Science.gov

Sample records for vertical gradient freeze

  1. Vertical bridgman and gradient freeze growth of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bourret, E.D.

    1990-07-01

    Major improvements in the structural and electrical perfection of single crystals of III-V compound semiconductors have been achieved by using new vertical Bridgman-type and vertical gradient freeze techniques. A general review of experimental set-ups used for growth of large diameter crystals of GaP, InP and GaAs is presented. Crystal properties and characteristic features are discussed to illustrate advantages and disadvantages of the vertical Bridgman-type growth techniques. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Design and fabrication of eight zone vertical dynamic gradient freeze system for organic single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, SP.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Ramamurthi, K.

    2013-08-01

    Design and construction of the vertical dynamic gradient freeze (VDGF) system operating in the temperature range from 50 °C to 500 °C for growing organic single crystals are described. The design of VDGF system consists of furnace, control system, translation assembly, and image capturing device. Furnace has been constructed with eight zones controlled independently by a dynamic temperature control system for achieving desired thermal environment and multiple temperature gradients, which are essential for the growth of organic single crystals. The transparent furnace enables direct observation to record and monitor the solid-liquid interface and growth of crystals through charge coupled device based video camera. The system is fully computerized hence it is possible to retrieve the complete growth and furnace history. In order to investigate the functioning of the constructed VDGF system for the growth of organic single crystals, a well known organic nonlinear optical single crystal of benzimidazole was grown. The crystalline quality and the optical transmittance of the grown crystal were studied.

  3. Synthesis and crystal growth of Mg2Si by the liquid encapsulated vertical gradient freezing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Reo; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Sakuragi, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of Mg2Si bulk crystals was performed by the vertical gradient freezing method using a KCl-MgCl2 eutectic liquid encapsulant. Stoichiometric polycrystalline Mg2Si bulk crystals were successfully grown by changing the composition ratio of starting Mg and Si powders (Mg/Si) from 2.0 to 3.5. A chemical reaction between Mg2Si and the crucible materials was inhibited using encapsulant materials, and the contamination by K or Cl originating from the encapsulant materials was not detected in almost all the samples. However, Mg evaporation could not be prevented completely during the synthesis and crystal growth. The optical band-gap energy of Mg2Si bulk crystals became minimal (0.79 eV) at a Mg/Si ratio of 2.5, at which the maximum electron mobility of 202 cm2·V-1·s-1 was obtained. These results indicate that the composition ratio of Mg/Si = 2.5 for starting Mg and Si powders was optimal for synthesizing Mg2Si bulk crystals with high crystalline quality.

  4. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of a CZT Growth Tip from a Vertical Gradient Freeze Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Henager, Charles H.; Edwards, Danny J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.

    2011-08-15

    Electronic backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to characterize the growth-tip region of a 4.2-cm diameter CdZnTe (CZT) boule grown using low-pressure Bridgman method in a vertical gradient freeze furnace. The boule was sectioned and polished and a section taken along the boule longitudinal centerline with an approximate surface area of 1-cm2 was used for optical and scanning electron microscopy. A collage was assembled using EBSD/SEM images to show morphological features, e.g., twin structure, grain structure, and overall crystal growth direction. Severely twinned regions originating from the tip and side walls were observed. The overall growth orientation was close to <110> and <112> directions. In some regions, the (001) poles of the CZT matrix aligned with the growth direction, while twins aligned such that (111) and (112) poles aligned with the growth direction. In some other areas, (112) or (011) poles of the CZT matrix aligned with the growth direction. New relationships between the CZT matrix and large Te polycrystalline particles were revealed: {11 }CZT??{1 00}Te and {001}CZT??{0 1}Te.

  5. Crystal Growth and Characterization of CdTe Grown by Vertical Gradient Freeze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, crystals of CdTe were grown from melts by the unseeded vertical gradient freeze method. The quality of grown crystal were studied by various characterization techniques including Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXT), chemical analysis by glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), low temperature photoluminescence (PL), and Hall measurements. The SWBXT images from various angles show nearly strain-free grains, grains with inhomogeneous strains, as well as twinning nucleated in the shoulder region of the boule. The GDMS chemical analysis shows the contamination of Ga at a level of 3900 ppb, atomic. The low temperature PL measurement exhibits the characteristic emissions of a Ga-doped sample. The Hall measurements show a resistivity of 1 x l0(exp 7) ohm-cm at room temperature to 3 x 10(exp 9) ohm-cm at 78K with the respective hole and electron concentration of 1.7 x 10(exp 9) cm(exp -3) and 3.9 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3) at room temperature.

  6. Effect of growth parameters on dislocation generation in InP single crystal grown by the vertical gradient freeze process

    SciTech Connect

    Gulluoglu, A.N. . Dept. of Material Science and Engineering); Tsai, C.T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-06-22

    The generation and multiplication of dislocations in an indium phosphide (InP) single crystal grown by the vertical gradient freeze (VGF) process is predicted using a crystallographic model. This model couples microscopic dislocation motion and multiplication to macroscopic plastic deformation during the crystal growth process. During growth of an InP crystal, dislocations are generated in the plastically deformed crystal as a result of crystallographic glide caused by excessive thermal stresses. The temperature fields are determined by solving the partial differential equation of heat conduction in a VGF crystal growth system. The effects of growth direction and growth parameters (i.e., imposed temperature gradients, crystal radius and growth rate) on dislocation generation and multiplication in an InP crystal are investigated. Dislocation density patterns on the cross section of an InP crystal are numerically calculated and compared with experimental observations.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray topographic study of dislocations in GaAs detector crystals grown by vertical gradient freeze technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tuomi, T.; Juvonen, M.; Rantamaeki, R.

    1998-12-31

    Large area transmission and section topographs of semi-insulating gallium arsenide wafers grown by the gradient freeze technique are made with synchrotron radiation at HASYLAB in Hamburg and at ESRF in Grenoble. Several high-resolution images including stereo pairs are obtained on the same film at a time. A typical dislocation line is an arc of a circle which starts from one surface and ends at the same surface. From the disappearance of the dislocation image and using the g {center_dot} b = 0 criterion it is concluded that the Burgers vector b of the most common dislocations is parallel to <110>. Rather large volumes of the wafer are dislocation-free. Section topographs of epitaxial wafers show defects and strain fields at the interface between an n-type substrate and the epitaxial layers grown by chemical vapor deposition. The results are compared with those obtained from detector performance measurements.

  8. Effects of total liquid encapsulation on the characteristics of GaAs single crystals grown by the vertical gradient freeze technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourret, E. D.; Merk, E. C.

    1991-03-01

    Total liquid encapsulation with B 2O 3 has been used to grow 50 mm diameter GaAs single crystals in PBN crucibles in a vertical gradient freeze configuration. The B 2O 3 layer efficiently prevents direct contact between the crucible and the GaAs charge and reproducible growth of single crystals can be achieved. The effect of B 2O 3 water content on the structural and electrical characteristics of the crystals was investigated. Water vapor can be trapped betwen the crystal and the crucible affecting the surface morphology of the crystals. The water content of the B 2O 3 encapsulant was found to affect the electrical properties of the crystals in a manner similar to what is observed for growth of GaAs crystals by the liquid encapsulated czochralski technique. Crystals grown encapsulated with dry B 2O 3 have been ion-implanted with silicon. The implant activations are comparable to those obtained on LEC grown crystals. Total liquid encapsulation in vertical gradient freeze can be used to produce device quality substrates.

  9. Final Report: Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations – Te-particles in vertical gradient freeze CZT: Size and Spatial Distributions and Constitutional Supercooling

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2014-10-01

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze CZT boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. The boule section was approximately 50-mm wide by 60-mm in length by 7-mm thick and was doubly polished for TIR work. Te-particles were imaged through the thickness using extended focal imaging to locate the particles in thickness planes spaced 15-µm apart and then in plane of the image using xy-coordinates of the particle center of mass so that a true three dimensional particle map was assembled for a 1-mm by 45-mm longitudinal strip and for a 1-mm by 50-mm radial strip. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips, and treating the particles as vertices of a network created a 3D image of the particle spatial distribution. Te-particles exhibited a multi-modal log-normal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure throughout the boule that can be correlated to dislocation network sizes in CZT. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te to reduce the melting point below 1273 K (1000°C). These solidification experiments were performed over a wide range of cooling rates and clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as 1) Te-particle direct capture from melt-solid growth instabilities, 2) Te-particle formation from dislocation core diffusion and the formation and breakup of Te-tubes, and 3) Te-particle formation due to classical nucleation and growth as precipitates.

  10. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  11. Semiconductor apparatus utilizing gradient freeze and liquid-solid techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry F. (Inventor); Borshchevsky, Alexander (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Transition metals of Group VIII (Co, Rh and Ir) have been prepared as semiconductor compounds with the general formula TSb.sub.3. The skutterudite-type crystal lattice structure of these semiconductor compounds and their enhanced thermoelectric properties results in semiconductor materials which may be used in the fabrication of thermoelectric elements to substantially improve the efficiency of the resulting thermoelectric device. Semiconductor materials having the desired skutterudite-type crystal lattice structure may be prepared in accordance with the present invention by using vertical gradient freezing techniques and/or liquid phase sintering techniques. Measurements of electrical and thermal transport properties of selected semiconductor materials prepared in accordance with the present invention, demonstrated high Hall mobilities (up to 1200 cm.sup.2.V.sup.-1.s.sup.-1) and good Seebeck coefficients (up to 150 .mu.VK.sup.-1 between 300.degree. C. and 700.degree. C.). Optimizing the transport properties of semiconductor materials prepared from elemental mixtures Co, Rh, Ir and Sb resulted in a substantial increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) at temperatures as high as 400.degree. C. for thermoelectric elements fabricated from such semiconductor materials.

  12. Controlled Temperature Gradient Improves Freezing Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Alter, Wendy S.; Hamilton, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Controlled gradient of temperature in advancing zone of solidification increases fatigue life of directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy. Improved solidification process eliminates, reduces, or controls microstructure of deleterious brittle phases, including carbides and gamma/gamma prime eutectic. Also reduces microsegregation and makes discrete carbides (if present) become fine and blocky. Expected to improve properties of other alloys, of both directionally-solidified polycrystalline and single-crystal forms.

  13. MODELING OF THE FREEZING PROCESS FOR FISH IN VERTICAL PLATE FREEZERS

    E-print Network

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    MODELING OF THE FREEZING PROCESS FOR FISH IN VERTICAL PLATE FREEZERS Christoph Backi, Jan Tommy at the freezing system on board. Aims of this study: Find a model to estimate the temperature distribution in a fish block during freezing in vertical platefreezers. For a known temperature distribution the energy

  14. Convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. W.; Chai, A. T.; Sun, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transport process in the fluid phase during the growth of a crystal has a profound influence on the structure and quality of the solid phase. In vertical growth techniques the fluid phase is often subjected to vertical temperature and concentration gradients. The main objective is to obtain more experimental data on convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients. Among actual crystal systems the parameters vary widely. The parametric ranges studied for mass transfer are mainly dictated by the electrochemical system employed to impose concentration gradients. Temperature or concentration difference are maintained between two horizontal end walls. The other walls are kept insulated. Experimental measurements and observations were made of the heat transfer or mass transfer, flow patterns, and the mean and fluctuating temperature distribution. The method used to visualize the flow pattern in the thermal cases is an electrochemical pH-indicator method. Laser shadowgraphs are employed to visualize flow patterns in the solutal cases.

  15. Convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. W.; Chai, A. T.; Sun, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The transport process in the fluid phase during the growth of a crystal has a profound influence on the structure and quality of the solid phase. In vertical growth techniques the fluid phase is often subjected to vertical temperature and concentration gradients. The main objective is to obtain more experimental data on convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients. Among actual crystal systems the parameters vary widely. The parametric ranges studied for mass transfer are mainly dictated by the electrochemical system employed to impose concentration gradients. Temperature or concentration difference are maintained between two horizontal end walls. The other walls are kept insulated. Experimental measurements and observations were made of the heat transfer or mass transfer, flow patterns, and the mean and fluctuating temperature distribution. The method used to visualize the flow pattern in the thermal cases is an electrochemical pH-indicator method. Laser shadowgraphs are employed to visualize flow patterns in the solutal cases.

  16. Relation between geoidal undulation, deflection of the vertical and vertical gravity gradient revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    The vertical gradients of gravity anomaly and gravity disturbance can be related to horizontal first derivatives of deflection of the vertical or second derivatives of geoidal undulations. These are simplified relations of which different variations have found application in satellite altimetry with the implicit assumption that the neglected terms—using remove-restore—are sufficiently small. In this paper, the different simplified relations are rigorously connected and the neglected terms are made explicit. The main neglected terms are a curvilinear term that accounts for the difference between second derivatives in a Cartesian system and on a spherical surface, and a small circle term that stems from the difference between second derivatives on a great and small circle. The neglected terms were compared with the dynamic ocean topography (DOT) and the requirements on the GOCE gravity gradients. In addition, the signal root-mean-square (RMS) of the neglected terms and vertical gravity gradient were compared, and the effect of a remove-restore procedure was studied. These analyses show that both neglected terms have the same order of magnitude as the DOT gradient signal and may be above the GOCE requirements, and should be accounted for when combining altimetry derived and GOCE measured gradients. The signal RMS of both neglected terms is in general small when compared with the signal RMS of the vertical gravity gradient, but they may introduce gradient errors above the spherical approximation error. Remove-restore with gravity field models reduces the errors in the vertical gravity gradient, but it appears that errors above the spherical approximation error cannot be avoided at individual locations. When computing the vertical gradient of gravity anomaly from satellite altimeter data using deflections of the vertical, the small circle term is readily available and can be included. The direct computation of the vertical gradient of gravity disturbance from satellite altimeter data is more difficult than the computation of the vertical gradient of gravity anomaly because in the former case the curvilinear term is needed, which is not readily available.

  17. Crystal Growth of CdTe by Gradient Freeze in Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Li, C.; Knuteson, D.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Szoke, J.; Barczy, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of unsealed melt growth of an array of II-VI compounds, namely, CdTe, CdZnTe and ZnSe, there is a tremendous amount of experimental data describing the correlations between melt conditions and crystal quality. The results imply that the crystallinity quality can be improved if the melt was markedly superheated or long-time held before growth. It is speculated that after high superheating the associated complex dissociate and the spontaneous nucleation is retarded. In this study, crystals of CdTe were grown from melts which have undergone different thermal history by the unseeded gradient freeze method using the Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC). The effects of melt conditions on the quality of grown crystal were studied by various characterization techniques, including Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWSXT), infrared microscopy, chemical analysis by glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), electrical conductivity and Hall measurements.

  18. Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in groundwater studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in ground-water studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.

  19. Overburden Pressure as a Cause of Vertical Velocity Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear effect of rocks stressed by the overburden pressure causes anisotropy. Evaluation shows that such anisotropy can be significant, reaching several tens of percent and probably more. This result is consistent with common practices, when stacking velocity needs extra corrections with a changing offset. This also implies that at field scales all the rocks are likely to be anisotropic, and this property needs to be accounted for during migration of data, tomography, AVO analysis etc. The laboratory velocity measurements need to be corrected for the nonlinear overburden effects, when applied to the field scales. Nonlinear rock coefficients can be determined from the special laboratory measurements. They also can be evaluated from observation of the nonlinear propagation effects, such as multiple frequency generation. Nonlinear coefficient for Berea sandstone turned out to be by an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from borehole data. This is likely due to low stiffness and low fluid saturation of the used sample. This also suggests possibility of very high velocity gradient at shallow depths in some rocks. An assumption that the amplitudes of the static strains well exceed those related to the dynamic field is not critical. It was made in order to simplify the derivations. If both components are comparable, then the solution would have an additional nonlinear component representing a multiple harmonic. The relations between the nonlinear elastic constants and the elastic constants of the effective TI medium are very simple and allow straightforward estimate of the medium anisotropy induced by an applied stress. There are other causes of anisotropy in rocks besides an applied stress. The rock can possibly be anisotropic on a microscopic (clays) and mesoscopic (sedimentary layering) levels. The combined contribution of all the causes can either reduce or increase the overall effect. Same rock at different depths might have different wave propagation properties. Proper geological interpretation of seismic velocity maps requires application of local depth corrections, which can remove the overburden pressure effects.verage velocity model for Los Angeles basin (blue line) and a least-squares fit (red line) using nonlinear theory.

  20. Bulk Crystal Growth of Piezoelectric PMN-PT Crystals Using Gradient Freeze Technique for Improved SHM Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan D.; Kochary, F.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Miller, Jim

    2007-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in recent years in lead based perovskite ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric solid solutions because of their excellent dielectric, piezoelectric and electrostrictive properties that make them very attractive for various sensing, actuating and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. We are interested in the development of highly sensitive and efficient PMN-PT sensors based on large single crystals for the structural health monitoring of composite materials that may be used in future spacecrafts. Highly sensitive sensors are needed for detection of defects in these materials because they often tend to fail by distributed and interacting damage modes and much of the damage occurs beneath the top surface of the laminate and not detectable by visual inspection. Research is being carried out for various combinations of solid solutions for PMN-PT piezoelectric materials and bigger size crystals are being sought for improved sensor applications. Single crystals of this material are of interest for sensor applications because of their high piezoelectric coefficient (d33 greater than 1700 pC/N) and electromechanical coefficients (k33 greater than 0.90). For comparison, the commonly used piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has a d33 of about 600 pC/N and electromechanical coefficients k33 of about 0.75. At the present time, these piezoelectric relaxor crystals are grown by high temperature flux growth method and the size of these crystals are rather small (3x4x5 mm(exp 3). In the present paper, we have attempted to grow bulk single crystals of PMN-PT in a 2 inch diameter platinum crucible and successfully grown a large size crystal of 67%PMN-33%PT using the vertical gradient freeze technique with no flux. Piezoelectric properties of the grown crystals are investigated. PMN-PT plates show excellent piezoelectric properties. Samples were poled under an applied electric field of 5 kV/cm. Dielectric properties at a frequency of 1 kHz are examined. The grown PMN-PT crystals show typical relaxor dielectric properties. Additionally, the thermal properties of the sample are tested. The results are in good agreement with those found in the literature and some are reported for the first time.

  1. Vertical gradients and seasonal variation in stem CO2 efflux within a Norway spruce stand.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Räntfors, Mats; Wallin, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Stem CO2 efflux is known to vary seasonally and vertically along tree stems. However, annual tree- and stand-scale efflux estimates are commonly based on measurements made only a few times a year, during daytime and at breast height. In this study, the effect of these simplifying assumptions on annual efflux estimates and their influence on the estimates of the importance of stems in stand-scale carbon cycling are evaluated. In order to assess the strength of seasonal, diurnal and along-stem variability in CO2 efflux, half-hourly measurements were carried out at three heights on three mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees over a period of 3 years. Making the common assumption of breast height efflux rates being representative of the entire stem was found to result in underestimations of 10-17% in the annual tree-scale CO2 efflux. Upscaling using only daytime measurements from breast height increased the underestimation to 15-20%. Furthermore, the results show that the strength of the vertical gradient varies seasonally, being strongest in the early summer and non-existent during the cool months. The observed seasonality in the vertical CO2 efflux gradient could not be explained by variation in stem temperature, temperature response of the CO2 efflux (Q10), outer-bark permeability, CO2 transport in the xylem or CO2 release from the phloem. However, the estimated CO2 concentration immediately beneath the bark was considerably higher in the upper stem during the main period of diameter growth, coinciding with the strongest vertical efflux gradient. These results suggest that higher growth rates in the upper stem are the main cause for the observed vertical variation in the stem CO2 effluxes. Furthermore, the results indicate that accounting for the vertical efflux variation is essential for assessments of the importance of stems in stand-scale carbon cycling. PMID:24878562

  2. Cu-Ni composition gradient for the catalytic synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Kate L; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Rack, Philip D; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Meyer III, Harry M; Simpson, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The influence of catalyst alloy composition on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers was studied using Cu-Ni thin films. Metals were co-sputtered onto a substrate to form a thin film alloy with a wide compositional gradient, as determined by Auger analysis. Carbon nanofibers were then grown from the gradient catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The alloy composition produced substantial differences in the resulting nanofibers, which varied from branched structures at 81%Ni-19%Cu to high aspect ratio nanocones at 80%Cu-20%Ni. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques also revealed segregation of the initial alloy catalyst particles at certain concentrations.

  3. Bulk Crystal Growth of Nonlinear Optical Organic Materials Using Inverted Vertical Gradient Freeze Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, J.; Cruz, Magda; Metzl, R.; Wang, W. S.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1998-01-01

    A new process for producing large bulk single crystals of benzil (C6H5COCOC6H5) is reported in this paper. Good quality crystals have been successfully grown using this approach to crystal growth. This method seems to be very promising for other thermally stable NLO organic materials also. The entire contents vycor crucible 1.5 inch in diameter and 2 inch deep was converted to single crystal. Purity of the starting growth material is also an important factor in the final quality of the grown crystals. The entire crystal can be very easily taken out of the crucible by simple maneuvering. Initial characterization of the grown crystals indicated that the crystals are as good as other crystals grown by conventional Bridgman Stockbarger technique.

  4. The vertical metallicity gradient of the Milky Way disk: transitions in [?/Fe] populations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Beers, Timothy C.; Harding, Paul; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bird, Jonathan C.; Schönrich, Ralph; Yanny, Brian; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Brinkmann, Jon

    2014-08-20

    Using G dwarfs from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) survey, we have determined the vertical metallicity gradient in the Milky Way's disk and examined how this gradient varies for different [?/Fe] subsamples. Our sample contains over 40,000 stars with low-resolution spectroscopy over 144 lines of sight. It also covers a significant disk volume, between ?0.3 and 1.6 kpc from the Galactic plane, and allows us to examine the disk in situ, whereas previous analyses were more limited in scope. Furthermore, this work does not presuppose a disk structure, whether composed of a single complex population or distinct thin and thick disk components. We employ the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline to obtain estimates of stellar parameters, [Fe/H], and [?/Fe] and extract multiple volume-complete subsamples of approximately 1000 stars each. Based on SEGUE's target-selection algorithm, we adjust each subsample to determine an unbiased picture of disk chemistry; consequently, each individual star represents the properties of many. The metallicity gradient is –0.243{sub ?0.053}{sup +0.039} dex kpc{sup –1} for the entire sample, which we compare to various literature results. This gradient stems from the different [?/Fe] populations inhabiting different ranges of height above the Galactic plane. Each [?/Fe] subsample shows little change in median [Fe/H] with height. If we associate [?/Fe] with age, the negligible gradients of our [?/Fe] subsamples suggest that stars formed in different epochs exhibit comparable vertical structure, implying similar star formation processes and evolution.

  5. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  6. Depth Estimation of Simple Causative Sources from Gravity Gradient Tensor Invariants and Vertical Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruç, Bülent

    2010-10-01

    The gravity gradient tensor (GGT) is deduced from products of second-order derivatives of the gravitational potential. A new method based on the invariants of the GGT has been proposed in this research to interpret gravity data due to sphere, infinite horizontal cylinder and semi-infinite vertical cylinder. The method estimates the depth of these simple causative sources from the multiplication of the maximum of the gravity vertical component by the maximum value of the invariants I 1 to I 2 ratio. To show the reliability and correctness of the estimated depths on 3-D models, the method has been tested using theoretical data with and without random noise. In addition, I have applied the method to a field-data example in Texas, USA and the depth obtained by the present method is compared with those published in the literature.

  7. A SPATIALLY RESOLVED VERTICAL TEMPERATURE GRADIENT IN THE HD 163296 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Qi, Chunhua; Hughes, A. Meredith

    2013-09-01

    We analyze sensitive, sub-arcsecond resolution ALMA science verification observations of CO emission lines in the protoplanetary disk hosted by the young, isolated Ae star HD 163296. The observed spatial morphology of the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 emission line is asymmetric across the major axis of the disk; the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 line features a much less pronounced, but similar, asymmetry. The J = 2-1 emission from {sup 12}CO and its main isotopologues have no resolved spatial asymmetry. We associate this behavior with the direct signature of a vertical temperature gradient and layered molecular structure in the disk. This is demonstrated using both toy models and more sophisticated calculations assuming non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. A model disk structure is developed to reproduce both the distinctive spatial morphology of the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 line as well as the J = 2-1 emission from the CO isotopologues assuming relative abundances consistent with the interstellar medium. This model disk structure has {tau} = 1 emitting surfaces for the {sup 12}CO emission lines that make an angle of {approx}15 Degree-Sign with respect to the disk midplane. Furthermore, we show that the spatial and spectral sensitivity of these data can distinguish between models that have sub-Keplerian gas velocities due to the vertical extent of the disk and its associated radial pressure gradient (a fractional difference in the bulk gas velocity field of {approx}> 5%)

  8. Sunscreening fungal pigments influence the vertical gradient of pendulous lichens in boreal forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Färber, Leonie; Sølhaug, Knut Asbjorn; Esseen, Per-Anders; Bilger, Wolfgang; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2014-06-01

    Pendulous lichens dominate canopies of boreal forests, with dark Bryoria species in the upper canopy vs. light Alectoria and Usnea species in lower canopy. These genera offer important ecosystem services such as winter forage for reindeer and caribou. The mechanism behind this niche separation is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that species-specific sunscreening fungal pigments protect underlying symbiotic algae differently against high light, and thus shape the vertical canopy gradient of epiphytes. Three pale species with the reflecting pigment usnic acid (Alectoria sarmentosa, Usnea dasypoga, U. longissima) and three with dark, absorbing melanins (Bryoria capillaris, B. fremontii, B. fuscescens) were compared. We subjected the lichens to desiccation stress with and without light, and assessed their performance with chlorophyll fluorescence. Desiccation alone only affected U. longissima. By contrast, light in combination with desiccation caused photoinhibitory damage in all species. Usnic lichens were significantly more susceptible to light during desiccation than melanic ones. Thus, melanin is a more efficient light-screening pigment than usnic acid. Thereby, the vertical gradient of pendulous lichens in forest canopies is consistent with a shift in type and functioning of sunscreening pigments, from high-light-tolerant Bryoria in the upper to susceptible Alectoria and Usnea in the lower canopy. PMID:25039211

  9. Longitudinal and Vertical Spatial Gradients in the Distribution of Fish within a Canyon-shaped Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaek, Mojmír; Kubeka, Jan; Peterka, Jií; Ech, Martin; Dratík, Vladislav; Hladík, Milan; Prchalová, Marie; Frouzová, Jaroslava

    2004-09-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution of fish was investigated within a morphometrically simple canyon-shaped reservoir with a single major tributary and a longitudinal trophic gradient (ímov Reservoir, Czech Republic). Samples of fish were taken by Nordic survey gill nets (several mesh sizes from 8 to 70 mm knot to knot) installed as surface nets at several offshore areas located along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir. Surveys were carried out in late summer during 1999-2003. An obvious distribution gradient of fish was revealed along the longitudinal axis of the ímov Reservoir. The total relative fish abundance and biomass (catch per unit effort) decreased considerably from the upstream end of the reservoir toward the dam. Roach (Rutilus rutilus), bleak (Alburnus alburnus) and bream (Abramis brama) comprised the bulk of catches at all areas. Enhanced dominance of bream was observed in the fish assemblage at the uppermost, more eutrophic area of the reservoir. The highest number of fish species and the highest abundance of young-of-the-year fish were also observed in the tributary area. In the downstream part of the reservoir, gill net surveys along the vertical depth profiles indicated that offshore fish occupied mostly the epilimnion. Extreme flood events affected the ímov Reservoir, however, it seemed they had no significant impact on the gradients described. (

  10. Particle surface area dependence of mineral dust in immersion freezing mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator and a vertical wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows one to freely suspend single drops in the air without any wall contact. Heterogeneous nucleation by two types of illite (illite IMt1 and illite NX) and a montmorillonite sample was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 mm in radius were monitored by a video camera while cooled down to -28 °C to simulate freezing within the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was contact-free, determined with an infrared thermometer; the onset of freezing was indicated by a sudden increase of the drop surface temperature. For comparison, measurements with one particle type (illite NX) were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 ?m radius freely suspended. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C as a function of particle type and particle surface area immersed in the drops. Isothermal experiments in the wind tunnel indicated that after the cooling stage freezing still proceeds, at least during the investigated time period of 30 s. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model. Although the wind tunnel results do not support the time-independence of the freezing process both models are applicable for comparing the results from the two experimental techniques.

  11. Use of sinkhole and specific capacity distributions to assess vertical gradients in a karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, K.J.; Kozar, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The carbonate-rock aquifer in the Great Valley, West Virginia, USA, was evaluated using a database of 687 sinkholes and 350 specific capacity tests to assess structural, lithologic, and topographic influences on the groundwater flow system. The enhanced permeability of the aquifer is characterized in part by the many sinkholes, springs, and solutionally enlarged fractures throughout the valley. Yet, vertical components of subsurface flow in this highly heterogeneous aquifer are currently not well understood. To address this problem, this study examines the apparent relation between geologic features of the aquifer and two spatial indices of enhanced permeability attributed to aquifer karstification: (1) the distribution of sinkholes and (2) the occurrence of wells with relatively high specific capacity. Statistical results indicate that sinkholes (funnel and collapse) occur primarily along cleavage and bedding planes parallel to subparallel to strike where lateral or downward vertical gradients are highest. Conversely, high specific capacity values are common along prominent joints perpendicular or oblique to strike. The similarity of the latter distribution to that of springs suggests these fractures are areas of upward-convergent flow. These differences between sinkhole and high specific capacity distributions suggest vertical flow components are primarily controlled by the orientation of geologic structure and associated subsurface fracturing. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Reconstructing the Vertical 14C Gradient of the Baja Margin during the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C. M.; Lehman, S. J.; Marchitto, T. M.; Ortiz, J. D.; van Geen, A.

    2011-12-01

    The radiocarbon activity (?14C) of the atmosphere decreased in two steps during the last deglaciation, coinciding with the well-known Heinrich 1 (H1) and Younger Dryas (YD) stadials. A leading explanation for these periods of decline involves the release of 14C-depleted carbon from a deep, isolated ocean reservoir- a mechanism that may also help to explain the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. Reconstructions of intermediate water ?14C near Baja California, Mexico (Marchitto et al., 2007 Science) and in the Arabian Sea (Bryan et al., 2010 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.) document two intervals of extreme depletion relative to the coeval atmosphere during H1 and the YD that are interpreted as evidence of the return of this aged carbon from the deep reservoir to the upper ocean and atmosphere. Here we report on 14C measurements in additional cores from the Baja margin that expand the depth range of our observations and enable reconstruction of the vertical ?14C gradient. Calendar ages were determined by (1) correlation of diffuse spectral reflectance (DSR, a proxy related to local productivity) with the layer-counted age model in the GISP2 ice core and (2) correlation of raw planktic G. ruber 14C ages to new measurements in core PC08 previously studied by Marchitto et al. (2007). Together these provide a common and consistent calendar age model for margin core PCO8 (depth 705 m), core PC13 from Soledad Basin (sill depth 290 m) and margin core GC38 (depth 1270 m). In preliminary results, G. ruber ?14C data from PC08 exhibit a record of deglacial depletion events that is consistent with partial upward mixing of the intermediate-depth signal to the surface. ?14C at 1270 meters showed relatively little change during H1 and YD, indicating that anomalously depleted water did not penetrate to this depth. The vertical gradient collapsed to within observational uncertainties at the start of the Bølling-Allerød/Antarctic Climate Reversal. Taken together the results support the lateral advection of two pulses of 14C-depleted carbon above 1270 m during H1 and YD with a period of substantial vertical mixing and re-equilibration in between.

  13. Individual and population plasticity of the seagrass Zostera noltii along a vertical intertidal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaço, Susana; Machás, Raquel; Santos, Rui

    2009-04-01

    The seasonal plasticity of individual Zostera noltii architectural, reproductive and elemental content features, of plant epiphyte load and of meadow biomass-density relationships was investigated along a vertical intertidal gradient at Ria Formosa lagoon, southern Portugal. The vertical variability of the seagrass environment was evident in the sediment characteristics, which showed coarser grain size, less organic matter, lower N content and higher ammonium concentration in the low intertidal than in medium and high intertidal. A clear vertical differentiation in Z. noltii morphology was observed from longer and wider leaves, longer and wider internodes and shorter roots at low intertidal, to shorter and narrow leaves, shorter and narrower internodes and longer roots at high intertidal. The leaf size was negatively related to light availability and positively related to nutrient availability whereas the root size was negatively related to nutrient availability. The lower leaf N and P content found in low intertidal plants may reflect a dilution effect of the nutrients due to higher growth rates. Lower N content of low intertidal leaves supports previous findings that the nitrate reductase activity is lower in plants from this level. The higher epiphyte load observed in Z. noltii leaves of the low intertidal may be a consequence of the lower exposure period, but also of higher hydrodynamics that increase the availability of nutrients. No evidence of the influence of the intertidal level on the flowering shoot density was found. The cyclic temporal pattern of the biomass-density relationship was much wider at low and medium intertidal than at high intertidal. At low intertidal, the decline in shoot density during fall and winter was coincident with a biomass decrease and its increase in spring and summer coincided with the biomass increase. In medium and high intertidal, the biomass and density seasonal variations were decoupled. As a result, only at low intertidal there was a significant positive relationship between biomass and density. This suggests that Z. noltii population structure along the intertidal is regulated by different factors. Light is probably the most important factor regulating the population structure in the low intertidal, whereas desiccation is probably the main factor regulating the populations in upper intertidal. Zostera noltii showed a considerable plasticity at a physiological-, plant- and population-level along the intertidal zone, indicative of the species acclimation to the steep environmental gradient of this particular ecosystem.

  14. Vertical distribution of zooplankton in subalpine and alpine lakes: Ultraviolet radiation, fish predation, and the transparency-gradient hypothesis

    E-print Network

    Williamson, Craig E.

    Vertical distribution of zooplankton in subalpine and alpine lakes: Ultraviolet radiation, fish, Maine 04469 Abstract The transparency-gradient hypothesis argues that ultraviolet radiation (UV a stronger negative phototaxis to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in a highly transparent lake than in a low

  15. AMMONIA AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE FLUX AND DRY DEPOSITION VELOCITY ESTIMATES USING VERTICAL GRADIENT METHOD AT A COMMERCIAL BEEF CATTLE FEEDLOT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide flux and dry deposition velocity were estimated using micrometeorological vertical gradient flux method at a commercial cattle feedyard of approximately 50,000 head of beef cattle and average 14.4 m2/head (150 ft2/head) stocking density. During summertime, NH3-N emission...

  16. Impacts of freezing and thawing dynamics on foliar litter carbon release in alpine/subalpine forests along an altitudinal gradient in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzhong, W.; Changhui, P.; Jianxiao, Z.; Jian, Z.; Bo, T.; Wanqin, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Carbon (C) release from foliar litter is a primary component in C exchange among the atmosphere, vegetation, soil and water from respiration and leaching, but little information is currently related to the effects of freezing and thawing dynamics on C release of foliar litter in cold regions. A 2-year field litter decomposition experiment was conducted along an altitudinal gradient (~ 2700 to ~ 3600 m) to mimic temperature increases in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. C release was investigated for fresh foliar litter of spruce, fir and birch. The onset of the frozen stage, deep frozen stage and thawing stage was partitioned according to changes in the freezing and thawing dynamics of each winter. More rapid 2-year C released from fresh foliar litter at upper elevations compared to lower elevations in the alpine/subalpine region. However, high C release was observed at low altitudes during winter stages, but high altitudes exhibited high C release during growing season stages. The deep frozen stage showed higher rates of C release than other stages in the second year of decomposition. Negative-degree days showing freezing degrees were correlated to C release rates for the deep frozen stages in both years, and this relationship continued for the duration of the experiment, indicating that changes in freezing can directly modify C release from foliar litter. The results suggested that the changed freezing and thawing dynamics could delay the onset of C release in fresh litter in this cold region in the scenario of climate warming.

  17. Vertical distribution of the soil microbiota along a successional gradient in a glacier forefield.

    PubMed

    Rime, Thomas; Hartmann, Martin; Brunner, Ivano; Widmer, Franco; Zeyer, Josef; Frey, Beat

    2015-03-01

    Spatial patterns of microbial communities have been extensively surveyed in well-developed soils, but few studies investigated the vertical distribution of micro-organisms in newly developed soils after glacier retreat. We used 454-pyrosequencing to assess whether bacterial and fungal community structures differed between stages of soil development (SSD) characterized by an increasing vegetation cover from barren (vegetation cover: 0%/age: 10 years), sparsely vegetated (13%/60 years), transient (60%/80 years) to vegetated (95%/110 years) and depths (surface, 5 and 20 cm) along the Damma glacier forefield (Switzerland). The SSD significantly influenced the bacterial and fungal communities. Based on indicator species analyses, metabolically versatile bacteria (e.g. Geobacter) and psychrophilic yeasts (e.g. Mrakia) characterized the barren soils. Vegetated soils with higher C, N and root biomass consisted of bacteria able to degrade complex organic compounds (e.g. Candidatus Solibacter), lignocellulolytic Ascomycota (e.g. Geoglossum) and ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota (e.g. Laccaria). Soil depth only influenced bacterial and fungal communities in barren and sparsely vegetated soils. These changes were partly due to more silt and higher soil moisture in the surface. In both soil ages, the surface was characterized by OTUs affiliated to Phormidium and Sphingobacteriales. In lower depths, however, bacterial and fungal communities differed between SSD. Lower depths of sparsely vegetated soils consisted of OTUs affiliated to Acidobacteria and Geoglossum, whereas depths of barren soils were characterized by OTUs related to Gemmatimonadetes. Overall, plant establishment drives the soil microbiota along the successional gradient but does not influence the vertical distribution of microbiota in recently deglaciated soils. PMID:25533315

  18. The Effect of Vertical Temperature Gradient on the Propagation of Three-dimensional Waves in a Protoplanetary Disk

    E-print Network

    Lee, Wing-Kit

    2015-01-01

    Excitation and propagation of waves in a thermally stratified disk with an arbitrary vertical temperature profile are studied. Previous analytical studies of three-dimensional waves had been focused on either isothermal or polytropic vertical disk structures. However, at the location in a protoplanetary disk where the dominant heating source is stellar irradiation, the temperature gradient may become positive in the vertical direction. We extend the analysis to study the effects of the vertical temperature structure on the waves that are excited at the Lindblad resonances. For a hotter disk atmosphere, the $f$-mode contributes less to the torque and remains confined near the midplane as it propagates away from the resonances. On the other hand, the excitation of the $g$-modes is stronger. As they propagate, they channel to the top of disk atmosphere and their group velocities decrease. The differences compared to previous studies may have implications in understanding the wave dynamics in a realistic disk str...

