio and crustal seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.I.

    1996-02-10

    This report discusses the use of Poisson`s ratio to place constraints on continental crustal composition. A summary of Poisson`s ratios for many common rock formations is also included with emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rock properties.

  20. TURBULENCE IN THE OUTER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. STRONG ACCRETION DRIVEN BY A VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Beckwith, Kris; Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2013-09-20

    We carry out a series of local, vertically stratified shearing box simulations of protoplanetary disks that include ambipolar diffusion and a net vertical magnetic field. The ambipolar diffusion profiles we employ correspond to 30 AU and 100 AU in a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) disk model, which consists of a far-ultraviolet-ionized surface layer and low-ionization disk interior. These simulations serve as a follow-up to Simon et al., in which we found that without a net vertical field, the turbulent stresses that result from the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are too weak to account for observed accretion rates. The simulations in this work show a very strong dependence of the accretion stresses on the strength of the background vertical field; as the field strength increases, the stress amplitude increases. For a net vertical field strength (quantified by ?{sub 0}, the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure at the disk mid-plane) of ?{sub 0} = 10{sup 4} and ?{sub 0} = 10{sup 5}, we find accretion rates M-dot ?10{sup -8}-10{sup –7} M{sub ?} yr{sup –1}. These accretion rates agree with observational constraints, suggesting a vertical magnetic field strength of ?60-200 ?G and 10-30 ?G at 30 AU and 100 AU, respectively, in a MMSN disk. Furthermore, the stress has a non-negligible component due to a magnetic wind. For sufficiently strong vertical field strengths, MRI turbulence is quenched, and the flow becomes largely laminar, with accretion proceeding through large-scale correlations in the radial and toroidal field components as well as through the magnetic wind. In all simulations, the presence of a low-ionization region near the disk mid-plane, which we call the ambipolar damping zone, results in reduced stresses there.

  1. A Vertical Differential Configuration in GPR prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pochanin, Gennadiy; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla; Catapano, Ilaria; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The rejection of the direct coupling between the antennas is an issue of interest in several GPR applications, especially when it is important to distinguish the targets of interest from the clutter and the signal reflected from the air soil interface. Therefore, in this framework several hardware and software strategies have been proposed. Among the software strategies, probably the most common one is the background removal [1], whereas as an hardware strategy the differential configuration has been introduced in [2-3] and then further on studied in [4] with respect to the spatial filtering properties of the relevant mathematical operator. In particular, the studies proposed in [1] and [4] have shown that, in general, all the strategies for the rejection of the direct coupling have necessarily some drawback, essentially because it is not possible to erase all and only the undesired contributions leaving "untouched" the contributions of the targets of interest to the gathered signal. With specific regard to the differential configuration, in [2-3], the differential configuration consisted in a couple of receiving antennas symmetrically placed around the transmitting one, being the three antennas placed along the same horizontal segment. Therefore, we might define that configuration as a "horizontal differential configuration". Here, we propose a novel differential GPR configuration, where the two receiving antennas are still symmetrically located with respect to the transmitting one, but are placed piled on each other at different heights from the air-soil interface, whereas the transmitting antenna is at the medium height between the two receiving one (however, it is not at the same abscissa but at a fixed horizontal offset from the receiving antennas). Such a differential configuration has been previously presented in [5-6] and allows a good isolation between the antennas, while preserving the possibility to collect backscattered signals from both electrically small objects and interfaces. This configuration can be labeled as a vertical differential configuration. At the conference, the reconstruction capabilities of this differential GPR configuration system will be discussed by means of an analysis of the problem based on a properly designed microwave tomographic inversion approach. The proposed approach exploits the Born approximation and faces the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In this way, the problem of the local minima is avoided [7] and it is possible to impose some regularization to the problem in an easy way problem [8-9]. At the conference, a theoretical analysis of the mathematical propserties of the scattering operator under the vertical differential configuration will be presented showing that, with respect to the horizontal differential configuration, the vertical one allows to reject the direct coupling between the antennas but not the coupling of the antennas occurring through the air-soil interface. On the other hand, the filtering properties of the operator at hand con be considered, let say, less severe in some cases. At the conference, both some numerical and experimental results will be shown. References [1] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Effects of the background removal in linear inverse scattering", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 46, pp. 1104-1114, April 2008. [2] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Three-Dimensional FDTD modeling of a ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 38, pp. 1513-1521, July 2000. [3] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Optimization of the transmitter-receiver separation in the ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 51, no 3, pp. 362-370, March 2003. [4] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "A microwave tomography approach for a differential configuration in GPR prospecting", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 54, pp. 3541 - 3548, 2006. [5] Y.A. Kopylov, S.A. Masalov, G.P. Pochanin, "The way of isolation between transmitting and receiving modules of antenna

  2. 75 FR 79286 - Designated Reserve Ratio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...3064-AD69 Designated Reserve Ratio AGENCY: Federal Deposit...comprehensive, long-range management plan for the Deposit...the designated reserve ratio (DRR) at 2 percent...the Designated Reserve Ratio setting out a comprehensive, long-range management plan for the DIF...

  3. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  4. Vertical One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Platforms for Label-Free (Bio)Sensing: Towards Drop-And- Measure Applications

    E-print Network

    Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In this work, all-silicon, integrated optofluidic platforms, fabricated by electrochemical micromachining technology, making use of vertical, one-dimensional high-aspect- ratio photonic crystals for flow-through (bio)sensing applications are reviewed. The potential of such platforms for point-of-care applications is discussed for both pressure-driven and capillarity- driven operations with reference to refractometry and biochemical sensing.

  5. On the Vertical Structuring of Gigantic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, C.; Pasko, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Gigantic Jets (GJs) are large-scale electrical discharges between the thundercloud tops and the lower ionosphere. It is estimated that an individual GJ can contribute as much as cloud-to-ground lightning in discharging a thunderstorm system, transferring hundreds of coulombs from thundercloud to the ionosphere [Cummer et al., Nat. Geosci., 2, 617-620, 2009]. GJs are initiated deep inside the thundercloud as intracloud lightning discharges. Owing to a charge imbalance, meaning the upper charge center is depleted with respect to the midlevel charge center, the upward-directed lightning leaders manage to escape through the thundercloud top to form GJs [Krehbiel et al., Nat. Geosci., 1, 233-237, 2008]. As a GJ leader crosses the stratosphere its streamer zone becomes longer and longer, due to the dynamics of streamer growth in a medium with exponentially-decreasing air density, such as in the Earth's atmosphere [Raizer et al., GRL, 33, L23801, 2006]. The speed at which a leader propagates is limited by the air heating of every newly formed leader section, rate of which is slower at upper altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere [da Silva and Pasko, GRL, 39, L13805, 2012]. Despite the expected deceleration of an upward-directed leader, GJs are observed to accelerate as they approach the ionosphere. To address this issue, we propose a simple time-dynamic model for GJ propagation that simulates the upward propagation of a leader discharge accounting for the effects of the expansion of its streamer zone. We propose that the GJ acceleration is a consequence of its vertical structuring and, therefore, can be used to trace the transition altitude between the leader and streamer zone sections of GJs [da Silva and Pasko, GRL, 40, 12, 3315-3319, 2013]. Leaders and streamers are very different electrical discharges in terms of the degree of ionization, temperature, and composition of the plasma inside their channels. A correct description of the vertical structuring of GJs is of fundamental importance for evaluation of their effects in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  6. Vertically Integrated Rheology of Deforming Oceanic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, J. K.; Gordon, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    The tectonics of the oceans have traditionally been modeled in terms of rigid plates interacting at narrow boundaries. The now well-documented existence of diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, across which relative motion is distributed over hundreds to thousands of kilometers, demonstrates the need for a different approach to understanding the tectonics and geodynamics of a substantial fraction of oceanic lithosphere. A model that has usefully been applied to diffuse zones of continental deformation is that of a thin viscous sheet of fluid obeying a power-law rheology. The model has few adjustable parameters, typically a power-law exponent, n, and the Argand number [England & McKenzie, 1982], which is a measure of the size of buoyancy forces caused by the deformation, and which can be neglected for deformation of oceanic lithosphere. In prior investigations of a thin sheet of power-law fluid for continental regions, most studies have found that the most appropriate power-law exponent is ?3 [e.g., England & Molnar 1991, 1997], but a value as large as ?10 has been recently suggested by Dayem et al. [2009]. Because the rheology of oceanic lithosphere differs significantly from that of continental lithosphere, the most appropriate exponent may be larger than 3, and should in some sense be an appropriately weighted average between the properties of the upper lithosphere, which deforms brittlely and semi-brittlely, and for which the power-law exponent is n ? ?, and the lower lithosphere, which deforms by dislocation glide [Goetze 1978; Evans & Goetze 1979; Ratteron et al. 2003; Dayem et al. 2009; Mei et al. 2010], which obeys an exponential law, and by dislocation creep for which n?3 [Sonder & England, 1986]. To estimate the appropriate power-law exponent consistent with laboratory experiments we determine strain rate as a function of applied end load on the lithosphere for various ages of lithosphere. We find that a power-law fluid well approximates the vertically integrated rheology of oceanic lithosphere determined from laboratory experiments and that the best-fitting power-law exponent for the vertically integrated rheology is insensitive to strain rate. We also find that, except for very young lithosphere (< ?10 Ma old), the best-fitting power law exponent is insensitive to the age of the lithosphere, with the value of the exponent being between 14 and 16 when failing for thrust faulting for the flow laws of Kohlstedt et al [1995] and between 15 and 19 for more recently published flow laws. These results support the application of thin viscous sheet models to diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, such as the ones accommodating motion between the India, Capricorn, and Australia plates in the Indian Ocean.

