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Sample records for vertical gradient freeze

  1. Effects of a traveling magnetic field on vertical gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2011-09-01

    The effects of a traveling magnetic field (TMF) on vertical gradient freeze (VGF) growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are studied using a coupled model of magnetic induction, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. Simulations are performed to determine the influences of current and frequency on melt flow and growth interface shape. A downward traveling electromagnetic wave drives flow downward at the wall, which tends to flatten the interface, whereas an upward traveling wave has the opposite effect. TMF makes a significant impact on interface shape in the absence of thermal buoyancy, but is ineffectual under realistic conditions in a 4 inch diameter ampoule, for which buoyancy dominates Lorentz force throughout the melt.

  2. Cu2ZnSnSe4 Photovoltaic Absorber Grown by Vertical Gradient Freeze Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sandip; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2013-12-01

    High quality large grain single phase Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) photovoltaic absorber material was grown by vertical gradient freeze (VGF) technique for the first time. Polycrystalline CZTSe ingot was grown in a vacuum sealed quartz ampoule inside a modified three-zone vertical Bridgman furnace employing a directional cooling. Structural and compositional analyses of the grown crystals were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The grown crystals exhibited highly crystalline tetragonal structure corresponding to kesterite Cu2ZnSnSe4 with lattice parameters of a = 5.696 Å and c = 11.338 Å as evidenced from XRD pattern. Raman spectra showed three characteristic peaks at 171.5, 194.6, and 231.1 cm-1 attributed to kesterite phase CZTSe. No other secondary phases were detected in the grown crystals. Thermoelectric probe measurements showed p-type conductivity of the grown crystals and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) along the crystal growth direction showed uniform and stoichiometric elemental distribution. Our results show that VGF technique can be used to grow high quality kesterite compounds for photovoltaic application.

  3. Synthesis and crystal growth of Mg2Si by the liquid encapsulated vertical gradient freezing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Reo; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Sakuragi, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of Mg2Si bulk crystals was performed by the vertical gradient freezing method using a KCl-MgCl2 eutectic liquid encapsulant. Stoichiometric polycrystalline Mg2Si bulk crystals were successfully grown by changing the composition ratio of starting Mg and Si powders (Mg/Si) from 2.0 to 3.5. A chemical reaction between Mg2Si and the crucible materials was inhibited using encapsulant materials, and the contamination by K or Cl originating from the encapsulant materials was not detected in almost all the samples. However, Mg evaporation could not be prevented completely during the synthesis and crystal growth. The optical band-gap energy of Mg2Si bulk crystals became minimal (0.79 eV) at a Mg/Si ratio of 2.5, at which the maximum electron mobility of 202 cm2·V-1·s-1 was obtained. These results indicate that the composition ratio of Mg/Si = 2.5 for starting Mg and Si powders was optimal for synthesizing Mg2Si bulk crystals with high crystalline quality.

  4. Crystal Growth and Characterization of CdTe Grown by Vertical Gradient Freeze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, crystals of CdTe were grown from melts by the unseeded vertical gradient freeze method. The quality of grown crystal were studied by various characterization techniques including Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXT), chemical analysis by glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), low temperature photoluminescence (PL), and Hall measurements. The SWBXT images from various angles show nearly strain-free grains, grains with inhomogeneous strains, as well as twinning nucleated in the shoulder region of the boule. The GDMS chemical analysis shows the contamination of Ga at a level of 3900 ppb, atomic. The low temperature PL measurement exhibits the characteristic emissions of a Ga-doped sample. The Hall measurements show a resistivity of 1 x l0(exp 7) ohm-cm at room temperature to 3 x 10(exp 9) ohm-cm at 78K with the respective hole and electron concentration of 1.7 x 10(exp 9) cm(exp -3) and 3.9 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3) at room temperature.

  5. Investigation on the growth and characterization of 4-aminobenzophenone single crystal by the vertical dynamic gradient freeze technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, SP.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Sukumar, M.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2014-03-01

    Growth of bulk single crystal of 4-Aminobenzophenone (4-ABP) from the vertical dynamic gradient freeze (VDGF) setup designed with eight zone furnace was investigated. The experimental parameters for the growth of 4-ABP single crystal with respect to the design of VDGF setup are discussed. The eight zones were used to generate multiple temperature gradients over the furnace, and video imaging system helped to capture the real time growth and solid-liquid interface. 4-ABP single crystal with the size of 18 mm diameter and 40 mm length was grown from this investigation. Structural and optical quality of grown crystal was examined by high resolution X-ray diffraction and UV-visible spectral analysis, respectively and the blue emission was also confirmed from the photoluminescence spectrum. Microhardness number of the crystal was estimated at different loads using Vicker's microhardness tester. The size and quality of single crystal grown from the present investigation are compared with the vertical Bridgman grown 4-ABP.

  6. The prospects for traveling magnetic fields to affect interface shape in the vertical gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2013-02-01

    The influence of a traveling magnetic field (TMF) on vertical gradient freeze (VGF) growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is studied using a coupled model of magnetic induction, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. Simulations are performed to determine the influences of current, phase shift, and frequency on melt flow and growth interface shape. A downward traveling electromagnetic wave drives flow downward at the wall, which tends to flatten the interface, whereas an upward traveling wave has the opposite effect. An optimum phase shift that maximizes Lorentz force is found to depend only on system geometry. Large currents (˜300 A) and high frequencies (˜500 Hz) make a significant impact on interface shape in the absence of thermal buoyancy, but are ineffectual under realistic conditions in a 4 in.-diameter ampoule, for which buoyancy dominates Lorentz force throughout the melt. The results indicate that interface shape in this CZT growth system is strongly governed by furnace heat transfer and is difficult to modify by TMF-driven forced convection.

  7. Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations . Te-particles in vertical gradient freeze CZT: Size and Spatial Distributions and Constitutional Supercooling

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2014-10-01

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze CZT boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. The boule section was approximately 50-mm wide by 60-mm in length by 7-mm thick and was doubly polished for TIR work. Te-particles were imaged through the thickness using extended focal imaging to locate the particles in thickness planes spaced 15-µm apart and then in plane of the image using xy-coordinates of the particle center of mass so that a true three dimensional particle map was assembled for a 1-mm by 45-mm longitudinal strip and for a 1-mm by 50-mm radial strip. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips, and treating the particles as vertices of a network created a 3D image of the particle spatial distribution. Te-particles exhibited a multi-modal log-normal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure throughout the boule that can be correlated to dislocation network sizes in CZT. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te to reduce the melting point below 1273 K (1000°C). These solidification experiments were performed over a wide range of cooling rates and clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as 1) Te

  8. Gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics fabricated by freeze casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Kai-hui; zhang, Yuan; Jiang, Dongliang; Zeng, Yu-Ping

    2011-04-01

    By controlling the cooling rates and the composition of slurries, the gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics are fabricated by the freeze casting method. According to the different cooling rate, the pores of HAP ceramics fabricated by gradient freeze casting are divided into three parts: one is lamellar pores, another is column pore and the last one is fine round pores. The laminated freeze casting is in favour of obtaining the gradient porous ceramics composed of different materials and the ceramics have unclear interfaces.

  9. Semiconductor apparatus utilizing gradient freeze and liquid-solid techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry F. (Inventor); Borshchevsky, Alexander (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Transition metals of Group VIII (Co, Rh and Ir) have been prepared as semiconductor compounds with the general formula TSb.sub.3. The skutterudite-type crystal lattice structure of these semiconductor compounds and their enhanced thermoelectric properties results in semiconductor materials which may be used in the fabrication of thermoelectric elements to substantially improve the efficiency of the resulting thermoelectric device. Semiconductor materials having the desired skutterudite-type crystal lattice structure may be prepared in accordance with the present invention by using vertical gradient freezing techniques and/or liquid phase sintering techniques. Measurements of electrical and thermal transport properties of selected semiconductor materials prepared in accordance with the present invention, demonstrated high Hall mobilities (up to 1200 cm.sup.2.V.sup.-1.s.sup.-1) and good Seebeck coefficients (up to 150 .mu.VK.sup.-1 between 300.degree. C. and 700.degree. C.). Optimizing the transport properties of semiconductor materials prepared from elemental mixtures Co, Rh, Ir and Sb resulted in a substantial increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) at temperatures as high as 400.degree. C. for thermoelectric elements fabricated from such semiconductor materials.

  10. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-04-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  11. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  12. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI. PMID:23008151

  13. Polymer Membranes with Vertically Oriented Pores Constructed by 2D Freezing at Ambient Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong-Qing; Ji, Ke-Jia; Zha, Li-Yun; Hu, Wen-Bing; Ou, Yang; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-06-01

    Polymer membranes with well-controlled and vertically oriented pores are of great importance in the applications for water treatment and tissue engineering. On the basis of two-dimensional solvent freezing, we report environmentally friendly facile fabrication of such membranes from a broad spectrum of polymer resources including poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(l-lactic acid), polyacrylonitrile, polystyrene, polysulfone and polypropylene. Dimethyl sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and arachidic acid are selected as green solvents crystallized in the polymer matrices under two-dimensional temperature gradients induced by water at ambient temperature. Parallel Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice polymers demonstrate that the directional process is feasible for each polymer holding suitable interaction with a corresponding solvent. As a typical example of this approach, poly(vinylidene fluoride) membranes exhibit excellent tensile strength, high optical transparence, and outstanding separation performance for the mixtures of yeasts and lactobacilli. PMID:27188247

  14. Vertical gradients of lung density in healthy supine men.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A B; Denison, D M

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomography was used to determine the vertical gradient of physical density in peripheral lung tissue of 12 healthy supine subjects, at total lung capacity and residual volume. At total lung capacity the mean (SD) density of peripheral lung tissue at the level of the mid right atrium was 0.0715 (0.017) g/cm3 and the vertical gradient of density was slight. At residual volume the density of peripheral tissue at the same level was 0.272 (0.067) g/cm3 and the vertical density gradient was curvilinear and more pronounced. Predictions of the gradient at residual volume were made on the basis of the known compliance of the lung and measured effects were attributed to the action of gravity on blood vessel distensibility at total lung capacity. These predictions agreed closely with the actual density gradient measured at residual volume and provide a basis for forecasting the vertical density gradient that would exist in healthy lungs at any degree of inflation. Departure from these gradients would imply local abnormalities of lung compliance, distribution of mechanical stress, or distensibility of vessels. Images PMID:2763259

  15. Convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. W.; Chai, A. T.; Sun, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transport process in the fluid phase during the growth of a crystal has a profound influence on the structure and quality of the solid phase. In vertical growth techniques the fluid phase is often subjected to vertical temperature and concentration gradients. The main objective is to obtain more experimental data on convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients. Among actual crystal systems the parameters vary widely. The parametric ranges studied for mass transfer are mainly dictated by the electrochemical system employed to impose concentration gradients. Temperature or concentration difference are maintained between two horizontal end walls. The other walls are kept insulated. Experimental measurements and observations were made of the heat transfer or mass transfer, flow patterns, and the mean and fluctuating temperature distribution. The method used to visualize the flow pattern in the thermal cases is an electrochemical pH-indicator method. Laser shadowgraphs are employed to visualize flow patterns in the solutal cases.

  16. Daytime and Nighttime Vertical Gradients of HONO in Houston, TX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Stutz, J.; Oh, H.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays an important role in tropospheric photochemistry as a precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the primary oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, the sources of HONO have not yet been fully understood. Recently, daytime HONO concentrations higher than expected have been observed in various field experiments. The cause of these elevated HONO levels is currently unclear. The vertical distribution of HONO at night and during the day, which can have a considerable impact on the importance of HONO for ozone formation, is also currently poorly characterized by observations and models. Measurements of daytime and nighttime HONO vertical profiles were made in Houston in Summer 2006 during the TexAQS II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) using long path DOAS. HONO developed negative concentration gradients during the night, due to inefficient vertical mixing, and a combination of ground deposition of NO2 and HONO and heterogeneous conversion of NO2 to HONO on surfaces. Despite the efficient vertical mixing during the day, boundary layer HONO gradients were also observed, indicating possible unknown source of HONO near the ground. Here we present and discuss the field observations of HONO and other traces gases during TRAMP and the modeling of daytime and nighttime HONO gradients using a one dimensional (1-D) chemistry and transport model.

  17. Using absolute gravimeter data to determine vertical gravity gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The position versus time data from a free-fall absolute gravimeter can be used to estimate the vertical gravity gradient in addition to the gravity value itself. Hipkin has reported success in estimating the vertical gradient value using a data set of unusually good quality. This paper explores techniques that may be applicable to a broader class of data that may be contaminated with "system response" errors of larger magnitude than were evident in the data used by Hipkin. This system response function is usually modelled as a sum of exponentially decaying sinusoidal components. The technique employed here involves combining the x0, v0 and g parameters from all the drops made during a site occupation into a single least-squares solution, and including the value of the vertical gradient and the coefficients of system response function in the same solution. The resulting non-linear equations must be solved iteratively and convergence presents some difficulties. Sparse matrix techniques are used to make the least-squares problem computationally tractable.

  18. Anomalous segregation during electrodynamic gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew; Burger, Arnold; Cui, Yunlong; Lynn, Kelvin G.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2011-06-01

    A transient, coupled model has been developed to analyze the segregation of zinc in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) grown in an electrodynamic gradient freeze (EDG) furnace. The coupled model consists of a local model that solves for time-dependent melt flow, heat transfer, melt-crystal interface position, and zinc distribution in both melt and solid phases and a quasi-steady-state global model that features realistic furnace heat transfer. After verification and validation tests, the model is applied to predict composition patterns in a large-scale CZT EDG growth system previously analyzed by Gasperino et al. [On crucible effects during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride in an electrodynamic gradient freeze furnace, J. Crys. Growth 311 (2009) 2327-2335]. Surprisingly, anomalous zinc segregation is predicted, featuring a non-monotonic axial concentration profile and several local minima and maxima across the boule. A mechanistic explanation is put forth based on the cumulative effect of changes in multi-cellular melt flow structures, a particularly susceptible occurrence for CZT systems. Additional effects of furnace translation rate and solid state diffusion are probed.

  19. New analytic solutions for modeling vertical gravity gradient anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Sep; Wessel, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Modern processing of satellite altimetry for use in marine gravimetry involves computing the along-track slopes of observed sea-surface heights, projecting them into east-west and north-south deflection of the vertical grids, and using Laplace's equation to algebraically obtain a grid of the vertical gravity gradient (VGG). The VGG grid is then integrated via overlapping, flat Earth Fourier transforms to yield a free-air anomaly grid. Because of this integration and associated edge effects, the VGG grid retains more short-wavelength information (e.g., fracture zone and seamount signatures) that is of particular importance for plate tectonic investigations. While modeling of gravity anomalies over arbitrary bodies has long been a standard undertaking, similar modeling of VGG anomalies over oceanic features is not commonplace yet. Here we derive analytic solutions for VGG anomalies over simple bodies and arbitrary 2-D and 3-D sources. We demonstrate their usability in determining mass excess and deficiency across the Mendocino fracture zone (a 2-D feature) and find the best bulk density estimate for Jasper seamount (a 3-D feature). The methodologies used herein are implemented in the Generic Mapping Tools, available from gmt.soest.hawaii.edu.

  20. Crystal growth through a computer controlled, eight zone thermal gradient freeze furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Michael R.

    Multiple temperature zone gradient furnaces are well suited to investigate crystal growth processes, since they have a plurality of independently controlled temperature zones which can be programmed to process a wide variety of materials under specific growth rate and temperature gradient conditions. The ongoing design and operation of a low cost multiple zone gradient freeze furnace is described. An early version consisted of the furnace core made of threaded hollow alumina around which eight independent resistive wire elements were wound, along with a power supply and a control system. Performance of the furnace was tested using both zinc and tin samples with a variety of furnace operating characteristics. A number of problems were revealed such as the difficulty of maintaining high thermal gradients. A numerical modelling review of the design indicated that the most significant feature limiting performance was the air gap separating the alumina core from the ampoule containing the sample. To improve performance, several fundamental changes were made. The core was modified into a series of independent ceramic elements, and isolated air cooling paths for each zone were installed. The entire furnace assembly was cabinetized for stability and portability in preparation for testing in a low gravity environment.

  1. A wet/wet differential pressure sensor for measuring vertical hydraulic gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2008-12-13

    This article describes a new tool for measuring vertical hydraulic gradient in the hyporheic zone. It is essentially an electronic version of an established differential pressure measurement technique.

  2. Crystal Growth of CdTe by Gradient Freeze in Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Li, C.; Knuteson, D.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Szoke, J.; Barczy, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of unsealed melt growth of an array of II-VI compounds, namely, CdTe, CdZnTe and ZnSe, there is a tremendous amount of experimental data describing the correlations between melt conditions and crystal quality. The results imply that the crystallinity quality can be improved if the melt was markedly superheated or long-time held before growth. It is speculated that after high superheating the associated complex dissociate and the spontaneous nucleation is retarded. In this study, crystals of CdTe were grown from melts which have undergone different thermal history by the unseeded gradient freeze method using the Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC). The effects of melt conditions on the quality of grown crystal were studied by various characterization techniques, including Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWSXT), infrared microscopy, chemical analysis by glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), electrical conductivity and Hall measurements.

  3. On crucible effects during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride in an electrodynamic gradient freeze furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperino, David; Bliss, Mary; Jones, Kelly; Lynn, Kelvin; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2009-04-01

    The CrysMAS code of the Crystal Growth Laboratory, Fraunhofer IISB, is applied to reveal conditions occurring in electrodynamic gradient freeze furnaces during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride crystals. Of particular interest are heat transfer and growth conditions associated with crucibles of different design, one constructed of graphite and the other of pyrolytic boron nitride (PBN). Under identical furnace set-point schedules, the two systems exhibit very different behaviors. Specifically, the temperature field through the cone region of the PBN crucible displays much steeper axial thermal profiles and promotes convex solid-liquid interface shapes (rather than the concave shapes computed for the graphite crucible). Both systems exhibit a concave interface during growth through the cylindrical part of the crucible. However, the axial thermal profile through the graphite-crucible charge is considerably more offset from the set-point profile of the furnace due to significant axial heat flows through the crucible walls. These factors argue in favor of the PBN crucible; however, comparatively larger radial gradients in the PBN system could lead to higher dislocation levels.

  4. On crucible effects during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride in an electrodynamic gradient freeze furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperino, David; Bliss, Mary; Jones, Kelly A.; Lynn, Kelvin G.; Derby, Jeffrey

    2009-01-04

    The CrysMAS code of the Crystal Growth Laboratory, Fraunhofer IISB, is applied to reveal conditions occurring in electrodynamic gradient freeze furnaces during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride crystals. Of particular interest are heat transfer and growth conditions associated with crucibles of different design, one constructed of graphite and the other of pyrolytic boron nitride (PBN). Under identical furnace set-point schedules, the PBN system exhibits very different heat transfer through the cone region of the crucible, resulting in steeper axial thermal profiles and convex solid-interface shapes (rather than the concave shapes computed for the graphite crucible). Both systems exhibit a concave interface during growth through the cylindrical part of the crucible; however, the axial thermal profile through the contents of the graphite crucible is considerably more offset from the set-point profile of the furnace due to the large axial flows of heat through the crucible walls. These conditions argue for advantage to the PBN system; however, comparatively larger radial gradients in the PBN system could lead to higher dislocation levels.

  5. Retained functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after double freezing and thawing using PureSperm density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, W M C; Parrilla, I; Caballero, I; Garcia, E; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Vazquez, J M; Rath, D

    2007-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the motility and functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after single and double freezing and thawing. The viability and morphological integrity of spermatozoa selected by PureSperm density gradient centrifugation after cryopreservation of bovine semen in two commercial extenders (Experiment 1) and the function of bull spermatozoa before and after a second freezing and thawing assisted by PureSperm selection (Experiment 2) were examined. On average, 35.8 +/- 12.1% of sperm loaded onto the PureSperm density gradient were recovered after centrifugation. In Experiment 1, post-thaw motility and acrosome integrity were higher for spermatozoa frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender than in AndroMed, whether the assessments were made immediately after thawing [80.4 +/- 12.7 vs 47.6 +/- 19.0% motile and 78.8 +/- 8.3 vs 50.1 +/- 19.5% normal apical ridge (NAR), p < 0.05] or after preparation on the gradient (83.3 +/- 8.6 vs 69.4 +/- 15.9% motile and 89.5 +/- 7.2 vs 69.1 +/- 11.4% NAR, p < 0.05). For semen frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender, selection on the PureSperm gradient did not influence total motility but significantly improved the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. After the gradient, both the total motility and percentage of normal acrosomes increased for spermatozoa frozen in AndroMed (Minitüb Tiefenbach, Germany). In Experiment 2, there was no difference in sperm motility after the first and second freeze-thawing (82.9 +/- 12.7 vs 68.8 +/- 18.7%). However, the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa was significantly improved by selection through the PureSperm gradient, whether measured by phase contrast microscopy (78.9 +/- 9.7 vs 90.4 +/- 4.0% NAR, p < 0.05) or flow cytometry (53.4 +/- 11.7 vs 76.3 +/- 6.0% viable acrosome-intact spermatozoa, p < 0.001). The improvement in the percentage of spermatozoa with normal acrosomes was maintained after resuspension in the cooling extender and cooling to 4 degrees C (88

  6. Investigation of height gradient in vertical plasma drift at equatorial ionosphere using multifrequency HF Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran Nayar, S. R.; Sreehari, C. V.

    2004-12-01

    A multifrequency HF Doppler radar installed at the magnetic equatorial station Trivandrum provides an opportunity to study the height gradient in vertical plasma drift at the bottomside of equatorial F region during evening time. The multifrequency radar gives near-simultaneous observation of vertical plasma drift at three close by F region heights above the sounding station. The height gradient of the vertical drift shows a negative value during the prereversal enhancement (PRE) period and turns to positive value after the prereversal enhancement. The average height gradient in vertical plasma drift remains negative around PRE and its magnitude decreases with altitude, below F peak. This could be a clear-cut manifestation of the curl-free nature of the low-latitude electric field, and it could also indicate a partial signature of the postsunset velocity vortex at the equatorial F region. The magnitude of the mean height gradient around PRE exhibits a seasonal variation.

  7. Intermittency of vertical density gradients at finescale and link with mixing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouruet-Aubertot, Pascale; Sommeria, J.; Le Cann, B.; Koudella, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    Nonlinear interactions among internal gravity waves lead to intermittent breaking events with density overturning and vertical turbulent mixing. We analyze the statistics of density fluctuations generated in this process, using direct numerical simulations. We then check the relevance of these results for in situ density profiles measured during the ARCANE experiment on the continental slope west of the Iberian peninsula, a region with strong internal tides. We focus the analysis in the depth range [400-1000 m] for which the temperature is uniform, and the density stratification is due mainly to salinity. We verify in the numerical simulations that the histograms of vertical density gradients become strongly skewed at small vertical scales. This intermittency of density fluctuations can be attributed to the formation of sheets with strong stable density gradients. These sheets result from convergent motion produced by surrounding breaking events. We check that the vertical density gradients at finescale can be represented by a model of layers and sheets distributed with a Poisson statistics, with a mean number of sheets per unit length, μ. We next show that the mean sheet spacing μ-1is proportional to the Ozmidov scale (proportional to the square root of the energy dissipation). Using the classical link between energy dissipation and vertical eddy diffusivity Kd, we deduce a link between the statistics of vertical density gradients and the vertical mixing, namely Kd is proportional to Nμ-2. For in situ measurements, we find a similar statistics of vertical density gradients, confirming earlier results obtained by Hayes et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 80 (3) 314] and Pinkel and Anderson [J. Phys. Oceanogr. 22 (1992) 773] in the open ocean thermocline. This allows us to estimate a rate of total energy dissipation 2.4×10-8W/kg and a vertical eddy diffusivity 5×10-4m2s-1. Comparisons with other estimates of energy dissipation or vertical mixing would be required to

  8. Bulk Crystal Growth of Piezoelectric PMN-PT Crystals Using Gradient Freeze Technique for Improved SHM Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan D.; Kochary, F.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Miller, Jim

    2007-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in recent years in lead based perovskite ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric solid solutions because of their excellent dielectric, piezoelectric and electrostrictive properties that make them very attractive for various sensing, actuating and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. We are interested in the development of highly sensitive and efficient PMN-PT sensors based on large single crystals for the structural health monitoring of composite materials that may be used in future spacecrafts. Highly sensitive sensors are needed for detection of defects in these materials because they often tend to fail by distributed and interacting damage modes and much of the damage occurs beneath the top surface of the laminate and not detectable by visual inspection. Research is being carried out for various combinations of solid solutions for PMN-PT piezoelectric materials and bigger size crystals are being sought for improved sensor applications. Single crystals of this material are of interest for sensor applications because of their high piezoelectric coefficient (d33 greater than 1700 pC/N) and electromechanical coefficients (k33 greater than 0.90). For comparison, the commonly used piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has a d33 of about 600 pC/N and electromechanical coefficients k33 of about 0.75. At the present time, these piezoelectric relaxor crystals are grown by high temperature flux growth method and the size of these crystals are rather small (3x4x5 mm(exp 3). In the present paper, we have attempted to grow bulk single crystals of PMN-PT in a 2 inch diameter platinum crucible and successfully grown a large size crystal of 67%PMN-33%PT using the vertical gradient freeze technique with no flux. Piezoelectric properties of the grown crystals are investigated. PMN-PT plates show excellent piezoelectric properties. Samples were poled under an applied electric field of 5 kV/cm. Dielectric properties at a

  9. Overburden Pressure as a Cause of Vertical Velocity Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear effect of rocks stressed by the overburden pressure causes anisotropy. Evaluation shows that such anisotropy can be significant, reaching several tens of percent and probably more. This result is consistent with common practices, when stacking velocity needs extra corrections with a changing offset. This also implies that at field scales all the rocks are likely to be anisotropic, and this property needs to be accounted for during migration of data, tomography, AVO analysis etc. The laboratory velocity measurements need to be corrected for the nonlinear overburden effects, when applied to the field scales. Nonlinear rock coefficients can be determined from the special laboratory measurements. They also can be evaluated from observation of the nonlinear propagation effects, such as multiple frequency generation. Nonlinear coefficient for Berea sandstone turned out to be by an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from borehole data. This is likely due to low stiffness and low fluid saturation of the used sample. This also suggests possibility of very high velocity gradient at shallow depths in some rocks. An assumption that the amplitudes of the static strains well exceed those related to the dynamic field is not critical. It was made in order to simplify the derivations. If both components are comparable, then the solution would have an additional nonlinear component representing a multiple harmonic. The relations between the nonlinear elastic constants and the elastic constants of the effective TI medium are very simple and allow straightforward estimate of the medium anisotropy induced by an applied stress. There are other causes of anisotropy in rocks besides an applied stress. The rock can possibly be anisotropic on a microscopic (clays) and mesoscopic (sedimentary layering) levels. The combined contribution of all the causes can either reduce or increase the overall effect. Same rock at different depths might have different wave propagation

  10. Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in groundwater studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume

  11. Does vertical temperature gradient of the atmosphere matter for El Niño development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Huang, Bohua; Tseng, Yu-heng; Wang, Wanqiu; Kumar, Arun; Zhu, Jieshun; Jha, Bhaskar

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we examine the connection of vertical temperature gradient of the tropospheric atmosphere along the equator with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the possible impact of the long-term change of the gradient. It is suggested that when the temperature anomalies in the lower troposphere are relatively warmer (cooler) than in the upper troposphere, the atmosphere is less (more) stable and favors an El Niño (a La Niña) event to develop. ENSO evolutions in 1997-1998 and 2014-2015 events are good examples of this relationship. They started from similar ocean anomaly states in the springs of 1997 and 2014, but developed into an extreme El Niño in 1997-1998 and a borderline El Niño in 2014-2015. That may be partially due to differences in the evolutions of the vertical temperature anomaly gradient in troposphere. Thus, in addition to the significant atmospheric response to ENSO, the preconditioning of vertical gradient of the tropospheric temperature due to internal atmospheric processes to some extent may play an active role in affecting ENSO evolution. The long-term trend with more pronounced warming in the upper troposphere than in the lower troposphere causes a reduction in the vertical temperature gradient in the troposphere. Moreover, unlike almost homogenous warm anomalies in the upper troposphere, the lower troposphere shows remarkable regional features along the equator during 1979-2014, with cold anomaly trends over the central and eastern Pacific Ocean associated with the so-called hiatus and some warm anomalies on its two sides in the east and west. This vertical and zonal distribution of the air temperature trends in the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean is consistent with the convection suppression over the central Pacific since 2000, implying a weakening of atmosphere and ocean coupling.

  12. Bulk Crystal Growth of Nonlinear Optical Organic Materials Using Inverted Vertical Gradient Freeze Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, J.; Cruz, Magda; Metzl, R.; Wang, W. S.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1998-01-01

    A new process for producing large bulk single crystals of benzil (C6H5COCOC6H5) is reported in this paper. Good quality crystals have been successfully grown using this approach to crystal growth. This method seems to be very promising for other thermally stable NLO organic materials also. The entire contents vycor crucible 1.5 inch in diameter and 2 inch deep was converted to single crystal. Purity of the starting growth material is also an important factor in the final quality of the grown crystals. The entire crystal can be very easily taken out of the crucible by simple maneuvering. Initial characterization of the grown crystals indicated that the crystals are as good as other crystals grown by conventional Bridgman Stockbarger technique.

  13. HONO Vertical Gradients during the 2006 TRAMP and the 2009 SHARP experiments in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Tsai, C.; Pikelnaya, O.; Stutz, J.; Fu, D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays a significant role in tropospheric photochemistry as a precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH). Despite the importance of HONO photolysis for the OH budget in the early morning, HONO formation mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In addition, recent observations of higher than expected daytime HONO concentrations are currently unexplained. The vertical distribution of HONO in the morning and during the day can have a considerable impact on its importance for ozone formation in the boundary layer. The observation of vertical profiles is also important to allow a better understanding of HONO formation in the atmosphere. Consequently there is an urgent need to provide observations and detailed model calculations of vertical HONO profiles. During the 2009 SHARP experiment from April 15 to May 29, 2009 in Houston, TX, we performed measurements of HONO, NO2, O3 and other trace gases in three altitude intervals (30-70m, 70 - 130m, and 130 - 300m), using UCLA’s long path DOAS instrument. Vertical gradients of all atmospheric trace gases were frequently observed during stable nights. HONO established negative gradients, with higher concentrations near the ground, indicating that the source of HONO is at or near the ground. Daytime HONO gradients were also observed during some days. Here we compare our results with observations made at the same location in 2006 and with results from a 1-D chemical transport model to elucidate the mechanisms forming HONO in urban areas.

  14. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  15. Vertical gradients in the zonal wind observed in the equatorial F-region under postsunset conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiene, A.; Larsen, M. F.; Kudeki, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the early evening sector of the F region near the geomagnetic equator, an eastward pressure gradient as the sun sets reorients the neutral flow toward the east, typically occurring within one hour of local sunset. Very few vertically-resolved measurements of this effect exist. We present recent in-situ chemical tracer results from the EVEX campaign, as well as results from the earlier Guara campaign, that show strong vertical shear in the zonal wind during sunset hours in the F region, up to a 150 m/s westward shift over 60 km altitude. Eastward F-region neutral winds near the geomagnetic equator drive vertical Pedersen currents at sunset that, in turn, drive the prereversal enhancement (PRE) of the eastward electric field in the equatorial F-region that is thought to be a primary driver of equatorial spread-F. Studies of the neutral winds relating to the PRE have been primarily focused on the winds observed from ground-based interferometry and from satellite accelerometer data, techniques which generally lack vertical resolution. We show that eastward winds at one altitude are not necessarily accompanied by eastward winds at higher altitudes, i.e., that the forces that drive the neutral wind are not constant with altitude at sunset. At sunset, solar heating varies significantly with altitude, decreasing at lower altitudes first, which would create a thermal pressure gradient with a similar vertical profile to that observed in the neutral winds. We discuss the magnitude of this effect as well as other factors that could contribute to the observed vertical gradients. We then apply these effects to typical ionospheric conditions at the time of the experiments and examine the resulting neutral forcing in relation to the observed wind profiles.

  16. Cu-Ni composition gradient for the catalytic synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Kate L; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Rack, Philip D; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Meyer III, Harry M; Simpson, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The influence of catalyst alloy composition on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers was studied using Cu-Ni thin films. Metals were co-sputtered onto a substrate to form a thin film alloy with a wide compositional gradient, as determined by Auger analysis. Carbon nanofibers were then grown from the gradient catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The alloy composition produced substantial differences in the resulting nanofibers, which varied from branched structures at 81%Ni-19%Cu to high aspect ratio nanocones at 80%Cu-20%Ni. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques also revealed segregation of the initial alloy catalyst particles at certain concentrations.

  17. The effect of vocal fold vertical stiffness gradient on sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Biao; Xue, Qian; Zheng, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    It is observed in some experimental studies on canine vocal folds (VFs) that the inferior aspect of the vocal fold (VF) is much stiffer than the superior aspect under relatively large strain. Such vertical difference is supposed to promote the convergent-divergent shape during VF vibration and consequently facilitate the production of sound. In this study, we investigate the effect of vertical variation of VF stiffness on sound production using a numerical model. The vertical variation of stiffness is produced by linearly increasing the Young's modulus and shear modulus from the superior to inferior aspects in the cover layer, and its effect on phonation is examined in terms of aerodynamic and acoustic quantities such as flow rate, open quotient, skewness of flow wave form, sound intensity and vocal efficiency. The flow-induced vibration of the VF is solved with a finite element solver coupled with 1D Bernoulli equation, which is further coupled with a digital waveguide model. This study is designed to find out whether it's beneficial to artificially induce the vertical stiffness gradient by certain implanting material in VF restoring surgery, and if it is beneficial, what gradient is the most favorable.

  18. Measuring thermal gradients in a melting/freezing PCM with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, R. M.; Papo, R.

    1982-12-01

    A water loop was constructed and used to control the temperature on one face of a 64 cu. in. cell containing PCM. Two faces were equipped with plate glass windows allowing a laser beam to pass through the cell and its net deflection to be measured. Thermal gradients in the liquid phase were compared with computer simulation of conduction in a PCM. Preliminary measurements with the current cell design show significant contributions to heat transfer in the PCM from convection despite attempts to limit heat transfer to conduction.

  19. Estimating Effective Vertical Diffusivity in Shallow Ponds by a Constrained Flux-Gradient Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, J. R.; Torgersen, T.

    2004-12-01

    Shallow ponds have been used to mitigate the deleterious effects of storm water run-off by acting as detention/retention basins that sequester run-off associated pollutants in sediments. Studies show that the retention efficiency of these systems can decrease over time as a result of the internal loading of nutrients/contaminants from the sediments back to the water column where they are available for export downstream. Quantifying the vertical transport of gases (down) and sediment derived materials (up) is vital to the modeling and understanding of the processes that contribute to the magnitude of internal loading. A critical parameter is the effective vertical diffusion coefficient: Kz=Dmolecular +Deddy (cm2 sec-1). The flux gradient method for estimating effective vertical thermal diffusivity has been applied with success in large lakes which undergo stratification cycles on seasonal or longer time scales. We offer a constrained version of the flux-gradient method that has been adapted for use in a shallow pond with a daily stratification cycle. The method employs heat as a tracer and assumes that transport in the face of a stable gradient is diffusive. By shrinking the spatial and temporal resolution of measurement to scales appropriate to the system of interest and carefully accounting for internal source and sink terms of heat (e.g solar radiation and sediment heat fluxes) we are able to calculate Kz as a function of time and depth during periods of stable stratification, i.e when the pond is not vertically well-mixed. Results show the magnitude of Kz varies from ca. 10-3 to 10-1 (cm2 sec-1) under stratified conditions depending primarily on the strength of stratification.

  20. The vertical metallicity gradient of the Milky Way disk: transitions in [α/Fe] populations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Beers, Timothy C.; Harding, Paul; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bird, Jonathan C.; Schönrich, Ralph; Yanny, Brian; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Brinkmann, Jon

    2014-08-20

    Using G dwarfs from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) survey, we have determined the vertical metallicity gradient in the Milky Way's disk and examined how this gradient varies for different [α/Fe] subsamples. Our sample contains over 40,000 stars with low-resolution spectroscopy over 144 lines of sight. It also covers a significant disk volume, between ∼0.3 and 1.6 kpc from the Galactic plane, and allows us to examine the disk in situ, whereas previous analyses were more limited in scope. Furthermore, this work does not presuppose a disk structure, whether composed of a single complex population or distinct thin and thick disk components. We employ the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline to obtain estimates of stellar parameters, [Fe/H], and [α/Fe] and extract multiple volume-complete subsamples of approximately 1000 stars each. Based on SEGUE's target-selection algorithm, we adjust each subsample to determine an unbiased picture of disk chemistry; consequently, each individual star represents the properties of many. The metallicity gradient is –0.243{sub −0.053}{sup +0.039} dex kpc{sup –1} for the entire sample, which we compare to various literature results. This gradient stems from the different [α/Fe] populations inhabiting different ranges of height above the Galactic plane. Each [α/Fe] subsample shows little change in median [Fe/H] with height. If we associate [α/Fe] with age, the negligible gradients of our [α/Fe] subsamples suggest that stars formed in different epochs exhibit comparable vertical structure, implying similar star formation processes and evolution.

  1. Particle surface area dependence of mineral dust in immersion freezing mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator and a vertical wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows one to freely suspend single drops in the air without any wall contact. Heterogeneous nucleation by two types of illite (illite IMt1 and illite NX) and a montmorillonite sample was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 mm in radius were monitored by a video camera while cooled down to -28 °C to simulate freezing within the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was contact-free, determined with an infrared thermometer; the onset of freezing was indicated by a sudden increase of the drop surface temperature. For comparison, measurements with one particle type (illite NX) were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 μm radius freely suspended. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C as a function of particle type and particle surface area immersed in the drops. Isothermal experiments in the wind tunnel indicated that after the cooling stage freezing still proceeds, at least during the investigated time period of 30 s. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model. Although the wind tunnel results do not support the time-independence of the freezing process both models are applicable for comparing the results from the two experimental techniques.

  2. Use of vertical temperature gradients for prediction of tidal flat sediment characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miselis, Jennifer L.; Holland, K. Todd; Reed, Allen H.; Abelev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Sediment characteristics largely govern tidal flat morphologic evolution; however, conventional methods of investigating spatial variability in lithology on tidal flats are difficult to employ in these highly dynamic regions. In response, a series of laboratory experiments was designed to investigate the use of temperature diffusion toward sediment characterization. A vertical thermistor array was used to quantify temperature gradients in simulated tidal flat sediments of varying compositions. Thermal conductivity estimates derived from these arrays were similar to measurements from a standard heated needle probe, which substantiates the thermistor methodology. While the thermal diffusivities of dry homogeneous sediments were similar, diffusivities for saturated homogeneous sediments ranged approximately one order of magnitude. The thermal diffusivity of saturated sand was five times the thermal diffusivity of saturated kaolin and more than eight times the thermal diffusivity of saturated bentonite. This suggests that vertical temperature gradients can be used for distinguishing homogeneous saturated sands from homogeneous saturated clays and perhaps even between homogeneous saturated clay types. However, experiments with more realistic tidal flat mixtures were less discriminating. Relationships between thermal diffusivity and percent fines for saturated mixtures varied depending upon clay composition, indicating that clay hydration and/or water content controls thermal gradients. Furthermore, existing models for the bulk conductivity of sediment mixtures were improved only through the use of calibrated estimates of homogeneous end-member conductivity and water content values. Our findings suggest that remotely sensed observations of water content and thermal diffusivity could only be used to qualitatively estimate tidal flat sediment characteristics.

  3. Use of vertical temperature gradients for prediction of tidal flat sediment characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miselis, Jennifer L.; Holland, K. Todd; Reed, Allen H.; Abelev, Andrei

    2012-03-01

    Sediment characteristics largely govern tidal flat morphologic evolution; however, conventional methods of investigating spatial variability in lithology on tidal flats are difficult to employ in these highly dynamic regions. In response, a series of laboratory experiments was designed to investigate the use of temperature diffusion toward sediment characterization. A vertical thermistor array was used to quantify temperature gradients in simulated tidal flat sediments of varying compositions. Thermal conductivity estimates derived from these arrays were similar to measurements from a standard heated needle probe, which substantiates the thermistor methodology. While the thermal diffusivities of dry homogeneous sediments were similar, diffusivities for saturated homogeneous sediments ranged approximately one order of magnitude. The thermal diffusivity of saturated sand was five times the thermal diffusivity of saturated kaolin and more than eight times the thermal diffusivity of saturated bentonite. This suggests that vertical temperature gradients can be used for distinguishing homogeneous saturated sands from homogeneous saturated clays and perhaps even between homogeneous saturated clay types. However, experiments with more realistic tidal flat mixtures were less discriminating. Relationships between thermal diffusivity and percent fines for saturated mixtures varied depending upon clay composition, indicating that clay hydration and/or water content controls thermal gradients. Furthermore, existing models for the bulk conductivity of sediment mixtures were improved only through the use of calibrated estimates of homogeneous end-member conductivity and water content values. Our findings suggest that remotely sensed observations of water content and thermal diffusivity could only be used to qualitatively estimate tidal flat sediment characteristics.

  4. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  5. Generalized model for a Moho inversion from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhourun; Tenzer, Robert; Sneeuw, Nico; Liu, Lintao; Wild-Pfeiffer, Franziska

    2016-07-01

    Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth's lithospheric structure including the Moho geometry. In regions where seismic data are sparse or completely absent, gravimetric or combined gravimetric-seismic methods could be applied to determine the Moho depth. In this study we derive and present generalized expressions for solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy for a Moho depth determination from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data. By solving the (non-linear) Fredholm's integral equation of the first kind, the linearized observation equations, which functionally relate the (given) gravity/gravity-gradient data to the (unknown) Moho depth, are derived in the spectral domain. The VMM gravimetric results are validated by using available seismic and gravimetric Moho models. Our results show that the VMM Moho solutions obtained by solving the VMM problem for gravity and gravity-gradient data are almost the same. This finding indicates that in global applications, using the global gravity/gravity-gradient data coverage, the spherical harmonic expressions for the gravimetric forward and inverse modeling yield (theoretically) the same results. Globally, these gravimetric solutions have also a relatively good agreement with the CRUST1.0 and GEMMA GOCE models in terms of their RMS Moho differences (4.7 km and 4.1 km respectively).

  6. Depth Estimation of Simple Causative Sources from Gravity Gradient Tensor Invariants and Vertical Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruç, Bülent

    2010-10-01

    The gravity gradient tensor (GGT) is deduced from products of second-order derivatives of the gravitational potential. A new method based on the invariants of the GGT has been proposed in this research to interpret gravity data due to sphere, infinite horizontal cylinder and semi-infinite vertical cylinder. The method estimates the depth of these simple causative sources from the multiplication of the maximum of the gravity vertical component by the maximum value of the invariants I 1 to I 2 ratio. To show the reliability and correctness of the estimated depths on 3-D models, the method has been tested using theoretical data with and without random noise. In addition, I have applied the method to a field-data example in Texas, USA and the depth obtained by the present method is compared with those published in the literature.

  7. Sensitivity of airborne fluorosensor measurements to linear vertical gradients in chlorophyll concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Punjabi, A. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation model for airborne laser fluorosensors has been extended to investigate the effects of inhomogeneities in the vertical distribution of phytoplankton concentrations in clear seawater. Simulation results for linearly varying step concentrations of chlorophyll are presented. The results indicate that statistically significant differences can be seen under certain conditions in the water Raman-normalized fluorescence signals between nonhomogeneous and homogeneous cases. A statistical test has been used to establish ranges of surface concentrations and/or verticl gradients in which calibration by surface samples would by inappropriate, and the results are discussed.

  8. Sunscreening fungal pigments influence the vertical gradient of pendulous lichens in boreal forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Färber, Leonie; Sølhaug, Knut Asbjorn; Esseen, Per-Anders; Bilger, Wolfgang; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2014-06-01

    Pendulous lichens dominate canopies of boreal forests, with dark Bryoria species in the upper canopy vs. light Alectoria and Usnea species in lower canopy. These genera offer important ecosystem services such as winter forage for reindeer and caribou. The mechanism behind this niche separation is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that species-specific sunscreening fungal pigments protect underlying symbiotic algae differently against high light, and thus shape the vertical canopy gradient of epiphytes. Three pale species with the reflecting pigment usnic acid (Alectoria sarmentosa, Usnea dasypoga, U. longissima) and three with dark, absorbing melanins (Bryoria capillaris, B. fremontii, B. fuscescens) were compared. We subjected the lichens to desiccation stress with and without light, and assessed their performance with chlorophyll fluorescence. Desiccation alone only affected U. longissima. By contrast, light in combination with desiccation caused photoinhibitory damage in all species. Usnic lichens were significantly more susceptible to light during desiccation than melanic ones. Thus, melanin is a more efficient light-screening pigment than usnic acid. Thereby, the vertical gradient of pendulous lichens in forest canopies is consistent with a shift in type and functioning of sunscreening pigments, from high-light-tolerant Bryoria in the upper to susceptible Alectoria and Usnea in the lower canopy. PMID:25039211

  9. Longitudinal and Vertical Spatial Gradients in the Distribution of Fish within a Canyon-shaped Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaek, Mojmír; Kubeka, Jan; Peterka, Jií; Ech, Martin; Dratík, Vladislav; Hladík, Milan; Prchalová, Marie; Frouzová, Jaroslava

    2004-09-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution of fish was investigated within a morphometrically simple canyon-shaped reservoir with a single major tributary and a longitudinal trophic gradient (ímov Reservoir, Czech Republic). Samples of fish were taken by Nordic survey gill nets (several mesh sizes from 8 to 70 mm knot to knot) installed as surface nets at several offshore areas located along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir. Surveys were carried out in late summer during 1999-2003. An obvious distribution gradient of fish was revealed along the longitudinal axis of the ímov Reservoir. The total relative fish abundance and biomass (catch per unit effort) decreased considerably from the upstream end of the reservoir toward the dam. Roach (Rutilus rutilus), bleak (Alburnus alburnus) and bream (Abramis brama) comprised the bulk of catches at all areas. Enhanced dominance of bream was observed in the fish assemblage at the uppermost, more eutrophic area of the reservoir. The highest number of fish species and the highest abundance of young-of-the-year fish were also observed in the tributary area. In the downstream part of the reservoir, gill net surveys along the vertical depth profiles indicated that offshore fish occupied mostly the epilimnion. Extreme flood events affected the ímov Reservoir, however, it seemed they had no significant impact on the gradients described. (

  10. The effect of a vertical temperature gradient in the lithosphere on seismic and tectonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, B. I.

    2008-09-01

    A linear analysis of the stability of the lithosphere considered as a viscoelastic layer with an equilibrium vertical gradient of temperature is carried out. The problem is solved with a complete system of linearized equations of a continuous medium represented in the dimensionless form and containing a set of dimensionless parameters that determine thermomechanical properties of the lithosphere. As a result of the stability analysis, decrements are found that give the time dependence of perturbations and correspond to high-frequency seismic waves and low-frequency tectonic waves. The frequency and velocity of seismic waves are determined by the elasticity and inertial properties of the lithosphere, and their attenuation, by viscous properties of the lithosphere. The temperature gradient existing in the lithosphere influences seismic waves very weakly. On the contrary, the pattern of tectonic waves is controlled by the temperature gradient and viscous properties, while the effect of elastic and inertial properties on these waves is negligibly small. The stability of a viscoelastic lithosphere is examined using such rheological models as the Maxwell, standard linear, and Andrade media (the frequency of tectonic waves is zero in the Maxwell medium).