  19. The Effect of Vertical Temperature Gradient on the Propagation of Three-dimensional Waves in a Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2015-11-01

    Excitation and propagation of waves in a thermally stratified disk with an arbitrary vertical temperature profile are studied. Previous analytical studies of three-dimensional waves had been focused on either isothermal or polytropic vertical disk structures. However, at the location in a protoplanetary disk where the dominant heating source is stellar irradiation, the temperature gradient may become positive in the vertical direction. We extend the analysis to study the effects of the vertical temperature structure on the waves that are excited at the Lindblad resonances. For a hotter disk atmosphere, the f-mode contributes less to the torque and remains confined near the midplane as it propagates away from the resonances. On the other hand, the excitation of the g-modes is stronger. As they propagate, they channel to the top of disk atmosphere and their group velocities decrease. The differences compared to previous studies may have implications in understanding the wave dynamics in a realistic disk structure.

  20. Large Vertical Gradient of Reactive Nitrogen Oxides in the Boundary Layer: Modeling Analysis of DISCOVER-AQ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Chen, G.; Smeltzer, C.; Liu, Z.; Crawford, J. H.; Olson, J. R.; Szykman, J.

    2013-12-01

    An often-used assumption of air pollution studies is the well-mixed planetary boundary layer (PBL), in which pollutants are evenly distributed. Because of the difficulty in obtaining vertically-resolved measurements, the validity of the assumption has not been thoroughly established. In this study, we use more than 200 vertical profiles observed in the DISCOVER-AQ aircraft campaign in 2011 to examine the vertical distributions of air pollutants over the Baltimore area during the summer. Contrary to the well-mixed profile, the observed median vertical profile of NOx, an important ozone precursor, shows a sharp negative gradient in the PBL. Our analysis suggests that the magnitude of NOx gradients is highly sensitive to atmospheric stability. Using a 1-D chemical transport model (REAM), we are able to reproduce the vertical profiles under different PBL stability conditions, classified based on the potential temperature gradient and the PBL height. To investigate how the parameterizations of the PBL and surface processes impact vertical profiles in 3-D chemical transport models, we test PBL mixing properties using two PBL schemes (Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ)) and two land-surface schemes (Noah and RUC) in the WRF model. Comparisons reveal that the YSU scheme performs better in turbulent and high PBL height conditions while the MYJ scheme performs better in less turbulent conditions. Results also show that the land-surface schemes in WRF do not have as large an influence as the PBL mixing schemes. Using the model results, we evaluate the impact of NOx gradient in the PBL on the calculation of the ozone production rate and satellite NO2 retrieval. We show that using the surface measurements and the well-mixed PBL assumption result in a ~30% high bias in the PBL ozone production rate. Our results also show that biases in the PBL height and the NOx gradient lead to a moderate bias (about 5%) in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric vertical columns. In addition, we diagnose the isoprene emission flux in the 1-D model, which is constrained by in situ observations of NOx, O3, and VOCs including isoprene, and find it in good agreement with that calculated in the MEGAN model.

  1. Seasonality of Isoprenoid Vertical Gradient Within a Primary Rainforest in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. G.; Jardine, K.; Tota, J.; Jardine, A. B.; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A. B.; Tavares, J. V.; Nelson, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical mixing ratio gradients of isoprene, total monoterpenes (TMt) and total sesquiterpenes (TSt) were quantified, within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia , using a Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). We also estimated the fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere. Measurements were carried out from the dry season (Sept/2010) to the wet season (Jan/2011), continuously. All compound mixing ratios were higher during the dry season than during the wet season; the same behavior was observed for ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Isoprene and TMt mixing ratios were higher within the canopy as compared to near the ground and above the canopy. Daytime TSt mixing ratios were higher near the ground than within and above the canopy. Isoprene and TMt had a diurnal cycle similar to diurnal cycles of air temperature and PAR suggesting that the emission of these compounds are light dependent and stimulated by increasing temperature. However, this same behavior was not observed for TSt. This is probably due to the fact that sesquiterpene emissions are not strongly light dependent; the ozonolysis of sesquiterpenes during daytime could reduce ambient sesquiterpene concentrations; and a less turbulent atmospheric boundary layer during nighttime could make the mixing ratio of sesquiterpenes higher near the surface at nighttime. Daytime flux estimations also presented seasonal variation for the fluxes of all compounds, such that fluxes of: isoprene ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 mg m-2 h-1, TMt ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 mg m-2 h-1, and TSt ranged from 0.1 to 0.25 mg m-2 h-1, being the highest end during the dry season. These flux estimations suggested that the canopy could be the main source of those compounds for the atmosphere for all seasons. Our results provide the first in situ observations of seasonal mixing ratio gradients of isoprenoids in central Amazonia, and suggest that some of the isoprenoid seasonal variations could be driven by changes in light, temperature and leaf phenology.

  2. Vertical canopy gradient in photosynthesis and monoterpenoid emissions: An insight into the chemistry and physiology behind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimpraga, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Bloemen, J.; Vanhaecke, L.; Demarcke, M.; Joó, E.; Pokorska, O.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Dewulf, J.; Van Langenhove, H.; Heinesch, B.; Aubinet, M.; Steppe, K.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that vertical canopy gradients and varying sky conditions influence photosynthesis (Pn), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf thickness (LT) and leaf pigments (lutein, â-carotene and chlorophyll). In contrast, little is known about these effects on monoterpenoid (MT) emissions. Our study examines simultaneously measured Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio along the canopy of an adult European beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) in natural forest conditions. Dynamic branch enclosure systems were used at four heights in the canopy (7, 14, 21 and 25 m) in order to establish relationships and better understand the interaction between Pn and MT emissions under both sunny and cloudy sky conditions. Clear differences in Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio were detected within the canopy. The highest Pn rates were observed in the sun leaves at 25 m due to the higher intercepted light levels, whereas MT emissions (and the MT/Pn ratio) were unexpectedly highest in the semi-shaded leaves at 21 m. The higher Pn rates and, apparently contradictory, lower MT emissions in the sun leaves may be explained by the hypothesis of Owen and Peñuelas (2005), stating synthesis of more photo-protective carotenoids may decrease the emissions of volatile isoprenoids (including MTs) because they both share the same biochemical precursors. In addition, leaf traits like SLA, LT and leaf pigments clearly differed with height in the canopy, suggesting that the leaf's physiological status cannot be neglected in future research on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) when aiming at developing new and/or improved emission algorithms.

  3. Estimation of the depth to the fresh-water/salt-water interface from vertical head gradients in wells in coastal and island aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, S.K.; Gingerich, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the depth to the theoretical interface between fresh, water and salt water is critical to estimates of well yields in coastal and island aquifers. The Ghyben-Herzberg relation, which is commonly used to estimate interface depth, can greatly underestimate or overestimate the fresh-water thickness, because it assumes no vertical head gradients and no vertical flow. Estimation of the interface depth needs to consider the vertical head gradients and aquifer anisotropy that may be present. This paper presents a method to calculate vertical head gradients using water-level measurements made during drilling of a partially penetrating well; the gradient is then used to estimate interface depth. Application of the method to a numerically simulated fresh-water/salt-water system shows that the method is most accurate when the gradient is measured in a deeply penetrating well. Even using a shallow well, the method more accurately estimates the interface position than does the Ghyben-Herzberg relation where substantial vertical head gradients exist. Application of the method to field data shows that drilling, collection methods of water-level data, and aquifer inhomogeneities can cause difficulties, but the effects of these difficulties can be minimized.

  4. Influence of SiC pedestal in the growth of 50 mm CZT by Vertical gradient freeze method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Carcelén, V.; Diéguez, E.

    2012-12-01

    Improving the structural, optical, and electronic properties of bulk CZT remains a topic of great interest for producing high quality nuclear imaging material. Consideration must be given to the thermal environment under which crystal growth is carried out. It is important that the furnace and insulation elements are chosen and arranged to promote a convex solid liquid interface. Results are presented for 50 mm CZT ingots grown using furnace elements, which have been shown to be conducive to a convex SLI.

  5. Dynamic impact of the vertical shear of gradient wind on the tropical cyclone boundary layer wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ninghao; Xu, Xin; Song, Lili; Bai, Lina; Ming, Jie; Wang, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    This work studies the impact of the vertical shear of gradient wind (VSGW) in the free atmosphere on the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL). A new TCBL model is established, which relies on fiveforce balance including the pressure gradient force, Coriolis force, centrifugal force, turbulent friction, and inertial deviation force. This model is then employed to idealize tropical cyclones (TCs) produced by DeMaria's model, under different VSGW conditions (non-VSGW, positive VSGW, negative VSGW, and VSGW increase/decrease along the radial direction). The results show that the free-atmosphere VSGW is particularly important to the intensity of TC. For negative VSGW, the total horizontal velocity in the TCBL is somewhat suppressed. However, with the maximum radial inflow displaced upward and outward, the radial velocity notably intensifies. Consequently, the convergence is enhanced throughout the TCBL, giving rise to a stronger vertical pumping at the TCBL top. In contrast, for positive VSGW, the radial inflow is significantly suppressed, even with divergent outflow in the middle-upper TCBL. For varying VSGW along the radial direction, the results indicate that the sign and value of VSGW is more important than its radial distribution, and the negative VSGW induces stronger convergence and Ekman pumping in the TCBL, which favors the formation and intensification of TC.

  6. The photospheric vector magnetic field of a sunspot and its vertical gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Smith, J. E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Hyder, C. L.; Gurman, J. B.; Shine, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of direct comparisons of photospheric and transition region line-of-sight field observations of sunspots using the SMM UV spectrometer and polarimeter are reported. The analysis accompanying the data is concentrated on demonstrating that the sunspot concentrated magnetic field extends into the transition region. An observation of a sunspot on Oct. 23, 1980 at the S 18 E 03 location is used as an example. Maximum field strengths ranged from 2030-2240 gauss for large and small umbrae viewed and inclination of the field to the line-of-sight was determined for the photosphere and transition region. The distribution of the magnetic field over the sunspot and variation of the line-of-sight gradient are discussed, as are the magnitudes and gradients of the photospheric field across the penumbral-photospheric boundaries.

  7. Variation in Community Structure across Vertical Intertidal Stress Gradients: How Does It Compare with Horizontal Variation at Different Scales?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Nelson; Scrosati, Ricardo A.; Molis, Markus; Knox, Amanda S.

    2011-01-01

    In rocky intertidal habitats, the pronounced increase in environmental stress from low to high elevations greatly affects community structure, that is, the combined measure of species identity and their relative abundance. Recent studies have shown that ecological variation also occurs along the coastline at a variety of spatial scales. Little is known, however, on how vertical variation compares with horizontal variation measured at increasing spatial scales (in terms of sampling interval). Because broad-scale processes can generate geographical patterns in community structure, we tested the hypothesis that vertical ecological variation is higher than fine-scale horizontal variation but lower than broad-scale horizontal variation. To test this prediction, we compared the variation in community structure across intertidal elevations on rocky shores of Helgoland Island with independent estimates of horizontal variation measured at the scale of patches (quadrats separated by 10s of cm), sites (quadrats separated by a few m), and shores (quadrats separated by 100s to 1000s of m). The multivariate analyses done on community structure supported our prediction. Specifically, vertical variation was significantly higher than patch- and site-scale horizontal variation but lower than shore-scale horizontal variation. Similar patterns were found for the variation in abundance of foundation taxa such as Fucus spp. and Mastocarpus stellatus, suggesting that the effects of these canopy-forming algae, known to function as ecosystem engineers, may explain part of the observed variability in community structure. Our findings suggest that broad-scale processes affecting species performance increase ecological variability relative to the pervasive fine-scale patchiness already described for marine coasts and the well known variation caused by vertical stress gradients. Our results also indicate that experimental research aiming to understand community structure on marine shores should benefit from applying a multi-scale approach. PMID:21887371

  8. Denitrification in nitrate-contaminated groundwater: Occurrence in steep vertical geochemical gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Duff, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively narrow vertical zone (5-6 m thick) of NO3- containing groundwater was identified using multilevel sampling devices in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, USA. The aquifer has been chronically contaminated by surface disposal of treated sewage 0.3 km upgradient from the study area. The NO3- zone was anoxic and contained high concentrations of N2O (16.5 ??M), suggesting that it was a zone of active denitrification. Denitrifying activity was confirmed with direct measurement using acetylene block incubations with aquifer core material; the peak rate was 2.4 nmol N reduced (g sed)-1 day-1. Concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon and N2 were close to atmospheric equilibrium in uncontaminated groundwater, but were more than 2 times higher within the contaminant plume. Excess CO2 and N2 suggested in situ formation with a stoichiometry of C and N mineralized via denitrification of 0.8 (C/N). Denitrification within the aquifer resulted in an increase in the natural ??15N of NO3- (from +13.6 to +42.0%.) and the N2 produced, with an isotopic enrichment factor, ??{lunate}, of -13.9%.. Vertical profiles of NH4+ and ??15N of NH4+ indicated that dissimilatory reduction of NO3- to NH4+ was also occurring but mass balance calculations indicated that denitrification was the predominant process. These results demonstrate that a combination approach using field mass balance, stable isotope analysis, and laboratory incubations yields useful insight as to the significance of denitrification in aquifer sediments and that closely spaced vertical sampling is necessary to adequately quantify the processes controlling C and N transport and transformation within these environments. ?? 1991.

  9. Measurement of the vertical gradient of the semidiurnal tidal wind phase in winter at the 95 km level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schminder, R.; Kurschner, D.

    1984-05-01

    When supplemented by absolute reflection height measurements, low frequency wind measurements in the 90-100 km height range become truly competitive in comparison with the more widely used radar meteor wind observations. For example, height profiles of the wind parameters in the so-called meteor zone can be obtained due to the considerable interdiurnal variability of the average nighttime reflection heights controlled by geomagnetic activity. The phase of the semidiurnal tidal wind is particularly height-dependent. The measured vertical gradient of 1/4 h/km in winter corresponds to a vertical wavelength of about 50 km. Wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, at heights between 90 and 100 km, were carried out at the Collm Geophysical Observatory of Karl Marx University Leipzig for a number of years. These measurements use the closely-spaced receiver method and three measuring paths, on 179, 227, and 272 kHz. They take place every day between sunset and sunrise, i.e., nightly. A night in this sense may last as long as 18 hours in winter. Both the measurements and their evaluation are completely automatic, and the prevailing winds and tides are separated.

  10. Measurement of the Vertical Gradient of the Semidiurnal Tidal Wind Phase in Winter at the 95 Km Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schminder, R.; Kurschner, D.

    1984-01-01

    When supplemented by absolute reflection height measurements, low frequency wind measurements in the 90-100 km height range become truly competitive in comparison with the more widely used radar meteor wind observations. For example, height profiles of the wind parameters in the so-called meteor zone can be obtained due to the considerable interdiurnal variability of the average nighttime reflection heights controlled by geomagnetic activity. The phase of the semidiurnal tidal wind is particularly height-dependent. The measured vertical gradient of 1/4 h/km in winter corresponds to a vertical wavelength of about 50 km. Wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, at heights between 90 and 100 km, were carried out at the Collm Geophysical Observatory of Karl Marx University Leipzig for a number of years. These measurements use the closely-spaced receiver method and three measuring paths, on 179, 227, and 272 kHz. They take place every day between sunset and sunrise, i.e., nightly. A night in this sense may last as long as 18 hours in winter. Both the measurements and their evaluation are completely automatic, and the prevailing winds and tides are separated.

  11. Freeze drying method

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  12. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  13. Freeze drying method

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, N.V.; Stewart, P.; Renzi, E.

    1999-12-07

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  14. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  15. A refined model of sedimentary rock cover in the southeastern part of the Congo basin from GOCE gravity and vertical gravity gradient observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Zden?k; Fullea, Javier

    2015-03-01

    We aim to interpret the vertical gravity and vertical gravity gradient of the GOCE-GRACE combined gravity model over the southeastern part of the Congo basin to refine the published model of sedimentary rock cover. We use the GOCO03S gravity model and evaluate its spherical harmonic representation at or near the Earth's surface. In this case, the gradiometry signals are enhanced as compared to the original measured GOCE gradients at satellite height and better emphasize the spatial pattern of sedimentary geology. To avoid aliasing, the omission error of the modelled gravity induced by the sedimentary rocks is adjusted to that of the GOCO03S gravity model. The mass-density Green's functions derived for the a priori structure of the sediments show a slightly greater sensitivity to the GOCO03S vertical gravity gradient than to the vertical gravity. Hence, the refinement of the sedimentary model is carried out for the vertical gravity gradient over the basin, such that a few anomalous values of the GOCO03S-derived vertical gravity gradient are adjusted by refining the model. We apply the 5-parameter Helmert's transformation, defined by 2 translations, 1 rotation and 2 scale parameters that are searched for by the steepest descent method. The refined sedimentary model is only slightly changed with respect to the original map, but it significantly improves the fit of the vertical gravity and vertical gravity gradient over the basin. However, there are still spatial features in the gravity and gradiometric data that remain unfitted by the refined model. These may be due to lateral density variation that is not contained in the model, a density contrast at the Moho discontinuity, lithospheric density stratifications or mantle convection. In a second step, the refined sedimentary model is used to find the vertical density stratification of sedimentary rocks. Although the gravity data can be interpreted by a constant sedimentary density, such a model does not correspond to the gravitational compaction of sedimentary rocks. Therefore, the density model is extended by including a linear increase in density with depth. Subsequent L2 and L? norm minimization procedures are applied to find the density parameters by adjusting both the vertical gravity and the vertical gravity gradient. We found that including the vertical gravity gradient in the interpretation of the GOCO03S-derived data reduces the non-uniqueness of the inverse gradiometric problem for density determination. The density structure of the sedimentary formations that provide the optimum predictions of the GOCO03S-derived gravity and vertical gradient of gravity consists of a surface density contrast with respect to surrounding rocks of 0.24-0.28 g/cm3 and its decrease with depth of 0.05-0.25 g/cm3 per 10 km. Moreover, the case where the sedimentary rocks are gravitationally completely compacted in the deepest parts of the basin is supported by L? norm minimization. However, this minimization also allows a remaining density contrast at the deepest parts of the sedimentary basin of about 0.1 g/cm3.

  16. Spatio-temporal distribution of the timing of start and end of growing season along vertical and horizontal gradients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Shin; Saitoh, Taku M; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida; Suzuki, Rikie

    2015-01-01

    We detected the spatio-temporal variability in the timing of start (SGS) and end of growing season (EGS) in Japan from 2003 to 2012 by analyzing satellite-observed daily green-red vegetation index with a 500-m spatial resolution. We also examined the characteristics of SGS and EGS timing in deciduous broadleaf and needleleaf forests along vertical and horizontal gradients and then evaluated the relationship between their timing and daily mean air temperature. We found that for the timing of SGS and EGS, changes along the vertical gradient in deciduous broadleaf forest tended to be larger than those in deciduous needleleaf forest. For both forest types, changes along the vertical and horizontal gradients in the timing of EGS tended to be smaller than those of SGS. Finally, in both forest types, the sensitivity of the timing of EGS to air temperature was much less than that of SGS. These results suggest that the spatio-temporal variability in the timing of SGS and EGS detected by satellite data, which may be correlated with leaf traits, photosynthetic capacity, and environment conditions, provide useful ground-truthing information along vertical and horizontal gradients. PMID:24781316

  17. An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmucker, Ulrich; Spitzer, Klaus; Steveling, Erich

    2009-09-01

    We have recorded for 13 d, geomagnetic variations simultaneously on the Earth's surface and in a borehole at 832 m depth straight below, with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. In addition, geoelectric variations were observed at the same site near Bad Königshofen in Frankonia, Germany. The penetrated moderately conductive Triassic sediments lie above highly resistive Permian deposits. A presumably crystalline basement begins at 1500-1900 m depth. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the skin effect of geomagnetic variations and to derive from it the equivalent to the magnetotelluric (MT) surface impedance, using the vertical gradient (VG) method of electromagnetic (EM) sounding. In this way, we were able to reproduce all four elements of the MT impedance tensor, except for an unexplained but consistent downward shift of VG phases against MT phases by roughly 15° for the two off-diagonal elements. Hence, our tensor evaluation goes beyond the common practice, to express the skin effect by a single VG transfer function in response to a layered structure. The otherwise good agreement of VG and MT results implies that at our test site, the MT impedance tensor is largely distortion-free and that, for example, its pronounced anisotropy should be regarded as a genuine characteristic of the EM response for a laterally non-uniform or possibly anisotropic deep structure. The drilling site lies within the range of a widespread induction anomaly. We have observed the resulting variations of the vertical magnetic component at the surface and in the borehole and found them to be identical. The thus established absence of a skin effect for the vertical component allows us to treat the sedimentary layer down to the depth of the borehole instrument as a thin sheet, and the pertinent thin-sheet approximation for EM induction forms the basis of our analysis. We have derived the required estimate of conductance from the skin effect of horizontal components, noting that this estimate has to be real valued and the same for all frequencies. We were unable, however, to verify the resulting value of 76 S with independent geoelectric direct current (DC) measurements in the borehole and at the Earth's surface. A model study shows that the thin-sheet conductance, which is relevant for the skin effect, may be substantially higher than the depth-integrated conductivity from DC data. Robust estimates of transfer functions were derived for 20 frequencies from 5.625 to 0.007 cpm, which corresponds to periods from 10 to 10000 s. Squared skin effect coherencies are above 0.9 for periods longer than 20 s and thereby comparable to MT coherencies.

  18. Marine induction studies based on measurements of vertical gradient of scalar magnetic field. A concept and 3-D model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Most of marine EM studies are based on sea-bottom vector measurements which are logistically and instrumentally demanding and rather expensive. Recently Kuvshinov et al (2013) proposed and proved a low-cost and easy-to-deploy magnetic survey concept which exploits sea surface scalar measurements. The concept is based on responses that relate variations of the scalar magnetic field at offshore survey sites with variations of the horizontal magnetic field at onshore base site. These responses are a mixture of elements of tipper and horizontal magnetic tensor, and thus they can be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the Earth. In the present work we introduce alternative responses that relate variations of vertical gradient of the scalar magnetic field at survey sites with variations of the horizontal magnetic field at a base site. We show that these responses are a mixture of elements of inter-site magnetotelluric tensor, and thus they also can be exploited for EM sounding of the Earth. We discuss the results of 3-D model studies aimed to investigate the sensitivity of the newly introduced responses to hypothetic plume structure beneath Hawaii islands.

  19. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbury, Colleen; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Collins, Gareth S.; Blair, David M.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Nimmo, Francis; Phillips, Roger J.; Bierson, Carver J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-11-01

    As a result of NASA’s dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ? 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ? 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; doi:10.1002/2015GL065022]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ? 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary crustal porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with the same mean porosity, but that vary with depth. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. We reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ? 100 km only for simulations where the pre-impact porosity is zero or low. Our results support the observation that SPA has lower overall porosity, but higher vertical gradients, giving craters within SPA more-negative BAs than those within the highlands crust. These simulations demonstrate that the BA and porosities reported here are valid for determining general trends only.

  20. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Abundance and Diversity along a Vertical Redox Gradient in Great Salt Lake, USA

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Swanson, Kevin D.; Howells, Alta E.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Meuser, Jonathan E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Peters, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes for the biotechnological production of H2 or other reduced products has been limited by their sensitivity to oxygen (O2). Here, we apply a PCR-directed approach to determine the distribution, abundance, and diversity of hydA gene fragments along co-varying salinity and O2 gradients in a vertical water column of Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The distribution of hydA was constrained to water column transects that had high salt and relatively low O2 concentrations. Recovered HydA deduced amino acid sequences were enriched in hydrophilic amino acids relative to HydA from less saline environments. In addition, they harbored interesting variations in the amino acid environment of the complex H-cluster metalloenzyme active site and putative gas transfer channels that may be important for both H2 transfer and O2 susceptibility. A phylogenetic framework was created to infer the accessory cluster composition and quaternary structure of recovered HydA protein sequences based on phylogenetic relationships and the gene contexts of known complete HydA sequences. Numerous recovered HydA are predicted to harbor multiple N- and C-terminal accessory iron-sulfur cluster binding domains and are likely to exist as multisubunit complexes. This study indicates an important role for [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the functioning of the GSL ecosystem and provides new target genes and variants for use in identifying O2 tolerant enzymes for biotechnological applications. PMID:25464382

  1. Acclimation of Leaf Nitrogen to Vertical Light Gradient at Anthesis in Wheat Is a Whole-Plant Process That Scales with the Size of the Canopy1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Delphine; Allard, Vincent; Gaju, Oorbessy; Le Gouis, Jacques; Foulkes, M. John; Martre, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Vertical leaf nitrogen (N) gradient within a canopy is classically considered as a key adaptation to the local light environment that would tend to maximize canopy photosynthesis. We studied the vertical leaf N gradient with respect to the light gradient for wheat (Triticum aestivum) canopies with the aims of quantifying its modulation by crop N status and genetic variability and analyzing its ecophysiological determinants. The vertical distribution of leaf N and light was analyzed at anthesis for 16 cultivars grown in the field in two consecutive seasons under two levels of N. The N extinction coefficient with respect to light (b) varied with N supply and cultivar. Interestingly, a scaling relationship was observed between b and the size of the canopy for all the cultivars in the different environmental conditions. The scaling coefficient of the b-green area index relationship differed among cultivars, suggesting that cultivars could be more or less adapted to low-productivity environments. We conclude that the acclimation of the leaf N gradient to the light gradient is a whole-plant process that depends on canopy size. This study demonstrates that modeling leaf N distribution and canopy expansion based on the assumption that leaf N distribution parallels that of the light is inappropriate. We provide a robust relationship accounting for vertical leaf N gradient with respect to vertical light gradient as a function of canopy size. PMID:22984122

  2. In situ modulation of the vertical distribution in a blend of P3HT and PC(60)BM via the addition of a composition gradient inducer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byung Joon; Lee, Gang-Young; Im, Min Jeong; Song, Seulki; Park, Taiho

    2014-02-21

    2,2,3,3,4,4,4-Heptafluoro-N-phenyl-butyr-amide (F-ADD) was synthesized and shown to induce a composition gradient in a blend of P3HT and PC60BM. The addition of small amounts (ca. 0.5 wt%) of F-ADD modulated the chemical distribution in the blend along the vertical direction by controlling the blend component interface energy through selective interactions between F-ADD and PC60BM. A homogeneous compositional distribution along the vertical direction in the nanostructured bulk heterojunction (BHJ) increased the interfacial area, which shortened the exciton path length to the donor-acceptor interface and improved the photovoltaic performance. PMID:24441576

  3. Leaf reflectance variation along a vertical crown gradient of two deciduous tree species in a Belgian industrial habitat.

    PubMed

    Khavaninzadeh, Ali Reza; Veroustraete, Frank; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Verrelst, Jochem; Samson, Roeland

    2015-09-01

    The reflectometry of leaf asymmetry is a novel approach in the bio-monitoring of tree health in urban or industrial habitats. Leaf asymmetry responds to the degree of environmental pollution and reflects structural changes in a leaf due to environmental pollution. This paper describes the boundary conditions to scale up from leaf to canopy level reflectance, by describing the variability of adaxial and abaxial leaf reflectance, hence leaf asymmetry, along the crown height gradients of two tree species. Our findings open a research pathway towards bio-monitoring based on the airborne remote sensing of tree canopies and their leaf asymmetric properties. PMID:26057363

  4. Spatial and vertical gradients in the stable carbon isotope composition of Lower Circumpolar Deep Water over the last 900 thousand years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Smith, J.; Hodell, D. A.; Frederichs, T.; Allen, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in stable carbon isotopes (?13C) recorded in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflect that of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of ambient seawater, and thus are used to reconstruct past changes in water mass mixing. Records of benthic foraminiferal ?13C from the Atlantic Ocean have revealed the development of a sharp vertical ?13C gradient between 2300-2500m water depth during successive glacial periods throughout the Late Quaternary, with extremely negative ?13C values recorded below this depth. It had been hypothesised that this gradient resulted from an increased stratification of water masses within the glacial Atlantic Ocean, and that these extreme ?13C values originated in the Southern Ocean. However the mechanisms behind the formation of this gradient and extreme ?13C depletion have remained unclear. This is in part due to the poor preservation of calcareous microfossils in the corrosive waters below 2500-3000m found in the Southern Ocean, which hampers our understanding of this key region. Here we present a unique new ?13C deep water record measured on benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides spp.) from a sediment core recovered from 2100m water depth in the Amundsen Sea, south-eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The site is bathed in Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) today, and combined palaeomagnetic and oxygen isotope stratigraphy show that the sediments continuously span at least the last 890 ka. A comparison of this new ?13C data with other LCDW records from ODP Sites 1089/1090 in the South Atlantic and ODP Site 1123 in the Southwest Pacific demonstrate a clear spatial gradient in circum-Antarctic LCDW during glacial periods. The pool of extremely depleted glacial deep marine ?13C is restricted to the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean, with increasingly positive ?13C values found in the Southwest Pacific and the south-eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. This implies that the ?13C depletion in the deep glacial Atlantic was sourced in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, and remained limited to this sector. This finding indicates either increased supply of relatively more positive ?13C deep waters or increased vertical mixing in the Indian and Pacific sectors of the glacial Southern Ocean.

  5. Tailored Height Gradients in Vertical Nanowire Arrays via Mechanical and Electronic Modulation of Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching.

    PubMed

    Otte, M A; Solis-Tinoco, V; Prieto, P; Borrisé, X; Lechuga, L M; González, M U; Sepulveda, B

    2015-09-01

    In current top-down nanofabrication methodologies the design freedom is generally constrained to the two lateral dimensions, and is only limited by the resolution of the employed nanolithographic technique. However, nanostructure height, which relies on certain mask-dependent material deposition or etching techniques, is usually uniform, and on-chip variation of this parameter is difficult and generally limited to very simple patterns. Herein, a novel nanofabrication methodology is presented, which enables the generation of high aspect-ratio nanostructure arrays with height gradients in arbitrary directions by a single and fast etching process. Based on metal-assisted chemical etching using a catalytic gold layer perforated with nanoholes, it is demonstrated how nanostructure arrays with directional height gradients can be accurately tailored by: (i) the control of the mass transport through the nanohole array, (ii) the mechanical properties of the perforated metal layer, and (iii) the conductive coupling to the surrounding gold film to accelerate the local electrochemical etching process. The proposed technique, enabling 20-fold on-chip variation of nanostructure height in a spatial range of a few micrometers, offers a new tool for the creation of novel types of nano-assemblies and metamaterials with interesting technological applications in fields such as nanophotonics, nanophononics, microfluidics or biomechanics. PMID:26033973

  6. Ground freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Kinosita, S.; Fukuda, M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors' discuss how artificial freezing of the ground has been used in increasingly in the last few decades to stabilize earth materials and control groundwater seepage in geotechnical construction. Emphasis is on the relation between theory, design and application of ground freezing in construction: Thermal properties and processes in earth materials; Frost action; Mechanical properties and processes in earth materials; Engineering design and case histories (tunnels, pipelines, foundations, slopes, LNG tanks, shafts).

  7. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2007-02-01

    Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2) at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne) radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan) by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1) the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR) over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2) the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3) the MU radar can provide stability profiles with a vertical resolution of 50 m at heights where humidity is negligible, 4) stable stratospheric layers as thin as 50 m or less have at least a horizontal extent of a few km to several tens of kilometers and can be considered as frozenly advected over scales of a few tens of minutes.

  8. Tomographic P wave velocity and vertical velocity gradient structure across the geothermal site Groß Schönebeck (NE German Basin): Relationship to lithology, salt tectonics, and thermal regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Moeck, I.; Norden, B.; Schulze, A.; Weber, M.; Wirth, H.

    2010-08-01

    Seismic wide-angle data were collected along a 40-km-long profile centered at the geothermal research well GrSk 3/90 in the Northeast German Basin. Tomographic inversion of travel time data provided a velocity and a vertical velocity gradient model, indicative of Cenozoic to Pre-Permian sediments. Wide-angle reflections are modeled and interpreted as top Zechstein and top Pre-Permian. Changes in velocity gradients are interpreted as the transition from mechanical to chemical compaction at 2-3 km depth, and localized salt structures are imaged, suggesting a previously unknown salt pillow in the southern part of the seismic profile. The Zechstein salt shows decreased velocities in the adjacent salt pillows compared to the salt lows, which is confirmed by sonic log data. This decrease in velocity could be explained by the mobilization of less dense salt, which moved and formed the salt pillows, whereas the denser salt remained in place at the salt lows. We interpret a narrow subvertical low-velocity zone under the salt pillow at GrSk 3/90 as a fault in the deep Permian to Pre-Permian. This WNW-ESE trending fault influenced the location of the salt tectonics and led to the formation of a fault-bounded graben in the Rotliegend sandstones with optimal mechanical conditions for geothermal production. Thermal modeling showed that salt pillows are related to chimney effects, a decrease in temperature, and increasing velocity. The assumed variations in salt lithology, density, and strain must thus be even higher to compensate for the temperature effect.

  9. When hot water freezes before cold

    E-print Network

    J. I. Katz

    2006-04-27

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. They are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reduce the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reduce the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  10. When hot water freezes before cold

    E-print Network

    Katz, J I

    2006-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. They are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reduce the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reduce the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  11. Freeze Technology for Nuclear Applications - 13590

    SciTech Connect

    Rostmark, Susanne C.; Knutsson, Sven; Lindberg, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Freezing of soil materials is a complicated process of a number of physical processes: - freezing of pore water in a thermal gradient, - cryogenic suction causing water migration and - ice formation expanding pores inducing frost heave. Structural changes due to increase of effective stress during freezing also take place. The over consolidation gives a powerful dewatering/drying effect and the freeze process causes separation of contaminates. Artificial ground freezing (AGF is a well established technique first practiced in south Wales, as early as 1862. AGF is mostly used to stabilize tunnels and excavations. During the last ten years underwater applications of freeze technologies based on the AGF have been explored in Sweden. The technology can, and has been, used in many different steps in a remediation action. Freeze Sampling where undisturbed samples are removed in both soft and hard sediment/sludge, Freeze Dredging; retrieval of sediment with good precision and minimal redistribution, and Freeze Drying; volume reduction of contaminated sludge/sediment. The application of these technologies in a nuclear or radioactive environment provides several advantages. Sampling by freezing gives for example an advantage of an undisturbed sample taken at a specified depth, salvaging objects by freezing or removal of sludges is other applications of this, for the nuclear industry, novel technology. (authors)

  12. Reconstructing the Late Pleistocene Southern Ocean biological pump using the vertical gradient of Cd/Ca in planktic and benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charidemou, Miros; Hall, Ian; Ziegler, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The Southern Ocean is a particularly important region in the global carbon cycle because its wind-driven upwelling regime brings CO2-rich deep waters to the ocean surface. However, outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere is ultimately determined by the efficiency of the soft-tissue biological pump which transfers carbon back into the deep sea. Biological productivity in the Southern Ocean on glacial-interglacial timescales is thought to be influenced by the availability of iron from terrestrial dust sources (Martin, 1990). However, the exact nature of the relationship between productivity and dust flux is still debated (Ziegler et al., 2013; Martinez-Garcia et al., 2014) and remains unclear for earlier times such as during the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT). Changes in the strength of the soft-tissue biological pump can be reconstructed with relative ease by measuring carbon isotopes in planktic and benthic foraminifera and quantifying the vertical gradient between them (Ziegler et al., 2013). Our ultimate aim is to use this technique to reconstruct changes in the biological pump in the Southern Ocean during the MPT, when a sharp rise in dust flux is observed in the sedimentary record (Martinez-Garcia et al., 2011). This will allow us to assess the contribution of changes in the Southern Ocean biological pump to the climatic reorganisation that occurred during the MPT. However, before the ??13C record is constructed for the MPT it is vital to confirm that this method is indeed a reliable proxy for the soft-tissue biological pump. Records of ??13C can be influenced by changes in the whole ocean inventory of ?13C, changes in circulation and changes in the degree of fractionation between the ocean and the atmosphere. The impact of inventory and circulation changes can be minimised by careful selection of study sites and by targeting foraminifera that live within specific water masses. However, deviations of ??13C from the biological signal could certainly arise due to ?13C fractionation between the ocean and the atmosphere. Due to the similarity in the distribution of phosphate and cadmium (Cd) in the ocean and the incorporation of this trace metal into the calcite tests of foraminifera, Cd/Ca ratios can provide an additional proxy for reconstructing the vertical nutrient distribution in the ocean in the same way as ?13C. We present downcore records of Cd/Ca in the deep-dwelling planktic species, Globorotalia truncatulinoides (s) and the benthic species, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi from sediment core MD02-2588. A new core a core-top calibration of Cd/Ca in G. truncatulinoides, combined with the established calibration for benthic species allows us to estimate seawater Cd within intermediate and deep water masses that bath the study site and to reconstruct the vertical seawater Cd gradient (?Cdsw) over the past 150,000 years. Comparison of ?Cdsw to ??13C from the same samples from core MD02-2588 in the Southern Ocean indicate a very similar downcore variability which supports the use of the ??13C method to reconstruct the biological pump during the MPT.