  7. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) started the survey system development for Hydrothermal deposit. We proposed the Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS), the reflection seismic survey with vertical cable above seabottom. VCS has the following advantages for hydrothermal deposit survey. (1) VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey in limited area. (2) It achieves high-resolution image because the sensors are closely located to the target. (3) It avoids the coupling problems between sensor and seabottom that cause serious damage of seismic data quality. (4) Because of autonomous recording system on sea floor, various types of marine source are applicable with VCS such as sea-surface source (GI gun etc.) , deep-towed or ocean bottom source. Our first experiment of 2D/3D VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN, in November 2009. The 2D VCS data processing follows the walk-away VSP, including wave field separation and depth migration. Seismic Interferometry technique is also applied. The results give much clearer image than the conventional surface seismic. Prestack depth migration is applied to 3D data to obtain good quality 3D depth volume. Seismic Interferometry technique is applied to obtain the high resolution image in the very shallow zone. Based on the feasibility study, we have developed the autonomous recording VCS system and carried out the trial experiment in actual ocean at the water depth of about 400m to establish the procedures of deployment/recovery and to examine the VC position or fluctuation at seabottom. The result shows that the VC position is estimated with sufficient accuracy and very little fluctuation is observed. Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo took the research cruise NT11-02 on JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima in February, 2011. In the cruise NT11-02, JGI carried out the second VCS survey using the autonomous VCS recording system with the deep towed source provided by Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo. It generates high frequency acoustic waves around 1kHz. The acquired VCS data clearly shows the reflections and currently being processed for imaging the subsurface structure.

  8. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for SMS exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hotoshi; Mizohata, Shigeharu

    2014-05-01

    The Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) survey is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by sea-surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because the VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed it for the SMS survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We have been developing the VCS survey system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of these surveys are from 100m up to 2100 m. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been also completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system is available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed a new approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In 2013, we have carried out the second VCS survey using the surface-towed high-voltage sparker and ocean bottom source in the Izena Cauldron, which is one of the most promising SMS areas around Japan. The positions of ocean bottom source estimated by this method are consistent with the VCS field records. The VCS data with the sparker have been processed with 3D PSTM. It gives the very high resolution 3D volume deeper than two hundred meters. Our VCS system has been demonstrated as a promising survey tool for the SMS exploration.

  9. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Mizohata, S.; Ishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    The VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic) is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of the survey are from 100m up to 2100m. The target of the survey includes not only hydrothermal deposit but oil and gas exploration. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system are available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed another approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In the data acquisition stage, we estimate the position of VCS location with slant ranging method from the sea surface. The deep-towed source or ocean bottom source is estimated by SSBL/USBL. The water velocity profile is measured by XCTD. After the data acquisition, we pick the first break times of the VCS recorded data. The estimated positions of shot points and receiver points in the field include the errors. We use these data as initial guesses, we invert iteratively shot and receiver positions to match the travel time data. After several iterations we could finally estimate the most probable positions. Integration of the constraint of VCS hydrophone positions, such as the spacing is 10m, can accelerate the convergence of the iterative inversion and improve results. The accuracy of the estimated positions from the travel time date is enough for the VCS data processing.

  10. Heat-transfer characteristics of climbing film evaporation in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luopeng; Chen, Xue; Shen, Shengqiang

    2010-09-15

    Heat-transfer characteristics of climbing film evaporation were experimentally investigated on a vertical climbing film evaporator heated by tube-outside hot water. The experimental setup was designed for determining the effect of the height of feed water inside a vertical tube and the range of temperature difference on local heat transfer coefficient inside a vertical tube (h{sub i}). In this setup, the height of feed water was successfully controlled and the polypropylene shell effectively impedes the heat loss to the ground. The results indicated that a reduction in the height of feed water contributed to a significant increase in h{sub i} if no dry patches around the wall of the heated tube appeared inside the tube. The height ratio of feed water R{sub h} = 0.3 was proposed as the optimal one as dry patches destroyed the continuous climbing film when R{sub h} is under 0.3. It was found that the minimum temperature difference driving climbing film evaporation is suggested as 5 C due to a sharp reduction in h{sub i} for temperature difference below 5 C. The experiment also showed that h{sub i} increased with an increase in temperature difference, which proved the superiority of climbing film evaporation in utilizing low-grade surplus heating source due to its wide range of driving temperature difference. The experimental results were compared with the previous literature and demonstrated a satisfactory agreement. (author)

  11. Enhanced UV-assisted vertical etching of polyethylene terephthalate for fabrication of microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanshahi, A.; Pajouhi, H.; Tamaddon, A. H.; Sadeghi, A.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Khadem-Hoseiny, B.

    2009-07-01

    The improved ultraviolet (UV)-assisted vertical etching of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) for manufacturing microsystem components is reported. The PET vertical etching is achieved by using a dimethylformamide solution assisted by ultraviolet illumination onto a patterned PET substrate. The process is carried out in low temperature solutions for the benefits of low shrinkage and deformation of PET, yet having high aspect ratio structures and relatively high rates of etching. Furthermore, mask engineering is done for selecting an appropriate mask in order to have crack-free structures. This UV-assisted vertical etching of PET is suitable for the formation of plastic micro-parts as well as metal micro-parts with the aid of electrodeposition. Using this technique, a micromanipulator tool and an electrodeposition setup, all plastic and metallic microsystems can be easily manufactured and assembled. As an example prototype, we have successfully fabricated and assembled an all-plastic microturbine. This microturbine can be used in hydraulic or fluidic applications in microsystems.

  12. Non-Exponential Growth in Density-Stratified Thin Vertically Isothermal Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mond, M.; Shtemler, Yu. M.

    2011-07-01

    Linear instability of an equilibrium configuration with toroidal dominant magnetic field is studied in thin vertically-isothermal Keplerian discs. Solutions of the stability problem are found explicitly by asymptotic expansions in small aspect ratio of the disc. The perturbations are decoupled into in-plane and vertical modes, which are the inertia-Coriolis and magnetosonic waves. It is shown that the axisymmetric MRI is completely suppressed by dominant toroidal magnetic fields. Exhibiting spectral asymptotic stability, thin discs are nonetheless shown to host intensive activity in the shape of non modal growth of initial small perturbations. In pure hydrodynamic case two mechanisms that lead to such behavior are identified and studied, namely, non-resonant excitation of vertically confined sound waves by stable planar inertia-Coriolis modes that results in linear growth with time, as well as resonant coupling of those two modes that leads to a quadratic growth of the initial perturbations. It is further speculated that the non modal growth can give rise to secondary stratorotational instabilities and thus lead to a new route to turbulence generation in thin discs.

  13. High-Performance Organic Vertical Thin Film Transistor Using Graphene as a Tunable Contact.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Hailong; Weiss, Nathan O; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-11-24

    Here we present a general strategy for the fabrication of high-performance organic vertical thin film transistors (OVTFTs) based on the heterostructure of graphene and different organic semiconductor thin films. Utilizing the unique tunable work function of graphene, we show that the vertical carrier transport across the graphene-organic semiconductor junction can be effectively modulated to achieve an ON/OFF ratio greater than 10(3). Importantly, with the OVTFT design, the channel length is determined by the organic thin film thickness rather than by lithographic resolution. It can thus readily enable transistors with ultrashort channel lengths (<200 nm) to afford a delivering current greatly exceeding that of conventional planar TFTs, thus enabling a respectable operation frequency (up to 0.4 MHz) while using low-mobility organic semiconductors and low-resolution lithography. With this vertical device architecture, the entire organic channel is sandwiched and naturally protected between the source and drain electrodes, which function as the self-passivation layer to ensure stable operation of both p- and n-type OVTFTs in ambient conditions and enable complementary circuits with voltage gain. The creation of high-performance and highly robust OVTFTs can open up exciting opportunities in large-area organic macroelectronics. PMID:26468901

  14. Measurements of surface pressures on an operating vertical-axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Akins, R.E. )

    1989-11-01

    This report describes measurements of surface pressures on a vertical-axis wind turbine using pressure transducers mounted at the equator of one blade of the rotor. These pressure transducers were monitored as a function of relative rotor position and incident wind speed to obtain the distribution of surface pressure. The measured pressure distributions are substantially different from wind-tunnel results. The surface pressures were integrated to obtain tangential and normal force coefficients as a function of rotor position relative to the incident wind. These measured force coefficients are compared with wind-tunnel results for tip-speed ratios from 2.20 to 4.60. At low tip-speed ratios there is evidence of dynamic stall for the upwind portion of the rotation. 15 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Demonstration of enhanced side-mode suppression in metal-filled photonic crystal vertical cavity lasers.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Benjamin G; Arbabi, Amir; Peun Tan, Meng; Kasten, Ansas M; Choquette, Kent D; Goddard, Lynford L

    2013-06-01

    Previously reported simulations have suggested that depositing thin layers of metal over the surface of a single-mode, etched air hole photonic crystal (PhC) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) could potentially improve the laser's side-mode suppression ratio by introducing additional losses to the higher-order modes. This work demonstrates the concept by presenting the results of a 30 nm thin film of Cr deposited on the surface of an implant-confined PhC VCSEL. Both experimental measurements and simulation results are in agreement showing that the single-mode operation is improved at the same injection current ratio relative to threshold. PMID:23722795

  16. Segregation in mixtures of granular chains and spherical grains under vertical vibration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Ning; Shi, Qingfan; Sun, Gang; Li, Liangsheng

    2013-04-01

    We experimentally investigate segregation behaviors of binary granular mixtures consisting of granular chains and spherical grains with different interstitial media under vertical vibrations. A quantitative criterion is proposed to locate the boundaries between different vibrating phases. The water-immersed granular mixture exhibits two interesting types of segregation behaviors: chain-on-top and sandwich patterns. However, the phenomenon of sandwich segregation is absent for the air-immersed mixture. The topological differences of phase diagrams between two different environments indicate that the interstitial fluid plays an important role on the granular demixing. Additionally, the phase behaviors of mixtures for the different chain lengths show a not significant discrepancy. Finally, the vibrating thickness ratio determining the phase boundary characterizes the mixing extent of the granular bed. The estimated ratios for various chain lengths exhibit a monotonically decreasing dependence, when the vibration frequency increases. PMID:23679403

  17. A three-dimensional microelectrode array composed of vertically aligned ultra-dense carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, C.; Yadav, S.; Joshi, R.; Schneider, J. J.; Thielemann, C.

    2015-07-01

    Electrodes based on carbon nanotubes are a promising approach to manufacture highly sensitive sensors with a low limit of signal detection and a high signal-to-noise ratio. This is achieved by dramatically increasing the electrochemical active surface area without increasing the overall geometrical dimensions. Typically, carbon nanotube electrodes are nearly planar and composed of randomly distributed carbon nanotube networks having a limited surface gain for a specific geometrical surface area. To overcome this limitation, we have introduced vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) networks as electrodes, which are arranged in a microelectrode pattern of 60 single electrodes. Each microelectrode features a very high aspect ratio of more than 300 and thus a dramatically increased surface area. These microelectrodes composed of VACNT networks display dramatically decreased impedance over the entire frequency range compared to planar microelectrodes caused by the enormous capacity increase. This is experimentally verified by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

  18. Mudflow rheology in a vertically rotating flume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Westphal, Jerome A.; Jobson, Harvey E.