  11. Use of sinkhole and specific capacity distributions to assess vertical gradients in a karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, K.J.; Kozar, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The carbonate-rock aquifer in the Great Valley, West Virginia, USA, was evaluated using a database of 687 sinkholes and 350 specific capacity tests to assess structural, lithologic, and topographic influences on the groundwater flow system. The enhanced permeability of the aquifer is characterized in part by the many sinkholes, springs, and solutionally enlarged fractures throughout the valley. Yet, vertical components of subsurface flow in this highly heterogeneous aquifer are currently not well understood. To address this problem, this study examines the apparent relation between geologic features of the aquifer and two spatial indices of enhanced permeability attributed to aquifer karstification: (1) the distribution of sinkholes and (2) the occurrence of wells with relatively high specific capacity. Statistical results indicate that sinkholes (funnel and collapse) occur primarily along cleavage and bedding planes parallel to subparallel to strike where lateral or downward vertical gradients are highest. Conversely, high specific capacity values are common along prominent joints perpendicular or oblique to strike. The similarity of the latter distribution to that of springs suggests these fractures are areas of upward-convergent flow. These differences between sinkhole and high specific capacity distributions suggest vertical flow components are primarily controlled by the orientation of geologic structure and associated subsurface fracturing. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Impacts of freezing and thawing dynamics on foliar litter carbon release in alpine/subalpine forests along an altitudinal gradient in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzhong, W.; Changhui, P.; Jianxiao, Z.; Jian, Z.; Bo, T.; Wanqin, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Carbon (C) release from foliar litter is a primary component in C exchange among the atmosphere, vegetation, soil and water from respiration and leaching, but little information is currently related to the effects of freezing and thawing dynamics on C release of foliar litter in cold regions. A 2-year field litter decomposition experiment was conducted along an altitudinal gradient (~ 2700 to ~ 3600 m) to mimic temperature increases in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. C release was investigated for fresh foliar litter of spruce, fir and birch. The onset of the frozen stage, deep frozen stage and thawing stage was partitioned according to changes in the freezing and thawing dynamics of each winter. More rapid 2-year C released from fresh foliar litter at upper elevations compared to lower elevations in the alpine/subalpine region. However, high C release was observed at low altitudes during winter stages, but high altitudes exhibited high C release during growing season stages. The deep frozen stage showed higher rates of C release than other stages in the second year of decomposition. Negative-degree days showing freezing degrees were correlated to C release rates for the deep frozen stages in both years, and this relationship continued for the duration of the experiment, indicating that changes in freezing can directly modify C release from foliar litter. The results suggested that the changed freezing and thawing dynamics could delay the onset of C release in fresh litter in this cold region in the scenario of climate warming.

  13. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  14. Flow regimes in a vertical Taylor-Couette system with a radial thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillerm, R.; Kang, C.; Savaro, C.; Lepiller, V.; Prigent, A.; Yang, K.-S.; Mutabazi, I.

    2015-09-01

    A rich variety of flow regimes in a Newtonian fluid inside a vertical large-aspect ratio and a wide-gap Taylor-Couette system with a radial temperature gradient has been determined in experiments and in direct numerical simulations (DNSs). Compared to previous experiments and numerical studies, a wider range of temperature differences (i.e., of the Grashof number Gr) and of the rotation rate (the Taylor number Ta) has been covered. The combined effect of rotation and of the radial temperature gradient is the occurrence of helicoidal vortices or modulated waves at the onset. Stationary axisymmetric vortices are found for very weak temperature differences. A good agreement was found for critical states between results from experiments, linear stability analysis, and DNS. Higher instability modes have been determined for a wide range of parameters and a state diagram of observable flow regimes has been established in the plane spanned by Gr and Ta. Some higher states observed in experiments were retrieved in DNS.

  15. Assessment Ground Safety Using Time Lap Vertical Gravity Gradient At The Subsidence Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H. B.; Park, Y.; Lim, M.; Koo, S. B.; Kwon, B. D.

    2007-05-01

    We have carried out time-lap vertical gravity gradient (VGG) survey in order to assess the ground safety before and after grouting. The target area is new pavement through the rice field, and the area has subsidence problems because of excessive pumping for agricultural irrigation. Therefore, it has been reinforced with cement grouting avoiding subsidence. In this paper, we examined the change of subsurface density distribution due to cement grouting by means of VGG survey. VGG method is more sensitive to detect the change of near surface than gravity survey itself because VGG enhanced small variation of gravity anomaly. We gathered one line gravity data about 270m long at every 2m. VGG survey consisted of observations between the ground bottom and the top separated vertically about 1.5m with help of the ladder specially designed. According to result, VGG anomaly made the response of man-made waterway clearer than Bouguer anomaly in the middle part of the line. And VGG result showed changes of subsurface density distribution after grouting.

  16. Individual and population plasticity of the seagrass Zostera noltii along a vertical intertidal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaço, Susana; Machás, Raquel; Santos, Rui

    2009-04-01

    The seasonal plasticity of individual Zostera noltii architectural, reproductive and elemental content features, of plant epiphyte load and of meadow biomass-density relationships was investigated along a vertical intertidal gradient at Ria Formosa lagoon, southern Portugal. The vertical variability of the seagrass environment was evident in the sediment characteristics, which showed coarser grain size, less organic matter, lower N content and higher ammonium concentration in the low intertidal than in medium and high intertidal. A clear vertical differentiation in Z. noltii morphology was observed from longer and wider leaves, longer and wider internodes and shorter roots at low intertidal, to shorter and narrow leaves, shorter and narrower internodes and longer roots at high intertidal. The leaf size was negatively related to light availability and positively related to nutrient availability whereas the root size was negatively related to nutrient availability. The lower leaf N and P content found in low intertidal plants may reflect a dilution effect of the nutrients due to higher growth rates. Lower N content of low intertidal leaves supports previous findings that the nitrate reductase activity is lower in plants from this level. The higher epiphyte load observed in Z. noltii leaves of the low intertidal may be a consequence of the lower exposure period, but also of higher hydrodynamics that increase the availability of nutrients. No evidence of the influence of the intertidal level on the flowering shoot density was found. The cyclic temporal pattern of the biomass-density relationship was much wider at low and medium intertidal than at high intertidal. At low intertidal, the decline in shoot density during fall and winter was coincident with a biomass decrease and its increase in spring and summer coincided with the biomass increase. In medium and high intertidal, the biomass and density seasonal variations were decoupled. As a result, only at low intertidal

  17. Vertical Gradients in Water Chemistry and Age in the Northern High Plains Aquifer, Nebraska, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Carney, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The northern High Plains aquifer is the primary source of water used for domestic, industrial, and irrigation purposes in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. Despite the aquifer's importance to the regional economy, fundamental ground-water characteristics, such as vertical gradients in water chemistry and age, remain poorly defined. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, water samples from nested, short-screen monitoring wells installed in the northern High Plains aquifer were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, stable and radioactive isotopes, dissolved gases, and other parameters to evaluate vertical gradients in water chemistry and age in the aquifer. Chemical data and tritium and radiocarbon ages show that water in the aquifer was chemically and temporally stratified in the study area, with a relatively thin zone of recently recharged water (less than 50 years) near the water table overlying a thicker zone of older water (1,800 to 15,600 radiocarbon years). In areas where irrigated agriculture was an important land use, the recently recharged ground water was characterized by elevated concentrations of major ions and nitrate and the detection of pesticide compounds. Below the zone of agricultural influence, major-ion concentrations exhibited small increases with depth and distance along flow paths because of rock/water interactions. The concentration increases were accounted for primarily by dissolved calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, and silica. In general, the chemistry of ground water throughout the aquifer was of high quality. None of the approximately 90 chemical constituents analyzed in each sample exceeded primary drinking-water standards. Mass-balance models indicate that changes in ground-water chemistry along flow paths in the aquifer can be accounted for by small amounts of feldspar and calcite dissolution; goethite and

  18. Impact of changes in freezing and thawing on foliar litter carbon release in alpine/subalpine forests along an altitudinal gradient in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F.; Peng, C.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, J.; Tan, B.; Yang, W.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon (C) release from foliar litter is a primary component in C exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, but little information is currently related to the effects of freezing and thawing dynamics on C release of foliar litter in cold regions. A two-year field litter decomposition experiment was conducted along an altitudinal gradient (∼2700 m to ∼3600 m) to mimic temperature increases in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. C release was investigated for fresh foliar litter of spruce, fir and birch. The onset of the frozen stage, deep frozen stage, and thawing stage were partitioned according to changes in freezing and thawing dynamics of each winter. High C release was observed in lower altitudes during winter stages, but higher altitudes exhibited high C release during growing season stages. The deep frozen stage showed higher rates of C release than other stages in the second year of decomposition. Negative degree-days showing freezing degree were correlated to C release rates for the deep frozen stages in both years, and this relationship continued for the duration of the experiment, indicating that changes in freezing can directly modify C release from foliar litter. The results suggested that climate warming could delay the onset of C release in fresh litter in this cold region.

  19. Redefining cooling rate in terms of ice front velocity and thermal gradient: first evidence of relevance to freezing injury of lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, J; Körber, C; Rau, G; Hubel, A; Cravalho, E G

    1990-06-01

    A freezing process and the resulting injury or survival of biological cells is commonly characterized in terms of the cooling rate, B. Under certain circumstances, the cooling rate can be expressed as B = G.v, where G denotes the thermal gradient at the ice-liquid interface and v its velocity, respectively. To determine the influence of G and v on the morphology of the ice-liquid interface and on cell survival, a gradient freezing stage was designed. Flat capillaries could be pushed with constant velocity from a warm to a cold heat reservoir. With this setup both parameters, G and v, are independently adjustable and the resulting process of directional solidification can be observed dynamically in a light microscope. Human lymphocytes in phosphate-buffered saline with 10 vol% of dimethyl sulfoxide were used as biological test material. Viability was assessed by a membrane integrity test with fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide. All cells were cooled down to a final temperature of -196 degrees C and then rapidly thawed. The results obtained with this technique show that the viability determined after freezing and thawing with a certain cooling rate, B = G.v, may vary considerably depending on the imposed values of the thermal gradient, G, and the ice front velocity, v. In addition, the data seem to suggest that, first, the maximum viability which can be reached is governed by the cooling rate, and, second, this maximum for a given cooling rate could be achieved by establishing small temperature gradients and high interface velocities (about 30 degrees K/cm and 500 microns/sec, respectively, for the range of values of G and v tested). PMID:2379414

  20. Large vertical gradient of reactive nitrogen oxides in the boundary layer: Modeling analysis of DISCOVER-AQ 2011 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang; Chen, Gao; Smeltzer, Charles; Crawford, James; Olson, Jennifer; Szykman, James; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Fried, Alan; Diskin, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    An often used assumption in air pollution studies is a well-mixed boundary layer (BL), where pollutants are evenly distributed. Because of the difficulty in obtaining vertically resolved measurements, the validity of the assumption has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, we use more than 200 vertical profiles observed in the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) aircraft campaign in July 2011 to examine the vertical distributions of pollutants over the Washington-Baltimore area. While many long-lived species are well mixed in daytime, the observed average vertical profile of NOx shows a large negative gradient with increasing altitude in the BL. Our analysis suggests that the magnitude of the NOx gradient is highly sensitive to atmospheric stability. We investigate how parameterizations of the BL and land-surface processes impact vertical profiles in a 1-D chemical transport model, using three BL schemes (Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2), Yonsei University (YSU), and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ)) and two land-surface schemes (Noah and Rapid Update Cycle (RUC)). The model reasonably reproduces the median vertical profiles of NOx under different BL stability conditions within 30% of observations, classified based on potential temperature gradient and BL height. Comparisons with NOx observations for individual vertical profiles reveal that while YSU performs better in the turbulent and deep BL case, in general, ACM2 (RMSE = 2.0 ppbv) outperforms YSU (RMSE = 2.5 ppbv) and MYJ (RMSE = 2.2 ppbv). Results also indicate that the land-surface schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model have a small impact on the NOx gradient. Using model simulations, we analyze the impact of BL NOx gradient on the calculation of the ozone production rate and satellite NO2 retrieval. We show that using surface measurements and the well-mixed BL assumption causes a

  1. Seasonality of Isoprenoid Vertical Gradient Within a Primary Rainforest in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. G.; Jardine, K.; Tota, J.; Jardine, A. B.; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A. B.; Tavares, J. V.; Nelson, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical mixing ratio gradients of isoprene, total monoterpenes (TMt) and total sesquiterpenes (TSt) were quantified, within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia , using a Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). We also estimated the fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere. Measurements were carried out from the dry season (Sept/2010) to the wet season (Jan/2011), continuously. All compound mixing ratios were higher during the dry season than during the wet season; the same behavior was observed for ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Isoprene and TMt mixing ratios were higher within the canopy as compared to near the ground and above the canopy. Daytime TSt mixing ratios were higher near the ground than within and above the canopy. Isoprene and TMt had a diurnal cycle similar to diurnal cycles of air temperature and PAR suggesting that the emission of these compounds are light dependent and stimulated by increasing temperature. However, this same behavior was not observed for TSt. This is probably due to the fact that sesquiterpene emissions are not strongly light dependent; the ozonolysis of sesquiterpenes during daytime could reduce ambient sesquiterpene concentrations; and a less turbulent atmospheric boundary layer during nighttime could make the mixing ratio of sesquiterpenes higher near the surface at nighttime. Daytime flux estimations also presented seasonal variation for the fluxes of all compounds, such that fluxes of: isoprene ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 mg m-2 h-1, TMt ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 mg m-2 h-1, and TSt ranged from 0.1 to 0.25 mg m-2 h-1, being the highest end during the dry season. These flux estimations suggested that the canopy could be the main source of those compounds for the atmosphere for all seasons. Our results provide the first in situ observations of seasonal mixing ratio gradients of isoprenoids in central Amazonia, and suggest that some

  2. Large Vertical Gradient of Reactive Nitrogen Oxides in the Boundary Layer: Modeling Analysis of DISCOVER-AQ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Chen, G.; Smeltzer, C.; Liu, Z.; Crawford, J. H.; Olson, J. R.; Szykman, J.

    2013-12-01

    An often-used assumption of air pollution studies is the well-mixed planetary boundary layer (PBL), in which pollutants are evenly distributed. Because of the difficulty in obtaining vertically-resolved measurements, the validity of the assumption has not been thoroughly established. In this study, we use more than 200 vertical profiles observed in the DISCOVER-AQ aircraft campaign in 2011 to examine the vertical distributions of air pollutants over the Baltimore area during the summer. Contrary to the well-mixed profile, the observed median vertical profile of NOx, an important ozone precursor, shows a sharp negative gradient in the PBL. Our analysis suggests that the magnitude of NOx gradients is highly sensitive to atmospheric stability. Using a 1-D chemical transport model (REAM), we are able to reproduce the vertical profiles under different PBL stability conditions, classified based on the potential temperature gradient and the PBL height. To investigate how the parameterizations of the PBL and surface processes impact vertical profiles in 3-D chemical transport models, we test PBL mixing properties using two PBL schemes (Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ)) and two land-surface schemes (Noah and RUC) in the WRF model. Comparisons reveal that the YSU scheme performs better in turbulent and high PBL height conditions while the MYJ scheme performs better in less turbulent conditions. Results also show that the land-surface schemes in WRF do not have as large an influence as the PBL mixing schemes. Using the model results, we evaluate the impact of NOx gradient in the PBL on the calculation of the ozone production rate and satellite NO2 retrieval. We show that using the surface measurements and the well-mixed PBL assumption result in a ~30% high bias in the PBL ozone production rate. Our results also show that biases in the PBL height and the NOx gradient lead to a moderate bias (about 5%) in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric vertical columns

  3. Combining high resolution vertical gradients and sequence stratigraphy to delineate hydrogeologic units for a contaminated sedimentary rock aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jessica R.; Parker, Beth L.; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Runkel, Anthony C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogeologic units (HGUs), representing subsurface contrasts in hydraulic conductivity, form the basis for all conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow. However, conventionally, delineation of these units relies heavily on data sets indirect with respect to hydraulic properties. Here, we use the spatial and temporal characteristics of the vertical component of hydraulic gradient (i.e., vertical gradient) as the primary line of evidence for delineating HGUs for Cambrian-Ordovician sedimentary rocks at a site in Dane County, Wisconsin. The site includes a 16 km2 area encompassing a 3 km long mixed organic contaminants plume. The vertical gradients are derived from hydraulic head profiles obtained using high resolution Westbay multilevel systems installed at 7 locations along two, orthogonal 4 km long cross-sections and monitoring to depths between 90 and 146 m with an average of 3-4 monitoring zones per 10 m. These vertical gradient cross-sections reveal 11 laterally extensive HGUs with contrasting vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv). The position and thickness of the Kv contrasts are consistently associated with sequence stratigraphic features (maximum flooding intervals and sequence boundaries) distinguished at the site using cores and borehole geophysical logs. The same sequence stratigraphic features are also traceable across much of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system of the Midwest US. The vertical gradients and sequence stratigraphy were arrived at independently and when combined provide a hydraulically calibrated sequence stratigraphic framework for the site. This framework provides increased confidence in the precise delineation and description of the nature of HGU contacts in each borehole, reduced uncertainty in interpolation of the HGUs between boreholes, and some capability to predict HGU boundaries and thickness in offsite areas where high resolution hydraulic data sets are not available. Consequently, this HGU conceptual model will

  4. 3D unconstrained and geologically constrained stochastic inversion of airborne vertical gravity gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchikaya, Euloge Budet; Chouteau, Michel; Keating, Pierre; Shamsipour, Pejman

    2016-02-01

    We present an inversion tool for airborne gravity gradient data that yields a 3D density model using stochastic methods i.e. cokriging and conditional simulation. This method uses geostatistical properties of the measured gravity gradient to estimate a 3D density model whose gravity response fits the measured gravity gradient anomaly. Linearity between gravity gradient data and density allows estimation of the model (density) covariance using observed data, i.e. we adjust iteratively the density covariance matrix by fitting experimental and theoretical gravity gradient covariance matrices. Inversion can be constrained by including densities known at some locations. In addition we can explore various reasonable solutions that honour both the estimated density covariance model and the gravity gradient data using geostatistical simulation. The proposed method is first tested with two synthetic datasets generated from a sharp-boundary model and a smooth stochastic model respectively. The results show the method to be capable of retrieving models compatible with the true models; it also allows the integration of complex a priori information. The technique is then applied to gravity gradient survey data collected for the Geological Survey of Canada in the area of McFaulds Lake (Ontario, Canada) using the Falcon airborne gravity system. Unconstrained inversion returns a density model that is geologically plausible and the computed response exactly fits the observed gravity gradient anomaly.

  5. Analysis of the growth of cadmium zinc telluride in an electrodynamic gradient freeze furnace via a self-consistent, multi-scale numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandy, Arun; Yeckel, Andrew; Reed, Michael; Szeles, Csaba; Hainke, Marc; Müller, Georg; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2005-03-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the growth of single crystals of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) in an industrial electrodynamic gradient freeze (EDG) furnace. A global model (CrsyVUn) that computes furnace heat transfer is coupled with a local model (CATS2D) that solves for heat transfer, melt flow, and melt-crystal interface shape in an iterative scheme to compute a self-consistent solution. Details of how the two models are coupled have a strong bearing on the convergence of the iterations. One-way coupling of the models, i.e., providing either flux or temperature boundary conditions from the global model to the local model without iteration, yields solutions that differ significantly from the self-consistent solution of the multi-scale model.

  6. Maintaining convex interface shapes during electrodynamic gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride using a dynamic, bell-curve furnace profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01

    A novel, bell-curve furnace temperature profile is presented and predicted to achieve macroscopically convex solid-liquid interface shapes during melt growth of CZT in an EDG furnace. A strategy is also presented to dynamically adapt this furnace profile so that uniform, convex interface shapes are maintained through an entire growth run. This approach represents a significant advance over traditional gradient-freeze profiles, which always yield concave interface shapes, and static heat transfer designs, such as pedestal design, that achieve convex interfaces over only a small portion of the growth run. Importantly, this strategy may be applied to any Bridgman configuration that utilizes multiple, controllable heating zones. Realizing a convex solidification interface via this adaptive bell-curve furnace profile is postulated to result in better crystallinity and higher yields than conventional CZT growth techniques.

  7. Freeze drying method

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  8. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  9. Bone regeneration using a freeze-dried 3D gradient-structured scaffold incorporating OIC-A006-loaded PLGA microspheres based on β-TCP/PLGA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liulan; Gao, Haitao; Dong, Yangyang

    2015-01-01

    To reveal the latent capacity of the growth factor-like low-molecular-weight material OIC-A006 in tissue regeneration, it is essential to design a porous scaffold in order to concurrently accommodate cells and drug release in a controlled manner. Consequently, we fabricated poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based microspheres with an OIC-A006-loaded gradient-structured β-TCP/PLGA scaffold by freeze-drying which could then be used for drug delivery and bone regeneration. The OIC-A006-loaded β-TCP/PLGA scaffold consisted of two parts which loaded different doses of OIC-A006 (6.25 μM, outside; 12.5 μM, inside). The porosity, compressive strength, SEM, degradation, and cumulative amount of drug release in vitro were characterized. Furthermore, we confirmed the incorporation of OIC-A006 into the PLGA-based microspheres within the scaffolds using UV-spectrophotometry, and the amount of drug remaining in the scaffold was maintained by 10 % for up to 28 days. The drug release was slower in the normal-structured drug-loaded scaffold. The OIC-A006 released action from the OIC-A006-loaded β-TCP/PLGA scaffold with ideal therapeutic prospects in tissue regeneration. In vitro cell culture results showed that this gradient-structured composite scaffold can induce the adhesion and proliferation of rat bone marrow stromal cells towards osteoblasts. These results showed that the newly developed OIC-A006-loaded scaffolds with gradient structure can be potentially applied to bone regeneration in clinical applications. PMID:25577209

  10. Dynamic impact of the vertical shear of gradient wind on the tropical cyclone boundary layer wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ninghao; Xu, Xin; Song, Lili; Bai, Lina; Ming, Jie; Wang, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    This work studies the impact of the vertical shear of gradient wind (VSGW) in the free atmosphere on the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL). A new TCBL model is established, which relies on fiveforce balance including the pressure gradient force, Coriolis force, centrifugal force, turbulent friction, and inertial deviation force. This model is then employed to idealize tropical cyclones (TCs) produced by DeMaria's model, under different VSGW conditions (non-VSGW, positive VSGW, negative VSGW, and VSGW increase/decrease along the radial direction). The results show that the free-atmosphere VSGW is particularly important to the intensity of TC. For negative VSGW, the total horizontal velocity in the TCBL is somewhat suppressed. However, with the maximum radial inflow displaced upward and outward, the radial velocity notably intensifies. Consequently, the convergence is enhanced throughout the TCBL, giving rise to a stronger vertical pumping at the TCBL top. In contrast, for positive VSGW, the radial inflow is significantly suppressed, even with divergent outflow in the middle-upper TCBL. For varying VSGW along the radial direction, the results indicate that the sign and value of VSGW is more important than its radial distribution, and the negative VSGW induces stronger convergence and Ekman pumping in the TCBL, which favors the formation and intensification of TC.

  11. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.A.; Viskanta, R. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model. 31 refs.

  12. Estimation of the depth to the fresh-water/salt-water interface from vertical head gradients in wells in coastal and island aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, S.K.; Gingerich, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the depth to the theoretical interface between fresh, water and salt water is critical to estimates of well yields in coastal and island aquifers. The Ghyben-Herzberg relation, which is commonly used to estimate interface depth, can greatly underestimate or overestimate the fresh-water thickness, because it assumes no vertical head gradients and no vertical flow. Estimation of the interface depth needs to consider the vertical head gradients and aquifer anisotropy that may be present. This paper presents a method to calculate vertical head gradients using water-level measurements made during drilling of a partially penetrating well; the gradient is then used to estimate interface depth. Application of the method to a numerically simulated fresh-water/salt-water system shows that the method is most accurate when the gradient is measured in a deeply penetrating well. Even using a shallow well, the method more accurately estimates the interface position than does the Ghyben-Herzberg relation where substantial vertical head gradients exist. Application of the method to field data shows that drilling, collection methods of water-level data, and aquifer inhomogeneities can cause difficulties, but the effects of these difficulties can be minimized.

  13. Meridional gradients in aerosol vertical distribution over Indian Mainland: Observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijith, S. S.; Suresh Babu, S.; Lakshmi, N. B.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-year observations from the network of ground-based observatories (ARFINET), established under the project 'Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India' (ARFI) of Indian Space Research Organization and space-borne lidar 'Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization' (CALIOP) along with simulations from the chemical transport model 'Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport' (GOCART), are used to characterize the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian landmass and its spatial structure. While the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction showed higher values close to the surface followed by a gradual decrease at increasing altitudes, a strong meridional increase is observed in the vertical spread of aerosols across the Indian region in all seasons. It emerges that the strong thermal convections cause deepening of the atmospheric boundary layer, which although reduces the aerosol concentration at lower altitudes, enhances the concentration at higher elevations by pumping up more aerosols from below and also helping the lofted particles to reach higher levels in the atmosphere. Aerosol depolarization ratios derived from CALIPSO as well as the GOCART simulations indicate the dominance of mineral dust aerosols during spring and summer and anthropogenic aerosols in winter. During summer monsoon, though heavy rainfall associated with the Indian monsoon removes large amounts of aerosols, the prevailing southwesterly winds advect more marine aerosols over to landmass (from the adjoining oceans) leading to increase in aerosol loading at lower altitudes than in spring. During spring and summer months, aerosol loading is found to be significant, even at altitudes as high as 4 km, and this is proposed to have significant impacts on the regional climate systems such as Indian monsoon.

  14. Denitrification in nitrate-contaminated groundwater: Occurrence in steep vertical geochemical gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Duff, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively narrow vertical zone (5-6 m thick) of NO3- containing groundwater was identified using multilevel sampling devices in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, USA. The aquifer has been chronically contaminated by surface disposal of treated sewage 0.3 km upgradient from the study area. The NO3- zone was anoxic and contained high concentrations of N2O (16.5 ??M), suggesting that it was a zone of active denitrification. Denitrifying activity was confirmed with direct measurement using acetylene block incubations with aquifer core material; the peak rate was 2.4 nmol N reduced (g sed)-1 day-1. Concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon and N2 were close to atmospheric equilibrium in uncontaminated groundwater, but were more than 2 times higher within the contaminant plume. Excess CO2 and N2 suggested in situ formation with a stoichiometry of C and N mineralized via denitrification of 0.8 (C/N). Denitrification within the aquifer resulted in an increase in the natural ??15N of NO3- (from +13.6 to +42.0%.) and the N2 produced, with an isotopic enrichment factor, ??{lunate}, of -13.9%.. Vertical profiles of NH4+ and ??15N of NH4+ indicated that dissimilatory reduction of NO3- to NH4+ was also occurring but mass balance calculations indicated that denitrification was the predominant process. These results demonstrate that a combination approach using field mass balance, stable isotope analysis, and laboratory incubations yields useful insight as to the significance of denitrification in aquifer sediments and that closely spaced vertical sampling is necessary to adequately quantify the processes controlling C and N transport and transformation within these environments. ?? 1991.

  15. Denitrification in nitrate-contaminated groundwater: Occurrence in steep vertical geochemical gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard L.; Howes, Brian L.; Duff, John H.

    1991-07-01

    A relatively narrow vertical zone (5-6 m thick) of NO 3- containing groundwater was identified using multilevel sampling devices in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, USA. The aquifer has been chronically contaminated by surface disposal of treated sewage 0.3 km upgradient from the study area. The NO 3- zone was anoxic and contained high concentrations of N 2O (16.5 μM), suggesting that it was a zone of active denitrification. Denitrifying activity was confirmed with direct measurement using acetylene block incubations with aquifer core material; the peak rate was 2.4 nmol N reduced (g sed) -1 day -1. Concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon and N 2 were close to atmospheric equilibrium in uncontaminated groundwater, but were more than 2 times higher within the contaminant plume. Excess CO 2 and N 2 suggested in situ formation with a stoichiometry of C and N mineralized via denitrification of 0.8 (C/N). Denitrification within the aquifer resulted in an increase in the natural δ15N of NO 3- (from +13.6 to +42.0%.) and the N 2 produced, with an isotopic enrichment factor, ɛ, of -13.9%.. Vertical profiles of NH 4+ and δ15N of NH 4+ indicated that dissimilatory reduction of NO 3- to NH 4+ was also occurring but mass balance calculations indicated that denitrification was the predominant process. These results demonstrate that a combination approach using field mass balance, stable isotope analysis, and laboratory incubations yields useful insight as to the significance of denitrification in aquifer sediments and that closely spaced vertical sampling is necessary to adequately quantify the processes controlling C and N transport and transformation within these environments.

  16. FILIF Measurements of HCHO Vertical Gradients and Flux via Eddy Covariance during BEACHON-ROCS 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digangi, J. P.; Boyle, E.; Henry, S. B.; Keutsch, F. N.; Beachon-Rocs Science Team

    2010-12-01

    Models of HOx chemistry in rural (low NOx) environments can drastically underpredict OH concentrations compared to measurements. In addition, models of OH reactivity based on modeled VOC emissions also underpredict OH reactivity. The combination of these facts implies a significant misunderstanding of HOx chemistry in rural environments. Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most ubiquitous VOC oxidation products and therefore is an important tracer of VOC oxidation. Formaldehyde may be formed via the fast oxidation of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs), such as isoprene and terpenes emitted from forests, giving a measure of any potential missing VOCs as a cause of the inconsistency in OH reactivity. Also, as the loss pathways of HCHO are well understood, HCHO concentrations can provide further information about OH concentrations. As a result, measurements of HCHO gradients and fluxes in pristine forests can provide valuable insight into this rural HOx chemistry. We present the first reported measurements of HCHO flux via eddy covariance, as well as HCHO concentrations and gradients as observed by the Madison FIber Laser-Induced Fluorescence (FILIF) Instrument during the BEACHON-ROCS 2010 campaign in a rural coniferous forest northwest of Colorado Springs, CO. Midday upward HCHO fluxes as high as 150 μg/m2/hr were observed. These results will be discussed in the context of rapid in-canopy BVOC oxidation and the uncertainties in the HOx budget inside forest canopies.

  17. Spatio-temporal variability of vertical gradients of major meteorological observations around the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Wang, L.; Tian, L.

    2015-12-01

    The near-surface air temperature lapse rate (TLR), wind speed gradient (WSG), and precipitation gradient (PG) provide crucial parameters used in models of mountain climate and hydrology. The complex mountain terrain and vast area of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) make such factors particularly important. With daily data from 161 meteorological stations over the past 43 years (1970-2012), we analyse the spatio-temporal variations of TLRs, WSGs, and PGs over and around TP, derived using linear regression methods and dividing the study area into zones based on spatial variations. Results of this study include: (1) The observed TLR varies from -0.46 to -0.73 ∘C (100 m) -1, with averaged TLRs of -0.60,-0.62, and -0.59 ∘C (100 m) -1 for Tmax, Tmin,and Tmean , respectively. The averaged TLR is slightly less than the global mean of -0.65 ∘C (100 m) -1 . The spatial variability of TLR relates to climate conditions, wherein the TLR increases in dry conditions and in cold months (October-April), while it lessens in humid regions and during warm months (May-September). (2) The estimated annual WSG ranges from 0.07 to 0.17m s -1 (100 m) -1. Monthly WSGs show a marked seasonal shift, in which higher WSGs can be explained by the high intensity of prevailing wind. (3) Positive summer PGs vary from 12.08 in the central TP to 26.14 mm (100 m) -1 in northeastern Qinghai and the southern TP, but a reverse gradient prevails in Yunnan and parts of Sichuan Province. (4) The regional warming over TP is more evident in winter, and Tmin demonstrated the most prominent warming compared with Tmax and Tmean. Environments at high elevations experience more rapid changes in temperatures (Tmax, Tmin,and Tmean) than those at low elevations, which is especially true in winter and for Tmin. Furthermore, inter-annual variation of TLRs is linked to elevation-dependent warming.

  18. Combinatorial evaluation system for thermal properties of glass materials using a vertical furnace with temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoroki, S.; Inoue, S.; Matsumoto, T.

    2002-04-01

    Critical cooling rate Q for zinc terullite glass system is determined based on the time-temperature-transfer (T-T-T) diagrams, which are compiled by analyzing the crystallized area in the glass sample libraries annealed simultaneously by a furnace with temperature gradient. This method reduces the laborious routine work for preparation compared with the conventional one. Since the surface/volume ratio of the present samples is large, their crystallization is mainly governed by heterogeneous nucleation. Thus, the Q values in this study can be used as a practical index for the glass products whose surface should be free of being ground and/or polished, such as fire-polished lenses, optical fibers and waveguides.

  19. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  20. Measurement of the Vertical Gradient of the Semidiurnal Tidal Wind Phase in Winter at the 95 Km Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schminder, R.; Kurschner, D.

    1984-01-01

    When supplemented by absolute reflection height measurements, low frequency wind measurements in the 90-100 km height range become truly competitive in comparison with the more widely used radar meteor wind observations. For example, height profiles of the wind parameters in the so-called meteor zone can be obtained due to the considerable interdiurnal variability of the average nighttime reflection heights controlled by geomagnetic activity. The phase of the semidiurnal tidal wind is particularly height-dependent. The measured vertical gradient of 1/4 h/km in winter corresponds to a vertical wavelength of about 50 km. Wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, at heights between 90 and 100 km, were carried out at the Collm Geophysical Observatory of Karl Marx University Leipzig for a number of years. These measurements use the closely-spaced receiver method and three measuring paths, on 179, 227, and 272 kHz. They take place every day between sunset and sunrise, i.e., nightly. A night in this sense may last as long as 18 hours in winter. Both the measurements and their evaluation are completely automatic, and the prevailing winds and tides are separated.

  1. Measurement of the vertical gradient of the semidiurnal tidal wind phase in winter at the 95 km level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schminder, R.; Kurschner, D.

    1984-05-01

    When supplemented by absolute reflection height measurements, low frequency wind measurements in the 90-100 km height range become truly competitive in comparison with the more widely used radar meteor wind observations. For example, height profiles of the wind parameters in the so-called meteor zone can be obtained due to the considerable interdiurnal variability of the average nighttime reflection heights controlled by geomagnetic activity. The phase of the semidiurnal tidal wind is particularly height-dependent. The measured vertical gradient of 1/4 h/km in winter corresponds to a vertical wavelength of about 50 km. Wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, at heights between 90 and 100 km, were carried out at the Collm Geophysical Observatory of Karl Marx University Leipzig for a number of years. These measurements use the closely-spaced receiver method and three measuring paths, on 179, 227, and 272 kHz. They take place every day between sunset and sunrise, i.e., nightly. A night in this sense may last as long as 18 hours in winter. Both the measurements and their evaluation are completely automatic, and the prevailing winds and tides are separated.

  2. Fluid motions and compositional gradients produced by crystallization or melting at vertical boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. Stewart; Gustafson, Lewis B.

    1981-12-01

    The results of a continuing series of laboratory experiments, designed to model the fluid motions which accompany crystallization, are both described and related in a preliminary way to prototype flows in magma chambers. Previous experiments have demonstrated the importance of compositional inhomogeneity, produced by crystallization and melting in a thermal gradient and coupled with double-diffusive effects, in driving convective flows which result in thermal and compositional stratification in an originally homogeneous fluid. The present experiments examine effects produced in tanks cooled at the side, by the upward flow of a less dense boundary layer depleted in the crystallizing component as crystals grow on the side wall. These processes are examined in simple two and three component aqueous systems (H 2O-Na 2CO 3, H 2O-Na 2CO 3-K 2CO 3, H 2O-CuSO 4-Na 2SO 4) with one and two crystallizing phases. In each of these systems, an initially downward flow of a cooled boundary layer against the side wall is reversed as crystallization commences and depletes the boundary layer in the crystallizing component. Accumulation of this cooler but lighter depleted fluid at the top of the chamber produces thermal and compositional layering by a "filling box" mechanism, partly modified by interchange between the boundary layer and the convecting layers outside. When more than one component is present in the solution, the crystallization process produces a differentiated fluid column, i.e. one with compositional gradients which are different for each of the components. The compositional and thermal distributions within the fluid change with time, but finally appear to reach a steady state. These distributions are the integrated result of compositional changes produced by crystallization from a thin boundary layer, a small proportion of the bulk fluid which evolves in composition and temperature independently of the bulk fluid, in a manner controlled by the dynamics of the system

  3. Observations of BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound) Fluxes and Vertical Gradients in a Ponderosa Pine Forest during BEARPEX 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Fares, S.; Weber, R.; Goldstein, A.

    2010-12-01

    During summer 2009 an intensive field campaign (Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment - BEARPEX) took place in Blodgett Forest, a Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The campaign aimed to investigate biosphere-atmosphere interactions during a period of intense photochemical activity, to elucidate the fate BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) in the atmosphere, and explore the processes of secondary organic aerosol formation. In this study, a PTR-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry) was used to measure 19 compounds (masses) including methanol, isoprene + MBO (2-Methyl-3-butene-2-ol), monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and some oxygenated BVOCs at 5 heights of a vertical gradient from the forest floor to above the canopy. Fluxes of the 4 dominant BVOCs were measured above the canopy with the Eddy covariance technique. In parallel with BVOC measurements, ozone fluxes and gradients, and meteorological parameters (PAR, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction) were recorded in order to investigate the dependence of BVOC emissions and chemistry on meteorological conditions and to test the hypothesis that BVOC remove atmospheric ozone through gas-phase reactions. BVOCs which are directly emitted from pine trees generally have the highest concentration at the lowest measurement height and the lowest concentration above the canopy. Sesquiterpenes were observed at lower concentration than monoterpenes, but with very similar vertical gradient patterns, indicating their emission patterns are similar. The observed MBO flux was approximately twice the Monoterpene flux. Measured monoterpene canopy scale flux was consistent with modeled emissions based on scaling up from branch enclosure measurements at this site (basal emission rate F30= 0.61 ±0.14 mgC m-2 hr-1 and temperature response β= 0.15 ±0.09 °C-1). We find that m/z 113, an unidentified OVOCs (oxygenated volatile organic compounds

  4. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H. J.; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Phillips, R. J.; Bierson, C. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    We use iSALE to model complex crater formation on the Moon. We vary initial target porosity and model vertical density/porosity gradients in the crust. We calculate the Bouguer anomaly associated with the craters and match them to GRAIL observations.

  5. An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmucker, Ulrich; Spitzer, Klaus; Steveling, Erich

    2009-09-01

    We have recorded for 13 d, geomagnetic variations simultaneously on the Earth's surface and in a borehole at 832 m depth straight below, with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. In addition, geoelectric variations were observed at the same site near Bad Königshofen in Frankonia, Germany. The penetrated moderately conductive Triassic sediments lie above highly resistive Permian deposits. A presumably crystalline basement begins at 1500-1900 m depth. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the skin effect of geomagnetic variations and to derive from it the equivalent to the magnetotelluric (MT) surface impedance, using the vertical gradient (VG) method of electromagnetic (EM) sounding. In this way, we were able to reproduce all four elements of the MT impedance tensor, except for an unexplained but consistent downward shift of VG phases against MT phases by roughly 15° for the two off-diagonal elements. Hence, our tensor evaluation goes beyond the common practice, to express the skin effect by a single VG transfer function in response to a layered structure. The otherwise good agreement of VG and MT results implies that at our test site, the MT impedance tensor is largely distortion-free and that, for example, its pronounced anisotropy should be regarded as a genuine characteristic of the EM response for a laterally non-uniform or possibly anisotropic deep structure. The drilling site lies within the range of a widespread induction anomaly. We have observed the resulting variations of the vertical magnetic component at the surface and in the borehole and found them to be identical. The thus established absence of a skin effect for the vertical component allows us to treat the sedimentary layer down to the depth of the borehole instrument as a thin sheet, and the pertinent thin-sheet approximation for EM induction forms the basis of our analysis. We have derived the required estimate of conductance from the skin effect of horizontal components, noting that this estimate

  6. Vertical gradients in water chemistry in the central High Plains aquifer, southwestern Kansas and Oklahoma panhandle, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    The central High Plains aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic, industrial, and irrigation uses in parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Water-level declines of more than 100 feet in some areas of the aquifer have increased the demand for water deeper in the aquifer. The maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer ranged from 500 to 600 feet in 1999. As the demand for deeper water increases, it becomes increasingly important for resource managers to understand how the quality of water in the aquifer changes with depth. In 1998?99, 18 monitoring wells at nine sites in southwestern Kansas and the Oklahoma Panhandle were completed at various depths in the central High Plains aquifer, and one monitoring well was completed in sediments of Permian age underlying the aquifer. Water samples were collected once from each well in 1999 to measure vertical gradients in water chemistry in the aquifer. Tritium concentrations measured in ground water indicate that water samples collected in the upper 30 feet of the aquifer were generally recharged within the last 50 years, whereas all of the water samples collected at depths more than 30 feet below the water table were recharged more than 50 years ago. Dissolved oxygen was present throughout the aquifer, with concentrations ranging from 1.7 to 8.4 mg/L. Water in the central High Plains aquifer was predominantly a calcium-bicarbonate type that exhibited little variability in concentrations of dissolved solids with depth (290 to 642 mg/L). Exceptions occurred in some areas where there had been upward movement of mineralized water from underlying sediments of Permian age and areas where there had been downward movement of mineralized Arkansas River water to the aquifer. Calcium-sulfate and sodium-chloride waters dominated and concentrations of dissolved solids were elevated (862 to 4,030 mg/L) near the base of the aquifer in the areas of upward leakage. Dissolution of gypsum or anhydrite and halite

  7. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbury, Colleen; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Collins, Gareth S.; Blair, David M.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Nimmo, Francis; Phillips, Roger J.; Bierson, Carver J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-11-01

    overall porosity, but higher vertical gradients, giving craters within SPA more-negative BAs than those within the highlands crust. These simulations demonstrate that the BA and porosities reported here are valid for determining general trends only.

  8. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Abundance and Diversity along a Vertical Redox Gradient in Great Salt Lake, USA

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Swanson, Kevin D.; Howells, Alta E.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Meuser, Jonathan E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Peters, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes for the biotechnological production of H2 or other reduced products has been limited by their sensitivity to oxygen (O2). Here, we apply a PCR-directed approach to determine the distribution, abundance, and diversity of hydA gene fragments along co-varying salinity and O2 gradients in a vertical water column of Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The distribution of hydA was constrained to water column transects that had high salt and relatively low O2 concentrations. Recovered HydA deduced amino acid sequences were enriched in hydrophilic amino acids relative to HydA from less saline environments. In addition, they harbored interesting variations in the amino acid environment of the complex H-cluster metalloenzyme active site and putative gas transfer channels that may be important for both H2 transfer and O2 susceptibility. A phylogenetic framework was created to infer the accessory cluster composition and quaternary structure of recovered HydA protein sequences based on phylogenetic relationships and the gene contexts of known complete HydA sequences. Numerous recovered HydA are predicted to harbor multiple N- and C-terminal accessory iron-sulfur cluster binding domains and are likely to exist as multisubunit complexes. This study indicates an important role for [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the functioning of the GSL ecosystem and provides new target genes and variants for use in identifying O2 tolerant enzymes for biotechnological applications. PMID:25464382

  9. Spatial Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure along a Vertical Oxygen Gradient in Flooded Paddy Soil Cores

    PubMed Central

    Lüdemann, Heiner; Arth, Inko; Liesack, Werner

    2000-01-01

    Molecular ecology techniques were applied to assess changes in the bacterial community structure along a vertical oxygen gradient in flooded paddy soil cores. Microsensor measurements showed that oxygen was depleted from 140 μM at the floodwater/soil interface to nondetectable amounts at a depth of approximately 2.0 mm and below. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene (rDNA)-based community fingerprint patterns were obtained from 200-μm-thick soil slices of both the oxic and anoxic zones by using the T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) technique. The fingerprints revealed a tremendous shift in the community patterns in correlation to the oxygen depletion measured with depth. 16S rDNA clone sequences recovered from the oxic or anoxic zone directly corresponded to those terminal restriction fragments which were highly characteristic of the respective zone. Comparative sequence analysis of these clones identified members of the α and β subclasses of Proteobacteria as the abundant populations in the oxic zone. In contrast, members of clostridial cluster I were determined to be the predominant bacterial group in the oxygen-depleted soil. The extraction of total RNA followed by reverse transcription-PCR of the bacterial 16S rRNA and T-RFLP analysis resulted for both oxic and anoxic zones of flooded soil cores in community fingerprint patterns similar to those obtained by the rDNA-based analysis. This finding suggests that the microbial groups detected on the rDNA level are the metabolically active populations within the oxic and anoxic soil slices examined. PMID:10653747

  10. Estimation of the depth to the fresh-water/salt-water interface from vertical head gradients in wells in coastal and island aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izuka, Scot K.; Gingerich, Stephen B.

    An accurate estimate of the depth to the theoretical interface between fresh, water and salt water is critical to estimates of well yields in coastal and island aquifers. The Ghyben-Herzberg relation, which is commonly used to estimate interface depth, can greatly underestimate or overestimate the fresh-water thickness, because it assumes no vertical head gradients and no vertical flow. Estimation of the interface depth needs to consider the vertical head gradients and aquifer anisotropy that may be present. This paper presents a method to calculate vertical head gradients using water-level measurements made during drilling of a partially penetrating well; the gradient is then used to estimate interface depth. Application of the method to a numerically simulated fresh-water/salt-water system shows that the method is most accurate when the gradient is measured in a deeply penetrating well. Even using a shallow well, the method more accurately estimates the interface position than does the Ghyben-Herzberg relation where substantial vertical head gradients exist. Application of the method to field data shows that drilling, collection methods of water-level data, and aquifer inhomogeneities can cause difficulties, but the effects of these difficulties can be minimized. Résumé Une estimation précise de la profondeur de l'interface théorique entre l'eau douce et l'eau salée est un élément critique dans les estimations de rendement des puits dans les aquifères insulaires et littoraux. La relation de Ghyben-Herzberg, qui est habituellement utilisée pour estimer la profondeur de cette interface, peut fortement sous-estimer ou surestimer l'épaisseur de l'eau douce, parce qu'elle suppose l'absence de gradient vertical de charge et d'écoulement vertical. L'estimation de la profondeur de l'interface requiert de prendre en considération les gradients verticaux de charge et l'éventuelle anisotropie de l'aquifère. Cet article propose une méthode de calcul des

  11. In situ modulation of the vertical distribution in a blend of P3HT and PC60BM via the addition of a composition gradient inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byung Joon; Lee, Gang-Young; Im, Min Jeong; Song, Seulki; Park, Taiho

    2014-01-01

    2,2,3,3,4,4,4-Heptafluoro-N-phenyl-butyr-amide (F-ADD) was synthesized and shown to induce a composition gradient in a blend of P3HT and PC60BM. The addition of small amounts (ca. 0.5 wt%) of F-ADD modulated the chemical distribution in the blend along the vertical direction by controlling the blend component interface energy through selective interactions between F-ADD and PC60BM. A homogeneous compositional distribution along the vertical direction in the nanostructured bulk heterojunction (BHJ) increased the interfacial area, which shortened the exciton path length to the donor-acceptor interface and improved the photovoltaic performance.2,2,3,3,4,4,4-Heptafluoro-N-phenyl-butyr-amide (F-ADD) was synthesized and shown to induce a composition gradient in a blend of P3HT and PC60BM. The addition of small amounts (ca. 0.5 wt%) of F-ADD modulated the chemical distribution in the blend along the vertical direction by controlling the blend component interface energy through selective interactions between F-ADD and PC60BM. A homogeneous compositional distribution along the vertical direction in the nanostructured bulk heterojunction (BHJ) increased the interfacial area, which shortened the exciton path length to the donor-acceptor interface and improved the photovoltaic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05312a

  12. Nocturnal Vertical Gradients of O3, NO2, NO3, HONO, HCHO, and SO2 in Los Angeles, CA, during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, J.; Pikelnaya, O.; Hurlock, S. C.; Wong, K.; Cheung, R.; Haman, C. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Stutz, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nocturnal chemistry, through the conversion and removal of air pollutants, plays an important role in determining the initial condition for photochemistry during the following day. In the stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) the interplay between suppressed vertical mixing and surface emissions of NOx and VOCs can result in pronounced vertical trace gas profiles. The resulting altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry makes the interpretation of ground observations challenging. In particular, the quantification of the nocturnal loss of NOx, due to NO3 and N2O5 chemistry, requires observations throughout the entire vertical extent of the NBL. The formation of daytime radical precursors, such as HONO, is also altitude dependent. An accurate assessment of their impact on daytime chemistry requires measurements of their profiles during the night and morning. Here we present observations from the CalNex-LA experiment, which took place from May 15 to June 15, 2010 on the east side of the Los Angeles Basin, CA. A Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (LP-DOAS) was set up on the roof of the Millikan library (265 m asl, 35m agl) on the campus of the California Institute of Technology. Four retroreflector arrays were mounted about 5 -7 km North-East of the instrument at 310m, 353m, 487m and 788 m asl. The vertical profiles of NO3, HONO, NO2, O3, HCHO, and SO2 were retrieved at altitude intervals of 35-78m, 78-121m, 121-255m and 255-556m above the ground. During many nights vertical gradients were observed, with elevated NO2 and HONO concentrations near the surface and larger ozone and NO3 concentrations aloft. Simultaneous ceilometer observations of the NBL structure show the impact of meteorology on the vertical trace gas distributions. We will discuss the consequences of trace gases gradients on the nocturnal NOx budget.