  13. Freezing and Food Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... its quality. Rapid freezing prevents undesirable large ice crystals from forming throughout the product because the molecules ... sided snowflake. Slow freezing creates large, disruptive ice crystals. During thawing, they damage the cells and dissolve ...

  14. High-Speed Imaging of Freezing Drops: Still No Preference for the Contact Line

    E-print Network

    Kostinski, Alex

    High-Speed Imaging of Freezing Drops: Still No Preference for the Contact Line Colin Gurganus. Here we report such nucleation positioning results measured within drops freezing on a substrate-substrate contact angle. No influence of thermal gradients on the preference for freezing at the triple line has

  15. 3 CFR - Pay Freeze

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay Freeze Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 21, 2009 Pay Freeze Memorandum for the Assistant to the President and Chief... facing, I intend to freeze the salaries of senior members of the White House staff, to the...

  16. Does the Cryogenic Freezing Process Cause Shorter Telomeres?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Edmund C.; Ye, Lingling; Silverman, Wayne P.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed evidence of increased telomere shortening in short-term T-lymphocyte cultures following freezing and thawing of the original inoculum obtained by ficoll-paque gradient centrifugation, compared to T-lymphocytes that were cultured immediately without freezing and thawing from the same blood sample from 3 female and 3 male adults. Because freezing may have similar effects on other cell types, and because telomere shortening may only manifest its effects after many years or decades, we suggest there is a pressing need for evaluation of the effects of freezing on any cells envisioned for clinical applications, including embryo implantation. PMID:22465657

  17. Radiobrightness of diurnally heated, freezing soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Anthony W.

    1990-01-01

    Freezing and thawing soils exhibit unique radiometric characteristics. To examine these characteristics, diurnal insolation is modeled as one-dimensional heating of a moist soil half-space during a typical fall at a northern Great Plains site. The one-dimensional heat flow equation is nonlinear because both the enthalpy (the change in internal energy with temperature at constant pressure) and the thermal conductivity of freezing soils are nonlinear functions of temperature. The problem is particularly difficult because phase boundaries propagate in time, and because soils, particularly clay-rich soils, freeze over a range of temperatures rather than at 0 C. Diurnal radiobrightness curves at 10.7, 18.0, and 37.0-GHz were computed for each month. The 37.0-GHz radiobrightness best tracks soil surface temperature; the 10.7-37.0-GHz spectral gradient of thawed soils is strongly positive; the spectral gradient of frozen soils is slightly negative; and the midnight-to-noon spectral gradient is shifted by approximately +0.1 K/GHz by diurnal changes in the surface temperature and the thermal gradient. These observations support the use of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer 37.0-GHz radiobrightness and its 10.7-37.0-GHz spectral gradient as discriminants in a frozen soil classifier for high-latitude prairie.

  18. A REDUCED OBSERVER DESIGN FOR A FREEZING PROCESS IN PLATE FREEZERS

    E-print Network

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    A REDUCED OBSERVER DESIGN FOR A FREEZING PROCESS IN PLATE FREEZERS Christoph Josef Backi, Jan Tommy, Norway christoph.backi@itk.ntnu.no jan.tommy.gravdahl@itk.ntnu.no INTRODUCTION The process of freezing fish to a block in a vertical plate freezer (Figure 1) is studied. The aim is to monitor freezing time

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies on sequential freezing solar water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Xinian; Tao Zhen; Lu Junsheng; Ge Hongchuan )

    1994-08-01

    This article presents the principle of using sequential freezing for the purpose of freeze protection in a solar water heater. Sequential freezing is accomplished by maintaining a temperature gradient across the collector so that water is squeezed out of the collector rather than being trapped by ice at the ends of the tubes. The authors give the mathematical models of tubular sequential freezing, compare the predicted results of models with the measured data, and investigate the influences of various factors on the tubular sequential freezing state with the model. A series of experiments show that a solar water heater designed according to the principle of sequential freezing can operate effectively in winter without drain-down, electricity, and heat exchanger systems.

  20. Periodic ice banding in freezing colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anthony M; Worster, M Grae

    2012-12-01

    Concentrated colloidal alumina dispersions were frozen in a directional solidification apparatus that provides independent control of the freezing rate and temperature gradient. Two distinct steady-state modes of periodic ice banding were observed in the range of freezing rates examined. For each mode, the wavelength between successive bands of segregated ice decreases with increasing freezing rate. At low freezing rates (0.25-3 ?m s(-1)), the ice segregates from the suspension into ice lenses, which are cracklike in appearance, and there is visible structure in the layer of rejected particles in the unfrozen region ahead of the ice lenses. In this regime, we argue that compressive cryosuction forces lead to the irreversible aggregation of the rejected particles into a close-packed cohesive layer. The temperature in the aggregated layer is depressed below the bulk freezing point by more than 2 °C before the ice lenses are encountered; moreover, this undercooled region appears as a light-colored layer. The magnitude of the undercooling and the color change in this region both suggest the presence of pore ice and the formation of a frozen fringe. The possibility of a frozen fringe is supported by a quantitative model of the freezing behavior. At intermediate freezing rates, around 4 ?m s(-1), the pattern of ice segregation is disordered, coinciding with the disappearance of the dark- and light-colored layers. Finally, at high freezing rates (5-10 ?m s(-1)), there is a new mode of periodic ice banding that is no longer cracklike and is absent of any visible structure in the suspension ahead of the ice bands. We discuss the implications of our experimental findings for theories of ice lensing. PMID:23110707

  1. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  2. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  3. Vertical partitioning and controlling factors of gradient-based soil carbon dioxide fluxes in two contrasted soil profiles along a loamy hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, F.; Vanclooster, M.; Van Oost, K.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aim to elucidate the role of physical conditions and gas transfer mechanism along soil profiles in the decomposition and storage of soil organic carbon (OC) in subsoil layers. We use a qualitative approach showing the temporal evolution and the vertical profile description of CO2 fluxes and abiotic variables. We assessed soil CO2 fluxes throughout two contrasted soil profiles (i.e. summit and footslope positions) along a hillslope in the central loess belt of Belgium. We measured the time series of soil temperature, soil moisture and CO2 concentration at different depths in the soil profiles for two periods of 6 months. We then calculated the CO2 flux at different depths using Fick's diffusion law and horizon specific diffusivity coefficients. The calculated fluxes allowed assessing the contribution of different soil layers to surface CO2 fluxes. We constrained the soil gas diffusivity coefficients using direct observations of soil surface CO2 fluxes from chamber-based measurements and obtained a good prediction power of soil surface CO2 fluxes with an R2 of 92 %. We observed that the temporal evolution of soil CO2 emissions at the summit position is mainly controlled by temperature. In contrast, at the footslope, we found that long periods of CO2 accumulation in the subsoil alternates with short peaks of important CO2 release. This was related to the high water filled pore space that limits the transfer of CO2 along the soil profile at this slope position. Furthermore, the results show that approximately 90 to 95 % of the surface CO2 fluxes originate from the first 10 cm of the soil profile at the footslope. This indicates that soil OC in this depositional context can be stabilized at depth, i.e. below 10 cm. This study highlights the need to consider soil physical properties and their dynamics when assessing and modeling soil CO2 emissions. Finally, changes in the physical environment of depositional soils (e.g. longer dry periods) may affect the long-term stability of the large stock of easily decomposable OC that is currently stored in these environments.

  4. Gravitino Freeze-In

    E-print Network

    Clifford Cheung; Gilly Elor; Lawrence Hall

    2011-03-22

    We explore an alternative mechanism for the production of gravitino dark matter whereby relic gravitinos originate from the decays of superpartners which are still in thermal equilibrium, i.e. via freeze-in. Contributions to the gravitino abundance from freeze-in can easily dominate over those from thermal scattering over a broad range of parameter space, e.g. when the scalar superpartners are heavy. Because the relic abundance from freeze-in is independent of the reheating temperature after inflation, collider measurements may be used to unambiguously reconstruct the freeze-in origin of gravitinos. In particular, if gravitino freeze-in indeed accounts for the present day dark matter abundance, then the lifetime of the next-to-lightest superpartner is uniquely fixed by the superpartner spectrum.

  5. Freezing Fish and Shellfish. 

    E-print Network

    Nickelson, Ranzell; Reddell, Annette

    1980-01-01

    them home. Place ice in the belly cavity of each fish and provide adequate ice between and around fish. The ice chest should have a false bottom to allow for drainage of melting ice and eliminate the possibility of fish floating in bloody, dirty... at about - 20 degrees F ( - 28 degrees C). Rapid freezing is important. In the initial stage of a slow freezing process, small ice crystals form within the tissue cells. As the freezing continues the size of the ice crystals increases until...

  6. Improved freezing level retrieval 

    E-print Network

    Hong, Sungwook

    2002-01-01

    TRMM Microwave Imager(TMI)-based passive microwave retrieval techniques result in biased estimates of the freezing level and rainfall over the east Pacific in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Passive microwave rainfall estimates...

  7. Future freeze forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Real time GOES thermal data acquisition, an energy balance minimum temperature prediction model and a statistical model are incorporated into a minicomputer system. These components make up the operational "Satellite Freeze Forecast System" being used to aid NOAA, NWS forecasters in developing their freeze forecasts. The general concept of the system is presented in this paper. Specific detailed aspects of the system can be found in the reference cited.

  8. Freezing Cellular Automata Bootstrap Percolation

    E-print Network

    Theyssier, Guillaume

    Freezing Cellular Automata and Bootstrap Percolation UAI - Doctorado en Ingenería de Sistemas-nilpotency is a simpler problem (0 2) in the simply convergent case #12;#12;Freezing cellular automata #12;Freezing cellular automata Q = {0, . . . , n - 1} with natural order N arbitrary neighborhood F is freezing if x, z

  9. Variation and co-variation of PM10, particle number concentration, NOx and NO2 in the urban air - Relationships with wind speed, vertical temperature gradient and weather type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundström, M.; Hak, C.; Chen, D.; Hallquist, M.; Pleijel, H.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 0.1 ?m) represent a growing global health concern in urban environments and has a strong link to traffic related emissions. UFP is usually the dominating fraction of atmospheric particle number concentrations (PNC) despite being a minor part of total particle mass. The aim of this study was to empirically investigate the relationship between PNC and other air pollutants (NOX, NO2 and PM10) in the urban environment and their dependence on meteorology and weather type, using the Lamb Weather Type (LWT) classification scheme. The study was carried out in Gothenburg, Sweden, at an urban background site during April 2007-May 2008. It was found that daily average [PNC] correlated very well with [NOx] (R2 = 0.73) during inversion days, to a lesser extent with [NO2] (R2 = 0.58) and poorly with [PM10] (R2 = 0.07). Both PNC and NOx had similar response patterns to wind speed and to the strength of temperature inversions. PNC displayed two regimes, one strongly correlated to NOx and a second poorly correlated to NOx which was characterised by high wind speed. For concentration averages based on LWTs, the PNC-[NOx] relationship remained strong (R2 = 0.70) where the windy LWT W deviated noticeably. Exclusion of observations with wind speed >5 ms-1 or ?T < 0 °C from LWTs produced more uniform and stronger relationships (R2 = 0.90; R2 = 0.93). Low wind speeds and positive vertical temperature gradients were most common during LWTs A, NW, N and NE. These weather types were also associated with the highest daily means of NOx (?30 ppb) and PNC (?10 000 # cm-3). A conclusion from this study is that NOx (but not PM10) is a good proxy for PNC especially during calm and stable conditions and that LWTs A, NW, N and NE are high risk weather types for elevated NOx and PNC.

  10. Bjorken model with Freeze Out

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai

    2007-11-19

    The freeze out of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, is discussed. We combine Bjorken scenario with earlier developed freeze out equations into a unified model. The important feature of the proposed model is that physical freeze out is completely finished in a finite time, which can be varied from 0 (freeze out hypersurface) to infinity. The dependence of the post freeze out distribution function on this freeze out time will be studied. As an example model is completely solved and analyzed for the gas of pions.

  11. Freezing Poultry for Home Use 

    E-print Network

    Davis, Michael

    2006-08-31

    Purchasing fresh poultry in large packages and freezing it in quantities suitable for individual meals can stretch time and food dollars. Topics include packaging needs, cutting, storing and thawing instructions, and freezing pre-cooked meals....

  12. Freeze Branding Horses 

    E-print Network

    Householder, Doug; Webb, Gary; Wigington, Sam; Bruemmer, Jason

    2001-06-29

    Freeze branding of horses has many advantages. It is safe, economical, simple to do and relatively painless. It can be done on horses of any age and does not damage the horse's hide. This publication gives complete, step-by-step instructions...

  13. Freezing and thawing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally frozen soil strongly influences runoff and erosion on large areas of land around the world. In many areas, rain or snowmelt on seasonally frozen soil is the single leading cause of severe runoff and erosion events. As soils freeze, ice blocks the soil pores, greatly diminishing the permea...

  14. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  15. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  16. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  17. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  18. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-print Network

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  19. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  20. SURROGATE BRIDGE FREEZING SRDJAN JANKOVIC

    E-print Network

    SURROGATE BRIDGE FREEZING SENSORS by SRDJAN JANKOVIC Bachelor of Science University of Belgrade: Stillwater, Oklahoma Title of Study: SURROGATE BRIDGE FREEZING SENSORS Pages in Study: 121 Candidate of this study was to design and test surrogate bridge freezing sensors in order to provide training data

  1. Thermodynamical effects accompanied freezing of two water layers separated by sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Marchenko, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    The process of melt pond freezing is very important for generation of sea ice cover thermodynamic and mass balance during winterperiod. However, due to significant difficulties of field measurements the available data of model estimations still have no instrumental confirmation. In May 2009 the authors carried out laboratory experiment on freezing of limited water volume in the University Centre in Svalbard ice tank. In the course of experiment fresh water layer of 27.5 cm thickness at freezing point poured on the 24 cm sea ice layer was cooled during 50 hours at the temperature -10º C and then once again during 60 hours at -20º C. For revealing process typical characteristics the data of continuous measurements of temperature and salinity in different phases were compared with data of numerical computations obtained with thermodynamic model which was formulated in the frames of 1-D equation system (infinite extension of water freezing layer) and adapted to laboratory conditions. The known surprise of the experiment became proximity of calculated and measured estimates of process dynamics that confirmed the adequacy of the problem mathematical statement (excluding probably process finale stage). This effect can be explained by formation of cracks on the upper layer of ice at sharp decreases of air temperature, which temporary compensated hydrostatic pressure growth during freezing of closed water volume. Another compensated mechanism can be migration of brine through the lower layer of ice under influence of vertical pressure gradient and also rejection of gas dissolved in water which increased its compressibility. During 110 hours cooling thickness of water layer between ice layers reduced approximately to 2 cm. According to computations this layer is not chilled completely but keeps as thin brine interlayer within ice body whose thickness (about units of mm) is determined by temperature fluctuations of cooled surface. Nevertheless, despite good coincidence of experimental and model estimates the question of existence of liquid phase under actual conditions is still open and can be clarified in a continuous laboratory experiment. This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project # 14-05-00677).

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 43, NO. 6, JUNE 2005 1317 Differentiation Between Melt and Freeze Stages of

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    Between Melt and Freeze Stages of the Melt Cycle Using SSM/I Channel Ratios Ivan S. Ashcraft, Member, IEEE, it is important to determine if wet snow is in the process of melting or freezing. The different stages to melt and freeze stages of the daily melt cycle. The horizontal to vertical polarization ratio

  3. On estimating freezing times during tissue rapid freezing.

    PubMed

    Jones, G J

    1984-12-01

    For the study of morphological changes that are associated with fast physiological processes, it is important to know the times at which the surface regions of specimens are frozen during rapid freezing. A simple physical model has been used to estimate the freezing times and the cooling rates at 10 micron depths in specimens. The calculations indicate that cooling rates in excess of 4 X 10(4) K s-1 are associated with freezing times of less than 0.5 ms. Using the same model, experimental measurements of freezing times at much larger depths have been extrapolated to a depth of 10 micron, the times obtained are 0.1-0.6 ms for freezing by rapid immersion in cryogenic liquids, and 0.1 ms or less for freezing on a metal block. It is concluded that the delay time between contact with a cryogenic source and specimen freezing is less than 0.5 ms. The uncertainty in the time of freezing may be larger than this, because of an uncertainty of about +/- 0.5 ms in determining the exact time of contact and, for freeze fracture studies, because of an uncertainty of up to 0.5 ms due to imprecision in the depth of fracture. At the same time it is estimated that the time during which freezing takes place may be as high as 250 microseconds, which can be taken as an upper limit for the resolution time for rapid freezing. PMID:6520865

  4. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (principal investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  5. Role of the stratospheric polar freezing belt in denitrification.

    PubMed

    Tabazadeh, A; Jensen, E J; Toon, O B; Drdla, K; Schoeberl, M R

    2001-03-30

    Homogeneous freezing of nitric acid hydrate particles can produce a polar freezing belt in either hemisphere that can cause denitrification. Computed denitrification profiles for one Antarctic and two Arctic cold winters are presented. The vertical range over which denitrification occurs is normally quite deep in the Antarctic but limited in the Arctic. A 4 kelvin decrease in the temperature of the Arctic stratosphere due to anthropogenic and/or natural effects can trigger the occurrence of widespread severe denitrification. Ozone loss is amplified in a denitrified stratosphere, so the effects of falling temperatures in promoting denitrification must be considered in assessment studies of ozone recovery trends. PMID:11283368

  6. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  7. Freeze Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, C. T. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of wind speed, net irradiation, and of air, soil, and dew point temperatures in an orchard at the Rock Springs Agricultural Research Center, as well as topographical and climatological data and a description of the major apple growing regions of Pennsylvania were supplied to the University of Florida for use in running the P-model, freeze prediction program. Results show that the P-model appears to have considerable applicability to conditions in Pennsylvania. Even though modifications may have to be made for use in the fruit growing regions, there are advantages for fruit growers with the model in its present form.

  8. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  9. Radiobrightness decision criteria for freeze/thaw boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuerndorfer, B.; England, Anthony W.

    1992-01-01

    A freeze indicator (FI), based on a low 37-GHz radiobrightness and a low 10.7, 18, and 37-GHz radiobrightness spectral gradient, has been used to classify frozen surfaces in the northern Great Plains. By modeling the radiometer beampatterns as Gaussian, freeze/thaw boundaries can be located at the (fine) resolution of the 37-GHz channel. The performance of the freeze indicator, and subsequent boundary location estimate, depends on the accuracy of the boundary decision criteria. It is shown that decision criteria based on clustering and unsupervised classification yield good performance. A simple algorithm for registering coarse-resolution FI boundaries to equivalent boundaries in fine-resolution 37-GHz radiobrightness images is also presented.

  10. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  11. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Isolation, Freezing, Thawing, and Culture.

    PubMed

    Riedhammer, Christine; Halbritter, Dagmar; Weissert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The work with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which comprise lymphocytes and monocytes, is indispensable in immunological diagnostics and research. The isolation of PBMCs takes advantage of differences in cell density of the different blood components. Density gradient centrifugation of diluted whole blood layered over a density gradient medium yields PBMCs; two subsequent washing steps remove remaining platelets. To store the cells for future assays, they can be frozen and thawed when required. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serves as a cryoprotectant for freezing PBMCs, but must be removed by washing after thawing, as it can become toxic to the cells on longer exposure. PMID:25092056

  12. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  13. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  14. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  15. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  16. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  17. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  19. Thermal freeze-out versus chemical freeze-out reexamined

    E-print Network

    Dariusz Prorok

    2010-03-04

    An alternative, to the commonly used blast-wave, model describing the freeze-out hypersurface is applied to fit the $p_{T}$-spectra of identified hadrons measured at relativistic heavy-ion collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=62.4, 130$ and 200 GeV. Decays of resonances are taken into account completely. It has turned out that the fitted freeze-out temperature and baryon number chemical potential depend weakly on the centrality of the collision and their values are close to the chemical freeze-out values determined from fits to particle yield ratios.

  20. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  1. The role of the geothermal gradient in the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms by which ground ice is emplaced, removed, and potentially replenished, are critical to understanding the climatic and hydrologic behavior of water on Mars, as well as the morphologic evolution of its surface. Because of the strong temperature dependence of the saturated vapor pressure of H2O, the atmospheric emplacement or replenishment of ground ice is prohibited below the depth at which crustal temperatures begin to monotonically increase due to geothermal heating. In contrast, the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice from reservoirs of H2O residing deep within the crust can occur by at least three different thermally-driven processes, involving all three phases of water. In this regard, Clifford has discussed how the presence of a geothermal gradient as small as 15 K/km can give rise to a corresponding vapor pressure gradient sufficient to drive the vertical transport of 1 km of water from a reservoir of ground water at depth to the base of the cryosphere every 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) years. This abstract expands on this earlier treatment by considering the influence of thermal gradients on the transport of H2O at temperatures below the freezing point.

  2. Commercial Application of Freeze Crystallization 

    E-print Network

    Gorgol, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    the world bcgan. The most noticeable frozen substance is, of course, water. Snow, ice cubcs, frozen lakes and streams, even iccbcrgs are all evidences of the freezing process at work. This process is also used to form crystalline compounds in industry... understand the water they obtained from ice was potable. RECENT APPLICATIONS Scientists have understood the basic mechanism of the freezing phase change for many years. ID an effort to harness the power of this phenomena, applications were researched...

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Cryoprotectants and Extreme Freeze

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Cryoprotectants and Extreme Freeze Tolerance in a Subarctic Population of the Wood in freeze tolerance, with sub- arctic populations tolerating experimental freezing to temperatures at least investigated their physiological responses to somatic freezing at extreme temperatures. Alaskan frogs collected

  4. Introducing freezing cellular automata Taller @ Concepcin

    E-print Network

    Theyssier, Guillaume

    Introducing freezing cellular automata Taller @ Concepción G. Theyssier (CNRS, CMM) October, 2013;#12;Freezing cellular automata Q = {0, . . . , n - 1} with natural order N arbitrary neighborhood F is freezing if x, z : F(x)z xz #12;Freezing cellular automata Q = {0, . . . , n - 1} with natural order N

  5. VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST

    E-print Network

    Peters, Richard

    VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST Vertical greenery is not a new concept; it dates back thousands-growingvarietiesbecome established. Theneedforpermissionfromcouncil, strataetc. #12;VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST THE PLAN

  6. Heat freezes niche evolution.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Miguel B; Ferri-Yáñez, Francisco; Bozinovic, Francisco; Marquet, Pablo A; Valladares, Fernando; Chown, Steven L

    2013-09-01

    Climate change is altering phenology and distributions of many species and further changes are projected. Can species physiologically adapt to climate warming? We analyse thermal tolerances of a large number of terrestrial ectotherm (n = 697), endotherm (n = 227) and plant (n = 1816) species worldwide, and show that tolerance to heat is largely conserved across lineages, while tolerance to cold varies between and within species. This pattern, previously documented for ectotherms, is apparent for this group and for endotherms and plants, challenging the longstanding view that physiological tolerances of species change continuously across climatic gradients. An alternative view is proposed in which the thermal component of climatic niches would overlap across species more than expected. We argue that hard physiological boundaries exist that constrain evolution of tolerances of terrestrial organisms to high temperatures. In contrast, evolution of tolerances to cold should be more frequent. One consequence of conservatism of upper thermal tolerances is that estimated niches for cold-adapted species will tend to underestimate their upper thermal limits, thereby potentially inflating assessments of risk from climate change. In contrast, species whose climatic preferences are close to their upper thermal limits will unlikely evolve physiological tolerances to increased heat, thereby being predictably more affected by warming. PMID:23869696

  7. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  8. Freeze-in through portals

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martínez, Enrique; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: enrique.fernandez-martinez@uam.es

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  9. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Ma?olepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ? liquid and cubic ice ? liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  10. Freezing of a Liquid Marble

    E-print Network

    Ali Hashmi; Adam Strauss; Jie Xu

    2012-07-03

    In this study, we present for the first time the observations of a freezing liquid marble. In the experiment, liquid marbles are gently placed on the cold side of a Thermo-Electric Cooler (TEC) and the morphological changes are recorded and characterized thereafter. These liquid marbles are noticed to undergo a shape transition from a spherical to a flying-saucer shaped morphology. The freezing dynamics of liquid marbles is observed to be very different from that of a freezing water droplet on a superhydrophobic surface. For example, the pointy tip appearing on a frozen water drop could not be observed for a frozen liquid marble. In the end, we highlight a possible explanation for the observed morphology.

  11. Freezing singularities in water drops

    E-print Network

    Enriquez, Oscar R; Winkels, Koen G; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2011-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show how a drop of water freezes into a singular shape when deposited on a cold surface. The process of solidification can be observed very clearly due to the change in refraction when water turns into ice. The drop remains approximately spherical during most of the process, with a freezing front moving upwards and smoothly following the interface. However, at the final stage of freezing, when the last cap of liquid turns into ice, a singular tip develops spontaneously. Interestingly, the sharp tip of the ice drop acts as a preferential site for deposition of water vapour, and a beautiful "tree" of ice crystals develops right at the tip. The tip singularity attracts the vapour in analogy to a sharp lightning rod attracting lightning.

  12. Freeze-dried microarterial allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, J.; Hargrave, J.C.

    1990-02-01

    Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts were implanted to bridge arterial defects using New Zealand White rabbits as the experimental model. Segments of artery from the rabbit ear and thigh were harvested and preserved for a minimum of 2 weeks after freeze-drying. These allografts, approximately 1 mm in diameter and ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 cm in length, were rehydrated and then implanted in low-pressure and high-pressure arterial systems. Poor patency was noted in low-pressure systems in both allografts and autografts, tested in 12 rabbits. In the high-pressure arterial systems, allografts that were freeze-dried and reconstituted failed in a group of 10 rabbits with an 8-week patency rate of 30 percent. Gamma irradiation in an effort to reduce infection and antigenicity of grafts after freeze-drying was associated with a patency rate of 10 percent at 8 weeks in this system in another group of 10 rabbits. Postoperative cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a patency rate of 22.2 percent in the high-pressure arterial system in a 9-rabbit group. Control autografts in this system in a group of 10 rabbits showed a 100 percent patency at 8 weeks. Microarterial grafts depend on perfusion pressure of the vascular bed for long-term patency. Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts do not seem to function well in lengths of 1 to 2.5 cm when implanted in a high-pressure arterial system. Freeze-dried arterial allografts are probably not antigenic.

  13. Molecular biology of freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2013-07-01

    Winter survival for many kinds of animals involves freeze tolerance, the ability to endure the conversion of about 65% of total body water into extracellular ice and the consequences that freezing imposes including interruption of vital processes (e.g., heartbeat and breathing), cell shrinkage, elevated osmolality, anoxia/ischemia, and potential physical damage from ice. Freeze-tolerant animals include various terrestrially hibernating amphibians and reptiles, many species of insects, and numerous other invertebrates inhabiting both terrestrial and intertidal environments. Well-known strategies of freezing survival include accumulation of low molecular mass carbohydrate cryoprotectants (e.g., glycerol), use of ice nucleating agents/proteins for controlled triggering of ice growth and of antifreeze proteins that inhibit ice recrystallization, and good tolerance of anoxia and dehydration. The present article focuses on more recent advances in our knowledge of the genes and proteins that support freeze tolerance and the metabolic regulatory mechanisms involved. Important roles have been identified for aquaporins and transmembrane channels that move cryoprotectants, heat shock proteins and other chaperones, antioxidant defenses, and metabolic rate depression. Genome and proteome screening has revealed many new potential targets that respond to freezing, in particular implicating cytoskeleton remodeling as a necessary facet of low temperature and/or cell volume adaptation. Key regulatory mechanisms include reversible phosphorylation control of metabolic enzymes and microRNA control of gene transcript expression. These help to remodel metabolism to preserve core functions while suppressing energy expensive metabolic activities such as the cell cycle. All of these advances are providing a much more complete picture of life in the frozen state. PMID:23897687

  14. Transverse freezing of thin liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerman, Michael

    A pair of coupled non-linear partial differential equations is derived using lubrication theory that govern the morphology of a thin, liquid film of a pure and a binary metal alloy, bounded by the liquid's solid phase and a passive gas phase. The analysis is motivated by the directional freezing of metallic foams, and is a first attempt to model transverse freezing in thin films that form in foam networks, but also applies to thin film layers in general. Both the no-slip crystal-melt and the free melt-gas interfaces are deformable. The governing pair of non-linear differential equations for the most general case incorporate crystal-melt and melt-gas surface tension, latent heat, heat transfer, volume change, molecular interactions, thermocapillary and dilute phase concentration effects. Linear analysis of a uniform film reveals a variety of instabilities. A unique wavenumber is selected at the onset of instability in the case of an applied temperature gradient with vanishing crystal-melt surface tension. This system reproduces the isothermal result for a rigid solid-liquid interface in which a band of wavenumbers is unstable. A new long-wave instability has been identified, for the case with CM surface tension, that is due to the coupling of the interfaces. Numerical solutions of the fully non-linear system provide film evolution and rupture times, and show that, near the critical conditions, rupture can occur by the growth of standing or traveling waves. The numerics also reveals complex non-linear interactions between unstable modes. It is found that for most unstable initial conditions, the crystal-melt interface retreats by melting away from the tip region of the encroaching melt-gas interface due to a rise in heat flux as the film thins near the rupture point.

  15. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  16. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  17. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  18. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  19. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  20. Status of Chemical Freeze-Out

    E-print Network

    J. Cleymans; H. Oeschler; K. Redlich; S. Wheaton

    2006-07-14

    The status of the energy dependence of the chemical freeze-out temperature and chemical potential obtained in heavy ion collisions is presented. Recent proposals for chemical freeze-out conditions are compared.

  1. The vertical profile of radar reflectivity of convective cells: A strong indicator of storm intensity and lightning probability?

    SciTech Connect

    Zipser, E.J.; Lutz, K.R.

    1994-08-01

    Reflectivity data from Doppler radars are used to construct vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) of convective cells in mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in three different environmental regimes. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CP-3 and CP-4 radars are used to calculate median VPRR for MCSs in the Oklahoma-Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central in 1985. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere radar in Darwin, Australia, is used to calculate VPRR for MCSs observed both in oceanic, monsoon regimes and in continental, break period regimes during the wet seasons of 1987/88 and 1988/89. The midlatitude and tropical continental VPRRs both exhibit maximum reflectivity somewhat above the surface and have a gradual decrease in reflectivity with height above the freezing level. In sharp contrast, the tropical oceanic profile has a maximum reflectivity at the lowest level and a very rapid decrease in reflectivity with height beginning just above the freezing level. The tropical oceanic profile in the Darwin area is almost the same shape as that for two other tropical oceanic regimes, leading to the conclustion that it is characteristic. The absolute values of reflectivity in the 0 to 20 C range are compared with values in the literature thought to represent a threshold for rapid storm electrification leading to lightning, about 40 dBZ at -10 C. The large negative vertical gradient of reflectivity in this temperature range for oceanic storms is hypothesized to be a direct result of the characteristically weaker vertical velocities observed in MCSs over tropical oceans..

  2. Waste freezing, remote retrieval technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) scientists have successfully demonstrated a process of freezing soil and buried waste and retrieving it using remotely operated tools. Early results indicate that this cryogenic retrieval process may reduce risk to workers and protect the environment from airborne and liquid contaminants during actual waste cleanup projects.

  3. Bjorken expansion with gradual freeze out

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai; E. Molnar

    2007-02-27

    The freeze out of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, will be discussed. We combine kinetic freeze out equations with Bjorken type system expansion into a unified model. Such a model is a more physical generalization of the earlier simplified non-expanding freeze out models. We shall see that the basic freeze out features, pointed out in the earlier works, are not smeared out by the expansion.

  4. Combined infrared and freeze-drying.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying of the combined infrared (IR) and freeze-drying of food materials has been shown to be very rapid compared to regular freeze drying (FD). The resulting tissue structure of products processed with sequential infrared and freeze drying (SIRFD) tends to have higher crispness than those proce...

  5. Freeze Thaw Durability of Modern Concrete Mixtures

    E-print Network

    Freeze Thaw Durability of Modern Concrete Mixtures Robert Felice John Michael Freeman Tyler Ley, P photos #12;Why Do We Add Air to Concrete? · Air-entrained bubbles are the key to the freeze-thaw resistance of concrete · Smaller bubbles are more effective in providing freeze-thaw resistance than larger

  6. Morphological instability in freezing colloidal suspensions

    E-print Network

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Morphological instability in freezing colloidal suspensions BY STEPHEN S. L. PEPPIN 1,2, *, M. GRAE of colloidal systems is that they do not freeze uniformly. Instead the ice segregates, aligning the expelled particles into different configurations depending on the freezing conditions (figure 1). One of the major

  7. Mapping freeze/thaw boundaries with SMMR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuerndorfer, B. W.; England, A. W.; Dobson, M. C.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1989-01-01

    Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data are used to map daily freeze/thaw patterns in the upper Midwest for the Fall of 1984. The combination of a low 37 GHz radiobrightness and a negative 10.7, 18, and 37 GHz spectral gradient, Partial Derivative of Tb with Respect to f, appears to be an effective discriminant for classifying soil as frozen or thawed. The 37 GHz emissivity is less sensitive to soil moisture than are the lower frequency emissivities so that the 37 GHz radiobrightness appears to track soil surface temperature relatively well. The negative gradient for frozen ground is a consequence of volume scatter darkening at shorter microwave wavelengths. This shorter wavelength darkening is not seen in thawed moist soils.

  8. Freeze chromatography method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-04-16

    A freeze chromatography method and apparatus are provided which enable separation of the solutes contained in a sample. The apparatus includes an annular column construction comprising cylindrical inner and outer surfaces defining an annular passage therebetween. One of the surfaces is heated and the other cooled while passing an eluent through the annular passageway so that the eluent in contact with the cooled surface freezes and forms a frozen eluent layer thereon. A mixture of solutes dissolved in eluent is passed through the annular passageway in contact with the frozen layer so that the sample solutes in the mixture will tend to migrate either toward or away the frozen layer. The rate at which the mixture flows through the annular passageway is controlled so that the distribution of the sample solutes approaches that at equilibrium and thus a separation between the sample solutes occurs. 3 figs.

  9. Slow-roll freezing quintessence

    E-print Network

    Sourish Dutta; Robert J. Scherrer

    2011-08-03

    We examine the evolution of quintessence models with potentials satisfying (V'/V)^2freezing phase, in which the equation of state parameter w decreases with time, followed by slow thawing evolution, for which w increases with time. These models resemble constant-V models at early times but diverge at late times. Our analytic approximation gives results in excellent agreement with exact numerical evolution.

  10. The thermodynamics of freezing soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Amico, Matteo; Rigon, Riccardo; Gruber, Stephan; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    In this work a throughout derivation of the soil freezing process is performed, from the thermodynamic equilibrium to the derivation of the water and ice content in the ground. Starting from a capillary tube schematization for the soil and the findings of Loch (1978), the generalized Clapeyron equation may be directly obtained by the Gibbs-Duhem identity. In this equation, however, the ice pressure complicates the formulation as it adds an unknown to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The only way to obtain the common generalized Clapeyron equation often used in literature is to hypothesize the behavior ''freezing=drying'' as proposed by Miller (1963). In this case the pressure at the ice-water interface is equal to the air-water interface, and so the ice pressure may be set constant and equal to the zero gauge pressure given by air pressure. This assumption, often tacitly assumed in literature, implies precise limitations on the physical processes that may be dealt with. In particular, frost heave may not be modeled. The objective of this work is to derive the thermodynamic equilibrium of the ice and water phases in a porous medium, to clarify the ''freezing=drying'' assumption and to propose a fully explicit formulation for the equilibrium where the ice pressure is added to the set of unknowns.