    1990-01-01

    Joint research by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Missouri-Rolla currently (1990) is being conducted on a 3.05 meters in diameter vertically rotating flume used to simulate mudflows under steady-state conditions. Observed mudflow simulations indicate flow patterns in the flume are similar to those occurring in natural mudflows. Variables such as mean and surface velocity, depth, and average boundary shear stress can be measured in this flume more easily than in the field or in a traditional tilting flume. Sensitive variables such as sediment concentration, grain-size distribution, and Atterberg limits also can be precisely and easily controlled. A known Newtonian fluid, SAE 30 motor oil, was tested in the flume and the computed value for viscosity was within 12.5 percent of the stated viscosity. This provided support that the data from the flume can be used to determine the rheological properties of fluids such as mud. Measurements on mud slurries indicate that flows with sediment concentrations ranging from 81 to 87 percent sediment by weight can be approximated as Bingham plastic for strain rates greater than 1 per second. In this approximation, the yield stress and Bingham viscosity were extremely sensitive to sediment concentration. Generally, the magnitude of the yield stress was large relative to the change in shear stress with increasing mudflow velocity.

  19. Jetting during vertical impacts of spherical projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Bowling, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The extreme pressures reached during jetting, a process by which material is squirted out from the contact point of two colliding objects, causes melting and vaporization at low impact velocities. Jetting is a major source of melting in shocked porous material, a potential source of tektites, a possible origin of chondrules, and even a conceivable origin of the Moon. Here, in an attempt to quantify the importance of jetting, we present numerical simulation of jetting during the vertical impacts of spherical projectiles on both flat and curved targets. We find that impacts on curved targets result in more jetted material but that higher impact velocities result in less jetted material. For an aluminum impactor striking a flat Al target at 2 km/s we find that 3.4% of a projectile mass is jetted while 8.3% is jetted for an impact between two equal sized Al spheres. Our results indicate that the theory of jetting during the collision of thin plates can be used to predict the conditions when jetting will occur. However, we find current analytic models do not make accurate predictions of the amount of jetted mass. Our work indicates that the amount of jetted mass is independent of model resolution as long as some jetted material is resolved. This is the result of lower velocity material dominating the mass of the jet.

  20. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  1. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  2. ATLAS LTCS Vertically Challenged System Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Deepak; Garrison, Matt; Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    Re-planning of LTCS TVAC testing and supporting RTA (Receiver Telescope Assembly) Test Plan and Procedure document preparation. The Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) is designed to maintain the lasers onboard Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) at their operational temperatures. In order to verify the functionality of the LTCS, a thermal balance test of the thermal hardware was performed. During the first cold start of the LTCS, the Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was unable to control the laser mass simulators temperature. The control heaters were fully on and the loop temperature remained well below the desired setpoint. Thermal analysis of the loop did not show these results. This unpredicted behavior of the LTCS was brought up to a panel of LHP experts. Based on the testing and a review of all the data, there were multiple diagnostic performed in order to narrow down the cause. The prevailing theory is that gravity is causing oscillating flow within the loop, which artificially increased the control power needs. This resulted in a replan of the LTCS test flow and the addition of a GSE heater to allow vertical operation.

  3. Heat transfer about a vertical permeable membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kaviany, M. )

    1988-05-01

    The natural convection heat transfer about both sides of vertical walls without any seepage has been studied and the effects of the wall thickness and thermal conductivity on the local and average heat transfer rates have been determined. Viskanta and Lankford have concluded that in predicting the heat transfer rate through the wall, for low-thermal-conductivity walls the a priori unknown wall surface temperatures can be walls the a priori unknown wall surface temperatures can be estimated as the arithmetic average of the reservoir temperatures without loss of accuracy (for most practical situations). Sparrow and Prakash treated the surface temperature as variable but used the local temperature along with the available isothermal boundary-layer analysis for determination of the local heat transfer rate and found this to be reasonable at relatively low Grashof numbers. In this study the heat trasnfer rate between two reservoirs of different temperature connected in part through a permeable membrane is analyzed. Rather than solving the complete problem numerically for the three domains (fluid-wall-fluid), the available results on the effects of suction and blowing on the natural convection boundary layer are used in an analysis of the membranes with low thermal conductivity and small seepage velocities, which are characteristic of membranes considered. This will lead to rather simple expressions for the determination of the heat transfer rate.

  4. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  5. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  6. Morpheus Vertical Test Bed Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy; Devolites, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing, that is designed to serve as a testbed for advanced spacecraft technologies. The lander vehicle, propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a 500kg payload to the lunar surface, provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. Morpheus onboard software is autonomous from ignition all the way through landing, and is designed to be capable of executing a variety of flight trajectories, with onboard fault checks and automatic contingency responses. The Morpheus 1.5A vehicle performed 26 integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire tests, tethered tests, and two attempted freeflights between April 2011 and August 2012. The final flight of Morpheus 1.5A resulted in a loss of the vehicle. In September 2012, development began on the Morpheus 1.5B vehicle, which subsequently followed a similar test campaign culminating in free-flights at a simulated planetary landscape built at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. This paper describes the integrated test campaign, including successes and setbacks, and how the system design for handling faults and failures evolved over the course of the project.

  7. Looking ahead with vertical seismic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, M.A. )

    1994-08-01

    Several operations enhance the ability to predict the subsurface below the bottom total depth (TD) of the well when applied to zero-offset vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data. Other key issues regarding the use of VSP data in this fashion are resolution and look-ahead distance. An impedance log is the most useful form for presenting VSP data to look ahead of the drill bit. The VSP composite trace must first tie reliably to the surface seismic section and to the well log synthetic seismogram. The impedance log is obtained by inverting this VSP composite trace. However, before performing the inversion, one needs to (1) correct the composite trace for attenuation effects below TD and (2) input velocities to provide low-frequency information. An exponential gain function applied to the VSP data below TD adequately compensates for the loss of amplitude caused by attenuation. A calibration of the seismically derived velocities with VSP velocities yields the necessary low-frequency information. These concepts are illustrated using a field data set and its subset truncated above TD. The output of these operations on the VSP data are compared to well log data. By way of illustration, the techniques described and investigated were applied to an offshore VSP data set to yield an impedance log. After calibrating this curve with the well log data, the base of the target sand was correctly identified below TD. This prediction successfully yielded the thickness of the sand. Individual zones within the sand unit were identified with less confidence.

  8. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    PubMed

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. PMID:25964210

  9. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  10. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1–39 mm2 s?1 in kinematic viscosities and 40–72 mN m?1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  11. Fabrication of vertical nanowire resonators for aerosol exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzsch, Stephan; Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Stranz, Andrej; Hinze, Peter; Weimann, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin; Waag, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Vertical silicon nanowire (SiNW) resonators are designed and fabricated in order to assess exposure to aerosol nanoparticles (NPs). To realize SiNW arrays, nanolithography and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) at cryogenic temperature are utilized in a top-down fabrication of SiNW arrays which have high aspect ratios (i.e., up to 34). For nanolithography process, a resist film thickness of 350 nm is applied in a vacuum contact mode to serve as a mask. A pattern including various diameters and distances for creating pillars is used (i.e., 400 nm up to 5 ?m). In dry etching process, the etch rate is set high of 1.5 ?m/min to avoid underetching. The etch profiles of Si wires can be controlled aiming to have either perpendicularly, negatively or positively profiled sidewalls by adjusting the etching parameters (e.g., temperature and oxygen content). Moreover, to further miniaturize the wire, multiple sacrificial thermal oxidations and subsequent oxide stripping are used yielding SiNW arrays of 650 nm in diameter and 40 ?m in length. In the resonant frequency test, a piezoelectric shear actuator is integrated with the SiNWs inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) chamber. The observation of the SiNW deflections are performed and viewed from the topside of the SiNWs to reduce the measurement redundancy. Having a high deflection of ~10 ?m during its resonant frequency of 452 kHz and a low mass of 31 pg, the proposed SiNW is potential for assisting the development of a portable aerosol resonant sensor.

  12. SIMPLE PDF MODELS FOR CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN VERTICAL DIFFUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mode of vertical velocity in convective boundary layers is usually negative and the probability distribution function(PDF) of w, pw is rarely symmetrlc. Consequently, vertical diffusion from elevated sources is usually asymmetric and exhibits a descending mode of concentratio...

  13. SeedChaser: Vertical soil tillage distribution model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of surface residues, chemicals, or seeds following tillage operations is of paramount importance to a wide variety of soil research areas. This paper describes a 1-D empirical vertical soil tillage distribution model with 1-cm grid spacing (SeedChaser) that pre...

  14. Vertical distribution of phosphorus in agricultural drainage ditch soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pedological processes such as gleization and organic matter accumulation may affect the vertical distribution of P within agricultural drainage ditch soils. The objective of this study was to assess the vertical distribution of P as a function of horizonation in ditch soils at the University of Mary...

  15. 19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH CASTLE ROCK IN BACKGROUND. JUNCTION OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL AND TOP CHORD WITH STABILIZING LATERAL STRUT ABOVE AND SWAY STRUT BELOW. ORIGINAL PAIRED DIAGONAL EYE BARS LATER REINFORCED WITH TIE ROD - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  16. ENTROPY CONSTRAINTS ON VERTICAL HEAT TRANSPORT AND STRUCTURES

    E-print Network

    ENTROPY CONSTRAINTS ON VERTICAL HEAT TRANSPORT AND STRUCTURES Wei Wu and Yangang Liu are still poorly understood and quantified. In this work, we use a simple 1D vertical energy-entropy climate model to investigate this issue. Especially, we explore the roles of the entropy-rated constraints

  17. Coupling the Vertical Distribution of Ozone in the Atmospheric Boundary

    E-print Network

    Aneja, Viney P.

    Coupling the Vertical Distribution of Ozone in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer V I N E Y P . A N E J examines the vertical distribution of ozone concentrations in the atmospheric boundary layer and early morning ozone concen- trations(ChR)intheresiduallayerabovethenocturnalboundary layer (NBL

  18. NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY

    E-print Network

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY Yeon SukChoi \\ Steven W. Van to measure the natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen between two vertical plates has been performed power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath

  19. Optimal control methods for vertical and horizontal beam dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitura, A.; Warminski, J.; Bochenski, M.