  13. When hot water freezes before cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is due to freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. The solutes are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reducing the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reducing the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the freezing front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  14. Acclimation of Leaf Nitrogen to Vertical Light Gradient at Anthesis in Wheat Is a Whole-Plant Process That Scales with the Size of the Canopy1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Delphine; Allard, Vincent; Gaju, Oorbessy; Le Gouis, Jacques; Foulkes, M. John; Martre, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Vertical leaf nitrogen (N) gradient within a canopy is classically considered as a key adaptation to the local light environment that would tend to maximize canopy photosynthesis. We studied the vertical leaf N gradient with respect to the light gradient for wheat (Triticum aestivum) canopies with the aims of quantifying its modulation by crop N status and genetic variability and analyzing its ecophysiological determinants. The vertical distribution of leaf N and light was analyzed at anthesis for 16 cultivars grown in the field in two consecutive seasons under two levels of N. The N extinction coefficient with respect to light (b) varied with N supply and cultivar. Interestingly, a scaling relationship was observed between b and the size of the canopy for all the cultivars in the different environmental conditions. The scaling coefficient of the b-green area index relationship differed among cultivars, suggesting that cultivars could be more or less adapted to low-productivity environments. We conclude that the acclimation of the leaf N gradient to the light gradient is a whole-plant process that depends on canopy size. This study demonstrates that modeling leaf N distribution and canopy expansion based on the assumption that leaf N distribution parallels that of the light is inappropriate. We provide a robust relationship accounting for vertical leaf N gradient with respect to vertical light gradient as a function of canopy size. PMID:22984122

  15. Lagrangian Stochastic Modelling of Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer with Skewed Turbulence Conditions and a Vertical Density Gradient: Formulation and Implementation in the FLEXPART Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, Massimo; Stohl, Andreas; Brioude, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    A correction for the vertical gradient of air density has been incorporated into a skewed probability density function formulation for turbulence in the convective boundary layer. The related drift term for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion modelling has been derived based on the well-mixed condition. Furthermore, the formulation has been extended to include unsteady turbulence statistics and the related additional component of the drift term obtained. These formulations are an extension of the drift formulation reported by Luhar et al. (Atmos Environ 30:1407-1418, 1996) following the well-mixed condition proposed by Thomson (J Fluid Mech 180:529-556, 1987). Comprehensive tests were carried out to validate the formulations including consistency between forward and backward simulations and preservation of a well-mixed state with unsteady conditions. The stationary state CBL drift term with density correction was incorporated into the FLEXPART and FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian models, and included the use of an ad hoc transition function that modulates the third moment of the vertical velocity based on stability parameters. Due to the current implementation of the FLEXPART models, only a steady-state horizontally homogeneous drift term could be included. To avoid numerical instability, in the presence of non-stationary and horizontally inhomogeneous conditions, a re-initialization procedure for particle velocity was used. The criteria for re-initialization and resulting errors were assessed for the case of non-stationary conditions by comparing a reference numerical solution in simplified unsteady conditions, obtained using the non-stationary drift term, and a solution based on the steady drift with re-initialization. Two examples of "real-world" numerical simulations were performed under different convective conditions to demonstrate the effect of the vertical gradient in density on the particle dispersion in the CBL.

  16. Large vertical δ13CDIC gradients in Early Triassic seas of the South China craton: Implications for oceanographic changes related to Siberian Traps volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huyue; Tong, Jinnan; Algeo, Thomas J.; Horacek, Micha; Qiu, Haiou; Song, Haijun; Tian, Li; Chen, Zhong-Qiang

    2013-06-01

    Vertical gradients in the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (Δδ13CDIC) can be estimated for paleomarine systems based on δ13Ccarb data from sections representing a range of depositional water depths. An analysis of eight Lower Triassic sections from the northern Yangtze Platform and Nanpanjiang Basin, representing water depths of ~ 50 to 500 m, allowed reconstruction of Δδ13CDIC in Early Triassic seas of the South China craton for seven time slices representing four negative (N) and three positive (P) carbon-isotope excursions: 8.5‰ (N1), 5.8‰ (P1), 3.5‰ (N2), 6.5‰ (P2), 7.8‰ (N3), - 1.9‰ (P3), and 2.2‰ (N4). These values are much larger than vertical δ13CDIC gradients in the modern ocean (~ 1-3‰) due to intensified stratification and reduced vertical mixing in Early Triassic seas. Peaks in Δδ13CDIC around the PTB (N1) and in the early to mid-Smithian (P2-N3) coincided with episodes of strong climatic warming, reduced marine productivity, and expanded ocean anoxia. The Dienerian-Smithian boundary marks the onset of a major mid-Early Triassic disturbance, commencing ~ 1 Myr after the latest Permian mass extinction, that we link to a second eruptive stage of the Siberian Traps. Inhospitable oceanic conditions generally persisted until the early Spathian, when strong climatic cooling caused re-invigoration of global-ocean circulation, leading to an interval of negative Δδ13CDIC values and a sharp increase in δ13Ccarb driven by upwelling of nutrient-rich deepwaters. These developments marked the end of the main eruptive stage of the Siberian Traps.

  17. Leaf reflectance variation along a vertical crown gradient of two deciduous tree species in a Belgian industrial habitat.

    PubMed

    Khavaninzadeh, Ali Reza; Veroustraete, Frank; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Verrelst, Jochem; Samson, Roeland

    2015-09-01

    The reflectometry of leaf asymmetry is a novel approach in the bio-monitoring of tree health in urban or industrial habitats. Leaf asymmetry responds to the degree of environmental pollution and reflects structural changes in a leaf due to environmental pollution. This paper describes the boundary conditions to scale up from leaf to canopy level reflectance, by describing the variability of adaxial and abaxial leaf reflectance, hence leaf asymmetry, along the crown height gradients of two tree species. Our findings open a research pathway towards bio-monitoring based on the airborne remote sensing of tree canopies and their leaf asymmetric properties. PMID:26057363

  18. Tailored Height Gradients in Vertical Nanowire Arrays via Mechanical and Electronic Modulation of Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching.

    PubMed

    Otte, M A; Solis-Tinoco, V; Prieto, P; Borrisé, X; Lechuga, L M; González, M U; Sepulveda, B

    2015-09-01

    In current top-down nanofabrication methodologies the design freedom is generally constrained to the two lateral dimensions, and is only limited by the resolution of the employed nanolithographic technique. However, nanostructure height, which relies on certain mask-dependent material deposition or etching techniques, is usually uniform, and on-chip variation of this parameter is difficult and generally limited to very simple patterns. Herein, a novel nanofabrication methodology is presented, which enables the generation of high aspect-ratio nanostructure arrays with height gradients in arbitrary directions by a single and fast etching process. Based on metal-assisted chemical etching using a catalytic gold layer perforated with nanoholes, it is demonstrated how nanostructure arrays with directional height gradients can be accurately tailored by: (i) the control of the mass transport through the nanohole array, (ii) the mechanical properties of the perforated metal layer, and (iii) the conductive coupling to the surrounding gold film to accelerate the local electrochemical etching process. The proposed technique, enabling 20-fold on-chip variation of nanostructure height in a spatial range of a few micrometers, offers a new tool for the creation of novel types of nano-assemblies and metamaterials with interesting technological applications in fields such as nanophotonics, nanophononics, microfluidics or biomechanics. PMID:26033973

  19. Spatial and vertical gradients in the stable carbon isotope composition of Lower Circumpolar Deep Water over the last 900 thousand years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Smith, J.; Hodell, D. A.; Frederichs, T.; Allen, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) recorded in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflect that of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of ambient seawater, and thus are used to reconstruct past changes in water mass mixing. Records of benthic foraminiferal δ13C from the Atlantic Ocean have revealed the development of a sharp vertical δ13C gradient between 2300-2500m water depth during successive glacial periods throughout the Late Quaternary, with extremely negative δ13C values recorded below this depth. It had been hypothesised that this gradient resulted from an increased stratification of water masses within the glacial Atlantic Ocean, and that these extreme δ13C values originated in the Southern Ocean. However the mechanisms behind the formation of this gradient and extreme δ13C depletion have remained unclear. This is in part due to the poor preservation of calcareous microfossils in the corrosive waters below 2500-3000m found in the Southern Ocean, which hampers our understanding of this key region. Here we present a unique new δ13C deep water record measured on benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides spp.) from a sediment core recovered from 2100m water depth in the Amundsen Sea, south-eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The site is bathed in Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) today, and combined palaeomagnetic and oxygen isotope stratigraphy show that the sediments continuously span at least the last 890 ka. A comparison of this new δ13C data with other LCDW records from ODP Sites 1089/1090 in the South Atlantic and ODP Site 1123 in the Southwest Pacific demonstrate a clear spatial gradient in circum-Antarctic LCDW during glacial periods. The pool of extremely depleted glacial deep marine δ13C is restricted to the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean, with increasingly positive δ13C values found in the Southwest Pacific and the south-eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. This implies that the δ13C depletion in the deep glacial

  20. Freeze Technology for Nuclear Applications - 13590

    SciTech Connect

    Rostmark, Susanne C.; Knutsson, Sven; Lindberg, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Freezing of soil materials is a complicated process of a number of physical processes: - freezing of pore water in a thermal gradient, - cryogenic suction causing water migration and - ice formation expanding pores inducing frost heave. Structural changes due to increase of effective stress during freezing also take place. The over consolidation gives a powerful dewatering/drying effect and the freeze process causes separation of contaminates. Artificial ground freezing (AGF is a well established technique first practiced in south Wales, as early as 1862. AGF is mostly used to stabilize tunnels and excavations. During the last ten years underwater applications of freeze technologies based on the AGF have been explored in Sweden. The technology can, and has been, used in many different steps in a remediation action. Freeze Sampling where undisturbed samples are removed in both soft and hard sediment/sludge, Freeze Dredging; retrieval of sediment with good precision and minimal redistribution, and Freeze Drying; volume reduction of contaminated sludge/sediment. The application of these technologies in a nuclear or radioactive environment provides several advantages. Sampling by freezing gives for example an advantage of an undisturbed sample taken at a specified depth, salvaging objects by freezing or removal of sludges is other applications of this, for the nuclear industry, novel technology. (authors)

  1. Vertical physico-chemical gradients with distinct microbial communities in the hypersaline and heliothermal Lake Ursu (Sovata, Romania).

    PubMed

    Máthé, István; Borsodi, Andrea K; Tóth, Erika M; Felföldi, Tamás; Jurecska, Laura; Krett, Gergely; Kelemen, Zsolt; Elekes, Erzsébet; Barkács, Katalin; Márialigeti, Károly

    2014-05-01

    The effect of vertical physico-chemical stratification on the planktonic microbial community composition of the deep, hypersaline and heliothermal Lake Ursu (Sovata, Romania) was examined in this study. On site and laboratory measurements were performed to determine the physical and chemical variables of the lake water, and culture-based and cultivation-independent techniques were applied to identify the members of microbial communities. The surface of the lake was characterized by a low salinity water layer while the deepest region was extremely saline (up to 300 g/L salinity). Many parameters (e.g. photosynthetically active radiation, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, redox potential) changed dramatically from 2 to 4 m below the water surface in conjunction with the increasing salinity values. The water temperature reached a maximum at this depth. At around 3 m depth, there was a water layer with high (bacterio) chlorophyll content dominated by Prosthecochloris vibrioformis, a phototrophic green sulfur bacterium. Characteristic microbial communities with various prokaryotic taxa were identified along the different environmental parameters present in the different water layers. Some of these bacteria were known to be heterotrophic and therefore may be involved in the decomposition of lake organic material (e.g. Halomonas, Idiomarina and Pseudoalteromonas) while others in the transformation of sulfur compounds (e.g. Prosthecochloris). Eukaryotic microorganisms identified by molecular methods in the lake water belonged to genera of green algae (Mantionella and Picochlorum), and were restricted mainly to the upper layers. PMID:24531691

  2. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length, vertical drift and layer height during magnetically quiet days: Implications for Spread F over Trivandrum, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-12-01

    A study has been carried out on the behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, vertical drift and layer height, around post sunset hours, during the magnetically quiet days of summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995), using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in all the three parameters. Further, the seasonal variation of equatorial Spread F (ESF) during the above period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L, the vertical drift and layer height (of the F layer) in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The results, show for the first time, that L also plays an important role, in controlling the quiet time seasonal and solar cycle variability of ESF; whereas in earlier studies this parameter had been taken to be constant. The detailed results are presented and discussed.

  3. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  4. Observations of Vertical Gradients in Composition, Oxidation States, and Diurnal Dynamics for a Comprehensive Suite of VOCs from 10 to 525 m in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Weber, R.; Guha, A.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted by numerous anthropogenic and biogenic sources and undergo oxidative processing, as well as horizontal and vertical transport, in the troposphere. Understanding the dynamics of chemical and physical land atmosphere exchange processes and their impacts on atmospheric chemistry requires high temporal resolution of observations at multiple heights and the knowledge of the sources and sinks. We measured dynamic composition changes of VOCs as a function of height (5 inlets from 10 to 525 m, switching every 2 minutes, full profile every 10 minutes) for more than a year using a PTR-QMS. Here, we focus on a multi-week period in February 2013 when simultaneous SRI-TOFMS and PTR-QMS took place. More than 300 ions were detected within an m/z range of 0.000 - 400.000 Th and 260 ions were analyzed. Chemical formulas were assigned to more than 50% of these ions. Late winter is a period when anthropogenic influences are relatively high including remote sources in the Central Valley. Biogenic influences are low at this time of year, but were clearly observed. The average diurnal vertical gradients (Figure 1) showed trends and patterns and behavior consistent with boundary layer dynamics, wind profiles and source activity for a broad array of VOCs and source categories. Mass concentration of oxygenated VOCs with 2, 3 or more oxygens or with nitrogen+oxygen had an increasing tendency with height. The opposite was true for pure hydrocarbons and reduced nitrogen containing VOCs which generally decrease with height. The remaining species comprised halogenated as well as other volatile products. Average oxidation state ranged from -2.0 to 4.3. These observations are useful to reflect the dynamics of VOCs at a rural site in the Central Valley and could be particularly useful for comparison with models of atmospheric chemistry that include PBL dynamics. Figure 1: Gradient concentration diurnal profiles for 48 selected ions, showing the

  5. Reconstructing the Late Pleistocene Southern Ocean biological pump using the vertical gradient of Cd/Ca in planktic and benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charidemou, Miros; Hall, Ian; Ziegler, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The Southern Ocean is a particularly important region in the global carbon cycle because its wind-driven upwelling regime brings CO2-rich deep waters to the ocean surface. However, outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere is ultimately determined by the efficiency of the soft-tissue biological pump which transfers carbon back into the deep sea. Biological productivity in the Southern Ocean on glacial-interglacial timescales is thought to be influenced by the availability of iron from terrestrial dust sources (Martin, 1990). However, the exact nature of the relationship between productivity and dust flux is still debated (Ziegler et al., 2013; Martinez-Garcia et al., 2014) and remains unclear for earlier times such as during the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT). Changes in the strength of the soft-tissue biological pump can be reconstructed with relative ease by measuring carbon isotopes in planktic and benthic foraminifera and quantifying the vertical gradient between them (Ziegler et al., 2013). Our ultimate aim is to use this technique to reconstruct changes in the biological pump in the Southern Ocean during the MPT, when a sharp rise in dust flux is observed in the sedimentary record (Martinez-Garcia et al., 2011). This will allow us to assess the contribution of changes in the Southern Ocean biological pump to the climatic reorganisation that occurred during the MPT. However, before the Δδ13C record is constructed for the MPT it is vital to confirm that this method is indeed a reliable proxy for the soft-tissue biological pump. Records of Δδ13C can be influenced by changes in the whole ocean inventory of δ13C, changes in circulation and changes in the degree of fractionation between the ocean and the atmosphere. The impact of inventory and circulation changes can be minimised by careful selection of study sites and by targeting foraminifera that live within specific water masses. However, deviations of Δδ13C from the biological signal could certainly

  6. Vertical gradient solution growth of N-type Si0.73Ge0.27 bulk crystals with homogeneous composition and its thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omprakash, M.; Arivanandhan, M.; Sabarinathan, M.; Koyama, T.; Momose, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Aswal, D. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Inatomi, Y.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Compositionally homogeneous Sb-doped (5×1018 and 1×1019 cm-3) Si0.73Ge0.27 bulk crystals were grown by a vertical gradient solution growth method. The sandwich sample Si (seed)/Sb-doped Ge/ Si(feed) was set up inside a furnace under a mild temperature gradient 0.57 °C/mm for homogeneous growth. The Si composition was analyzed by electron probe micro- analysis (EPMA). It revealed that the Si composition was homogeneous and the lengths of the Sb-doped (5×1018 and 1×1019 cm-3) Si0.73Ge0.27 bulk crystals were 18.3 and 15.1 mm, respectively. Grain distribution was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction spectrum (EBSD). The Seebeck coefficients (-440 and -426 μV/K) of Sb-doped (5×1018 and 1×1019 cm-3) Si0.73Ge0.27 were higher than the reported value (-211 μV/K) of P-doped (5×1019 cm-3) Si0.8Ge0.2 at room temperature. Thermal conductivity of Ga and Sb-doped SiGe was decreased with temperature due to scattering of phonon at the temperature range between 313 and 913 K. The maximum ZT values of Ga and Sb-doped SiGe were 0.34 and 0.44 at 820 K, respectively. The ZT values of Ga and Sb-doped SiGe were higher (0.07 and 0.13) than the reported value of Ga-doped Si0.81Ge0.19 (0.05) and P-doped (5×1019 cm-3) Si0.8Ge0.2 bulk crystals at room temperature. The improvement in ZT value was caused by a decrease of thermal conductivity which related to a composition of the alloy and doping concentration in the crystal.

  7. Freezing and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Freezer Burn Color Changes Freeze Rapidly Freezer - Refrigerator Temperatures Freezer Storage Time Safe Thawing Refreezing Cooking Frozen ... parasites can be destroyed by sub-zero freezing temperatures. However, very strict government-supervised conditions must be ...

  8. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  9. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  10. Surface freezing of water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided. PMID:27330895

  11. Versatile wedge-based system for the construction of unidirectional collagen scaffolds by directional freezing: practical and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Pot, Michiel W; Faraj, Kaeuis A; Adawy, Alaa; van Enckevort, Willem J P; van Moerkerk, Herman T B; Vlieg, Elias; Daamen, Willeke F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2015-04-29

    Aligned unidirectional collagen scaffolds may aid regeneration of those tissues where alignment of cells and extracellular matrix is essential, as for instance in cartilage, nerve bundles, and skeletal muscle. Pores can be introduced by ice crystal formation followed by freeze-drying, the pore architecture reflecting the ice crystal morphology. In this study we developed a wedge-based system allowing the production of a wide range of collagen scaffolds with unidirectional pores by directional freezing. Insoluble type I collagen suspensions were frozen using a custom-made wedge system, facilitating the formation of a horizontal as well as a vertical temperature gradient and providing a controlled solidification area for ice dendrites. The system permitted the growth of aligned unidirectional ice crystals over a large distance (>2.5 cm), an insulator prolonging the freezing process and facilitating the construction of crack-free scaffolds. Unidirectional collagen scaffolds with tunable pore sizes and pore morphologies were constructed by varying freezing rates and suspension media. The versatility of the system was indicated by the construction of unidirectional scaffolds from albumin, poly(vinyl alcohol) (a synthetic polymer), and collagen-polymer blends producing hybrid scaffolds. Macroscopic observations, temperature measurements, and scanning electron microscopy indicated that directed horizontal ice dendrite formation, vertical ice crystal nucleation, and evolutionary selection were the basis of the aligned unidirectional ice crystal growth and, hence, the aligned unidirectional pore structure. In conclusion, a simple, highly adjustable freezing system has been developed allowing the construction of large (hybrid) bioscaffolds with tunable unidirectional pore architecture. PMID:25822583

  12. A study on the vertical profile of bacterial DNA structure in the Puruogangri (Tibetan Plateau) ice core using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinfang; Yao, Tandong; An, Lizhe; Tian, Lide; Xu, Shijian

    The bacterial DNA structures at different depths in the Puruogangri (Tibetan Plateau) ice core (83.45 m) were investigated by the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) DNA fingerprinting technique. DGGE profiles indicated that the bacterial species diversity in glacial ice is high, and indigenous species represented by common bands in all samples may grow on the glacial surface. Bacterial diversity, as estimated by Shannon indices (mean 2.91; SD 0.25; n = 13), was comparable to that of soil habitats and had a positive correlation with Ca2+ concentration (R = 0.71; P < 0.01), a good proxy of dust. This suggested that the soil ecosystem was the main source of bacteria in this glacier. The low similarity indices (0-43%) were found between the ice-core samples, which corresponded to the episodic deposition under defined climatic conditions and low activity of microorganisms in glacial ice. The profiles of bacterial species composition in glacial ice may be a bioindicator of climatic changes or dating.

  13. Vertical partitioning and controlling factors of gradient-based soil carbon dioxide fluxes in two contrasted soil profiles along a loamy hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, F.; Vanclooster, M.; Van Oost, K.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aim to elucidate the role of physical conditions and gas transfer mechanism along soil profiles in the decomposition and storage of soil organic carbon (OC) in subsoil layers. We use a qualitative approach showing the temporal evolution and the vertical profile description of CO2 fluxes and abiotic variables. We assessed soil CO2 fluxes throughout two contrasted soil profiles (i.e. summit and footslope positions) along a hillslope in the central loess belt of Belgium. We measured the time series of soil temperature, soil moisture and CO2 concentration at different depths in the soil profiles for two periods of 6 months. We then calculated the CO2 flux at different depths using Fick's diffusion law and horizon specific diffusivity coefficients. The calculated fluxes allowed assessing the contribution of different soil layers to surface CO2 fluxes. We constrained the soil gas diffusivity coefficients using direct observations of soil surface CO2 fluxes from chamber-based measurements and obtained a good prediction power of soil surface CO2 fluxes with an R2 of 92 %. We observed that the temporal evolution of soil CO2 emissions at the summit position is mainly controlled by temperature. In contrast, at the footslope, we found that long periods of CO2 accumulation in the subsoil alternates with short peaks of important CO2 release. This was related to the high water filled pore space that limits the transfer of CO2 along the soil profile at this slope position. Furthermore, the results show that approximately 90 to 95 % of the surface CO2 fluxes originate from the first 10 cm of the soil profile at the footslope. This indicates that soil OC in this depositional context can be stabilized at depth, i.e. below 10 cm. This study highlights the need to consider soil physical properties and their dynamics when assessing and modeling soil CO2 emissions. Finally, changes in the physical environment of depositional soils (e.g. longer dry periods) may affect the

  14. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  15. Freeze-cast alumina pore networks: Effects of freezing conditions and dispersion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S. M.; Xiao, X.; Faber, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina ceramics were freeze-cast from water- and camphene-based slurries under varying freezing conditions and examined using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Pore network characteristics, i.e., porosity, pore size, geometric surface area, and tortuosity, were measured from XCT reconstructions and the data were used to develop a model to predict feature size from processing conditions. Classical solidification theory was used to examine relationships between pore size, temperature gradients, and freezing front velocity. Freezing front velocity was subsequently predicted from casting conditions via the two-phase Stefan problem. Resulting models for water-based samples agreed with solidification-based theories predicting lamellar spacing of binary eutectic alloys, and models for camphene-based samples concurred with those for dendritic growth. Relationships between freezing conditions and geometric surface area were also modeled by considering the inverse relationship between pore size and surface area. Tortuosity was determined to be dependent primarily on the type of dispersion medium. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds. PMID:21087023

  17. The freezing bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2010-03-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron 'bomb' and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation suggests a maximum of about 55 MPa (8000 psi) might have been achieved, with some 2.3% of the water frozen into a hollow shell around the interior of the vessel. In a sufficiently strong alloy steel container the pressure might rise to a maximum of 210 MPa (30 460 psi), this limiting figure being due to the collapse of ordinary ice (ice I) to the denser forms ice II or ice III.

  18. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  19. Spatiotemporal measurement of freezing-induced deformation of engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ka Yaw; Dutton, J. Craig; Han, Bumsoo

    2010-01-01

    In order to cryopreserve functional engineered tissues (ETs), the microstructure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) should be maintained as well as the cellular viability since the functionality is closely related to the ECM microstructure. Since the post-thaw ECM microstructure is determined by the deformation of ETs during cryopreservation, freezing-induced deformation of ETs was measured with a newly developed quantum dot (QD)-mediated cell image deformetry system using dermal equivalents as a model tissue. The dermal equivalents were constructed by seeding QD-labeled fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices. After 24 hour incubation, the ETs were directionally frozen by exposing them to a spatial temperature gradient (from 4 °C to −20 °C over a distance of 6 mm). While being frozen, the ETs were consecutively imaged, and consecutive pairs of these images were two-dimensionally cross-correlated to determine the local deformation during freezing. The results showed that freezing induced the deformation of ET, and its magnitude varied with both time and location. The maximum local dilatation was 0.006 s−1 and was always observed at the phase change interface. Due to this local expansion, the unfrozen region in front of the freezing interface experienced compression. This expansion-compression pattern was observed throughout the freezing process. In the unfrozen region, the deformation rate gradually decreased away from the freezing interface. After freezing/thawing, the ET experienced an approximately 28% decrease in thickness and 8% loss in weight. These results indicate that freezing-induced deformation caused the transport of interstitial fluid and the interstitial fluid was extruded. In summary, the results suggest that complex cell-fluid-matrix interactions occur within ETs during freezing, and these interactions determine the post-thaw ECM microstructure and eventual post-thaw tissue functionality. PMID:20459191

  20. Variation in seedling freezing response is associated with climate in Larrea

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Diane L.; Maherali, Hafiz; Pockman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Variation in freezing severity is hypothesized to have influenced the distribution and evolution of the warm desert evergreen genus Larrea. If this hypothesis is correct, performance and survival of species and populations should vary predictably along gradients of freezing severity. If freezing environment changes in the future, the ability of Larrea to adapt will depend on the structure of variation for freezing resistance within populations. To test whether freezing responses vary among and within Larrea populations, we grew maternal families of seedlings from high and low latitude L. divaricata and high latitude L. tridentata populations in a common garden. We measured survival, projected plant area and dark-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) before and after cold acclimation and for 2 weeks following a single freeze. We detected significant variation in freezing resistance among species and populations. Maternal family lines differed significantly in their responses to cold acclimation and/or freezing for two out of the three populations: among L. tridentata maternal families and among low latitude L. divaricata maternal families. There were no significant differences across maternal families of high latitude L. divaricata. Our results indicate that increased freezing resistance in high latitude populations likely facilitated historical population expansion of both species into colder climates, but this may have occurred to a greater extent for L. tridentata than for L. divaricata. Differences in the structure of variation for cold acclimation and freezing responses among populations suggest potential differences in their ability to evolve in response to future changes in freezing severity. PMID:22068319

  1. Thermodynamical effects accompanied freezing of two water layers separated by sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Marchenko, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    The process of melt pond freezing is very important for generation of sea ice cover thermodynamic and mass balance during winterperiod. However, due to significant difficulties of field measurements the available data of model estimations still have no instrumental confirmation. In May 2009 the authors carried out laboratory experiment on freezing of limited water volume in the University Centre in Svalbard ice tank. In the course of experiment fresh water layer of 27.5 cm thickness at freezing point poured on the 24 cm sea ice layer was cooled during 50 hours at the temperature -10º C and then once again during 60 hours at -20º C. For revealing process typical characteristics the data of continuous measurements of temperature and salinity in different phases were compared with data of numerical computations obtained with thermodynamic model which was formulated in the frames of 1-D equation system (infinite extension of water freezing layer) and adapted to laboratory conditions. The known surprise of the experiment became proximity of calculated and measured estimates of process dynamics that confirmed the adequacy of the problem mathematical statement (excluding probably process finale stage). This effect can be explained by formation of cracks on the upper layer of ice at sharp decreases of air temperature, which temporary compensated hydrostatic pressure growth during freezing of closed water volume. Another compensated mechanism can be migration of brine through the lower layer of ice under influence of vertical pressure gradient and also rejection of gas dissolved in water which increased its compressibility. During 110 hours cooling thickness of water layer between ice layers reduced approximately to 2 cm. According to computations this layer is not chilled completely but keeps as thin brine interlayer within ice body whose thickness (about units of mm) is determined by temperature fluctuations of cooled surface. Nevertheless, despite good coincidence of

  2. Freeze-drying using vacuum-induced surface freezing.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Martin; Sennhenn, Bernd; Lee, Geoffrey

    2002-02-01

    A method of freezing during freeze-drying, which avoids undercooling of a solution and allows growth of large, dendritic ice crystals, was investigated. Aqueous solutions of mannitol, sucrose, or glycine were placed under a chamber vacuum of approximately 1 mbar at a shelf temperature of +10 degrees C. Under these conditions, the solutions exhibit surface freezing to form an ice layer of approximately 1-3 mm thickness. On releasing the vacuum and lowering the shelf temperature to below the freezing point of the ice in the solution, crystal growth occurs to yield large, chimney-like ice crystals. The duration of primary drying of a frozen cake--as measured by using inverse comparative pressure measurement--was up to 20% shorter than when using a "moderate" freezing procedure (2 K shelf temperature per min). With mannitol, however, the residual moisture content of the final dried product was higher than with moderate freezing, and with sucrose and glycine there was no difference. These findings are related to the structures of the dried cakes formed during freezing, as examined by light microscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The introduction of an annealing step (4 h at a shelf temperature slightly above the onset melting point of the ice in the frozen cake) combined with the vacuum-induced surface freezing procedure maintains the rapid primary drying and produces a low residual moisture (0.2%) for the freeze-dried mannitol solution. PMID:11835203

  3. Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction - time of flight - mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS): comparison with PTR-MS measured vertical gradients and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Timkovsky, J.; Fares, S.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J.; Holzinger, R.

    2013-02-01

    During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction - time of flight - mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a quadrupole proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux calculations. The high time resolution (5 Hz) and high mass resolution (up to 5000 m/Δm) data from the PTR-TOF-MS provided the basis for calculating the concentration and flux for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Throughout the campaign, 664 mass peaks were detected in mass-to-charge ratios between 10 and 1278. Here we present PTR-TOF-MS EC fluxes of the 27 ion species for which the vertical gradient was simultaneously measured by PTR-MS. These EC flux data were validated through spectral analysis (i.e., co-spectrum, normalized co-spectrum, and ogive). Based on inter-comparison of the two PTR instruments, no significant instrumental biases were found in either mixing ratios or fluxes, and the data showed agreement within 5% on average for methanol and acetone. For the measured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), the EC fluxes from PTR-TOF-MS were in agreement with the qualitatively inferred flux directions from vertical gradient measurements by PTR-MS. For the 27 selected ion species reported here, the PTR-TOF-MS measured total (24 h) mean net flux of 299 μg C m-2 h-1. The dominant BVOC emissions from this site were monoterpenes (m/z 81.070 + m/z 137.131 + m/z 95.086, 34%, 102 μg C m-2 h-1) and methanol (m/z 33.032, 18%, 72 μg C m-2 h-1). The next largest fluxes were detected at the following masses (attribution in parenthesis): m/z 59.048 (mostly acetone, 12.2%, 36.5 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 61.027 (mostly acetic acid, 11.9%, 35.7 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 93.069 (para-cymene + toluene, 4.1%, 12.2 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 45.033 (acetaldehyde, 3.8%, 11.5 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 71.048 (methylvinylketone + methacrolein, 2.4%, 7

  4. Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS): comparison with PTR-MS measured vertical gradients and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Timkovsky, J.; Fares, S.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J.; Holzinger, R.

    2012-08-01

    During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a standard proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux calculations. The high time resolution (5 Hz) and high mass resolution (up to 5000 m Δ m-1) data from the PTR-TOF-MS provided the basis for calculating the concentration and flux for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Throughout the campaign, 664 mass peaks were detected in mass-to-charge ratios between 10 and 1278. Here we present PTR-TOF-MS EC fluxes of the 27 ion species for which the vertical gradient was simultaneously measured by PTR-MS. These EC flux data were validated through spectral analysis (i.e. co-spectrum, normalized co-spectrum, and ogive). Based on inter-comparison of the two PTR instruments, no significant instrumental biases were found in either mixing ratios or fluxes, and the data showed agreement within 5% on average for methanol and acetone. For the measured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), the EC fluxes from PTR-TOF-MS were in agreement with the qualitatively inferred flux directions from vertical gradient measurements by PTR-MS. For the 27 selected ion species reported here, the PTR-TOF-MS measured total (24 h) mean net flux of 299 μg C m-2 h-1. The dominant BVOC emissions from this site were monoterpenes (m/z 81.070 + m/z 137.131 + m/z 95.086, 34%, 102 μg C m-2 h-1) and methanol (m/z 33.032, 18%, 72 μg C m-2 h-1). The next largest fluxes were detected at the following masses (attribution in parenthesis): m/z 59.048 (mostly acetone, 12.2%, 36.5 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 61.027 (mostly acetic acid, 11.9%, 35.7 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 93.069 (para-cymene + toluene, 4.1%, 12.2 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 45.033 (acetaldehyde, 3.8%, 11.5 μg C m-2 h-1), m/z 71.048 (methylvinylketone + methacrolein, 2.4%, 7.1

  5. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  6. Freeze crystallization technology for Kraft black liquor concentration. Third report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.E.; Rhodes, C.R.

    1985-04-01

    About 25% of the purchased energy in the pulp and paper industry is used to concentrate black liquor. The technical feasibility of using freeze concentration to supplement evaporation has been successfully demonstrated, and results indicate that energy consumption can be reduced 45%. After compiling a considerable data base on the characteristics of black liquor at low temperature and after developing a computer program to aid analysis, the process chosen was vacuum freezing-vapor absorption (VFVA). A pilot plant was built and operated; however, due to problems with crystallization of the absorbent and contamination, it was found that maintaining the conditions necessary for a continuous process was not practical at the present state of development. Therefore, indirect freezing was used for all subsequent work. This required the design and fabrication of a simple shuttle crystallizer to replace scraped surface units conventionally used. CSI also developed an integrated ice separation column that combined crystal growth, a concentration gradient, and washing all in one unit. Finally, extensive heat transfer coefficient data were collected so that a preliminary design could be completed for a 350 TPD industrial freeze concentration unit. An economic analysis was calculated in order to compare using evaporation and freeze concentration to process the increased liquor flow from a pulp mill expansion. A 200,000 lb/hr freezing unit used to preconcentrate the mill's entire stream up to 18.7% solids would save $10 to $16 per ton of pulp.

  7. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  8. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  10. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Crutzen, Paul

    Theoretical calculations are presented for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing of sulfuric acid droplets under stratospheric conditions, based on classical nucleation theory. In contrast to previous results it is shown that a prominent candidate for freezing, sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT ≡ H2SO4·4H2O), does not freeze homogeneously. The theoretical results limit the homogeneous freezing rate at 200 K to much less than 1 cm-3s-1, a value that may be estimated from bulk phase laboratory experiments. This suggests that the experimental value is likely to be a measure of heterogeneous, not homogeneous nucleation. Thus, under statospheric conditions, freezing of SAT can only occur in the presence of suitable nuclei; however, even for heterogeneous nucleation experimental results impose strong constraints. Since a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) embryo probably needs a solid body for nucleation, these results put an important constraint on the theory of NAT formation in polar stratospheric clouds.

  11. Freeze-Lining Formation of a Synthetic Lead Slag: Part I. Microstructure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Mieke; Jak, Evgueni; Blanpain, Bart; Wollants, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Recently, freeze linings have been selected more frequently to protect pyrometallurgical reactor walls, due to a number of advantages over conventional refractory linings, such as a self-regenerating capability and the possibility of operating under high-intensity process conditions. A freeze lining is formed on a cooled reactor wall in a time-dependent temperature gradient. A full description of freeze-lining development, including phase formation as a function of temperature, time, and position, is important in understanding freeze-lining formation mechanisms and may be instrumental for the design of a sustainable freeze-lining concept. Freeze-lining formation is therefore investigated in a synthetic lead slag system: PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-ZnO-CaO-SiO2. Lab-scale freeze linings were produced by submerging an air-cooled probe into liquid slag for different times ranging from 1 to 120 minutes. The freeze-lining microstructures were characterized with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The results were compared with the results of reference experiments. The freeze-lining formation of the studied slag system is initially dominated by the formation of glass and a highly viscous liquid. After 1 minute, extensive crystallization occurs and further growth of the freeze lining is determined by the growth of the melilite phase, which forms networking crystals. Because the heat transfer occurs very quickly, these melilite crystals form in undercooled liquid. Because the initial solidification rate is high, mass exchange between the freeze lining and bath affects the freeze-lining growth only when the freeze lining almost reaches its steady-state thickness.

  12. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  13. Heritage roundtable: the nuclear freeze

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.V.; Gray, C.; Kalicki, J.; Pfaltzgraff, R.; Scoville, H.

    1982-01-01

    The transcript of a panel of foreign policy experts, chaired by former National Security Adviser Richard Allen, debates the proposed nuclear freeze. They consider whether a freeze is a step in the right direction, acting to slow the arms race and contribute to world security, or whether it would aggravate strategic problems by perpetuating an umbalanced situation. Disagreement among the participants makes clear that no one favors nuclear war, but there are differing perspectives on how to continue preventing such a war.

  14. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  15. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  16. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of reducing development time for new pharmaceutical products, formulation and process development scientists must continually look for ways to "work smarter, not harder." Within the product development arena, this means reducing the amount of trial and error empiricism in arriving at a formulation and identification of processing conditions which will result in a quality final dosage form. Characterization of the freezing behavior of the intended formulation is necessary for developing processing conditions which will result in the shortest drying time while maintaining all critical quality attributes of the freeze-dried product. Analysis of frozen systems was discussed in detail, particularly with respect to the glass transition as the physical event underlying collapse during freeze-drying, eutectic mixture formation, and crystallization events upon warming of frozen systems. Experiments to determine how freezing and freeze-drying behavior is affected by changes in the composition of the formulation are often useful in establishing the "robustness" of a formulation. It is not uncommon for seemingly subtle changes in composition of the formulation, such as a change in formulation pH, buffer salt, drug concentration, or an additional excipient, to result in striking differences in freezing and freeze-drying behavior. With regard to selecting a formulation, it is wise to keep the formulation as simple as possible. If a buffer is needed, a minimum concentration should be used. The same principle applies to added salts: If used at all, the concentration should be kept to a minimum. For many proteins a combination of an amorphous excipient, such as a disaccharide, and a crystallizing excipient, such as glycine, will result in a suitable combination of chemical stability and physical stability of the freeze-dried solid. Concepts of heat and mass transfer are valuable in rational design of processing conditions. Heat transfer by conduction

  17. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  18. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank chilled to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. When the bulk of the fuel was above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removed all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depended on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. When the bulk of the fuel was at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceased when solids blocked the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depended on the overall average temperature.

  19. Facing freeze: social threat induces bodily freeze in humans.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Karin; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Stins, John

    2010-11-01

    Freezing is a common defensive response in animals threatened by predators. It is characterized by reduced body motion and decreased heart rate (bradycardia). However, despite the relevance of animal defense models in human stress research, studies have not shown whether social threat cues elicit similar freeze-like responses in humans. We investigated body sway and heart rate in 50 female participants while they were standing on a stabilometric force platform and viewing cues that were socially threatening, socially neutral, and socially affiliative (angry, neutral, and happy faces, respectively). Posturographic analyses showed that angry faces (compared with neutral faces and happy faces) induced significant reductions in body sway. In addition, the reduced body sway for angry faces was accompanied by bradycardia and correlated significantly with subjective anxiety. Together, these findings indicate that spontaneous body responses to social threat cues involve freeze-like behavior in humans that mimics animal freeze responses. These findings open avenues for studying human freeze responses in relation to various sociobiological markers and social-affective disorders. PMID:20876881

  20. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  1. Heat freezes niche evolution.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Miguel B; Ferri-Yáñez, Francisco; Bozinovic, Francisco; Marquet, Pablo A; Valladares, Fernando; Chown, Steven L

    2013-09-01

    Climate change is altering phenology and distributions of many species and further changes are projected. Can species physiologically adapt to climate warming? We analyse thermal tolerances of a large number of terrestrial ectotherm (n = 697), endotherm (n = 227) and plant (n = 1816) species worldwide, and show that tolerance to heat is largely conserved across lineages, while tolerance to cold varies between and within species. This pattern, previously documented for ectotherms, is apparent for this group and for endotherms and plants, challenging the longstanding view that physiological tolerances of species change continuously across climatic gradients. An alternative view is proposed in which the thermal component of climatic niches would overlap across species more than expected. We argue that hard physiological boundaries exist that constrain evolution of tolerances of terrestrial organisms to high temperatures. In contrast, evolution of tolerances to cold should be more frequent. One consequence of conservatism of upper thermal tolerances is that estimated niches for cold-adapted species will tend to underestimate their upper thermal limits, thereby potentially inflating assessments of risk from climate change. In contrast, species whose climatic preferences are close to their upper thermal limits will unlikely evolve physiological tolerances to increased heat, thereby being predictably more affected by warming. PMID:23869696

  2. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  3. Freeze-in through portals

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martínez, Enrique; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: enrique.fernandez-martinez@uam.es

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  4. Basic concepts in freezing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    Freezing involves the lowering of temperature and the formation of ice. Most cells have not been found to be sensitive to the former; rather injury is a consequence of the removal of water from the system in the form of ice. Some cells such as boar sperm and those of many tropical crops are susceptible to even short-term lowering of temperature to near O/sup 0/C. This susceptiblity, which is independent of the rate of temperature drop, is defined as chilling injury. Other cells are injured by chilling only if the rate of cooling is high, a phenomenon referred to as thermal shock. This paper discusses the physical-chemical events during freezing and on freezing injury will assume that lowered temperature per se is not injurious.

  5. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  6. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  7. Ellipsometric characterization of surface freezing in Ga-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, K.; Nattland, D.; Kumar, A.; Dogel, S.; Freyland, W.

    2006-04-01

    We present results on surface freezing of Ga-based alloys, GaBi, GaPb and GaTl, above the liquidus line between the Ga-rich eutectic and the monotectic point. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV <=hν<=4.2 eV) and kinetic single wavelength ellipsometry (2.75 eV) have been employed to probe the changes of the interfacial electronic structures on surface freezing. To minimize thermal gradients across the sample a heatable cap that covers the sample and crucible was developed. The surface freezing temperature, TSF, for the spontaneous formation of a solid-like film on top of the Ga-rich liquid on cooling the sample from the homogeneous phase region was found to be independent of the temperature difference between the upper and lower furnace (ΔT: +10 to -10 K) and only weakly dependent on the cooling rate (\\partial T/\\partial t : 2.5-20 K h-1). In the case of GaPb the solid film consists of solid Pb with a thickness h>=400 Å. Comparing with GaBi we draw analogous conclusions for GaPb and GaTl and suggest that the surface freezing transition precedes the bulk phase transition along the liquidus line as the alloy is cooled.

  8. Tunable shape transformation of freezing liquid water marbles.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Lin, Kejun; Wang, Wenkai; Gu, Yaxi; Zhang, Yongjian; Geng, Xingguo; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-03-01

    Liquid water marbles coated with fumed silica nanoparticles exhibit various shape transformations upon freezing which are dependent on the hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles. The shape can be recovered during re-melting. For marbles coated with the most hydrophobic particles, a vertically prolonged morphology with a pointed protrusion on the top is formed on freezing. For marbles coated with less hydrophobic particles, a lateral expanded flying saucer-shaped morphology is formed. The different responses to freezing result from the different heterogeneous nucleation sites owing to the different positions of the particles at the air-water interface. If the particles are more immersed in water, ice embryos tend to form in the concave cavities between the particles. The volume expansion of water caused by freezing and continuous nucleation lead to continuous lateral stretching of the particle network coating the droplet surface and ultimately to the horizontally inflated shape of the marble. If the particles are more exposed to air, nucleation occurs on the convex surface of the particles, similar to that of a bare water droplet on a hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24651262

  9. Modification of a variational objective analysis model for new equations for pressure gradient and vertical velocity in the lower troposphere and for spatial resolution and accuracy of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achtemeier, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Since late 1982 NASA has supported research to develop a numerical variational model for the diagnostic assimilation of conventional and space-based meteorological data. In order to analyze the model components, four variational models are defined dividing the problem naturally according to increasing complexity. The first of these variational models (MODEL I), the subject of this report, contains the two nonlinear horizontal momentum equations, the integrated continuity equation, and the hydrostatic equation. This report summarizes the results of research (1) to improve the way the large nonmeteorological parts of the pressure gradient force are partitioned between the two terms of the pressure gradient force terms of the horizontal momentum equations, (2) to generalize the integrated continuity equation to account for variable pressure thickness over elevated terrain, and (3) to introduce horizontal variation in the precision modulus weights for the observations.

  10. Irradiance gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.J. Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne ); Heckbert, P.S. . School of Computer Science Technische Hogeschool Delft . Dept. of Technical Mathematics and Informatics)

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  11. The role of the geothermal gradient in the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms by which ground ice is emplaced, removed, and potentially replenished, are critical to understanding the climatic and hydrologic behavior of water on Mars, as well as the morphologic evolution of its surface. Because of the strong temperature dependence of the saturated vapor pressure of H2O, the atmospheric emplacement or replenishment of ground ice is prohibited below the depth at which crustal temperatures begin to monotonically increase due to geothermal heating. In contrast, the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice from reservoirs of H2O residing deep within the crust can occur by at least three different thermally-driven processes, involving all three phases of water. In this regard, Clifford has discussed how the presence of a geothermal gradient as small as 15 K/km can give rise to a corresponding vapor pressure gradient sufficient to drive the vertical transport of 1 km of water from a reservoir of ground water at depth to the base of the cryosphere every 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) years. This abstract expands on this earlier treatment by considering the influence of thermal gradients on the transport of H2O at temperatures below the freezing point.