  11. Shadowgraph Study of Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David; Nikolaenko, Gennady; Giglio, Marzio; Vailati, Alberto; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Meyer, William

    2002-01-01

    A fluid or fluid mixture, subjected to a vertical temperature and/or concentration gradient in a gravitational field, exhibits greatly enhanced light scattering at small angles. This effect is caused by coupling between the vertical velocity fluctuations due to thermal energy and the vertically varying refractive index. Physically, small upward or downward moving regions will be displaced into fluid having a refractive index different from that of the moving region, thus giving rise to the enhanced scattering. The scattered intensity is predicted to vary with scattering wave vector q, as q(sup -4), for sufficiently large q, but the divergence is quenched by gravity at small q. In the absence of gravity, the long wavelength fluctuations responsible for the enhanced scattering are predicted to grow until limited by the sample dimensions. It is thus of interest to measure the mean-squared amplitude of such fluctuations in the microgravity environment for comparison with existing theory and ground based measurements. The relevant wave vectors are extremely small, making traditional low-angle light scattering difficult or impossible because of stray elastically scattered light generated by optical surfaces. An alternative technique is offered by the shadowgraph method, which is normally used to visualize fluid flows, but which can also serve as a quantitative tool to measure fluctuations. A somewhat novel shadowgraph apparatus and the necessary data analysis methods will be described. The apparatus uses a spatially coherent, but temporally incoherent, light source consisting of a super-luminescent diode coupled to a single-mode optical fiber in order to achieve extremely high spatial resolution, while avoiding effects caused by interference of light reflected from the various optical surfaces that are present when using laser sources. Results obtained for a critical mixture of aniline and cyclohexane subjected to a vertical temperature gradient will be presented. The sample was confined between two horizontal parallel sapphire plates with a vertical spacing of 1 mm. The temperatures of the sapphire plates were controlled by independent circulating water loops that used Peltier devices to add or remove heat from the room air as required. For a mixture with a temperature gradient, two effects are involved in generating the vertical refractive index gradient, namely thermal expansion and the Soret effect, which generates a concentration gradient in response to the applied temperature gradient. For the aniline/cyclohexane system, the denser component (aniline) migrates toward the colder surface. Consequently, when heating from above, both effects result in the sample density decreasing with altitude and are stabilizing in the sense that no convective motion occurs regardless of the magnitude of the applied temperature gradient. The Soret effect is strong near a binary liquid critical point, and thus the dominant effect is due to the induced concentration gradient. The results clearly show the divergence at low q and the predicted gravitational quenching. Results obtained for different applied temperature gradients at varying temperature differences from the critical temperature, clearly demonstrate the predicted divergence of the thermal diffusion ratio. Thus, the more closely the critical point is approached, the smaller becomes the temperature gradient required to generate the same signal. Two different methods have been used to generate pure concentration gradients. In the first, a sample cell was filled with a single fluid, ethylene glycol, and a denser miscible fluid, water, was added from below thus establishing a sharp interface to begin the experiment. As time went on the two fluids diffused into each other, and large amplitude fluctuations were clearly observed at low q. The effects of gravitational quenching were also evident. In the second method, the aniline/cyclohexane sample was used, and after applying a vertical temperature gradient for several hours, the top and bottom temperatures were set equal and the thermal

  12. Effects of freeze-thaw cycles on anaerobic microbial processes in an Arctic intertidal mud flat.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Joanna E; Robador, Alberto; Hubert, Casey; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-04-01

    Insight into the effects of repeated freezing and thawing on microbial processes in sediments and soils is important for understanding sediment carbon cycling at high latitudes acutely affected by global warming. Microbial responses to repeated freeze-thaw conditions were studied in three complementary experiments using arctic sediment collected from an intertidal flat that is exposed to seasonal freeze-thaw conditions (Ymerbukta, Svalbard, Arctic Ocean). The sediment was subjected to oscillating freeze-thaw incubations, either gradual, from -5 to 4 degrees C, or abrupt, from -20 to 10 degrees C. Concentrations of low-molecular weight carboxylic acids (volatile fatty acids) were measured and sulfate reduction was assessed by measuring (35)S sulfate reduction rates (SRRs). Gradual freeze-thaw incubation decreased microbial activity in the frozen state to 0.25 % of initial levels at 4 degrees C, but activity resumed rapidly reaching >60 % of initial activity in the thawed state. Exposure of sediments to successive large temperature changes (-20 versus 10 degrees C) decreased SRR by 80% of the initial activity, suggesting that a fraction of the bacterial community recovered rapidly from extreme temperature fluctuations. This is supported by 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles that revealed persistence of the dominant microbial taxa under repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The fast recovery of the SRRs suggests that carbon mineralization in thawing arctic sediment can resume without delay or substantial growth of microbial populations. PMID:20033071

  13. Freezing Rate Due to Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, Gabor

    1994-07-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled water is influenced by the nature of the foreign nuclei that serve as the sites for ice embryo formation, and by the stochastic nature of the process of embryo growth to critical size. The relative roles of these two factors have been the subject of some debate, especially as they influence the way nucleation of ice is modeled in clouds. `Freezing rate' is defined as the time-dependent rate at which a population of macroscopically identical samples (e.g., drops in a volume of air) freeze due to the nuclei contained in them. Freezing rate is the combined result of nucleus content and of time dependence. The time-dependent freezing rate model (TDFR) is consistent with available empirical evidence. For droplets cooled at rates of the order of 1°C per min, the nucleus content, or nucleus spectrum, predicts the freezing rate with reasonable accuracy. For samples exposed to a fixed temperature, the time dependence of the freezing rate becomes important, but the probability of freezing is not the same for each individual of the sample population. Stochastic models are not supported by the results. Application of the TDFR model and use of measured freezing nucleus data for precipitation provide a basis for the description of ice formation via immersion-freezing nucleation in cloud models. Limitations to full development of these models arise from inadequate knowledge about the freezing nucleus content of cloud water as a function of cloud evolution.

  14. Improved cryofixation applicable to freeze etching.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, L; Schmitt, W W

    1971-09-01

    Freeze etching of solute model systems (e.g., glycerol or ferritin solutions) demonstrates that cryofixation can introduce serious artifacts due to the segregation of the dissolved or dispersed material from the solvent. Since, in principle, this problem can be reduced by increasing the cooling rate, a new technique has been developed which combines spray freezing with freeze etching. This spray-freeze-etching is applied by first spraying the specimen into a liquid cryomedium. The frozen droplets are then "glued" together with butylbenzene to form a regular freeze-etch specimen, while the temperature of the sample is kept at -85 degrees C. The results obtained by spray-freeze-etching are far superior to those obtained by standard freezing. Our results, using 5% glycerol as a test specimen, are equivalent to those obtained by the high-pressure method (1). The reduction of segregation during freezing makes freeze etching a method applicable for the investigation of solute systems. Furthermore, the study of unicellular organisms or cellular fractions by freeze etching without the use of antifreeze is made possible. PMID:4943787

  15. Freeze-drying processes and wind erodibility of a clay loam soil in southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, M S.; Larney, F. J.; McGinn, Sean M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    1999-01-01

    Freeze-drying has been implicated as a factor causing soil aggregate breakdown on the Canadian Prairies and northern Great Plains. Aggregates of a Dark Brown Chernozemic clay loam soil sampled in October 1993 and January and April 1994 were subjected to repeated cycles of wetting (to 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 kg kg-1 water contents) freezing, and freeze-drying under laboratory conditions. The October 1993 samples showed less disruption when initially exposed to freeze-drying cycles compared to samples taken in January and April 1994. Using regression analysis, we predicted that 31 freeze-dry cycles were required for the 0.1 kg kg-1 water content aggregates to reach 60% erodible fraction (EF, % aggregates <0.86 mm), 9 cycles for the 0.2 kg kg-1 aggregates and 2 for 0.3 kg kg-1 aggregates. In a field study, conducted over the 1994-1995 winter on a similar clay loam soil, we estimated the number of freeze-drying cycles using large vapor pressure (VPL) and small vapor pressure (VPS) gradients bet ween the soil surface (which had a mean winter water content of {approx}0.1 kg kg-1) and the atmosphere. With solar energy adjustments, we predicted that the number of freeze-dry cycles required for the soil to reach 60% EF was 60 for VPL and 37 for VPS conditions. The latter number was similar to the 31 cycles predicted in the laboratory study of aggregates at 0.1 water content. Our results demonstrate that freeze-drying is an important overwinter process in the breakdown of soil aggregates and hence wind erosion risk in the Canadian prairie region.

  16. Predicting Freezing for Some Repulsive Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-18

    We propose a simple method to approximately predict the freezing (fluid-solid) phase transition in systems of particles interacting via purely repulsive potentials. The method is based on the striking universality of the freezing curve for the model Yukawa and inverse-power-law interactions. This method is applied to draw an exemplary phase diagram of complex plasmas. We suggest that it can also be used to locate freezing transition in other substances with similar properties of interaction.

  17. Freezing techniques defeat ground water problems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    The sinking of a new shaft at Walsum Colliery, West Germany, is described. The 640 m of strata above the coal seams were known to be unstable and include the Bunter Sandstone. The shaft is also within 1 km of the River Rhine. Freezing techniques were therefore adopted. Details of the freezing operation are given, including the drilling of the freezing holes and the determination of the size and strength of the ice wall.

  18. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  19. Chemically grafted carbon nanotube surface coverage gradients.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Ellis, Amanda V; Shapter, Joseph G; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2010-12-01

    Two approaches to producing gradients of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on silicon surfaces by chemical grafting are presented here. The first approach involves the use of a porous silicon (pSi) substrate featuring a pore size gradient, which is functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Carboxylated SWCNTs are then immobilized on the topography gradient via carbodiimide coupling. Our results show that as the pSi pore size and porosity increase across the substrate the SWCNT coverage decreases concurrently. In contrast, the second gradient is an amine-functionality gradient produced by means of vapor-phase diffusion of APTES from a reservoir onto a silicon wafer where APTES attachment changes as a function of distance from the APTES reservoir. Carboxylated SWCNTs are then immobilized via carbodiimide coupling to the amine-terminated silicon gradient. Our observations confirm that with decreasing APTES density on the surface the coverage of the attached SWCNTs also decreases. These gradient platforms pave the way for the time-efficient optimization of SWCNT coverage for applications ranging from field emission to water filtration to drug delivery. PMID:20977243

  20. Freeze out in narrow and wide layers

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai; E. Molnar

    2006-01-19

    The freeze out of particles from a layer of finite thickness is discussed in a phenomenological kinetic model. The proposed model, based on the Modified Boltzman Transport Equation, is Lorentz invariant and can be applied equally well for the freeze out layers with space-like and time-like normal vectors. It leads to non-equilibrated post freeze out distributions. The dependence of the resulting distribution on the thickness of the layer is presented and discussed for a space-like freeze out scenario.

  1. Measuring freezing tolerance: survival and regrowth assays.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Daniel Z; Garland-Campbell, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Screening plants for freezing tolerance under tightly controlled conditions is an invaluable technique for studying freezing tolerance and selecting for improved winterhardiness. Artificial freezing tests of cereal plants historically have used isolated crown and stem tissue prepared by "removing all plant parts 3 cm above and 0.5 cm below the crown tissue" (Fowler et al., Crop Sci 21:896-901, 1981). Here, we describe a method of conducting freezing tolerance tests using intact plants grown in small horticultural containers, including suggested methods for collecting and analyzing the data. PMID:24852624

  2. About the vertical gradient of composition in Titan's lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Roussel, J.; Rannou, P.

    2015-10-01

    The hydrocarbons seas of Titan, discovered by Cassini/Huygens mission are among the most interesting features of this object. However, their chemical composition remains not well known. Due to the presence of the methane in the atmosphere, only a few indications favoring the existence of some amount of ethane in Ontario Lacus have been brought by observations reported in [2, 10]. Several numerical models have been proposed: Dubouloz et al. (1989), Cordier et al. (2009,2013) based on the Regular Solution Theory, Glein et al. (2013) [4] and Tan et al. (2013) [13] respectively based on a RST family model and on the advanced equation of state PC-SAFT1 [5, 13, 10, 3]. The atmosphere of Titan is dominated by nitrogen and contains a few percents of methane. The latter, photolyzed by solar radiations in the stratosphere, gives rise to a complex organic chemistry yielding to the production of a plethora of compounds [7]. According to numerical models, the most abundant species, produced by photochemistry, should be ethane. Then, the bulk composition of Titan's lakes can reasonably regarded as a mixture of methane and ethane, withsome amount of dissolved N2. This latter has a melting temperature (63.3 K) much below than that for methane (around 91 K) and ethane (101 K determined by Streng, 1971; 89.2 K measured by Timmermans,1935); as the ground temperature of Titan in the range 90?95K, the nitrogenmay play a role of an antifreezing solute.

  3. The effect of density gradients on hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Martti; Sillanpää, Sampo

    2003-05-01

    Hydrometers are simple but effective instruments for measuring the density of liquids. In this work, we studied the effect of non-uniform density of liquid on a hydrometer reading. The effect induced by vertical temperature gradients was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A method for compensating for the effect mathematically was developed and tested with experimental data obtained with the MIKES hydrometer calibration system. In the tests, the method was found reliable. However, the reliability depends on the available information on the hydrometer dimensions and density gradients.

  4. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preferred carrier freezes. 64.1190 Section 64....1190 Preferred carrier freezes. (a) A preferred carrier freeze (or freeze) prevents a change in a subscriber's preferred carrier selection unless the subscriber gives the carrier from whom the freeze...

  5. Leica EM AFS2 Automatic Freeze Substitution System

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Leica EM AFS2 Automatic Freeze Substitution System Leica EM FSP Freeze Substitution Processor #12 working range · "Deep Freeze" allows sample transfer at temperatures below -140 °C · Transfer function "TF steel working platform Leica EM AFS2 Freeze Substitution has never been easier... Freeze Substitution

  6. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preferred carrier freezes. 64.1190 Section 64....1190 Preferred carrier freezes. (a) A preferred carrier freeze (or freeze) prevents a change in a subscriber's preferred carrier selection unless the subscriber gives the carrier from whom the freeze...

  7. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preferred carrier freezes. 64.1190 Section 64....1190 Preferred carrier freezes. (a) A preferred carrier freeze (or freeze) prevents a change in a subscriber's preferred carrier selection unless the subscriber gives the carrier from whom the freeze...

  8. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preferred carrier freezes. 64.1190 Section 64....1190 Preferred carrier freezes. (a) A preferred carrier freeze (or freeze) prevents a change in a subscriber's preferred carrier selection unless the subscriber gives the carrier from whom the freeze...

  9. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [of freeze dried foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Methods which produce freeze dried foods of improved quality were examined with emphasis on storage stability. Specific topics discussed include: microstructure of freeze dried systems, investigation of structural changes in freeze dried systems, artificial food matrices, osmotic preconcentration to yield improved quality freeze dried fruits, and storage stability of osmotically preconcentrated freeze dried fruits.

  10. Mesoscale monitoring of the soil freeze/thaw boundary from orbital microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Craig; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Zuerndorfer, Brian; England, Anthony W.

    1990-01-01

    A technique was developed for mapping the spatial extent of frozen soils from the spectral characteristics of the 10.7 to 37 GHz radiobrightness. Through computational models for the spectral radiobrightness of diurnally heated freesing soils, a distinctive radiobrightness signature was identified for frozen soils, and the signature was cast as a discriminant for unsupervised classification. In addition to large area images, local area spatial averages of radiobrightness were calculated for each radiobrightness channel at 7 meteorologic sites within the test region. Local area averages at the meteorologic sites were used to define the preliminary boundaries in the Freeze Indicator discriminate. Freeze Indicator images based upon Nimbus 7, Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data effectively map temporal variations in the freeze/thaw pattern for the northern Great Plains at the time scale of days. Diurnal thermal gradients have a small but measurable effect upon the SMMR spectral gradient. Scale-space filtering can be used to improve the spatial resolution of a freeze/thaw classified image.

  11. HOST CADAVERS PROTECT ENTOMOPATHOGENIC NEMATODES DURING FREEZING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four species of insect-killing nematodes were exposed to freezing temperatures while inside their hosts. Survival was assessed by observing live and dead nematodes inside cadavers and by counting the infective juveniles (IJs) tht emerged after freezing. We 1) measured the effects of 24 hours of fr...

  12. Improving Forecasts of Freezing Rain at ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsonevsky, Ivan; Forbes, Richard; Hewson, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Freezing rain events, though relatively rare, can be extremely debilitating and dangerous for society, with recovery times of order months or even years. Analysis of forecasts of past events by the operational ECMWF Integrated Forecast System (IFS) showed a strong tendency to incorrectly represent freezing rain as snow. Investigations highlighted that this was primarily because the re-freezing process in IFS, following hydrometeors as they descend, was parametrised with the same time-scale as the melting process. In reality the time-scale for re-freezing should, in general, be much longer. The model physics were changed accordingly, and the results in terms of forecast quality were positive and very striking. Coupled with these physics changes new IFS output was developed for users which shows precipitation type at the surface (rain, snow, wet snow, sleet, freezing rain, ice pellets). The changes to the physics will be described in detail, and their impact will be illustrated by comparing forecast output for past events in new and old model versions, in terms of precipitation type and intensity. Illustrations will include short-range deterministic forecasts from 'HRES' (the high resolution ECMWF model), and longer range probabilistic forecasts of freezing rain occurrence from the ensemble. There will also be reference to issues requiring further work/investigation, such as high level convection in potential freezing rain cases, freezing drizzle generated in supercooled shallow clouds, and IFS retention of the 'warm nose' in which melting occurs.

  13. The principles of freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gerald D J; Cook, Isobel; Ward, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date overview of freeze-drying (lyophilization) with particular relevance to stabilizing live cells or viruses for industrial applications as vaccines or seed culture. The chapter discusses the importance of formulation, cycle development, validation, and the need to satisfy pharmaceutical regulatory requirements necessary for the commercial exploitation of freeze-dried products. PMID:25428004

  14. A Possible Role for Immersion Freezing in

    E-print Network

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    A Possible Role for Immersion Freezing in Mixed-phase Stratus Clouds Gijs de Boer T. Hashino, G and Klett, 1997) (Contact) - Nucleation through free IN - Immersion nucleation - Condensation nucleation;Jensenetal., 1998) SplinterEjection(>-8°C) (HeymsfieldandMossop, 1984) #12;Immersion Freezing Polar Cloud

  15. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section... Rooms and Compartments § 58.620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall be...

  16. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section... Rooms and Compartments § 58.620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall be...

  17. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section... Rooms and Compartments § 58.620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall be...

  18. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section... Rooms and Compartments § 58.620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall be...

  19. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section... Rooms and Compartments § 58.620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall be...

  20. 7 CFR 305.18 - Quick freeze treatment schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment schedule. 305...PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Quick Freeze Treatments § 305.18 Quick freeze treatment schedule. (a...United States or its territorial waters, or is otherwise disposed...

  1. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  2. Analysis of freezing in an eccentric annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal energy storage systems are very important in the harnessing of periodical energy sources, such as solar energy. The phase change thermal energy storage system is the most promising since it can store and release a large amount of heat energy during the melting and freezing process. Freezing in an eccentric annulus is investigated numerically by using a temperature transforming model. Since the effect of the heat conduction along the circular direction on the growth of the freezing layer is very small, an analytical solution by employing integral approximate method is proposed. The freezing rate obtained by the analytical solution agreed very well with that of the numerical solution, although the analytical solution is much simpler than the numerical solution. The effects of the eccentric annulus geometric structure on the freezing process is also investigated.

  3. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  4. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  5. Freezing Out Early Dark Energy

    E-print Network

    Jannis Bielefeld; W. L. Kimmy Wu; Robert R. Caldwell; Olivier Dore

    2013-05-09

    A phenomenological model of dark energy that tracks the baryonic and cold dark matter at early times but resembles a cosmological constant at late times is explored. In the transition between these two regimes, the dark energy density drops rapidly as if it were a relic species that freezes out, during which time the equation of state peaks at +1. Such an adjustment in the dark energy density, as it shifts from scaling to potential-domination, could be the signature of a trigger mechanism that helps explain the late-time cosmic acceleration. We show that the non-negligible dark energy density at early times, and the subsequent peak in the equation of state at the transition, leave an imprint on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy pattern and the rate of growth of large scale structure. The model introduces two new parameters, consisting of the present-day equation of state and the redshift of the freeze-out transition. A Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis of a ten-dimensional parameter space is performed to compare the model with pre-Planck cosmic microwave background, large scale structure and supernova data and measurements of the Hubble constant. We find that the transition described by this model could have taken place as late as a redshift z~400. We explore the capability of future cosmic microwave background and weak lensing experiments to put tighter constraints on this model. The viability of this model may suggest new directions in dark-energy model building that address the coincidence problem.

  6. Evaluation of anti-freeze viscosity modifier for potential external tank applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, R. O. L.

    1981-01-01

    Viscosity modifiers and gelling agents were evaluated in combination with ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide water eutectics. Pectin and agarose are found to gel these eutectics effectively in low concentration, but the anti-freeze protection afforded by these compositions is found to be marginal in simulations of the intended applications. Oxygen vent shutters and vertical metallic surfaces were simulated, with water supplied as a spray, dropwise, and by condensation from the air.

  7. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  8. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  9. Freeze-thaw cycles as drivers of complex ribozyme assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mutschler, Hannes; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA catalyst capable of self-replication is considered a key transition in the origin of life. However, how such replicase ribozymes emerged from the pools of short RNA oligomers arising from prebiotic chemistry and non-enzymatic replication is unclear. Here we show that RNA polymerase ribozymes can assemble from simple catalytic networks of RNA oligomers no longer than 30 nucleotides. The entropically disfavoured assembly reaction is driven by iterative freeze-thaw cycles even in the absence of external activation chemistry. The steep temperature and concentration gradients of such cycles result in an RNA chaperone effect that enhances the otherwise only partially realized catalytic potential of the RNA oligomer pool by an order of magnitude. Our work outlines how cyclic physicochemical processes could have driven an expansion of RNA compositional and phenotypic complexity from simple oligomer pools. PMID:25991529

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of thin sections of Drosophila: high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kent L; Sharp, David J; Rickoll, Wayne

    2012-04-01

    The state of the art in fine-structure preservation for thin sectioning can be achieved by using fast-freezing technology followed by freeze substitution and embedding in resin. Samples prepared by high-pressure freezing are estimated to be "fixed" in 20-50 msec. Fast freezing also freezes every cell component regardless of its chemistry. Once frozen, tissues can be processed in a variety of ways before viewing in the electron microscope; here we describe only freeze substitution. In freeze substitution, cells are dehydrated at very low temperatures and cell water is replaced with organic solvent at -80°C to -90°C. At this temperature, large molecules such as proteins are immobilized, yet smaller molecules such as water (ice) can be dissolved and replaced with organic solvents, e.g., acetone. The ideal way to do freeze substitution is with a dedicated freeze-substitution device such as the Leica AFS2 system. These devices allow programming of the times and temperatures needed. Alternatively, if this equipment is not available, freeze substitution can still be performed using items commonly found around the laboratory, as is described here. This protocol is useful for preparing thin sections of Drosophila when the best possible preservation of ultrastructure and antigenicity is required. PMID:22474654

  11. Exploring the Nature of Contact Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Duft, D.; Leisner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The freezing of supercooled water droplets upon contact with aerosol particles (contact nucleation of ice) is the least understood mechanism of ice formation in atmospheric clouds. Although experimental evidences suggest that some aerosols can be better IN in the contact than in the immersion mode (that is, triggering ice nucleation at higher temperature), no final explanation of this phenomena currently exists. On the other hand, the contact freezing is believed to be responsible for the enhanced rate of secondary ice formation occasionally observed in LIDAR measurements in the cold mixed phase clouds. Recently we have been able to show that the freezing of supercooled droplets electrodynamically levitated in the laminar flow containing mineral dust particles (kaolinite) is a process solely governed by a rate of collisions between the supercooled droplet and the aerosol particles. We have shown that the probability of droplet freezing on a single contact with aerosol particle may differ over an order of magnitude for kaolinite particles having different genesis and morphology. In this presentation we extend the study of contact nucleation of ice and compare the IN efficiency measured for DMA-selected kaolinite, illite and hematite particles. We show that the freezing probability increases towards unity as the temperature decreases and discuss the functional form of this temperature dependence. We explore the size dependence of the contact freezing probability and show that it scales with the surface area of the particles, thus resembling the immersion freezing behavior. However, for all minerals investigated so far, the contact freezing has been shown to dominate over immersion freezing on the short experimental time scales. Finally, based on the combined ESEM and electron microprobe analysis, we discuss the significance of particle morphology and variability of chemical composition on its IN efficiency in contact mode.

  12. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze - a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space-time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  13. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    E-print Network

    C. Wetterich

    2014-05-23

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze - a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple "crossover model" without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space-time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy dominated universe.

  14. Evaluation of spin freezing versus conventional freezing as part of a continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, L; Van Bockstal, P-J; Corver, J; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T

    2015-12-30

    Spin-freezing as alternative freezing approach was evaluated as part of an innovative continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses. The aim of this paper was to compare the sublimation rate of spin-frozen vials versus traditionally frozen vials in a batch freeze-dryer, and its impact on total drying time. Five different formulations, each having a different dry cake resistance, were tested. After freezing, the traditionally frozen vials were placed on the shelves while the spin-frozen vials were placed in aluminum vial holders providing radial energy supply during drying. Different primary drying conditions and chamber pressures were evaluated. After 2h of primary drying, the amount of sublimed ice was determined in each vial. Each formulation was monitored in-line using NIR spectroscopy during drying to determine the sublimation endpoint and the influence of drying conditions upon total drying time. For all tested formulations and applied freeze-drying conditions, there was a significant higher sublimation rate in the spin-frozen vials. This can be explained by the larger product surface and the lower importance of product resistance because of the much thinner product layers in the spin frozen vials. The in-line NIR measurements allowed evaluating the influence of applied drying conditions on the drying trajectories. PMID:25981618

  15. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2015-06-01

    Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the "executive-attention" network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping.In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  16. Freeze concentration beats the heat

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on freeze concentration (FC) which saves energy and money in packaging, shipping, and storing food products. FC---in contrast to existing heat-evaporation processes---retains volatile flavor and aroma compounds in food products so that no additives are required to restore the taste and smell of the original product. In recent tests on orange, grapefruit, and pineapple juices, reconstituted FC juices were found to be superior in taste to juices produced by evaporation and similar to the original pasteurized juices. The dairy industry, which is the largest user of energy for concentration in the food sector, is looking to FC for new products such as frozen concentrated milk as well as better use of the milk by-products of cheese production. The biggest potential for new FC applications is in those industries that consume large amounts of energy for separation processing, according to a 1987 report prepared for EPRI. In the food industry, this includes milk, vinegar, and beer producers. Potential applications also abound in the pulp and paper, pharmaceutical, chemical, and petroleum industries. FC separates substances via crystallization at substantial energy savings.

  17. Signatures of currency vertices

    E-print Network

    Holme, Petter

    2008-01-01

    Many real-world networks have broad degree distributions. For some systems, this means that the functional significance of the vertices is also broadly distributed, in other cases the vertices are equally significant, but in different ways. One example of the latter case is metabolic networks, where the high-degree vertices -- the currency metabolites -- supply the molecular groups to the low-degree metabolites, and the latter are responsible for the higher-order biological function, of vital importance to the organism. In this paper, we propose a generalization of currency metabolites to currency vertices. We investigate the network structural characteristics of such systems, both in model networks and in some empirical systems. In addition to metabolic networks, we find that a network of music collaborations and a network of e-mail exchange could be described by a division of the vertices into currency vertices and others.

  18. Doering 6/2004 Freezing Cell Lines

    E-print Network

    Doering, Tamara

    in the lab!!! Please freeze down any strain you or others might use in the future, whether that is a crypto melted) sample out on the plate. I like using a sterile needle to obtain the ice chips of sample

  19. Freeze-out Conditions from Lattice QCD

    E-print Network

    Swagato Mukherjee

    2012-11-29

    We describe a procedure for determination of freeze-out parameters of heavy-ion collisions through direct comparisons between experimentally measured higher order cumulants of charge fluctuations and first principle (lattice) QCD calculations.

  20. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  1. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  2. Continuous decoupling and freeze-out

    E-print Network

    Joern Knoll

    2009-02-13

    The decoupling and freeze-out of energetic nuclear collisions is analysed in terms of transparent semi-classical decoupling formulae. They provide a smooth transition and generalise frequently employed instantaneous freeze-out procedures. Simple relations between the damping width and the duration of the decoupling process are presented and the implications on various physical phenomena arising from the expansion and decay dynamics of the highly compressed hadronic matter generated in high energy nuclear collisions are discussed.

  3. Feedback from Freeze-out in Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    John J. Neumann; Boris Lavrenchuk; George Fai

    1996-12-09

    Most hydrodynamical calculations used in heavy-ion physics ignore the effect of freeze-out matter carrying energy and momentum away from the expanding fluid. In a simple one-dimensional model we compare calculated energy density and velocity profiles, with and without interaction between fluid-like and freeze-out parts of the system, in order to estimate the importance of this effect.

  4. Notes on the freezing of simple substances

    SciTech Connect

    Stishov, S. M.

    2006-08-15

    Experimental data on the freezing of argon and the helium isotopes at high pressures are analyzed. It is found that attractive forces in argon can be adequately described by the van der Waals mean field theory. An analogous approximation may also be applicable to helium, but this cannot be established conclusively because of quantum effects. However, an analysis of experimental results on the freezing of helium intuitively suggests that the solid-phase stability region is enlarged by quantum effects.

  5. Improved Approximation Algorithms for the Freeze-Tag Problem

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Joseph S.B.

    Improved Approximation Algorithms for the Freeze-Tag Problem Esther M. Arkin Applied Math In the Freeze-Tag Problem, the objective is to awaken a set of "asleep" robots, starting with only one "awake resemblance to the children's game of freeze-tag, this problem has been called Freeze-Tag Problem (FTP

  6. A sledge microtome for high resolution subsampling of freeze cores

    E-print Network

    Patterson, Timothy

    NOTES A sledge microtome for high resolution subsampling of freeze cores Andrew L. Macumber · R microtome designed for the high-resolution subsampling of freeze cores. This inexpensive freeze events even in systems with low sedimentation rates. The freeze-core micro- tome is particularly useful

  7. GOCE gravity gradient data for lithospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Meekes, Sjef; Abdul Fattah, Rader; Fuchs, Martin; Gradmann, Sofie; Haagmans, Roger; Lieb, Verena; Schmidt, Michael; Dettmering, Denise; Bosch, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) is the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission to determine the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivers gravity gradients, a new type of satellite data. We study how these data can improve modeling of the Earth's lithosphere. We discuss the use of the original GOCE gravity gradients versus the use of gravity gradients in grids at satellite altitude or close the Earth's surface and conclude that grids are easier to handle than the original data because one does not have to deal with very different error characteristics of the different gradients, given in a rotating frame at varying heights. The downward continuation to the surface enhances signal and better reflects the near-surface geology. But this does not outweigh the amplification of noise and omission errors, which is why we recommend using the field at mean satellite altitude for lithospheric modeling. The North-East Atlantic region is ideal to analyze the additional value of GOCE gravity gradients because it is a well-studied region in terms of regional geophysics. We calculated the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model. This reveals that especially interfaces with large density contrasts have a distinct signal in the gravity gradients, but that they are quite insensitive to intra-crustal density sources, which can have quite a large effect on surface gravity data. We also show that the satellite gradients have a depth sensitivity well suited to study the upper mantle density structure, making them complementary to gravity and seismic tomography. In the underexplored Rub'al-Khali area the GOCE vertical gradient was used to invert for crustal thickness. The updated Moho model gives a good fit to four of the six gradients and independent depths from seismic stations. The Moho model was used to update the heat flow model and source rock maturity maps, which are generally consistent with known source rock maturity trends in the surrounding regions. GOCE gradients are therefore useful to map crustal thickness and deep regional structures for frontier areas. In combination with other data, heat flow can be modeled which is essential for basin maturity evaluation.

  8. High-speed Imaging of Freezing Drops: Investigating the Role of Point-like Contact in Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J.; Shaw, R. A.; Kostinski, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Formation of ice by contact nucleation remains enigmatic and the possible role of the three-phase boundary (i.e., liquid water-ice-aerosol contact line) is still undetermined. Because aerosol size, surface area, composition and exact region of contact remain difficult to measure, we examine a simpler geometry with a spherical cap droplet resting on a substrate. In this configuration, the droplet simultaneously experiences a two-phase immersion region and a three phase contact region around the perimeter of the droplet. Utilizing high speed imaging of the droplet-substrate plane, we are able to identify nucleation sites in individual droplets. This technique allows for a spatial distribution of freezing sites in addition to a freezing temperature distribution. Our initial study indicated no preference for nucleation originating at the three phase boundary for an atomically smooth homogenous substrate [1]. The nucleation site distribution agreed well with the stochastic view in that the germ sites are distributed uniformly over the surface area. In that study we minimized the thermal variation (?T) across a droplet during cooling to prevent biased observations. We also compared ?T for several experiments in literature using a simple formulation of droplet size (r) and cooling rate (?). Large variations in some experiments could possibly explain observed 'contact nucleation' events in the laboratory as artifacts of radial thermal variations during droplet cooling. As a continuation of this study, we redesigned our system to enable much greater substrate cooling rates, but these experiments too revealed no preference for nucleation in the contact mode. Thermal modeling of the new system confirmed that while a vertical thermal gradient does develop within the droplet, no horizontal gradient is induced in the drop near the substrate. This result argues against a thermodynamic bias toward contact nucleation in substrate cooled geometries. Another possible explanation for this contact phenomenon comes in a lowering of the energy barrier for nucleation due to the existence of a line tension at the point of contact. A scale analysis of the line and surface energy values available in the literature suggests that line tension may become dominant below length scales of ~10 nm [1]. From this simple result we postulate that 'point-like' surface features might play an important role at the three phase boundary. To mimic these features on substrates we introduce chemical and mechanical processes to enhance substrate surface roughness. Using these new substrates we repeat our experimental procedure to compare effectiveness of the immersion (two phase) and contact (three phase) regions for a variety of surface topologies. Here we report the initial findings from this work. 1. Gurganus, C.; Kostinski, A. B.; Shaw, R. A., Fast Imaging of Freezing Drops: No Preference for Nucleation at the Contact Line. J Phys Chem Lett 2011, 2 (12) Identifying nucleation sites with two high speed cameras.

  9. Hydrocarbon exclusion from ground water during freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeo, M.A.; Davidson, B. )

    1993-08-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted using a constant-head ground-water flow chamber and natural soil. Initial experiments with chlorides and dye were conducted to test the hydraulic and adsorptive characteristics of the chamber. A constant flow of phenol was then introduced into the chamber and contaminant movement with time was monitored under freezing and nonfreezing conditions. The chamber was located in a controlled-temperature room, and freezing fronts were induced from the soil surface downward using cooled Freon circulated through freezer pads placed on the surface of the soil. The results conclusively demonstrate that phenol is excluded from the freezing front and pushed downward through the system. Extensive exclusion of the chemical occurs even though the freezing point of phenol (43 C) is significantly higher than water. The information gained through this research is applicable in cold regions outside Alaska and the Arctic where ground water systems may undergo periodic freezing, and may also be of extreme importance in artificial-freezing scenarios such as those currently being investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a method of contaminant containment.

  10. Monitoring active layer thaw and freeze-back in four different periglacial landforms in Svalbard using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Oswald, A.; Watanabe, T.; Christiansen, H. H.; Matsuoka, N.

    2012-04-01

    Thawing and freezing of the active layer has an important impact on the underlying permafrost through latent heat effects and changes in effective thermal conductivity and mechanisms of heat transport. Information on the active layer freeze/thaw dynamics is therefore important to understand the permafrost response to climate variability. In addition, active layer deepening may be an early sign of permafrost degradation, making monitoring programs such as the CALM network important. Active layer depths are traditionally measured by mechanical probing in fine-grained sediments or by vertical arrays of ground temperature sensors. The first technique prevents measurements to be made in stony sediments, while the latter technique gives only a point value of the active layer depth. In this study we have tested Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) as a tool to measure and monitor active layer depth and freeze/thaw dynamics. The electrical resistivity of the ground is largely dependent on the unfrozen water content, making resistivity monitoring a potentially valuable tool to delineate freeze and thaw extent, and patterns in soil moisture. The results presented here are part of the IPY 2007-2009 research project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' (TSP NORWAY) and the IPA periglacial working group project on 'High-Resolution Periglacial Climate Indicators'. Electrode arrays were installed permanently in four different periglacial landforms in the Adventdalen valley area in central Svalbard; a solifluction slope in May 2007, a loess terrace (the UNISCALM site) in September 2007, and a mudboil site and ice-wedge site in June 2009 (Watanabe et al., submitted). The arrays were 16m long, giving maximum profile depths of 2m, and electrodes were installed with 0.2m spacing. Measurements were made with irregular but approximately two- to four-week time intervals, depending on weather conditions and instrument availability. Data are available until autumn 2009 for all sites, and until autumn 2010 for the mudboil and ice-wedge sites. Ground temperature and soil moisture is monitored at all four sites, and mechanical probing of thaw depth progression was performed along with the resistivity measurements for parts of the period. The apparent resistivity raw data error is low in the summer, but in the wintertime 40 to 50% of the data was excluded in the worst cases. The errors are higher in the dry loess site also in the summer, compared to the other three relatively wet sites. After inverting the raw data to give subsurface models of the specific resistivity, depth of investigation mapping was made to identify model areas that were not well constrained by the data. The models show good reliability except at the model edges, in some cases of steep resistivity gradients and at local resistivity extremes. Preliminary results of this study have been presented (Juliussen et al 2010, Oswald 2010), but here the aim is to (1) quantify the accuracy of ERT-based thaw depth estimates as compared to the probed depths, and (2) to analyze the resistivity values with respect to soil moisture and temperature data and ground ice content obtained from coring.

  11. Vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.S.

    1980-04-08

    A vertical axis windmill is described which involves a rotatable central vertical shaft having horizontal arms pivotally supporting three sails that are free to function in the wind like the main sail on a sail boat, and means for disabling the sails to allow the windmill to be stopped in a blowing wind.

  12. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  13. Vertical distribution of mercury species at two sites in the Western Black Sea

    E-print Network

    Murray, James W.

    waters. The strong vertical density gradient in the Black Sea results in little ventilation of deep to the marine environment is growing. This is appropriate, as the majority of fish consumed worldwide are marine

  14. Subsurface temperatures and geothermal gradients on the North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    1989-01-01

    Geothermal gradients as interpreted from a series of high-resolution stabilized well-bore-temperature surveys from 46 North Slope, Alaska, wells vary laterally and vertically throughout the near-surface sediment (0-2,000 m). The data from these surveys have been used in conjunction with depths of ice-bearing permafrost, as interpreted from 102 well logs, to project geothermal gradients within and below the ice-bearing permafrost sequence. The geothermal gradients calculated from the projected temperature profiles are similar to the geothermal gradients measured in the temperature surveys. Measured and projected geothermal gradients in the ice-bearing permafrost sequence range from 1.5??C/100m in the Prudhoe Bay area to 5.1??C/100m in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA).