    2012-08-01

    An application of the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) actuators for damping of a composite beam is presented in this paper. The effectiveness of vibration reduction by a selected control method is tested for vertical and horizontal position of the beam. The original model has been studied numerically by using Galerkin's discretisation method. The numerical results for the vertical and horizontal beams are compared.

  20. On the Dynamics of a Vertically Driven Damped Planar Pendulum

    E-print Network

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    On the Dynamics of a Vertically Driven Damped Planar Pendulum M. V. Bartuccelli # , G. Gentile on the dynamics of the planar pendulum with parametric vertical time­periodic forcing are reviewed and extended the dynamics of the pendulum shows sensitivity to initial conditions. Keywords: basins of attraction

  1. On the Dynamics of a Vertically Driven Damped Planar Pendulum

    E-print Network

    Bartuccelli, Michele

    On the Dynamics of a Vertically Driven Damped Planar Pendulum M. V. Bartuccelli #3; , G. Gentile y Results on the dynamics of the planar pendulum with parametric vertical time-periodic forcing are reviewed parameter values the dynamics of the pendulum shows sensitivity to initial conditions. Keywords: basins

  2. On the Dynamics of a Vertically Driven Damped Planar Pendulum

    E-print Network

    On the Dynamics of a Vertically Driven Damped Planar Pendulum M. V. Bartuccelli # , G. Gentile Abstract The dynamics of the planar pendulum with parametric vertical time­periodic forcing is con­ sidered calculate the Lyapunov exponents to show that for some parameter values the dynamics of the pendulum shows

  3. A vertical handoff decision algorithm based on ARMA prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Shen, Jiao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qiuhuan

    2011-12-01

    With the development of computer technology and the increasing demand for mobile communications, the next generation wireless networks will be composed of various wireless networks (e.g., WiMAX and WiFi). Vertical handoff is a key technology of next generation wireless networks. During the vertical handoff procedure, handoff decision is a crucial issue for an efficient mobility. Based on auto regression moving average (ARMA) prediction model, we propose a vertical handoff decision algorithm, which aims to improve the performance of vertical handoff and avoid unnecessary handoff. Based on the current received signal strength (RSS) and the previous RSS, the proposed approach adopt ARMA model to predict the next RSS. And then according to the predicted RSS to determine whether trigger the link layer triggering event and complete vertical handoff. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the RSS-based scheme with a threshold in the performance of handoff and the number of handoff.

  4. A vertical handoff decision algorithm based on ARMA prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Shen, Jiao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qiuhuan

    2012-01-01

    With the development of computer technology and the increasing demand for mobile communications, the next generation wireless networks will be composed of various wireless networks (e.g., WiMAX and WiFi). Vertical handoff is a key technology of next generation wireless networks. During the vertical handoff procedure, handoff decision is a crucial issue for an efficient mobility. Based on auto regression moving average (ARMA) prediction model, we propose a vertical handoff decision algorithm, which aims to improve the performance of vertical handoff and avoid unnecessary handoff. Based on the current received signal strength (RSS) and the previous RSS, the proposed approach adopt ARMA model to predict the next RSS. And then according to the predicted RSS to determine whether trigger the link layer triggering event and complete vertical handoff. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the RSS-based scheme with a threshold in the performance of handoff and the number of handoff.

  5. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  6. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. T.; He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, N.; Tang, C. J.

    2015-05-01

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j// , at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  7. Experimental Study of Flooding in Vertical Narrow Rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. C.; Sun, Z. N.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, counter-current gas—liquid two-phase flow and onset of flooding in vertical narrow rectangular channels were studied. The onset of flooding in vertical narrow rectangular channels was investigated by the condition at which the liquid on the channel wall begins to move partially above the liquid injection section. In order to study the flow pattern, during counter-current flow and determine conditions associated with the onset of flooding, the flow pattern and pressure drop were investigated by visual experiments. In addition, the flooding phenomena in vertical narrow rectangular channels were compared with that in conventional channels. The results show that the flow characteristics and the tendency of pressure drop in vertical narrow rectangular channels were similarly with the conventional channels. However, the maximum of pressure drop appeared at the completed carrying up of flooding in vertical narrow rectangular channels, and it appeared at the onset of flooding in conventional channels.

  8. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  9. Constraints on aerosol processes in climate models from vertically-resolved aircraft observations of black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Schwarz, J. P.; Perring, A. E.; Spackman, J. R.; Mann, G. W.; Johnson, C. E.; Telford, P. J.

    2013-06-01

    Evaluation of the aerosol schemes in current climate models is dependent upon the available observational data. In-situ observations from flight campaigns can provide valuable data about the vertical distribution of aerosol that is difficult to obtain from satellite or ground-based platforms, although they are localised in space and time. Using single-particle soot-photometer (SP2) measurements from the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaign, which consists of many vertical profiles over a large region of the Pacific, we evaluate the meridional and vertical distribution of black carbon (BC) aerosol simulated by the HadGEM3-UKCA and ECHAM5-HAM2 models. Both models show a similar pattern of overestimating the BC column burden compared to that derived from the observations, in many areas by an order of magnitude. However, by sampling the simulated BC mass mixing ratio along the flight track and comparing to the observations, we show that this discrepancy has a rather different vertical structure in the two models: in HadGEM3-UKCA the discrepancy is dominated by excess aerosol in the tropical upper troposphere, while in ECHAM5-HAM2 areas of discrepancy are spread across many different latitudes and altitudes. Using this methodology, we conduct sensitivity tests on two specific elements of the models: biomass-burning emissions and scavenging by convective precipitation. We show that, by coupling the convective scavenging more tightly with convective transport, both the column burden and vertical distribution of BC in HadGEM3-UKCA are much improved with respect to the observations, with a substantial and statistically significant increase in correlation - this demonstrates the importance of a realistic representation of this process. In contrast, updating from GFED2 to GFED3.1 biomass-burning emissions makes a more modest improvement in both models, which is not statistically significant. By comparing our results with a more traditional approach using regional- and monthly-mean vertical profile curves, we show that the point-by-point analysis allows the model improvements to be demonstrated more clearly. We also demonstrate the important role that nudged simulations (where the large-scale model dynamics are continuously relaxed towards a reanalysis) can play in this type of evaluation, allowing statistically significant differences between configurations of the aerosol scheme to be seen where the differences between the corresponding free-running simulations would not be significant.

  10. Vertically aligned N-doped CNTs growth using Taguchi experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ricardo M.; Fernandes, António J. S.; Ferro, Marta C.; Pinna, Nicola; Silva, Rui F.

    2015-07-01

    The Taguchi method with a parameter design L9 orthogonal array was implemented for optimizing the nitrogen incorporation in the structure of vertically aligned N-doped CNTs grown by thermal chemical deposition (TCVD). The maximization of the ID/IG ratio of the Raman spectra was selected as the target value. As a result, the optimal deposition configuration was NH3 = 90 sccm, growth temperature = 825 °C and catalyst pretreatment time of 2 min, the first parameter having the main effect on nitrogen incorporation. A confirmation experiment with these values was performed, ratifying the predicted ID/IG ratio of 1.42. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization revealed a uniform completely vertically aligned array of multiwalled CNTs which individually exhibit a bamboo-like structure, consisting of periodically curved graphitic layers, as depicted by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated a 2.00 at.% of N incorporation in the CNTs in pyridine-like and graphite-like, as the predominant species.

  11. Convecting particle diffusion in a binary particle system under vertical vibration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaiwei; Xie, Zi-Ang; Wu, Ping; Sun, Jing; Li, Li; Jia, Chao; Zhang, Shiping; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Li

    2014-06-28

    We studied the separation behaviour of binary granular particles in a vertically vibrated container. The final separation of the binary particle system exhibited the Brazil-Nut (BN) effect, though it was not complete. Particle convection occurred, and four different typical convection modes were observed when the frequency f changed from 20 Hz to 80 Hz at constant dimensionless acceleration ? = 4?Af(2)/g. However, when ? changed from 2 to 4 at constant f, the system's convection mode stayed almost the same. In our experiments, one type of particle generally moved much faster than the other, so the former was termed the 'convecting' particle, and the latter was termed the 'non-convecting' particle. To study the separation results qualitatively, we divided the system into vertical layers and calculated the mass distribution of the binary particles along the z axis. The results showed that when f increased at constant ? or ? decreased at constant f, the convecting particles, usually the smaller and lighter ones, distributed less to the top side and more to the bottom side of the container. Finally, to explain the experimental results, we derived a mass conservation equation for the convecting particles considering simultaneous convection and diffusion. The equation described the experimental results well. We also analysed the effects of f, ?, diameter ratio, density ratio, etc., on the final separation results. PMID:24796705

  12. Modeling and experimental study of nucleate boiling on a vertical array of horizontal plain tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ribatski, Gherhardt; Saiz Jabardo, Jose M.

    2008-09-15

    An investigation of nucleate boiling on a vertical array of horizontal plain tubes is presented in this paper. Experiments were performed with refrigerant R123 at reduced pressures varying from 0.022 to 0.64, tube pitch to diameter ratios of 1.32, 1.53 and 2.00, and heat fluxes from 0.5 to 40 kW/m{sup 2}. Brass tubes with external diameters of 19.05 mm and average roughness of 0.12 {mu}m were used in the experiments. The effect of the tube spacing on the local heat transfer coefficient along the tube array was negligible within the present range of experimental conditions. For partial nucleate boiling, characterized by low heat fluxes, and low reduced pressures, the tube positioning shows a remarkable effect on the heat transfer coefficient. Based on these data, a general correlation for the prediction of the nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient on a vertical array of horizontal tubes under flooded conditions was proposed. According to this correlation, the ratio between the heat transfer coefficients of a given tube and the lowest tube in the array depends only on the tube row number, the reduced pressure and the heat flux. By using the proposed correlation, most of the experimental heat transfer coefficients obtained in the present study were predicted within {+-}15%. The new correlation compares reasonably well with independent data from the literature. (author)

  13. Dense gas vertical diffusion over rough surfaces: results of wind-tunnel studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, G. A.; Britter, R. E.; Hanna, S. R.; Havens, J. A.; Robins, A. G.; Snyder, W. H.