  12. Combined infrared and freeze-drying.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying of the combined infrared (IR) and freeze-drying of food materials has been shown to be very rapid compared to regular freeze drying (FD). The resulting tissue structure of products processed with sequential infrared and freeze drying (SIRFD) tends to have higher crispness than those proce...

  13. Measuring freezing tolerance: Survival and regrowth assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening plants for freezing tolerance under tightly-controlled conditions is an invaluable technique for studying freezing tolerance and selecting for improved winterhardiness. Artificial freezing tests of cereal plants historically have used isolated crown and stem tissue prepared by “removing a...

  14. Immersion and contact freezing experiments in the Mainz wind tunnel laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppers, Oliver; Mayer, Amelie; Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir; Borrmann, Stephan; Szakáll, Miklós

    2016-04-01

    Immersion and contact freezing are of outmost important ice nucleation processes in mixed phase clouds. Experimental studies are carried out in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel laboratory in order to characterize these nucleation processes for different ice nucleating particles (INP), such as for mineral dust or biological particles. Immersion freezing is investigated in our laboratory with two different experimental techniques, both attaining contact-free levitation of liquid droplets and cooling of the surrounding air down to about -25 °C. In an acoustic levitator placed in the cold room of our laboratory, drops with diameters of 2 mm are investigated. In the vertical air stream of the wind tunnel droplets with diameter of 700 micron are freely floated at their terminal velocities, simulating the flow conditions of the free atmosphere. Furthermore, the wind tunnel offers a unique platform for contact freezing experiments. Supercooled water droplets are floated in the vertical air stream at their terminal velocities and INP are injected into the tunnel air stream upstream of them. As soon as INP collides with the supercooled droplet the contact freezing is initiated. The first results of immersion and contact freezing experiments with cellulose particles both in the acoustic levitator and in the wind tunnel will be presented. Cellulose is considered as typical INP of biological origin and a macrotracer for plant debris. Nucleating properties of cellulose will be provided, mainly focusing on the temperature, INP concentration, and specific surface area dependences of the freezing processes. Direct comparison between the different experimental techniques (acoustic levitator and wind tunnel), as well as between nucleation modes (immersion and contact freezing) will be presented. The work is carried out within the framework of the German research unit INUIT.

  15. Freeze chromatography method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-04-16

    A freeze chromatography method and apparatus are provided which enable separation of the solutes contained in a sample. The apparatus includes an annular column construction comprising cylindrical inner and outer surfaces defining an annular passage therebetween. One of the surfaces is heated and the other cooled while passing an eluent through the annular passageway so that the eluent in contact with the cooled surface freezes and forms a frozen eluent layer thereon. A mixture of solutes dissolved in eluent is passed through the annular passageway in contact with the frozen layer so that the sample solutes in the mixture will tend to migrate either toward or away the frozen layer. The rate at which the mixture flows through the annular passageway is controlled so that the distribution of the sample solutes approaches that at equilibrium and thus a separation between the sample solutes occurs. 3 figs.

  16. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.« less

  17. Freeze Concentration and Its Recent Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakisaka, Minato; Shirai, Yoshihito

    This article concerns freeze concentration and its recent development. Freeze concentration enables to remove water from aqueous solutions including volatile and heat-sensitive components with less damage to the concentrated solution because of the operation at lower temperature near the freezing point with possibly no gas-liquid boundary. Moreover, the lower latent heat accompanied with ice crystallization provides a possibility of the operation with lower energy consumption. Recently freeze concentration has been applied to the wastewater treatment field. First the principle of freeze concentration will be addressed. Second applications of freeze concentration to the wastewater treatment field will be reviewed, including our recent works. Finally prospective views of freeze concentration will be given.

  18. A study of the impact of freezing on the lyophilization of a concentrated formulation with a high fill depth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Viverette, Todd; Virgin, Marlin; Anderson, Mitch; Paresh, Dalal

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of freezing on the lyophilization of a concentrated formulation with a high fill depth. A model system consisting of a 15-mL fill of 15% (w/w) sulfobutylether 7-beta-cyclodextrin (SBECD) solution in a 30-mL vial was selected for this study. Various freezing methods including single-step freezing, two-step freezing with a super-cooling holding, annealing, vacuum-induced freezing, changing ice habit using tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA), ice nucleation with silver iodide (AgI), as well as combinations of some of the methods, were used in the lyophilization of this model system. This work demonstrated that the freezing process had a significant impact on primary drying rate and product quality of a concentrated formulation with a high fill depth. Annealing, vacuum-induced freezing, and addition of either TBA or an ice nucleating agent (AgI) to the formulation accelerated the subsequent ice sublimation process. Two-step freezing or addition of TBA improved the product quality by eliminating vertical heterogeneity within the cake. The combination of two-step freezing in conjunction with an annealing step was shown to be a method of choice for freezing in the lyophilization of a product with a high fill depth. In addition to being an effective method of freezing, it is most applicable for scaling up. An alternative approach is to add a certain amount of TBA to the formulation, if the TBA-formulation interaction or regulatory concerns can be demonstrated as not being an issue. An evaluation of vial size performed in this study showed that although utilizing large-diameter vials to reduce the fill depth can greatly shorten the cycle time of a single batch, it will substantially decrease the product throughput in a large-scale freeze-dryer. PMID:15926675

  19. Mapping freeze/thaw boundaries with SMMR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuerndorfer, B. W.; England, A. W.; Dobson, M. C.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1989-01-01

    Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data are used to map daily freeze/thaw patterns in the upper Midwest for the Fall of 1984. The combination of a low 37 GHz radiobrightness and a negative 10.7, 18, and 37 GHz spectral gradient, Partial Derivative of Tb with Respect to f, appears to be an effective discriminant for classifying soil as frozen or thawed. The 37 GHz emissivity is less sensitive to soil moisture than are the lower frequency emissivities so that the 37 GHz radiobrightness appears to track soil surface temperature relatively well. The negative gradient for frozen ground is a consequence of volume scatter darkening at shorter microwave wavelengths. This shorter wavelength darkening is not seen in thawed moist soils.

  20. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P < 0.05) sperm motility and membrane integrity, in both nonselected and DCG-selected sperm samples, >60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. PMID:26268795

  1. Reptile freeze tolerance: metabolism and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-02-01

    Terrestrially hibernating reptiles that live in seasonally cold climates need effective strategies of cold hardiness to survive the winter. Use of thermally buffered hibernacula is very important but when exposure to temperatures below 0 degrees C cannot be avoided, either freeze avoidance (supercooling) or freeze tolerance strategies can be employed, sometimes by the same species depending on environmental conditions. Several reptile species display ecologically relevant freeze tolerance, surviving for extended times with 50% or more of their total body water frozen. The use of colligative cryoprotectants by reptiles is poorly developed but metabolic and enzymatic adaptations providing anoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense are important aids to freezing survival. New studies using DNA array screening are examining the role of freeze-responsive gene expression. Three categories of freeze responsive genes have been identified from recent screenings of liver and heart from freeze-exposed (5h post-nucleation at -2.5 degrees C) hatchling painted turtles, Chrysemys picta marginata. These genes encode (a) proteins involved in iron binding, (b) enzymes of antioxidant defense, and (c) serine protease inhibitors. The same genes were up-regulated by anoxia exposure (4 h of N2 gas exposure at 5 degrees C) of the hatchlings which suggests that these defenses for freeze tolerance are aimed at counteracting the injurious effects of the ischemia imposed by plasma freezing. PMID:16321368

  2. Egg freezing: a breakthrough for reproductive autonomy?

    PubMed

    Harwood, Karey

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the relatively new technology of freezing human eggs and examines whether egg freezing, specifically when it is used by healthy women as 'insurance' against age-related infertility, is a legitimate exercise of reproductive autonomy. Although egg freezing has the potential to expand women's reproductive options and thus may represent a breakthrough for reproductive autonomy, I argue that without adequate information about likely outcomes and risks, women may be choosing to freeze their eggs in a commercially exploitative context, thus undermining rather than expanding reproductive autonomy. PMID:18945249

  3. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  4. Estimation of coastal density gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, M. J.; Palmer, M. R.; Polton, J. A.; O'Neill, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    Density gradients in coastal regions with significant freshwater input are large and variable and are a major control of nearshore circulation. However their measurement is difficult, especially where the gradients are largest close to the coast, with significant uncertainties because of a variety of factors - spatial and time scales are small, tidal currents are strong and water depths shallow. Whilst temperature measurements are relatively straightforward, measurements of salinity (the dominant control of spatial variability) can be less reliable in turbid coastal waters. Liverpool Bay has strong tidal mixing and receives fresh water principally from the Dee, Mersey, Ribble and Conwy estuaries, each with different catchment influences. Horizontal and vertical density gradients are variable both in space and time. The water column stratifies intermittently. A Coastal Observatory has been operational since 2002 with regular (quasi monthly) CTD surveys on a 9 km grid, an situ station, an instrumented ferry travelling between Birkenhead and Dublin and a shore-based HF radar system measuring surface currents and waves. These measurements are complementary, each having different space-time characteristics. For coastal gradients the ferry is particularly useful since measurements are made right from the mouth of Mersey. From measurements at the in situ site alone density gradients can only be estimated from the tidal excursion. A suite of coupled physical, wave and ecological models are run in association with these measurements. The models, here on a 1.8 km grid, enable detailed estimation of nearshore density gradients, provided appropriate river run-off data are available. Examples are presented of the density gradients estimated from the different measurements and models, together with accuracies and uncertainties, showing that systematic time series measurements within a few kilometres of the coast are a high priority. (Here gliders are an exciting prospect for

  5. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  6. On gradient field theories: gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the fundamentals of gradient field theories are presented and reviewed. In particular, the theories of gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity are investigated and compared. For gradient magnetostatics, non-singular expressions for the magnetic vector gauge potential, the Biot-Savart law, the Lorentz force and the mutual interaction energy of two electric current loops are derived and discussed. For gradient elasticity, non-singular forms of all dislocation key formulas (Burgers equation, Mura equation, Peach-Koehler stress equation, Peach-Koehler force equation, and mutual interaction energy of two dislocation loops) are presented. In addition, similarities between an electric current loop and a dislocation loop are pointed out. The obtained fields for both gradient theories are non-singular due to a straightforward and self-consistent regularization.

  7. Freeze-drying processes and wind erodibility of a clay loam soil in southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, M S.; Larney, F. J.; McGinn, Sean M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    1999-01-01

    Freeze-drying has been implicated as a factor causing soil aggregate breakdown on the Canadian Prairies and northern Great Plains. Aggregates of a Dark Brown Chernozemic clay loam soil sampled in October 1993 and January and April 1994 were subjected to repeated cycles of wetting (to 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 kg kg-1 water contents) freezing, and freeze-drying under laboratory conditions. The October 1993 samples showed less disruption when initially exposed to freeze-drying cycles compared to samples taken in January and April 1994. Using regression analysis, we predicted that 31 freeze-dry cycles were required for the 0.1 kg kg-1 water content aggregates to reach 60% erodible fraction (EF, % aggregates <0.86 mm), 9 cycles for the 0.2 kg kg-1 aggregates and 2 for 0.3 kg kg-1 aggregates. In a field study, conducted over the 1994-1995 winter on a similar clay loam soil, we estimated the number of freeze-drying cycles using large vapor pressure (VPL) and small vapor pressure (VPS) gradients bet ween the soil surface (which had a mean winter water content of {approx}0.1 kg kg-1) and the atmosphere. With solar energy adjustments, we predicted that the number of freeze-dry cycles required for the soil to reach 60% EF was 60 for VPL and 37 for VPS conditions. The latter number was similar to the 31 cycles predicted in the laboratory study of aggregates at 0.1 water content. Our results demonstrate that freeze-drying is an important overwinter process in the breakdown of soil aggregates and hence wind erosion risk in the Canadian prairie region.

  8. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [of freeze dried foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Methods which produce freeze dried foods of improved quality were examined with emphasis on storage stability. Specific topics discussed include: microstructure of freeze dried systems, investigation of structural changes in freeze dried systems, artificial food matrices, osmotic preconcentration to yield improved quality freeze dried fruits, and storage stability of osmotically preconcentrated freeze dried fruits.

  9. Identification, analysis and monitoring of risks of freezing affecting aircraft flying over the Guadarrama Mountains (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, Sergio; Sánchez, José Luis; Gascón, Estíbaliz; Merino, Andrés; Hermida, Lucía; López, Laura; Marcos, José Luis; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Freezing is one of the main causes of aircraft accidents registered over the last few decades. This means it is very important to be able to predict this situation so that aircraft can change their routes to avoid freezing risk areas. Also, by using satellites it is possible to observe changes in the horizontal and vertical extension of cloud cover likely to cause freezing in real time as well as microphysical changes in the clouds. The METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) makes it possible to create different red-green-blue (RGB) compositions that provide a large amount of information associated with the microphysics of clouds, in order to identify super-cooled water clouds that pose a high risk of freezing to aircraft. During the winter of 2011/12 in the Guadarrama Mountains, in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula, a series of scientific flights (conducted by INTA) were organised in order to study the cloud systems that affected this region during the winter. On the flight of the 1st of February 2012, the aircraft was affected by freezing after crossing over a mountain ridge with supercooled large drops (SLD). Although freezing was not expected during that day's flight, the orography caused a series of mesoscale factors that led to the appearance of localised freezing conditions. By analysing this case, we have been able to conclude that the use of satellite images makes it possible to monitor the risk of freezing, especially under specific mesoscale circumstances. Acknowledgements S. Fernández-González acknowledges the grant supported from the FPU program (AP 2010-2093). This study was supported by the following grants: GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22). The authors would like to thank the INTA for its scientific flights.

  10. Freeze thaw: a simple approach for prediction of optimal cryoprotectant for freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Date, Praveen V; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V

    2010-03-01

    The present study evaluates freeze thaw as a simple approach for screening the most appropriate cryoprotectant. Freeze-thaw study is based on the principle that an excipient, which protects nanoparticles during the first step of freezing, is likely to be an effective cryoprotectant. Nanoparticles of rifampicin with high entrapment efficiency were prepared by the emulsion-solvent diffusion method using dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) as complexing agent and Gantrez AN-119 as polymer. Freeze-thaw study was carried out using trehalose and fructose as cryoprotectants. The concentration of cryoprotectant, concentration of nanoparticles in the dispersion, and the freezing temperature were varied during the freeze-thaw study. Cryoprotection increased with increase in cryoprotectant concentration. Further, trehalose was superior to fructose at equivalent concentrations and moreover permitted use of more concentrated nanosuspensions for freeze drying. Freezing temperature did not influence the freeze-thaw study. Freeze-dried nanoparticles revealed good redispersibility with a size increase that correlated well with the freeze-thaw study at 20% w/v trehalose and fructose. Transmission electron microscopy revealed round particles with a size approximately 400 nm, which correlated with photon correlation spectroscopic measurements. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction suggested amorphization of rifampicin. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy could not confirm interaction of drug with AOT. Nanoparticles exhibited sustained release of rifampicin, which followed diffusion kinetics. Nanoparticles of rifampicin were found to be stable for 12 months. The good correlation between freeze thaw and freeze drying suggests freeze-thaw study as a simple and quick approach for screening optimal cryoprotectant for freeze drying. PMID:20182826

  11. Freeze tolerance and avoidance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold acclimation is a multigenic, quantitative trait that involves biochemical and structural changes that effect the physiology of a plant. Mechanisms associated with freeze tolerance or freeze avoidance develop and are lost on an annual cycle. When conducting studies to characterize and determin...

  12. Inherent freeze protection for solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Jeter, S.M.; Leonaitis, L.L.; Leonaitis, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    Research and development of a method for protection of a solar collector from freezing is described. The method is shown to be technically and economically feasible. A prototype water heating system using the inherent freeze protection method was successfully operated during the winter of 1980 to 1981.

  13. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature–pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  14. Oocyte freezing: timely reproductive insurance?

    PubMed

    Molloy, David; Hall, Barbara A; Ilbery, Mariannne; Irving, Jacqui; Harrison, Keith L

    2009-03-01

    Cryopreservation of unfertilised oocytes for later use in initiating pregnancy is now a viable technology, with acceptable pregnancy rates (over 20% per thaw cycle). Oocyte cryopreservation used as a form of insurance against "social" (age-related) infertility can improve the lifetime chance of pregnancy in women who defer pregnancy into their late 30s or early 40s. We report two pregnancies using oocytes that were frozen for social rather than medical reasons, as part of a larger series of nine pregnancies using cryopreserved oocytes. Use of oocytes harvested and frozen from women aged under 35 years may more than double the chance of pregnancy for a 41-year-old woman. The disadvantages of oocyte freezing for social infertility reasons include cost, the usual risks associated with in-vitro fertilisation, and the lack of a guarantee of eventual pregnancy. PMID:19296788

  15. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  16. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  17. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  18. Split-sample comparison of directional and liquid nitrogen vapour freezing method on post-thaw semen quality in white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum simum and Ceratotherium simum cottoni).

    PubMed

    Reid, C E; Hermes, R; Blottner, S; Goeritz, F; Wibbelt, G; Walzer, C; Bryant, B R; Portas, T J; Streich, W J; Hildebrandt, T B

    2009-01-15

    To increase the quality of cryopreserved sperm in white rhinoceros, the liquid nitrogen vapour (LN vapour) freezing and the multi-thermal gradient directional freezing methods were compared. Sixteen white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum sp.) were electro-ejaculated. Semen samples were diluted with cryoextender (Tris, lactose, egg-yolk, DMSO) and aliquoted into straws for LN vapour freezing, and glass hollow tubes for directional freezing. The sperm quality was evaluated before and after freezing by assessing the following parameters: motility, morphologic state, acrosomal integrity and plasma membrane function and integrity (i.e. sperm viability) as defined by the hypo-osmotic swelling. Directional freezing improved the sperm viability by 5.6% (p<0.005), progressive motility score by 34.7% and sperm motility index (SMI) by 8.1% (p<0.005) versus LN vapour freezing. When data was categorized into groups of low (<19%), moderate (20-39%) and high (>40%) percentages of morphologically normal, directional freezing (DF) resulted in 31.4% less abnormal acrosomes for the low quality group as well as 18.7% increase in intact acrosomes and 10.9% increase in motility for the high quality group compared to LN vapour freezing (LN) (p<0.01, p<0.03, p<0.01, respectively). LN showed a significant reduction in sperm head volume (5.7%, p<0.05) compared to the prefreeze; whereas, no significant reduction in head volume was demonstrated after DF. Several additives (xanthenuric acid, cytochalasin D, potassium, EDTA) to the basic cryoextender provided no significant improvement in spermatozoal survival after directional freezing. In conclusion, directional freezing proved to facilitate higher gamete survival compared to LN vapour freezing. This is especially effective in ejaculates of low sperm quality and is important in endangered species where high quality semen donors are often not accessible. These results suggest that directional freezing could be valuable particularly for species

  19. On the freezing precipitation in korea and the basic schemes for its potential prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Byun, Hi-Ryong; Park, Chang-Kyun; Kwon, Hui-Nae

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to improve the forecasting skill for freezing precipitation. A total of 102 freezing precipitation cases were collected in South and North Korea from 2001 onwards. Temperature fields on the ground and in the atmosphere, vertical temperature profiles, geopotential fields, thickness fields and their spatiotemporal variations, and their combinations using the predominant precipitation-type nomograms (P-type nomograms) were classified and investigated to determine whether or not these data could be used as predictors. Results show that 1) the combination of the thicknesses of 1000-850 hPa and 850-700 hPa is recommended for the P-type nomograms for Korea, which is different from that used in the United States in threshold values; 2) 35 out of 72 synoptic situations are possible conditions for freezing precipitation; and 3) 3 groups out of those 35 situations, i.e., the 1000 hPa warmfront group, the mid-level southerly category of 850 hPa, and the mid-layer warm type in the vertical temperature profile, show the greatest frequency. Freezing precipitation occurs only in a small part of a possible area. Therefore, despite the increasing observations in the year-on-year trend, only a few of the cases have been detected. The possibility of observation errors is also one of the biggest problems. Therefore, the need for new equipment, such as a freezing rain detector (FRAD), to detect the phenomenon automatically is required and proposed. A denser observing system of FRADs and an ultra-fine gridded numerical model are suggested as a solution for the prediction of freezing precipitation.

  20. Mesoscale monitoring of the soil freeze/thaw boundary from orbital microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Craig; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Zuerndorfer, Brian; England, Anthony W.

    1990-01-01

    A technique was developed for mapping the spatial extent of frozen soils from the spectral characteristics of the 10.7 to 37 GHz radiobrightness. Through computational models for the spectral radiobrightness of diurnally heated freesing soils, a distinctive radiobrightness signature was identified for frozen soils, and the signature was cast as a discriminant for unsupervised classification. In addition to large area images, local area spatial averages of radiobrightness were calculated for each radiobrightness channel at 7 meteorologic sites within the test region. Local area averages at the meteorologic sites were used to define the preliminary boundaries in the Freeze Indicator discriminate. Freeze Indicator images based upon Nimbus 7, Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data effectively map temporal variations in the freeze/thaw pattern for the northern Great Plains at the time scale of days. Diurnal thermal gradients have a small but measurable effect upon the SMMR spectral gradient. Scale-space filtering can be used to improve the spatial resolution of a freeze/thaw classified image.

  1. Mimicking the quasi-random assembly of protein fibers in the dermis by freeze-drying method.

    PubMed

    Ghaleh, Hakimeh; Abbasi, Farhang; Alizadeh, Mina; Khoshfetrat, Ali Baradar

    2015-04-01

    Freeze-drying is extensively used for fabrication of porous materials in tissue engineering and biomedical applications, due to its versatility and use of no toxic solvent. However, it has some significant drawbacks. Conventional freeze-drying technique leads to the production of heterogeneous porous structures with side orientated columnar pores. As the top and bottom surfaces of the sample are not in contact with similar environments, different rates of heat transfer in the surfaces and the temperature gradient across the sample establish the preferential direction of heat transfer. To achieve a scaffold with a desirable microstructure for skin tissue engineering, freeze-drying method was modified by controlling the rate of cooling and regulation of heat transfer across the sample during the freezing step. It could create a homogeneous porous structure with more equiaxed non-oriented pores. Freezing the polymeric solution in the aluminum mold enhanced pore interconnectivity relative to the polystyrene mold. Recrystallization process was discussed how to influence the mean pore size of the scaffold when the final freezing temperature varied. Higher final freezing temperature can easily provide the energy required for the recrystallization process, which lead to enlarged ice crystals and resulting pores. PMID:25687012

  2. Exploring the Nature of Contact Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Duft, D.; Leisner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The freezing of supercooled water droplets upon contact with aerosol particles (contact nucleation of ice) is the least understood mechanism of ice formation in atmospheric clouds. Although experimental evidences suggest that some aerosols can be better IN in the contact than in the immersion mode (that is, triggering ice nucleation at higher temperature), no final explanation of this phenomena currently exists. On the other hand, the contact freezing is believed to be responsible for the enhanced rate of secondary ice formation occasionally observed in LIDAR measurements in the cold mixed phase clouds. Recently we have been able to show that the freezing of supercooled droplets electrodynamically levitated in the laminar flow containing mineral dust particles (kaolinite) is a process solely governed by a rate of collisions between the supercooled droplet and the aerosol particles. We have shown that the probability of droplet freezing on a single contact with aerosol particle may differ over an order of magnitude for kaolinite particles having different genesis and morphology. In this presentation we extend the study of contact nucleation of ice and compare the IN efficiency measured for DMA-selected kaolinite, illite and hematite particles. We show that the freezing probability increases towards unity as the temperature decreases and discuss the functional form of this temperature dependence. We explore the size dependence of the contact freezing probability and show that it scales with the surface area of the particles, thus resembling the immersion freezing behavior. However, for all minerals investigated so far, the contact freezing has been shown to dominate over immersion freezing on the short experimental time scales. Finally, based on the combined ESEM and electron microprobe analysis, we discuss the significance of particle morphology and variability of chemical composition on its IN efficiency in contact mode.

  3. Spray-freezing freeze substitution (SFFS) of cell suspensions for improved preservation of ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Fields, S D; Strout, G W; Russell, S D

    1997-08-01

    Some unicellular organisms present challenges to chemical fixations that lead to common, yet obvious, artifacts. These can be avoided in entirety by adapting spray-freezing technology to ultrarapidly freeze specimens for freeze substitution. To freeze specimens, concentrated suspensions of cells ranging in diameter from 0.5-30 pm were sprayed with an airbrush at 140-200 kPa (1.05-1.5 torr; 20.3-29.0 psi) into a nylon mesh transfer basket submerged in liquid propane. After freezing, the mesh basket containing the frozen sample was lifted out of the chamber, drained and transferred through several anhydrous acetone rinses at 188 K (-85 degrees C). Freeze substitution was conducted in 1% tannic acid/1% anhydrous glutaraldehyde in acetone at 188 K (-85 degrees C), followed by 1% OsO4/acetone at 277 K (4 degrees C). Freeze substitution was facilitated using a shaking table to provide gentle mixing of the substitution medium on dry ice. High quality freezing was observed in 70% of spray-frozen dinoflagellate cells and in 95% of spray-frozen cyanobacterial cells. These could be infiltrated and observed directly; however, overall ultrastructural appearance and membrane contrast were improved when the freeze-substituted cells were rehydrated and post-fixed in aqueous OSO4, then dehydrated and embedded in either Spurr's or Epon resin. Ultrastructural preservation using this ultrarapid freezing method provided specimens that were consistently superior to those obtainable in even the best comparable chemical fixations. PMID:9264343

  4. Fast acclimation of freezing resistance suggests no influence of winter minimum temperature on the range limit of European beech.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Armando; Hoch, Günter; Vitasse, Yann

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature extremes drive species distribution at a global scale. Here, we assessed the acclimation potential of freezing resistance in European beech (Fagus sylvaticaL.) during winter. We specifically asked (i) how do beech populations growing in contrasting climates differ in their maximum freezing resistance, (ii) do differences result from genetic differentiation or phenotypic plasticity to preceding temperatures and (iii) is beech at risk of freezing damage in winter across its distribution range. We investigated the genetic and environmental components of freezing resistance in buds of adult beech trees from three different populations along a natural large temperature gradient in north-western Switzerland, including the site holding the cold temperature record in Switzerland. Freezing resistance of leaf primordia in buds varied significantly among populations, with LT50values (lethal temperature for 50% of samples) ranging from -25 to -40 °C, correlating with midwinter temperatures of the site of origin. Cambial meristems and the pith of shoots showed high freezing resistance in all three populations, with only a trend to lower freezing resistance at the warmer site. After hardening samples at -6 °C for 5 days, freezing resistance of leaf primordia increased in all provenances by up to 4.5 K. After additional hardening at -15 °C for 3 days, all leaf primordia were freezing resistant to -40 °C. We demonstrate that freezing resistance ofF. sylvaticahas a high ability to acclimate to temperature changes in winter, whereas the genetic differentiation of freezing resistance among populations seems negligible over this small geographic scale but large climatic gradient. In contrast to the assumption made in most of the species distribution models, we suggest that absolute minimum temperature in winter is unlikely to shape the cold range limit of beech. We conclude that the rapid acclimation of freezing resistance to winter temperatures allows

  5. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: When Hot Water Freezes Faster than Cold Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more…

  6. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  7. Freeze concentration beats the heat

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on freeze concentration (FC) which saves energy and money in packaging, shipping, and storing food products. FC---in contrast to existing heat-evaporation processes---retains volatile flavor and aroma compounds in food products so that no additives are required to restore the taste and smell of the original product. In recent tests on orange, grapefruit, and pineapple juices, reconstituted FC juices were found to be superior in taste to juices produced by evaporation and similar to the original pasteurized juices. The dairy industry, which is the largest user of energy for concentration in the food sector, is looking to FC for new products such as frozen concentrated milk as well as better use of the milk by-products of cheese production. The biggest potential for new FC applications is in those industries that consume large amounts of energy for separation processing, according to a 1987 report prepared for EPRI. In the food industry, this includes milk, vinegar, and beer producers. Potential applications also abound in the pulp and paper, pharmaceutical, chemical, and petroleum industries. FC separates substances via crystallization at substantial energy savings.

  8. A Closed System for Batch/Continuous Freeze-drying of Liquid Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Harashima, Konomi; Ariyama, Hiroichi; Yao, Ai-Ru

    Up to the present, the conventional freeze-drying method for bulk pharmaceticals and other liquid materials has employed a tray/shelf system, while the development of a closed system has been desired for many years, especially for the manufacturing of sterile bulk pharmaceuticals. Seffinga (1964) devised a method, which he called "vertical tube dryer", however, this system was not established due to several drawbacks. Having restudied Seffinga's method, we have succeeded in eliminating the drawbacks of this method and have developed a closed system for the batch/continuous freeze-drying of liquid materials. Two of the drawbacks of Seffinga's method, namely (a) supercooloing followed by sudden freezing and (b) adherence of dried material to the tube surface, have been eliminated by the formation of an ice lining. Another drawback (c) that a substaintial part of the liquid poured into the chamber must be drained has been solved through multistage frozen layer formation. All of the stage of freeze-drying can be performed using the closed system developed in this study. Further, since the interior dose not have a complicated structure, internal cleaning and steam sterilization can be easily performed. This paper discussed the closed system and the behavior of materials in the freeze-drying process.

  9. Effective anisotropy gradient in pressure graded [Co/Pd] multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B. J. Maranville, B. B.; Greene, P. K.; Liu, Kai; Davies, J. E.

    2015-02-14

    We have used polarized neutron reflectometry to show that controlled variation of growth pressure during deposition of Co/Pd multilayers can be used to achieve a significant vertical gradient in the effective anisotropy. This gradient is strongly dependent on deposition order (low to high pressure or vice versa), and is accompanied by a corresponding gradient in saturation magnetization. These results demonstrate pressure-grading as an attractively simple technique for tailoring the anisotropy profile of magnetic media.

  10. Evaluation of spin freezing versus conventional freezing as part of a continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, L; Van Bockstal, P-J; Corver, J; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T

    2015-12-30

    Spin-freezing as alternative freezing approach was evaluated as part of an innovative continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses. The aim of this paper was to compare the sublimation rate of spin-frozen vials versus traditionally frozen vials in a batch freeze-dryer, and its impact on total drying time. Five different formulations, each having a different dry cake resistance, were tested. After freezing, the traditionally frozen vials were placed on the shelves while the spin-frozen vials were placed in aluminum vial holders providing radial energy supply during drying. Different primary drying conditions and chamber pressures were evaluated. After 2h of primary drying, the amount of sublimed ice was determined in each vial. Each formulation was monitored in-line using NIR spectroscopy during drying to determine the sublimation endpoint and the influence of drying conditions upon total drying time. For all tested formulations and applied freeze-drying conditions, there was a significant higher sublimation rate in the spin-frozen vials. This can be explained by the larger product surface and the lower importance of product resistance because of the much thinner product layers in the spin frozen vials. The in-line NIR measurements allowed evaluating the influence of applied drying conditions on the drying trajectories. PMID:25981618

  11. Freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Rousseau, D

    2009-11-01

    Factors influencing water-in-oil emulsion stability during freeze/thaw-cycling, namely interfacial crystallization vs. network crystallization and the sequence of crystallization events (i.e., dispersed vs. continuous phase or vice versa), are assessed. We show that destabilization is most apparent with a liquid-state emulsifier and a continuous oil phase that solidifies prior to the dispersed phase. Emulsions stable to F/T-cycling are obtained when the emulsifier crystallizes at the oil-water interface or in emulsions where the continuous phase crystallizes after the dispersed aqueous phase. The materials used are two food-grade oil-soluble emulsifiers - polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and glycerol monostearin (GMS) and two continuous oil phases with differing crystallization temperatures - canola oil and coconut oil. Emulsion stability is assessed with pulsed field gradient NMR droplet size analysis, sedimentation, microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. This study demonstrates the sequence of crystallization events and the physical state of the surfactant at the oil-water interface strongly impact the freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:19683718

  12. Freeze-thaw cycles as drivers of complex ribozyme assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mutschler, Hannes; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA catalyst capable of self-replication is considered a key transition in the origin of life. However, how such replicase ribozymes emerged from the pools of short RNA oligomers arising from prebiotic chemistry and non-enzymatic replication is unclear. Here we show that RNA polymerase ribozymes can assemble from simple catalytic networks of RNA oligomers no longer than 30 nucleotides. The entropically disfavoured assembly reaction is driven by iterative freeze-thaw cycles even in the absence of external activation chemistry. The steep temperature and concentration gradients of such cycles result in an RNA chaperone effect that enhances the otherwise only partially realized catalytic potential of the RNA oligomer pool by an order of magnitude. Our work outlines how cyclic physicochemical processes could have driven an expansion of RNA compositional and phenotypic complexity from simple oligomer pools. PMID:25991529

  13. Freeze-thaw cycles as drivers of complex ribozyme assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschler, Hannes; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of an RNA catalyst capable of self-replication is considered a key transition in the origin of life. However, how such replicase ribozymes emerged from the pools of short RNA oligomers arising from prebiotic chemistry and non-enzymatic replication is unclear. Here we show that RNA polymerase ribozymes can assemble from simple catalytic networks of RNA oligomers no longer than 30 nucleotides. The entropically disfavoured assembly reaction is driven by iterative freeze-thaw cycles, even in the absence of external activation chemistry. The steep temperature and concentration gradients of such cycles result in an RNA chaperone effect that enhances the otherwise only partially realized catalytic potential of the RNA oligomer pool by an order of magnitude. Our work outlines how cyclic physicochemical processes could have driven an expansion of RNA compositional and phenotypic complexity from simple oligomer pools.

  14. Freeze-thaw cycles as drivers of complex ribozyme assembly.

    PubMed

    Mutschler, Hannes; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of an RNA catalyst capable of self-replication is considered a key transition in the origin of life. However, how such replicase ribozymes emerged from the pools of short RNA oligomers arising from prebiotic chemistry and non-enzymatic replication is unclear. Here we show that RNA polymerase ribozymes can assemble from simple catalytic networks of RNA oligomers no longer than 30 nucleotides. The entropically disfavoured assembly reaction is driven by iterative freeze-thaw cycles, even in the absence of external activation chemistry. The steep temperature and concentration gradients of such cycles result in an RNA chaperone effect that enhances the otherwise only partially realized catalytic potential of the RNA oligomer pool by an order of magnitude. Our work outlines how cyclic physicochemical processes could have driven an expansion of RNA compositional and phenotypic complexity from simple oligomer pools. PMID:25991529

  15. Evaluation of anti-freeze viscosity modifier for potential external tank applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, R. O. L.

    1981-01-01

    Viscosity modifiers and gelling agents were evaluated in combination with ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide water eutectics. Pectin and agarose are found to gel these eutectics effectively in low concentration, but the anti-freeze protection afforded by these compositions is found to be marginal in simulations of the intended applications. Oxygen vent shutters and vertical metallic surfaces were simulated, with water supplied as a spray, dropwise, and by condensation from the air.

  16. Freezing mammalian cells for production of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Seth, Gargi

    2012-03-01

    Cryopreservation techniques utilize very low temperatures to preserve the structure and function of living cells. Various strategies have been developed for freezing mammalian cells of biological and medical significance. This paper highlights the importance and application of cryopreservation for recombinant mammalian cells used in the biopharmaceutical industry to produce high-value protein therapeutics. It is a primer that aims to give insight into the basic principles of cell freezing for the benefit of biopharmaceutical researchers with limited or no prior experience in cryobiology. For the more familiar researchers, key cell banking parameters such as the cell density and hold conditions have been reviewed to possibly help optimize their specific cell freezing protocols. It is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the freezing of complex and sensitive cellular entities as we implement best practices around the techniques and strategies used for cryopreservation. PMID:22226818

  17. Freezing of Xylem Sap Without Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, H. T.

    1967-01-01

    Freezing of stem sections and entire twigs of hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) has been demonstrated to occur without increasing the resistance to the movement of water through the frozen part after rewarming. This was interpreted to mean that freezing did not produce cavitation in the xylem sap even though A) the sap was unquestionably frozen; B) it contained dissolved gases; and C) it was under tension before freezing and after. Freezing stem sections of some other evergreen gymnosperms during the summer again produced no evidence for cavitation of the xylem sap. On the other hand, freezing stem sections of some angiosperms invariably increased the resistance to sap flow leading to wilting and death in a few hours when the sap tension was at normal daytime values at the time of freezing. These results were interpreted to mean that the bordered pits on the tracheids of gymnosperms function to isolate the freezing sap in each tracheid so that the expansion of water upon freezing not only eliminates any existing tension but also develops positive pressure in the sap. Dissolved gases frozen out of solution may then be redissolved under this positive pressure as melting occurs. As the bubbles are reduced in size by this ice pressure developed in an isolated tracheid, further pressure is applied by the surface tension of the water against air. If the bubbles are redissolved or are reduced to sufficient small size by the time the tension returns to the sap as the last ice crystals melt, then the internal pressure from surface tension in any existing small bubbles may exceed the hydrostatic tension of the melted sap and the bubbles cannot expand and will continue to dissolve. PMID:16656485

  18. Quality changes and freezing time prediction during freezing and thawing of ginger.

    PubMed

    Singha, Poonam; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2016-07-01

    Effects of different freezing rates and four different thawing methods on chemical composition, microstructure, and color of ginger were investigated. Computer simulation for predicting the freezing time of cylindrical ginger for two different freezing methods (slow and fast) was done using ANSYS (®) Multiphysics. Different freezing rates (slow and fast) and thawing methods significantly (P < 0.05) affected the color and composition of essential oil in ginger. Fresh ginger was found to contain 3.60% gingerol and 18.30% zingerone. A maximum yield of 7.43% gingerol was obtained when slow frozen gingers when thawed by infrared method. Maximum zingerone content of 38.30% was achieved by thawing slow frozen gingers using infrared-microwave method. Microscopic examination revealed that structural damage was more pronounced in slow frozen gingers than fast frozen gingers. Simulated freezing curves were in good agreement with experimental measurements (r = 0.97 for slow freezing and r = 0.92 for fast freezing). Slow freezing damaged ginger's cellular structure. Data obtained will be helpful in selecting appropriate thawing method to increase desirable essential oil components in ginger. Computer simulation for predicting freezing time may help in developing proper storage system of ginger. PMID:27386102

  19. Freezing of living cells: mechanisms and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1984-01-01

    Cells can endure storage at low temperatures such as -196/sup 0/C for centuries. The challenge is to determine how they can survive both the cooling to such temperatures and the subsequent return to physiological conditions. A major factor is whether they freeze intracellularly. They do so if cooling is too rapid, because with rapid cooling insufficient cell water is removed osmotically to eliminate supercooling. Equations have been developed that describe the kinetics of this water loss and permit one to predict the likelihood of intracellular freezing as a function of cooling rate. Such predictions agree well with observations. Although the avoidance of intracellular freezing is usually necessary for survival, it is not sufficient. Slow freezing itself can be injurious. As ice forms outside the cell, the residual unfrozen medium forms channels of decreasing size and increasing solute concentration. The cells lie in the channels and shrink in osmotic response to the rising solute concentration. Prior theories have ascribed slow freezing injury to the concentration of solutes or the cell shrinkage. Recent experiments, however, indicate that the damage is due more to the decrease in the size of the unfrozen channels. This new view of the mechanism of slow freezing injury ought to facilitate the development of procedures for the preservation of complex assemblages of cells of biological, medical, and agricultural significance. 126 references, 18 figures, 2 tables.

  20. A new freeze casting technique for ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi

    A new freeze casting technique for ceramics capable of manufacturing near room temperature with a sublimable vehicle has been developed in order to eliminate expensive processes under extremely cold temperatures in the conventional freeze casting. Fluid concentrated slurries of Al2O 3 powder in molten camphene (C10H16) were successfully prepared at 55°C with a small amount of a dispersant. These slurries were quickly solidified (frozen) at room temperature to yield a rigid solid green body, where the frozen camphene was easily removed by sublimation (freeze-drying) with negligible shrinkage. Sintering was successfully conducted without any special binder burnout process to yield dense sintered bodies (over 98% T.D). An organic alloy with a eutectic composition in the naphthalene (C 10H8)-camphor (C10H16O) binary system with a eutectic temperature of 31°C was also found to be a successful vehicle for the new ceramic freeze casting. The fabrication processes are almost the same as those with camphene. It was found that vehicles with off-eutectic compositions resulted in large voids in the sintered body due to the ceramic particle rejection by pro-eutectic crystals during freezing. At the eutectic composition, fine lamellar microstructure in the solidified vehicle inhibits the particle rejection. The proposed advantages of the new freeze casting technique with a sublimable vehicle include; (1) elimination of extremely cold temperatures used in conventional freeze casting; (2) elimination of troublesome binder burnout process; and (3) fast manufacturing cycle due to quick solidification. Porous ceramic bodies with unique interconnected pore channels were fabricated by the new freeze casting with lower solid content. The unique channels surrounded by fully dense walls have nearly circular cross-sections unlike conventional aqueous freeze casting. The porosity and the channel diameters are controllable by the solid content in the slurry. The unique channels are

  1. A thermobaric instability of Lagrangian vertical coordinate ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Robert

    Lagrangian- (and isopycnic-) vertical coordinate ocean models are subject to an exponentially growing numerical instability in weakly stratified regions when thermobaricity is not accurately compensated. Inaccurate compensation for compressibility in the pressure gradient terms leads to pressure gradient truncation errors (due to the vertical discretization) that can drive the Lagrangian coordinate surfaces to reinforce these errors. It is possible to avoid this instability while using the full non-linear equation of state for seawater by using an optimal alternate discretization of the pressure gradient terms and extracting a slowly spatially varying reference compressibility that approximates the compressibility of the ocean's mean state.

  2. The effect of density gradients on hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Martti; Sillanpää, Sampo

    2003-05-01

    Hydrometers are simple but effective instruments for measuring the density of liquids. In this work, we studied the effect of non-uniform density of liquid on a hydrometer reading. The effect induced by vertical temperature gradients was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A method for compensating for the effect mathematically was developed and tested with experimental data obtained with the MIKES hydrometer calibration system. In the tests, the method was found reliable. However, the reliability depends on the available information on the hydrometer dimensions and density gradients.

  3. The equilibrated state of freezing as a basis for distinguishing lethal stresses of freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for coordination of stresses that limit winterhardiness in plants based on the thermodynamic equilibrated state of freezing and melting provides a rational basis for distinction of freeze-induced energies which can stress and injure living organisms in various ways. The departure from equili...

  4. Freeze Tolerance of Nine Zoysiagrass Cultivars Using Natural Cold Acclimation and Freeze Chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter hardiness of zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.) cultivars is an important attribute throughout the biogeographical transition zone, thus the inability to withstand freezing temperatures may limit the use of these cultivars. The objective of this research was to determine the freeze tolerance (LT50) of...

  5. Freezing and thawing or freezing, thawing, and aging effects on beef tenderness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of freezing and thawing or freezing and thawing with an additional aging period after frozen storage on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and semitendinosus (ST) steaks relative to aged, fresh steaks. Left-side LL and ST (n=35 each) ...

  6. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-02-07

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S.A.Khrapak, M.Chaudhuri, G.E.Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the method--estimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with ''tunable'' interactions--is briefly discussed.

  7. Droplet coalescence and freezing on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and biphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Alexander S.; Collard, Diane; Derby, Melanie M.; Betz, Amy Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Frost and ice formation can have severe negative consequences, such as aircraft safety and reliability. At atmospheric pressure, water heterogeneously condenses and then freezes at low temperatures. To alter this freezing process, this research examines the effects of biphilic surfaces (surfaces which combine hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) on heterogeneous water nucleation, growth, and freezing. Silicon wafers were coated with a self-assembled monolayer and patterned to create biphilic surfaces. Samples were placed on a freezing stage in an environmental chamber at atmospheric pressure, at a temperature of 295 K, and relative humidities of 30%, 60%, and 75%. Biphilic surfaces had a significant effect on droplet dynamics and freezing behavior. The addition of biphilic patterns decreased the temperature required for freezing by 6 K. Biphilic surfaces also changed the size and number of droplets on a surface at freezing and delayed the time required for a surface to freeze. The main mechanism affecting freezing characteristics was the coalescence behavior.

  8. Freeze tolerance of soil chytrids from temperate climates in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Frank H; Letcher, Peter M; McGee, Peter A

    2008-08-01

    Very little is known about the capacity of soil chytrids to withstand freezing in the field. Tolerance to freezing was tested in 21 chytrids isolated from cropping and undisturbed soils in temperate Australia. Samples of thalli grown on peptone-yeast-glucose (PYG) agar were incubated for seven days at -15 degrees C. Recovery of growth after thawing and transferring to fresh medium at 20 degrees C indicated survival. All isolates in the Blastocladiales and Spizellomycetales survived freezing in all tests. All isolates in the Chytridiales also survived freezing in some tests. None of the isolates in the Rhizophydiales survived freezing in any of the tests. However, some isolates in the Rhizophydiales recovered growth after freezing if they were grown on PYG agar supplemented with either 1% sodium chloride or 1% glycerol prior to freezing. After freezing, the morphology of the thalli of all isolates was observed under LM. In those isolates that recovered growth after transfer to fresh media, mature zoosporangia were observed in the monocentric isolates and resistant sporangia or resting spores in the polycentric isolates. Encysted zoospores in some monocentric isolates also survived freezing. In some of the experiments the freezing and thawing process caused visible structural damage to the thalli. The production of zoospores after freezing and thawing was also used as an indicator of freeze tolerance. The chytrids in this study responded differently to freezing. These data add significantly to our limited knowledge of freeze tolerance in chytrids but leave many questions unanswered. PMID:18550351

  9. Freeze verification: time for a fresh approach

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, C.

    1983-01-01

    The administration's claim that some elements of a comprehensive nuclear freeze are unverifiable does not specify the nature of those elements and whether they represent a real threat to national security if we trusted the USSR to comply. The author contends that clandestine development of new weapons will have little strategic effect since both sides already have total destructive power. The risks of noncompliance are largely political and less than the risks of continued arms buildup. Since the USSR would also want the US to be bound by freeze terms, deterrence would come from mutual benefit. Hardliners argue that cheating is easier in a closed society; that our democracy would tend to relax and the USSR would move ahead with its plans for world domination. The author argues that, over time, a freeze would diminish Soviet confidence in its nuclear war fighting capabilities and that adequate verification is possible with monitoring and warning arrangements. (DCK)

  10. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  11. Monitoring active layer thaw and freeze-back in four different periglacial landforms in Svalbard using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Oswald, A.; Watanabe, T.; Christiansen, H. H.; Matsuoka, N.