  15. Freeze Tolerance of Nine Zoysiagrass Cultivars Using Natural Cold Acclimation and Freeze Chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter hardiness of zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.) cultivars is an important attribute throughout the biogeographical transition zone, thus the inability to withstand freezing temperatures may limit the use of these cultivars. The objective of this research was to determine the freeze tolerance (LT50) of...

  16. The equilibrated state of freezing as a basis for distinguishing lethal stresses of freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for coordination of stresses that limit winterhardiness in plants based on the thermodynamic equilibrated state of freezing and melting provides a rational basis for distinction of freeze-induced energies which can stress and injure living organisms in various ways. The departure from equili...

  17. ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS AS OBSERVED BY A VERTICALLY POINTING DOPPLER RADAR Frdric Fabry, and Isztar Zawadzki

    E-print Network

    Fabry, Frederic

    have also observed supercooled drizzle formed directly via the warm rain process coexisting with snow, Canada 1. THE INSTRUMENT AND ITS USES FIG. 1. The McGill vertically pointing radar after a freezing rain this instrument and its data. 2. WARM AND COLD RAIN PROCESSES Despite the fact that radar observations in rain

  18. Effects of drop freezing on microphysics of an ascending cloud parcel under biomass burning conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Simmel, M.; Wurzler, S.

    There is some evidence that the initiation of warm rain is suppressed in clouds over regions with vegetation fires. Thus, the ice phase becomes important as another possibility to initiate precipitation. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate heterogeneous drop freezing for a biomass-burning situation. An air parcel model with a sectional two-dimensional description of the cloud microphysics was employed with parameterizations for immersion and contact freezing which consider the different ice nucleating efficiencies of various ice nuclei. Three scenarios were simulated resulting to mixed-phase or completely glaciated clouds. According to the high insoluble fraction of the biomass-burning particles drop freezing via immersion and contact modes was very efficient. The preferential freezing of large drops followed by riming (i.e. the deposition of liquid drops on ice particles) and the evaporation of the liquid drops (Bergeron-Findeisen process) caused a further decrease of the liquid drops' effective radius in higher altitudes. In turn ice particle sizes increased so that they could serve as germs for graupel or hailstone formation. The effects of ice initiation on the vertical cloud dynamics were fairly significant leading to a development of the cloud to much higher altitudes than in a warm cloud without ice formation.

  19. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  20. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-02-07

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S.A.Khrapak, M.Chaudhuri, G.E.Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the method--estimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with ''tunable'' interactions--is briefly discussed.

  1. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. T.; He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, N.; Tang, C. J.

    2015-05-01

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j// , at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  2. Droplet coalescence and freezing on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and biphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Alexander S.; Collard, Diane; Derby, Melanie M.; Betz, Amy Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Frost and ice formation can have severe negative consequences, such as aircraft safety and reliability. At atmospheric pressure, water heterogeneously condenses and then freezes at low temperatures. To alter this freezing process, this research examines the effects of biphilic surfaces (surfaces which combine hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) on heterogeneous water nucleation, growth, and freezing. Silicon wafers were coated with a self-assembled monolayer and patterned to create biphilic surfaces. Samples were placed on a freezing stage in an environmental chamber at atmospheric pressure, at a temperature of 295 K, and relative humidities of 30%, 60%, and 75%. Biphilic surfaces had a significant effect on droplet dynamics and freezing behavior. The addition of biphilic patterns decreased the temperature required for freezing by 6 K. Biphilic surfaces also changed the size and number of droplets on a surface at freezing and delayed the time required for a surface to freeze. The main mechanism affecting freezing characteristics was the coalescence behavior.

  3. VERTICAL ELECTROPOLISHING NIOBIUM CAVITIES , C. Crawford, H. Padamsee, A. Seaman

    E-print Network

    Geng, Rong-Li

    VERTICAL ELECTROPOLISHING NIOBIUM CAVITIES R.L. Geng ¡ , C. Crawford, H. Padamsee, A. Seaman LEPP cavities has been de- veloped at Cornell University and applied successfully to a dozen half-cells and several single-cell 1.3-1.5 GHz nio- bium cavities. High gradients in excess of 35 MV/m were achieved

  4. Freeze verification: time for a fresh approach

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, C.

    1983-01-01

    The administration's claim that some elements of a comprehensive nuclear freeze are unverifiable does not specify the nature of those elements and whether they represent a real threat to national security if we trusted the USSR to comply. The author contends that clandestine development of new weapons will have little strategic effect since both sides already have total destructive power. The risks of noncompliance are largely political and less than the risks of continued arms buildup. Since the USSR would also want the US to be bound by freeze terms, deterrence would come from mutual benefit. Hardliners argue that cheating is easier in a closed society; that our democracy would tend to relax and the USSR would move ahead with its plans for world domination. The author argues that, over time, a freeze would diminish Soviet confidence in its nuclear war fighting capabilities and that adequate verification is possible with monitoring and warning arrangements. (DCK)

  5. Directional freezing for large volume cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is currently the method of choice when it comes to long-term preservation of viable biological samples. The process, and consequently the volume of the sample, however, is limited by the ability to achieve homogenous and efficient heat removal. When this cannot be properly managed, ice crystals will grow uncontrollably resulting in extensive damage to the cryopreserved cells or tissues. Directional freezing is a technique that can be used to precisely control heat dissipation and ice crystal growth and morphology even when freezing large volumes. The technique has been used over the years to cryopreserve spermatozoa, oocytes, embryos, tissue slices and whole organs from a wide variety of domestic and wild species. In this chapter a protocol for directional freezing of spermatozoa is described and its benefits and shortcomings are discussed. PMID:25428019

  6. Reproducing Black's experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat, which was taken for granted by Black, and the instantaneous freezing of supercooled water also poses some difficulties for that theory.

  7. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  8. Vertical neck lifting.

    PubMed

    Jacono, Andrew A; Talei, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    The authors' vertical neck lifting procedure is an extended deep plane facelift, which elevates the skin and SMAS-platysma complex as a composite unit. The goal is to redrape cervicomental laxity vertically onto the face rather than laterally and postauricularly. The authors consider this an extended technique because it lengthens the deep plane flap from the angle of the mandible into the neck to release the cervical retaining ligaments that limit platysmal redraping. This technique does not routinely use midline platysmal surgery because it counteracts the extent of vertical redraping. A majority of aging face patients are good candidates for this procedure in isolation, but indications for combining vertical neck lifting with submental surgery are elucidated. PMID:24745389

  9. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  10. Unitarity constraints on asymmetric freeze-in

    E-print Network

    Anson Hook

    2011-08-30

    This paper considers unitarity and CPT constraints on asymmetric freeze-in, the use of freeze-in to store baryon number in a dark sector. In this scenario, Sakharov's out of equilibrium condition is satisfied by placing the visible and hidden sectors at different temperatures while a net visible baryon number is produced by storing negative baryon number in a dark sector. It is shown that unitarity and CPT lead to unexpected cancellations. In particular, the transfer of baryon number cancels completely at leading order.

  11. Stratospheric Polar Freezing Belt Causes Denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Toon, O. B.; Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Trajectory cloud model calculations are presented to show that homogeneous freezing of nitric acid hydrates can produce a polar freezing belt in both hemispheres that can cause denitrification. While hydrate cloud microphysical properties are similar over both poles, the shorter persistence of clouds in the Arctic prevents the depth of the denitrified layers from growing beyond a few kilometers. The 1999-2000 Arctic winter is unique in showing a distinct denitrification profile with a depth of approx. 4.5 km that is nearly half as deep as that computed for a typical Antarctic winter.

  12. High-Rayleigh-Number Convection in a Vertical Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, M.; Pabiou, H.; Chillà, F.; Castaing, B.

    2006-02-01

    We measure the relation between convective heat flux and temperature gradient in a vertical channel filled with water, the average vertical mass flux being zero. Compared to the classical Rayleigh-Bénard case, this situation has the advantage of avoiding plates and, thus, their neighborhood, in which is usually concentrated most of the temperature gradient. Consequently, inertial processes should control the convection, with poor influence of the viscosity. This idea gives a good account of our observations, if we consider that a natural vertical length, different from the channel width, appears. Our results also suggest that heat fluxes can be deduced from velocity measurements in free convective flows. This confers to our results a wide range of applications.

  13. Simultaneous measurements of wind shear and temperature gradient spectra in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, J.; Cot, C. )

    1989-10-01

    The authors present in this paper the first high resolution analysis of wind shears and temperature gradient measured over 25 m in the low stratosphere. Their power spectral densities deduced by two different methods show that for vertical wavelengths greater than 500 m the behaviors of the temperature and vertical velocity fluctuating field are significantly different from the saturated wave model predictions.

  14. Quantifying littoral vertical habitat structure and fish community associations using underwater visual census

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Don

    Quantifying littoral vertical habitat structure and fish community associations using underwater correspondence analysis, vertical structure, littoral Synopsis We developed and tested a new visual census in the littoral zone of a freshwater lake. We demonstrated that the primary environmental gradient, accounting

  15. Preservation of flavor in freeze dried green beans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Davis, D.

    1973-01-01

    Before freeze drying, green beans are heated to point at which their cell structure is altered. Beans freeze dried with altered cell structure have improved rehydration properties and retain color, flavor, and texture.

  16. Nucleation Pathways For Freezing Of Two Grades Of Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Rulison, Aaron; Bayuzick, Robert; Hofmeister, William; Morton, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses classical nucleation theory of freezing and describes experimental study of nucleation mechanisms that predominate during freezing of spherical specimens of initially molten zirconium levitated electrostatically in vacuum.

  17. Canalization of freeze tolerance in an alpine grasshopper.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Timothy C

    2015-10-01

    In the Rock and Pillar Range, New Zealand, the alpine grasshopper, Sigaus australis Hutton, survives equilibrium freezing (EF) all-year round. A comparison of freeze tolerance (FT) in grasshoppers over four austral seasons for a 1year period finds that: (a) the majority (>70%) of the sample population of grasshoppers survive single freeze-stress throughout the year; (b) exposure to increased freeze stress (multiple freeze-stress events) does not lead to a loss of freeze tolerance; and (c) responses to increased freeze stress reveal seasonal tuning of the FT adaptation to environmental temperatures. The Rock and Pillar sample population provides a clear example of the canalization of the FT adaptation. Seasonal variability in the extent of tolerance of multiple freezing events indicates that physiology is modulated to environmental temperatures by phenotypic plasticity - i.e. the FT adaptation is permanent and adjustable. PMID:26210007

  18. Liquid Freezing Dynamics on Hydrophobic and Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    False color environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) images of water freezing on smooth (?e ? 120°) and nanostructured (l ~ 50 nm, ?e ? 170 - 180°) hydrophobic surfaces are presented. To obtain the freezing dynamics ...

  19. Monitoring freeze-thaw cycles along north-south Alaskan transects using ERS-1 SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rignot, E.; Way, J.B. )

    1994-08-01

    Monitoring freeze-thaw cycles of high latitude terrestrial ecosystems is useful for estimating the length of the growing season and annual productivity in the tundra and in boreal forests, for estimating potential damage to living plants due to frost drought, and for evaluating major changes in heat fluxes between land and atmosphere. At microwave frequencies, freezing results in a dramatic decrease of the dielectric constant of soil and vegetation, which significantly alters their radar scattering properties. In this article the authors investigate the possibility of monitoring freeze-thaw cycles of terrestrial ecosystems using C-band frequency (5.3 GHz), vertical transmit and receive polarization, synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data gathered by the European Space Agency's Earth Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1). Repeat-pass SAR images are mosaicked together along a north-south transect across Alaska, coregistered, and analyzed using a change detection algorithm that determines when the landscape freezes based on a decrease in radar backscatter greater than 3 dB relative to a known thawed, wet state of the landscape. Air-temperature recordings from seven airport weather stations and in situ observations from three monitored forest stands in interior Alaska concur to indicate SAR accurately maps frozen areas across the entire state. The technique does not apply to open water areas because calm water and frozen water are confused. Elsewhere, ERS-1 SAR could monitor thaw/freeze transitions of terrestrial ecosystems at the regional scale, at a spatial resolution of several tens of meters and independent of cloud cover and vegetation type.

  20. Managing damaging freeze events in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of sugarcane to damaging frosts occurs in approximately 25% of the sugarcane producing countries of the world, but is most frequent on the mainland of the United States, especially in the state of Louisiana. The frequent winter freezes that occur in the sugarcane areas of Louisiana have fo...

  1. Unitarity Constraints on Asymmetric Freeze-In

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    This paper considers unitarity and CPT constraints on asymmetric freeze-in, the use of freeze-in to store baryon number in a dark sector. In this scenario, Sakharov's out of equilibrium condition is satisfied by placing the visible and hidden sectors at different temperatures while a net visible baryon number is produced by storing negative baryon number in a dark sector. It is shown that unitarity and CPT lead to unexpected cancellations. In particular, the transfer of baryon number cancels completely at leading order. This note has shown that if two sectors are in thermal equilibrium with themselves, but not with each other, then the leading effect transferring conserved quantities between the two sectors is of order the the weak coupling connecting them to the third power. When freeze-in is used to produce a net baryon number density, the leading order effect comes from {Omicron}({lambda}{sup 3}) diagrams where the intermediate state that goes on-shell has a different visible baryon number than the final state visible baryon number. Models in which the correct baryon number is generated with freeze-in as the dominant source of abundance, typically require {lambda} {approx}> 10{sup -6} and m{sub bath} {approx}> TeV. m{sub bath} is the mass of the visible particle which communicates with the hidden sector. The lower window is potentially observable at the LHC.

  2. Freeze Crystallization Processes: Efficiency by Flexibility 

    E-print Network

    Heist, J. A.; Barron, T. S.

    1983-01-01

    change is required only once in freeze processes, as opposed to the high reflux ratios needed in most distillation separations. 2) The latent heat of fusion is less than the heat of vaporization, and the process operates at a lower temperature, so...

  3. Device and method for determining freezing points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, Balakrishnan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A freezing point method and device (10) are disclosed. The method and device pertain to an inflection point technique for determining the freezing points of mixtures. In both the method and device (10), the mixture is cooled to a point below its anticipated freezing point and then warmed at a substantially linear rate. During the warming process, the rate of increase of temperature of the mixture is monitored by, for example, thermocouple (28) with the thermocouple output signal being amplified and differentiated by a differentiator (42). The rate of increase of temperature data are analyzed and a peak rate of increase of temperature is identified. In the preferred device (10) a computer (22) is utilized to analyze the rate of increase of temperature data following the warming process. Once the maximum rate of increase of temperature is identified, the corresponding temperature of the mixture is located and earmarked as being substantially equal to the freezing point of the mixture. In a preferred device (10), the computer (22), in addition to collecting the temperature and rate of change of temperature data, controls a programmable power supply (14) to provide a predetermined amount of cooling and warming current to thermoelectric modules (56).

  4. FREEZE-FRAME: Fast Action Stress Relief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childre, Doc Lew

    Recent scientific research has proven that we can, not only manage our stress, we can even prevent it. Ways to achieve stress management are presented in this book. It details a method called FREEZE-FRAME, a process in which individuals mentally stop the chaos that surrounds them and then calmly contemplate their situation. The text opens with an…

  5. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  6. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed.

  7. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  8. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  9. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  10. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  11. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze... and pavement design characteristics of the alternate route should be equivalent to those of...

  12. Mapping of solution components, pH changes, protein stability and the elimination of protein precipitation during freeze-thawing of fibroblast growth factor 20.

    PubMed

    Maity, Haripada; Karkaria, Cyrus; Davagnino, Juan

    2009-08-13

    This study discusses the effect of key factors like containers, buffers and the freeze (controlled vs. flash freezing) and thawing processes on the stability of a therapeutic protein fibroblast growth factor 20 (FGF-20). The freezing profiles monitored by 15 temperature probes located at different regions in a 2-L bottle during freezing can be grouped into three categories. A rapid drop in temperature was observed at the bottom followed by the top and middle center of the bottle. The freeze-thawing behavior in a 50 ml tube is considerably uniform, as expected. Among phosphate, HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine ethanesulfonic acid), citrate and histidine (each containing 0.5 M arginine-sulfate) buffer systems, a minimum pH change (0.4 pH unit vs. approximately 1.7 pH unit) was observed for the phosphate buffer system. Thawing in a 50 ml tube at room temperature standing resulted in a significant phase separation in citrate, histidine and HEPES buffers; however, phase separation was least in the phosphate buffer system. These phase separations were found to be temperature dependent. No effect of Polysorbate 80 on freeze-thawing of FGF-20 was observed. Significant concentration gradients in major buffer components and protein concentration were observed during freeze-thawing in a 2-L bottle. The segregation patterns of the various components were similar with the top and bottom layers containing lowest and highest concentrations, respectively. In the formulation buffer no pH gradient was formed, and the precipitation of FGF-20 during thawing at the top layer was related to an insufficient amount of arginine-sulfate and the precipitation at the bottom layer was due to a salting out effect. The precipitate generated during thawing goes into solution easily upon mixing whole solution of the bottle and the various gradient formations do not cause any irreversible change in structure, stability and isoform distribution of FGF-20. Comparison of slow freezing and flash freezing data suggests that the gradients in excipient and protein concentrations are mainly formed during thawing. PMID:19505546

  13. FREEZING-STRESS-RESPONSIVE GENES AND THEIR EXPRESSION IN BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Injury of barley plants by spring freezing is a major cause of crop loss, but most cold tolerance research has focused on cold acclimation, which confers freezing tolerance upon exposure to low nonfreezing temperatures. In order to address freezing tolerance per se, we have chosen a cold sensitive ...

  14. VISUALIZATION OF FREEZING PROGRESSION IN TURFGRASSES USING INFRARED VIDEO THERMOGRAPHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing injury can be a significant problem in turfgrasses. Understanding how freezing develops and ramifies throughout the plant could assist in the development of improved management or screening processes for cultivar improvemen. The development of freezing injury is not well understand due pa...

  15. On the freeze quantifier in Constraint LTL: decidability and complexity

    E-print Network

    Doyen, Laurent

    On the freeze quantifier in Constraint LTL: decidability and complexity St´ephane Demri a,1 , Ranko of operational models with constraints. The freeze quantifier can be part of the language, as in some real with -abstraction etc.). We show that Constraint LTL over the simple domain N, = augmented with the freeze

  16. Continuous decoupling and freeze-out Jorn Knoll

    E-print Network

    Knoll, Jörn

    Continuous decoupling and freeze-out J¨orn Knoll GSI, Helmholtzzentrum f¨ur Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany The decoupling and freeze-out of energetic nuclear collisions is anal- ysed and generalise frequently employed instantaneous freeze-out procedures. Simple relations between the damping

  17. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  18. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze treatment requirements. Quick freeze treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or...

  19. TRACKING MELT-FREEZE CRUST EVOLUTION Ryan Buhler

    E-print Network

    Jamieson, Bruce

    TRACKING MELT-FREEZE CRUST EVOLUTION Ryan Buhler 1 , Sascha Bellaire 1 , Bruce Jamieson 1,2 1 Dept, Canada Melt-freeze crusts are one of the most critical layers for slab avalanche formation. These layers can be inconsistent amongst multiple observers. In order to improve the way melt-freeze crusts

  20. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  1. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  2. 47 CFR 64.636 - Prohibition of default provider freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibition of default provider freezes. 64.636... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.636 Prohibition of default provider freezes. (a) A default provider freeze prevents a change in an iTRS user's default provider selection...

  3. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze treatment requirements. Quick freeze treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or...

  4. LTL with the Freeze Quantifier and Register Automata Stephane Demri

    E-print Network

    Doyen, Laurent

    LTL with the Freeze Quantifier and Register Automata St´ephane Demri LSV, CNRS & ENS Cachan, temporal logics are extended with the freeze quantifier, first-order logics with predicates over the data of standard decision problems for LTL with the freeze quan- tifier (LTL ), 2-variable first-order logic (FO2

  5. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  6. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  7. Freeze After Writing Quasi-Deterministic Parallel Programming with LVars

    E-print Network

    Connelly, Kay

    Freeze After Writing Quasi-Deterministic Parallel Programming with LVars Lindsey Kuper Indiana the ability to "freeze" and then read the contents of an LVar directly. Second, we add the ability to attach and freezing enable an expressive and useful style of parallel program- ming. We prove that in a language where

  8. 47 CFR 64.636 - Prohibition of default provider freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition of default provider freezes. 64.636... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.636 Prohibition of default provider freezes. (a) A default provider freeze prevents a change in an iTRS user's default provider selection...

  9. Probabilistic Network Formation through Coverage and Freeze-Tag

    E-print Network

    Isler, Ibrahim Volkan

    Probabilistic Network Formation through Coverage and Freeze-Tag Eric Meisner1 , Wei Yang1 formation problem and other fundamental problems such as rendezvous, coverage and freeze-tag. 1.1 Related is closely related to the Freeze-Tag problem [4]. In fr

  10. Predicting equilibrium structures in freezing processes Dieter Gottwald

    E-print Network

    Likos, Christos N.

    Predicting equilibrium structures in freezing processes Dieter Gottwald Center for Computational candidate structures into which a simple fluid can freeze. In contrast to the conventional approach where American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1901585 I. INTRODUCTION The freezing behavior of simple

  11. Experimental Verification of Morphological Instability in Freezing Aqueous Colloidal Suspensions

    E-print Network

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Experimental Verification of Morphological Instability in Freezing Aqueous Colloidal Suspensions S; published 9 June 2008) We describe an experimental test of a new theory of the unidirectional freezing of aqueous colloidal suspensions. At low freezing speeds a planar ice lens completely rejects the particles

  12. The Bottom-Up Freezing: An Approach to Neural Engineering

    E-print Network

    Ghorbani, Ali

    The Bottom-Up Freezing: An Approach to Neural Engineering Ali Farzan and Ali A. Ghorbani Faculty of the proposed method is to reduce the size of the network by freezing any node that does not actively presents a new pruning method. The proposed method, which we call Bottom-Up Freezing (BUF), alters

  13. Modification of physical properties of freeze-dried rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.

    1971-01-01

    Freeze cycling process consists of alternately freezing and thawing precooked rice for two cycles, rice is then frozen and freeze-dehydrated in vacuum sufficient to remove water from rice by sublimitation. Process modifies rice grain structure and porosity, enabling complete rehydration in one minute in hot water.

  14. STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING

    E-print Network

    STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING BY ALBERT W. COLLIER AND KENNETH T, Director STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING By ALBERT W. COLLIER and KENNETH T_________________________________________________ 76 u #12;STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING By ALBERT W. COLLIER, Fishery

  15. Solvation versus freezing in a heteropolymer globule Phillip L. Geissler*

    E-print Network

    Geissler, Phillip

    the mol- ecule, and Tfr is the freezing temperature below which the ground state dominates. For strongSolvation versus freezing in a heteropolymer globule Phillip L. Geissler* Department of Chemistry a freezing transition, in which the freedom of chain shape fluctuations is sacrificed for the choice

  16. Ambient in-situ immersion freezing measurements - findings from the ZAMBIS 2014 field campaign for three ice nucleation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Atkinson, James D.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the influence of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, it is crucial to understand cloud formation processes in the atmosphere. A key process, which significantly affects cloud microphysical properties and the initiation of precipitation thus contributing to the hydrological cycle, is the prevailing type of ice nucleation mechanism. In mixed-phase clouds immersion freezing is the dominant ice crystal forming mechanism, whereby ice nucleating particles (INP) first act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are activated to cloud droplets followed by freezing upon supercooling. There are a number of experimental methods and techniques to investigate the ice nucleating ability in the immersion mode, however most techniques are offline for field sampling or only suitable for laboratory measurements. In-situ atmospheric studies are needed to understand the ice formation processes of 'real world' particles. Laboratory experiments simulate conditions of atmospheric processes like ageing or coating but are still idealized. Our method is able to measure ambient in-situ immersion freezing on single immersed aerosol particles. The instrumental setup consists of the recently developed portable immersion mode cooling chamber (PIMCA) as a vertical extension to the portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC, [1]), where the frozen fraction of activated aerosol particles are detected by the ice optical depolarization detector (IODE, [2]). Two additional immersion freezing techniques based on a droplet freezing array [3,4] are used to sample ambient aerosol particles either in a suspension (fraction larger ~0.6 ?m) or on PM10-filters to compare different ice nucleation techniques. Here, we present ambient in-situ measurements at an urban forest site in Zurich, Switzerland held during the Zurich ambient immersion freezing study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014. We investigated the ice nucleating ability of natural atmospheric aerosol with the PIMCA/PINC immersion freezing setup as well as a droplet freezing method on aerosol particles either collected in a suspension or on PM10-filters to obtain atmospheric IN concentrations based on the measured ambient aerosol. Investigation of physical properties (number and size distribution) and chemical composition as well as the meteorological conditions provide supplementary information that help to understand the nature of particles and air masses that contribute to immersion freezing. Acknowledgements We thank Hannes Wydler and Hansjörg Frei from ETH Zurich for their technical support. Furthermore, the authors want thank Franz Conen from the University of Basel for sharing equipment and training in the drop freezing experiment. References [1] Chou et al. (2011), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4725-4738. [2] Nicolet et al. (2010), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 313-325. [3] Conen et al. (2012), Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 321-327. [4] Stopelli et al. (2014), Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 129-134.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  18. Manipulating the Gradient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  19. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  20. Numerical study of two-dimensional freezing in an annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Sablani, S.S.; Venkateshan, S.P.; Sastri, V.M.K. )

    1990-07-01

    An evaluation is made of the results of a numerical study on two-dimensional freezing in an annulus made up of an initially superheated phase-change medium. Numerical results are used to deduce a relation between the nondimensional discharge time and the other parameters. The velocity of the freeze front decreases with time because of the increase of interface area as the freezing proceeds radially outward, followed by a marginal decrease in the freezing rate due to the presence of the adiabatic surface; sensible cooling then occurs only where the freeze front has already reached the adiabatic surface. 6 refs.

  1. The energy equation for freezing of biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsky, B. )

    1989-11-01

    In the past, the process of freezing in biological tissue was modeled using the regular energy equation for a homogeneous compound. New experimental evidence shows that in tissue the water freezes separately in the vascular system and in the cells. The freezing process is affected by the water transport between the cells and the blood vessels. A new equation was developed to model the experimental results. In this work the general equation for freezing of biological tissue will be presented together with a linearized version of the new equation. A perturbation solution is obtained for the linearized equation to illustrate the effect of the water transport on the freezing process in tissue.

  2. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (inventors)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  3. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  4. To freeze or not to: Quantum correlations under local decoherence

    E-print Network

    Titas Chanda; Amit Kumar Pal; Anindya Biswas; Aditi Sen De; Ujjwal Sen

    2015-09-10

    We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for freezing of quantum correlations as measured by quantum discord and quantum work deficit in the case of bipartite as well as multipartite states subjected to local noisy channels. We recognize that inhomogeneity of the magnetizations of the shared quantum states plays an important role in the freezing phenomena. We show that the frozen value of the quantum correlation and the time interval for freezing follow a complementarity relation. For states which do not exhibit "exact" freezing, but can be frozen "effectively", by having a very slow decay rate with suitable tuning of the state parameters, we introduce an index -- the freezing index -- to quantify the goodness of freezing. We find that the freezing index can be used to detect quantum phase transitions and discuss the corresponding scaling behavior.

  5. Dynamical Freeze-out in 3-Fluid Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    V. N. Russkikh; Yu. B. Ivanov

    2007-10-19

    Freeze-out procedure accepted in the model of 3-fluid dynamics (3FD) is analyzed. This procedure is formulated in terms of drain terms in hydrodynamic equations. Dynamics of the freeze-out is illustrated by 1-dimensional simulations. It is demonstrated that the resulting freeze-out reveals a nontrivial dynamics depending on initial conditions in the expanding ``fireball''. The freeze-out front is not defined just ``geometrically'' on the condition of the freeze-out criterion met but rather is a subject the fluid evolution. It competes with the fluid flow and not always reaches the place where the freeze-out criterion is met. Dynamics of the freeze-out in 3D simulations is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the late stage of central nuclear collisions at top SPS energies is of the form of three (two baryon-rich and one baryon-free) fireballs separated from each other.

  6. Exotic Freezing of Response in Quantum Many-Body System

    E-print Network

    Arnab Das

    2010-11-01

    We show that when a quantum many-body system is subjected to coherent periodic driving, the response may exhibit exotic freezing behavior in high driving frequency ($\\omega$) regime. In a periodically driven classical thermodynamic system, freezing at high $\\omega$ occurs when $1/\\omega$ is much smaller than the characteristic relaxation time of the system, and hence the freezing always increases there as $\\omega$ is increased. Here, in the contrary, we see surprising non-monotonic freezing behavior of the response with $\\omega$, showing curious peak-valley structure. Quite interestingly, the entire system tends to freeze almost absolutely (the freezing peaks) when driven with a certain combination of driving parameters values (amplitude and $\\omega$) due to coherent suppression of dynamics of the quantum many-body modes, which has no classical analog. We demonstrate this new freezing phenomenon analytically (supported by large-scale numerics) for a general class of integrable quantum spin systems.

  7. Influence of melt freezing characteristics on steam explosion energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the freezing process of distinct melt particles interacting with water. Approximate time scales of freezing are estimated for some high-temperature melt materials that are of interest in experimental and reactor situations. Transient conduction calculations are performed to clarify the special freezing characteristics of oxidic melt materials (low conductivity) and binary melt mixtures (no definite freezing point). The transient calculations are compared with recent experiments indicating ``non-explosivity`` of Corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}). One potential explanation, based on the freezing characteristics of binary Corium mixture, is proposed for the experimental observations. The numerical results are generalized by discussing the scaling implications of the thermal conduction analysis and by defining different freezing categories. Finally, conclusions are drawn on the potential influence of melt freezing characteristics on steam explosion energetic.

  8. Fish antifreeze protein and the freezing and recrystallization of ice.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L; Oolman, L D

    Antifreeze glycopeptide and peptides from the blood of polar fishes prevent the growth of ice crystals in water at temperatures down to approximately 1 degree C below freezing point, but do not appreciably influence the equilibrium freezing point. This freezing point hysteresis must be a disequilibrium effect, or it would violate Gibbs' phase rule, but the separate freezing and melting points are experimentally very definite: ice neither melts nor freezes perceptibly within the 'hysteresis gap', for periods of hours or days. We report here unusual crystal faces on ice crystals grown from solutions of very low concentrations of the anti-freeze glycopeptides and peptides. This is a clue to the mechanism of freezing inhibition, and it may be the basis of a simple, very sensitive test for antifreeze material. Very low concentrations of the antifreeze protein are also remarkably effective in preventing the recrystallization of ice. PMID:6700733

  9. A Unified Theory of Matter Genesis: Asymmetric Freeze-In

    E-print Network

    Lawrence J. Hall; John March-Russell; Stephen M. West

    2010-10-01

    We propose a unified theory of dark matter (DM) genesis and baryogenesis. It explains the observed link between the DM density and the baryon density, and is fully testable by a combination of collider experiments and precision tests. Our theory utilises the "thermal freeze-in" mechanism of DM production, generating particle anti-particle asymmetries in decays from visible to hidden sectors. Calculable, linked, asymmetries in baryon number and DM number are produced by the feeble interaction mediating between the two sectors, while the out-of-equilibrium condition necessary for baryogenesis is provided by the different temperatures of the visible and hidden sectors. An illustrative model is presented where the visible sector is the MSSM, with the relevant CP violation arising from phases in the gaugino and Higgsino masses, and both asymmetries are generated at temperatures of order 100 GeV. Experimental signals of this mechanism can be spectacular, including: long-lived metastable states late decaying at the LHC; apparent baryon-number or lepton-number violating signatures associated with these highly displaced vertices; EDM signals correlated with the observed decay lifetimes and within reach of planned experiments; and a prediction for the mass of the dark matter particle that is sensitive to the spectrum of the visible sector and the nature of the electroweak phase transition.

  10. Study of Transient Nuclei near Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Masaharu; Alder, Berni

    2011-03-01

    The molasses tail in dense hard core fluids is investigated by extensive event-driven molecular dynamics simulation through the orientational autocorrelation functions. Near the fluid- solid phase transition, there exist three regimes in the relaxation of the pair orientational autocorrelation function, namely the kinetic, molasses (stretched exponential), and diffusional power decay. The density dependence of both the molasses and diffusional power regimes are evaluated and the latter compares with theoretical predictions in three dimensions. The largest cluster at the freezing density of only a few sphere diameter in size persist for only about 30 picoseconds (~ 2.8 ×10-11 [s]). The most striking observation through the bond orientatinal order parameter is the dramatic increase of the cluster size as the freezing density is approached.

  11. Freeze-out parameters: lattice meets experiment

    E-print Network

    S. Borsanyi; Z. Fodor; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; C. Ratti; K. K. Szabo

    2013-05-22

    We present our results for ratios of higher order fluctuations of electric charge as functions of the temperature. These results are obtained in a system of 2+1 quark flavors at physical quark masses and continuum extrapolated. We compare them to preliminary data on higher order moments of the net electric charge distribution from the STAR collaboration. This allows us to determine the freeze-out temperature and chemical potential from first principles. We also show continuum-extrapolated results for ratios of higher order fluctuations of baryon number. These will allow to test the consistency of the approach, by comparing them to the corresponding experimental data (once they become available) and thus extracting the freeze-out parameters in an independent way.

  12. Astronomical bounds on future big freeze singularity

    E-print Network

    Artyom V. Yurov; Artyom V. Astashenok; Pedro F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    2007-05-28

    Recently it was found that dark energy in the form of phantom generalized Chaplygin gas may lead to a new form of the cosmic doomsday, the big freeze singularity. Like the big rip singularity, the big freeze singularity would also take place at a finite future cosmic time, but unlike the big rip singularity it happens for a finite scale factor.Our goal is to test if a universe filled with phantom generalized Chaplygin gas can conform to the data of astronomical observations. We shall see that if the universe is only filled with generalized phantom Chaplygin gas with equation of state $p=-c^2s^2/\\rho^{\\alpha}$ with $\\alphafreeze doomsday.

  13. Freezing and melting water in lamellar structures.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J T; Erramilli, S; Gruner, S M

    1994-08-01

    The manner in which ice forms in lamellar suspensions of dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water depends strongly on the water fraction. For weight fractions between 15 and 9%, the freezing and melting temperatures are significantly depressed below 0 degree C. The ice exhibits a continuous melting transition spanning as much as 20 degrees C. When the water weight fraction is below 9%, ice never forms at temperatures as low as -40 degrees C. We show that when water contained in a lamellar lipid suspension freezes, the ice is not found between the bilayers; it exists as pools of crystalline ice in equilibrium with the bound water associated with the polar lipid headgroups. We have used this effect, together with the known chemical potential of ice, to measure hydration forces between lipid bilayers. We find exponentially decaying hydration repulsion when the bilayers are less than about 7 A apart. For larger separations, we find significant deviations from single exponential decay. PMID:7948683

  14. Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-07-01

    The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

  15. Motivation Smoothing Projected gradient Proximal Gradient Non-Smooth Optimization

    E-print Network

    Marlin, Benjamin

    Motivation Smoothing Projected gradient Proximal Gradient Non-Smooth Optimization Jason Hartford (with slides from Mark Schmidt) October 2015 #12;Motivation Smoothing Projected gradient Proximal-dimensional problems Nesterov-style and Newton-like methods allow better performance. #12;Motivation Smoothing

  16. Freeze out of the expanding system

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai; E. Molnar

    2007-02-22

    The freeze out (FO) of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, is discussed. We start with kinetic FO model, which realizes complete physical FO in a layer of given thickness, and then combine our gradual FO equations with Bjorken type system expansion into a unified model. We shall see that the basic FO features, pointed out in the earlier works, are not smeared out by the expansion.

  17. Fast Melting and Freezing for Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial tube welders adapted to metallurgical research. Proposed furnace melts and resolidifies small metal samples during brief periods. In furnace, sample surrounded by large heat sinks and rapidly heated near midlength by intense source of heat. Furnace intended for use in experiments in microgravity: entire melting-and-freezing process requires less than 20 s of near weightlessness experienced in parabolic climb and dive of KC-135 airplane.

  18. Vogel-Fulcher freezing in relaxor ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Pirc, R.; Blinc, R.

    2007-07-01

    A physical mechanism for the freezing of polar nanoregions (PNRs) in relaxor ferroelectrics is presented. Assuming that the activation energy for the reorientation of a cluster of PNRs scales with the mean volume of the cluster, the characteristic relaxation time {tau} is found to diverge as the cluster volume reaches the percolation limit. Applying the mean field theory of continuum percolation, the familiar Vogel-Fulcher equation for the temperature dependence of {tau} is derived.