    A cooperative program of measurements of vertical diffusion of continuous, dense gas plumes over rough surfaces in neutral boundary layers has been carried out in three wind tunnels in the USA and the UK. The three environmental boundary layer tunnels were at the Chemical Hazards Research Center (CHRC) at the University of Arkansas, the Fluid Modeling Facility (FMF) of the US Environmental Protection Agency in North Carolina, and the Environmental Flow Research Centre (EnFlo) at the University of Surrey. A simple and consistent set of definitions was adopted for the plume variables like plume depth, mean plume transport speed, vertical entrainment velocity, we, and plume Richardson number Ri ?, where Ri 1/2? is a ratio of buoyancy-induced flow velocities to u ?, the upstream-of-source ambient friction velocity. The present experiments focus on how Ri ? affects the ratio w e/u ?. In order to maintain nearly constant Ri ? in distance and time, continuous line sources of dense gas, primarily CO 2, were employed. Good agreement was found among the three tunnels. The results also agree with the classic Prairie grass field experiment for the "passive limit" ( Ri ?=0): w e/u ?=0.6-0.7. For Ri ? up to 20, the results fit the equation w e/u ?=0.65/(1+0.2 Ri ?). For Ri ?>20, molecular diffusion and viscosity effects were apparently quite strong because we was observed to collapse to values nearly commensurate with molecular diffusion alone.

  14. Vertical and Horizontal Trust at Work as Predictors of Retirement Intentions: The Finnish Public Sector Study

    PubMed Central

    Muurinen, Charlotte; Laine, Matti; Pentti, Jaana; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Oksanen, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of trust towards the supervisor (vertical trust) and trust towards co-workers (horizontal trust) with retirement intentions. The participants were 14 840 women and men working in the municipal sector in 2000–12 (Finnish Public Sector Study). Trust (vertical trust towards the supervisor and horizontal trust towards co-workers) and retirement intentions were assessed in repeated surveys. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between baseline trust and retirement intentions at 3.7 years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, health, psychological distress, health risk behaviors, personality factors, and psychosocial factors were included as covariates. Of the participants, 67.0% trusted their supervisor and 54.9% trusted their co-workers. Employees who trusted their supervisor (odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53–0.67) and employees who trusted their co-workers (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.55–0.70) at baseline were less likely to have strong retirement intentions at follow-up compared to those who did not trust. These associations largely persisted after adjusting for all covariates and taking into account baseline retirement intentions. In conclusion, trust in the supervisor and co-workers predicted retirement intentions. These observational findings suggest that increasing trust in the workplace may contribute to lengthening working careers and preventing early retirement. PMID:25191745

  15. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio and flux in Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Dai, G.; Song, X.; Liu, B.; Liu, L.

    2015-11-01

    The water vapor expedition experiment campaign was operated in the Tibetan Plateau during July and August 2014, by utilizing the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL). The observation was carried out in Nagqu area (31.5° N, 92.05° E), which is 4508 m above the mean sea level. During the observation, the water vapor mixing ratio at high elevation was obtained. In this paper, the methodology of the WACAL and the retrieval method are presented in particular. The validation of water vapor mixing ratio measured during the field campaigns is completed by comparing the Lidar measurements to the radiosonde data. WACAL observations from July to August illustrate the diurnal variation of water vapor mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer in this high elevation area. The mean water vapor mixing ratio in Nagqu in July and August is about 9.4 g kg-1 and the values vary from 6.0 to 11.7 g kg-1 near ground. The SNRs and relative errors of the data are analyzed and discussed as well in this paper. Finally, combining the vertical wind speed profiles measured by the coherent wind lidar, the vertical flux of water vapor is calculated and the upwelling and deposition of the water vapor are monitored. It is the first application, to our knowledge, to operate continuously atmospheric observation by utilizing multi-disciplinary lidar at altitude higher than 4000 m which is significant for research on the boundary dynamics and meteorology of Tibetan Plateau.

  16. Effect of well-screen placement on recovery of vertically stratified contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Conant, B. Jr.; Akindunni, F.F.; Gillham, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    Field experiments and numerical modeling showed that vertical placement of a pumping-well screen in an appropriate location could enhance the recovery of dissolved contaminants from a distinct depth interval of an unconfined aquifer. Two single-well contaminant recovery tests were performed for 72 hours each at Borden, Ontario in a thin, fine-grained sand aquifer. A zone 1.5 m thick at the bottom of the aquifer was contaminated by landfill leachate. One screen was located entirely within the contaminated zone and the other had only half its length placed in the zone of contamination. In both tests, concentrations in the effluent were initially high, but asymptotically declined and approached the vertically averaged concentration of the aquifer. The decline in concentration occurred because converging flow in the vertical plane caused a reduction in the thickness of the plume near the well; that in turn decreased the ratio of contaminated to clean waters entering the well screen. The field results were simulated using SUNFLOWPT, a saturated-unsaturated flow model with particle tracking. Predictions of the model successfully matched the observed drawdown and effluent concentration data. Propagation of simulated capture zones into the overlying uncontaminated aquifer waters are consistent with the observed declines in effluent concentrations. Two-dimensional plan-view modeling is unable to accurately simulate observed data at early times of pumping. In aquifers having stratified contamination, only models that incorporate vertical flow should be used to interpret or predict effluent concentrations from short-duration tests conducted for the purpose of designing pump-and-treat remediation schemes. The results suggest that in some cases of long-term cleanup, two screens that separately capture the clean and contaminated waters of the aquifer could significantly reduce the volume of water requiring treatment.

  17. Performance of various RANS eddy-viscosity models for turbulent natural convection in tall vertical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moutaouakil, L.; Zrikem, Z.; Abdelbaki, A.

    2014-08-01

    The present study is dedicated to the identification of turbulence models that are accurate and numerically economic for computing the natural air-flow and heat transfer by convection in tall cavities with differentially heated vertical walls. The eddy-viscosity models (EVM) are among the simplest to implement and the most economical to treat this problem. This study evaluated the dynamic, thermal and computational performances of twenty EVM turbulence models with one, two or three-equation closure. All the models were first implemented in several in-house codes using the finite volume method. The predictions of the retained models in terms of profiles of velocity, temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations in the cavity have been compared with those of experimental or numerical studies. The obtained results were used to identify the turbulence models that are accurate and numerically economic in predicting natural convection in vertical cavities with a high aspect ratio. The EVM models with three-equation (v2-f and ?-f) provide the most accurate mean and fluctuating quantities, followed by the k-? RNG (ReNormalization Group) and k-? SST (Shear Stress Transport) models. The computing time of these four models is higher than that of the 2L (two-layer) and q-? models, which provide fairly accurate results especially for the mean heat transfer between the vertical active walls. The other one-equation (Spalart and Allmaras model) and two-equation (k-?, k-? and hybrid models) turbulence models tested in this work, have a high computing time and/or predictions that are not sufficiently precise simultaneously for both velocity and temperature fields.

  18. Effect of interannual variation in winter vertical mixing on CH4 dynamics in a subtropical reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Tokida, Takeshi; Fukui, Manabu; Kojima, Hisaya; Miki, Takeshi; Tayasu, Ichiro; Shiah, Fuh-Kwo; Okuda, Noboru

    2015-07-01

    Although freshwaters are considered to be substantial natural sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), in situ processes of CH4 production and consumption in freshwater ecosystems are poorly understood, especially in subtropical areas, leading to uncertainties in the estimation of global CH4 emissions. To improve our understanding of physical and biogeochemical factors affecting CH4 dynamics in subtropical lakes, we examined vertical and seasonal profiles of dissolved CH4 and its carbon isotope ratio (?13C) and conducted incubation experiments to assess CH4 production and oxidation in the deep subtropical Fei-Tsui Reservoir (FTR; Taiwan). The mixing pattern of the FTR is essentially monomixis, but the intensity of winter vertical mixing changes with climatic conditions. In years with incomplete vertical mixing (does not reach the bottom) and subsequent strong thermal stratification resulting in profundal hypoxia, we observed increases in sedimentary CH4 production and thus profundal CH4 storage with the development of reducing conditions. In contrast, in years with strong winter vertical mixing to the bottom of the reservoir, CH4 production was suppressed under NO3--rich conditions, during which denitrifiers have the competitive advantage over methanogens. Diffusive emission from profundal CH4 storage appeared to be negligible due to the efficiency of CH4 oxidation during ascent through methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) activity. Most of the profundal CH4 was rapidly oxidized by MOB in both oxic and anoxic layers, as characterized by its carbon isotope signature. In contrast, aerobic CH4 production in the subsurface layer, which may be enhanced under high temperatures in summer, may account for a large portion of atmospheric CH4 emissions from this reservoir. Our CH4 profiling results provide valuable information for future studies predicting CH4 emissions from subtropical lakes with the progress of global warming.

  19. Spirit Near 'Stapledon' on Sol 1802 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera for the images assembled into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,802nd Martian day, or sol, (January 26, 2009) of Spirit's mission on the surface of Mars. North is at the top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    Spirit had driven down off the low plateau called 'Home Plate' on Sol 1782 (January 6, 2009) after spending 12 months on a north-facing slope on the northern edge of Home Plate. The position on the slope (at about the 9-o'clock position in this view) tilted Spirit's solar panels toward the sun, enabling the rover to generate enough electricity to survive its third Martian winter. Tracks at about the 11-o'clock position of this panorama can be seen leading back to that 'Winter Haven 3' site from the Sol 1802 position about 10 meters (33 feet) away. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about one meter (40 inches).

    Where the receding tracks bend to the left, a circular pattern resulted from Spirit turning in place at a soil target informally named 'Stapledon' after William Olaf Stapledon, a British philosopher and science-fiction author who lived from 1886 to 1950. Scientists on the rover team suspected that the soil in that area might have a high concentration of silica, resembling a high-silica soil patch discovered east of Home Plate in 2007. Bright material visible in the track furthest to the right was examined with Spirit's alpha partical X-ray spectrometer and found, indeed, to be rich in silica.

    The team laid plans to drive Spirit from this Sol 1802 location back up onto Home Plate, then southward for the rover's summer field season.