    2012-04-01

    Thawing and freezing of the active layer has an important impact on the underlying permafrost through latent heat effects and changes in effective thermal conductivity and mechanisms of heat transport. Information on the active layer freeze/thaw dynamics is therefore important to understand the permafrost response to climate variability. In addition, active layer deepening may be an early sign of permafrost degradation, making monitoring programs such as the CALM network important. Active layer depths are traditionally measured by mechanical probing in fine-grained sediments or by vertical arrays of ground temperature sensors. The first technique prevents measurements to be made in stony sediments, while the latter technique gives only a point value of the active layer depth. In this study we have tested Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) as a tool to measure and monitor active layer depth and freeze/thaw dynamics. The electrical resistivity of the ground is largely dependent on the unfrozen water content, making resistivity monitoring a potentially valuable tool to delineate freeze and thaw extent, and patterns in soil moisture. The results presented here are part of the IPY 2007-2009 research project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' (TSP NORWAY) and the IPA periglacial working group project on 'High-Resolution Periglacial Climate Indicators'. Electrode arrays were installed permanently in four different periglacial landforms in the Adventdalen valley area in central Svalbard; a solifluction slope in May 2007, a loess terrace (the UNISCALM site) in September 2007, and a mudboil site and ice-wedge site in June 2009 (Watanabe et al., submitted). The arrays were 16m long, giving maximum profile depths of 2m, and electrodes were installed with 0.2m spacing. Measurements were made with irregular but approximately two- to four-week time intervals, depending on weather conditions and

  12. Stratospheric Polar Freezing Belt Causes Denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Toon, O. B.; Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Trajectory cloud model calculations are presented to show that homogeneous freezing of nitric acid hydrates can produce a polar freezing belt in both hemispheres that can cause denitrification. While hydrate cloud microphysical properties are similar over both poles, the shorter persistence of clouds in the Arctic prevents the depth of the denitrified layers from growing beyond a few kilometers. The 1999-2000 Arctic winter is unique in showing a distinct denitrification profile with a depth of approx. 4.5 km that is nearly half as deep as that computed for a typical Antarctic winter.

  13. Freeze-drying Various Strains of Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Sanford; Altieri, Patricia L.; Groffinger, Albert; Lowenthal, Joseph P.; Formal, Samuel B.

    1968-01-01

    Of six candidate strains of Shigella prepared in Brain Heart Infusion broth as freeze-dried vaccine, low survival rates were obtained with two of the most promising strains. Survival rates with these two strains were increased to acceptable levels when the organisms were suspended in a medium consisting of 8.2% sucrose, 0.01 M phosphate, 0.07% monosodium glutamate, and 2.5% human serum albumin. Alteration of the freezing temperature did not improve the recovery rates significantly. PMID:5726151

  14. Effect of vertical magnetic field on convection and segregation in vertical Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Adornato, Peter M.; Brown, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    A previous finite-element analysis of vertical Bridgman growth for dilute and nondilute alloys is extended to include the effect of a vertically-aligned magnetic field in the limit of zero magnetic Reynolds number. Calculations are presented for growth of a dilute gallium-germanium alloy in a vertically stabilized Bridgman-Stockbarger system and in a furnace with a uniform temperature gradient imposed along the ampoule. Steady cellular convection driven by radial temperature gradients causes good axial and radial mixing in both systems without a magnetic field. A weak magnetic field decreases the intensity of convection and the effectiveness of solute mixing. The radial nonuniformity is greatest for an intermediate field strength. Stronger fields suppress flow recirculation completely, and lead to uniform solute segregation across the crystal and to diffusion-controlled axial segregation.

  15. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  16. Chloroplast Membrane Remodeling during Freezing Stress Is Accompanied by Cytoplasmic Acidification Activating SENSITIVE TO FREEZING2.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Allison C; Benning, Christoph; Roston, Rebecca L

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature is a seasonal abiotic stress that restricts native plant ranges and crop distributions. Two types of low-temperature stress can be distinguished: chilling and freezing. Much work has been done on the mechanisms by which chilling is sensed, but relatively little is known about how plants sense freezing. Recently, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SENSITIVE TO FREEZING2 (SFR2) was identified as a protein that responds in a nontranscriptional manner to freezing. Here, we investigate the cellular conditions that allow SFR2 activation. Using a combination of isolated organelle, whole-tissue, and whole-plant assays, we provide evidence that SFR2 is activated by changes in cytosolic pH and Mg(2+) Manipulation of pH and Mg(2+) in cold-acclimated plants is shown to cause changes similar to those of freezing. We conclude that pH and Mg(2+) are perceived as intracellular cues as part of the sensing mechanism for freezing conditions. This evidence provides a specific molecular mechanism to combat freezing. PMID:27233750

  17. Cryoprotectant Production in Freeze-Tolerant Wood Frogs Is Augmented by Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles.

    PubMed

    Larson, Don J; Barnes, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation across the skin of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) rapidly induces endogenous production of glucose, a cryoprotectant necessary for freeze tolerance. In laboratory studies of freeze tolerance, wood frogs are cooled slowly, often at -0.05°C h(-1), to facilitate high cryoprotectant production and survival. Under natural conditions in Alaska, however, wood frogs accumulate maximal tissue glucose concentrations while cooling at much faster rates, -0.35° to -1.6°C h(-1), and in addition undergo multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles before remaining frozen for the winter. We examined whether simulating these ecologically relevant cooling rates and repeated freeze-thaw events in captive wood frogs results in the high glucose concentrations found in naturally frozen wood frogs. We found that over successive freezing and thawing events, glucose concentrations increased stepwise in all measured tissues. Short thawing periods did not result in a statistically significant decline of glucose concentrations. Wood frogs that experienced three freeze-thaw events had fresh weight glucose concentrations that approached values found in tissues of wood frogs frozen in natural conditions. Laboratory wood frogs survive frozen for 2 mo, while wood frogs frozen under natural conditions survive frozen for up to 7 mo at temperatures below -18°C. We hypothesize that repeated freeze-thaw cycles with rapid cooling and warming rates allow for greater survival in Alaskan wood frogs through enhanced cryoprotectant production. PMID:27327184

  18. Reproducing Black's experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat, which was taken for granted by Black, and the instantaneous freezing of supercooled water also poses some difficulties for that theory.

  19. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  20. Implication of ice flux on the geometry of basal freeze-on plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leysinger Vieli, Gwendolyn J.-M. C.

    2016-04-01

    In recent radio echo sounding (RES) surveys in Greenland and Antarctica large plume-like features in internal ice layer structures are seen. These large-scale anomalous structures rise from the bed to up to half of the ice thickness and commonly extend horizontally over several ice thicknesses. Numerical ice sheet flow models applying ice accretion at the base are able to reproduce such layer structures. Here I explore the geometry of these plume-like features in relation to ice dynamics. From theoretical considerations, based on mass continuity, a simple quantification of plume height is derived that depends on balance ice flux and on its vertical deformation profile. The dominant factor controlling plume height is thereby given by the ratio between the ice flux originating from basal freeze-on and the surface balance flux. It further implies that for relatively high plumes the vertical shape function profile in flux is of secondary importance, but of increasing importance for smaller plumes. Based on this concept, the ice flux originating from freeze-on at the bed can therefore be estimated from the observed relative plume heights. This provides direct constraints on rates of basal freeze-on, which is otherwise very difficult to quantify. This concept is explored on the example of observed plumes in North Greenland.

  1. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  2. Stereo transparency and the disparity gradient limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2002-01-01

    Several studies (Vision Research 15 (1975) 583; Perception 9 (1980) 671) have shown that binocular fusion is limited by the disparity gradient (disparity/distance) separating image points, rather than by their absolute disparity values. Points separated by a gradient >1 appear diplopic. These results are sometimes interpreted as a constraint on human stereo matching, rather than a constraint on fusion. Here we have used psychophysical measurements on stereo transparency to show that human stereo matching is not constrained by a gradient of 1. We created transparent surfaces composed of many pairs of dots, in which each member of a pair was assigned a disparity equal and opposite to the disparity of the other member. For example, each pair could be composed of one dot with a crossed disparity of 6' and the other with uncrossed disparity of 6', vertically separated by a parametrically varied distance. When the vertical separation between the paired dots was small, the disparity gradient for each pair was very steep. Nevertheless, these opponent-disparity dot pairs produced a striking appearance of two transparent surfaces for disparity gradients ranging between 0.5 and 3. The apparent depth separating the two transparent planes was correctly matched to an equivalent disparity defined by two opaque surfaces. A test target presented between the two transparent planes was easily detected, indicating robust segregation of the disparities associated with the paired dots into two transparent surfaces with few mismatches in the target plane. Our simulations using the Tsai-Victor model show that the response profiles produced by scaled disparity-energy mechanisms can account for many of our results on the transparency generated by steep gradients.

  3. Managing damaging freeze events in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of sugarcane to damaging frosts occurs in approximately 25% of the sugarcane producing countries of the world, but is most frequent on the mainland of the United States, especially in the state of Louisiana. The frequent winter freezes that occur in the sugarcane areas of Louisiana have fo...

  4. Observation of transverse spin freezing by TDPAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, T. A.; Ryan, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    We use 181Hf time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy to investigate magnetic ordering in the bond-frustrated metallic glass: a - Fe91Hf9. We show that TDPAC can be used to observe the magnetic fluctuations that are associated with the freezing of transverse spin components at T xy .

  5. Freeze-drying of yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Bond, Chris

    2007-01-01

    A method is described that allows yeast species to be stored using a variation on the standard freeze-drying method, which employs evaporative cooling in a two-stage process. Yeast cultures are placed in glass ampoules after having been mixed with a lyoprotectant. Primary drying is carried out using a centrifuge head connected to a standard freeze-dryer. Once the centrifuge head is running, air is removed and evaporated liquid is captured in the freeze-dryer. Centrifugation continues for 15 min and primary drying for a further 3 h. The ampoules are constricted using a glass blowing torch. They are then placed on the freeze-dryer manifold for secondary drying under vacuum overnight, using phosphorus pentoxide as a desiccant. The ampoules are sealed and removed from the manifold by melting the constricted section. Although the process causes an initial large drop in viability, further losses after storage are minimal. Yeast strains have remained viable for more than 30 yr when stored using this method and sufficient cells are recovered to produce new working stocks. Although survival rates are strain specific, nearly all National Collection of Yeast Cultures strains covering most yeast genera, have been successfully stored with little or no detectable change in strain characteristics. PMID:18080464

  6. Freeze-thaw induced gelation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Shen, Wei; Chen, Zhigang; Wu, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Adding divalent ions or lowering pH below the pKa values of alginate monomers are common ways in preparing alginate gels. Herein a new way of preparing alginate gels using freeze-thaw technique is described. Solvent crystallization during freezing drove the polymers to associate into certain structures that became the junction zones of hydrogels after thawing. It enabled the preparation of alginate gels at pH 4.0 and 3.5, two pH at which the gel could not be formed previously. At pH 3.0 where alginate gel could be formed initially, applying freeze-thaw treatment increased the gel storage modulus almost 100 times. The formation of hydrogels and the resulting gel properties, such as dynamic moduli and gel syneresis were influenced by the pH values, number of freeze-thaw cycles, alginate concentrations, and ionic strengths. The obtained hydrogels were soft and demonstrated a melting behavior upon storage, which may find novel applications in the biomedical industry. PMID:27185114

  7. FREEZE-FRAME: Fast Action Stress Relief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childre, Doc Lew

    Recent scientific research has proven that we can, not only manage our stress, we can even prevent it. Ways to achieve stress management are presented in this book. It details a method called FREEZE-FRAME, a process in which individuals mentally stop the chaos that surrounds them and then calmly contemplate their situation. The text opens with an…

  8. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section 590.536 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements §...

  9. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary,...

  10. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary,...

  11. Device and method for determining freezing points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, Balakrishnan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A freezing point method and device (10) are disclosed. The method and device pertain to an inflection point technique for determining the freezing points of mixtures. In both the method and device (10), the mixture is cooled to a point below its anticipated freezing point and then warmed at a substantially linear rate. During the warming process, the rate of increase of temperature of the mixture is monitored by, for example, thermocouple (28) with the thermocouple output signal being amplified and differentiated by a differentiator (42). The rate of increase of temperature data are analyzed and a peak rate of increase of temperature is identified. In the preferred device (10) a computer (22) is utilized to analyze the rate of increase of temperature data following the warming process. Once the maximum rate of increase of temperature is identified, the corresponding temperature of the mixture is located and earmarked as being substantially equal to the freezing point of the mixture. In a preferred device (10), the computer (22), in addition to collecting the temperature and rate of change of temperature data, controls a programmable power supply (14) to provide a predetermined amount of cooling and warming current to thermoelectric modules (56).

  12. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J W; Arnold, J F; Nail, S L; Renzi, E

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to steam sterilization has been examined using a pilot plant freeze dryer equipped with a prototype vapor generator. Specific objectives of the study discussed in this presentation were to: 1. Identify critical process variables affecting the lethality of VHP to Bacillus stearothermophilus spores, particularly within dead legs in the system. 2. Measure the efficacy of system degassing after sterilization. 3. Determine the effect of repeated sterilization cycles on the integrity of elastomeric components of the freeze dryer. Penetration of adequate concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor into small diameter piping, such as tubing connected to pressure gauges, is the most challenging aspect of VHP sterilization of freeze dryers. Prior to equipment modifications, spore strips placed within such dead legs remained positive irrespective of the number of gas/degas pulses and system pressure. Equipment modifications necessary to effect complete kill of biological indicators placed in system dead legs is discussed. Results of this study support the conclusion that vaporized hydrogen peroxide shows promise as an alternative sterilization method for freeze dryers. PMID:1474433

  13. Unitarity Constraints on Asymmetric Freeze-In

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    This paper considers unitarity and CPT constraints on asymmetric freeze-in, the use of freeze-in to store baryon number in a dark sector. In this scenario, Sakharov's out of equilibrium condition is satisfied by placing the visible and hidden sectors at different temperatures while a net visible baryon number is produced by storing negative baryon number in a dark sector. It is shown that unitarity and CPT lead to unexpected cancellations. In particular, the transfer of baryon number cancels completely at leading order. This note has shown that if two sectors are in thermal equilibrium with themselves, but not with each other, then the leading effect transferring conserved quantities between the two sectors is of order the the weak coupling connecting them to the third power. When freeze-in is used to produce a net baryon number density, the leading order effect comes from {Omicron}({lambda}{sup 3}) diagrams where the intermediate state that goes on-shell has a different visible baryon number than the final state visible baryon number. Models in which the correct baryon number is generated with freeze-in as the dominant source of abundance, typically require {lambda} {approx}> 10{sup -6} and m{sub bath} {approx}> TeV. m{sub bath} is the mass of the visible particle which communicates with the hidden sector. The lower window is potentially observable at the LHC.

  14. Susceptibility of blackberry flowers to freezing temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Injury of tight buds, open flowers and green fruit often occur in fruit crops during spring frost events. In this study, freezing tolerance of ‘Triple Crown’ blackberry flowers at different reproductive stages of development (tight bud to green drupe) was determined using two methods. One method i...

  15. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: when hot water freezes faster than cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more rapid heat loss by surface radiation and evaporation than obtains for uniform temperature. This more rapid cooling enables the initially warmer liquid to overtake the cooler liquid, reaching 0 °C earlier and freezing first. Liquid cooling under natural convection follows a five-fourths power law (temperature of liquid T , temperature of surroundings {{T}a} , cooling constant k ): \\frac{\\text{d}T}{\\text{d}t}=k{{≤ft(T-{{T}a}\\right)}\\frac{5{4}}} . In this investigation we found that with evaporation this becomes a four-thirds power law:

  16. Nucleation Pathways For Freezing Of Two Grades Of Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Rulison, Aaron; Bayuzick, Robert; Hofmeister, William; Morton, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses classical nucleation theory of freezing and describes experimental study of nucleation mechanisms that predominate during freezing of spherical specimens of initially molten zirconium levitated electrostatically in vacuum.

  17. Canalization of freeze tolerance in an alpine grasshopper.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Timothy C

    2015-10-01

    In the Rock and Pillar Range, New Zealand, the alpine grasshopper, Sigaus australis Hutton, survives equilibrium freezing (EF) all-year round. A comparison of freeze tolerance (FT) in grasshoppers over four austral seasons for a 1 year period finds that: (a) the majority (>70%) of the sample population of grasshoppers survive single freeze-stress throughout the year; (b) exposure to increased freeze stress (multiple freeze-stress events) does not lead to a loss of freeze tolerance; and (c) responses to increased freeze stress reveal seasonal tuning of the FT adaptation to environmental temperatures. The Rock and Pillar sample population provides a clear example of the canalization of the FT adaptation. Seasonal variability in the extent of tolerance of multiple freezing events indicates that physiology is modulated to environmental temperatures by phenotypic plasticity - i.e. the FT adaptation is permanent and adjustable. PMID:26210007

  18. 47 CFR 64.636 - Prohibition of default provider freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (a) A default provider freeze prevents a change in an iTRS user's default provider selection unless the iTRS user gives the provider from whom the freeze was requested his or her express consent....

  19. 47 CFR 64.636 - Prohibition of default provider freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... (a) A default provider freeze prevents a change in an iTRS user's default provider selection unless the iTRS user gives the provider from whom the freeze was requested his or her express consent....

  20. Directional freezing of sperm and associated derived technologies.

    PubMed

    Arav, Amir; Saragusty, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Directional freezing has now completed 30 years of development since it was first introduced to cryobiology. In the field of sperm cryopreservation, directional freezing has been shown to be advantageous over slow freezing for numerous domestic and wildlife species. In particular, it was shown that freezing of large volume is possible. Furthermore, double freezing of sperm and freezing of sex-sorted sperm are possible and became the routine in the sex sorted sperm industry. In wild animals, our labs and others showed that sperm from a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic species can be successfully cryopreserved using directional freezing. Finally, we will describe for the first time the successful freeze-drying of human sperm in an aseptic method. Using a device that produces clean liquid air, we froze human sperm in small droplets and then dried them in a bench top lyophilizer that was sterilized prior to use. More than 80% of DNA integrity was found after rehydration. PMID:26879097

  1. Preservation of flavor in freeze dried green beans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Davis, D.

    1973-01-01

    Before freeze drying, green beans are heated to point at which their cell structure is altered. Beans freeze dried with altered cell structure have improved rehydration properties and retain color, flavor, and texture.

  2. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  3. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  4. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  5. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  6. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  7. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants. PMID:18019146

  8. Tandem high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution of plant tissues for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R; Burch-Smith, Tessa M

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  9. High-presssure shift freezing. Part 2. Modeling of freezing times for a finite cylindrical model.

    PubMed

    Sanz, P D; Otero, L

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive vision of the heat transfer process involved in high-pressure shift freezing (HPSF) is shown in comparison to the process at atmospheric pressure. In addition, a mathematical model to predict the freezing times is presented. This model takes into consideration the dependence of the thermophysical properties relating to temperature and pressure and the supercooling reached by liquid water at atmospheric pressure after adiabatic expansion in the HPSF process. Experimental and theoretical data appear to agree. PMID:11101332

  10. [The breeding of strawberries suited for freezing : I. Breeding potential and ecovalence of two "freezing" characteristics].

    PubMed

    Hondelmann, W

    1968-01-01

    Heritability in the broad sense, the expected genetic advance with selection and the repeatabilities for two freezing characteristics were estimated in strawberry clones (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) over several years. The freezing characteristics were extravasation of juice and texture of berries after thawing. It could be shown that after 12-15 years of breeding and selection there was still much genetic variance. An estimation of ecovalence for these characteristics showed that ecovalence depends on genetic diversity. PMID:24442065

  11. Objective video quality assessment method for freeze distortion based on freeze aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Keishiro; Okamoto, Jun; Kurita, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    With the development of the broadband network, video communications such as videophone, video distribution, and IPTV services are beginning to become common. In order to provide these services appropriately, we must manage them based on subjective video quality, in addition to designing a network system based on it. Currently, subjective quality assessment is the main method used to quantify video quality. However, it is time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, we need an objective quality assessment technology that can estimate video quality from video characteristics effectively. Video degradation can be categorized into two types: spatial and temporal. Objective quality assessment methods for spatial degradation have been studied extensively, but methods for temporal degradation have hardly been examined even though it occurs frequently due to network degradation and has a large impact on subjective quality. In this paper, we propose an objective quality assessment method for temporal degradation. Our approach is to aggregate multiple freeze distortions into an equivalent freeze distortion and then derive the objective video quality from the equivalent freeze distortion. Specifically, our method considers the total length of all freeze distortions in a video sequence as the length of the equivalent single freeze distortion. In addition, we propose a method using the perceptual characteristics of short freeze distortions. We verified that our method can estimate the objective video quality well within the deviation of subjective video quality.

  12. SLAPex Freeze/Thaw 2015: The First Dedicated Soil Freeze/Thaw Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Wu, Albert; DeMarco, Eugenia; Powers, Jarrett; Berg, Aaron; Rowlandson, Tracy; Freeman, Jacqueline; Gottfried, Kurt; Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; Derksen, Chris; Royer, Alain; Belair, Stephane; Houser, Paul; McDonald, Kyle; Entin, Jared; Lewis, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Soil freezing and thawing is an important process in the terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles, marking the change between two very different hydraulic, thermal, and biological regimes. NASA's Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission includes a binary freeze/thaw data product. While there have been ground-based remote sensing field measurements observing soil freeze/thaw at the point scale, and airborne campaigns that observed some frozen soil areas (e.g., BOREAS), the recently-completed SLAPex Freeze/Thaw (F/T) campaign is the first airborne campaign dedicated solely to observing frozen/thawed soil with both passive and active microwave sensors and dedicated ground truth, in order to enable detailed process-level exploration of the remote sensing signatures and in situ soil conditions. SLAPex F/T utilized the Scanning L-band Active/Passive (SLAP) instrument, an airborne simulator of SMAP developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and was conducted near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, in October/November, 2015. Future soil moisture missions are also expected to include soil freeze/thaw products, and the loss of the radar on SMAP means that airborne radar-radiometer observations like those that SLAP provides are unique assets for freeze/thaw algorithm development. This paper will present an overview of SLAPex F/T, including descriptions of the site, airborne and ground-based remote sensing, ground truth, as well as preliminary results.

  13. Modification of physical properties of freeze-dried rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.

    1971-01-01

    Freeze cycling process consists of alternately freezing and thawing precooked rice for two cycles, rice is then frozen and freeze-dehydrated in vacuum sufficient to remove water from rice by sublimitation. Process modifies rice grain structure and porosity, enabling complete rehydration in one minute in hot water.

  14. Interspecific analysis of xylem freezing responses in Acer and Betula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperate woody plants have evolved two methods for coping with seasonal exposure to sub-zero temperatures. Supercooling is a freeze-avoidance strategy where cells are able to resist the freezing of intracellular water below sub-zero temperatures. Non-supercooling is a freeze-tolerance strategy wh...

  15. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  16. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  17. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  18. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  19. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  20. VISUALIZATION OF FREEZING PROGRESSION IN TURFGRASSES USING INFRARED VIDEO THERMOGRAPHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing injury can be a significant problem in turfgrasses. Understanding how freezing develops and ramifies throughout the plant could assist in the development of improved management or screening processes for cultivar improvemen. The development of freezing injury is not well understand due pa...

  1. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze treatment requirements. Quick freeze treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or...

  2. Genetics of winter wheat response to two freezing treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inheritance of the ability of winter wheat plants to survive two kinds of freezing stress was investigated in a five-parent diallel cross. Plants were acclimated at +4°C for 5 wks and frozen with or without a –3°C, 16-hour pre-freezing (PF) period prior to freezing to damaging temperatures. The ...

  3. JSC Mars-1 Soil Moisture Characteristic and Soil Freezing Characteristic Curves for Modeling Bulk Vapor Flow and Soil Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Sizemore, H. G.

    2008-03-01

    A new JSC Mars-1 particle size distribution is used to establish soil moisture characteristic and soil freezing characteristic curves that are needed for modeling bulk (Darcy) vapor flow and soil freezing in the variably saturated subsurface of Mars.

  4. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  5. Shadowgraph Study of Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David; Nikolaenko, Gennady; Giglio, Marzio; Vailati, Alberto; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Meyer, William

    2002-01-01

    A fluid or fluid mixture, subjected to a vertical temperature and/or concentration gradient in a gravitational field, exhibits greatly enhanced light scattering at small angles. This effect is caused by coupling between the vertical velocity fluctuations due to thermal energy and the vertically varying refractive index. Physically, small upward or downward moving regions will be displaced into fluid having a refractive index different from that of the moving region, thus giving rise to the enhanced scattering. The scattered intensity is predicted to vary with scattering wave vector q, as q(sup -4), for sufficiently large q, but the divergence is quenched by gravity at small q. In the absence of gravity, the long wavelength fluctuations responsible for the enhanced scattering are predicted to grow until limited by the sample dimensions. It is thus of interest to measure the mean-squared amplitude of such fluctuations in the microgravity environment for comparison with existing theory and ground based measurements. The relevant wave vectors are extremely small, making traditional low-angle light scattering difficult or impossible because of stray elastically scattered light generated by optical surfaces. An alternative technique is offered by the shadowgraph method, which is normally used to visualize fluid flows, but which can also serve as a quantitative tool to measure fluctuations. A somewhat novel shadowgraph apparatus and the necessary data analysis methods will be described. The apparatus uses a spatially coherent, but temporally incoherent, light source consisting of a super-luminescent diode coupled to a single-mode optical fiber in order to achieve extremely high spatial resolution, while avoiding effects caused by interference of light reflected from the various optical surfaces that are present when using laser sources. Results obtained for a critical mixture of aniline and cyclohexane subjected to a vertical temperature gradient will be presented. The

  6. Vertically Velocity Characteristics of Oceanic Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, David P.; Lemone, Margaret A.

    1989-03-01

    Oceanic cumulonimbus updraft and downdraft events observed in the Western Pacific during the TAMEX program by NOAA P-3 research aircraft are analyzed and discussed. The basic dataset consists of flight-level data from 10 missions in the Taiwan region during May and June 1987. The 1 Hz time series of vertical velocity is used to define convective updrafts using the criteria that the velocity must be continuously positive for at least 0.5 km and exceed 0.5 m s1 for 1 s. A subset of the strongest drafts, termed cores, are defined as events that exceed 1 m s1 for 0.5 km. Downdrafts and downdraft cores are defined analogously. The statistics are from a total of 12 841 km of flight legs and consist of 359 updrafts and 466 downdrafts at altitudes from 150 m to 6.8 km MSL. The populations of average vertical velocity, maximum vertical velocity, diameter, and mass transport for both drafts and cores are approximately log-normally distributed, consistent with the results of previous studies of convective characteristics in other locations. TAMEX drafts and cores are comparable in size and strength with those measured in GATE and hurricanes but much weaker than those measured in continental thunderstorms.The median core updraft was less than 3 m s1, implying a time scale for ascent from cloud base to the freezing level of about 35 min. The microphysical implications of the low updraft rates are illustrated by comparing vertical profiles of radar reflectivity for TAMEX with those in other regions. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the oceanic convection that was studied in GATE, hurricanes, and TAMEX is dominated by warm rain coalescence processes and that a large fractional rainout occurs below the freezing level. The rapid reduction of cloud water and radar reflectivity above the freezing level, as well as observations of abundant ice particles in all but the strongest updraft cores at temperatures just below 0°C, implies a rapid conversion of cloud water and

  7. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  8. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  9. Monitoring freeze-thaw cycles along north-south Alaskan transects using ERS-1 SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rignot, E.; Way, J.B. )

    1994-08-01

    Monitoring freeze-thaw cycles of high latitude terrestrial ecosystems is useful for estimating the length of the growing season and annual productivity in the tundra and in boreal forests, for estimating potential damage to living plants due to frost drought, and for evaluating major changes in heat fluxes between land and atmosphere. At microwave frequencies, freezing results in a dramatic decrease of the dielectric constant of soil and vegetation, which significantly alters their radar scattering properties. In this article the authors investigate the possibility of monitoring freeze-thaw cycles of terrestrial ecosystems using C-band frequency (5.3 GHz), vertical transmit and receive polarization, synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data gathered by the European Space Agency's Earth Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1). Repeat-pass SAR images are mosaicked together along a north-south transect across Alaska, coregistered, and analyzed using a change detection algorithm that determines when the landscape freezes based on a decrease in radar backscatter greater than 3 dB relative to a known thawed, wet state of the landscape. Air-temperature recordings from seven airport weather stations and in situ observations from three monitored forest stands in interior Alaska concur to indicate SAR accurately maps frozen areas across the entire state. The technique does not apply to open water areas because calm water and frozen water are confused. Elsewhere, ERS-1 SAR could monitor thaw/freeze transitions of terrestrial ecosystems at the regional scale, at a spatial resolution of several tens of meters and independent of cloud cover and vegetation type.

  10. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  11. Cavitation and water fluxes driven by ice water potential in Juglans regia during freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Badel, Eric; Charrier, Guillaume; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bonhomme, Marc; Foucat, Loïc; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles induce major hydraulic changes due to liquid-to-ice transition within tree stems. The very low water potential at the ice-liquid interface is crucial as it may cause lysis of living cells as well as water fluxes and embolism in sap conduits, which impacts whole tree-water relations. We investigated water fluxes induced by ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in Juglans regia L. stems using four non-invasive and complementary approaches: a microdendrometer, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray microtomography, and ultrasonic acoustic emissions analysis. When the temperature dropped, ice nucleation occurred, probably in the cambium or pith areas, inducing high water potential gradients within the stem. The water was therefore redistributed within the stem toward the ice front. We could thus observe dehydration of the bark's living cells leading to drastic shrinkage of this tissue, as well as high tension within wood conduits reaching the cavitation threshold in sap vessels. Ultrasonic emissions, which were strictly emitted only during freezing, indicated cavitation events (i.e. bubble formation) following ice formation in the xylem sap. However, embolism formation (i.e. bubble expansion) in stems was observed only on thawing via X-ray microtomography for the first time on the same sample. Ultrasonic emissions were detected during freezing and were not directly related to embolism formation. These results provide new insights into the complex process and dynamics of water movements and ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in tree stems. PMID:26585223

  12. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  13. Laser textured surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  14. Study of Transient Nuclei near Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Masaharu; Alder, Berni

    2011-03-01

    The molasses tail in dense hard core fluids is investigated by extensive event-driven molecular dynamics simulation through the orientational autocorrelation functions. Near the fluid- solid phase transition, there exist three regimes in the relaxation of the pair orientational autocorrelation function, namely the kinetic, molasses (stretched exponential), and diffusional power decay. The density dependence of both the molasses and diffusional power regimes are evaluated and the latter compares with theoretical predictions in three dimensions. The largest cluster at the freezing density of only a few sphere diameter in size persist for only about 30 picoseconds (~ 2.8 ×10-11 [s]). The most striking observation through the bond orientatinal order parameter is the dramatic increase of the cluster size as the freezing density is approached.

  15. Studies on Freezing Injury of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shizuo

    1984-01-01

    The thermotropic transition of plasma membrane of Dactylis glomerata was studied by using fluorescence polarization of embedded fluorophore, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Under the presence of 35% ethylene glycol, reversible thermotropic transitions were observed in isolated plasma membrane vesicles in nearly the same temperature range as the temperature of freezing injury to cells. In liposomes prepared from isolated plasma membranes, however, the thermotropic transitions occurred at much lower temperatures in comparison with those of intact membrane vesicles. Following treatment with pronase, the thermotropic transition also shifted downward. Thus, the thermotropic properties of plasma membranes appeared to be dependent on the membrane proteins. In vitro freezing of the isolated plasma membrane vesicles without addition of any cryoprotectant, such as sorbitol, resulted in an irreversible alteration both in the fluorescence anisotropy values and the temperatures for the thermotropic transition, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the membrane structure, presumably changes in lipid-protein interactions and protein conformation. PMID:16663597

  16. Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-07-01

    The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

  17. The effect of undissolved air on isochoric freezing.

    PubMed

    Perez, Pedro A; Preciado, Jessica; Carlson, Gary; DeLonzor, Russ; Rubinsky, Boris

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of undissolved air on isochoric freezing of aqueous solutions. Isochoric freezing is concerned with freezing in a constant volume thermodynamic system. A possible advantage of the process is that it substantially reduces the percentage of ice in the system at every subzero temperature, relative to atmospheric freezing. At the pressures generated by isochoric freezing, or high pressure isobaric freezing, air cannot be considered an incompressible substance and the presence of undissolved air substantially increases the amount of ice that forms at any subfreezing temperature. This effect is measurable at air volumes as low as 1%. Therefore eliminating the undissolved air, or any separate gaseous phase, from the system is essential for retaining the properties of isochoric freezing. PMID:27074589

  18. Freezing enhancement around a horizontal tube using copper foil disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Beer, H.

    2011-12-01

    Freezing of water saturated in circumferentially arranged copper foils around a cooling tube is studied experimentally and numerically. The copper foils need not to be welded to the cooling tube but are merely placed around the tube so that the freezing system is easily arranged. Copper foils greatly enhance freezing compared with that of a bare tube, even with a small copper volume fraction in the freezing system. Numerical calculations by means of a continuum model predict well freezing enhancement. The effect of the copper foils is also considered numerically for the melting process in order to compare with freezing. It is seen that copper foils contribute more to the melting enhancement than to the increase of the freezing rate.

  19. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher R J

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 MΩ water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ∼4. PMID:21721725

  20. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christopher R. J.

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 MΩ water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ˜4.

  1. Human freezing in response to affective films.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; Roelofs, Karin; Stins, John F

    2014-01-01

    Human freezing has been objectively assessed using a passive picture viewing paradigm as an analog for threat. These results should be replicated for other stimuli in order to determine their stability and generalizability. Affective films are used frequently to elicit affective responses, but it is unknown whether they also elicit freezing-like defense responses. To test whether this is the case, 50 participants watched neutral, pleasant and unpleasant film fragments while standing on a stabilometric platform and wearing a polar band to assess heart rate. Freezing-like responses (indicated by overall reduced body sway and heart rate deceleration) were observed for the unpleasant film only. The unpleasant film also elicited early reduced body sway (1-2 s after stimulus onset). Heart rate and body sway were correlated during the unpleasant film only. The results suggest that ecologically valid stimuli like films are adequate stimuli in evoking defense responses. The results also underscore the importance of including time courses in human experimental research on defense reactions in order to delineate different stages in the defense response. PMID:23805855

  2. Steam consumption reduction by eutectic freeze crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Bichsel, S.E.; Cleary, M.; Barron, T.S.; Heist, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Steam production in American beet sugar factories can be reduced by 600 pounds per ton of beets by using hydrate freeze crystallization in place of pan evaporators for sugar crystallization. This is a relatively constant number, regardless of current factory energy use. Further reduction is limited by the juice heating needs in the purification operations. Steam for juice heating is 20 to 30% on beets, or 400 to 600 pounds of steam per ton. In efficient factories this is about the steam flow to the evaporators when the pan crystallizers are replaced by freeze crystallization. An approach is described here for a rapid evaluation of effects on the steam balance of basic process changes. It provides a visual guide to restructuring the steam balance that simplifies optimization when such changes are made. The graphic approach is useful in illustrating methods of reducing energy use in a sugar factory, in addition to the current analysis of integration of the hydrate freeze process. For example, membrane and vapor recompression evaporators for juice concentration must be accompanied by major factory modifications to produce any net savings of steam. The reason is the needs for specific steam quantity and quality for the pan evaporators and juice heaters, supplied through the current evaporator trains. Reduction of the steam rate below 25 to 35% on beets will require changes to the conventional juice purification process.

  3. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  4. Atmospheric freeze drying assisted by power ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santacatalina, J. V.; Cárcel, J. A.; Simal, S.; Garcia-Perez, J. V.; Mulet, A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric freeze drying (AFD) is considered an alternative to vacuum freeze drying to keep the quality of fresh product. AFD allows continuous drying reducing fix and operating costs, but presents, as main disadvantage, a long drying time required. The application of power ultrasound (US) can accelerate AFD process. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of power ultrasound to improve atmospheric freeze drying of carrot. For that purpose, AFD experiments were carried out with carrot cubes (10 mm side) at constant air velocity (2 ms-1), temperature (-10°C) and relative humidity (10%) with (20.5 kWm-3,USAFD) and without (AFD) ultrasonic application. A diffusion model was used in order to quantify the influence of US in drying kinetics. To evaluate the quality of dry products, rehydration capacity and textural properties were determined. The US application during AFD of carrot involved the increase of drying rate. The effective moisture diffusivity identified in USAFD was 73% higher than in AFD experiments. On the other hand, the rehydration capacity was higher in USAFD than in AFD and the hardness of dried samples did not show significant (p<0.05) differences. Therefore, US application during AFD significantly (p<0.05) sped-up the drying process preserving the quality properties of the dry product.

  5. Mathematical model of induced flow on the airplane vertical tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ; Edu, Raluca Ioana

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is presented a mathematical model of the flow around the vertical tail of an airplane, based on the general elements of the aerodynamic design, with details leading to the separate formulation of the Fourier coefficients in the series solution of the Prandtl's lifting-line equation. Numerical results are obtained in Maple soft environment, for a standard configuration of an airplane geometry. The results include the discussion of the vortex model for the sidewash gradient on the vertical stabilizer.

  6. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  7. Core drilling through the ross ice shelf (antarctica) confirmed Basal freezing.

    PubMed

    Zotikov, I A; Zagorodnov, V S; Raikovsky, J V

    1980-03-28

    New techniques that have been used to obtain a continuous ice core through the whole 416-meter thickness of the Ross Ice Shelf at Camp J-9 have demonstrated that the bottom 6 meters of the ice shelf consists of sea ice. The rate of basal freezing that is forming this ice is estimated by different methods to be 2 centimeters of ice per year. The sea ice is composed of large vertical crystals, which form the waffle-like lower boundary of the shelf. A distinct alignment of the crystals throughout the sea ice layer suggests the presence of persistent long-term currents beneath the ice shelf. PMID:17779616

  8. Mapping of solution components, pH changes, protein stability and the elimination of protein precipitation during freeze-thawing of fibroblast growth factor 20.

    PubMed

    Maity, Haripada; Karkaria, Cyrus; Davagnino, Juan

    2009-08-13

    This study discusses the effect of key factors like containers, buffers and the freeze (controlled vs. flash freezing) and thawing processes on the stability of a therapeutic protein fibroblast growth factor 20 (FGF-20). The freezing profiles monitored by 15 temperature probes located at different regions in a 2-L bottle during freezing can be grouped into three categories. A rapid drop in temperature was observed at the bottom followed by the top and middle center of the bottle. The freeze-thawing behavior in a 50 ml tube is considerably uniform, as expected. Among phosphate, HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine ethanesulfonic acid), citrate and histidine (each containing 0.5 M arginine-sulfate) buffer systems, a minimum pH change (0.4 pH unit vs. approximately 1.7 pH unit) was observed for the phosphate buffer system. Thawing in a 50 ml tube at room temperature standing resulted in a significant phase separation in citrate, histidine and HEPES buffers; however, phase separation was least in the phosphate buffer system. These phase separations were found to be temperature dependent. No effect of Polysorbate 80 on freeze-thawing of FGF-20 was observed. Significant concentration gradients in major buffer components and protein concentration were observed during freeze-thawing in a 2-L bottle. The segregation patterns of the various components were similar with the top and bottom layers containing lowest and highest concentrations, respectively. In the formulation buffer no pH gradient was formed, and the precipitation of FGF-20 during thawing at the top layer was related to an insufficient amount of arginine-sulfate and the precipitation at the bottom layer was due to a salting out effect. The precipitate generated during thawing goes into solution easily upon mixing whole solution of the bottle and the various gradient formations do not cause any irreversible change in structure, stability and isoform distribution of FGF-20. Comparison of slow freezing and flash

  9. Subsurface temperatures and geothermal gradients on the North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    1989-01-01

    Geothermal gradients as interpreted from a series of high-resolution stabilized well-bore-temperature surveys from 46 North Slope, Alaska, wells vary laterally and vertically throughout the near-surface sediment (0-2,000 m). The data from these surveys have been used in conjunction with depths of ice-bearing permafrost, as interpreted from 102 well logs, to project geothermal gradients within and below the ice-bearing permafrost sequence. The geothermal gradients calculated from the projected temperature profiles are similar to the geothermal gradients measured in the temperature surveys. Measured and projected geothermal gradients in the ice-bearing permafrost sequence range from 1.5??C/100m in the Prudhoe Bay area to 5.1??C/100m in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA).

  10. Vertical seismic profile at Pike's Peak, Saskatchewan, Canada: turning rays and velocity anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newrick, Rachel T.; Lawton, Don C.

    2003-12-01

    First-arrival traveltimes from a multi-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) were used to estimate velocity anisotropy in the presence of a vertical velocity gradient. A numerical model consisting of two layers with vertical velocity gradients of 3.1 and 1.2 s-1, respectively, and global anisotropy parameters of ε=0.12±0.02 and δ=0.30±0.06 yielded first-arrival traveltimes that matched the observed traveltimes well. Shallow receivers were found to be crucial for constraining the vertical velocity field and for determining the parameters of anisotropy at depth.

  11. Ultrastructure of sea urchin calcified tissues after high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution.

    PubMed

    Ameye, L; Hermann, R; Dubois, P

    2000-08-01

    The improvements brought by high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution fixation methods to the ultrastructural preservation of echinoderm mineralized tissues are investigated in developing pedicellariae and teeth of the echinoid Paracentrotus lividus. Three freeze substitution (FS) protocols were tested: one in the presence of osmium tetroxide, one in the presence of uranyl acetate, and the last in the presence of gallic acid. FS in the presence of osmium tetroxide significantly improved cell ultrastructure preservation and should especially be used for ultrastructural studies involving vesicles and the Golgi apparatus. With all protocols, multivesicular bodies, suggested to contain Ca(2+), were evident for the first time in skeleton-forming cells. FS in the presence of gallic acid allowed us to confirm the structured and insoluble character of a part of the organic matrix of mineralization in the calcification sites of the tooth, an observation which modifies the current understanding of biomineralization control in echinoderms. PMID:11042082

  12. Comparing contact and immersion freezing from continuous flow diffusion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, Baban; Marcolli, Claudia; Welti, André; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere are responsible for glaciating cloud droplets between 237 and 273 K. Different mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation can compete under mixed-phase cloud conditions. Contact freezing is considered relevant because higher ice nucleation temperatures than for immersion freezing for the same INPs were observed. It has limitations because its efficiency depends on the number of collisions between cloud droplets and INPs. To date, direct comparisons of contact and immersion freezing with the same INP, for similar residence times and concentrations, are lacking. This study compares immersion and contact freezing efficiencies of three different INPs. The contact freezing data were obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH) using 80 µm diameter droplets, which can interact with INPs for residence times of 2 and 4 s in the chamber. The contact freezing efficiency was calculated by estimating the number of collisions between droplets and particles. Theoretical formulations of collision efficiencies gave too high freezing efficiencies for all investigated INPs, namely AgI particles with 200 nm electrical mobility diameter, 400 and 800 nm diameter Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and kaolinite particles. Comparison of freezing efficiencies by contact and immersion freezing is therefore limited by the accuracy of collision efficiencies. The concentration of particles was 1000 cm-3 for ATD and kaolinite and 500, 1000, 2000 and 5000 cm-3 for AgI. For concentrations < 5000 cm-3, the droplets collect only one particle on average during their time in the chamber. For ATD and kaolinite particles, contact freezing efficiencies at 2 s residence time were smaller than at 4 s, which is in disagreement with a collisional contact freezing process but in accordance with immersion freezing or adhesion freezing. With "adhesion freezing", we refer to a contact nucleation process that is enhanced compared to immersion freezing

  13. Inflorescences of alpine cushion plants freeze autonomously and may survive subzero temperatures by supercooling

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Jürgen; Ladinig, Ursula; Wagner, Johanna; Neuner, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    Freezing patterns in the high alpine cushion plants Saxifraga bryoides, Saxifraga caesia, Saxifraga moschata and Silene acaulis were studied by infrared thermography at three reproductive stages (bud, anthesis, fruit development). The single reproductive shoots of a cushion froze independently in all four species at every reproductive stage. Ice formation caused lethal damage to the respective inflorescence. After ice nucleation, which occurred mainly in the stalk or the base of the reproductive shoot, ice propagated throughout that entire shoot, but not into neighboring shoots. However, anatomical ice barriers within cushions were not detected. The naturally occurring temperature gradient within the cushion appeared to interrupt ice propagation thermally. Consequently, every reproductive shoot needed an autonomous ice nucleation event to initiate freezing. Ice nucleation was not only influenced by minimum temperatures but also by the duration of exposure. At moderate subzero exposure temperatures (−4.3 to −7.7 °C) the number of frozen inflorescences increased exponentially. Due to efficient supercooling, single reproductive shoots remained unfrozen down to −17.4 °C (cooling rate 6 K h−1). Hence, the observed freezing pattern may be advantageous for frost survival of individual inflorescences and reproductive success of high alpine cushion plants, when during episodic summer frosts damage can be avoided by supercooling. PMID:21151351

  14. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Norman L.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  15. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, N.L.

    1983-11-10

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  16. Gradient enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijl, Peter C.; Hurd, Ralph E.

    2011-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the personal recollections of the authors regarding their contributions to the introduction of shielded gradient technology into NMR spectroscopy during the late 1980s and early 1990s. It provides some background into early probe design and details some of the early technical progress with the use of shielded magnetic field gradients for coherence selection in high resolution NMR and describes the developments at General Electric, the National Institutes of Health, Georgetown University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine that ultimately led to this technology becoming commonplace in modern NMR spectroscopy. Most of this early technical work was published in the Journal of Magnetic Resonance.

  17. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed.

  18. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  19. Gradient tabu search.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Svetlana; Engels, Bernd

    2007-01-30

    This paper presents a modification of the tabu search called gradient tabu search (GTS). It uses analytical gradients for a fast minimization to the next local minimum and analytical diagonal elements of the Hessian to escape local minima. For an efficient blocking of already visited areas tabu regions and tabu directions are introduced into the tabu list (TL). Trials with various well-known test functions indicate that the GTS is a very promising approach to determine local and global minima of differentiable functions. Possible application areas could be optimization routines for force field parameters or conformational searches for large molecules. PMID:17186482

  20. Development of a Rapid Vertical Sampling Technique for Turbulence Measurements in Stably-Stratified Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, M.; Desanctis, G. D.; Stretch, D. D.; Nomura, K. K.; Rottman, J. W.; Keller, K. H.; van Atta, C. W.

    2001-11-01

    A new technique for very rapidly obtaining vertical profiles of vertical velocity and temperature in a thermally-stratified turbulent shear flow is presented. The main purpose of these experiments is to gain a better understanding of what vertical sampling in the ocean tells us about oceanic turbulence and mixing. The technique consists of a cold wire probe for temperature measurements and a hot wire probe for velocity measurements propelled vertically through a thermally-stratified wind tunnel by a pneumatic piston. Speeds of nearly 15 m/s are reached as it traverses the central part of the tunnel. This speed is sufficient to freeze the flow structure sampled by the sensors, so the measured profiles are effectively instantaneous. The design and construction of the vertical traverse device and data acquisition system are described. Ensemble-averaged measurements of the vertical velocity and temperature profiles are presented and comparisons made with single-point time-averaged measurements.