  19. Stress-gradient plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Srinath S.; Curtin, W. A.

    2011-01-01

    A new model, stress-gradient plasticity, is presented that provides unique mechanistic insight into size-dependent phenomena in plasticity. This dislocation-based model predicts strengthening of materials when a gradient in stress acts over dislocation source–obstacle configurations. The model has a physical length scale, the spacing of dislocation obstacles, and is validated by several levels of discrete-dislocation simulations. When incorporated into a continuum viscoplastic model, predictions for bending and torsion in polycrystalline metals show excellent agreement with experiments in the initial strengthening and subsequent hardening as a function of both sample-size dependence and grain size, when the operative obstacle spacing is proportional to the grain size. PMID:21911403

  20. Steam consumption reduction by eutectic freeze crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Bichsel, S.E.; Cleary, M.; Barron, T.S.; Heist, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Steam production in American beet sugar factories can be reduced by 600 pounds per ton of beets by using hydrate freeze crystallization in place of pan evaporators for sugar crystallization. This is a relatively constant number, regardless of current factory energy use. Further reduction is limited by the juice heating needs in the purification operations. Steam for juice heating is 20 to 30% on beets, or 400 to 600 pounds of steam per ton. In efficient factories this is about the steam flow to the evaporators when the pan crystallizers are replaced by freeze crystallization. An approach is described here for a rapid evaluation of effects on the steam balance of basic process changes. It provides a visual guide to restructuring the steam balance that simplifies optimization when such changes are made. The graphic approach is useful in illustrating methods of reducing energy use in a sugar factory, in addition to the current analysis of integration of the hydrate freeze process. For example, membrane and vapor recompression evaporators for juice concentration must be accompanied by major factory modifications to produce any net savings of steam. The reason is the needs for specific steam quantity and quality for the pan evaporators and juice heaters, supplied through the current evaporator trains. Reduction of the steam rate below 25 to 35% on beets will require changes to the conventional juice purification process.

  1. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher R J

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 M? water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ?4. PMID:21721725

  2. Infrared Freezing of Euclidean QCD observables

    E-print Network

    Paul M. Brooks; C. J. Maxwell

    2006-08-22

    We consider the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion for QCD observables and show that for energies Q^2>\\Lambda^2, where Q^2=\\Lambda^2 is the Landau pole in the coupling, the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to the standard Borel integral representation, with ambiguities related to infrared (IR) renormalons. For Q^2freezing behaviour, vanishing at Q^2=0. Finiteness at Q^2=\\Lambda^2 implies specific relations between the residues of IR and UV renormalons in the Borel plane. These relations, only one of which has previously been noted (though it remained unexplained) are shown to follow from the continuity of the characteristic function in the skeleton expansion. By considering the compensation of non-perturbative and perturbative ambiguities we are led to a result for the Q^2 dependence of these observables at all Q^2, in which there is a single undetermined non-perturbative parameter, and which involves the skeleton expansion characteristic function. The observables freeze to zero in the infrared. We briefly consider the freezing behaviour of the Minkowskian R_{e+e-} ratio.

  3. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  4. Freezing promotes perception of coarse visual features.

    PubMed

    Lojowska, Maria; Gladwin, Thomas E; Hermans, Erno J; Roelofs, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Freezing is an evolutionarily preserved defensive behavior, characterized by immobility and heart rate deceleration, which is thought to promote visual perception. Rapid perceptual assessment of threat is crucial in life-threatening situations; for example, when policemen need to make split-second decisions about the use of deadly force. Here, we hypothesized that freezing is specifically associated with better perception of rapidly processed coarse, low-spatial frequency (LSF) features. We used a visual discrimination task in which participants determined the orientation of LSF and high-spatial frequency (HSF) gratings under threat of shock and safe conditions. As predicted, threat anticipation improved perception of LSF at the expense of HSF gratings. Crucially, stronger decrease in heart rate, a parasympathetic physiological index of freezing, was linked to better perception of LSF. These results provide empirical evidence for the comobilization of physiological and perceptual processes, which may play an important role in decision making under acute stress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26595839

  5. Atmospheric freeze drying assisted by power ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santacatalina, J. V.; Cárcel, J. A.; Simal, S.; Garcia-Perez, J. V.; Mulet, A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric freeze drying (AFD) is considered an alternative to vacuum freeze drying to keep the quality of fresh product. AFD allows continuous drying reducing fix and operating costs, but presents, as main disadvantage, a long drying time required. The application of power ultrasound (US) can accelerate AFD process. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of power ultrasound to improve atmospheric freeze drying of carrot. For that purpose, AFD experiments were carried out with carrot cubes (10 mm side) at constant air velocity (2 ms-1), temperature (-10°C) and relative humidity (10%) with (20.5 kWm-3,USAFD) and without (AFD) ultrasonic application. A diffusion model was used in order to quantify the influence of US in drying kinetics. To evaluate the quality of dry products, rehydration capacity and textural properties were determined. The US application during AFD of carrot involved the increase of drying rate. The effective moisture diffusivity identified in USAFD was 73% higher than in AFD experiments. On the other hand, the rehydration capacity was higher in USAFD than in AFD and the hardness of dried samples did not show significant (p<0.05) differences. Therefore, US application during AFD significantly (p<0.05) sped-up the drying process preserving the quality properties of the dry product.

  6. Force Gradient Integrators

    E-print Network

    A. D. Kennedy; M. A. Clark; P. J. Silva

    2009-10-15

    We present initial results of the use of Force Gradient integrators for lattice field theories. These promise to give significant performance improvements, especially for light fermions and large lattices. Our results show that this is indeed the case, indicating a speed-up of more than a factor of two, which is expected to increase as the integration step size becomes smaller for larger lattices and smaller fermion masses.

  7. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  8. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  9. Vertical electron transistor (VET) in GaAs with a heterojunction (AlGaAs-GaAs) cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, U.; Maki, P. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Schaff, W.; Kohn, E.; Eastman, L. F.

    1984-02-01

    The successful fabrication of submicrometer channel length (0.75 micron) and gate length (0.15 micron) vertical electron transistors with AlGaAs cathodes is reported. Lack of electron velocity enhancement has been proposed to be due to high operating channel temperatures, and low temperature measurements were hindered by carrier freeze-out.

  10. technology offer Magnetic Gradient Sensor

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Anton

    technology offer Magnetic Gradient Sensor magnetic gradient sensor, micromechanical structure The invention concerns a sensor for the magnetic field gradient and applies micromechanical structures. Lorentz are typically measured by Hall- sensors which suffer from a large offset and offset drift. For the measurement

  11. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100?nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-?m structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  12. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100?nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-?m structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  13. 'Endurance' All Around Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was taken on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as 'site 33.' Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into 'Endurance Crater.' The view is a vertical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  14. Reconstructing global overturning from meridional density gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E. D.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Hirschi, J. J.-M.; Mecking, J. V.

    2015-07-01

    Despite the complexity of the global ocean system, numerous attempts have been made to scale the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), principally in the North Atlantic, with large-scale, basin-wide hydrographic properties. In particular, various approaches to scaling the MOC with meridional density gradients have been proposed, but the success of these has only been demonstrated under limited conditions. Here we present a scaling relationship linking overturning to twice vertically-integrated meridional density gradients via the hydrostatic equation and a "rotated" form of the geostrophic equation. This provides a meridional overturning streamfunction as a function of depth for each basin. Using a series of periodically forced experiments in a global, coarse resolution configuration of the general circulation model NEMO, we explore the timescales over which this scaling is temporally valid. We find that the scaling holds well in the upper Atlantic cell (at 1000 m) for multi-decadal (and longer) timescales, accurately reconstructing the relative magnitude of the response for different frequencies and explaining over 85 % of overturning variance on timescales of 64-2048 years. Despite the highly nonlinear response of the Antarctic cell in the abyssal Atlantic, between 76 and 94 % of the observed variability at 4000 m is reconstructed on timescales of 32 years (and longer). The scaling law is also applied in the Indo-Pacific. This analysis is extended to a higher resolution, stochastically forced simulation for which correlations of between 0.79 and 0.99 are obtained with upper Atlantic MOC variability on timescales >25 years. These results indicate that meridional density gradients and overturning are linked via meridional pressure gradients, and that both the strength and structure of the MOC can be reconstructed from hydrography on multi-decadal and longer timescales provided that the link is made in this way.

  15. Florida Harvester Ant Nest Architecture, Nest Relocation and Soil Carbon Dioxide Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2013-01-01

    Colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius, excavate species-typical subterranean nests up the 3 m deep with characteristic vertical distribution of chamber area/shape, spacing between levels and vertical arrangement of the ants by age and brood stage. Colonies excavate and occupy a new nest about once a year, and doing so requires that they have information about the depth below ground. Careful excavation and mapping of vacated and new nests revealed that there was no significant difference between the old and new nests in any measure of nest size, shape or arrangement. Colonies essentially built a replicate of the just-vacated nest (although details differed), and they did so in less than a week. The reason for nest relocation is not apparent. Tschinkel noted that the vertical distribution of chamber area, worker age and brood type was strongly correlated to the soil carbon dioxide gradient, and proposed that this gradient serves as a template for nest excavation and vertical distribution. To test this hypothesis, the carbon dioxide gradient of colonies that were just beginning to excavate a new nest was eliminated by boring 6 vent holes around the forming nest, allowing the soil CO2 to diffuse into the atmosphere and eliminating the gradient. Sadly, neither the nest architecture nor the vertical ant distribution of vented nests differed from either unvented control or from their own vacated nest. In a stronger test, workers excavated a new nest under a reversed carbon dioxide gradient (high concentration near the surface, low below). Even under these conditions, the new and old nests did not differ significantly, showing that the soil carbon dioxide gradient does not serve as a template for nest construction or vertical worker distribution. The possible importance of soil CO2 gradients for soil-dwelling animals is discussed. PMID:23555829

  16. Vertical heterogeneity in predation pressure in a temperate forest canopy

    PubMed Central

    Aikens, Kathleen R.; Buddle, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The forest canopy offers a vertical gradient across which variation in predation pressure implies variation in refuge quality for arthropods. Direct and indirect experimental approaches were combined to assess whether canopy strata differ in ability to offer refuge to various arthropod groups. Vertical heterogeneity in impact of avian predators was quantified using exclosure cages in the understory, lower, mid, and upper canopy of a north-temperate deciduous forest near Montreal, Quebec. Bait trials were completed in the same strata to investigate the effects of invertebrate predators. Exclusion of birds yielded higher arthropod densities across all strata, although treatment effects were small for some taxa. Observed gradients in predation pressure were similar for both birds and invertebrate predators; the highest predation pressure was observed in the understory and decreased with height. Our findings support a view of the forest canopy that is heterogeneous with respect to arthropod refuge from natural enemies. PMID:24010017

  17. Vertical heterogeneity in predation pressure in a temperate forest canopy.

    PubMed

    Aikens, Kathleen R; Timms, Laura L; Buddle, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The forest canopy offers a vertical gradient across which variation in predation pressure implies variation in refuge quality for arthropods. Direct and indirect experimental approaches were combined to assess whether canopy strata differ in ability to offer refuge to various arthropod groups. Vertical heterogeneity in impact of avian predators was quantified using exclosure cages in the understory, lower, mid, and upper canopy of a north-temperate deciduous forest near Montreal, Quebec. Bait trials were completed in the same strata to investigate the effects of invertebrate predators. Exclusion of birds yielded higher arthropod densities across all strata, although treatment effects were small for some taxa. Observed gradients in predation pressure were similar for both birds and invertebrate predators; the highest predation pressure was observed in the understory and decreased with height. Our findings support a view of the forest canopy that is heterogeneous with respect to arthropod refuge from natural enemies. PMID:24010017

  18. Thermal properties of freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tatsuko; Tanaka, Masaru; Hatakeyama, Hyoe

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the thermal properties of bound water restrained by various kinds of polysaccharides and several synthetic polymers. The characteristic features of freezing bound water which is closely related with biocompatibility of polymers are summarized based on results obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition, cold crystallization and melting of water-polysaccharide systems were observed. Three kinds of water, non-freezing, freezing bound and free water, were quantified from the enthalpy of melting of water in the system. Freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides is in a metastable state. The equilibrium melting temperature of freezing bound water is lower than 0°C and the temperature decreases with decreasing water content. Nucleation and growth rate of freezing bound water were calculated from isothermal crystallization and the values were compared with those of free water. PMID:20557717

  19. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  20. Freeze-drying of live virus vaccines: A review.

    PubMed

    Hansen, L J J; Daoussi, R; Vervaet, C; Remon, J-P; De Beer, T R M

    2015-10-13

    Freeze-drying is the preferred method for stabilizing live, attenuated virus vaccines. After decades of research on several aspects of the process like the stabilization and destabilization mechanisms of the live, attenuated viruses during freeze-drying, the optimal formulation components and process settings are still matter of research. The molecular complexity of live, attenuated viruses, the multiple destabilization pathways and the lack of analytical techniques allowing the measurement of physicochemical changes in the antigen's structure during and after freeze-drying mean that they form a particular lyophilization challenge. The purpose of this review is to overview the available information on the development of the freeze-drying process of live, attenuated virus vaccines, herewith focusing on the freezing and drying stresses the viruses can undergo during processing as well as on the mechanisms and strategies (formulation and process) that are used to stabilize them during freeze-drying. PMID:26364685

  1. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Infomatics, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  2. Atmospheric gradients from very long baseline interferometry observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmillan, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    Azimuthal asymmetries in the atmospheric refractive index can lead to errors in estimated vertical and horizontal station coordinates. Daily average gradient effects can be as large as 50 mm of delay at a 7 deg elevation. To model gradients, the constrained estimation of gradient paramters was added to the standard VLBI solution procedure. Here the analysis of two sets of data is summarized: the set of all geodetic VLBI experiments from 1990-1993 and a series of 12 state-of-the-art R&D experiments run on consecutive days in January 1994. In both cases, when the gradient parameters are estimated, the overall fit of the geodetic solution is improved at greater than the 99% confidence level. Repeatabilities of baseline lengths ranging up to 11,000 km are improved by 1 to 8 mm in a root-sum-square sense. This varies from about 20% to 40% of the total baseline length scatter without gradient modeling for the 1990-1993 series and 40% to 50% for the January series. Gradients estimated independently for each day as a piecewise linear function are mostly continuous from day to day within their formal uncertainties.

  3. Infrared freezing of Euclidean QCD observables

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Paul M.; Maxwell, C. J.

    2006-09-15

    We consider the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion for QCD observables and show that for energies Q{sup 2}>{lambda}{sup 2}, where Q{sup 2}={lambda}{sup 2} is the Landau pole of the coupling, the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to the standard Borel integral representation, with ambiguities related to infrared (IR) renormalons. For Q{sup 2}<{lambda}{sup 2} the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to a previously proposed modified Borel representation where the ambiguities are connected with ultraviolet (UV) renormalons. We investigate the Q{sup 2}-dependence of the perturbative corrections to the Adler-D function, the GLS sum rule and the polarized and unpolarized Bjorken sum rules. In all these cases the one-chain result changes sign in the vicinity of Q{sup 2}={lambda}{sup 2}, and then exhibits freezing behavior, vanishing at Q{sup 2}=0. Finiteness at Q{sup 2}={lambda}{sup 2} implies specific relations between the residues of IR and UV renormalon singularities in the Borel plane. These relations, only one of which has previously been noted (though it remained unexplained), are shown to follow from the continuity of the characteristic function in the skeleton expansion. By considering the compensation of nonperturbative and perturbative ambiguities we are led to a result for the Q{sup 2}-dependence of these observables at all Q{sup 2}, in which there is a single undetermined nonperturbative parameter, and which involves the skeleton expansion characteristic function. The observables freeze to zero in the infrared. We briefly consider the freezing behavior of the Minkowskian R{sub e{sup +}}{sub e{sup -}} ratio.

  4. Pion Mass Shift and the Kinetic Freeze Out Process

    E-print Network

    Sven Zschocke; Laszlo P. Csernai

    2009-01-12

    The kinetic Freeze Out process of a pion gas through a finite layer with time-like normal is considered. The pion gas is described by a Boltzmann gas with elastic collisions among the pions. Within this model, the impact of the in-medium pion mass modification on the Freeze Out process is studied. A marginal change of the Freeze Out variables temperature and flow velocity and an insignificant modification of the frozen out particle distribution function has been found.

  5. Effect of local filtering on Freezing Phenomena of Quantum Correlation

    E-print Network

    Sumana Karmakar; Ajoy Sen; Amit Bhar; Debasis Sarkar

    2015-04-20

    General quantum correlations measures like quantum discord, one norm geometric quantum discord, exhibit freezing, sudden change, double sudden change behavior in their decay rates under different noisy channels. Therefore, one may attempt to investigate how the freezing behavior and other dynamical features are affected under application of local quantum operations. In this work, we demonstrate the effect of local filtering on the dynamical evolution of quantum correlations. We have found that using local filtering one may remove freezing depending upon the filtering parameter.

  6. Electrical Indicator of Imminent Freezing in Supercooled Water

    E-print Network

    James D. Brownridge

    2002-04-02

    Data is presented that demonstrate electrical activity and evidences of dipole alignment in supercooled water and heavy water before and after the onset of freezing. Voltage signals as high as 13 mV have been recorded. In some cases up to 3 seconds before latent heat is released and freezing began. The polarity of the voltage signals is suggestive of molecule dipole alignment prior to freezing.

  7. Displacement Echoes: Classical Decay and Quantum Freeze

    E-print Network

    Cyril Petitjean; Diego V. Bevilaqua; Eric J. Heller; Philippe Jacquod

    2007-04-23

    Motivated by neutron scattering experiments, we investigate the decay of the fidelity with which a wave packet is reconstructed by a perfect time-reversal operation performed after a phase space displacement. In the semiclassical limit, we show that the decay rate is generically given by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical dynamics. For small displacements, we additionally show that, following a short-time Lyapunov decay, the decay freezes well above the ergodic value because of quantum effects. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  8. Freeze Tolerant Radiator for an Advanced EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.; Elliott, Jeannine; Weislogel, Mark

    2004-01-01

    During an Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the astronaut s metabolic heat and the heat produced by the Portable Life Support Unit (PLSS) must be rejected. This heat load is currently rejected by a sublimator, which vents up to eight pounds of water each EVA. However, for advanced space missions of the future, water venting to space needs to be minimized because resupply impacts from earth will be prohibitive. If this heat load could be radiated to space from the PLSS, which has enough surface area to radiate most of the heat, the amount of water now vented could be greatly reduced. Unfortunately, a radiator rejects heat at a relatively constant rate, but the astronauts generate a variable heat load depending on how hard they are working. Without a way to vary the heat removal rate, the astronaut would experience cold discomfort or even frostbite. A proven method allowing a radiator to be turned-down is to sequentially allow tubes that carry the heat transfer fluid to the radiator to freeze. A drawback of current freezable radiators using this method is that they are far to heavy for use on a PLSS, because they use heavy construction to prevent the tubes from bursting as they freeze and thaw. This creates the need for a large radiator to reject most of the heat but with a lightweight tube that doesn t burst as it freezes and thaws. The new freezable radiator for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has features to accommodate the expansion of the radiator fluid when it freezes, and still have the high tube to fin conductance needed to minimize the number and weight of the tubes. Radiator fluid candidates are water and a propylene glycol-water mixture. This design maintains all materials within their elastic limits so that large volume changes can be achieved without breaking the tube. This concept couples this elastic expansion with an extremely lightweight, extremely high conductivity carbon fiber fin that can carry the heat needed to thaw a frozen tube. By using most of the exposed surface area of the PLSS as a radiator, the system can reject about 75% of the highest heat load, and reduce the loss of water through sublimation by a factor of four. The proposed radiator and a small water tank can be no heavier than the current system.

  9. Freezing and collapse of flexible polymers

    E-print Network

    Thomas Vogel; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2009-02-13

    We analyze the freezing and collapse transition of a simple model for flexible polymer chains on simple cubic and face-centered cubic lattices by means of sophisticated chain-growth methods. In contrast to bond-fluctuation polymer models in certain parameter ranges, where these two conformational transitions were found to merge in the thermodynamic limit, we conclude from our results that the two transitions remain well-separated in the limit of infinite chain lengths. The reason for this qualitatively distinct behavior is presumably due to the ultrashort attractive interaction range in the lattice models considered here.

  10. Freezing distributed entanglement in spin chains

    E-print Network

    Irene D'Amico; Brendon W. Lovett; Timothy P. Spiller

    2007-08-21

    We show how to freeze distributed entanglement that has been created from the natural dynamics of spin chain systems. The technique that we propose simply requires single-qubit operations and isolates the entanglement in specific qubits at the ends of branches. Such frozen entanglement provides a useful resource, for example for teleportation or distributed quantum processing. The scheme can be applied to a wide range of systems -- including actual spin systems and alternative qubit embodiments in strings of quantum dots, molecules or atoms.

  11. Freezing on heating of liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Plazanet, M; Floare, C; Johnson, M R; Schweins, R; Trommsdorff, H P

    2004-09-15

    We report a reversible liquid-solid transition upon heating of a simple solution composed of a-cyclodextrine (alpha CD), water, and 4-methylpyridine. These solutions are homogeneous and transparent at ambient temperature and solidify when heated to temperatures between 45 degrees and 75 degrees. Quasielastic and elastic neutron scattering show that molecular motions are slowed down in the solid and that crystalline order is established. The solution "freezes on heating." This process is fully reversible, on cooling the solid melts. A rearrangement of hydrogen bonds is postulated to be responsible for the observed phenomenon. PMID:15352791

  12. Freeze fracturing of elastic porous media

    E-print Network

    Vlahou, Ioanna

    2012-06-12

    in polygonal, circular or striped patterns, as seen in Figure 1.2: Exposed ice core of an eroded pingo (Schutter, 2004). 2 1.1 The geophysical problem figure 1.1. The phenomenon is called patterned ground and is a result of a com- bination of several processes... , including particle self-organization and deformation of the soil during freezing (Kessler & Werner, 2003). Other impressive features created by frost heave are pingos. Pingos are mounts with ice-filled cores, sometimes up to tens of metres high and hundreds...

  13. Hierarchical freezing in a lattice model.

    PubMed

    Byington, Travis W; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2012-01-27

    A certain two-dimensional lattice model with nearest and next-nearest neighbor interactions is known to have a limit-periodic ground state. We show that during a slow quench from the high temperature, disordered phase, the ground state emerges through an infinite sequence of phase transitions. We define appropriate order parameters and show that the transitions are related by renormalizations of the temperature scale. As the temperature is decreased, sublattices with increasingly large lattice constants become ordered. A rapid quench results in a glasslike state due to kinetic barriers created by simultaneous freezing on sublattices with different lattice constants. PMID:22400863

  14. Mechano-freezing of the ambient water

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Xi; Zou, Bo; Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

  15. Mechano-freezing of the ambient water

    E-print Network

    Xi Zhang; Tingting Yan; Bo Zou; Chang Q Sun

    2013-10-05

    Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

  16. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  17. Fast hadron freeze-out generator. II. Noncentral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Amelin, N. S.; Lednicky, R.; Lokhtin, I. P.; Malinina, L. V.; Snigirev, A. M.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Arsene, I.; Bravina, L.

    2008-01-15

    The fast Monte Carlo procedure of hadron generation developed in our previous work is extended to describe noncentral collisions of nuclei. We consider different possibilities to introduce appropriate asymmetry of the freeze-out hypersurface and flow velocity profile. For comparison with other models and experimental data, we demonstrate the results based on the standard parametrizations of the hadron freeze-out hypersurface and flow velocity profile assuming either a common chemical and thermal freeze-out or the chemically frozen evolution from chemical to thermal freeze-out. The C++ generator code is written under the ROOT framework and is available for public use at http://uhkm.jinr.ru/.

  18. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  19. Avoidance and tolerance of freezing in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; Lee, Richard E

    2013-06-01

    Ectothermic vertebrates have colonized regions that are seasonally or perpetually cold, and some species, particularly terrestrial hibernators, must cope with temperatures that fall substantially below 0°C. Survival of such excursions depends on either freeze avoidance through supercooling or freeze tolerance. Supercooling, a metastable state in which body fluids remain liquid below the equilibrium freezing/melting point, is promoted by physiological responses that protect against chilling injury and by anatomical and behavioral traits that limit risk of inoculative freezing by environmental ice and ice-nucleating agents. Freeze tolerance evolved from responses to fundamental stresses to permit survival of the freezing of a substantial amount of body water under thermal and temporal conditions of ecological relevance. Survival of freezing is promoted by a complex suite of molecular, biochemical and physiological responses that limit cell death from excessive shrinkage, damage to macromolecules and membranes, metabolic perturbation and oxidative stress. Although freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance generally are mutually exclusive strategies, a few species can switch between them, the mode used in a particular instance of chilling depending on prevailing physiological and environmental conditions. PMID:23678097

  20. Reversible Photoinhibition in Antarctic Moss during Freezing and Thawing.

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, C. E.; Jackson, A. E.; Melick, D. R.; Seppelt, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Tolerance of antarctic moss to freezing and thawing stress was investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Freezing in darkness caused reductions in Fv/Fm (ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence) and Fo (initial fluorescence) that were reversible upon thawing. Reductions in Fv/Fm and Fo during freezing in darkness indicate a reduction in the potential efficiency of photosystem II that may be due to conformational changes in pigment-protein complexes due to desiccation associated with freezing. The absorption of light during freezing further reduced Fv/Fm and Fo but was also reversible. Using dithiothreitol (DTT), which inhibits the formation of the carotenoid zeaxanthin, we found reduced flurorescence quenching during freezing and reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin after freezing in DTT-treated moss. Reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin in DTT-treated moss were partially associated with reductions in nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching. The reversible photoinhibition observed in antarctic moss during freezing indicates the existence of processes that protect from photoinhibitory damage in environments where freezing temperatures occur in conjunction with high solar radiation levels. These processes may limit the need for repair cycles that require temperatures favorable for enzyme activity. PMID:12228644

  1. Design of a blood-freezing system for leukemia research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. E.; Cygnarowicz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Leukemia research involves the use of cryogenic freezing and storage equipment. In a program being carried out at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), bone marrow (white blood cells) was frozen using a standard cryogenic biological freezer. With this system, it is difficult to maintain the desired rate of freezing and repeatability from sample to sample. A freezing system was developed that satisfies the requirements for a repeatable, constant freezing rate. The system was delivered to NIC and is now operational. This report describes the design of the major subsystems, the analyses, the operating procedure, and final system test results.

  2. Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ammon Williams

    2012-05-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent species—surrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate—1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurations—lid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture—50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt—1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the temperature differences between the high and low furnace zones—200 and 300 ?C. During each experiment, the temperatures at selected locations around the crucible were measured and recorded to provide temperature profiles. Following each experiment, samples were collected and elemental analysis was done to determine the composition of iii the salt. Several models—non-mixed, well-mixed, Favier, and hybrid—were explored to describe the zone freezing process. For CsCl-LiCl-KCl system, experimental results indicate that through this process up to 90% of the used salt can be recycled, effectively reducing waste volume by a factor of ten. The optimal configuration was found to be a 5.0 mm/hr rate with a lid configuration and a ?T of 200°C. The larger 400 g mixtures had recycle percentages similar to the 50 g mixtures; however, the throughput per time was greater for the 400 g case. As a result, the 400 g case is recommended. For the CeCl3-LiCl-KCl system, the result implies that it is possible to use this process to separate the rare-earth and transuranics chlorides. Different models were applied to only CsCl ternary system. The best fit model was the hybrid model as a result of a solute transport transition from non- mixed to well-mixed throughout the growing process.

  3. Physical Continuity and Vertical Alignment of Block Copolymer Domains by Kinetically Controlled Electrospray Deposition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanqiong; Choo, Youngwoo; Feng, Xunda; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2015-07-01

    The fabrication of block copolymer (BCP) thin films is reported with vertically aligned cylindrical domains using continuous electrospray deposition onto bare wafer surfaces. The out-of-plane orientation of hexagonally packed styrene cylinders is achieved in the "fast-wet" deposition regime in which rapid evaporation of the solvent in deposited droplets of polymer solution drives the vertical alignment of the self-assembled structure. Thermally activated crosslinking of the polybutadiene matrix provides kinetic control of the morphology, freezing the vertical alignment and preventing relaxation of the system to its preferred parallel orientation on the nontreated substrate. Physically continuous vertically oriented domains can be achieved over several micrometers of film thickness. The ability of electrospray deposition to fabricate well-ordered and aligned BCP films on nontreated substrates, the low amount of material used relative to spin-coating, and the continuous nature of the deposition may open up new opportunities for BCP thin films. PMID:25959572

  4. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  5. The impact of freeze-drying on microstructure and rehydration properties of carrot Adrian Voda a,

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    The impact of freeze-drying on microstructure and rehydration properties of carrot Adrian Voda a Microstructure Winter carrot Freeze-drying The impact of freeze-drying, blanching and freezing rate pre techniques. The freezing rate determines the size of ice crystals being formed that leave pores upon drying

  6. INTRODUCTION Cold-hardy invertebrates can be classified most simply as freeze

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    524 INTRODUCTION Cold-hardy invertebrates can be classified most simply as freeze tolerant or freeze intolerant. Freeze-tolerant species survive the freezing of their body fluids by promoting ice (Zachariassen, 1985; Duman et al., 1991; Lee, 1991). For freeze-intolerant species, by contrast, internal ice

  7. Continuous freezing condenser for phthalic anhydride. [Patented

    SciTech Connect

    Korobchanskii, V.I.; Grebenyuk, A.F.; Korobchanskii, Yu.V.; Il'in, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing outputs of plastics and polymer materials necessitate correspondingly larger outputs of various organic monomers. Phthalic anhydride is one of the source products for organic synthesis. Phthalic anhydride is made in the coking industry by the catalytic vapor-phase oxidation of naphthalene. The product is difficult to isolate from the reaction mixture leaving the static-bed catalytic reactors, since the volume of gases and vapors to be cooled is very large and the phthalic anhydride concentration in the mixture is very low. Continuous freezing condensers have been developed, in which the gas stream is cooled by counterflow contact with a stream of solid granular material on which the phthalic anhydride is condensed. One serious drawback is the need to expend large amounts of heat to remelt the phthalic anhydride crystals. The low strength of the granulated solid substrate leads to dust formation in operation, and the dust contaminates the product. We have developed a condenser in which the freezing and remelting stages take place on metal balls in the same unit and the heat is derived from the incoming reaction mixture. Accordingly, units of large capacity can be constructed giving a higher product yield and lowering the heat consumption in the remelting stage.

  8. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  9. Charge gradient microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seungbum; Tong, Sheng; Park, Woon Ik; Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Cho, Yasuo; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Here we present a simple and fast method to reliably image polarization charges using charge gradient microscopy (CGM). We collected the current from the grounded CGM probe while scanning a periodically poled lithium niobate single crystal and single-crystal LiTaO3 thin film on the Cr electrode. We observed current signals at the domains and domain walls originating from the displacement current and the relocation or removal of surface charges, which enabled us to visualize the ferroelectric domains at a scan frequency above 78 Hz over 10 ?m. We envision that CGM can be used in high-speed ferroelectric domain imaging and piezoelectric energy-harvesting devices. PMID:24760831

  10. Charge gradient microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seungbum; Tong, Sheng; Park, Woon Ik; Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Cho, Yasuo; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a simple and fast method to reliably image polarization charges using charge gradient microscopy (CGM). We collected the current from the grounded CGM probe while scanning a periodically poled lithium niobate single crystal and single-crystal LiTaO3 thin film on the Cr electrode. We observed current signals at the domains and domain walls originating from the displacement current and the relocation or removal of surface charges, which enabled us to visualize the ferroelectric domains at a scan frequency above 78 Hz over 10 ?m. We envision that CGM can be used in high-speed ferroelectric domain imaging and piezoelectric energy-harvesting devices. PMID:24760831

  11. Validation studies of a computational model for molten material freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akinao

    1996-02-01

    Validation studies are described of a computational model for the freezing of molten core materials under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH, performed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in Germany, has already been analyzed with the SIMMER-II code. In the current study, TRAN simulation tests in the SIMBATH facility are analyzed by SIMMER-II for its modeling validation of molten material freezing. The original TRAN experiments were performed at Sandia National laboratories to examine the freezing behavior of molten UO{sub 2} injected into an annular channels. In the TAN simulation experiments of the SIMBATH series, similar freezing phenomena are investigated for molten thermite, a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and iron, instead of UO{sub 2}. Two typical TRAN simulation tests are analyzed that aim at clarification of the applicability of the code to the freezing process during the experiments. The distribution of molten materials that are deposited in the test section according to the experimental measurements and in calculations by SIMMER-II is compared. These studies confirm that the conduction-limited freezing model combined with the rudimentary bulk freezing (particle-jamming) model of SIMMER-II is compared. These studies confirm that the conduction-limited freezing model combined with the rudimentary bulk freezing (particle-jamming) model of SIMMER-II could be used to reproduce the TRAN simulation experiments satisfactorily. This finding encourages the extrapolation of the results of previous validation research for SIMMER-II based on other SIMBATH tests to reactor case analyses. The calculation by SIMMER-II suggest that further improvements of the model, such as freezing on a convex surface of pin cladding and the scraping of crusts, make possible more accurate simulation of freezing phenomena.

  12. Observation of picometer vertical emittance with a vertical undulator.

    PubMed

    Wootton, K P; Boland, M J; Dowd, R; Tan, Y-R E; Cowie, B C C; Papaphilippou, Y; Taylor, G N; Rassool, R P

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic. PMID:23215388

  13. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ?y=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  14. Facile Route to Vertically Aligned High-Aspect Ratio Block Copolymer Films via Dynamic Zone Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Kulkarni, Manish; Yager, Kevin; Smilgies, Detlef; Bucknall, David; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-02-01

    Directed assembly of block copolymers (BCP) can be used to fabricate a diversity of nanostructures useful for nanotech applications. The ability to vertically orient etchable high aspect ratio (˜30) ordered BCP domains on flexible substrates via continuous processing methods are particularly attractive for nanomanufacturing. We apply sharp dynamic cold zone annealing (CZA-S) to create etchable, and predominantly vertically oriented 30nm cylindrical domains in 1 ?m thick poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate) films on low thermal conductivity rigid (quartz) and flexible (PDMS & Kapton) substrates. Under similar static conditions, temporally stable vertical cylinders form within a narrow zone above a critical temperature gradient. Primary ordering mechanism of CZA-S involves sweeping this vertically orienting zone created at maximum thermal gradient. An optimal speed is needed since the process competes with preferential surface wetting dynamics that favors parallel orientation. GISAXS of etched BCP films confirms internal morphology.

  15. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture. Model-data fusion suggests that model performance is improved when the relatively high thermal conductivity of the ice phase is accounted for. However, the permafrost site is very gravelly so that the model equations for thermal conductivity are at the edge of applicability. The freezing-soil formulation is tested in the presence of snow, using measurements at an orchard site in Idaho. The model reproduces well observed snow-water equivalents and soil temperatures. However, it is highly sensitive to snow emissivity and maximum liquid content of the snow, leading both to modified refreezing of melted water. It is possible that the model would benefit from 1-2 more snow layers to permit simulation of density and temperature gradients in the snow-pack. SLI was run globally on 1°x1° grid as the soil part of the land surface scheme CABLE. We could therefore demonstrate that this detailed and physically-realistic formulation is fast enough to be a feasible alternative to the much simpler default soil-scheme in CABLE. References Hansson et al. (2004) Vadose Zone J 3, 693ff Haverd & Cuntz (2010) J Hydro 388, 434ff Haverd et al. (2013) Biogeosci 10, 2011ff Weismüller et al. (2011) The Cryosphere 5, 741ff

  16. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Haverd, V.

    2013-12-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture. Model-data fusion suggests that model performance is improved when the relatively high thermal conductivity of the ice phase is accounted for. However, the permafrost site is very gravelly so that the model equations for thermal conductivity are at the edge of applicability. The freezing-soil formulation is tested in the presence of snow, using measurements at an orchard site in Idaho. The model reproduces well observed snow-water equivalents and soil temperatures. However, it is highly sensitive to snow emissivity and maximum liquid content of the snow, leading both to modified refreezing of melted water. It is possible that the model would benefit from 1-2 more snow layers to permit simulation of density and temperature gradients in the snow-pack. SLI was run globally on 1x1 degree grid as the soil part of the land surface scheme CABLE. We could therefore demonstrate that this detailed and physically-realistic formulation is fast enough to be a feasible alternative to the much simpler default soil-scheme in CABLE. References Hansson et al. (2004) Vadose Zone J 3, 693ff Haverd & Cuntz (2010) J Hydro 388, 434ff Haverd et al. (2013) Biogeosci 10, 2011ff Weismüller et al. (2011) The Cryosphere 5, 741ff

  17. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Angelis, M. de; Prevedelli, M.

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  19. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  20. Geoff Freeze is a Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mr. Freeze has over 25

    E-print Network

    Biography G. Freeze Geoff Freeze is a Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mr. Freeze has over 25 years of professional experience in radioactive techniques. Mr. Freeze has authored over 40 journal articles and project reports, taught short courses

  1. Understanding freeze stress in biological tissues: thermodynamics of interfacial water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermodynamic approach to distinguish forms of freeze energy that injure plants as the temperature decreases is developed. The pattern resulting from this analysis dictated the sequence of thermal requirements for water to exist as an independent state. Improvement of freezing tolerance in biolo...

  2. 7 CFR 58.638 - Freezing the mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing the mix. 58.638 Section 58.638 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.638 Freezing the mix. After the mix enters the freezer, it shall be frozen as rapidly...

  3. Logistic Regression Analysis of Freezing Tolerance in Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four winter wheat cultivars, Eltan, Froid, Kestrel, and Tiber, were cold-acclimated for five weeks and then tested for freezing tolerance in a programmable freezer. The temperature of the soil was recorded every two minutes and the freezing episode was described as five parameters: the minimum temp...