  20. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Vertical Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  1. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-09-21

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  2. Longitudinal Differences of Ionospheric Vertical Density Distribution and Equatorial Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valledares, C.E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian approx. 37 deg and 290 deg E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation, such as from VEFI onboard Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite and JULIA radar, is equally promising. The observations at different longitudes suggest that the vertical drift velocities and the vertical density distribution have significant longitudinal differences; especially the equatorial anomaly peaks expand to higher latitudes more in American sector than the African sector, indicating that the vertical drift in the American sector is stronger than the African sector.

  3. The seasonal variation of water vapor and ozone in the upper mesosphere: Implications for vertical transport and ozone photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, R.M.; Summers, M.E. ); Strobel, D.F. ); Olivero, J.J. ); Allen, M. )

    1990-01-20

    Ground-based microwave techniques have supplied the only long-term measurements of water vapor in the mesosphere. The authors review the entire current data base, which consists of measurements obtained in three separate experiments over an 8-year period. The data from all three experiments indicate that the water vapor seasonal variation at mid-latitudes in the upper mesosphere is dominated by an annual component with low mixing ratios in winter and high mixing ratios in summer. This suggests that the vertical distribution of water vapor in the upper mesosphere (up to 80 km) is controlled by advective rather than diffusive processes. This consistent with the low mesospheric K{sub zz} values ({approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2}/s) deduced from the vertical gradient of the microwave water vapor measurements by Strobel et al. (1987). However, it is difficult to reconcile the predominantly annual water vapor variation with the semiannual variation in ozone at 78 km observed by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer. The authors perform a series of one-dimensional photochemical/vertical transport model calculations which verify that (within the context of the hydrogen/oxygen chemistry considered in the model), the seasonal variation of water vapor cannot be the mechanism for the semiannual ozone variation. This variation is either a manifestation of some heretofore unknown ozone photochemical mechanism, or it could be driven by a seasonal variation in the vertical transport of atomic oxygen from the thermosphere. One possible vertical transport scenario for producing the semiannual ozone variation (while retaining the annual water vapor variation) is described.

  4. Interpretation of the underground muon charge ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.; Schreinera, P. A.; Reichenbachera, J.; High Energy Physics; Benedictine Univ.; Univ. of Alabama

    2009-08-01

    The MINOS experiment has observed a rise in the underground muon charge ratio r{sub {mu}} = {mu}{sup +}/{mu}{sup -}. This ratio can be related to the atmospheric production ratios of {pi}{sup +}/{pi}{sup -} and K{sup +}/K{sup -}. Our analysis indicates that the relevant variable for studying the charge ratio is E{sub {mu}}{sup surface} cos {theta}, rather than E{sub {mu}}{sup surface}. We compare a simple energy dependent parameterization of the rise in the charge ratio with more detailed previously published Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical calculation. We also estimate the size of two previously neglected effects in this context: the charge sign dependency of the dE/dx in rock, and the energy dependence of heavy primaries on the derived K{sup +}/K{sup -} ratio.

  5. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith Edward (Kobe, JP); Moser, William Elliott (Peoria, IL); Roozenboom, Stephan Donald (Washington, IL); Knox, Kevin Jay (Peoria, IL)

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  6. Dissociated vertical deviation (DVD): The saccadic and slow eye movements.

    PubMed

    Zubcov, A A; Goldstein, H P; Reinecke, R D

    1994-01-01

    Dissociated vertical deviation (DVD), a vertical strabismus, is often associated with infantile esotropia, latent nystagmus and excyclo-torsion. DVD usually becomes apparent at about three years of age. The authors wished to determine whether DVD is a manifestation of an abnormal motor vergence system or is part of a visual system disorder. Vertical eye movements of six subjects with DVD, on cover-uncover and alternate cover tests, were studied using the magnetic search eye coil system. Asymmetry between the eyes' saccades were quantified during the DVD upward movement and during a trial of pure vertical saccades. In three subjects the vertical deviation increased to its full amount through a smooth vertical divergence movement, and in the other three patients through a combination of smooth and asymmetrical saccade-like movements. The latencies of the DVD, the peak velocity of the deviation movements, its time constant and the asymmetries in the saccades suggest that DVD represents an abnormal vertical vergence system. PMID:21314545

  7. Solution chemistry approach to fabricate vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on gold wires: towards vertically integrated electronics.

    PubMed

    Flavel, Benjamin S; Yu, Jingxian; Ellis, Amanda V; Quinton, Jamie S; Shapter, Joseph G

    2008-11-01

    A monolayer of hexadecyltrichlorosilane, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane or 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane was self-assembled onto a p-type silicon (100) substrate to provide a resist for electrochemical anodization with an atomic force microscope cantilever. Silane treatment of the oxide nanostructures created by anodization lithography allowed for the creation of a chemically heterogeneous surface, containing regions of -NH(2) or -SH surrounded by -CH(3) functionality. These patterned regions of -NH(2) or -SH provided the point of attachment for citrate-stabilized gold colloid nanoparticles, which act as 'seed' particles for the electro-less deposition of gold. This has allowed the creation of gold wires on a silicon surface. Carbon nanotubes, with high carboxylic acid functionality, were vertically immobilized on the patterned gold wires with the use of a cysteamine monolayer and a condensation reaction. Such a material may prove useful in the creation of future vertically integrated electronic devices where it is desirable for electron transport to be in three dimensions and this electron transport is demonstrated with cyclic voltammetry. PMID:21832724

  8. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  9. The ratio of effective building height to street width governs dispersion of local vehicle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Nico; Tan, Si; Venkatram, Akula

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of data collected in street canyons located in Hanover, Germany and Los Angeles, USA, suggests that street-level concentrations of vehicle-related pollutants can be estimated with a model that assumes that vertical turbulent transport of emissions dominates the governing processes. The dispersion model relates surface concentrations to traffic flow rate, the effective aspect ratio of the street, and roof level turbulence. The dispersion model indicates that magnification of concentrations relative to those in the absence of buildings is most sensitive to the aspect ratio of the street, which is the ratio of the effective height of the buildings on the street to the width of the street. This result can be useful in the design of transit oriented developments that increase building density to reduce emissions from transportation.

  10. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  11. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  12. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  13. Dissociated vertical divergence: a righting reflex gone wrong.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, M C

    1999-09-01

    Dissociated vertical divergence (DVD) is an ocular motor disorder characterized by a slow, upward drift of 1 eye when the other eye is fixating a target. I propose that DVD is a dorsal light reflex in which asymmetrical visual input to the 2 eyes evokes a vertical divergence movement of the eyes. This primitive visuo-vestibular reflex functions as a righting response to restore vertical orientation in lower lateral-eyed animals by equalizing binocular visual input. The dorsal light reflex is suppressed in humans but can manifest as DVD when early-onset strabismus precludes normal binocular development. PMID:10496394

  14. Vertical Distributions of PH3 in Saturn from Observations of Its 1-0 and 3-2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. S.; Serabyn, E.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of the 1-0 and 3-2 PH3 transitions in Saturn's disk near 267 and 800 GHz (8.9 and 26.7/cm), respectively, were analyzed simultaneously to derive a global mean profile for the PH3 vertical mixing ratio between 100 and 600 mbar total pressure. The far-infrared spectrum is relatively free from spectral interlopers, suffers minimal absorption or scattering by atmospheric particulates, and contains intrinsically weak PH3 lines that are sensitive to a range of atmospheric depths. The combined spectra are inconsistent with a uniform tropospheric mixing ratio, even with a stratospheric cut-off. They are consistent with a volume mixing ratio of PH3 that drops from 1.2 x 10(exp -5) at 645 mbar pressure to a value of 4.1 x 10(exp -7) at 150 mbar pressure, a decrease that is linear is log abundance vs log pressure. The mixing ratio could drop even more quickly at atmospheric pressures below 150 mbar and still be consistent with the data. The mixing ratio may well remain constant with depth for pressures above 630 mbar. The maximum PH3 mixing ratio in this model is consistent with a [P]/[H] ratio in the deep atmosphere that is about a factor of 10 higher than solar composition. Such a model is consistent with rapid mixing up to the radiative-convective boundary and transport by, for example, vertical waves just above this boundary. In the best fitting model, the eddy diffusion coefficient is approximately 10(exp 4) sq cm near 630 mbar, and it must increase with altitude. The predominant PH3 loss mechanisms are direct photolysis by UV radiation and scavenging by H atoms produced by the photolysis.

  15. The Vertical Force-Couple Generator Shear waves may be generated by a force or force-couple acting on a single interface, or by vertical

    E-print Network

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    The Vertical Force-Couple Generator Shear waves may be generated by a force or force-couple acting on a single interface, or by vertical separation of the forces in the medium. An example of the former the the force impuls comes from two opposite and vertically separated horizontal forces. A vertical force couple

  16. Influence of short incompatible practice on the Simon effect: transfer along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions.

    PubMed

    Conde, Erick F Q; Fraga-Filho, Roberto Sena; Lameira, Allan Pablo; Mograbi, Daniel C; Riggio, Lucia; Gawryszewski, Luiz G

    2015-11-01

    In spatial compatibility and Simon tasks, the response is faster when stimulus and response locations are on the same side than when they are on opposite sides. It has been shown that a spatial incompatible practice leads to a subsequent modulation of the Simon effect along the horizontal dimension. It has also been reported that this modulation occurs both along and across vertical and horizontal dimensions, but only after intensive incompatible training (600 trials). In this work, we show that this modulatory effect can be obtained with a smaller number of incompatible trials, changing the spatial arrangement of the vertical response keys to obtain a stronger dimensional overlap between the spatial codes of stimuli and response keys. The results of Experiment 1 showed that 80 incompatible vertical trials abolished the Simon effect in the same dimension. Experiment 2 showed that a modulation of the vertical Simon effect could be obtained after 80 horizontal incompatible trials. Experiment 3 explored whether the transfer effect can also occur in a horizontal Simon task after a brief vertical spatial incompatibility task, and results were similar to the previous experiments. In conclusion, we suggest that the spatial arrangement between response key and stimulus locations may be critical to establish the short-term memory links that enable the transfer of learning between brief incompatible practices and the Simon effects, both along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions. PMID:26265123

  17. Effects of Thermal Conductivity Ratio in

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    negligible Calculate nondimensional heat transfer coefficient and loss coefficient KL from experimental dataEffects of Thermal Conductivity Ratio in Helium-Cooled Divertors B. H. Mills J. D. Rader D. L conductivity ratio Verify previous predictions of thermal performance at prototypical conditions and general

  18. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Albumin; Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Creatinine ; Glucose ; A1c ; Urine Protein ; Beta-2 Microglobulin All content on Lab ... urine ). Most of the time, both albumin and creatinine are measured in a random urine sample and an albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is ...