  1. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  2. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  3. Freezing of fluids confined between mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ayappa, K G; Mishra, Ratan K

    2007-12-27

    Using grand ensemble simulations, we show that octamethyl-cyclo-tetra-siloxane (OMCTS) confined between two mica surfaces can form a variety of frozen phases which undergo solid-solid transitions as a function of the separation between the surfaces. For atomically smooth mica surfaces, the following sequence of transitions 1[triangle up] --> 1[triangle up]b --> 2B --> 2 square --> 2[triangle up] are observed in the one- and two-layered regimes, where n[triangle up], n[square], and nB denote triangular, square, and buckled phases, respectively, with the prefix n denoting the number of confined layers. The presence of potassium on mica is seen to have a strong influence on the degree of order induced in the fluid. The sequence of solid-solid transitions that occurs with the smooth mica surface is no longer observed. When equilibrated with a state point near the liquid-solid transition, a counterintuitive freezing scenario is observed in the presence of potassium. Potassium disrupts in-plane ordering in the fluid in contact with the mica surface, and freezing is observed only in the inner confined layers. The largest mica separations at which frozen phases were observed ranged from separations that could accommodate six to seven fluid layers. The extent of freezing and the square-to-triangular lattice transition was found to be sensitive to the presence of potassium as well as the thermodynamic conditions of the bulk fluid. The implications of our results on interpretation of surface force experiments as well as the generic phase behavior of confined soft spheres is discussed. PMID:18092763

  4. Influence of vertical flows in wells on groundwater sampling.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Lindsay A; Rivett, Michael O; Tellam, John H; Dumble, Peter; Sharp, Helen

    2014-11-15

    Pumped groundwater sampling evaluations often assume that horizontal head gradients predominate and the sample comprises an average of water quality variation over the well screen interval weighted towards contributing zones of higher hydraulic conductivity (a permeability-weighted sample). However, the pumping rate used during sampling may not always be sufficient to overcome vertical flows in wells driven by ambient vertical head gradients. Such flows are reported in wells with screens between 3 and 10m in length where lower pumping rates are more likely to be used during sampling. Here, numerical flow and particle transport modeling is used to provide insight into the origin of samples under ambient vertical head gradients and under a range of pumping rates. When vertical gradients are present, sample provenance is sensitive to pump intake position, pumping rate and pumping duration. The sample may not be drawn from the whole screen interval even with extended pumping times. Sample bias is present even when the ambient vertical flow in the wellbore is less than the pumping rate. Knowledge of the maximum ambient vertical flow in the well does, however, allow estimation of the pumping rate that will yield a permeability-weighted sample. This rate may be much greater than that recommended for low-flow sampling. In practice at monitored sites, the sampling bias introduced by ambient vertical flows in wells may often be unrecognized or underestimated when drawing conclusions from sampling results. It follows that care should be taken in the interpretation of sampling data if supporting flow investigations have not been undertaken. PMID:24999176

  5. Freezing distributed entanglement in spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Irene; Lovett, Brendon W.; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2007-09-15

    We show how to freeze distributed entanglement that has been created from the natural dynamics of spin chain systems. The technique that we propose simply requires single-qubit operations and isolates the entanglement in specific qubits at the ends of branches. Such frozen entanglement provides a useful resource, for example for teleportation or distributed quantum processing. The scheme can be applied to a wide range of systems--including actual spin systems and alternative qubit embodiments in strings of quantum dots, molecules, or atoms.

  6. Freeze Tolerant Radiator for an Advanced EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.; Elliott, Jeannine; Weislogel, Mark

    2004-01-01

    During an Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the astronaut s metabolic heat and the heat produced by the Portable Life Support Unit (PLSS) must be rejected. This heat load is currently rejected by a sublimator, which vents up to eight pounds of water each EVA. However, for advanced space missions of the future, water venting to space needs to be minimized because resupply impacts from earth will be prohibitive. If this heat load could be radiated to space from the PLSS, which has enough surface area to radiate most of the heat, the amount of water now vented could be greatly reduced. Unfortunately, a radiator rejects heat at a relatively constant rate, but the astronauts generate a variable heat load depending on how hard they are working. Without a way to vary the heat removal rate, the astronaut would experience cold discomfort or even frostbite. A proven method allowing a radiator to be turned-down is to sequentially allow tubes that carry the heat transfer fluid to the radiator to freeze. A drawback of current freezable radiators using this method is that they are far to heavy for use on a PLSS, because they use heavy construction to prevent the tubes from bursting as they freeze and thaw. This creates the need for a large radiator to reject most of the heat but with a lightweight tube that doesn t burst as it freezes and thaws. The new freezable radiator for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has features to accommodate the expansion of the radiator fluid when it freezes, and still have the high tube to fin conductance needed to minimize the number and weight of the tubes. Radiator fluid candidates are water and a propylene glycol-water mixture. This design maintains all materials within their elastic limits so that large volume changes can be achieved without breaking the tube. This concept couples this elastic expansion with an extremely lightweight, extremely high conductivity carbon fiber fin that can carry the heat needed to thaw a frozen tube. By using

  7. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  8. Freezing point and melting point of barnacle muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Caillé, J P

    1983-10-01

    The freezing point and the melting point of myoplasm were measured with two experimental models. In all samples, a supercooled stage was reached by lowering the temperature of the sample to approximately - 7 degrees C, and the freezing of the sample was mechanically induced. The freezing process was associated with a phase transition in the interstices between the contractile filaments. In intact muscle fibers, the freezing point showed a structural component (0.43 degrees C), and the melting point indicated that the intracellular and the extracellular compartments are isotonic. When the sample of myoplasm, previously inserted in a cylindrical cavity was incubated in an electrolyte solution, the freezing point showed a structural component similar to that of the intact muscle fiber, but the melting point was lower than the freezing and the melting points of the embedding solution. This was interpreted as evidence that the counterions around the contractile filaments occupied a nonnegligible fraction of the intracellular compartment. PMID:6640420

  9. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  10. Freezing of water saturated in aluminum wool mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Onodera, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Tago, M.; Beer, H.

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the freezing of water saturated in aluminum wool mats (AWM) around a cooling pipe. Two arrangements of AWM around the pipe are considered, i.e. a disk-type and a roll-type. Freezing mass M(kg/m2) in the disk type for a porosity ɛ = 0.95, indicates to be two times larger compared with that without AWM (i.e. ɛ = 1) at the freezing time t = 180 min. Even a small AWM volume fraction enhances considerably freezing of water in the disk type. However, freezing enhancement in the roll type is small compared with that of the disk type. Numerical calculation predicts well freezing at the disk type arrangement by using an anisotropy model for the effective thermal conductivity of ice/water saturated AWM, however, poor predictions for the roll type arrangement.

  11. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  12. Manipulating the Gradient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  13. Comparison of frozen and freeze-dried particulate bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, Theodore; Temple, H Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Freeze-dried and frozen particulate bone allografts are used interchangeably on the assumption that the biologic behavior of these grafts is similar. Dissimilarities in biologic behavior and differences in the rate and extent of bone incorporation of freeze-dried and frozen particulate grafts were demonstrated in a comparative study using a non-human primate model. Freeze-dried particulate allografts induced new bone formation and healing of the osseous defects much faster than the frozen allografts. PMID:17658506

  14. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. T.; He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, N.; Tang, C. J.

    2015-05-15

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j{sub //}, at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  15. An improved high pressure freezing and freeze substitution method to preserve the labile vaccinia virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high pressure freezing and freeze substitution have been widely used for electron microscopy to reveal viral and cellular structures that are difficult to preserve. Vaccinia virus, a member of the Poxviridae family, presents one of the most complex viral structures. The classical view of vaccinia virus structure consists of an envelope surrounding a biconcave core, with a lateral body in each concavity of the core. This classical view was challenged by Peters and Muller (1963), who demonstrated the presence of a folded tubular structure inside the virus core and stated the difficulty in visualizing this structure, possibly because it is labile and cannot be preserved by conventional sample preparation. Therefore, this tubular structure, now called the nucleocapsid, has been mostly neglected over the years. Earlier studies were able to preserve the nucleocapsid, but with low efficiency. In this study, we report the protocol (and troubleshooting) that resulted in preservation of the highest numbers of nucleocapsids in several independent preparations. Using this protocol, we were able to demonstrate an interdependence between the formation of the virus core wall and the nucleocapsid, leading to the hypothesis that an interaction exists between the major protein constituents of these compartments, A3 (core wall) and L4 (nucleocapsid). Our results show that high pressure freezing and freeze substitution can be used in more in-depth studies concerning the nucleocapsid structure and function. PMID:27155322

  16. Reversible Photoinhibition in Antarctic Moss during Freezing and Thawing.

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, C. E.; Jackson, A. E.; Melick, D. R.; Seppelt, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Tolerance of antarctic moss to freezing and thawing stress was investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Freezing in darkness caused reductions in Fv/Fm (ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence) and Fo (initial fluorescence) that were reversible upon thawing. Reductions in Fv/Fm and Fo during freezing in darkness indicate a reduction in the potential efficiency of photosystem II that may be due to conformational changes in pigment-protein complexes due to desiccation associated with freezing. The absorption of light during freezing further reduced Fv/Fm and Fo but was also reversible. Using dithiothreitol (DTT), which inhibits the formation of the carotenoid zeaxanthin, we found reduced flurorescence quenching during freezing and reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin after freezing in DTT-treated moss. Reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin in DTT-treated moss were partially associated with reductions in nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching. The reversible photoinhibition observed in antarctic moss during freezing indicates the existence of processes that protect from photoinhibitory damage in environments where freezing temperatures occur in conjunction with high solar radiation levels. These processes may limit the need for repair cycles that require temperatures favorable for enzyme activity. PMID:12228644

  17. Design of a blood-freezing system for leukemia research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. E.; Cygnarowicz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Leukemia research involves the use of cryogenic freezing and storage equipment. In a program being carried out at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), bone marrow (white blood cells) was frozen using a standard cryogenic biological freezer. With this system, it is difficult to maintain the desired rate of freezing and repeatability from sample to sample. A freezing system was developed that satisfies the requirements for a repeatable, constant freezing rate. The system was delivered to NIC and is now operational. This report describes the design of the major subsystems, the analyses, the operating procedure, and final system test results.

  18. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  19. Avoidance and tolerance of freezing in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; Lee, Richard E

    2013-06-01

    Ectothermic vertebrates have colonized regions that are seasonally or perpetually cold, and some species, particularly terrestrial hibernators, must cope with temperatures that fall substantially below 0°C. Survival of such excursions depends on either freeze avoidance through supercooling or freeze tolerance. Supercooling, a metastable state in which body fluids remain liquid below the equilibrium freezing/melting point, is promoted by physiological responses that protect against chilling injury and by anatomical and behavioral traits that limit risk of inoculative freezing by environmental ice and ice-nucleating agents. Freeze tolerance evolved from responses to fundamental stresses to permit survival of the freezing of a substantial amount of body water under thermal and temporal conditions of ecological relevance. Survival of freezing is promoted by a complex suite of molecular, biochemical and physiological responses that limit cell death from excessive shrinkage, damage to macromolecules and membranes, metabolic perturbation and oxidative stress. Although freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance generally are mutually exclusive strategies, a few species can switch between them, the mode used in a particular instance of chilling depending on prevailing physiological and environmental conditions. PMID:23678097

  20. Retarded condensate freezing propagation on superhydrophobic surfaces patterned with micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yugang; Yang, Chun

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown ice delay on nano-structured or hierarchical surfaces with nanoscale roughness. Here we report retarded condensate freezing on superhydrophobic silicon substrates fabricated with patterned micropillars of small aspect ratio. We further investigated the pillar size effects on freezing propagation. We found that the velocity of freezing propagation on the surface patterned with proper micropillars can be reduced by one order of magnitude, compared to that on the smooth untreated silicon surface. Additionally, we developed an analytical model to describe the condensate freezing propagation on a structured surface with micropillars and the model predictions were compared with our experimental results.

  1. Freezing efficiency of Silver Iodide, ATD and Kaolinite in the contact freezing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, Baban; Marcolli, Claudia; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation via contact freezing is one of the open questions in the atmospheric science community. In our laboratory, we built the Collision Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH) (Ladino et al. 2011) in which falling cloud droplets can collide with aerosol particles. In this study, contact freezing experiments are conducted to investigate the ice nucleation ability of silver iodide (AgI), kaolinite and Arizona Test Dust (ATD). Silver iodide has been known for its ice nucleation ability since 1940s (Vonnegut 1947) while kaolinite is a clay mineral and known to be a moderate ice nucleus. ATD is a commercial dust sample used by many groups to compare different setups. In CLINCH, size selected aerosol particles collide with water droplets of 80 µm diameter. With the extension in chamber length it is possible to vary the interaction time of ice nuclei and the droplets. Our experiments are performed between -10 to -36 ºC for various concentrations of ice nuclei and different interaction times. The frozen fraction of the droplets is determined using the custom-made depolarization detector IODE (Nicolet et al., 2010). Depolarization of linearly polarized incident laser light is used to determine the ratio of frozen droplets to all droplets. Frozen fractions of the three particle types with different residence times from CLINCH will be presented in this study. The number of collisions between a single droplet and several aerosol particles can be calculated by accounting for the theoretical collision efficiency at the experimental conditions in order to obtain the freezing efficiency (frozen fraction/number of collisions). Nucleation efficiency is compared with other contact freezing studies and with immersion freezing

  2. Entropy Budgets in Oscillating and Freezing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    An interesting spontaneously oscillating system was demonstrated some decades ago by Welander : an open-topped water tank supplied with a continuous supply of heat is exposed to chilled air. A layer of ice forms, as one might expect. However, the ice retards the loss of heat to the air, and the water temperature rises until eventually the ice melts. The enhanced heat loss allows the system to cool again to the point where ice can form, and the cycle repeats. The oscillating behaviour is counterintuitive (like another freezing phenomenon, the Mpemba effect, wherein a warm liquid will begin freezing before a cool one), but is in full accord with the laws of thermodynamics and can be demonstrated in the laboratory and with numerical models. Oscillations occur in specific regions of parameter space (heating rate, heat transfer coefficients etc) - smooth variation, e.g. of the ice:air heat transfer coefficient yields a smooth variation of entropy production, except for a jump to increased entropy production when oscillations begin. A geophysical system where similar oscillations may occur is the icy Jovian satellite Europa, which appears to have a young crust. More generally, where a system is subject to a varying excitation (such as diurnal or seasonal forcing of the climate of Earth or Mars) the presence of phase changes such as melting of water or the condensation of carbon dioxide as frost have an important impact on the entropy budget of the system.

  3. Morphological study of endothelial cells during freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A.; Xu, L. X.; Sandison, G. A.; Cheng, S.

    2006-12-01

    Microvascular injury is recognized as a major tissue damage mechanism of ablative cryosurgery. Endothelial cells lining the vessel wall are thought to be the initial target of freezing. However, details of this injury mechanism are not yet completely understood. In this study, ECMatrix™ 625 was used to mimic the tumour environment and to allow the endothelial cells cultured in vitro to form the tube-like structure of the vasculature. The influence of water dehydration on the integrity of this structure was investigated. It was found that the initial cell shape change was mainly controlled by water dehydration, dependent on the cooling rate, resulting in the shrinkage of cells in the direction normal to the free surface. As the cooling was prolonged and temperature was lowered, further cell shape change could be induced by the chilling effects on intracellular proteins, and focal adhesions to the basement membrane. Quantitative analysis showed that the freezing induced dehydration greatly enhanced the cell surface stresses, especially in the axial direction. This could be one of the major causes of the final breaking of the cell junction and cell detachment.

  4. Freeze-drying today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Leary, J H; Stanford, E A

    1976-10-01

    The freeze-drying process and equipment have been improved over the years; the cycle times have shortened and the dried products have improved as a result. This talk will deal with these improvements and how we have progressed from the early systems to where we are today. Such areas of discussion will include: vacuum pumping systems, how they are sized and designed to meet the needs for general and special applications; heat transfer systems, and their use in maintaining the drying profile; condensing surface design, and what is best for certain types of dryers; controls and instrumentation, and how these have played a big part in the drying process and have made it possible to get repeatability; refrigeration systems, and the part they play in the performance of freeze-drying; and lastly the effect of internal stoppering, bottomless trays, and other items such as these have had on the present state of the art. It goes without saying that there have been many changes and there will continue to be changes and we shall endeavor to look into the future--as to what might well bo some of these changes. Included in the talk will be a number of slides and illustrations to point out the various items as they are discussed. PMID:1030422

  5. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  6. Limitations of determining density or magnetic boundaries from the horizontal gradient of gravity or pseudogravity data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Cordell, L.

    1987-01-01

    Offsets of horizontal-gradient magnitude maxima (gradient maxima) from a position directly over the boundary are predicted for cases where boundaries are not near-vertical or where several boundaries are close together. These are illustrated by offset equations; other factors which cause offsets are discussed briefly. -after Authors

  7. Gas-solid flow in vertical tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pita, J.A.; Sundaresan, S. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a computational study of fully-developed flow of gas-particle suspensions in vertical pipes which was carried out, using the model proposed recently by Sinclair and Jackson, to understand the predicted scale-up characteristics. It was shown that the model can capture the existence of steady-state multiplicity wherein different pressure gradients can be obtained for the same gas and solids fluxes. A pronounced and nonmonotonic variation of the pressure gradient required to achieve desired fluxes of solid and gas with tube diameter was predicted by the model, and this is explained on a physical basis. The computed results were compared with the experimental data. The model manifests an unsatisfactory degree of sensitivity to the inelasticity of the particle-particle collisions and the damping of particle-phase fluctuating motion by the gas.

  8. Effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on geographically different populations of the freeze-tolerant worm Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Holmstrup, Martin; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    Freeze-tolerant organisms survive internal ice formation; however, the adaptations to repeated freeze-thaw cycles are often not well investigated. Here we report how three geographically different populations of Enchytraeus albidus (Germany, Iceland and Svalbard) respond to three temperature treatments - constant thawed (0°C), constant freezing (-5°C) and fluctuating temperature (0 to -5°C) - over a period of 42 days. Survival varied between treatments and populations such that enchytraeids from arctic locations had a higher survival following prolonged freeze periods compared with temperate populations. However, enchytraeids from temperate locations had the same survival rate as arctic populations when exposed to repeated freeze-thaw events. Across all populations, metabolic rate decreased markedly in frozen animals (-5°C) compared with thawed controls (0°C). This decrease is likely due to the lower temperature of frozen animals, but also to the transition to the frozen state per se. Animals exposed to repeated freeze-thaw events had an intermediate metabolic rate and freeze-thaw events were not associated with pronounced excess energetic costs. Overwintering under either condition was not associated with a decrease in lipid content; however, during exposure to constant freezing and repeated freeze-thaw events there was a noticeable decrease in carbohydrate stores over time. Thus, animals exposed to constant freezing showed a decrease in glycogen stores, while both glucose and glycogen content decreased over time when the organisms were exposed to repeated freezing. The results therefore suggest that carbohydrate resources are important as a fuel for E. albidus during freezing whereas lipid resources are of marginal importance. PMID:25214492

  9. Integrated gravity and gravity gradient 3D inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Pengbo; Huang, Danian; Yuan, Yuan; Geng, Meixia; Liu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Gravity data, which are critical in mineral, oil, and gas exploration, are obtained from the vertical component of the gravity field, while gravity gradient data are measured from changes in the gravity field in three directions. However, few studies have sought to improve exploration techniques by integrating gravity and gravity gradient data using inversion methods. In this study, we developed a new method to integrate gravity and gravity gradient data in a 3D density inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method and the minimum gradient support (MGS) functional to regularize the 3D inverse problem and to obtain a clear and accurate image of the anomalous body. The NLCG algorithm, which is suitable for solving large-scale nonlinear optimization problems and requires no memory storage, was compared to the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton algorithm and the results indicated that the convergence rate of NLCG is slower, but that the storage requirement and computation time is lower. To counteract the decay in kernel function, we introduced a depth weighting function for anomalous bodies at the same depth, with information about anomalous body depth obtained from well log and seismic exploration data. For anomalous bodies at different depths, we introduced a spatial gradient weighting function to incorporate additional information obtained in the inversion. We concluded that the spatial gradient weighting function enhanced the spatial resolution of the recovered model. Furthermore, our results showed that including multiple components for inversion increased the resolution of the recovered model. We validated our model by applying our inversion method to survey data from Vinton salt dome, Louisiana, USA. The results showed good agreement with known geologic information; thus confirming the accuracy of this approach.

  10. Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ammon Williams

    2012-05-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent species—surrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate—1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurations—lid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture—50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt—1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the

  11. Effect of long-term freezing and freeze-thaw cycles on indigenous and inoculated microorganisms in dewatered blackwater.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsdóttir, Ragnhildur; Müller, Karoline; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Jenssen, Petter Deinboll; Villumsen, Arne

    2012-11-20

    Wastewater treatment in many Arctic regions is inadequate, even nonexisting. Natural freezing of wastewater in those areas may be beneficial for reduction of microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term freezing, and repeated freezing and thawing, on indigenous coliforms, fecal streptococci, and antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria, and inoculated Salmonella Enteriditis and E. coli bacteriophage ΦX174 in dewatered blackwater. At the end of the long-term freezing experiment (10 months), an MPN recovery study was done, including the microbial groups that had shown the largest reduction, using tryptone soy broth at incubation temperatures of 10 and 20 °C overnight for the coliforms and AR bacteria, and buffered peptone water at incubation temperature of 37 °C for 18-20 h for Salmonella. Fecal streptococci were more resistant to long-term freezing than the coliform group. Total number of AR bacteria decreased slowly but constantly over the 10-month freezing period. Salmonella rapidly decreased and were nondetectable within a week but exhibited some recovery after 10 months of freezing, whereas limited or no recovery of coliforms and AR-bacteria was detected. Bacteriophages showed limited reduction during the long-term freezing. Repeated freezing and thawing increased the reduction of all tested microbial groups markedly. PMID:23113759

  12. [Characteristics of soil net nitrogen mineralization in subalpine/alpine forests of west Sichuan, Southwest China during seasonal freeze-thaw period].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Ling; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Shi, Pei-Li; Wang, Ao; Yang, Yu-Lian; Wu, Zhi-Chao

    2012-03-01

    Seasonal freeze-thaw cycle and its change pattern under the scenarios of climate warming might exert strong effects on the soil nitrogen mineralization in alpine forests. In this paper, intact soil cores were collected from the subalpine/alpine forests along an altitudinal gradient in west Sichuan, and an incubation test was conducted to study the soil net nitrogen mineralization rate and the amount of soil mineralized nitrogen in the forests during growth season and seasonal freeze-thaw period under simulated scenarios of global warming. In the test soils, the NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N contents both showed a clear tendency of decreased in the period from growth season to the onset stage of freezing, increased at deep freezing stage, and decreased again at the early stage of thawing. The soil net nitrogen mineralization rate and the amount of soil mineralized nitrogen were significantly lower in freeze-thaw period than in growth season, and the soil inorganic nitrogen was obviously immobilized. The soil nitrogen immobilization was stronger at middle altitudes but weaker at high altitudes, as compared with that at low altitudes, possibly due to the variation of soil temperature and its induced different freeze-thaw cycle. During growth period, the soil net nitrogen mineralization rate and the amount of soil mineralized nitrogen showed an obvious increasing trend with the decrease of altitude, and the soil nitrogen mineralization was the strongest at low altitudes, implying that under the scenarios of climate warming, the increase of soil temperature promoted the soil nitrogen mineralization during growth season, and affected the soil nitrogen mineralization rate by increasing the frequency of freeze-thaw cycle and shortening the time period of freeze-thaw. Soil micro-environment could also affect the soil nitrogen mineralization in alpine forest regions. PMID:22720601

  13. Controlled Freeze-thaw Experiments to Study Biogeochemical Process and its Effects on Greenhouse Gas Release in Arctic Soil Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Tas, N.; Bill, M.; Ulrich, C.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas release associated with permafrost thawing is one of the largest uncertainties in future climate prediction. Improvement of such prediction relies on a better representation of the interactions between hydrological, geochemical and microbial processes in the Arctic ecosystem that occur over a wide range of space and time scales and under dynamic freeze-thaw conditions. As part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments in the Arctic (NGEE-Arctic), we conducted controlled laboratory freeze-thaw experiments to study greenhouse gas release in vertical permafrost soil columns with vertically heterogeneous hydrological, geochemical and microbial properties. The studies were performed using soil cores collected from the NGEE Barrow, AK site. Two cores collected next to each other with very similar soil structures were used for the experiment. One of the cores was destructively sampled for baseline characterization, and the second core was used for the freeze-thaw experiments. The core extends from the ground surface into the permafrost with roughly 40 cm of active layer. The column was instrumented with various sensors and sampling devices, including thermocouples, geophysical (electrical) sensors, and sampling ports for solids and fluids. The headspace of the soil column was purged with CO2 free air and the gas samples were collected periodically for greenhouse gas analysis. Our initial tests simulated seasonal temperature variation from ~ -10°C to +10°C at the ground surface. Our results demonstrated that temperature and geophysical data provided real time information on the freeze thaw dynamics of the column and the surface greenhouse gas fluxes correlated with the freeze thaw stages and associated hydrological and biogeochemical processes in the vertical soil column. For example, surface fluxes data revealed an early burst of GHG concentrations during the initial thawing of the surface ice rich layer of the soil, indicating the presence of trapped

  14. Bigravity from gradient expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuho; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    We discuss how the ghost-free bigravity coupled with a single scalar field can be derived from a braneworld setup. We consider DGP two-brane model without radion stabilization. The bulk configuration is solved for given boundary metrics, and it is substituted back into the action to obtain the effective four-dimensional action. In order to obtain the ghost-free bigravity, we consider the gradient expansion in which the brane separation is supposed to be sufficiently small so that two boundary metrics are almost identical. The obtained effective theory is shown to be ghost free as expected, however, the interaction between two gravitons takes the Fierz-Pauli form at the leading order of the gradient expansion, even though we do not use the approximation of linear perturbation. We also find that the radion remains as a scalar field in the four-dimensional effective theory, but its coupling to the metrics is non-trivial.

  15. Vertical Seismoelectric Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araji, A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismoelectric method corresponds to the measurement of electromagnetic disturbances associated with the passage of seismic waves in a porous medium. The coupling is due to the existence of the electric double layer at the solid/water interfaces. We consider the case of vertical seismoelectric profiling in which we trigger a seismic source in a vertical borehole and measure the seismoelectric response on the surface. We aim to image hetrogeneities in that section of the subsurface by utilizing the seismoelectric sources created at interfaces. An iterative source localization inversion algorithm is used to achieve the imaging of interfaces.

  16. Freezing in porous media: Phase behavior, dynamics and transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    2012-12-21

    This research was focused on developing the underlying framework for the mechanisms that control the nature of the solidification of a broad range of porous media. To encompass the scope of porous media under consideration we considered material ranging from a dilute colloidal suspension to a highly packed saturated host matrix with a known geometry. The basic physical processes that occur when the interstitial liquid phase solidifies revealed a host of surprises with a broad range of implications from geophysics to materials science and engineering. We now understand that ostensibly microscopic films of unfrozen liquid control both the equilibrium and transport properties of a highly packed saturated host matrix as well as a rather dilute colloidal suspension. However, our description of the effective medium behavior in these settings is rather different and this sets the stage for the future research based on our past results. Once the liquid phase of a saturated relatively densely packed material is frozen, there is a rich dynamical behavior of particles for example due to the directed motion driven by thermomolecular pressure gradients or the confined Brownian motion of the particles. In quite striking contrast, when one freezes a dilute suspension the behavior can be rather more like that of a binary alloy with the particles playing the role of a ``solute''. We probed such systems quantitatively by (i) using X ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (ii) studying the Argonne cell in the laboratory using optical microscopy and imagery (because it is not directly visible while in the vacuum can). (3) analyzed the general transport phenomena within the framework of both irreversible thermodynamics and alloy solidification and (4) applied the results to the study of the redistribution of solid particles in a frozen interstitial material. This research has gone a long way towards

  17. St. Lawrence River Freeze-Up Forecast Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assel, R. A.

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) is presented for calculating the date of freeze-up on the St. Lawrence River at Massena, N.Y. The SOP is based on two empirical temperature decline equations developed for Kingston, Ontario, and Massena, N.Y., respectively. Input data needed to forecast freeze-up consist of the forecast December flow rate and…

  18. Effects of freezes on survival of Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus in Florida is occasionally subjected to freezing temperatures. No information was available on the effect of freezing temperatures on mortality of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Florida. Studies were therefore initiated to assess mortality rates of D. citri eggs, nymphs and adults...

  19. Stopping biological time: The freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental physical-chemical events that occur during the freezing and thawing of cells are outlined and the manner in which cell permeability determines the response of the cell to freezing is discussed both in terms of physical response and in terms of survival. 40 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  1. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  2. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze...

  3. Increasing freezing tolerance: kinase regulation of ICE1.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiangqiang; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Lang, Zhaobo

    2015-02-01

    Cold temperatures trigger the ICE1-CBF-COR transcriptional cascade in plants, which reprograms gene expression to increase freezing tolerance. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Ding et al. (2015) report that cold stress activates the protein kinase OST1 to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize and stimulate ICE1. This enhances plant tolerance to freezing temperatures. PMID:25669879

  4. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  6. Metabolic changes in Avena sativa crowns recovering from freezing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recove...

  7. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B.; Swemmer, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  8. The Turnbull correlation and the freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, A. Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Batris, Evangelos; Kulmala, Markku

    1998-05-01

    An empirical correlation that is important in the calculation of homogeneous freezing probabilities, the "Turnbull correlation" for interfacial tensions, has been reevaluated and applied to systems of interest as possible components of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The systems studied were: sulphuric acid solutions freezing to water ice and sulphuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT); and nitric acid solutions freezing to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD). The calculations have been compared to experimental data: agreement is generally good, although aerosol freezing experiments, which would rigorously test the theory, have not been made for NAT. Of the three measurements of aerosol freezing to NAD, the calculations are closer to those measurements showing a lower freezing temperature, of about 175-177 K. The comparison substantially improves our confidence in our understanding of the mechanisms of PSC formation. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol to water ice remains the most plausible first step in solid-particle PSC formation if homogeneous freezing is the mechanism by which solid-particle PSC formation occurs.

  9. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze...

  10. Understanding freeze stress in biological tissues: thermodynamics of interfacial water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermodynamic approach to distinguish forms of freeze energy that injure plants as the temperature decreases is developed. The pattern resulting from this analysis dictated the sequence of thermal requirements for water to exist as an independent state. Improvement of freezing tolerance in biolo...

  11. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B; Swemmer, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  12. Optimum parameters for freeze-drying decellularized arterial scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, William S; Duffy, Garry P; Murphy, Bruce P

    2013-12-01

    Decellularized arterial scaffolds have achieved success in advancing toward clinical use as vascular grafts. However, concerns remain regarding long-term preservation and sterilization of these scaffolds. Freeze drying offers a means of overcoming these concerns. In this study, we investigated the effects of various freeze-drying protocols on decellularized porcine carotid arteries and consequently, determined the optimum parameters to fabricate a stable, preserved scaffold with unaltered mechanical properties. Freeze drying by constant slow cooling to two final temperatures ((Tf), -10 °C and -40 °C) versus instant freezing was investigated by histological examination and mechanical testing. Slow cooling to Tf= -10 °C produced a stiffer and less distensible response than the non freeze-dried scaffolds and resulted in disruption to the collagen fibers. The mechanical response of Tf= -40 °C scaffolds demonstrated disruption to the elastin network, which was confirmed with histology. Snap freezing scaffolds in liquid nitrogen and freeze drying to Tf= -40 °C with a precooled shelf at -60 °C produced scaffolds with unaltered mechanical properties and a histology resembling non-freeze-dried scaffolds. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of optimizing the nucleation and ice crystal growth/size to ensure homogenous drying, preventing extracellular matrix disruption and subsequent inferior mechanical properties. This new manufacturing protocol creates the means for the preservation and sterilization of decellularized arterial scaffolds while simultaneously maintaining the mechanical properties of the tissue. PMID:23614758

  13. Experimental investigation of molten metal freezing on to a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mizanur Rahman, M.; Hino, Tomohiko; Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Maschek, Werner

    2007-10-15

    During core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs), it is important to understand the freezing phenomena of molten metal, which may prevent fuel dispersal and subsequent shutdown. The present paper describes the freezing behavior of molten metal during interaction with a structure with a view to the safety of LMRs. In this study, Wood's metal (melting point 78.8 C) was used as a simulant melt, while stainless steel and copper were used as freezing structures. A series of simulation experiments was conducted to study the freezing behavior of Wood's metal during pouring on to the freezing structures immersed in a coolant. In the experiments, simulant melt was poured into a stainless steel tube and finally ejected into a coolant through a nozzle so as to observe the freezing behavior of the molten metal. The penetration length and width were measured in the air cooled experiments, whereas penetration length and the proportion of adhering frozen metal were measured in water coolant experiment. The melt flow and distribution were observed in both types of experiment using a high-speed video camera. Distinct freezing modes were observed in the water coolant experiments, whereas only one freezing mode with a longer melt penetration was found in air coolant experiments. The present result will be utilized to create a relevant database for the verification of reactor safety analysis codes. (author)

  14. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included.

  15. Freezing D2O clay gels.

    PubMed

    Letellier, M

    1998-01-01

    To obtain the T1 surface value in smectites/D2O diluted suspensions or gels, as was obtained on a monolayer deuterated clay, we freeze them. The broad Pake's doublets similar to ice doublets and with the same T1 show that we can separate frozen from unfrozen D2O. The latter exhibits a narrower line and a single T1 and is attributed to the liquid surface water layer in rapid exchange with the nearby supercooled water, the quantity of which diminishes with the lowering of the temperature depending on the gel porosity. It is possible to measure the supercooled water quantity and to correct the T1 measured values to extract the T1 surface. The value extrapolated at room temperature allows the complete clay surface area measurement. The example of a montmorillonite is given and a comparison with laponite is made. PMID:9803898

  16. Solar desalination by freezing and distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvajic, G.

    It is noted that among seawater desalination processes the absorption-freeze vapor compression processes based on the thermal heat pump, although untested commercially and still in the development stage, appears technically and economically an attractive application of low-grade (exergy) solar heat. The distillation processes proposed here may be conveniently powered by low-grade solar heat (from flat plate solar collectors). It is expected that the scaling problem will be insignificant in comparison with that encountered in the conventional multistage flash process. The novel feature here is the use of enlarged capacity for heat exchange between distillate and brine via latent heat of solid-liquid phase change of a suitable hydrophobic intermediate heat transfer material.

  17. Cooling method with automated seasonal freeze protection

    DOEpatents

    Cambell, Levi; Chu, Richard; David, Milnes; Ellsworth, Jr, Michael; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Simons, Robert; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-31

    An automated multi-fluid cooling method is provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The method includes obtaining a coolant loop, and providing a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  18. Cooling system with automated seasonal freeze protection

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth, Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Simons, Robert E.; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-24

    An automated multi-fluid cooling system and method are provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The cooling system includes a coolant loop, a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  19. Crystal structures and freezing of dipolar fluids.

    PubMed

    Groh, B; Dietrich, S

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the crystal structure of classical systems of spherical particles with an embedded point dipole at T=0. The ferroelectric ground state energy is calculated using generalizations of the Ewald summation technique. Due to the reduced symmetry compared to the nonpolar case the crystals are never strictly cubic. For the Stockmayer (i.e., Lennard-Jones plus dipolar) interaction three phases are found upon increasing the dipole moment: hexagonal, body-centered orthorhombic, and body-centered tetragonal. An even richer phase diagram arises for dipolar soft spheres with a purely repulsive inverse power law potential approximately r(-n). A crossover between qualitatively different sequences of phases occurs near the exponent n=12. The results are applicable to electro- and magnetorheological fluids. In addition to the exact ground state analysis we study freezing of the Stockmayer fluid by density-functional theory. PMID:11308482

  20. Freezing of Martian streams under climatic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The valley networks of Mars are widely believed to have formed at a time when climatic conditions on the planet were significantly different from those that currently prevail. This view arises from the following observations: (1) the valleys form integrated branching networks which suggests fluid drainage, and water is the most plausible fluid, (2) the present atmosphere contains only minute amounts of water, (3) the networks appear to be more akin to terrestrial valleys that are eroded by streams of modest discharges than features that form by catastrophic floods, and (4) small streams of water will rapidly freeze under present climatic conditions. Climatic conditions at the time of formation of the valleys are studied based on the assumption that they were cut by running water.

  1. Heat pump with freeze-up prevention

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1981-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

  2. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, S.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Pummer, B.; Grothe, H.; Hartmann, S.; Tomsche, L.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Ignatius, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-11-01

    Birch pollen grains are known to be ice nucleating active biological particles. The ice nucleating activity has previously been tracked down to biological macromolecules that can be easily extracted from the pollen grains in water. In the present study, we investigated the immersion freezing behavior of these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules. Therefore we measured the frozen fractions of particles generated from birch pollen washing water as a function of temperature at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). Two different birch pollen samples were considered, with one originating from Sweden and one from the Czech Republic. For the Czech and Swedish birch pollen samples, freezing was observed to start at -19 and -17 °C, respectively. The fraction of frozen droplets increased for both samples down to -24 °C. Further cooling did not increase the frozen fractions any more. Instead, a plateau formed at frozen fractions below 1. This fact could be used to determine the amount of INA macromolecules in the droplets examined here, which in turn allowed for the determination of nucleation rates for single INA macromolecules. The main differences between the Swedish birch pollen and the Czech birch pollen were obvious in the temperature range between -17 and -24 °C. In this range, a second plateau region could be seen for Swedish birch pollen. As we assume INA macromolecules to be the reason for the ice nucleation, we concluded that birch pollen is able to produce at least two different types of INA macromolecules. We were able to derive parameterizations for the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types, using two different methods: a simple exponential fit and the Soccer ball model. With these parameterization methods we were able to describe the ice nucleation behavior of single INA macromolecules from both the Czech and the Swedish birch pollen.

  3. An improved microscope stage for direct observation of freezing and freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, S L; Her, L M; Proffitt, C P; Nail, L L

    1994-08-01

    A microscope stage for observation of freezing and freeze drying is described. The stage uses thermoelectric (Peltier) heaters configured in two stages, with circulating fluid as a heat sink on the high temperature side. Lowest attainable sample temperature is about -47 degrees C. Principal advantages of this system are closed-loop control of stage temperature, rapid response to changes in temperature set point, and improved documentation of experiments by use of a video recorder system with a character generator which allows display of sample identity and temperature. Accuracy of measuring the sample temperature in the field of view was validated by comparing observed values of eutectic melting with published values for a series of solutes with eutectic temperatures in the range from -2 degrees C to -32 degrees C. Good agreement was obtained throughout this range. PMID:7971708

  4. Versatile Aerogel Fabrication by Freezing and Subsequent Freeze-Drying of Colloidal Nanoparticle Solutions.

    PubMed

    Freytag, Axel; Sánchez-Paradinas, Sara; Naskar, Suraj; Wendt, Natalja; Colombo, Massimo; Pugliese, Giammarino; Poppe, Jan; Demirci, Cansunur; Kretschmer, Imme; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Behrens, Peter; Bigall, Nadja C

    2016-01-18

    A versatile method to fabricate self-supported aerogels of nanoparticle (NP) building blocks is presented. This approach is based on freezing colloidal NPs and subsequent freeze drying. This means that the colloidal NPs are directly transferred into dry aerogel-like monolithic superstructures without previous lyogelation as would be the case for conventional aerogel and cryogel fabrication methods. The assembly process, based on a physical concept, is highly versatile: cryogelation is applicable for noble metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs, and no impact of the surface chemistry or NP shape on the resulting morphology is observed. Under optimized conditions the shape and volume of the liquid equal those of the resulting aerogels. Also, we show that thin and homogeneous films of the material can be obtained. Furthermore, the physical properties of the aerogels are discussed. PMID:26638874

  5. What happens in freezing bodies? Experimental study of histological tissue change caused by freezing injuries.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, A T; Kaufmann, J D

    1999-06-28

    In order to evaluate histological features of freezing damages to human tissue after death, we froze samples of liver and heart tissue to temperatures of -12 degrees C, -28 degrees C and -80 degrees C, and stored them for 24 and 72 h, respectively, at those temperatures. After thawing and routine preparation for histology, the samples were evaluated both by microscope and with an electronic image analyzer. In all cases, we found extended extracellular spaces and shrunken cells resulting from the freeze-thaw cycle. These features were more pronounced in tissues stored for longer durations. Such findings seem to be typical of tissue that has been frozen prior to examination. Two cases of dead bodies found outdoors at subzero temperatures demonstrate that formerly frozen and unfrozen tissues can be distinguished histologically. The findings are examined in relation to the fundamental laws of cryobiology. PMID:10464930

  6. Photomicrographic Investigation of Spontaneous Freezing Temperatures of Supercooled Water Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Hacker, P. T.

    1950-01-01

    A photomicrographic technique for investigating eupercooled. water droplets has been devised and. used. to determine the spontaneous freezing temperatures of eupercooled. water droplets of the size ordinarily found. in the atmosphere. The freezing temperatures of 4527 droplets ranging from 8.75 to 1000 microns in diameter supported on a platinum surface and 571 droplets supported on copper were obtained. The average spontaneous freezing temperature decreased with decrease in the size of the droplets. The effect of size on the spontaneous freezing temperature was particularly marked below 60 microns. Frequency-distribution curves of the spontaneous freezing temperatures observed for droplets of a given size were obtained. Although no droplet froze at a temperature above 20 0 F, all droplets melted at 32 F. Results obtained with a copper support did not differ essentially from those obtained with a platinum surface.

  7. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  8. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  9. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  10. Freezing Precipitation and Freezing Events over Northern Eurasia and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Yin, Xungang; Bulygina, Olga; Partasenok, Irina; Zolina, Olga; Hanssen-Bauer, Inger

    2016-04-01

    With global climate change in the extratropics, the 0°C isotherm will not disappear and associated precipitation events will continue to occur. The near-0°C temperatures should generally move poleward and arrive at many locations earlier in spring or later in autumn. This could potentially affect the seasonal cycle of near-0°C precipitation. The overall warming, together with a larger influx of the water vapor in the winter atmosphere from the oceans (including ice-free portions of the Arctic Ocean) can also affect the amount of near-0°C precipitation. The issue of near 0°C precipitation is linked with several hazardous phenomena including heavy snowfall/rainfall transition around °C; strong blizzards; rain-on-snow events causing floods; freezing rain and freezing drizzle; and ice load on infrastructure. In our presentation using more than 1,500 long-term time series of synoptic observations for the past four decades, we present climatology and the empirical evidence about changes in occurrence, timing, and intensity of freezing rains and freezing drizzles over several countries of Northern Eurasia and North America. In the former Soviet Union, instrumental monitoring of ice load has been performed by ice accretion indicator that in addition to the type, intensity and duration of ice deposits reports also their weight and size. Estimates of climatology and changes in ice load based on this monitoring at 958 Russian stations will be also presented. The work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (grant 14.B25.31.0026) and NASA LCLUC Program (grant "How Environmental Change in Central Asian Highlands Impacts High Elevation Communities").

  11. Evaluation and Validation of the Messinger Freezing Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important non-dimensional parameters used in ice-accretion modeling and scaling studies is the freezing fraction defined by the heat-balance analysis of Messinger. For fifty years this parameter has been used to indicate how rapidly freezing takes place when super-cooled water strikes a solid body. The value ranges from 0 (no freezing) to 1 (water freezes immediately on impact), and the magnitude has been shown to play a major role in determining the physical appearance of the accreted ice. Because of its importance to ice shape, this parameter and the physics underlying the expressions used to calculate it have been questioned from time to time. Until now, there has been no strong evidence either validating or casting doubt on the current expressions. This paper presents experimental measurements of the leading-edge thickness of a number of ice shapes for a variety of test conditions with nominal freezing fractions from 0.3 to 1.0. From these thickness measurements, experimental freezing fractions were calculated and compared with values found from the Messinger analysis as applied by Ruff. Within the experimental uncertainty of measuring the leading-edge thickness, agreement of the experimental and analytical freezing fraction was very good. It is also shown that values of analytical freezing fraction were entirely consistent with observed ice shapes at and near rime conditions: At an analytical freezing fraction of unity, experimental ice shapes displayed the classic rime shape, while for conditions producing analytical freezing fractions slightly lower than unity, glaze features started to appear.

  12. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  13. Effect of wettability on sessile drop freezing: when superhydrophobicity stimulates an extreme freezing delay.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Korolev, Vadim V; Pashinin, Andrei S

    2014-02-18

    An increasing number of studies directed at supercooling water droplets on surfaces with different wettabilities have appeared in recent years. This activity has been stimulated by the recognition that water supercooling phenomena can be effectively used to develop methods for protecting outdoor equipment and infrastructure elements against icing and snow accretion. In this article, we discuss the nucleation kinetics of supercooled sessile water droplets on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces under isothermal conditions at temperatures of -8, -10, and -15 °C and a saturated water vapor atmosphere. The statistics of nucleation events for the ensembles of freezing sessile droplets is completed by the detailed analysis of the contact angle temperature dependence and freezing of individual droplets in a saturated vapor atmosphere. We have demonstrated that the most essential freezing delay is characteristic of the superhydrophobic coating on aluminum, with the texture resistant to contact with ice and water. This delay can reach many hours at T = -8 °C and a few minutes at -23 °C. The observed behavior is analyzed on the basis of different nucleation mechanisms. The dissimilarity in the total nucleation rate, detected for two superhydrophobic substrates having the same apparent contact angle of the water drop but different resistivities of surface texture to the contact with water/ice, is associated with the contribution of heterogeneous nucleation on external centers located at the water droplet/air interface. PMID:24491217

  14. Feasibility of high pressure freezing with freeze substitution after long-term storage in chemical fixatives.

    PubMed

    Venter, Chantelle; Van Der Merwe, Christiaan Frederick; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Bester, Megan Jean; Taute, Helena

    2013-09-01

    Fixation of biological samples is an important process especially related to histological and ultrastructural studies. Chemical fixation was the primary method of fixing tissue for transmission electron microscopy for many years, as it provides adequate preservation of the morphology of cells and organelles. High pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution (FS) is a newer alternative method that rapidly freezes non-cryoprotected samples that are then slowly heated in the FS medium, allowing penetration of the tissue to insure adequate fixation. This study addresses several issues related to tissue preservation for electron microscopy. Using mice liver tissue as model the difference between samples fixed chemically or with HPF immediately after excision, or stored before chemical or HPF fixation were tested with specific focus on the nuclear membrane. Findings are that immediate HPF is the method of choice compared to chemical fixation. Of the chemical fixatives, immediate fixation with 2.5% glutaraldehyde (GA)/formaldehyde (FA) is the best in preserving membrane morphology, 2.5% GA can be used as alternative for stored and then chemically processed samples, with 10% formalin being suitable as a storage medium only if followed by HPF fixation. Overall, storage leads to lower ultrastructural preservation, but HPF with FS can minimize these artifacts relative to other processing protocols. PMID:23818457

  15. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    . Model-data fusion suggests that model performance is improved when the relatively high thermal conductivity of the ice phase is accounted for. However, the permafrost site is very gravelly so that the model equations for thermal conductivity are at the edge of applicability. The freezing-soil formulation is tested in the presence of snow, using measurements at an orchard site in Idaho. The model reproduces well observed snow-water equivalents and soil temperatures. However, it is highly sensitive to snow emissivity and maximum liquid content of the snow, leading both to modified refreezing of melted water. It is possible that the model would benefit from 1-2 more snow layers to permit simulation of density and temperature gradients in the snow-pack. SLI was run globally on 1°x1° grid as the soil part of the land surface scheme CABLE. We could therefore demonstrate that this detailed and physically-realistic formulation is fast enough to be a feasible alternative to the much simpler default soil-scheme in CABLE. References Hansson et al. (2004) Vadose Zone J 3, 693ff Haverd & Cuntz (2010) J Hydro 388, 434ff Haverd et al. (2013) Biogeosci 10, 2011ff Weismüller et al. (2011) The Cryosphere 5, 741ff

  16. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Haverd, V.