  4. Generalized motor inhibitory deficit in Parkinson's disease patients who freeze.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Patrick G; Logan, Gordon D; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Tolleson, Christopher M; Phibbs, Fenna T; Claassen, Daniel O; Wylie, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Freezing of gait is a disabling symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that involves failure to initiate and continue motor activity appropriately. PD disrupts fronto-basal ganglia circuitries that also implement the inhibition of responses, leading to the hypothesis that freezing of gait may involve fundamental changes in both initiation and inhibition of motor actions. We asked whether PD patients who show freezing of gait show selective deficits in their ability to inhibit upper and lower extremity reactions. We compared older healthy controls, older PD controls without freezing of gait, and older PD participants with freezing of gait, in stop-signal tasks that measured the initiation (go trials) and inhibition (stop trials) of both hand and foot responses. When only go trials were presented, all three groups showed similar initiation speeds across lower and upper extremity responses. When stop-signal trials were introduced, both PD groups slowed their reactions nearly twice as much as healthy controls. While this adjustment helped PD controls stop their actions as quickly as healthy controls, PD patients with freezing showed significantly delayed inhibitory control of both upper and lower extremities. When anticipating the need to stop their actions urgently, PD patients show greater adjustments (i.e., slowing) to reaction speed than healthy controls. Despite these proactive adjustments, PD patients who freeze show marked impairments in inhibiting both upper and lower extremity responses, suggesting that freezing may involve a fundamental disruption to the brain's inhibitory control system. PMID:26354102

  5. Effects of Refrigeration and Freezing on the Electromechanical and

    E-print Network

    Buschmann, Michael

    Effects of Refrigeration and Freezing on the Electromechanical and Biomechanical Properties, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at 20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive elec.0% of control values, p 0.004) were observed at day 12 of refrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were

  6. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  7. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  9. Freeze Out Process with In-Medium Nucleon Mass

    E-print Network

    Sven Zschocke; Laszlo P. Csernai; Etele Molnár; Jaakko Manninen; Agnes Nyiri

    2006-10-16

    We investigate the kinetic freeze out scenario of a nucleon gas through a finite layer. The in-medium mass modification of nucleons and it's impact on the freeze out process is studied. A considerable modification of the thermodynamical parameters temperature, flow-velocity, energy density and particle density has been found in comparison with evaluations which use a constant vacuum nucleon mass.

  10. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  11. Determination of Freeze-out Conditions from Lattice QCD Calculations

    E-print Network

    Frithjof Karsch

    2012-02-19

    Freeze-out conditions in Heavy Ion Collisions are generally determined by comparing experimental results for ratios of particle yields with theoretical predictions based on applications of the Hadron Resonance Gas model. We discuss here how this model dependent determination of freeze-out parameters may eventually be replaced by theoretical predictions based on equilibrium QCD thermodynamics.

  12. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if no... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135... for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1) The phrase to commence construction means to engage in...

  14. 7 CFR 305.18 - Quick freeze treatment schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment schedule. 305.18 Section 305.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Quick Freeze Treatments § 305.18 Quick...

  15. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  16. Experimental investigation of molten metal freezing on to a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mizanur Rahman, M.; Hino, Tomohiko; Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Maschek, Werner

    2007-10-15

    During core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs), it is important to understand the freezing phenomena of molten metal, which may prevent fuel dispersal and subsequent shutdown. The present paper describes the freezing behavior of molten metal during interaction with a structure with a view to the safety of LMRs. In this study, Wood's metal (melting point 78.8 C) was used as a simulant melt, while stainless steel and copper were used as freezing structures. A series of simulation experiments was conducted to study the freezing behavior of Wood's metal during pouring on to the freezing structures immersed in a coolant. In the experiments, simulant melt was poured into a stainless steel tube and finally ejected into a coolant through a nozzle so as to observe the freezing behavior of the molten metal. The penetration length and width were measured in the air cooled experiments, whereas penetration length and the proportion of adhering frozen metal were measured in water coolant experiment. The melt flow and distribution were observed in both types of experiment using a high-speed video camera. Distinct freezing modes were observed in the water coolant experiments, whereas only one freezing mode with a longer melt penetration was found in air coolant experiments. The present result will be utilized to create a relevant database for the verification of reactor safety analysis codes. (author)

  17. Freezing-induced perturbation of tertiary structure of monoclonal antibody

    E-print Network

    Liu, Lu; Kueltzo, L. A.; Jones, L. S.; Carpenter, J. F.

    2006-10-25

    field-flow fractionation(AFFF) stud- ies of the freeze-thawed samples showed that IgG aggregates formed during freeze-thawing at pH 3, 4 and 8 either with or with- out 150 mM KCl. KCl facilitated aggregation at pH 3, but reduce it at pH 4...

  18. Effects of freezes on survival of Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus in Florida is occasionally subjected to freezing temperatures. No information was available on the effect of freezing temperatures on mortality of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Florida. Studies were therefore initiated to assess mortality rates of D. citri eggs, nymphs and adults...

  19. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...telecommunications services (e.g. , local exchange, intraLATA toll, and interLATA toll) subject to a preferred carrier freeze. The carrier...freeze orders electronically shall establish one or more toll-free telephone numbers exclusively for that...

  20. Stopping biological time: The freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental physical-chemical events that occur during the freezing and thawing of cells are outlined and the manner in which cell permeability determines the response of the cell to freezing is discussed both in terms of physical response and in terms of survival. 40 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Observation of a freezing drizzle episode: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, S.; Valero, F.; Sanchez, Jose L.; Gascón, E.; López, L.; García-Ortega, E.; Merino, A.

    2014-11-01

    On 5 February 2012 an episode of freezing precipitation took place in the Guadarrama Mountains, at the center of the Iberian Peninsula. This precipitation affected high elevations, where temperatures remained below freezing because of snow cover that had accumulated from snowfall during the previous days. The case study was recorded by surface synoptic observations (SYNOP) at Navacerrada Pass meteorological observatory (belonging to the National Weather Service of Spain). To study winter cloud systems during the TEcoAgua project, a multichannel ground-based microwave radiometer (MMWR), Micro Rain Radar (MRR-2), and isothermal cloud chamber were installed in the study area, thus permitting the monitoring of the freezing precipitation event. Analysis using Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite data and observations permitted the determination of factors that triggered the freezing precipitation event. Freezing drizzle was interspersed with the passage of a warm and cold front. During frontal passage, mid-level clouds inhibited the generation of freezing drizzle, with snowfall recorded in the study area. However, during the period between the two fronts, an absence of mid-level clouds permitted low-level orographic clouds to persist upwind of the mountain system, producing freezing drizzle at the surface. The decisive factors for the generation of freezing drizzle were high humidity at low levels, weak mesoscale updrafts caused by the topography, stability at mid levels, cloud-top temperatures warmer than - 15 °C, and low concentrations of ice nuclei.

  2. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze...

  3. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze...

  4. St. Lawrence River Freeze-Up Forecast Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assel, R. A.

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) is presented for calculating the date of freeze-up on the St. Lawrence River at Massena, N.Y. The SOP is based on two empirical temperature decline equations developed for Kingston, Ontario, and Massena, N.Y., respectively. Input data needed to forecast freeze-up consist of the forecast December flow rate and…

  5. Soil respiration and carbon loss relationship with temperature and land use conversion in freeze-thaw agricultural area.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Lai, Xuehui; Li, Xia; Liu, Heying; Lin, Chunye; Hao, Fanghua

    2015-11-15

    Soil respiration (Rs) was hypothesized to have a special response pattern to soil temperature and land use conversion in the freeze-thaw area. The Rs differences of eight types of land use conversions during agricultural development were observed and the impacts of Rs on soil organic carbon (SOC) loss were assessed. The land use conversions during last three decades were categorized into eight types, and the 141 SOC sampling sites were grouped by conversion type. The typical soil sampling sites were subsequently selected for monitoring of soil temperature and Rs of each land use conversion types. The Rs correlations with temperature at difference depths and different conversion types were identified with statistical analysis. The empirical mean error model and the biophysical theoretical model with Arrhenius equation about the Rs sensitivity to temperature were both analyzed and shared the similar patterns. The temperature dependence of soil respiration (Q10) analysis further demonstrated that the averaged value of eight types of land use in this freeze-thaw agricultural area ranged from 1.15 to 1.73, which was lower than the other cold areas. The temperature dependence analysis demonstrated that the Rs in the top layer of natural land covers was more sensitive to temperature and experienced a large vertical difference. The natural land covers exhibited smaller Rs and the farmlands had the bigger value due to tillage practices. The positive relationships between SOC loss and Rs were identified, which demonstrated that Rs was the key chain for SOC loss during land use conversion. The spatial-vertical distributions of SOC concentration with the 1.5-km grid sampling showed that the more SOC loss in the farmland, which was coincided with the higher Rs in farmlands. The analysis of Rs dynamics provided an innovative explanation for SOC loss in the freeze-thaw agricultural area. The analysis of Rs dynamics provided an innovative explanation for SOC loss in the freeze-thaw agricultural area. PMID:26172588

  6. The effect of water-soluble polymers on the microstructure and properties of freeze-cast alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekor, Christopher Michael

    Porous ceramics can be divided into three separate classes based on their pore size: microporous ceramics with pores less than 2 nm, mesoporous ceramics with pores in the range of 2--50 nm and macroporous ceramics with pores that are greater than 50 nm. In particular, macroporous ceramics are used in a variety of applications such as refractories, molten metal filtration, diesel particulate filters, heterogeneous catalyst supports and biomedical scaffolds. Freeze casting is a novel method used to create macroporous ceramics. In this method growing ice crystals act as a template for the pores and are solidified, often directionally, through a ceramic dispersion and removed from the green body through a freeze drying procedure. This method has attracted some attention over the past few years due to its relative simplicity, flexibility and environmental friendliness. On top of this freeze casting is capable of producing materials with high pore volume fractions, which is an advantage over processing by packing and necking of particles, where the pore volume fraction is typically less than 50%. Many of the basic processing variables that affect the freeze cast microstructure, such as the temperature gradient, interfacial velocity and solid loading of the dispersion have been well established in the literature. On the other hand, areas such as the effect of additives on the microstructure and mechanical properties have not been covered in great detail. In this study the concept of constitutional supercooling from basic solidification theory is used to explain the effects of two water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol, on the microstructure of freeze cast alumina ceramics. In addition, changes in the observed microstructure will be related to experimentally determined values of permeability and compressive strength.

  7. 14 CFR 25.1455 - Draining of fluids subject to freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Draining of fluids subject to freezing. 25.1455 Section 25.1455 Aeronautics... § 25.1455 Draining of fluids subject to freezing. If fluids subject to freezing may be drained overboard in flight or...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1455 - Draining of fluids subject to freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Draining of fluids subject to freezing. 25.1455 Section 25.1455 Aeronautics... § 25.1455 Draining of fluids subject to freezing. If fluids subject to freezing may be drained overboard in flight or...

  9. Alternative overwintering strategies in an Antarctic midge: freezing vs. cryoprotective dehydration

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    Alternative overwintering strategies in an Antarctic midge: freezing vs. cryoprotective dehydration understanding of freeze avoidance strategies employed by polar invertebrates. Although the underlying cellular processes associated with this strategy are similar to those of freeze tolerance, little is known about

  10. 14 CFR 25.1455 - Draining of fluids subject to freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Draining of fluids subject to freezing. 25.1455 Section 25.1455 Aeronautics... § 25.1455 Draining of fluids subject to freezing. If fluids subject to freezing may be drained overboard in flight or...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1455 - Draining of fluids subject to freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Draining of fluids subject to freezing. 25.1455 Section 25.1455 Aeronautics... § 25.1455 Draining of fluids subject to freezing. If fluids subject to freezing may be drained overboard in flight or...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1455 - Draining of fluids subject to freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Draining of fluids subject to freezing. 25.1455 Section 25.1455 Aeronautics... § 25.1455 Draining of fluids subject to freezing. If fluids subject to freezing may be drained overboard in flight or...

  13. A search for the Mpemba effect: When hot water freezes faster then cold water

    E-print Network

    Brownridge, James D

    2010-01-01

    An explanation for why hot water will sometime freeze more rapidly than cold water is offered. Two specimens of water from the same source will often have different spontaneous freezing temperatures; that is, the temperature at which freezing begins. When both specimens supercool and the spontaneous freezing temperature of the hot water is higher than that of the cold water, then the hot water will usually freeze first, if all other conditions are equal and remain so during cooling. The probability that the hot water will freeze first if it has the higher spontaneous freezing temperature will be larger for a larger difference in spontaneous freezing temperature. Heating the water may lower, raise or not change the spontaneous freezing temperature. The keys to observing hot water freezing before cold water are supercooling the water and having a significant difference in the spontaneous freezing temperature of the two water specimens. We observed hot water freezing before cold water 28 times in 28 attempts und...

  14. Photomicrographic Investigation of Spontaneous Freezing Temperatures of Supercooled Water Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Hacker, P. T.

    1950-01-01

    A photomicrographic technique for investigating eupercooled. water droplets has been devised and. used. to determine the spontaneous freezing temperatures of eupercooled. water droplets of the size ordinarily found. in the atmosphere. The freezing temperatures of 4527 droplets ranging from 8.75 to 1000 microns in diameter supported on a platinum surface and 571 droplets supported on copper were obtained. The average spontaneous freezing temperature decreased with decrease in the size of the droplets. The effect of size on the spontaneous freezing temperature was particularly marked below 60 microns. Frequency-distribution curves of the spontaneous freezing temperatures observed for droplets of a given size were obtained. Although no droplet froze at a temperature above 20 0 F, all droplets melted at 32 F. Results obtained with a copper support did not differ essentially from those obtained with a platinum surface.

  15. Hadron Freeze-Out and Unruh Radiation

    E-print Network

    Paolo Castorina; Alfredo Iorio; Helmut Satz

    2014-09-10

    We consider hadron production in high energy collisions as an Unruh radiation phenomenon. This mechanism describes the production pattern of newly formed hadrons and is directly applicable at vanishing baryochemical potential, mu = 0. It had already been found to correctly yield the hadronisation temperature, T_h = sqrt(sigma / 2 pi) = 165 MeV in terms of the string tension sigma. Here we show that the Unruh mechanism also predicts hadronic freeze-out conditions, giving s/T_h^3 = 3 pi^2 / 4 = 7.4 in terms of the entropy density s and E/N = \\sqrt(2 pi sigma) = 1.09 for the average energy per hadron. These predictions provide a theoretical basis for previous phenomenological results and are also in accord with recent lattice studies.

  16. Heat pump with freeze-up prevention

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

    1981-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

  17. Freezing of Martian streams under climatic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The valley networks of Mars are widely believed to have formed at a time when climatic conditions on the planet were significantly different from those that currently prevail. This view arises from the following observations: (1) the valleys form integrated branching networks which suggests fluid drainage, and water is the most plausible fluid, (2) the present atmosphere contains only minute amounts of water, (3) the networks appear to be more akin to terrestrial valleys that are eroded by streams of modest discharges than features that form by catastrophic floods, and (4) small streams of water will rapidly freeze under present climatic conditions. Climatic conditions at the time of formation of the valleys are studied based on the assumption that they were cut by running water.

  18. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included.

  19. Depression of soil moisture freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V.I.

    1996-12-01

    Certain criteria for freezing temperature of clay soil have been found which are a relative moisture content at the soil liquid limit (W/W{sub L}) and maximum hydroscopic moisture (W/W{sub h}). On the strength of test data it has been established that the relative moisture content at the soil liquid limit (W/W{sub L}) may also serve as a criterion on compression pressure and resistance against shearing for soil paste with no structural binding. Linear correlation between the moisture content of natural soil and its paste -- the equation of moisture balance -- has been found which specifies a thermodynamic balance condition. The equation of moisture balance represents a whole set of properties for a certain type of soil, such as strength and compressibility. In this respect, it may be considered as a ``Soil equation`` which allows for further prognosis of its properties.

  20. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    E-print Network

    Jeng, M

    2005-01-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more ...

  1. Crystal structures and freezing of dipolar fluids

    E-print Network

    B. Groh; S. Dietrich

    2000-10-21

    We investigate the crystal structure of classical systems of spherical particles with an embedded point dipole at T=0. The ferroelectric ground state energy is calculated using generalizations of the Ewald summation technique. Due to the reduced symmetry compared to the nonpolar case the crystals are never strictly cubic. For the Stockmayer (i.e., Lennard-Jones plus dipolar) interaction three phases are found upon increasing the dipole moment: hexagonal, body-centered orthorhombic, and body-centered tetragonal. An even richer phase diagram arises for dipolar soft spheres with a purely repulsive inverse power law potential $\\sim r^{-n}$. A crossover between qualitatively different sequences of phases occurs near the exponent $n=12$. The results are applicable to electro- and magnetorheological fluids. In addition to the exact ground state analysis we study freezing of the Stockmayer fluid by density-functional theory.

  2. Empirical equation estimates geothermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. )

    1995-01-02

    An empirical equation can estimate geothermal (natural) temperature profiles in new exploration areas. These gradients are useful for cement slurry and mud design and for improving electrical and temperature log interpretation. Downhole circulating temperature logs and surface outlet temperatures are used for predicting the geothermal gradients.

  3. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  4. Free-energy functional for freezing transitions: Hard sphere systems freezing into crystalline and amorphous structures

    E-print Network

    Swarn Lata Singh; Atul S. Bharadwaj; Yashwant Singh

    2011-01-31

    A free-energy functional that contains both the symmetry conserved and symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function has been used to investigate the freezing of a system of hard spheres into crystalline and amorphous structures. The freezing parameters for fluid-crystal transition have been found to be in very good agreement with the results found from simulations. We considered amorphous structures found from the molecular dynamics simulations at packing fractions $\\eta$ lower than the glass close packing fraction $\\eta_{J}$ and investigated their stability compared to that of a homogeneous fluid. The existence of free-energy minimum corresponding to a density distribution of overlapping Gaussians centered around an amorphous lattice depicts the deeply supercooled state with a heterogeneous density profile.

  5. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  6. Multiple glass transitions and freezing events of aqueous citric acid.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Loerting, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10-64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid-glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid-glass and reverse glass-liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  7. Evaluation and Validation of the Messinger Freezing Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important non-dimensional parameters used in ice-accretion modeling and scaling studies is the freezing fraction defined by the heat-balance analysis of Messinger. For fifty years this parameter has been used to indicate how rapidly freezing takes place when super-cooled water strikes a solid body. The value ranges from 0 (no freezing) to 1 (water freezes immediately on impact), and the magnitude has been shown to play a major role in determining the physical appearance of the accreted ice. Because of its importance to ice shape, this parameter and the physics underlying the expressions used to calculate it have been questioned from time to time. Until now, there has been no strong evidence either validating or casting doubt on the current expressions. This paper presents experimental measurements of the leading-edge thickness of a number of ice shapes for a variety of test conditions with nominal freezing fractions from 0.3 to 1.0. From these thickness measurements, experimental freezing fractions were calculated and compared with values found from the Messinger analysis as applied by Ruff. Within the experimental uncertainty of measuring the leading-edge thickness, agreement of the experimental and analytical freezing fraction was very good. It is also shown that values of analytical freezing fraction were entirely consistent with observed ice shapes at and near rime conditions: At an analytical freezing fraction of unity, experimental ice shapes displayed the classic rime shape, while for conditions producing analytical freezing fractions slightly lower than unity, glaze features started to appear.

  8. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, S.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Pummer, B.; Grothe, H.; Hartmann, S.; Tomsche, L.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Ignatius, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-11-01

    Birch pollen grains are known to be ice nucleating active biological particles. The ice nucleating activity has previously been tracked down to biological macromolecules that can be easily extracted from the pollen grains in water. In the present study, we investigated the immersion freezing behavior of these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules. Therefore we measured the frozen fractions of particles generated from birch pollen washing water as a function of temperature at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). Two different birch pollen samples were considered, with one originating from Sweden and one from the Czech Republic. For the Czech and Swedish birch pollen samples, freezing was observed to start at -19 and -17 °C, respectively. The fraction of frozen droplets increased for both samples down to -24 °C. Further cooling did not increase the frozen fractions any more. Instead, a plateau formed at frozen fractions below 1. This fact could be used to determine the amount of INA macromolecules in the droplets examined here, which in turn allowed for the determination of nucleation rates for single INA macromolecules. The main differences between the Swedish birch pollen and the Czech birch pollen were obvious in the temperature range between -17 and -24 °C. In this range, a second plateau region could be seen for Swedish birch pollen. As we assume INA macromolecules to be the reason for the ice nucleation, we concluded that birch pollen is able to produce at least two different types of INA macromolecules. We were able to derive parameterizations for the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types, using two different methods: a simple exponential fit and the Soccer ball model. With these parameterization methods we were able to describe the ice nucleation behavior of single INA macromolecules from both the Czech and the Swedish birch pollen.

  9. DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED

    E-print Network

    Devroye, Luc

    DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED GALTON­WATSON TREES LUC DEVROYE AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We consider a conditioned Galton­Watson tree and prove an estimate of a randomly labelled conditioned Galton­Watson tree converges in distribution, after suitable normalization

  10. DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED

    E-print Network

    Janson, Svante

    DISTANCES BETWEEN PAIRS OF VERTICES AND VERTICAL PROFILE IN CONDITIONED GALTON--WATSON TREES LUC DEVROYE AND SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We consider a conditioned Galton--Watson tree and prove an estimate of a randomly labelled conditioned Galton--Watson tree converges in distribution, after suitable normalization

  11. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  12. Fabrication of porous ceramics by freeze-casting/freeze-drying. Final report, April 1991-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.; Gusman, M.I.

    1993-04-01

    Porous ceramics have many applications in the gas industry, including gas separation, filtration, catalyst supports and substrates, lightweight insulation, and burners. The report explores the fabrication of porous ceramics by a new approach involving the use of cryogenic processing techniques such as freeze-drying, to characterize the materials formed in this way, and to evaluate the potential of the techniques for making porous ceramics for specific gas industry applications.

  13. Mesophyll freezing and effects of freeze dehydration visualized by simultaneous measurement of IDTA and differential imaging chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Jürgen; Spindelböck, Joachim Paul; Neuner, Gilbert

    2008-11-01

    Infrared differential thermal analysis (IDTA) and differential imaging chlorophyll fluorescence (DIF) were employed simultaneously to study the two-dimensional pattern of ice propagation in leaves and mesophyll freeze dehydration as detected by a significant increase of basic chlorophyll fluorescence (F(0)). IDTA and DIF technique gave different insights into the freezing process of leaves that was highly species-specific. IDTA clearly visualized the freezing process consisting of an initial fast spread of ice throughout the vascular system followed by mesophyll freezing. While mesophyll freezing was homogeneously in Poa alpina, Rhododendron ferrugineum and Senecio incanus as determined by IDTA, DIF showed a distinct pattern only in S. incanus, with the leaf tips being affected earlier. In Cinnamomum camphora, a mottled freezing pattern of small mesophyll compartments was observed by both methods. In IDTA images, a random pattern predominated, while in DIF images, compartments closer to lower order veins were affected earlier. The increase of F(0) following mesophyll freezing started after a species-specific time lag of up to 26 min. The start of the F(0) increase and its slope were significantly enhanced at lower temperatures, which suggest a higher strain on mesophyll protoplasts when freezing occurs at lower temperatures. PMID:18761699

  14. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  15. Combining Step Gradients and Linear Gradients in Density.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok A; Walz, Jenna A; Gonidec, Mathieu; Mace, Charles R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-16

    Combining aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS) and magnetic levitation (MagLev) provides a method to produce hybrid gradients in apparent density. AMPS—solutions of different polymers, salts, or surfactants that spontaneously separate into immiscible but predominantly aqueous phases—offer thermodynamically stable steps in density that can be tuned by the concentration of solutes. MagLev—the levitation of diamagnetic objects in a paramagnetic fluid within a magnetic field gradient—can be arranged to provide a near-linear gradient in effective density where the height of a levitating object above the surface of the magnet corresponds to its density; the strength of the gradient in effective density can be tuned by the choice of paramagnetic salt and its concentrations and by the strength and gradient in the magnetic field. Including paramagnetic salts (e.g., MnSO4 or MnCl2) in AMPS, and placing them in a magnetic field gradient, enables their use as media for MagLev. The potential to create large steps in density with AMPS allows separations of objects across a range of densities. The gradients produced by MagLev provide resolution over a continuous range of densities. By combining these approaches, mixtures of objects with large differences in density can be separated and analyzed simultaneously. Using MagLev to add an effective gradient in density also enables tuning the range of densities captured at an interface of an AMPS by simply changing the position of the container in the magnetic field. Further, by creating AMPS in which phases have different concentrations of paramagnetic ions, the phases can provide different resolutions in density. These results suggest that combining steps in density with gradients in density can enable new classes of separations based on density. PMID:25978093

  16. Convection in Drying and Freezing Ground

    E-print Network

    Faizal, Mir

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the drying of a soil composed of particles, water and solute impurities, and study the occurrence of convective instabilities during evaporation. We find that the main driving force for instability is the formation of a concentration gradient at the soil surface due to the evaporation of water. A similar phenomenon may occur during the thawing of frozen ground in Arctic regions.

  17. Convection in drying and freezing ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Peppin, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we analyse the drying of a soil composed of particles, water and solute impurities, and study the occurrence of convective instabilities during evaporation. We find that the main driving force for instability is the formation of a concentration gradient at the soil surface due to the evaporation of water. A similar phenomenon may occur during the thawing of frozen ground in Arctic regions.

  18. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for estrus synchronization during breeding season resulted in higher heat response and lambing rate than two injections given 10 days apart.

  19. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  20. Line-of-sight electron density gradients as deduced from an empirical ionospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesterczuk, G.; Kozelsky, J. K.; Behuncik, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A topside ionospheric model (Bent Ionospheric Model) was developed for an accurate prediction of integrated total electron content (TEC), from a global data acquired for the years 1962 to 1969. In this paper the effects of line-of-sight electron density gradients on ground to satellite measurements are discussed. The results of analyses show that in the presence of increasing density gradients, deduced values of vertical electron content or slab thicknesses will be too large, while for decreasing gradients these values will be smaller than they should be.

  1. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  2. Vertical Motion and Dynamical Instabilities in Non-hydrostatic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacham, S.; Mahadevan, A.

    2002-05-01

    The ocean exhibits many strong, dynamically active frontal features. When the fronts are sufficiently narrow and the potential vorticity gradient sufficiently strong, non-hydrostatic effects modify the stability characteristics of these strongly sheared flows and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of perturbations to these flows. In this talk, we first discuss the linear instabilities of simple model shear flows in the presence of non-hydrostatic effects. We then use a non-hydrostatic coastal circulation model to examine the impact of non-hydrostatic effects on the non-linear evolution of unstable perturbations to an idealized representation of a shelf-break front. When the front is linearly unstable, growing meanders are associated with localized cells of vertical motion and three-dimensional Lagarangian pathways through the frontal system. When the front is stable, finite-amplitude perturbations such as those associated with Gulf Stream rings and filaments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight can produce similar effects. Vertical motion can be a significant transport mechanism for nutrients. The largest vertical motions seem to arise under transient conditions. We evaluate the mean vertical velocity field for a stable jet subject to persistent transient forcing. We also evaluate the differences in vertical velocity fields and meander evolution between hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic simulations. As one would anticipate from aspect ratio arguments, these are generally small in a slowly evolving system but, for some types of motion, a significant difference is seen.

  3. Freeze shoe sampler for the collection of hyporheic zone sediments and porewater.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, M; Smith, L; Beckie, R

    2015-01-01

    The Starr and Ingleton (1992) drive point piston sampler (DPPS) design was modified by fitting it with a Murphy and Herkelrath (1996) type sample-freezing drive shoe (SFDS), which uses liquid carbon dioxide as a cryogen. Liquid carbon dioxide was used to freeze sediments in the lower 0.1?m of the core and the drive-point piston sealed the core at the top preserving the reductive-oxidation (redox) sensitive sediments from the atmosphere and maintaining natural stratigraphy. The use of nitrogen gas to provide positive pressure on the gas system blocked the ingress of water which froze on contact with the cryogen thus blocking the gas lines with ice. With this adaptation to the gas system cores could be collected at greater depths beneath the static water level. This tool was used to collect intact saturated sediment cores from the hyporheic zone of the tidally influenced Fraser River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada where steep geochemical and microbial gradients develop within the interface between discharging anaerobic groundwater and recharging aerobic river water. In total, 25 cores driven through a 1.5?m sampling interval were collected from the river bed with a mean core recovery of 75%. The ability to deploy this method from a fishing vessel makes the tool more cost effective than traditional marine-based drilling operations which often use barges, tug boats, and drilling rigs. PMID:24825508

  4. Dynamical freeze-out in three-fluid hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Russkikh, V. N.; Ivanov, Yu. B.

    2007-11-15

    The freeze-out procedure accepted in a model of three-fluid dynamics is analyzed. This procedure is formulated in terms of drain terms in hydrodynamic equations. The dynamics of freeze-out is illustrated by one-dimensional simulations. It is demonstrated that the resulting freeze-out reveals a nontrivial dynamics depending on initial conditions in the expanding 'fireball'. The freeze-out front is not just defined 'geometrically' on the condition of the freeze-out criterion met but rather is a subject of fluid evolution. It competes with the fluid flow and does not always reach the place where the freeze-out criterion is met. Dynamics of the freeze-out in three-dimensional simulations is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the late stage of central nuclear collisions at the top energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron is of the form of three (two baryon-rich and one baryon-free) fireballs separated from each other.

  5. Prevention of freezing in measuring and regulating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wofford, D.

    1995-12-01

    The strict and competitive business environment in which the natural gas industry operates today dictates that measurement and control systems which are utilized are of the highest achievable operational integrity. This entails not only that measurements and controls are performed and maintained precisely and reliably, but also that consideration is given to operational phenomena which may adversely affect the overall performance and integrity of such systems. Freezing is an operational occurrence winch frequently affects the functionality and performance of measurement and regulating systems. Freezing is the result of either ice or hydrate formation within the gas stream and is dependent upon the presence of water. Ice forms in the system when the water vapor within the gas stream experiences such conditions that condensation and freezing occurs. Ice will form at approximately 320 Fahrenheit Hydrates form in the system when water vapor within the gas stream combines with hydrocarbons and forms a compound which will condense and freeze at temperatures winch are often above the freezing point for water alone. Hydrate formations usually occur in gathering lines which are saturated with water vapor. In either case, the freezing condition can result in measurement errors, regulating and control equipment malfunction, and complete line blockages. These results ultimately have detrimental economic and operational impact. Therefore, the avoidance of freezing problems is a good long term investment.

  6. Freeze-dried dog sperm: Dynamics of DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Olaciregui, M; Luño, V; Gonzalez, N; De Blas, I; Gil, L

    2015-10-01

    Freeze-drying (FD) has been proposed as an alternative method to preserve spermatozoa. During the FD procedure, sperm DNA might become damaged by both freezing and drying stresses caused by the endonucleases, the oxidative stress and the storage conditions. We examined the DNA integrity of dog sperm freeze-dried with two kinds of chelating agents in FD buffers and storage at two different temperatures. Ejaculated sperm from four dogs were suspended in basic medium (10mM Tris-HCl buffer+50mM NaCl) supplemented with 50mM EGTA or with 50mM EDTA and then freeze-dried. Sperm samples were stored at 4°C as room temperature, and the analysis of DNA damage was performed after a month and 5months of storage using a Sperm Chromatin Dispersion test. We found four different sperm populations according to the size of the halos around the sperm head: (1) absent halo, (2) <6?m, (3) 6-10?m, (4) >10?m. All of them coexisted in each freeze-dried dog semen samples and differed significantly among different treatments. The highest percentage of spermatozoa with halo >10?m was obtained when the semen samples were freeze-dried in EDTA medium and stored at room temperature for five months. Results suggested that both, the kind of chelating agent as well as storage temperature and period, influenced DNA integrity of freeze-dried dog sperm. PMID:26247315

  7. A sampler for quantifying the vertical distribution of macroinvertebrates in shallow wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKay, J.; Euliss, N.H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A sampler for quantifying the vertical distribution of aquatic macroinvertebrates in wetlands is described. This device will facilitate quantitative sampling of macroinvertebrates in waterfowl ecology and related studies. Because it simultaneously collects benthic and pelagic invertebrates the sampler reduces bias associated with sampling macroinvertebrates that occupy the benthic-pelagic interface of wetlands. The sampling device also separates benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates into separate vertical profiles to facilitate studies of distribution patterns or the influence of chemical and physical gradients on invertebrate vertical distribution.

  8. Sucrose Diffusion in Decellularized Heart Valves for Freeze-Drying.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Goecke, Tobias; Ramm, Robert; Harder, Michael; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Wolkers, Willem Frederik

    2015-09-01

    Decellularized heart valves can be used as starter matrix implants for heart valve replacement therapies in terms of guided tissue regeneration. Decellularized matrices ideally need to be long-term storable to assure off-the-shelf availability. Freeze-drying is an attractive preservation method, allowing storage at room temperature in a dried state. However, the two inherent processing steps, freezing and drying, can cause severe damage to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and the overall tissue histoarchitecture and thus impair biomechanical characteristics of resulting matrices. Freeze-drying therefore requires a lyoprotective agent that stabilizes endogenous structural proteins during both substeps and that forms a protective glassy state at room temperature. To estimate incubation times needed to infiltrate decellularized heart valves with the lyoprotectant sucrose, temperature-dependent diffusion studies were done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Glycerol, a cryoprotective agent, was studied for comparison. Diffusion of both protectants was found to exhibit Arrhenius behavior. The activation energies of sucrose and glycerol diffusion were found to be 15.9 and 37.7?kJ·mol(-1), respectively. It was estimated that 4?h of incubation at 37°C is sufficient to infiltrate heart valves with sucrose before freeze-drying. Application of a 5% sucrose solution was shown to stabilize acellular valve scaffolds during freeze-drying. Such freeze-dried tissues, however, displayed pores, which were attributed to ice crystal damage, whereas vacuum-dried scaffolds in comparison revealed no pores after drying and rehydration. Exposure to a hygroscopic sucrose solution (80%) before freeze-drying was shown to be an effective method to diminish pore formation in freeze-dried ECMs: matrix structures closely resembled those of control samples that were not freeze-dried. Heart valve matrices were shown to be in a glassy state after drying, suggesting that they can be stored at room temperature. PMID:25809201

  9. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  10. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  11. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  12. Immersion freezing on mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Grothe, Hinrich; Pummer, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Mineral dust is considered to play a major role in ice cloud nucleation in the troposphere. More than 1.000 Tg of mineral dust are aerosolized from the ground every year, 1-10% of these reach the upper troposphere [1]. At an altitude of about 8 km ice residual particle analysis has shown that about 50% of all ice nuclei (IN) are mineral dust[2]. In principle, natural occurring dusts may either be IN-active themselves or are carriers of organic and/or biological IN. Up to now the ice nucleation, i.e. cloud glaciation, has not been quantized. However, different authors report a high IN-activity for many mineral dust samples, although a systematic comparison between different minerals is still missing. Therefore, we studied selected mineral dust samples which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy before use. Oil immersion measurements were performed on the most common minerals, clay materials and volcanic ash. The median freezing temperatures range from -21°C up to homogenous freezing at 38°C. Even though quite a few dust samples show a reasonable high IN-activity, their median freezing temperatures are low compared to biological samples [3, 4]. Furthermore, heat treatment of the dusts was applied in order to decompose and to denaturize organic and/or biological surfactants. Finally, some dust samples had a high loss of activity and thus were subjects of further experiments. These mineral dust particles were suspended in water and after an incubation time were removed. In some cases the washing water had become IN-active, but lost its activity after enzymatic treatment. The observed high IN-activity can thus be explained by adsorbed biological materials. The results suggest that some mineral dusts are IN-active, and if it is not intrinsic they may even enhance IN-activity of organic and biological IN if these are adsorbed on the dust particle surface. A relatively high IN-activity of the pure mineral dusts was only observed in quartz, clays, and mixed natural dusts (ATD), which are mainly composed of SiO2 and clays. References. [1] C. S. Zender, R. L. Miller and I. Tegen, Eos Trans. AGU, 2004,85, 509. [2] K. A. Pratt, P. J. DeMott, J. R. French, Z. Wang, D. L. Westphal, A. J. Heymsfield, C. H. Twohy, A. J. Prenni, K. A. Prather, Nat. Geosci., 2009, 2, 397-400. [3] B. Pummer, H. Bauer, J. Bernardi, S. Bleicher and H. Grothe, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2012, 12, 2541-2550. [4] V. T. J. Phillips, C. Andronache, B. Christner, C. E. Morris, D. C. Sands, A. Bansemer, A. Lauer, C. McNaughton and C. Seman, Biogeosciences, 2009, 6, 987-1014.

  13. Spray irrigation effects on surface-layer stability in an experimental citrus orchard during winter freezes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, H.J.; Smith, E.A.; Martsolf, J.D.

    1997-02-01

    Observations taken by two surface radiation and energy budget stations deployed in the University of Florida/Institute for Food and Agricultural Service experimental citrus orchard in Ginesville, Florida, have been analyzed to identify the effects of sprayer irrigation on thermal stability and circulation processes within the orchard during three 1992 winter freeze episodes. Lapse rates of temperature observed from a micrometeorological tower near the center of the orchard were also recorded during periods of irrigation for incorporation into the analysis. Comparisons of the near-surface temperature lapse rates observed with the two energy budget stations show consistency between the two sites and with the tower-based lapse rates taken over a vertical layer from 1.5 to 15 m above ground level. A theoretical framework was developed that demonstrates that turbulent-scale processes originating within the canopy, driven by latent heat release associated with condensation and freezing processes from water vapor and liquid water released from sprayer nozzles, can destabilize lapse rates and promote warm air mixing above the orchard canopy. The orchard data were then analyzed in the context of the theory for evidence of local overturning and displacement of surface layer air, with warmer air from aloft driven by locally buoyant plumes generated by water vapor injected into the orchard during the irrigation periods. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  14. PEM Fuel Cell Freeze Durability and Cold Start Project

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, T.; O'Neill, Jonathan

    2008-01-02

    UTC has taken advantage of the unique water management opportunities inherent in micro-porous bipolar-plates to improve the cold-start performance of its polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). Diagnostic experiments were used to determine the limiting factors in micro-porous plate PEFC freeze performance and the causes of any performance decay. Alternative cell materials were evaluated for their freeze performance. Freeze-thaw cycling was also performed to determine micro-porous plate PEFC survivability. Data from these experiments has formed the basis for continuing development of advanced materials capable of supporting DOE's cold-start and durability objectives.