  19. Thermal photons to dileptons ratio at LHC

    E-print Network

    Jajati K. Nayak; Jan-e Alam; Sourav Sarkar; Bikash Sinha

    2007-05-24

    It is shown that the ratio of transverse momentum (p_T) distribution of thermal photons to dileptons produced in heavy ion collisions reaches a plateau above p_T=1 GeV. We argue that the value of the ratio in the plateau region can be used to estimate the initial temperature.

  20. Key financial ratios can foretell hospital closures.

    PubMed

    Lynn, M L; Wertheim, P

    1993-11-01

    An analysis of various financial ratios sampled from open and closed hospitals shows that certain leverage, liquidity, capital efficiency, and resource availability ratios can predict hospital closure up to two years in advance of the closure with an accuracy of nearly 75 percent. PMID:10145901

  1. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  2. Construction of CCC resistance ratio bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.; Jensen, D.H.; Holtoug, J.U.

    1994-12-31

    The paper introduces the cryogenic current comparator (CCC) resistance ratio bridge being built at DFM, which is designed to relate the value of quantized hall resistance R{sub H}(i) to room temperature resistance standards. The CCC is an overlapping tube type with copper wire. A double constant current source is used to supply for the CCC resistance ratio bridge.

  3. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  4. The Divine Ratio and Golden Rectangles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martin

    1982-01-01

    The material examines aspects of Fibonacci and Lucas sequences, the generation of the Divine Ratio, and the nature of this ratio in golden rectangles, triangles, and figures made up of golden triangles. It is noted Lucas sequence is formed like Fibonacci but has one and three as the first elements. (Author/MP)

  5. Sex ratios in pheasant research and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.

    1952-01-01

    Sex ratios are of primary importance in interpretation of extensive studies of pheasant populations. They are necessary for converting crowing-cock indices to population estimates even where annual trends are to be studied in the same area. Reliability of population estimates from hunting season kill of pheasants suffers primarily from inability to estimate sex ratios accurately. Fall sex ratio is an index to production and where adult sex ratios are divergent can serve as a good check on production per hen. Age ratios of cocks cannot be interpreted directly as an index of productivity, even within the boundaries of one state, unless adult sex ratios are known. The relationship between observed and actual sex ratio varies significantly from season to season and according to the method of observation. In view of their importance in population studies and the lack of reliability of present methods, it is believed that intensive studies on techniques for obtaining sex ratios are a major need in pheasant research.

  6. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  7. Sustainable sex ratio in lattice populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainaka, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yoshimura, J.

    2006-05-01

    We present a lattice model of mating populations. Simulation is performed by two different methods: local and global interactions. Simulation results account for the reason why the observed sex ratio is nearly one half in many animals. The male-biased sex ratio, such as in human populations, is also explained.

  8. The Golden Ratio--A Contrary Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Clement

    2005-01-01

    Many assertions about the occurrence of the golden ratio phi in art, architecture, and nature have been shown to be false, unsupported, or misleading. For instance, we show that the spirals found in sea shells, in particular the "Nautilus pompilius," are not in the shape of the golden ratio, as is often claimed. Some of the most interesting…

  9. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  10. Static Footprint Local Forces, Areas, and Aspect Ratios for Three Type 7 Aircraft Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, William E.; Perez, Sharon E.; Vogler, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The National Tire Modeling Program (NTMP) is a joint NASA/industry effort to improve the understanding of tire mechanics and develop accurate analytical design tools. This effort includes fundamental analytical and experimental research on the structural mechanics of tires. Footprint local forces, areas, and aspect ratios were measured. Local footprint forces in the vertical, lateral, and drag directions were measured with a special footprint force transducer. Measurements of the local forces in the footprint were obtained by positioning the transducer at specified locations within the footprint and externally loading the tires. Three tires were tested: (1) one representative of those used on the main landing gear of B-737 and DC-9 commercial transport airplanes, (2) a nose landing gear tire for the Space Shuttle Orbiter, and (3) a main landing gear tire for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Data obtained for various inflation pressures and vertical loads are presented for two aircraft tires. The results are presented in graphical and tabulated forms.

  11. 13. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, TOP CHORD, SWAY BRACING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, TOP CHORD, SWAY BRACING, TOP STRUTS, CENTER OF SOUTH TRUSS - Marathon City Bridge, Spanning Big Rib River, on state Trunk Highway 107, Marathon, Marathon County, WI

  12. 12. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED ENDPOST, PORTAL BRACING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED ENDPOST, PORTAL BRACING, TOP CHORD, SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SOUTH TRUSS (RIVETED CONNECTION) - Marathon City Bridge, Spanning Big Rib River, on state Trunk Highway 107, Marathon, Marathon County, WI

  13. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK, SHOWING ENDPANEL VERTICAL, ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK, SHOWING END-PANEL VERTICAL, ARCH SEGMENT, LOWER CHORD AND FLOOR SYSTEM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Davis Bridge, Spanning Upper Iowa River at County Road 16, Lime Springs, Howard County, IA

  14. 32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PINCONNECTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PIN-CONNECTED EXPANSION JOINT BETWEEN CANTILEVER ARM AND SUSPENDED SPAN. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  15. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical posts on concrete footing with diagonal timber bracing and wire bracing. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  16. View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' from superstructure. Wooden platform open side faces west. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. TRANSMISIÓN VERTICAL DE HTLV-1 EN EL PERÚ

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, Jorge Alarcón; Romaní, Franco Romaní; Torres, Silvia Montano; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    La infección por el virus linfotrópico humano de células T tipo 1 (HTLV-1) ha sido descrita en muchas áreas del mundo, como en los países del Caribe, Japón, África, Oceanía y en Sudamérica. En la presente revisión definimos la endemicidad del HTLV-1 en el país, planteando cuatro criterios epidemiológicos. Luego discutimos el tema central de la revisión: la transmisión vertical del HTLV-1, que en nuestro país sería uno de los principales mecanismos de transmisión. Dentro del desarrollo de este aspecto en particular, presentamos una estimación de la tasa de transmisión vertical y los factores de riesgo asociados con la transmisión vertical sobre la base de una revisión exhaustiva de estudios nacionales y extranjeros. Con esta revisión pretendemos dar una primera aproximación al estudio de la trasmisión vertical de HTLV-1, un aspecto poco estudiado en nuestro medio. PMID:21537777

  18. An ecological perceptual aid for precision vertical landings

    E-print Network

    Smith, Cristin Anne

    2006-01-01

    Pilots of vertical landing vehicles face numerous control challenges which often involve the loss of outside visual perceptual cues or the control of flight parameters within tight constraints. These challenges are often ...

  19. VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP AT LEVEL 0?, WITH VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP AT LEVEL 0?, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN BACKGROUND AND PART OF SHEAVE RACK ABOVE THE TANK, LOOKING NORTH - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  20. VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN BACKGROUND, LEVEL 0?, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  1. VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN BACKGROUND, LTR TANK TOP ON LEFT, AND SHEAVE RACK ELEMENTS AT TOP, LOOKING NORTH - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  2. 31. View from southeast of vertical gas washer with No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View from southeast of vertical gas washer with No. 2 Furnace and dust catcher in background. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. 22. PIN CONNECTION AT JUNCTURE OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL WITH BOTTOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. PIN CONNECTION AT JUNCTURE OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL WITH BOTTOM CHORD ON PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS. HYDRAULICALLY FORGED EYES ON ROLLED STOCK. - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  4. VERTICAL REDISTRIBUTION OF A POLLUTANT TRACER DUE TO CUMULUS CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical formalisms that incorporate the physical processes responsible for the vertical redistribution of a conservative pollutant tracer due to a convective cloud field are presented. Two modeling approaches are presented differing in the manner in which the cloud fields ar...

  5. High-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Ochiai, M.; Hietala, V.M.

    1997-03-01

    High speed modulation and pulsing are reported for oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) with inverted doping and proton implantation to reduce the extrinsic limitations.

  6. Small vertical movement of a K1 channel voltage

    E-print Network

    Bezanilla, Francisco

    the voltage sensors and a pore-bound scorpion toxin. Our results are consistent with a 2-A° vertical movements. Here we have attached the acceptor dye to the channel by means of a scorpion toxin that binds

  7. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  8. 1. GENERAL VIEW. OVERHANG, PAINTED RED, HAS VERTICAL SIDING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW. OVERHANG, PAINTED RED, HAS VERTICAL SIDING AND FADED PAINTINGS OF FARM ANIMALS: COW, DONKEYS AND HORSE. - De Turck House, Barn, State Route 662 vicinity, Oley Township, Oley, Berks County, PA

  9. Assessing and Predicting Vertical Intent for Web , Ronan Cummins2

    E-print Network

    Lalmas, Mounia

    , especially as the vertical items are hidden), this assumption eases the assessment burden, and reflects, discussion, scholar, wiki) and contains 320 web topics. Assessors were anonymous online respondents who

  10. 9. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical tensile members at the fifth panel point north from south abutment of Moody Bridge. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  11. 8. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical member at the third panel point north from south abutment of Moody Bridge. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  12. 11. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical tensile members between panels nine end ten of Moody Bridge - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  13. 23. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTORS. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  14. 24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTOR, BRAKE, PINION SHAFT, DRIVE WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  15. 22. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTORS. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  16. 17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop granite pier cap. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  17. 8. CHESTNUT ST. (vertical line) LOOKING WEST BETWEEN FIFTH (upper) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. CHESTNUT ST. (vertical line) LOOKING WEST BETWEEN FIFTH (upper) AND FOURTH (lower) STS., SHOWING SECOND BANK OF U.S. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Vertical velocity in oceanic convection off tropical Australia 

    E-print Network

    Lucas, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Time series of 1 Hz vertical velocity data collected during penetrations by research aircraft of oceanic cumulonimbus clouds near tropical Australia as part of the Equatorial Mesoscale Experiment (EMEX) are analyzed for updraft and downdraft events...