    2013-12-01

    . Model-data fusion suggests that model performance is improved when the relatively high thermal conductivity of the ice phase is accounted for. However, the permafrost site is very gravelly so that the model equations for thermal conductivity are at the edge of applicability. The freezing-soil formulation is tested in the presence of snow, using measurements at an orchard site in Idaho. The model reproduces well observed snow-water equivalents and soil temperatures. However, it is highly sensitive to snow emissivity and maximum liquid content of the snow, leading both to modified refreezing of melted water. It is possible that the model would benefit from 1-2 more snow layers to permit simulation of density and temperature gradients in the snow-pack. SLI was run globally on 1x1 degree grid as the soil part of the land surface scheme CABLE. We could therefore demonstrate that this detailed and physically-realistic formulation is fast enough to be a feasible alternative to the much simpler default soil-scheme in CABLE. References Hansson et al. (2004) Vadose Zone J 3, 693ff Haverd & Cuntz (2010) J Hydro 388, 434ff Haverd et al. (2013) Biogeosci 10, 2011ff Weismüller et al. (2011) The Cryosphere 5, 741ff

  17. The role of seawater freezing in the formation of subsurface brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herut, Barak; Starinsky, Avraham; Katz, Amitai; Bein, Amos

    1990-01-01

    Several mechanisms (evaporation, water-rock interaction, ultra-filtration) have been suggested to explain the evolution of ubiquitous Ca-chloride subsurface brines. In the present paper, the freezing of seawater in polar regions, and in even wider areas during glacial periods, is proposed as an additional possible path of brine formation. Four detailed seawater freezing experiments to -14°C (resulting in a concentration factor of about 5) were carried out, and Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Cl, SO 4, and Br were analysed in the residual brines and in the ice. Br and Sr, whose behavior during the freezing of seawater is reported here for the first time, show a conservative behavior throughout the studied temperature range. Our data and earlier literature show that the high salinities, which are common in subsurface brines (>300 g/l), may be obtained by the removal of H 2O as ice in the primary glacial environment. The decrease in the Na/Cl ratio is caused by the crystallization of mirabilite (Na 2SO 4 · 10H 2O), supplemented by hydrohalite (NaCl · 2H 2O). Sulfate is removed both in mirabilite and by bacterial reduction. The brine then migrates to the subsurface, heats-up under the local geothermal gradient, and interacts with the adjacent rocks. At this stage, it may be diluted by meteoric waters, its Mg/Ca ratio decreases (dolomitization and chloritization), the SO 4/Cl ratio varies according to the local gypsum-anhydrite equilibrium conditions, and the Ca/(SO 4 + HCO 3) ratio increases as a result of dolomitization or chloritization. The interaction with rocks in the subsurface may affect both the original 87Sr /86Sr and the 18O /16O ratios of the brine. Although several of the processes which lead to the formation of Ca-chloride brines are common for both the evaporative and the freezing models, the Na-Br-Cl relationship in a given brine can be used to discriminate between the two modes of brine evolution. Several subsurface brines from the Canadian Shield and one brine

  18. Vertical electron transistor (VET) in GaAs with a heterojunction (AlGaAs-GaAs) cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, U.; Maki, P. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Schaff, W.; Kohn, E.; Eastman, L. F.

    1984-02-01

    The successful fabrication of submicrometer channel length (0.75 micron) and gate length (0.15 micron) vertical electron transistors with AlGaAs cathodes is reported. Lack of electron velocity enhancement has been proposed to be due to high operating channel temperatures, and low temperature measurements were hindered by carrier freeze-out.

  19. Continuous gravity gradient logging

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described for conducting a gravimetry survey of an earth formation, comprising the steps of: (a) continuously traversing the earth formation with a gravity logging tool having a column of fluid within the tool, (b) measuring a first pressure difference along a first interval within the column of fluid, (c) measuring a second pressure difference along a second interval within the column of fluid, (d) differencing the first and second pressure differences to determine the gravity gradient along the earth formation between the first and second intervals.

  20. Effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on glucosinolates and antioxidant attributes in broccoli florets.

    PubMed

    Cai, Congxi; Miao, Huiying; Qian, Hongmei; Yao, Leishuan; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-11-01

    The effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on the contents of glucosinolates and antioxidants (vitamin C, polyphenols, carotenoid and chlorophyll), as well as the antioxidant capacity in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets were investigated in the present study. Our results showed that the glucosinolate accumulations were significantly decreased after pre-freezing processing, whereas elevated levels of phenols, carotenoids, chlorophyll, and also antioxidant capacity were observed in frozen broccoli florets. The contents of vitamin C remained constant during above mentioned processing. In conclusion, the current industrial freezing processing method is a good practice for the preservation of main antioxidant nutrients in broccoli florets, although some improvements in pre-freezing processing, such as steam blanching and ice-water cooling, are needed to attenuate the decrease in glucosinolate content. PMID:27211670

  1. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for

  2. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  3. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  4. Two-Zone Bridgman Furnace With Sharp Thermal Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borshchevsky, Alex; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    Two-zone vertical directional-solidification furnace designed and built to grow crystals from stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric melts and from solutions. Includes conventional wire heater in lower zone, tubular silicon carbide heating element in upper zone, and thermal baffle between zones. Temperature gradients up to 125 degrees centigrade per centimeter achieved in the crystal-growth region. Sharper gradient enables both faster growth and better separation between solid and liquid. Furnace used in laboratory or industrial setting for growth of crystals from congruently melting materials as well as for growth of compounds formed by peritectic reactions.

  5. The effect of water-soluble polymers on the microstructure and properties of freeze-cast alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekor, Christopher Michael

    Porous ceramics can be divided into three separate classes based on their pore size: microporous ceramics with pores less than 2 nm, mesoporous ceramics with pores in the range of 2--50 nm and macroporous ceramics with pores that are greater than 50 nm. In particular, macroporous ceramics are used in a variety of applications such as refractories, molten metal filtration, diesel particulate filters, heterogeneous catalyst supports and biomedical scaffolds. Freeze casting is a novel method used to create macroporous ceramics. In this method growing ice crystals act as a template for the pores and are solidified, often directionally, through a ceramic dispersion and removed from the green body through a freeze drying procedure. This method has attracted some attention over the past few years due to its relative simplicity, flexibility and environmental friendliness. On top of this freeze casting is capable of producing materials with high pore volume fractions, which is an advantage over processing by packing and necking of particles, where the pore volume fraction is typically less than 50%. Many of the basic processing variables that affect the freeze cast microstructure, such as the temperature gradient, interfacial velocity and solid loading of the dispersion have been well established in the literature. On the other hand, areas such as the effect of additives on the microstructure and mechanical properties have not been covered in great detail. In this study the concept of constitutional supercooling from basic solidification theory is used to explain the effects of two water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol, on the microstructure of freeze cast alumina ceramics. In addition, changes in the observed microstructure will be related to experimentally determined values of permeability and compressive strength.

  6. Purification of very high density lipoproteins by differential density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Haunerland, N H; Ryan, R O; Law, J H; Bowers, W S

    1987-03-01

    Differential density gradient ultracentrifugation procedures, utilizing a vertical rotor, were developed for the preparative purification of very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, density greater than 1.21 g/ml). The VHDLs of several insect species were purified as follows. An initial density gradient ultracentrifugation step removed lipoproteins of lower density from the VHDL-fraction, which partially separated from the nonlipoproteins present in the infranatant. A complete separation was achieved by a second centrifugation step employing a modified gradient system. The use of a vertical rotor and specially designed discontinuous gradients allows a relatively fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the class of very high density lipoproteins. Similar gradient systems should be useful for the detection and purification of VHDLs from other sources. PMID:3578796

  7. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  8. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  9. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  10. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results. PMID:23576906

  11. Freeze-thaw durability of air-entrained concrete.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to "the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete" GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results. PMID:23576906

  12. Reconstructing global overturning from meridional density gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E. D.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Hirschi, J. J.-M.; Mecking, J. V.

    2016-04-01

    Despite the complexity of the global ocean system, numerous attempts have been made to scale the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), principally in the North Atlantic, with large-scale, basin-wide hydrographic properties. In particular, various approaches to scaling the MOC with meridional density gradients have been proposed, but the success of these has only been demonstrated under limited conditions. Here we present a scaling relationship linking overturning to twice vertically-integrated meridional density gradients via the hydrostatic equation and a "rotated" form of the geostrophic equation. This provides a meridional overturning streamfunction as a function of depth for each basin. Using a series of periodically forced experiments in a global, coarse resolution configuration of the general circulation model NEMO, we explore the timescales over which this scaling is temporally valid. We find that the scaling holds well in the upper Atlantic cell (at 1000 m) for multi-decadal (and longer) timescales, accurately reconstructing the relative magnitude of the response for different frequencies and explaining over 85 % of overturning variance on timescales of 64-2048 years. Despite the highly nonlinear response of the Antarctic cell in the abyssal Atlantic, between 76 and 94 % of the observed variability at 4000 m is reconstructed on timescales of 32 years (and longer). The scaling law is also applied in the Indo-Pacific. This analysis is extended to a higher resolution, stochastically forced simulation for which correlations of between 0.79 and 0.99 are obtained with upper Atlantic MOC variability on timescales >25 years. These results indicate that meridional density gradients and overturning are linked via meridional pressure gradients, and that both the strength and structure of the MOC can be reconstructed from hydrography on multi-decadal and longer timescales provided that the link is made in this way.

  13. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-chuan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A new read gate design for the vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory is disclosed which offers larger operating margin than the existing read gate designs. In the existing read gate designs, a current is applied to all the stripes. The stripes that contain a VBL pair are chopped, while the stripes that do not contain a VBL pair are not chopped. The information is then detected by inspecting the presence or absence of the bubble. The margin of the chopping current amplitude is very small, and sometimes non-existent. A new method of reading Vertical Bloch Line memory is also disclosed. Instead of using the wall chirality to separate the two binary states, the spatial deflection of the stripe head is used. Also disclosed herein is a compact memory which uses vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement in the form of stacks of VBL memory layers is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. High data transfer rate is achieved by operating all the layers in parallel. Using Hall effect sensing, and optical sensing via the Faraday effect to access the data from within the three-dimensional packages, an even higher data transfer rate can be achieved due to parallel operation within each layer.

  14. Sucrose Diffusion in Decellularized Heart Valves for Freeze-Drying.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Goecke, Tobias; Ramm, Robert; Harder, Michael; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Wolkers, Willem Frederik

    2015-09-01

    Decellularized heart valves can be used as starter matrix implants for heart valve replacement therapies in terms of guided tissue regeneration. Decellularized matrices ideally need to be long-term storable to assure off-the-shelf availability. Freeze-drying is an attractive preservation method, allowing storage at room temperature in a dried state. However, the two inherent processing steps, freezing and drying, can cause severe damage to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and the overall tissue histoarchitecture and thus impair biomechanical characteristics of resulting matrices. Freeze-drying therefore requires a lyoprotective agent that stabilizes endogenous structural proteins during both substeps and that forms a protective glassy state at room temperature. To estimate incubation times needed to infiltrate decellularized heart valves with the lyoprotectant sucrose, temperature-dependent diffusion studies were done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Glycerol, a cryoprotective agent, was studied for comparison. Diffusion of both protectants was found to exhibit Arrhenius behavior. The activation energies of sucrose and glycerol diffusion were found to be 15.9 and 37.7 kJ·mol(-1), respectively. It was estimated that 4 h of incubation at 37°C is sufficient to infiltrate heart valves with sucrose before freeze-drying. Application of a 5% sucrose solution was shown to stabilize acellular valve scaffolds during freeze-drying. Such freeze-dried tissues, however, displayed pores, which were attributed to ice crystal damage, whereas vacuum-dried scaffolds in comparison revealed no pores after drying and rehydration. Exposure to a hygroscopic sucrose solution (80%) before freeze-drying was shown to be an effective method to diminish pore formation in freeze-dried ECMs: matrix structures closely resembled those of control samples that were not freeze-dried. Heart valve matrices were shown to be in a glassy state after drying, suggesting that they can

  15. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  16. Exploring human freeze responses to a threat stressor.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Norman B; Richey, J Anthony; Zvolensky, Michael J; Maner, Jon K

    2008-09-01

    Despite the fundamental nature of tonic immobility in anxiety responses, surprisingly little empirical research has focused on the "freeze" response in humans. The present report evaluated the frequency and predictors of a freeze response in the context of a biological challenge. A nonclinical sample (N=404) underwent a 20-s inhalation of 20% CO(2)/balance O(2). Perceptions of immobility in the context of the challenge were reported in 13% of the sample, compared with 20% reporting a significant desire to flee. Subjective anxiety and panic during the challenge were associated with the freeze response, as were a number of anxiety symptom dimensions. PMID:17880916

  17. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  18. PEM Fuel Cell Freeze Durability and Cold Start Project

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, T.; O'Neill, Jonathan

    2008-01-02

    UTC has taken advantage of the unique water management opportunities inherent in micro-porous bipolar-plates to improve the cold-start performance of its polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). Diagnostic experiments were used to determine the limiting factors in micro-porous plate PEFC freeze performance and the causes of any performance decay. Alternative cell materials were evaluated for their freeze performance. Freeze-thaw cycling was also performed to determine micro-porous plate PEFC survivability. Data from these experiments has formed the basis for continuing development of advanced materials capable of supporting DOE's cold-start and durability objectives.

  19. Vertical variations of coral reef drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Shai; Niewerth, Stephan; Koll, Katinka; Shavit, Uri

    2016-05-01

    Modeling flow in a coral reef requires a closure model that links the local drag force to the local mean velocity. However, the spatial flow variations make it difficult to predict the distribution of the local drag. Here we report on vertical profiles of measured drag and velocity in a laboratory reef that was made of 81 Pocillopora Meandrina colony skeletons, densely arranged along a tilted flume. Two corals were CT-scanned, sliced horizontally, and printed using a 3-D printer. Drag was measured as a function of height above the bottom by connecting the slices to drag sensors. Profiles of velocity were measured in-between the coral branches and above the reef. Measured drag of whole colonies shows an excellent agreement with previous field and laboratory studies; however, these studies never showed how drag varies vertically. The vertical distribution of drag is reported as a function of flow rate and water level. When the water level is the same as the reef height, Reynolds stresses are negligible and the drag force per unit fluid mass is nearly constant. However, when the water depth is larger, Reynolds stress gradients become significant and drag increases with height. An excellent agreement was found between the drag calculated by a momentum budget and the measured drag of the individual printed slices. Finally, we propose a modified formulation of the drag coefficient that includes the normal dispersive stress term and results in reduced variations of the drag coefficient at the cost of introducing an additional coefficient.

  20. Controlled freezing studies on boar sperm cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Medrano, A; Holt, W V; Watson, P F

    2009-08-01

    Boar spermatozoa from different males were frozen at a number of cooling rates using a controlled-rate freezing machine designed to minimise thermal variables involved in the cooling process, to see whether inter-boar sperm cryosurvival may be improved by changing cooling rate. Four cooling rates in the range 3 degrees C min(-1) to 24 degrees C min(-1) from +5 degrees C to -5 degrees C and five cooling rates in the range 5 degrees C min(-1) to 80 degrees C min(-1) from -5 degrees C to -80 degrees C were tested. Motile spermatozoa were assessed by CASA, plasma membrane integrity by fluorescent probes (SYBR14/propidium iodide) and flow cytometry, and acrosome membrane integrity by lectins (PSA-rhodamine) and fluorescent microscopy. Cooling rate affected sperm cryosurvival from different boars in different ways; that is, spermatozoa from some individuals were less susceptible than those from others. For some individuals, sperm cryosurvival was poor regardless of cooling rate, but for others it was better with faster rates. This confirms cooling rate effects on sperm cryosurvival depend on inter-individual boar differences more than on the cooling process itself. PMID:19601937

  1. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jill C; Sandve, Simen R

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve. PMID:23761798

  2. Drying a tuberculosis vaccine without freezing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yun-Ling; Sampson, Samantha; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Caponetti, Giovanni; Sadoff, Jerry; Bloom, Barry R; Edwards, David

    2007-02-20

    With the increasing incidence of tuberculosis and drug resistant disease in developing countries due to HIV/AIDS, there is a need for vaccines that are more effective than the present bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. We demonstrate that BCG vaccine can be dried without traditional freezing and maintained with remarkable refrigerated and room-temperature stability for months through spray drying. Studies with a model Mycobacterium (Mycobacterium smegmatis) revealed that by removing salts and cryoprotectant (e.g., glycerol) from bacterial suspensions, the significant osmotic pressures that are normally produced on bacterial membranes through droplet drying can be reduced sufficiently to minimize loss of viability on drying by up to 2 orders of magnitude. By placing the bacteria in a matrix of leucine, high-yield, free-flowing, "vial-fillable" powders of bacteria (including M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG) can be produced. These powders show relatively minor losses of activity after maintenance at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C up to and beyond 4 months. Comparisons with lyophilized material prepared both with the same formulation and with a commercial formulation reveal that the spray-dried BCG has better overall viability on drying. PMID:17299039

  3. Effect of geometrical frustration on inverse freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Morais, C. V.; Zimmer, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between geometrical frustration (GF) and inverse freezing (IF) is studied within a cluster approach. The model considers first-neighbor (J1) and second-neighbor (J2) intracluster antiferromagnetic interactions between Ising spins on a checkerboard lattice and long-range disordered couplings (J ) among clusters. We obtain phase diagrams of temperature versus J1/J in two cases: the absence of J2 interaction and the isotropic limit J2=J1 , where GF takes place. An IF reentrant transition from the spin-glass (SG) to paramagnetic (PM) phase is found for a certain range of J1/J in both cases. The J1 interaction leads to a SG state with high entropy at the same time that can introduce a low-entropy PM phase. In addition, it is observed that the cluster size plays an important role. The GF increases the PM phase entropy, but larger clusters can give an entropic advantage for the SG phase that favors IF. Therefore, our results suggest that disordered systems with antiferromagnetic clusters can exhibit an IF transition even in the presence of GF.

  4. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Sandve, Simen R.

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve. PMID:23761798

  5. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  6. Freeze fracturing of the human stria vascularis.

    PubMed

    Bagger-Sjöbäck, D; Engström, B; Steinholtz, L; Hillerdal, M

    1987-01-01

    The stria vascularis is an important functional element in the mammalian cochlea. This special tissue is considered to be the source of the endocochlear potential and thus the driving force for the production of a receptor response to the auditory stimulus. In order to maintain its function, the stria vascularis needs to be separated from the endolymphatic space by a tight seal. This seal is comprised of tight junctions in the marginal cell layer. The junctional arrangement in the stria vascularis is described, utilizing the freeze-fracturing technique which allows the visualization of large expansions of plasma membrane. The marginal cells are generally separated by tight junctions of the moderately tight to tight type. In places, however, even so-called leaky junctions with only a few sealing strands are present. Whereas the intermediate cell layer seems to lack tight junctions, the basal cells are connected by extensive tight junctions more or less covering the entire cell. These junctions seem to form an extremely tight barrier against the spiral ligament. Gap junctions are also present in the tissue. Intermediate cells as well as the basal cells are coupled by gap junctions. In the basal cell layer, gap junctional elements may also be found inside the large tight junctions comprising so-called mixed junctions. PMID:3564929

  7. Freezing water in no-man's land.

    PubMed

    Manka, Alexandra; Pathak, Harshad; Tanimura, Shinobu; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard; Wyslouzil, Barbara E

    2012-04-01

    We report homogeneous ice nucleation rates between 202 K and 215 K, thereby reducing the measurement gap that previously existed between 203 K and 228 K. These temperatures are significantly below the homogenous freezing limit, T(H)≈ 235 K for bulk water, and well within no-man's land. The ice nucleation rates are determined by characterizing nanodroplets with radii between 3.2 and 5.8 nm produced in a supersonic nozzle using three techniques: (1) pressure trace measurements to determine the properties of the flow as well as the temperature and velocity of the droplets, (2) small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to measure the size and number density of the droplets, and (3) Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to follow the liquid to solid phase transition. Assuming that nucleation occurs throughout the droplet volume, the measured ice nucleation rates J(ice,V) are on the order of 10(23) cm(-3) s(-1), and agree well with published values near 203 K. PMID:22354018

  8. Satellite freeze forecast system: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A satellite-based temperature monitoring and prediction system consisting of a computer controlled acquisition, processing, and display system and the ten automated weather stations called by that computer was developed and transferred to the national weather service. This satellite freeze forecasting system (SFFS) acquires satellite data from either one of two sources, surface data from 10 sites, displays the observed data in the form of color-coded thermal maps and in tables of automated weather station temperatures, computes predicted thermal maps when requested and displays such maps either automatically or manually, archives the data acquired, and makes comparisons with historical data. Except for the last function, SFFS handles these tasks in a highly automated fashion if the user so directs. The predicted thermal maps are the result of two models, one a physical energy budget of the soil and atmosphere interface and the other a statistical relationship between the sites at which the physical model predicts temperatures and each of the pixels of the satellite thermal map.

  9. The interaction of saccharides with lipid bilayer vesicles: stabilization during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Strauss, G; Schurtenberger, P; Hauser, H

    1986-06-13

    The fusion of small unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholines during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying/rehydration, and the suppression of fusion under these conditions by various saccharides, was investigated by gel filtration on Sepharose 4B, quasielastic light scattering, high-resolution 1H-NMR, ESR spin labeling, and differential scanning calorimetry. Freeze-thawing and freeze-drying of aqueous small unilamellar vesicle suspensions in the presence of sufficient sucrose had no significant effect on the average size and size distribution of small unilamellar vesicles. In the presence of sucrose the structural integrity and the permeability properties of the phosphatidylcholine bilayers were retained during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. A comparison of the stabilizing effect of sucrose with that of trehalose and glucose showed that the stabilization is not sugar-specific but is a general property of saccharides. The fraction of small unilamellar vesicles recovered after freeze-thawing depended on the saccharide/phosphatidylcholine molar ratio. The mechanism of the cryoprotective effect involves binding of the sugar to the phospholipid polar group, probably through hydrogen bonding. PMID:3011090

  10. Amplitude Manipulation Evokes Upper Limb Freezing during Handwriting in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Heremans, Elke; Nackaerts, Evelien; Vervoort, Griet; Vercruysse, Sarah; Broeder, Sanne; Strouwen, Carolien; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that besides freezing of gait (FOG), many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) also suffer from freezing in the upper limbs (FOUL). Up to now, it is unclear which task constraints provoke and explain upper limb freezing. Objective To investigate whether upper limb freezing and other kinematic abnormalities during writing are provoked by (i) gradual changes in amplitude or by (ii) sustained amplitude generation in patients with and without freezing of gait. Methods Thirty-four patients with PD, including 17 with and 17 without FOG, performed a writing task on a touch-sensitive writing tablet requiring writing at constant small and large size as well as writing at gradually increasing and decreasing size. Patients of both groups were matched for disease severity, tested while ‘on’ medication and compared to healthy age-matched controls. Results Fifty upper limb freezing episodes were detected in 10 patients, including 8 with and 2 without FOG. The majority of the episodes occurred when participants had to write at small or gradually decreasing size. The occurrence of FOUL and the number of FOUL episodes per patient significantly correlated with the occurrence and severity of FOG. Patients with FOUL also showed a significantly smaller amplitude in the writing parts outside the freezing episodes. Conclusions Corroborating findings of gait research, the current study supports a core problem in amplitude control underlying FOUL, both in maintaining as well as in flexibly adapting the cycle size. PMID:26580556

  11. Chloroplast Membrane Remodeling during Freezing Stress Is Accompanied by Cytoplasmic Acidification Activating SENSITIVE TO FREEZING21[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Allison C.

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a seasonal abiotic stress that restricts native plant ranges and crop distributions. Two types of low-temperature stress can be distinguished: chilling and freezing. Much work has been done on the mechanisms by which chilling is sensed, but relatively little is known about how plants sense freezing. Recently, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SENSITIVE TO FREEZING2 (SFR2) was identified as a protein that responds in a nontranscriptional manner to freezing. Here, we investigate the cellular conditions that allow SFR2 activation. Using a combination of isolated organelle, whole-tissue, and whole-plant assays, we provide evidence that SFR2 is activated by changes in cytosolic pH and Mg2+. Manipulation of pH and Mg2+ in cold-acclimated plants is shown to cause changes similar to those of freezing. We conclude that pH and Mg2+ are perceived as intracellular cues as part of the sensing mechanism for freezing conditions. This evidence provides a specific molecular mechanism to combat freezing. PMID:27233750

  12. Comparison of the depth of tissue necrosis between double-freeze and single-freeze nitrous oxide-based cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Adepiti, Akinfolarin Clement; Ajenifuja, Olusegun Kayode; Fadahunsi, Oluwaseyi Olatunji; Osasan, Stephen Adebayo; Pelemo, Olumuyiwa Eyitayo; Loto, Morebishe Olabisi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is one the methods of treating cervical premalignant lesions. It is particularly suitable for low-resource countries because of it is relative cheaper, has low cost of maintenance, ease of use and that does not require electricity which is in short supply in many rural areas of developing countries where the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer is very high. In this study we compared single and double freezing on the cervices of women admitted for hysterectomy for benign conditions using Nitrous-based cryotherapy. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted for elective hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions were randomized into two arms. The first group had single freeze cryotherapy while the second arm received double freeze cryotherapy. The cervices were examined 24 hours later to determine the depth of tissue necrosis. Results: In this comparative study, the depth of tissue necrosis was deeper with double freeze compared with single freeze. Also in both arms, the depth of necrosis was deeper on anterior lips than on posterior lips of the cervix. Conclusion: Double freeze technique achieve more depth of tissue necrosis than single-freeze on both anterior and posterior lips of the cervix. PMID:27185971

  13. Inner ear tissue preservation by rapid freezing: improving fixation by high-pressure freezing and hybrid methods.

    PubMed

    Bullen, A; Taylor, R R; Kachar, B; Moores, C; Fleck, R A; Forge, A

    2014-09-01

    In the preservation of tissues in as 'close to life' state as possible, rapid freeze fixation has many benefits over conventional chemical fixation. One technique by which rapid freeze-fixation can be achieved, high pressure freezing (HPF), has been shown to enable ice crystal artefact-free freezing and tissue preservation to greater depths (more than 40 μm) than other quick-freezing methods. Despite increasingly becoming routine in electron microscopy, the use of HPF for the fixation of inner ear tissue has been limited. Assessment of the quality of preservation showed routine HPF techniques were suitable for preparation of inner ear tissues in a variety of species. Good preservation throughout the depth of sensory epithelia was achievable. Comparison to chemically fixed tissue indicated that fresh frozen preparations exhibited overall superior structural preservation of cells. However, HPF fixation caused characteristic artefacts in stereocilia that suggested poor quality freezing of the actin bundles. The hybrid technique of pre-fixation and high pressure freezing was shown to produce cellular preservation throughout the tissue, similar to that seen in HPF alone. Pre-fixation HPF produced consistent high quality preservation of stereociliary actin bundles. Optimising the preparation of samples with minimal artefact formation allows analysis of the links between ultrastructure and function in inner ear tissues. PMID:25016142

  14. Inner ear tissue preservation by rapid freezing: Improving fixation by high-pressure freezing and hybrid methods

    PubMed Central

    Bullen, A.; Taylor, R.R.; Kachar, B.; Moores, C.; Fleck, R.A.; Forge, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the preservation of tissues in as ‘close to life’ state as possible, rapid freeze fixation has many benefits over conventional chemical fixation. One technique by which rapid freeze-fixation can be achieved, high pressure freezing (HPF), has been shown to enable ice crystal artefact-free freezing and tissue preservation to greater depths (more than 40 μm) than other quick-freezing methods. Despite increasingly becoming routine in electron microscopy, the use of HPF for the fixation of inner ear tissue has been limited. Assessment of the quality of preservation showed routine HPF techniques were suitable for preparation of inner ear tissues in a variety of species. Good preservation throughout the depth of sensory epithelia was achievable. Comparison to chemically fixed tissue indicated that fresh frozen preparations exhibited overall superior structural preservation of cells. However, HPF fixation caused characteristic artefacts in stereocilia that suggested poor quality freezing of the actin bundles. The hybrid technique of pre-fixation and high pressure freezing was shown to produce cellular preservation throughout the tissue, similar to that seen in HPF alone. Pre-fixation HPF produced consistent high quality preservation of stereociliary actin bundles. Optimising the preparation of samples with minimal artefact formation allows analysis of the links between ultrastructure and function in inner ear tissues. PMID:25016142

  15. Characterization of a laboratory-scale container for freezing protein solutions with detailed evaluation of a freezing process simulation.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ulrich; Jajcevic, Dalibor; Leitgeb, Stefan; Khinast, Johannes G; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    A 300-mL stainless steel freeze container was constructed to enable QbD (Quality by Design)-compliant investigations and the optimization of freezing and thawing (F/T) processes of protein pharmaceuticals at moderate volumes. A characterization of the freezing performance was conducted with respect to freezing kinetics, temperature profiling, cryoconcentration, and stability of the frozen protein. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of temperature and phase transition were established to facilitate process scaling and process analytics as well as customization of future freeze containers. Protein cryoconcentration was determined from ice-core samples using bovine serum albumin. Activity, aggregation, and structural perturbation were studied in frozen rabbit muscle l-lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) solution. CFD simulations provided good qualitative and quantitative agreement with highly resolved experimental measurements of temperature and phase transition, allowing also the estimation of spatial cryoconcentration patterns. LDH exhibited stability against freezing in the laboratory-scale system, suggesting a protective effect of cryoconcentration at certain conditions. The combination of the laboratory-scale freeze container with accurate CFD modeling will allow deeper investigations of F/T processes at advanced scale and thus represents an important step towards a better process understanding. PMID:24338205

  16. Impact of Freezing and Thawing on Soil Oxygen Dynamics and Nutrient Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojevic, T.; Rezanezhad, F.; Van Cappellen, P.; Smeaton, C. M.; Parsons, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs) influence the physical properties, microbial activity, biogeochemistry, nutrient and carbon cycling in soils, and regulate subsurface oxygen (O2) availability, affecting greenhouse gas exchanges between soils and the atmosphere. The ability to monitor changes in O2 levels, which are indicative of aerobic and anaerobic conditions, is key to understanding how changes in the frequency and amplitude of freeze-thaw cycles affect a soil's geochemical conditions and microbial activity. In this study, a highly instrumented soil column experiment was designed to accurately simulate freeze-thaw dynamics under controlled conditions. This design allowed us to reproduce realistic, time- and depth-dependent temperature gradients in the soil column. Continuous O2 levels throughout the soil column were monitored using high-resolution, luminescence-based, Multi Fiber Optode (MuFO) microsensors. Image-processing techniques were used to convert light intensity of high-resolution digital images of the sensor-emitted light into O2 concentrations. Water samples from various depths in the column were collected to monitor pore water composition changes. Headspace gas measurements were used to derive the effluxes of CO2 and CH4 during the experiment. The results indicate that the pulse of oxygen introduced by thawing caused partial and temporal oxidation of previously reduced sulfur and nitrogen species, leading to concomitant changes in pore water SO42- and NO3- concentrations. Pulsed CO2 emission to the headspace was observed at the onset of thawing, indicating that a physical ice barrier had formed during frozen conditions and prevented gas exchange between the soil and atmosphere. CO2 emission was due to a combination of the physical release of gases dissolved in pore water and entrapped below the frozen zone and changing microbial respiration in response to electron acceptor variability (O2, NO3-, SO42-).

  17. Tectorial Membrane Stiffness Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Emadi, Gulam; Getnick, Geoffrey; Quesnel, Alicia; Dallos, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear processes sound with high sensitivity and fine resolution over a wide frequency range. The underlying mechanism for this remarkable ability is the “cochlear amplifier”, which operates by modifying cochlear micromechanics. However, it is largely unknown how the cochlea implements this modification. Although gradual improvements in experimental techniques have yielded ever-better descriptions of gross basilar membrane vibration, the internal workings of the organ of Corti and of the tectorial membrane have resisted exploration. Although measurements of cochlear function in mice with a gene mutation for α-tectorin indicate the tectorial membrane's key role in the mechanoelectrical transformation by the inner ear, direct experimental data on the tectorial membrane's physical properties are limited, and only a few direct measurements on tectorial micromechanics are available. Using the hemicochlea, we are able to show that a tectorial membrane stiffness gradient exists along the cochlea, similar to that of the basilar membrane. In artificial perilymph (but with low calcium), the transversal and radial driving point stiffnesses change at a rate of –4.0 dB/mm and −4.9 dB/mm, respectively, along the length of the cochlear spiral. In artificial endolymph, the stiffness gradient for the transversal component was –3.4 dB/mm. Combined with the changes in tectorial membrane dimensions from base to apex, the radial stiffness changes would be able to provide a second frequency-place map in the cochlea. Young's modulus, which was obtained from measurements performed in the transversal direction, decreased by −2.6 dB/mm from base to apex. PMID:17496047

  18. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    SciTech Connect

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  19. Freeze shoe sampler for the collection of hyporheic zone sediments and porewater.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, M; Smith, L; Beckie, R

    2015-01-01

    The Starr and Ingleton (1992) drive point piston sampler (DPPS) design was modified by fitting it with a Murphy and Herkelrath (1996) type sample-freezing drive shoe (SFDS), which uses liquid carbon dioxide as a cryogen. Liquid carbon dioxide was used to freeze sediments in the lower 0.1 m of the core and the drive-point piston sealed the core at the top preserving the reductive-oxidation (redox) sensitive sediments from the atmosphere and maintaining natural stratigraphy. The use of nitrogen gas to provide positive pressure on the gas system blocked the ingress of water which froze on contact with the cryogen thus blocking the gas lines with ice. With this adaptation to the gas system cores could be collected at greater depths beneath the static water level. This tool was used to collect intact saturated sediment cores from the hyporheic zone of the tidally influenced Fraser River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada where steep geochemical and microbial gradients develop within the interface between discharging anaerobic groundwater and recharging aerobic river water. In total, 25 cores driven through a 1.5 m sampling interval were collected from the river bed with a mean core recovery of 75%. The ability to deploy this method from a fishing vessel makes the tool more cost effective than traditional marine-based drilling operations which often use barges, tug boats, and drilling rigs. PMID:24825508

  20. Florida harvester ant nest architecture, nest relocation and soil carbon dioxide gradients.

    PubMed

    Tschinkel, Walter R

    2013-01-01

    Colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius, excavate species-typical subterranean nests up the 3 m deep with characteristic vertical distribution of chamber area/shape, spacing between levels and vertical arrangement of the ants by age and brood stage. Colonies excavate and occupy a new nest about once a year, and doing so requires that they have information about the depth below ground. Careful excavation and mapping of vacated and new nests revealed that there was no significant difference between the old and new nests in any measure of nest size, shape or arrangement. Colonies essentially built a replicate of the just-vacated nest (although details differed), and they did so in less than a week. The reason for nest relocation is not apparent. Tschinkel noted that the vertical distribution of chamber area, worker age and brood type was strongly correlated to the soil carbon dioxide gradient, and proposed that this gradient serves as a template for nest excavation and vertical distribution. To test this hypothesis, the carbon dioxide gradient of colonies that were just beginning to excavate a new nest was eliminated by boring 6 vent holes around the forming nest, allowing the soil CO2 to diffuse into the atmosphere and eliminating the gradient. Sadly, neither the nest architecture nor the vertical ant distribution of vented nests differed from either unvented control or from their own vacated nest. In a stronger test, workers excavated a new nest under a reversed carbon dioxide gradient (high concentration near the surface, low below). Even under these conditions, the new and old nests did not differ significantly, showing that the soil carbon dioxide gradient does not serve as a template for nest construction or vertical worker distribution. The possible importance of soil CO2 gradients for soil-dwelling animals is discussed. PMID:23555829

  1. Florida Harvester Ant Nest Architecture, Nest Relocation and Soil Carbon Dioxide Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2013-01-01

    Colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius, excavate species-typical subterranean nests up the 3 m deep with characteristic vertical distribution of chamber area/shape, spacing between levels and vertical arrangement of the ants by age and brood stage. Colonies excavate and occupy a new nest about once a year, and doing so requires that they have information about the depth below ground. Careful excavation and mapping of vacated and new nests revealed that there was no significant difference between the old and new nests in any measure of nest size, shape or arrangement. Colonies essentially built a replicate of the just-vacated nest (although details differed), and they did so in less than a week. The reason for nest relocation is not apparent. Tschinkel noted that the vertical distribution of chamber area, worker age and brood type was strongly correlated to the soil carbon dioxide gradient, and proposed that this gradient serves as a template for nest excavation and vertical distribution. To test this hypothesis, the carbon dioxide gradient of colonies that were just beginning to excavate a new nest was eliminated by boring 6 vent holes around the forming nest, allowing the soil CO2 to diffuse into the atmosphere and eliminating the gradient. Sadly, neither the nest architecture nor the vertical ant distribution of vented nests differed from either unvented control or from their own vacated nest. In a stronger test, workers excavated a new nest under a reversed carbon dioxide gradient (high concentration near the surface, low below). Even under these conditions, the new and old nests did not differ significantly, showing that the soil carbon dioxide gradient does not serve as a template for nest construction or vertical worker distribution. The possible importance of soil CO2 gradients for soil-dwelling animals is discussed. PMID:23555829

  2. Freezing in Sealed Capillaries for Preparation of Frozen Hydrated Sections

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the freezing of specimens in a confined volume for preparation of vitreous samples for cryosectioning. With 15% dextran as a cryoprotectant, a sample sealed in a copper tube begins to freeze into crystalline ice when plunged into liquid ethane. Crystallization rapidly causes an increase in the pressure to the point that much of the sample freezes in a vitreous state. We used synchrotron X-ray diffraction of samples frozen with various amounts of dextran to characterize the ice phases and crystal orientation, providing insights on the freezing process. We have characterized cryosections obtained from these samples to explore the optimum amount of cryoprotectant. Images of cryosectioned bacteria frozen with various levels of cryoprotectant illustrate effects of cryoprotectant concentration. PMID:22077543

  3. 19. FIRST FLOOR LEVEL BELOW ICE FREEZING TANKS AND LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. FIRST FLOOR LEVEL BELOW ICE FREEZING TANKS AND LOWER LEVEL OF ICE DUMP AND LIFT WHERE FROZEN ICE IS BROUGHT INTO STORAGE. - Atlantic Ice & Coal Company, 135 Prince Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  4. Hydraulic conductivity of geosynthetic clay liners after freeze-thaw

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, R.D.; Daniel, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity tests were performed in large tanks on intact (single panel) and overlapped samples of three geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) that has been subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. The compressive stress applied to the GCLs (7.6--12.4 kPa) was selected to simulate final cover systems for landfills. Laboratory flexible-wall permeameter tests were also performed. With the exception of one overlapped GCL, all three GCLs withstood three freeze-thaw cycles without a significant change in hydraulic conductivity. An overlapped, geo-textile-encased, stitch-bonded GCL did undergo a 1,000-fold increase in hydraulic conductivity after one freeze-thaw cycle, but the overlapped area contained stitches, which are left off the edges of the full-sized material that is deployed in the field. In general, the tests showed that GCLs can withstand at least three freeze-thaw cycles without significant changes in hydraulic conductivity.

  5. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  6. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER SYSTEM - SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tec...

  7. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tech...

  8. Normal freezing of ideal ternary systems of the pseudobinary type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    Perfect liquid mixing but no solid diffusion is assumed in normal freezing. In addition, the molar compositions of the freezing solid and remaining liquid, respectively, follow the solidus and liquidus curves of the constitutional diagram. For the linear case, in which both the liquidus and solidus are perfectly straight lines, the normal freezing equation giving the fraction solidified at each melt temperature and the solute concentration profile in the frozen solid was determined as early as 1902, and has since been repeatedly published. Corresponding equations for quadratic, cubic or higher-degree liquidus and solidus lines have also been obtained. The equation of normal freezing for ideal ternary liquid solutions solidified into ideal solid solutions of the pseudobinary type is given. Sample computations with the use of this new equation were made and are given for the Ga-Al-As system.

  9. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  10. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  11. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  12. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  13. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  14. Atmospheric science: Sea-spray particles cause freezing in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.

    2015-09-01

    Ice clouds in marine regions at high latitudes might form in warmer and drier air than was previously believed because of freezing induced by airborne particles that contain organic materials from ocean surface waters. See Letter p.234

  15. Universality of tip singularity formation in freezing water drops.

    PubMed

    Marín, A G; Enríquez, O R; Brunet, P; Colinet, P; Snoeijer, J H

    2014-08-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:25126922

  16. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  17. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  18. Spray irrigation effects on surface-layer stability in an experimental citrus orchard during winter freezes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, H.J.; Smith, E.A.; Martsolf, J.D.

    1997-02-01

    Observations taken by two surface radiation and energy budget stations deployed in the University of Florida/Institute for Food and Agricultural Service experimental citrus orchard in Ginesville, Florida, have been analyzed to identify the effects of sprayer irrigation on thermal stability and circulation processes within the orchard during three 1992 winter freeze episodes. Lapse rates of temperature observed from a micrometeorological tower near the center of the orchard were also recorded during periods of irrigation for incorporation into the analysis. Comparisons of the near-surface temperature lapse rates observed with the two energy budget stations show consistency between the two sites and with the tower-based lapse rates taken over a vertical layer from 1.5 to 15 m above ground level. A theoretical framework was developed that demonstrates that turbulent-scale processes originating within the canopy, driven by latent heat release associated with condensation and freezing processes from water vapor and liquid water released from sprayer nozzles, can destabilize lapse rates and promote warm air mixing above the orchard canopy. The orchard data were then analyzed in the context of the theory for evidence of local overturning and displacement of surface layer air, with warmer air from aloft driven by locally buoyant plumes generated by water vapor injected into the orchard during the irrigation periods. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Amine-phenyl multi-component gradient stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dewoolkar, Veeren C; Kannan, Balamurali; Ashraf, Kayesh M; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2015-09-01

    Continuous multi-component gradients in amine and phenyl groups were fabricated using controlled rate infusion (CRI). Solutions prepared from either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTEOS) or phenyltrimethoxysilane (PTMOS) were infused, in a sequential fashion, at a controlled rate into an empty graduated cylinder housing a vertically aligned thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. The hydrolyzed precursors reacted with an abundance of silanol (SiOH) groups on the TLC plates, covalently attaching the functionalized silane to its surface. The extent of modification by phenyl and amine was determined by the kinetics of each reaction and the exposure time at each point along the TLC plate. The local concentrations of phenyl and amine were measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The profile of the multi-component gradients strongly depended on the order of infusion, the direction of the gradient and the presence of available surface silanol groups. A slightly higher amount of phenyl can be deposited on the TLC plate by first modifying its surface with amine groups as they serve as a catalyst, enhancing condensation. Separation of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and the control of retention factors were demonstrated on the multi-component gradient TLC plates. Uniformly modified and single-component TLC plates gave different separations compared to the multi-component gradient plates. The retention factors of the individual vitamins depended on the order of surface modification, the spotting end, and whether the multi-component gradients align or oppose each other. PMID:26255112

  20. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  1. Atmospheric gradients from very long baseline interferometry observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmillan, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    Azimuthal asymmetries in the atmospheric refractive index can lead to errors in estimated vertical and horizontal station coordinates. Daily average gradient effects can be as large as 50 mm of delay at a 7 deg elevation. To model gradients, the constrained estimation of gradient paramters was added to the standard VLBI solution procedure. Here the analysis of two sets of data is summarized: the set of all geodetic VLBI experiments from 1990-1993 and a series of 12 state-of-the-art R&D experiments run on consecutive days in January 1994. In both cases, when the gradient parameters are estimated, the overall fit of the geodetic solution is improved at greater than the 99% confidence level. Repeatabilities of baseline lengths ranging up to 11,000 km are improved by 1 to 8 mm in a root-sum-square sense. This varies from about 20% to 40% of the total baseline length scatter without gradient modeling for the 1990-1993 series and 40% to 50% for the January series. Gradients estimated independently for each day as a piecewise linear function are mostly continuous from day to day within their formal uncertainties.

  2. Biphasic Investigation of Tissue Mechanical Response During Freezing Front Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jamie; Han, Bumsoo; Chuong, Cheng-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Cryopreservation of engineered tissue (ET) has achieved limited success due to limited understanding of freezing-induced biophysical phenomena in ETs, especially fluid-matrix interaction within ETs. To further our understanding of the freezing-induced fluid-matrix interaction, we have developed a biphasic model formulation that simulates the transient heat transfer and volumetric expansion during freezing, its resulting fluid movement in the ET, elastic deformation of the solid matrix and the corresponding pressure redistribution within. Treated as a biphasic material, the ET consists of a porous solid matrix fully saturated with interstitial fluid. Temperature-dependent material properties were employed and phase change was included by incorporating the latent heat of phase change into an effective specific heat term. Model-predicted temperature distribution, the location of the moving freezing front, and the ET deformation rates through the time course compare reasonably well with experiments reported previously. Results from our theoretical model show that behind the marching freezing front, the ET undergoes expansion due to phase change of its fluid contents. It compresses the region preceding the freezing front leading to its fluid expulsion and reduced regional fluid volume fractions. The expelled fluid is forced forward and upward into the region further ahead of the compression zone causing a secondary expansion zone; which then compresses the region further downstream with much reduced intensity. Overall, it forms an alternating expansion-compression pattern which moves with the marching freezing front. The present biphasic model helps us to gain insights into some facets of the freezing process and cryopreservation treatment that could not be gleaned experimentally. Its resulting understanding will ultimately be useful to design and improve cryopreservation protocols for ETs. PMID:22757502

  3. Freeze concentration of dairy products Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.E.; Vasavada, K.C.

    1993-09-01

    An efficient, electrically driven freeze concentration system offers potential for substantially increasing electricity demand while providing the mature dairy industry with new products for domestic and export markets together with enhanced production efficiencies. Consumer tests indicate that dairy products manufactured from freeze-concentrated ingredients are either preferred or considered equivalent in quality to fresh milk-based products. Economic analyses indicate that this technology should be competitive with thermal evaporation processes on a commercial basis.

  4. Stabilized, Freeze-Dried PCR Mix for Detection of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klatser, Paul R.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; van Ingen, Cor W.; Kolk, Arend H. J.

    1998-01-01

    We report here the development of a freeze-drying procedure allowing stabilization at ambient temperature of preoptimized, premixed, and predispensed PCR mixes aimed at the detection of mycobacteria in clinical materials. The freeze-dried mixes retained activity at 4°C and at 20°C for 1 year and for 3 months at 37°C, as judged by their performance with 50 and 500 fg of purified Mycobacterium bovis BCG target DNA. PMID:9620427

  5. Computation of the gravity field and its gradient: Some applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, C. P.; Tiwari, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    New measuring instruments of Earth's gravity gradient tensors (GGT) have offered a fresh impetus to gravimetry and its application in subsurface exploration. Several efforts have been made to provide a thorough understanding of the complex properties of the gravity gradient tensor and its mathematical formulations to compute GGT. However, there is not much open source software available. Understanding of the tensor properties leads to important guidelines in the development of real three dimensional geological models. We present a MATLAB computational algorithm to calculate the gravity field and full gravity gradient tensor for an undulated surface followed by regular geometries like an infinite horizontal slab, a vertical sheet, a solid sphere, a vertical cylinder, a normal fault model and a rectangular lamina or conglomerations of such bodies and the results are compared with responses using professional software based on different computational schemes. Real subsurface geometries of complex geological structures of interest are approximated through arrangements of vertical rectangular laminas. The geological application of this algorithm is demonstrated over a horst-type structure of Oklahoma Aulacogen, USA and Vredefort Dome, South Africa, where measured GGT data are available.