  19. 10. EYEBAR PIN CONNECTION JOINING VERTICAL SUSPENSION STRINGER WITH LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. EYEBAR PIN CONNECTION JOINING VERTICAL SUSPENSION STRINGER WITH LATERAL BRACING MEMBERS - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  20. REGULAR PAPER Vertical distribution and characterization of aerobic phototrophic

    E-print Network

    REGULAR PAPER Vertical distribution and characterization of aerobic phototrophic bacteria the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. Twelve similar strains of obligately aerobic phototrophic. Only one aerobic phototrophic strain was isolated from surface waters. This strain is morphologically

  1. 18. VERTICAL VIEW. DETAIL, VIEW FROM LANDING ON CONTROL CABIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VERTICAL VIEW. DETAIL, VIEW FROM LANDING ON CONTROL CABIN LADDER, AT APPROXIMATELY BRIDGE DECK LEVEL, SHOWING PORTION OF GEAR TRAIN AT TURNTABLE. - Gianella Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at State Highway 32, Hamilton City, Glenn County, CA

  2. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  3. [Review of the treatment of decreased vertical dimension].

    PubMed

    Langlade, M; Zulic, M

    1990-04-01

    The decreasing of vertical dimension, specially in extremely cases (more than three clinical standard deviations) is a border problem between orthopedics, orthodontics, prosthetics and surgery. The authors reviewed the treatments possibilities proposed by the different specialties. PMID:2099393

  4. Vertical hydrodynamic focusing in an isotropically etched glass microfluidic device

    E-print Network

    Lin, Tony An-tong

    2007-01-01

    The development of microfluidic devices has enabled precision control of nanoliter-scale environments and reactions. Vertical hydrodynamic focusing is one possible way to improve the optical performance of these devices ...

  5. VERTICAL MIXING OF LAKE SEDIMENTS BY TUBIFICID OLIGOCHAETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical mixing of lake sediments by tubificid oligochaetes was studied in laboratory experiments by using a radioactive (cesium 137 labeled sediment) marker horizon. Results from these experiments were used to develop and test a mathematical model describing tubificid sediment m...

  6. Origami building blocks: generic and special 4-vertices

    E-print Network

    Scott Waitukaitis; Martin van Hecke

    2015-07-30

    Four rigid panels connected by hinges that meet at a point form a 4-vertex, the fundamental building block of origami metamaterials. Here we show how the geometry of 4-vertices, given by the sector angles of each plate, affects their folding behavior. For generic vertices, we distinguish three vertex types and two subtypes. We establish relationships based on the relative sizes of the sector angles to determine which folds can fully close and the possible mountain-valley assignments. Next, we consider what occurs when sector angles or sums thereof are set equal, which results in 16 special vertex types. One of these, flat-foldable vertices, has been studied extensively, but we show that a wide variety of qualitatively different folding motions exist for the other 15 special and 3 generic types. Our work establishes a straightforward set of rules for understanding the folding motion of both generic and special 4-vertices and serves as a roadmap for designing origami metamaterials.

  7. 7. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & GUSSET PLATE, TWO DIAGONAL BRACES - Enterprise Parker Truss Bridge, Spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS

  8. 8. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & GUSSET PLATE, ONE DIAGONAL BRACE - Enterprise Parker Truss Bridge, Spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS

  9. 13. DETAIL SHOWING EXPOSED VERTICAL LOG CONSTRUCTION WITH MEASURING TAPE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL SHOWING EXPOSED VERTICAL LOG CONSTRUCTION WITH MEASURING TAPE, WEST ROOM AT REAR OF HOUSE, FIRST FLOOR - Pierre Delassus DeLuziereHouse, U.S. Route 61, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  10. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  11. 14 CFR 91.180 - Operations within airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum airspace. 91.180 Section...airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum airspace. (a) Except...airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace...

  12. 14 CFR 91.706 - Operations within airspace designed as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum Airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...airspace designed as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum Airspace. 91.706 Section...airspace designed as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum Airspace. (a) Except...airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace...

  13. Characterization of the slug flow formation in vertical-to-horizontal channels with obstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onder, Ebru Nihan

    This thesis presents the results of the work carried out to study the formation of slugs under conditions of vertical-to-horizontal counter-current flow with obstructions. A flow instability is the mechanism proposed for the formation of slugs in a co-current flow. However, to the best of author's knowledge no work has been carried out for the formation of slugs in a vertical-to-horizontal counter-current flow with obstructions. Despite the existence of a few studies on counter-current vertical-to-horizontal slug flow with obstructions, it is in particular of great importance in the area of nuclear reactor safety analysis of a CANDU reactor. A test section manufactured of 63.5 mm inner diameter (ID) plexiglass was used for this work. The test section consists of 2022 mm long vertical and 3327 mm long horizontal legs connected by a 90° PVC elbow. The horizontal leg contains flanges in which an orifice may be installed. These flanges are located at the distance of 1110 mm and 2217 mm from the elbow. The experiments were carried out to study the frequency of the formation of slugs, the slug propagation velocity and the averaged void fraction of slugs. We also carried out experiments for the characterisation of the propagation of waves. This allowed us to obtain the initial conditions required by the present model in order to predict the formation of slugs. In this model, the initial profile of waves was used to start calculations. Therefore, the aim of these experiments was to obtain the initial profile of these waves. The comparison of the experimental data collected at the onset of flooding with that collected at the onset of slugging shows that the results are very close to each other. This reflects the fact that flooding is simultaneously accompanied by the formation of slugs in the horizontal leg. We found that, for a given liquid flow rate, the gas flow rate, necessary to form the slugs as well as to provoke flooding, decreases as the severity of the obstruction increases. We also found that, for all the cases studied, the slug frequency decreases with increasing superficial gas velocity. It is also observed that for a given superficial gas velocity and orifice beta ratio, the slug frequency is much higher if the orifice is located closer to the elbow. Furthermore, the predominant slug frequency increases with decreasing orifice beta ratios. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. Vertical Scales of Turbulence at the Mt. Wilson Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.

    1995-01-01

    The vertical scales of turbulence at the Mt. Wilson observatory are inferred from data from the University of California at Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI), by modeling path length fluctuations observed in the interferometric paths to celestial objects and those in instrumental ground- based paths. The correlations between the stellar and ground-based path length fluctuations and the temporal statistic of those fluctuations are modeled on various time scales to constrain the vertical scales.

  15. PMSE dependence on long-period vertical motions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.Y.N.; Morley, R.L.

    1995-05-15

    The authors analyze the temporal relationship between PMSE (polar mesosphere summer echoes) and long-period vertical motions using the Poker Flat, Alaska radar data. The results show that the vertical velocity leads PMSE by 90{degrees} to 180{degrees} with a possible upward trend in phase with increasing frequency. They show that this is consistent with the current PMSE theories which depend primarily upon the presence of charged ice aerosols for the enhancement of radar scatter. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Vertical-plane pendulum absorbers for minimizing helicopter vibratory loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, K. B.; Neff, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The use of pendulum dynamic absorbers mounted on the blade root and operating in the vertical plane to minimize helicopter vibratory loads was discussed. A qualitative description was given of the concept of the dynamic absorbers and some results of analytical studies showing the degree of reduction in vibratory loads attainable are presented. Operational experience of vertical plane dynamic absorbers on the OH-6A helicopter is also discussed.

  17. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    SciTech Connect

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-08-16

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan for the Prototype vertical Denitration Calciner has been developed for this process.

  18. Observations of the vertical distribution of stratospheric OClO

    SciTech Connect

    Pommereau, J.P.; Piquard, J. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper reports on the first measurements of OClO vertical profiles in the arctic stratosphere from a balloon borne sonde launched from northern Sweden, carrying a lightweight spectrometer scanning the ultraviolet and visible spectrum. The vertical profiles of OClO were observed during two flights when the presence of polar stratospheric clouds could be confirmed from the ground. The column densities inferred are consistent with ground and aircraft based column density measurements.

  19. Vertical structure of aerosols, temperature, and moisture associated with an intense African dust event observed over the eastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce; Prospero, Joseph M.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2013-05-01

    unusually intense African dust event affected a large area of the western Atlantic and eastern Caribbean in early April 2010. Measurements made east of Barbados from the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter research aircraft are used to characterize particle size distributions; vertical distributions of aerosols, temperature, and moisture; and processes leading to the observed stratification in the boundary layer. The vertical profiles of various aerosol characterizations were similar on both days and show three layers with distinct aerosol and thermodynamic characteristics: the Saharan Air Layer (SAL; ~2.2 km ± 500 m), a subcloud layer (SCL; surface to ~500 m), and an intermediate layer extending between them. The SAL and SCL display well-mixed aerosol and thermodynamic characteristics; but the most significant horizontal and vertical variations in aerosols and thermodynamics occur in the intermediate layer. The aerosol variability observed in the intermediate layer is likely associated with modification by shallow cumulus convection occurring sometime in the prior history of the air mass as it is advected across the Atlantic. A comparison of the thermodynamic structure observed in the event from its origin over Africa with that when it reached Barbados indicates that the lower part of the SAL was moistened by surface fluxes as the air mass was advected across the Atlantic. Mixing diagrams using aerosol concentrations and water vapor mixing ratios as conserved parameters provide insight into the vertical transports and mixing processes that may explain the observed aerosol and thermodynamic variability in each layer.

  20. Improved vertical refractive-index structure parameter model for the maritime atmosphere based on local bulk meteorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Hammel, Stephen M.; McBryde, Kevin; Tsintikidis, Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    The refractive index structure parameter C 2/n(z) as a function of vertical height z, is a key parameter describing the turbulent intensity of the atmosphere, and is important for modeling and predicting beam propagation behavior. Over the past several decades many vertical C 2/n models have been developed, many based on empirical data from field test campaigns involving difficult in situ measurements by radiosondes, or remote-sensing using scidar/lidar/radar techniques. Each model has its own set of limitations and caveats. We have developed an improved C 2/n parametric model for the maritime environment, which uses the Navy Surface-Layer Optical Turbulence model for the low-altitude surface boundary layer, and merges with a generalized Hufnagel-Valley model for the middle- and upper-altitudes (up to 24 km elevation). It takes inputs of local bulk meteorological measurements and forms an estimate of C 2/n based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. We present phase-screen wave-optics propagation simulations comparing our improved model with previous models, in terms of turbulence metrics such as Fried's atmospheric coherence width r0, the scintillation index, and the Strehl ratio for both the weak and strong turbulence regimes, for vertical and slant paths, and for various characteristic regimes of the ratio w0=r0, where w0 is the Gaussian beam waist radius.