  6. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  7. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  8. Immersion freezing of biological particles at LACIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauss, T.; Hartmann, S.; Temkiv, T. S.; Augustin, S.; Gosewinkel Karlson, U.; Sahyoun, M. M.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Voigtländer, J.; Raddatz, M.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Biological particles, especially bacteria being ubiquitous in the atmosphere, belong to the most efficient ice nuclei (IN) (Möhler, 2008) and hence might have a large impact on weather and climate. In this study, the immersion freezing behavior of different size segregated biological particles is investigated at the laminar flow tube LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Hartmann et al., 2011). For these experiments, SNOMAX and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are used as IN. SNOMAX industrially produced from Pseudomonas-syringae bacteria, which are very ice nucleation active, can be seen as a proxy for ice nucleating bacteria in general. On the surface of these bacteria, ice nucleating proteins that initiate the freezing are situated (Maki et al., 1974). Additionally, it has been found that some ice nucleating bacteria strains have the ability to produce OMV, i.e., strangulated parts of the bacterial cell consisting of the same membrane material (Phelps et al., 1986). These OMV might contain the same ice nucleating proteins on their surface and thus might be able to nucleate ice as well. The OMV used in our experiments were extracted from bacteria cultivated from rain samples collected in Denmark from 30 m height. In our experiments, the biological particles are suspended in air via atomization, size selected by means of a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, and then fed into LACIS. In LACIS, well defined droplets are produced by activating the biological particles to cloud droplets, so that each droplet contains only one biological particle. By decreasing the temperature in LACIS, these droplets are frozen. To determine the ice fraction, i.e., the fraction of frozen droplets to all particles, the liquid and frozen droplets are distinguished by means of a newly self-built optical device, which is positioned under LACIS, using the depolarization of light scattered by a single particle. The ice fractions are measured as a function of temperature and

  9. Freeze concentration of dairy products, Phase 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luksas, A.; Ahmed, S.; Johnson, T.A.

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore freeze concentration as a process to replace thermal evaporation in the dairy industry. The goals of the study were to save energy by converting concentration processes to an efficient, electrically powered, refrigeration system, and to create higher quality and innovative products that might bring new life to a nature dairy market. A small freeze concentration pilot plant was used to concentrate products for quality comparisons, for physical and chemical analytical determinations, and to discover any equipment/product attributes or limitations. Data was correlated to compare operating economics of freeze concentrations superior to the fresh feedstock in sensory and functionality tests upon reconstitution. Laboratory testing showed equal or superior quality in resulting spray dried powders from freeze concentrates. Freeze concentration was shown to be economically competitive with thermal processes and second generation freezing technology is projected to produce a substantially less expensive product and offer other advantages over current thermally produced goods. 31 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Freeze avoidance: a dehydrating moss gathers no ice.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Thomas; Bryant, Gary; Hocart, Charles H; Huang, Cheng X; Ball, Marilyn C

    2010-10-01

    Using cryo-SEM with EDX fundamental structural and mechanical properties of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. were studied in relation to tolerance of freezing temperatures. In contrast to more complex plants, no ice accumulated within the moss during the freezing event. External ice induced desiccation with the response being a function of cell type; water-filled hydroid cells cavitated and were embolized at -4 °C while parenchyma cells of the inner cortex exhibited cytorrhysis, decreasing to ∼ 20% of their original volume at a nadir temperature of -20 °C. Chlorophyll fluorescence showed that these winter acclimated mosses displayed no evidence of damage after thawing from -20 °C while GCMS showed that sugar concentrations were not sufficient to confer this level of freezing tolerance. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry showed internal ice nucleation occurred in hydrated moss at ∼-12 °C while desiccated moss showed no evidence of freezing with lowering of nadir temperature to -20 °C. Therefore the rapid dehydration of the moss provides an elegantly simple solution to the problem of freezing; remove that which freezes. PMID:20525002

  11. Quality Evaluation of Pork with Various Freezing and Thawing Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the physicochemical and sensory quality characteristics due to the influence of various thawing methods on electro-magnetic and air blast frozen pork were examined. The packaged pork samples, which were frozen by air blast freezing at −45℃ or electro-magnetic freezing at −55℃, were thawed using 4 different methods: refrigeration (4±1℃), room temperature (RT, 25℃), cold water (15℃), and microwave (2450 MHz). Analyses were carried out to determine the drip and cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC), moisture content and sensory evaluation. Frozen pork thawed in a microwave indicated relatively less thawing loss (0.63-1.24%) than the other thawing methods (0.68-1.38%). The cooking loss after electro-magnetic freezing indicated 37.4% by microwave thawing, compared with 32.9% by refrigeration, 36.5% by RT, and 37.2% by cold water in ham. The thawing of samples frozen by electro-magnetic freezing showed no significant differences between the methods used, while the moisture content was higher in belly thawed by microwave (62.0%) after electro-magnetic freezing than refrigeration (54.8%), RT (61.3%), and cold water (61.1%). The highest overall acceptability was shown for microwave thawing after electro-magnetic freezing but there were no significant differences compared to that of the other samples. PMID:26761493

  12. Effect of Freezing Conditions on Fecal Bacterial Composition in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Lawlor, Peadar G; Magowan, Elizabeth; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Sample preservation and recovery of intact DNA from gut samples may affect the inferred gut microbiota composition in pigs. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the freezing process and storage temperature prior to DNA extraction on DNA recovery and bacterial community composition in pig feces using quantitative PCR. Fresh fecal samples from six growing pigs were collected and five aliquots of each prepared: (1) total DNA extracted immediately; (2) stored at -20 °C; (3) snap frozen and stored at -20 °C; (4) stored at -80 °C; and (5) snap frozen and stored at -80 °C. Results showed that DNA yields from fresh fecal samples were, on average, 25 to 30 ng higher than those from the various stored samples. The DNA extracted from fresh samples had more gene copies of total bacteria and all targeted bacterial groups per gram feces compared to DNA extraction from frozen samples. Data presentation also modified the observed effect of freeze storage; as results for Lactobacillus group, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Clostridium cluster IV, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and Enterobacteriaceae showed the opposite effect when expressed as relative abundance, by being greater in freeze stored feces than in fresh feces. Snap freezing increased the relative proportion of Clostridium cluster IV by 24%. In conclusion, the freezing process affected DNA yield and bacterial abundances, whereas snap freezing and storage temperature had only little influence on abundances of bacterial populations in pig feces. PMID:26927191

  13. Effect of Surface Energy on Freezing Temperature of Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Bekele, Selemon; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Previous studies have found that superhydrophobic surfaces are effective in delaying freezing of water droplets. However, the freezing process of water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces depends on factors such as droplet size, surface area, roughness, and cooling rate. The role of surface energy, independent of any other parameters, in delaying freezing of water is not understood. Here, we have used infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) to study the freezing of water next to solid substrates with water contact angles varying from 5° to 110°. We find that the freezing temperature of water decreases with increasing surface hydrophobicity only when the sample volume is small (∼10 μL). For a larger volume of water (∼300 μL), the freezing temperature is independent of surface energy. For water next to the surfaces with contact angle ≥54°, we observe a strong SFG peak associated with highly coordinated water. This research sheds new light on understanding the key factors in designing new anti-icing coatings. PMID:27314147

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Spartina pectinata in Response to Freezing Stress.

    PubMed

    Nah, Gyoungju; Lee, Moonsub; Kim, Do-Soon; Rayburn, A Lane; Voigt, Thomas; Lee, D K

    2016-01-01

    Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata), a perennial C4 grass native to the North American prairie, has several distinctive characteristics that potentially make it a model crop for production in stressful environments. However, little is known about the transcriptome dynamics of prairie cordgrass despite its unique freezing stress tolerance. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to explore the transcriptome dynamics of prairie cordgrass in response to freezing stress at -5°C for 5 min and 30 min. We used a RNA-sequencing method to assemble the S. pectinata leaf transcriptome and performed gene-expression profiling of the transcripts under freezing treatment. Six differentially expressed gene (DEG) groups were categorized from the profiling. In addition, two major consecutive orders of gene expression were observed in response to freezing; the first being the acute up-regulation of genes involved in plasma membrane modification, calcium-mediated signaling, proteasome-related proteins, and transcription regulators (e.g., MYB and WRKY). The follow-up and second response was of genes involved in encoding the putative anti-freezing protein and the previously known DNA and cell-damage-repair proteins. Moreover, we identified the genes involved in epigenetic regulation and circadian-clock expression. Our results indicate that freezing response in S. pectinata reflects dynamic changes in rapid-time duration, as well as in metabolic, transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic regulation. PMID:27032112

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Spartina pectinata in Response to Freezing Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nah, Gyoungju; Lee, Moonsub; Kim, Do-Soon; Rayburn, A. Lane; Voigt, Thomas; Lee, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata), a perennial C4 grass native to the North American prairie, has several distinctive characteristics that potentially make it a model crop for production in stressful environments. However, little is known about the transcriptome dynamics of prairie cordgrass despite its unique freezing stress tolerance. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to explore the transcriptome dynamics of prairie cordgrass in response to freezing stress at -5°C for 5 min and 30 min. We used a RNA-sequencing method to assemble the S. pectinata leaf transcriptome and performed gene-expression profiling of the transcripts under freezing treatment. Six differentially expressed gene (DEG) groups were categorized from the profiling. In addition, two major consecutive orders of gene expression were observed in response to freezing; the first being the acute up-regulation of genes involved in plasma membrane modification, calcium-mediated signaling, proteasome-related proteins, and transcription regulators (e.g., MYB and WRKY). The follow-up and second response was of genes involved in encoding the putative anti-freezing protein and the previously known DNA and cell-damage-repair proteins. Moreover, we identified the genes involved in epigenetic regulation and circadian-clock expression. Our results indicate that freezing response in S. pectinata reflects dynamic changes in rapid-time duration, as well as in metabolic, transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic regulation. PMID:27032112

  16. Imaging the Endothelial Glycocalyx In Vitro by Rapid Freezing/Freeze Substitution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ebong, Eno E; Macaluso, Frank P; Spray, David C; Tarbell, John M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Recent publications questioned the validity of endothelial cell (EC) culture studies of glycocalyx (GCX) function, due to findings that GCX in vitro may be substantially thinner than in vivo. The assessment of thickness differences is complicated by GCX collapse during dehydration for traditional electron microscopy. We measured in vitro GCX thickness using rapid freezing/freeze substitution transmission electron microscopy (RF/FS-TEM), taking advantage of high spatial resolution provided by TEM and the capability to stably preserve the GCX in its hydrated configuration by RF/FS. Methods and Results Bovine aortic and rat fat pad endothelial cells (BAEC and RFPEC) were subjected to conventional- or RF/FS-TEM. Conventionally preserved BAEC GCX was ~0.040 μm in thickness. RF/FS-TEM revealed impressively thick BAEC GCX of ~11 μm and RFPEC GCX of ~5 μm. RF/FS-TEM also discerned GCX structure and thickness variations due to heparinase III enzyme treatment and extracellular protein removal, respectively. Immunoconfocal studies confirmed that the in vitro GCX is several microns thick and is comprised of extensive and well integrated heparan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and protein layers. Conclusions New observations by RF/FS-TEM reveal substantial GCX layers on cultured EC, supporting their continued use for fundamental studies of GCX and its function in the vasculature. PMID:21474821

  17. Effects of freezing, freeze drying and convective drying on in vitro gastric digestion of apples.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Maria Esperanza; Bornhorst, Gail M; Eim, Valeria; Rosselló, Carmen; Simal, Susana

    2017-01-15

    The influence of processing (freezing at -196°C in liquid N2, FN sample; freeze-drying at -50°C and 30Pa, FD sample; and convective drying at 60°C and 2m/s, CD sample) on apple (var. Granny Smith) behavior during in vitro gastric digestion was investigated. Dried apples (FD and CD samples) were rehydrated prior to digestion. Changes in carbohydrate composition, moisture, soluble solids, acidity, total polyphenol content (TPC), and antioxidant activity (AA) of apple samples were measured at different times during digestion. Processing resulted in disruption of the cellular structure during digestion, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and changes in carbohydrate composition. Moisture content increased (6-11% dmo), while soluble solids (55-78% dmo), acidity (44-72% dmo), total polyphenol content (30-61% dmo), and antioxidant activity (41-87%) decreased in all samples after digestion. Mathematical models (Weibull and exponential models) were used to better evaluate the influence of processing on apple behavior during gastric digestion. PMID:27542444

  18. Inhibition, Executive Function, and Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rajal G.; Klein, Krystal A.; Nomura, Mariko; Fleming, Michael; Mancini, Martina; Giladi, Nir; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that freezing of gait (FoG) in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with declines in executive function (EF). However, EF is multi-faceted, including three dissociable components: inhibiting prepotent responses, switching between task sets, and updating working memory. Objective This study investigated which aspect of EF is most strongly associated with FoG in PD. Method Three groups were studied: adults with PD (with and without FoG) and age-matched, healthy adults. All participants completed a battery of cognitive tasks previously shown to discriminate among the three EF components. Participants also completed a turning-in-place task that was scored for FoG by neurologists blind to subjects’ self-reported FoG. Results Compared to both other groups, participants with FoG showed significant performance deficits in tasks associated with inhibitory control, even after accounting for differences in disease severity, but no significant deficits in task-switching or updating working memory. Surprisingly, the strongest effect was an intermittent tendency of participants with FoG to hesitate, and thus miss the response window, on go trials in the Go-Nogo task. The FoG group also made slower responses in the conflict condition of the Stroop task. Physician-rated FoG scores were correlated both with failures to respond on go trials and with failures to inhibit responses on nogo trials in the Go-Nogo task. Conclusion These results suggest that FoG is associated with a specific inability to appropriately engage and release inhibition, rather than with a general executive deficit. PMID:24496099

  19. A three dimensional view of damage in oat crown tissue recovering from freezing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiology of freezing tolerance in small grains (oats, barley, wheat and rye) is usually studied by analyzing the metabolism and genetics of plants prior to freezing, during cold- and freeze-acclimation. We wanted to study the physiology of plants after freezing, during a period of recovery whe...

  20. Carbohydrate and lipid dynamics in wheat crown tissue in response to mild freeze-thaw treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing tolerance resulting from cold hardening is critical to survival of fall-planted crops such as winter wheat. Exposure of winter wheat plants to cycles of freeze-thaw at temperatures just below, and just above freezing results in incremental improvements of freezing tolerance. Defining the ph...

  1. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [improved quality of freeze-dried foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for improving the quality of freeze-dried foods were investigated. Areas discussed include: (1) microstructure of freeze-dried systems, (2) structural changes in freeze-dried systems, (3) artificial food matrices, and (4) osmotic preconcentration to yield improved freeze-dried products.

  2. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  3. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  4. Vertical heterogeneity in predation pressure in a temperate forest canopy

    PubMed Central

    Aikens, Kathleen R.; Buddle, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The forest canopy offers a vertical gradient across which variation in predation pressure implies variation in refuge quality for arthropods. Direct and indirect experimental approaches were combined to assess whether canopy strata differ in ability to offer refuge to various arthropod groups. Vertical heterogeneity in impact of avian predators was quantified using exclosure cages in the understory, lower, mid, and upper canopy of a north-temperate deciduous forest near Montreal, Quebec. Bait trials were completed in the same strata to investigate the effects of invertebrate predators. Exclusion of birds yielded higher arthropod densities across all strata, although treatment effects were small for some taxa. Observed gradients in predation pressure were similar for both birds and invertebrate predators; the highest predation pressure was observed in the understory and decreased with height. Our findings support a view of the forest canopy that is heterogeneous with respect to arthropod refuge from natural enemies. PMID:24010017

  5. Surfactant-induced gradients in the three-dimensional Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Kupitz, Dennis; Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus; Hauser, Marcus J B

    2011-11-01

    Scroll waves are prominent patterns formed in three-dimensional excitable media, and they are frequently considered highly relevant for some types of cardiac arrhythmias. Experimentally, scroll wave dynamics is often studied by optical tomography in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which produces CO(2) as an undesired product. Addition of small concentrations of a surfactant to the reaction medium is a popular method to suppress or retard CO(2) bubble formation. We show that in closed reactors even these low concentrations of surfactants are sufficient to generate vertical gradients of excitability which are due to gradients in CO(2) concentration. In reactors open to the atmosphere such gradients can be avoided. The gradients induce a twist on vertically oriented scroll waves, while a twist is absent in scroll waves in a gradient-free medium. The effects of the CO(2) gradients are reproduced by a numerical study, where we extend the Oregonator model to account for the production of CO(2) and for its advection against the direction of gravity. The numerical simulations confirm the role of solubilized CO(2) as the source of the vertical gradient of excitability in reactors closed to the atmosphere. PMID:22181487

  6. Surface Energy Fluxes During Arctic Freeze-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ola; Blomquist, Byron; Guest, Peter; Fairall, Christopher; Stammerjohn, Sharon; Brooks, Ian; Björk, Göran; Tjernström, Michael; Inoue, Jun

    2016-04-01

    This presentation will use atmospheric and ocean mixed-layer observations from three cruises during the past two years to examine the magnitude and variability of the air-ocean energy fluxes, the sources of the variability, the impact of the fluxes on the ocean mixed-layer thermal structure, and how these surface energy fluxes impact the initial ice formation. The measurements were made during the ACSE, Mirai, and Sea State field programs, the first two obtaining measurements near the ice edge in the Laptev and Chukchi Seas in September 2014 and the last along the advancing ice edge in the Beaufort/Chukchi Sea in October 2015. These time periods include the onset of continuous ocean heat loss, the initial episodic ice formation, and the core period for southward advance of the ice. Frequent atmospheric soundings and continuous remote-sensor measurements provide the vertical kinematic and thermodynamic structure in the lower troposphere. Broadband radiometers, turbulent flux sensors, surface temperature sensors, surface characterization instruments, and basic meteorological instrumentation provide continuous measurements of all surface energy flux terms (shortwave/longwave radiation, sensible/latent turbulent heat fluxes), allowing the quantification of the total energy exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere. Furthermore, each cruise provided continuous measurements of the upper-ocean temperature and salinity and frequent CTD measurements of the ocean temperature and salinity profiles, providing estimates of upper-ocean energy evolution. Various methods for characterizing the ocean surface (open ocean, ice cover, ice thickness, wave state, etc.) allow linking energy changes with changes in ocean surface conditions. Analyses of the September and October conditions show persistent ocean heat loss after Sep. 15 because of the reduction of downwelling shortwave radiation and strong impacts of off-ice airflow on turbulent heat fluxes and downwelling longwave

  7. Gradients in analyzability.

    PubMed

    Grotstein, J S

    A discussion of "Some Communicative Properties of the Bipersonal Field" by Robert Langs, M.D. In response to Dr. Langs' delineation of the bipersonal field concept and his clinical elaboration of a triad of disorders which are graded into classifications of descending analyzability: Types A,B, and C fields. I confirm his thesis and endeavor to demonstrate some underlying foundations of his categorical assumptions, namely the conceptions of projective identification, of the intactness of the background object of primary identification, the conception of a dual-track theory of infantile development in order to delineate the parallel between the separated self and the continuation of primary identification, and the postulation of manic and schizoid types of narcissistic character disorders (Types B and C respectively). All of these conceptions are vicissitudes of the varying ways in which patients confront the depressive position of separation-individuation with rapprochement and, thereby, conform to a gradient in which symbolization interpretations can be utilized in analytic treatment. PMID:738806

  8. Cold-stage scanning electron microscope measurement of ice morphology in apple tissue as a function of freezing rate.

    PubMed

    Bomben, J L; King, C J; Hayes, T L

    1983-10-01

    A cold-stage SEM was used to document the morphology of ice in apple tissue and a sucrose solution frozen at rates ranging from 450 to 0.03 degrees K/min. Freezing rates of 3-mm-thick apple discs were measured with a differential thermocouple technique, which gave measurement of the growth velocity and the temperature gradient through the solidified specimen as well as the cooling rate during solidification. Cold-stage SEM micrographs were used to measure the dendritic spacing of the ice structures, and these data were found to correlate linearly with the square root of the cooling rate during solidification as would be predicted by a theoretical analysis of mass transfer in the formation of dendrites. Comparison of freeze-substituted and freeze-dried apple-tissue micrographs with those from a cold-stage SEM showed that the cold-stage SEM technique was the only one which correctly represented ice morphology in apple tissue. PMID:6627968

  9. Hysteretic melting and freezing of nanoscale indium islands using local thermal cycling for phase-change memory nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brintlinger, Todd; Hussain Baloch, Kamal; Qi, Yi; Cullen, William G.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Cumings, John

    2007-03-01

    Using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) operating in dark-field mode, the melting and freezing transition in nanoscale (approximately 20-200nm diameter) metal islands can be imaged at video rates (33ms/frame). The metal, typically indium, islands are thermally evaporated on one side of a 100nm thick SiN membrane. Local thermal gradients produced by Joule heating of lithographically defined electrodes on the opposite side of the membrane show a hysteretic effect in the melting/freezing of the metal islands. Read and write cycles are accomplished with 5-10 microW power, while a quiescent power of 80-100 microW is required to keep an island near its melting point. The hysteresis indicates a finite nucleation energy during freezing of individual islands. While TEM is not a practical readout mechanism, the behavior suggests a type of phase-change memory node on an inherently nanometer scale. Results for all the aforementioned will be shown, including micrographs, video, and related discussion.

  10. Ambient in-situ immersion freezing measurements - findings from the ZAMBIS 2014 field campaign for three ice nucleation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Atkinson, James D.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the influence of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, it is crucial to understand cloud formation processes in the atmosphere. A key process, which significantly affects cloud microphysical properties and the initiation of precipitation thus contributing to the hydrological cycle, is the prevailing type of ice nucleation mechanism. In mixed-phase clouds immersion freezing is the dominant ice crystal forming mechanism, whereby ice nucleating particles (INP) first act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are activated to cloud droplets followed by freezing upon supercooling. There are a number of experimental methods and techniques to investigate the ice nucleating ability in the immersion mode, however most techniques are offline for field sampling or only suitable for laboratory measurements. In-situ atmospheric studies are needed to understand the ice formation processes of 'real world' particles. Laboratory experiments simulate conditions of atmospheric processes like ageing or coating but are still idealized. Our method is able to measure ambient in-situ immersion freezing on single immersed aerosol particles. The instrumental setup consists of the recently developed portable immersion mode cooling chamber (PIMCA) as a vertical extension to the portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC, [1]), where the frozen fraction of activated aerosol particles are detected by the ice optical depolarization detector (IODE, [2]). Two additional immersion freezing techniques based on a droplet freezing array [3,4] are used to sample ambient aerosol particles either in a suspension (fraction larger ~0.6 μm) or on PM10-filters to compare different ice nucleation techniques. Here, we present ambient in-situ measurements at an urban forest site in Zurich, Switzerland held during the Zurich ambient immersion freezing study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014. We investigated the ice nucleating ability of natural atmospheric aerosol with the PIMCA/PINC immersion freezing setup as

  11. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  12. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. Empirical equation estimates geothermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. )

    1995-01-02

    An empirical equation can estimate geothermal (natural) temperature profiles in new exploration areas. These gradients are useful for cement slurry and mud design and for improving electrical and temperature log interpretation. Downhole circulating temperature logs and surface outlet temperatures are used for predicting the geothermal gradients.

  14. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  15. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  16. Measuring and modeling hemoglobin aggregation below the freezing temperature.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mónica; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P; Singh, Satish K; Geraldes, Vitor; Rodrigues, Miguel A

    2013-08-01

    Freezing of protein solutions is required for many applications such as storage, transport, or lyophilization; however, freezing has inherent risks for protein integrity. It is difficult to study protein stability below the freezing temperature because phase separation constrains solute concentration in solution. In this work, we developed an isochoric method to study protein aggregation in solutions at -5, -10, -15, and -20 °C. Lowering the temperature below the freezing point in a fixed volume prevents the aqueous solution from freezing, as pressure rises until equilibrium (P,T) is reached. Aggregation rates of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) increased at lower temperature (-20 °C) and higher BHb concentration. However, the addition of sucrose substantially decreased the aggregation rate and prevented aggregation when the concentration reached 300 g/L. The unfolding thermodynamics of BHb was studied using fluorescence, and the fraction of unfolded protein as a function of temperature was determined. A mathematical model was applied to describe BHb aggregation below the freezing temperature. This model was able to predict the aggregation curves for various storage temperatures and initial concentrations of BHb. The aggregation mechanism was revealed to be mediated by an unfolded state, followed by a fast growth of aggregates that readily precipitate. The aggregation kinetics increased for lower temperature because of the higher fraction of unfolded BHb closer to the cold denaturation temperature. Overall, the results obtained herein suggest that the isochoric method could provide a relatively simple approach to obtain fundamental thermodynamic information about the protein and the aggregation mechanism, thus providing a new approach to developing accelerated formulation studies below the freezing temperature. PMID:23808610

  17. Experience Modulates Vicarious Freezing in Rats: A Model for Empathy

    PubMed Central

    Atsak, Piray; Orre, Marie; Bakker, Petra; Cerliani, Leonardo; Roozendaal, Benno

    2011-01-01

    The study of the neural basis of emotional empathy has received a surge of interest in recent years but mostly employing human neuroimaging. A simpler animal model would pave the way for systematic single cell recordings and invasive manipulations of the brain regions implicated in empathy. Recent evidence has been put forward for the existence of empathy in rodents. In this study, we describe a potential model of empathy in female rats, in which we studied interactions between two rats: a witness observes a demonstrator experiencing a series of footshocks. By comparing the reaction of witnesses with or without previous footshock experience, we examine the role of prior experience as a modulator of empathy. We show that witnesses having previously experienced footshocks, but not naïve ones, display vicarious freezing behavior upon witnessing a cage-mate experiencing footshocks. Strikingly, the demonstrator's behavior was in turn modulated by the behavior of the witness: demonstrators froze more following footshocks if their witness froze more. Previous experiments have shown that rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) when receiving footshocks. Thus, the role of USV in triggering vicarious freezing in our paradigm is examined. We found that experienced witness-demonstrator pairs emitted more USVs than naïve witness-demonstrator pairs, but the number of USVs was correlated with freezing in demonstrators, not in witnesses. Furthermore, playing back the USVs, recorded from witness-demonstrator pairs during the empathy test, did not induce vicarious freezing behavior in experienced witnesses. Thus, our findings confirm that vicarious freezing can be triggered in rats, and moreover it can be modulated by prior experience. Additionally, our result suggests that vicarious freezing is not triggered by USVs per se and it influences back onto the behavior of the demonstrator that had elicited the vicarious freezing in witnesses, introducing a paradigm to study empathy

  18. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  19. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ɛy=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  20. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  1. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  2. Multi-scale validation of a new soil freezing scheme for a land-surface model with physically-based hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttevin, I.; Krinner, G.; Ciais, P.; Polcher, J.; Legout, C.

    2012-04-01

    Soil freezing is a major feature of boreal regions with substantial impact on climate. The present paper describes the implementation of the thermal and hydrological effects of soil freezing in the land surface model ORCHIDEE, which includes a physical description of continental hydrology. The new soil freezing scheme is evaluated against analytical solutions and in-situ observations at a variety of scales in order to test its numerical robustness, explore its sensitivity to parameterization choices and confront its performance to field measurements at typical application scales. Our soil freezing model exhibits a low sensitivity to the vertical discretization for spatial steps in the range of a few millimetres to a few centimetres. It is however sensitive to the temperature interval around the freezing point where phase change occurs, which should be 1 °C to 2 °C wide. Furthermore, linear and thermodynamical parameterizations of the liquid water content lead to similar results in terms of water redistribution within the soil and thermal evolution under freezing. Our approach does not allow firm discrimination of the performance of one approach over the other. The new soil freezing scheme considerably improves the representation of runoff and river discharge in regions underlain by permafrost or subject to seasonal freezing. A thermodynamical parameterization of the liquid water content appears more appropriate for an integrated description of the hydrological processes at the scale of the vast Siberian basins. The use of a subgrid variability approach and the representation of wetlands could help capture the features of the Arctic hydrological regime with more accuracy. The modeling of the soil thermal regime is generally improved by the representation of soil freezing processes. In particular, the dynamics of the active layer is captured with more accuracy, which is of crucial importance in the prospect of simulations involving the response of frozen carbon

  3. Preparation of chitosan nanocomposites with a macroporous structure by unidirectional freezing and subsequent freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Aranaz, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez, María C; Ferrer, María Luisa; del Monte, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Chitosan is the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, a naturally abundant mucopolysaccharide that consists of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucose through a β (1→4) linkage and is found in nature as the supporting material of crustaceans, insects, etc. Chitosan has been strongly recommended as a suitable functional material because of its excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, and adsorption properties. Boosting all these excellent properties to obtain unprecedented performances requires the core competences of materials chemists to design and develop novel processing strategies that ultimately allow tailoring the structure and/or the composition of the resulting chitosan-based materials. For instance, the preparation of macroporous materials is challenging in catalysis, biocatalysis and biomedicine, because the resulting materials will offer a desirable combination of high internal reactive surface area and straightforward molecular transport through broad "highways" leading to such a surface. Moreover, chitosan-based composites made of two or more distinct components will produce structural or functional properties not present in materials composed of one single component. Our group has been working lately on cryogenic processes based on the unidirectional freezing of water slurries and/or hydrogels, the subsequent freeze-drying of which produce macroporous materials with a well-patterned structure. We have applied this process to different gels and colloidal suspensions of inorganic, organic, and hybrid materials. In this review, we will describe the application of the process to chitosan solutions and gels typically containing a second component (e.g., metal and ceramic nanoparticles, or carbon nanotubes) for the formation of chitosan nanocomposites with a macroporous structure. We will also discuss the role played by this tailored composition and structure in the ultimate performance of these materials. PMID:25421320

  4. Preparation of Chitosan Nanocompositeswith a Macroporous Structure by Unidirectional Freezing and Subsequent Freeze-Drying

    PubMed Central

    Aranaz, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez, María C.; Ferrer, María Luisa; del Monte, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan is the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, a naturally abundant mucopolysaccharide that consists of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucose through a β (1→4) linkage and is found in nature as the supporting material of crustaceans, insects, etc. Chitosan has been strongly recommended as a suitable functional material because of its excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, and adsorption properties. Boosting all these excellent properties to obtain unprecedented performances requires the core competences of materials chemists to design and develop novel processing strategies that ultimately allow tailoring the structure and/or the composition of the resulting chitosan-based materials. For instance, the preparation of macroporous materials is challenging in catalysis, biocatalysis and biomedicine, because the resulting materials will offer a desirable combination of high internal reactive surface area and straightforward molecular transport through broad “highways” leading to such a surface. Moreover, chitosan-based composites made of two or more distinct components will produce structural or functional properties not present in materials composed of one single component. Our group has been working lately on cryogenic processes based on the unidirectional freezing of water slurries and/or hydrogels, the subsequent freeze-drying of which produce macroporous materials with a well-patterned structure. We have applied this process to different gels and colloidal suspensions of inorganic, organic, and hybrid materials. In this review, we will describe the application of the process to chitosan solutions and gels typically containing a second component (e.g., metal and ceramic nanoparticles, or carbon nanotubes) for the formation of chitosan nanocomposites with a macroporous structure. We will also discuss the role played by this tailored composition and structure in the ultimate performance of these materials. PMID:25421320

  5. Fight-flight or freeze-hide? Personality and metabolic phenotype mediate physiological defence responses in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Rupia, Emmanuel J; Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G; Lu, Weiqun

    2016-07-01

    Survival depends on appropriate behavioural and physiological responses to danger. In addition to active 'fight-flight' defence responses, a passive 'freeze-hide' response is adaptive in some contexts. However, the physiological mechanisms determining which individuals choose a given defence response remain poorly understood. We examined the relationships among personality, metabolic performance and physiological stress responses across an environmental gradient in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. We employed four behavioural assays to document the existence of two distinct behavioural types ('bold' and 'shy') in this species. We found consistent metabolic differences between individuals of a given behavioural type across an environmental gradient: shy individuals had overall lower aerobic scope, maximum metabolic rate and standard metabolic rate than bold individuals in both high (25 ppt) and low (3 ppt) salinity. These behavioural and metabolic differences translated into divergent physiological responses during acute stress: shy individuals adopted a passive 'freeze-hide' response by reducing their oxygen consumption rates (akin to shallow breathing) whereas bold individuals adopted an active 'fight-flight' response by increasing their rates of respiration. These distinct defence strategies were repeatable within individuals between salinity treatments. Although it has been suggested theoretically, this is the first empirical evidence that the metabolic response to stressful situations differs between bold and shy individuals. Our results emphasize the importance of incorporating physiological measures to understand the mechanisms driving persistent inter-individual differences in animals. PMID:27044558

  6. Snowmelt and Surface Freeze/Thaw Timings over Alaska derived from Passive Microwave Observations using a Wavelet Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Dinardo, S. J.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost soils contain a vast amount of organic carbon that will be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide or methane when thawed. Surface to air greenhouse gas fluxes are largely dependent on such surface controls as the frozen/thawed state of the snow and soil. Satellite remote sensing is an important means to create continuous mapping of surface properties. Advances in the ability to determine soil and snow freeze/thaw timings from microwave frequency observations improves upon our ability to predict the response of carbon gas emission to warming through synthesis with in-situ observation, such as the 2012-2015 Carbon in Arctic Reservoir Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Surface freeze/thaw or snowmelt timings are often derived using a constant or spatially/temporally variable threshold applied to time-series observations. Alternately, time-series singularity classifiers aim to detect discontinuous changes, or "edges", in time-series data similar to those that occur from the large contrast in dielectric constant during the freezing or thaw of soil or snow. We use multi-scale analysis of continuous wavelet transform spectral gradient brightness temperatures from various channel combinations of passive microwave radiometers, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, AMSR2) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I F17) gridded at a 10 km posting with resolution proportional to the observational footprint. Channel combinations presented here aim to illustrate and differentiate timings of "edges" from transitions in surface water related to various landscape components (e.g. snow-melt, soil-thaw). To support an understanding of the physical basis of observed "edges" we compare satellite measurements with simple radiative transfer microwave-emission modeling of the snow, soil and vegetation using in-situ observations from the SNOw TELemetry (SNOTEL) automated weather stations. Results of freeze/thaw and snow-melt timings and trends are

  7. Effect of Freezing Conditions on Fecal Bacterial Composition in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Lawlor, Peadar G.; Magowan, Elizabeth; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Storage of gut samples may affect the extractability of intact DNA and analyzed bacterial composition. In this study, we compared the DNA yield and the abundance of total bacteria and eight bacterial taxa when DNA was extracted from fresh fecal samples of pigs or from freeze stored samples with or without prior snap-freezing in liquid nitrogen. Results showed that the greatest differences in DNA yield and bacterial abundances were found when DNA was extracted from fresh feces compared to freeze stored fecal samples. Abstract Sample preservation and recovery of intact DNA from gut samples may affect the inferred gut microbiota composition in pigs. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the freezing process and storage temperature prior to DNA extraction on DNA recovery and bacterial community composition in pig feces using quantitative PCR. Fresh fecal samples from six growing pigs were collected and five aliquots of each prepared: (1) total DNA extracted immediately; (2) stored at −20 °C; (3) snap frozen and stored at −20 °C; (4) stored at −80 °C; and (5) snap frozen and stored at −80 °C. Results showed that DNA yields from fresh fecal samples were, on average, 25 to 30 ng higher than those from the various stored samples. The DNA extracted from fresh samples had more gene copies of total bacteria and all targeted bacterial groups per gram feces compared to DNA extraction from frozen samples. Data presentation also modified the observed effect of freeze storage; as results for Lactobacillus group, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Clostridium cluster IV, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and Enterobacteriaceae showed the opposite effect when expressed as relative abundance, by being greater in freeze stored feces than in fresh feces. Snap freezing increased the relative proportion of Clostridium cluster IV by 24%. In conclusion, the freezing process affected DNA yield and bacterial abundances, whereas snap freezing and storage

  8. Antibody Staining in C. Elegans Using "Freeze-Cracking"

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Janet S.

    2013-01-01

    To stain C. elegans with antibodies, the relatively impermeable cuticle must be bypassed by chemical or mechanical methods. "Freeze-cracking" is one method used to physically pull the cuticle from nematodes by compressing nematodes between two adherent slides, freezing them, and pulling the slides apart. Freeze-cracking provides a simple and rapid way to gain access to the tissues without chemical treatment and can be used with a variety of fixatives. However, it leads to the loss of many of the specimens and the required compression mechanically distorts the sample. Practice is required to maximize recovery of samples with good morphology. Freeze-cracking can be optimized for specific fixation conditions, recovery of samples, or low non-specific staining, but not for all parameters at once. For antibodies that require very hard fixation conditions and tolerate the chemical treatments needed to chemically permeabilize the cuticle, treatment of intact nematodes in solution may be preferred. If the antibody requires a lighter fix or if the optimum fixation conditions are unknown, freeze-cracking provides a very useful way to rapidly assay the antibody and can yield specific subcellular and cellular localization information for the antigen of interest. PMID:24145964

  9. Instability and freezing in a solidifying melt conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda C.; Whitehead, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous works have shown that when liquid flows in a pipe whose boundary temperature is below freezing, a tubular drainage conduit forms surrounded by solidified material that freezes shut under the appropriate combination of forcing conditions. We conduct laboratory experiments with wax in which the tube freezes shut below a certain value of flux from a pump. As the flux is gradually decreased to this value, the total pressure drop across the length of the tube first decreases to a minimum value and then rises before freezing. Previous theoretical models of a tube driven by a constant pressure drop suggest that once the pressure minimum is reached, the states for a lower flux should be unstable and the tube should therefore freeze-up. In our experiments, flux and pressure drop were coupled, and this motivates us to extend the theory for low Reynolds number flow through a tube with solidification to incorporate a simple pressure-drop-flux relationship. Our model predicts a steady-state relationship between flux and pressure drop that has a minimum pressure as the flux is varied. The stability properties of these steady states depend on the boundary conditions: for a fixed flux, they are all stable, whereas for fixed pressure drop, only those with a flux larger than that at the pressure drop minimum are stable. For a mixed pressure-flux condition, the stability threshold of the steady states lies between these two end members. This provides a possible mechanism for the experimental observations.

  10. Arabidopsis ESK1 encodes a novel regulator of freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhanguo; Mandaokar, Ajin; Chen, Junping; Last, Robert L; Browse, John

    2007-03-01

    The eskimo1 (esk1) mutation of Arabidopsis resulted in a 5.5 degrees C improvement in freezing tolerance in the absence of cold acclimation. Here we show that the increase in freezing tolerance is not associated with any increase in the ability to survive drought or salt stresses, which are similar to freezing in their induction of cellular dehydration. Genome-wide comparisons of gene expression between esk1-1 and wild type indicate that mutations at esk1 result in altered expression of transcription factors and signaling components and of a set of stress-responsive genes. Interestingly, the list of 312 genes regulated by ESK1 shows greater overlap with sets of genes regulated by salt, osmotic and abscisic acid treatments than with genes regulated by cold acclimation or by the transcription factors CBF3 and ICE1, which have been shown to control genetic pathways for freezing tolerance. Map-based cloning identified the esk1 locus as At3g55990. The wild-type ESK1 gene encodes a 57-kDa protein and is a member of a large gene family of DUF231 domain proteins whose members encode a total of 45 proteins of unknown function. Our results indicate that ESK1 is a novel negative regulator of cold acclimation. Mutations in the ESK1 gene provide strong freezing tolerance through genetic regulation that is apparently very different from previously described genetic mechanisms of cold acclimation. PMID:17316173

  11. Freezing-induced fluid-matrix interaction in poroelastic material

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bumsoo; Miller, Jeffrey D.; Jung, Jun K.

    2008-01-01

    Freezing of biological tissue is emerging in various biomedical applications. The success of these applications requires precise control of the tissue functionality, which is closely associated with the microstructure of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study, the spatiotemporal effects of freezing on the ECM were experimentally and theoretically investigated by approximating biological tissue as a poroelastic material saturated with interstitial fluid. The experiments with type I collagen gel showed that its matrix underwent two distinct levels of structural changes due to freezing : enlarged pore structure of the matrix and increased collagen fibril diameters. The extent of these changes was augmented as the freezing temperature was lowered. The theoretical model suggested that the interstitial fluid might be transported toward the unfrozen region from the phase change interface due to the volumetric expansion associated with the water-ice phase change, and the transported fluid could interact with the matrix and enlarge its pore structure. The model also illustrated the effects of matrix structural properties on this interaction including initial porosity, hydraulic conductivity and elastic modulus. These results imply that an identical macroscopic freezing protocol may result in different microstructural alterations of poroelastic materials depending on the structural properties of the matrix. This may be relevant to understanding the tissue-type dependent outcomes of cryomedicine applications and be useful in designing cryomedicine applications for a wide variety of tissues. PMID:19102561

  12. A modified homogeneous freezing rate parameterization for aqueous solution droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Benz, S.; Hoehler, K.; Wagner, R.

    2012-12-01

    It is still a matter of debate wether cirrus cloud formation is dominated by heterogeneous ice nucleation, leading to low ice crystal number concentrations, or is also influenced by homogeneous freezing of solution aerosols leading to higher ice crystal number concentrations. Part of the discussion is due to the fact that current models seem to overestimate ice crystal numbers from homogeneous freezing compared to measurements, though the formation rate of cirrus ice crystals by homogeneous freezing of aqueous particles is believed to be well understood and formulated in terms of e.g. the concept of effective freezing temperatures or the water activity dependent ice nucleation rates. Series of recent cirrus cloud simulation experiments at the cloud chamber facility AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between -40°C and -80°C together with process modeling studies demonstrated, that the freezing formulations tend to show a low bias in the humidity onset thresholds for homogeneous ice formation at temperatures below about 210 K, and furthermore overestimate the ice formation rate by at least a factor of 2. The experimental results will be summarized and a new empirical fit to the experimental data will be suggested for use in atmospheric models.

  13. High-pressure freezing: current state and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kaech, Andres; Ziegler, Urs

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the latest developments in the field of high-pressure freezing (HPF). The Leica HPF machine EM HPM100 is discussed in detail due to significant changes compared to its predecessor model. Its centerpiece is a multipart polymer cartridge which holds the specimen carrier sandwich and guides it automatically through the freezing process until immersed in liquid nitrogen. The cartridge can be adapted to the specimen and carrier geometry to optimize the flow of liquid nitrogen and hence rapid cooling. Dedicated cartridges are available for a variety of different carriers, including carriers for samples of up to 5 mm in diameter. Cartridge-specific handling and carrier assemblies are described extensively for freezing samples in aluminum specimen carriers, cell cultures grown on Sapphire discs, suspensions for freeze-fracturing, and specimens for cryo-sectioning. Additionally, we include an advanced technique to freeze monolayer cell cultures on Sapphire discs with the Leica EM PACT2 HPF machine using a composite carrier. PMID:24357363

  14. Stabilization of lipid bilayer vesicles by sucrose during freezing

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, G.; Hauser, H.

    1986-01-01

    The freeze-induced fusion and leakage of small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) of natural and synthetic phosphatidylcholines and the suppression of these processes by sucrose was studied by electron microscopy, by high-resolution NMR, and by ESR techniques. During slow freezing of SUV suspensions in water, the lipid was compressed into a small interstitial volume and transformed into a multilamellar aggregate without vesicular structure. When frozen in sucrose solution, the lipid also was compressed between the ice crystals but remained in the form of vesicles. The fractional amount of lipid remaining as SUV after freezing was found to increase significantly only at sucrose/lipid molar ratios above 0.4. Eu3+ displaced sucrose from the lipid by competitive binding. During freezing in the absence of sucrose, the vesicles became transiently permeable to ions. ESR studies showed that fusion of vesicles in the absence of sucrose is far more extensive when they are frozen while above their phase-transition temperature (tc) than when frozen while below their tc. It is concluded that the extent of membrane disruption depends on the membrane mobility at the moment of freezing and that sucrose exerts its protective effect by binding to the membrane interface and/or by affecting the water structure. Images PMID:16593683

  15. Ready and waiting: Freezing as active action preparation under threat.

    PubMed

    Gladwin, Thomas E; Hashemi, Mahur M; van Ast, Vanessa; Roelofs, Karin

    2016-04-21

    Freezing is a defensive response characterized by rigidity and bradycardia, but it is unclear whether it is a passive versus active preparatory state. We developed a shooting task in which preparation and threat were manipulated independently: Participants were either helpless or able to respond to a possible upcoming attack, and attacks were either associated with an electric shock or not. Essentially, a purely anticipatory preparatory period was used during which no stimuli occurred. Freezing was assessed during this period. In addition to heart rate, body sway was measured, using a stabilometric force platform. The efficacy of the threat manipulation was confirmed via self-report. The ability to prepare led to decreases in heart rate and postural sway, while threat led to decreased heart rate. Further, exploratory analyses suggested that aggressive participants showed reduced initial freezing for threatening opponents, but increased postural freezing when armed. The results suggest that freezing may involve active preparation. Relations to results in passive viewing tasks are discussed. PMID:26994781

  16. 'Banking time': egg freezing and the negotiation of future fertility.

    PubMed

    Waldby, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the relatively recent practice of non-medical egg freezing, in which women bank their eggs for later use in conceiving a child. Non-medical egg freezing has only been available for about the last five years, as new vitrification techniques have made the success rates for actual conception more reliable than the earlier method of slow freezing. I draw on interviews with both clinicians and women who have banked their eggs to consider how this novel practice articulates with broader issues about the relationship between sexuality, reproduction and the political economy of household formation. Non-medical egg-freezing provides a technical solution to a number of different problems women face with regard to the elongation of the life course, the extension of education, the cost of household establishment and the iterative nature of relationship formation, thematised by the ubiquity of internet dating among the interviewees. I focus on the ways women used egg freezing to manage and reconcile different forms of time. PMID:25247927

  17. Measurement of electric field and gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters of floating microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, T E; Katschke, M R; Wells, K D

    2007-02-01

    A method for measuring the time-averaged vertical electric field and its gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters with n = 2 or 3 floating microspheres of known mass is described. The particle charge q is found by determining the ratio of the breathing frequency to the center-of-mass frequency for horizontal (in-plane) oscillations. The electric field at the position of the particles is then calculated using the measured charge-to-mass ratio, and the electric-field gradient is determined from the vertical resonance frequency. The Debye length is also found. Experimental results are in agreement with a simple sheath model. PMID:17578108

  18. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  19. Temperature profiles in high gradient furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Woodell, G. A.; Berry, R.; Crouch, R. K.; Sorokach, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate temperature measurement of the furnace environment is very important in both the science and technology of crystal growth as well as many other materials processing operations. A high degree of both accuracy and precision is acutely needed in the directional solidification of compound semiconductors in which the temperature profiles control the freezing isotherm which, in turn, affects the composition of the growth with a concomitant feedback perturbation on the temperature profile. Directional solidification requires a furnace configuration that will transport heat through the sample being grown. A common growth procedure is the Bridgman Stockbarger technique which basically consists of a hot zone and a cold zone separated by an insulator. In a normal growth procedure the material, contained in an ampoule, is melted in the hot zone and is then moved relative to the furnace toward the cold zone and solidification occurs in the insulated region. Since the primary path of heat between the hot and cold zones is through the sample, both axial and radial temperature gradients exist in the region of the growth interface. There is a need to know the temperature profile of the growth furnace with the crystal that is to be grown as the thermal load. However it is usually not feasible to insert thermocouples inside an ampoule and thermocouples attached to the outside wall of the ampoule have both a thermal and a mechanical contact problem as well as a view angle problem. The objective is to present a technique of calibrating a furnace with a thermal load that closely matches the sample to be grown and to describe procedures that circumvent both the thermal and mechanical contact problems.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Angelis, M. de; Prevedelli, M.

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.