  15. Freeze-out volume of hot dense fireball

    E-print Network

    M. Mishra; C. P. Singh

    2007-09-27

    A thermodynamically consistent excluded volume model is proposed to account for the particle multiplicities obtained from lowest SIS energies to the highest RHIC energies. The chemical freeze-out volumes lying in a slice of one unit of rapidity for pions and kaons are separately inferred from this analysis and the results are compared with the corresponding thermal freeze-out volumes obtained from the Hanbury-Brown Twiss (HBT) pion interferometry. Furthermore, we extract the variations of freeze-out number densities for pions and nucleons with the center-of-mass energy in our model and compare them with the HBT data.

  16. Freeze Tape Casting of Functionally Graded Porous Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Freeze tape casting is a means of making preforms of ceramic sheets that, upon subsequent completion of fabrication processing, can have anisotropic and/or functionally graded properties that notably include aligned and graded porosity. Freeze tape casting was developed to enable optimization of the microstructures of porous ceramic components for use as solid oxide electrodes in fuel cells: Through alignment and grading of pores, one can tailor surface areas and diffusion channels for flows of gas and liquid species involved in fuel-cell reactions. Freeze tape casting offers similar benefits for fabrication of optimally porous ceramics for use as catalysts, gas sensors, and filters.

  17. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water transport, thereby leading to previously unconsidered mechanisms of cell freezing response. In addition, cellular water transport is identified as the critical limiting factor on the amount of freezing-induced tissue deformation, particularly in native tissues with high cell densities. Finally, effects of cryopreservation on post-thaw biological functionality of collagen engineered tissue constructs is investigated where cell-matrix interactions during fibroblast migration are considered as the functional response. Simultaneous cell migration and extracellular matrix deformation are characterized. Results show diminished cell-matrix coupling by freeze/thaw accompanied by a subtle decrease in cell migration. A connection between these results and freezing-induced collagen fibril damage is also suggested. Overall, this dissertation provides new fundamental knowledge on cryodamage mechanisms and a collection of novel multi-purpose engineering tools that will open the way for rational design of cryomedicine technologies.

  18. Maximum freeze-out baryon density in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Cleymans, J.

    2006-10-15

    Using simple parametrizations of the thermodynamic freeze-out parameters extracted from the data over a wide beam-energy range, we reexpress the hadronic freeze-out line in terms of the underlying dynamic quantities, the net baryon density {rho}{sub B} and the energy density epsiv, which are subject to local conservation laws. This analysis reveals that {rho}{sub B} exhibits a maximum as the collision energy is decreased. This maximum freeze-out density has {mu}=400-500 MeV, which is above the critical value, and it is reached for a fixed-target bombarding energy of 20-30 GeV/nucleon.

  19. Is Enceladus' Internal Ocean Doomed to Freeze?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Barr, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Enceladus is geologically hyperactive, with plumes of water vapor, other volatiles such as ammonia, and salty particles erupting from its South Polar Terrain. The plumes are spatially associated with a region of greatly increased local heat flux, with a total power output 15.8 × 3.1 GW spread over an area of 70,000 km2 (e.g., Spencer and Nimmo 2013, AREPS 41), corresponding to a regional heat flux of 180-270 mW m-2. Tidal strains of the magnitude only possible in an ice shell that is decoupled from a rocky interior by an internal ocean or regional sea are required to generate this much heat (e.g., Behounkova et al. 2012, Icarus 219). Yet, numerous studies conclude that Enceladus' ocean cannot be in present-day thermodynamic steady state with a conductive or convective ice I shell (e.g., Roberts and Nimmo 2008, Icarus 194; Behounkova et al. 2012). Regardless of where Enceladus' tidal heating is concentrated (i.e., the poles), and regardless of whether its outer ice I shell convects, Enceladus' ocean is predicted to freeze on a geologically rapid time scale, implying that activity on Enceladus is only a transient or episodic phenomenon. These arguments strictly apply only to pure water ice oceans, however. We have previously argued that if the presence of salts or ammonia is allowed for, the ocean may be cooler and can be maintained essentially permanently by tidal heating in the ice above (McKinnon and Barr 2008, LPS XXXIX). Here we elaborate on the conditions under which Enceladus' ocean can be stabilized or even increase in thickness due to present-day tidal heating within the ice shell and the presence of salts and ammonia, which we now know are there (Waite et al. 2009, Nature 460; Postberg et al. 2011, Nature 474). As previous work has found, we cannot explain the present-day heat flow, but there is no fundamental reason that Enceladus' ocean or sea should completely freeze for present-day orbital eccentricities.

  20. Amplitude Manipulation Evokes Upper Limb Freezing during Handwriting in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Heremans, Elke; Nackaerts, Evelien; Vervoort, Griet; Vercruysse, Sarah; Broeder, Sanne; Strouwen, Carolien; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that besides freezing of gait (FOG), many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) also suffer from freezing in the upper limbs (FOUL). Up to now, it is unclear which task constraints provoke and explain upper limb freezing. Objective To investigate whether upper limb freezing and other kinematic abnormalities during writing are provoked by (i) gradual changes in amplitude or by (ii) sustained amplitude generation in patients with and without freezing of gait. Methods Thirty-four patients with PD, including 17 with and 17 without FOG, performed a writing task on a touch-sensitive writing tablet requiring writing at constant small and large size as well as writing at gradually increasing and decreasing size. Patients of both groups were matched for disease severity, tested while ‘on’ medication and compared to healthy age-matched controls. Results Fifty upper limb freezing episodes were detected in 10 patients, including 8 with and 2 without FOG. The majority of the episodes occurred when participants had to write at small or gradually decreasing size. The occurrence of FOUL and the number of FOUL episodes per patient significantly correlated with the occurrence and severity of FOG. Patients with FOUL also showed a significantly smaller amplitude in the writing parts outside the freezing episodes. Conclusions Corroborating findings of gait research, the current study supports a core problem in amplitude control underlying FOUL, both in maintaining as well as in flexibly adapting the cycle size. PMID:26580556

  1. Inner ear tissue preservation by rapid freezing: Improving fixation by high-pressure freezing and hybrid methods

    PubMed Central

    Bullen, A.; Taylor, R.R.; Kachar, B.; Moores, C.; Fleck, R.A.; Forge, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the preservation of tissues in as ‘close to life’ state as possible, rapid freeze fixation has many benefits over conventional chemical fixation. One technique by which rapid freeze-fixation can be achieved, high pressure freezing (HPF), has been shown to enable ice crystal artefact-free freezing and tissue preservation to greater depths (more than 40 ?m) than other quick-freezing methods. Despite increasingly becoming routine in electron microscopy, the use of HPF for the fixation of inner ear tissue has been limited. Assessment of the quality of preservation showed routine HPF techniques were suitable for preparation of inner ear tissues in a variety of species. Good preservation throughout the depth of sensory epithelia was achievable. Comparison to chemically fixed tissue indicated that fresh frozen preparations exhibited overall superior structural preservation of cells. However, HPF fixation caused characteristic artefacts in stereocilia that suggested poor quality freezing of the actin bundles. The hybrid technique of pre-fixation and high pressure freezing was shown to produce cellular preservation throughout the tissue, similar to that seen in HPF alone. Pre-fixation HPF produced consistent high quality preservation of stereociliary actin bundles. Optimising the preparation of samples with minimal artefact formation allows analysis of the links between ultrastructure and function in inner ear tissues. PMID:25016142

  2. On the height variation of the equatorial F region vertical plasma drifts

    SciTech Connect

    Pingree, J.E.; Fejer, B.G. )

    1987-05-01

    The authors have used improved incoherent scatter radar measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory to study the height variation of the F region vertical plasma drift velocity (driven by the zonal electric field) during moderately quiet conditions. Preliminary results indicate a nearly linear change of the vertical drift velocity with altitude between 200 and 700 km, but with considerable day-to-day variations in the value of the slope. On the average, the velocity gradients are positive in the late night and morning periods and negative during the afternoon and evening hours. Simultaneous vertical and zonal drift measurements confirm that the measured height variation of the vertical drift is consistent with the existence of a curl free electric field in the low latitude ionosphere. The time dependence of the Jicamarca vertical drifts extrapolated to higher altitudes closely resembles the diurnal variation of the drift component due to the zonal electric field observed at F region heights over Arecibo.

  3. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-01-06

    We discuss the approach of generating round beams for ultimate storage rings using vertical damping wigglers (with horizontal magnetic field). The vertical damping wigglers provide damping and excite vertical emittance. This eliminates the need to generate large linear coupling that is impractical with traditional off-axis injection. We use a PEP-X compatible lattice to demonstrate the approach. This lattice uses separate quadrupole and sextupole magnets with realistic gradient strengths. Intrabeam scattering effects are calculated. As a result, the horizontal and vertical emittances are 22.3 pm and 10.3 pm, respectively, for a 200 mA, 4.5 GeV beam, with a vertical damping wiggler of a total length of 90 m, a peak field of 1.5 T and a wiggler period of 100 mm.

  4. Prediction of mechanical properties of multilayer gradient hydroxyapatite reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) gel biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Yusong, Pan; Qianqian, Shen; Chengling, Pan; Jing, Wang

    2013-07-01

    Functional graded materials provided us one new concept for artificial articular cartilage design with graded component and graded structure. In this article, a novel functional material design was proposed by functionalizing hydroxyapatite (HA) particles in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel. The goal of the present study was to fabricate a multilayer gradient HA/PVA gel biocomposites through layer-by-layer casting method combining with freeze/thaw cycle technology and establish a mechanical model to predict the compressive mechanical properties of multilayer gradient gel biocomposites. The results showed that the compressive strength of the multilayer gradient gel biocomposites increased with the rise of HA content, but it presented decreasing trend with the rise of interlayer gradient concentration of HA particles. Furthermore, the compressive strength of multilayer gradient biocomposites would be approximately predicted by the established mechanical model. The maximum error between theoretical compressive strength predicted by the model and the experimental strength is less than 7%. On the other hand, the compressive mechanical properties of multilayer gradient composites could be designed and controlled by the mechanical model as established in this study. PMID:23359553

  5. Generalized gradient and contour program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellman, Marshall Strong

    1972-01-01

    This program computes estimates of gradients, prepares contour maps, and plots various sets of data provided by the user on the CalComp plotters. The gradients represent the maximum rates of change of a real variable Z=f(X,Y) with respect to the twodimensional rectangle on which the function is defined. The contours are lines of equal Z values. The program also plots special line data sets provided by the user.

  6. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    E-print Network

    Monwhea Jeng

    2005-12-29

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes are also described.

  7. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 ?m water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  8. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jill C; Sandve, Simen R

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve. PMID:23761798

  9. Stochastic flux freezing and magnetic dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Eyink, Gregory L.

    2011-05-15

    Magnetic flux conservation in turbulent plasmas at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is argued neither to hold in the conventional sense nor to be entirely broken, but instead to be valid in a statistical sense associated to the ''spontaneous stochasticity'' of Lagrangian particle trajectories. The latter phenomenon is due to the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion, which leads to a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics. Empirical evidence is presented for spontaneous stochasticity, including numerical results. A Lagrangian path-integral approach is then exploited to establish stochastic flux freezing for resistive hydromagnetic equations and to argue, based on the properties of Richardson diffusion, that flux conservation must remain stochastic at infinite magnetic Reynolds number. An important application of these results is the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in nonhelical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number (Pr{sub m}) equal to unity. Numerical results on the Lagrangian dynamo mechanisms by a stochastic particle method demonstrate a strong similarity between the Pr{sub m}=1 and 0 dynamos. Stochasticity of field-line motion is an essential ingredient of both. Finally, some consequences for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, dynamo, and reconnection are briefly considered.

  10. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Sandve, Simen R.

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve. PMID:23761798

  11. Freezing and Decorated Poisson Point Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subag, Eliran; Zeitouni, Ofer

    2015-07-01

    The limiting extremal processes of the branching Brownian motion (BBM), the two-speed BBM, and the branching random walk are known to be randomly shifted decorated Poisson point processes (SDPPP). In the proofs of those results, the Laplace functional of the limiting extremal process is shown to satisfy for any nonzero, nonnegative, compactly supported, continuous function f, where is the shift operator, is a real number that depends on f, and g is a real function that is independent of f. We show that, under some assumptions, this property characterizes the structure of SDPPP. Moreover, when it holds, we show that g has to be a convolution of the Gumbel distribution with some measure. The above property of the Laplace functional is closely related to a `freezing phenomenon' that is expected to occur in a wide class of log-correlated fields, and which has played an important role in the analysis of various models. Our results shed light on this intriguing phenomenon and provide a natural tool for proving an SDPPP structure in these and other models.

  12. Satellite freeze forecast system: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (principal investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A satellite-based temperature monitoring and prediction system consisting of a computer controlled acquisition, processing, and display system and the ten automated weather stations called by that computer was developed and transferred to the national weather service. This satellite freeze forecasting system (SFFS) acquires satellite data from either one of two sources, surface data from 10 sites, displays the observed data in the form of color-coded thermal maps and in tables of automated weather station temperatures, computes predicted thermal maps when requested and displays such maps either automatically or manually, archives the data acquired, and makes comparisons with historical data. Except for the last function, SFFS handles these tasks in a highly automated fashion if the user so directs. The predicted thermal maps are the result of two models, one a physical energy budget of the soil and atmosphere interface and the other a statistical relationship between the sites at which the physical model predicts temperatures and each of the pixels of the satellite thermal map.

  13. Freeze fracturing of the human stria vascularis.

    PubMed

    Bagger-Sjöbäck, D; Engström, B; Steinholtz, L; Hillerdal, M

    1987-01-01

    The stria vascularis is an important functional element in the mammalian cochlea. This special tissue is considered to be the source of the endocochlear potential and thus the driving force for the production of a receptor response to the auditory stimulus. In order to maintain its function, the stria vascularis needs to be separated from the endolymphatic space by a tight seal. This seal is comprised of tight junctions in the marginal cell layer. The junctional arrangement in the stria vascularis is described, utilizing the freeze-fracturing technique which allows the visualization of large expansions of plasma membrane. The marginal cells are generally separated by tight junctions of the moderately tight to tight type. In places, however, even so-called leaky junctions with only a few sealing strands are present. Whereas the intermediate cell layer seems to lack tight junctions, the basal cells are connected by extensive tight junctions more or less covering the entire cell. These junctions seem to form an extremely tight barrier against the spiral ligament. Gap junctions are also present in the tissue. Intermediate cells as well as the basal cells are coupled by gap junctions. In the basal cell layer, gap junctional elements may also be found inside the large tight junctions comprising so-called mixed junctions. PMID:3564929

  14. A Uniform PV Framework for Balanced Dynamics vertical structure of the troposphere

    E-print Network

    Muraki, David J.

    tropopause displacement PV on 330K & 310K surfaces, mean PV gradient morgan&nielsen-gammon(1999) http peaked at tropopause level, decrease in troposphere vertical structure of geopotential (zonal fourier amplitudes) at 40 N tropopause map of potential temperature 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1000 925 850 700 600 500 400

  15. Universality of tip singularity formation in freezing water drops.

    PubMed

    Marín, A G; Enríquez, O R; Brunet, P; Colinet, P; Snoeijer, J H

    2014-08-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:25126922

  16. Fast hadron freeze-out generator, part II: noncentral collisions

    E-print Network

    N. S. Amelin; R. Lednicky; I. P. Lokhtin; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Snigirev; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov; I. Arsene; L. Bravina

    2007-12-13

    The fast Monte Carlo procedure of hadron generation developed in our previous work is extended to describe noncentral collisions of nuclei. We consider different possibilities to introduce appropriate asymmetry of the freeze-out hyper-surface and flow velocity profile. For comparison with other models and experimental data we demonstrate the results based on the standard parametrizations of the hadron freeze-out hyper-surface and flow velocity profile assuming either a common chemical and thermal freeze-out or the chemically frozen evolution from chemical to thermal freeze-out. The C++ generator code is written under the ROOT framework and is available for public use at http://uhkm.jinr.ru/

  17. Universal chemical freeze-out as a phase transition signature

    E-print Network

    Ulrich Heinz; Gregory Kestin

    2006-12-26

    It is shown that kinetic freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions invariably entails a non-trivial dependence of the freeze-out temperature on the collision centrality. The centrality independence of the chemical freeze-out temperature observed in Au+Au collisions at RHIC is therefore inconsistent with the hypothesis that hadron abundances decouple kinetically from inelastic hadron-hadron interactions. On the other hand, it is consistent with the hypothesis that chemical decoupling is driven by the quark-hadron phase transition, and that the observed universal chemical freeze-out reflects its critical temperature, independent of the dynamical state of the collision fireball as it passes through the phase transition.

  18. Challenging endeavour for preservation of freeze-dried mammalian spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Hochi, Shinichi; Abdalla, Hany; Hara, Hiromasa; Hirabayashi, Masumi

    2011-10-01

    Freeze-drying (lyophilization) has been proposed as an alternative method for sperm preservation to overcome the disadvantages of the current cryopreservation method such as the high maintenance cost of frozen stocks, the problems associated with transportation of frozen materials and the potential risk of total loss of the frozen stock. Since freeze-dried spermatozoa after rehydration lose their motility, which is an essential requirement to complete physiological fertilization, a relatively difficult microinsemination technique must be applied to rehydrated spermatozoa. Theoretically, it has been supposed that freeze-dried spermatozoa could maintain their functions and abilities to interact with the oocyte cytoplasm after prolonged storage at refrigerator temperature. However, sufficient yield of transferable blastocysts and production of live offspring derived from freeze-dried sperm samples are still subjects to be challenged and overcome in large domestic species. PMID:22052044

  19. 19. FIRST FLOOR LEVEL BELOW ICE FREEZING TANKS AND LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. FIRST FLOOR LEVEL BELOW ICE FREEZING TANKS AND LOWER LEVEL OF ICE DUMP AND LIFT WHERE FROZEN ICE IS BROUGHT INTO STORAGE. - Atlantic Ice & Coal Company, 135 Prince Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  20. Freezing in Sealed Capillaries for Preparation of Frozen Hydrated Sections

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the freezing of specimens in a confined volume for preparation of vitreous samples for cryosectioning. With 15% dextran as a cryoprotectant, a sample sealed in a copper tube begins to freeze into crystalline ice when plunged into liquid ethane. Crystallization rapidly causes an increase in the pressure to the point that much of the sample freezes in a vitreous state. We used synchrotron X-ray diffraction of samples frozen with various amounts of dextran to characterize the ice phases and crystal orientation, providing insights on the freezing process. We have characterized cryosections obtained from these samples to explore the optimum amount of cryoprotectant. Images of cryosectioned bacteria frozen with various levels of cryoprotectant illustrate effects of cryoprotectant concentration. PMID:22077543

  1. An approximation for homogeneous freezing temperature of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O, K.-T.; Wood, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, based on the well-known formulae of classical nucleation theory (CNT), the temperature TNc = 1 at which the mean number of critical embryos inside a droplet is unity is derived and proposed as a new approximation for homogeneous freezing temperature of water droplets. Without consideration of time dependence and stochastic nature of the ice nucleation process, the approximation TNc = 1 is able to reproduce the dependence of homogeneous freezing temperature on drop size and water activity of aqueous drops observed in a wide range of experimental studies. We use the TNc = 1 approximation to argue that the distribution of homogeneous freezing temperatures observed in the experiments may largely be explained by the spread in the size distribution of droplets used in the particular experiment. It thus appears that this approximation is useful for predicting homogeneous freezing temperatures of water droplets in the atmosphere.

  2. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  3. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  4. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  5. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  6. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  7. Density functional theory of freezing: Analysis of crystal density

    E-print Network

    Laird, Brian Bostian; McCoy, John D.; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1987-09-01

    The density functional theory of freezing is used to study the liquid to crystal phase transition in the hardsphere and Lennard?Jones systems. An important step in the calculation is the parametrization of the solid phase average single particle...

  8. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER SYSTEM - SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tec...

  9. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tech...

  10. Universality of Tip Singularity Formation in Freezing Water Drops

    E-print Network

    Marin, Alvaro G; Brunet, Philipe; Colinet, Pierre; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2014-01-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with observations.

  11. Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

  12. Atmospheric science: Sea-spray particles cause freezing in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.

    2015-09-01

    Ice clouds in marine regions at high latitudes might form in warmer and drier air than was previously believed because of freezing induced by airborne particles that contain organic materials from ocean surface waters. See Letter p.234

  13. Phase separation during freezing upon warming of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, A.; Loerting, T.

    2014-11-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry, we show that the addition of solute(s) to emulsified water lowers the freezing temperature to <231 K, the homogeneous nucleation temperature of pure bulk water, or even completely suppresses freezing. In the latter case, freezing upon warming occurs above TX ? 150 K and leads to a phase separation into pure ice and a freeze-concentrated solution (FCS) which crystallizes upon further warming. We also show that emulsified 20-21.5 wt. % HCl solutions and the FCS of HCl/H2O solutions transform to glass at Tg ? 127-128 K, i.e., lower than Tg ? 136 K of water. We suggest that water nanodrops adsorbed on fumed silica resemble bulk water more than water confined in nanoscaled confinement and also more than nanoscaled water domains in aqueous solution.

  14. Effect of temperature on plasma freezing under industrial conditions.

    PubMed

    Bravo, M I; Grancha, S; Jorquera, J I

    2006-08-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia monograph on Human plasma for fractionation does not define the freezing process time but does define the freezing temperature (- 30 degrees C or below). Initial freezing conditions are crucial for the quality of plasma. These conditions were intended to preserve labile proteins such as fVIIl, but they can also be considered favourable for the plasma quality in general. This study evaluates the way the industrial plasma freezing affects labile coagulation factors. We have studied the freezing of plasma in industrial-size chambers at temperatures close to - 30 degrees C, - 25 degrees C and - 20 degrees C, and the possible differences between performing the freezing process in a chamber or in a freezer, in order to elucidate whether or not these parameters affect the quality of plasma. For this study, plasma bottles were frozen in industrial chambers set at - 30 degrees C, - 25 degrees C and - 20 degrees C, and in a freezer set at - 20 degrees C. The freezing rates were followed by means of probes in plasma control bottles. From this plasma, coagulation factors (fVIII, fIX and fibrinogen) were analysed before and after freezing, and cryoprecipitate was obtained in some cases. Statistically significant differences exist in fVIII:C recovery in thawed plasma between freezing at - 30 degrees C and at - 20 degrees C (n = 11; 85.4 +/- 4.3 % versus 74.6 +/- 6.0 % (chamber) or 79.3 +/- 6.3 % (freezer)). There is no difference between - 30 degrees C and - 25 degrees C, or between freezing at - 20 degrees C in a chamber or in a freezer. No significant loss of activity in thawed plasma is observed for fIX and fibrinogen at - 25 degrees C or - 20 degrees C versus - 30 degrees C. The fVIII and vWF recovery in cryoprecipitates does not show differences (464.2 IU fVIII/ml at - 30 degrees C, 446.7 IU fVIII/ml at - 25 degrees C, and 475.8 IU fVIII/ml at - 20 degrees C). The results obtained from this study support that plasma might also be frozen at - 25 degrees C or below without any impact on its quality, and that sporadic and short term deviations, from - 30 degrees C or below up to - 25 degrees C, in the currently required freezing temperature, would not have an effect on the labile factors recovery. PMID:17694644

  15. Entropy production at freeze-out from dissipative fluids

    E-print Network

    E. Molnar

    2007-09-17

    Entropy production due to shear viscosity during the continuous freeze-out of a longitudinally expanding dissipative fluid is addressed. Assuming the validity of the fluid dynamical description during the continuous removal of interacting matter we estimated a small entropy production as function of the freeze-out duration and the ratio of dissipative to non-dissipative quantities in case of a relativistic massless pion fluid.

  16. Freeze concentration of dairy products Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.E.; Vasavada, K.C.

    1993-09-01

    An efficient, electrically driven freeze concentration system offers potential for substantially increasing electricity demand while providing the mature dairy industry with new products for domestic and export markets together with enhanced production efficiencies. Consumer tests indicate that dairy products manufactured from freeze-concentrated ingredients are either preferred or considered equivalent in quality to fresh milk-based products. Economic analyses indicate that this technology should be competitive with thermal evaporation processes on a commercial basis.

  17. 5 CFR 1690.15 - Freezing an account-administrative holds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SAVINGS PLAN Miscellaneous § 1690.15 Freezing an account—administrative holds. (a) The TSP may freeze (e.g...) An account freeze (i.e., administrative hold) prohibits a participant from withdrawing funds... freeze (administrative hold) by submitting a notarized request to the TSP....

  18. 5 CFR 1690.15 - Freezing an account-administrative holds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SAVINGS PLAN Miscellaneous § 1690.15 Freezing an account—administrative holds. (a) The TSP may freeze (e.g...) An account freeze (i.e., administrative hold) prohibits a participant from withdrawing funds... freeze (administrative hold) by submitting a notarized request to the TSP....

  19. Unexpected effect of climate change: Stream ecosystem responses to the 2007 spring freeze

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Unexpected effect of climate change: Stream ecosystem responses to the 2007 spring freeze C t t P freeze remains highly variable with no long-term trend. In 2007, throughout much of the eastern United by a hard freeze in early Aprilhard freeze in early April. Canopy foliar display never recovered to normal

  20. 5 CFR 1690.15 - Freezing an account-administrative holds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SAVINGS PLAN Miscellaneous § 1690.15 Freezing an account—administrative holds. (a) The TSP may freeze (e.g...) An account freeze (i.e., administrative hold) prohibits a participant from withdrawing funds... freeze (administrative hold) by submitting a notarized request to the TSP....

  1. Bioinspired composites from freeze casting with clathrate hydrates Steven E. Naleway a,

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Marc A.

    Bioinspired composites from freeze casting with clathrate hydrates Steven E. Naleway a Bioinspired Freeze casting Ceramic matrix composite Mechanical behavior a b s t r a c t Freeze casting with isopropanol (IPA)­H2O as a freezing agent has shown the potential to create porous scaffolds with enlarged

  2. PETS: Persistent TCP using Simple Freeze* Chakchai So-In1

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    PETS: Persistent TCP using Simple Freeze* Chakchai So-In1 , Student Member, IEEE, Raj Jain1 IP hides the IP address change from TCP but does nothing to prevent it from timing out. TCP freeze freeze (PETS) framework, we combine the TCP freeze and Mobile IP to prevent TCP from disconnecting during

  3. 33 CFR 154.2112 - Vapors with potential to polymerize or freeze-Special requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polymerize or freeze-Special requirements. 154.2112 Section 154.2112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Vapors with potential to polymerize or freeze—Special requirements. (a) A vapor control system (VCS) that... freeze at ambient temperature must have a design that prevents the freezing of vapors or condensate...

  4. 5 CFR 1690.15 - Freezing an account-administrative holds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SAVINGS PLAN Miscellaneous § 1690.15 Freezing an account—administrative holds. (a) The TSP may freeze (e.g...) An account freeze (i.e., administrative hold) prohibits a participant from withdrawing funds... freeze (administrative hold) by submitting a notarized request to the TSP....

  5. 5 CFR 1690.15 - Freezing an account-administrative holds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SAVINGS PLAN Miscellaneous § 1690.15 Freezing an account—administrative holds. (a) The TSP may freeze (e.g...) An account freeze (i.e., administrative hold) prohibits a participant from withdrawing funds... freeze (administrative hold) by submitting a notarized request to the TSP....

  6. Large-Scale Oceanographic Constraints on the Distribution of Melting and Freezing under Ice Shelves

    E-print Network

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Large-Scale Oceanographic Constraints on the Distribution of Melting and Freezing under Ice Shelves experience asymmetric melting and freezing. Topography may constrain oceanic circulation (and thus basal melt­freeze patterns) through its influence on the potential vorticity (PV) field. However, melting and freezing induce

  7. Carbohydrate and lipid dynamics in wheat crown tissue in response to mild freeze-thaw treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing tolerance resulting from cold hardening is critical to survival of fall-planted crops such as winter wheat. Exposure of winter wheat plants to cycles of freeze-thaw at temperatures just below, and just above freezing results in incremental improvements of freezing tolerance. Defining the ph...

  8. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [improved quality of freeze-dried foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for improving the quality of freeze-dried foods were investigated. Areas discussed include: (1) microstructure of freeze-dried systems, (2) structural changes in freeze-dried systems, (3) artificial food matrices, and (4) osmotic preconcentration to yield improved freeze-dried products.

  9. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  10. Visualize Vertical Connectedness (Middle Ground).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Allen, Lanny

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of vertical connectedness in K-12 education through references to journal articles and the author's own reflections. Suggests that middle school teachers may be leaders in a movement toward eliminating redundancy and gaps between grade levels. (TB)

  11. Vertically Aligned Nanocomposite Thin Films 

    E-print Network

    Bi, Zhenxing

    2012-07-16

    Vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) thin films have recently stimulated significant research interest to achieve better material functionality or multifunctionalities. In VAN thin films, both phases grow epitaxially in parallel on given...

  12. Place Value: A Vertical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Sandra P.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses children's place-value understanding, including initial learning interference, vertical number lines, and planned discourse. Describes a learning activity that can guide children from a concrete to a symbolic understanding of place value. (11 references) (MKR)

  13. Seismic Velocity Gradients Across the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, C.; Cammarano, F.; de Koker, N.; Piazzoni, A.; Wang, Y.; Marone, F.; Dalton, C.; Romanowicz, B.

    2006-12-01

    One-D elastic velocity models derived from mineral physics do a notoriously poor job at predicting the velocity gradients in the upper mantle transition zone, as well as some other features of models derived from seismological data. During the 2006 CIDER summer program, we computed Vs and Vp velocity profiles in the upper mantle based on three different mineral physics approaches: two approaches based on the minimization of Gibbs Free Energy (Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2005; Piazzoni et al., 2006) and one obtained by using experimentally determined phase diagrams (Weidner and Wang, 1998). The profiles were compared by assuming a vertical temperature profile and two end-member compositional models, the pyrolite model of Ringwood (1979) and the piclogite model of Anderson and Bass (1984). The predicted seismic profiles, which are significantly different from each other, primarily due to different choices of properties of single minerals and their extrapolation with temperature, are tested against a global dataset of P and S travel times and spheroidal and toroidal normal mode eigenfrequencies. All the models derived using a potential temperature of 1600K predict seismic velocities that are too slow in the upper mantle, suggesting the need to use a colder geotherm. The velocity gradient in the transition zone is somewhat better for piclogite than for pyrolite, possibly indicating the need to increase Ca content. The presence of stagnant slabs in the transition zone is a possible explanation for the need for 1) colder temperature and 2) increased Ca content. Future improvements in seismic profiles obtained from mineral physics will arise from better knowledge of elastic properties of upper mantle constituents and aggregates at high temperature and pressure, a better understanding of differences between thermodynamic models, and possibly the effect of water through and on Q. High resolution seismic constraints on velocity jumps at 400 and 660 km also need to be included. earth.org/2006/workshop.html

  14. Quality Evaluation of Pork with Various Freezing and Thawing Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the physicochemical and sensory quality characteristics due to the influence of various thawing methods on electro-magnetic and air blast frozen pork were examined. The packaged pork samples, which were frozen by air blast freezing at ?45? or electro-magnetic freezing at ?55?, were thawed using 4 different methods: refrigeration (4±1?), room temperature (RT, 25?), cold water (15?), and microwave (2450 MHz). Analyses were carried out to determine the drip and cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC), moisture content and sensory evaluation. Frozen pork thawed in a microwave indicated relatively less thawing loss (0.63-1.24%) than the other thawing methods (0.68-1.38%). The cooking loss after electro-magnetic freezing indicated 37.4% by microwave thawing, compared with 32.9% by refrigeration, 36.5% by RT, and 37.2% by cold water in ham. The thawing of samples frozen by electro-magnetic freezing showed no significant differences between the methods used, while the moisture content was higher in belly thawed by microwave (62.0%) after electro-magnetic freezing than refrigeration (54.8%), RT (61.3%), and cold water (61.1%). The highest overall acceptability was shown for microwave thawing after electro-magnetic freezing but there were no significant differences compared to that of the other samples.

  15. Freeze avoidance: a dehydrating moss gathers no ice.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Thomas; Bryant, Gary; Hocart, Charles H; Huang, Cheng X; Ball, Marilyn C

    2010-10-01

    Using cryo-SEM with EDX fundamental structural and mechanical properties of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. were studied in relation to tolerance of freezing temperatures. In contrast to more complex plants, no ice accumulated within the moss during the freezing event. External ice induced desiccation with the response being a function of cell type; water-filled hydroid cells cavitated and were embolized at -4 °C while parenchyma cells of the inner cortex exhibited cytorrhysis, decreasing to ? 20% of their original volume at a nadir temperature of -20 °C. Chlorophyll fluorescence showed that these winter acclimated mosses displayed no evidence of damage after thawing from -20 °C while GCMS showed that sugar concentrations were not sufficient to confer this level of freezing tolerance. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry showed internal ice nucleation occurred in hydrated moss at ?-12 °C while desiccated moss showed no evidence of freezing with lowering of nadir temperature to -20 °C. Therefore the rapid dehydration of the moss provides an elegantly simple solution to the problem of freezing; remove that which freezes. PMID:20525002

  16. Approaching threats elicit a freeze-like response in humans.

    PubMed

    Sagliano, Laura; Cappuccio, Angela; Trojano, Luigi; Conson, Massimiliano

    2014-02-21

    Freezing is one of the most widely recognized defensive reactions to approaching threats in animals. Here we tested whether the same stimuli can elicit freeze-like responses in healthy humans as well. We used a modified version of the two-frame apparent motion paradigm, in which both size and location of a stimulus within a background were manipulated; by these means, participants perceived the stimuli as approaching or receding. In Experiment 1, we showed that implicitly processed approaching threats (e.g., spiders or snakes) elicited a stronger freeze-like response (operationalized as slower reaction times) with respect to receding threats; freezing was significantly related to higher levels of participants' state anxiety. In Experiment 2, approaching/threatening animals were explicitly judged as more threatening than receding ones. Finally, in two further control experiments we observed that the same manipulation of stimuli's size and location, but in absence of apparent motion, did not affect freezing (Experiment 3) or explicit threat judgements (Experiment 4). The present findings demonstrated that approaching threats are critical to elicit freezing in humans, in line with animals' behaviour. PMID:24373990

  17. The role of time in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy P.; Petters, Markus D.

    2013-05-01

    A small fraction of particles in the atmosphere can catalyze ice formation in cloud water drops through heterogeneous freezing nucleation at temperatures warmer than the homogeneous freezing temperature of approximately -38°C. The rate for heterogeneous freezing nucleation is dependent on several factors, including the type and surface area of dust that is immersed inside the drop. Although nucleation is an inherently stochastic process resulting from size fluctuations of the incipient ice germ, there is a growing body of literature that suggests that quasi-deterministic models of ice nucleation can describe laboratory experiments. Here we present new experiments and simulations that aim to better constrain theoretical models fitted to laboratory data. We collected ice nucleation data for Arizona Test Dust aerosol immersed in water using a droplet freezing assay setup that allows for the cooling rates to be changed between 10 and 0.01 K min-1. Discrete event simulations based on a variant of the multiple-component stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing nucleation were used to simulate different experimental procedures. The nucleation properties of the dust are specified by four material-dependent parameters that accurately describe the time dependence of the freezing process. We anticipate that the combination of discrete event simulations and a spectrum of experimental procedures described here can be used to design more meaningful laboratory experiments probing ice nucleation and will aid the development of better parameterizations for use in models.

  18. Tissue Triage and Freezing for Models of Skeletal Muscle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Grange, Robert W.; Yang, Lin; Beggs, Alan H.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Cossette, Stacy A.; Frase, Alison; Childers, Martin K.; Granzier, Henk; Gussoni, Emanuela; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a unique tissue because of its structure and function, which requires specific protocols for tissue collection to obtain optimal results from functional, cellular, molecular, and pathological evaluations. Due to the subtlety of some pathological abnormalities seen in congenital muscle disorders and the potential for fixation to interfere with the recognition of these features, pathological evaluation of frozen muscle is preferable to fixed muscle when evaluating skeletal muscle for congenital muscle disease. Additionally, the potential to produce severe freezing artifacts in muscle requires specific precautions when freezing skeletal muscle for histological examination that are not commonly used when freezing other tissues. This manuscript describes a protocol for rapid freezing of skeletal muscle using isopentane (2-methylbutane) cooled with liquid nitrogen to preserve optimal skeletal muscle morphology. This procedure is also effective for freezing tissue intended for genetic or protein expression studies. Furthermore, we have integrated our freezing protocol into a broader procedure that also describes preferred methods for the short term triage of tissue for (1) single fiber functional studies and (2) myoblast cell culture, with a focus on the minimum effort necessary to collect tissue and transport it to specialized research or reference labs to complete these studies. Overall, this manuscript provides an outline of how fresh tissue can be effectively distributed for a variety of phenotypic studies and thereby provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for pathological studies related to congenital muscle disease. PMID:25078247

  19. Density gradient electrophoresis of cells in a reversible gel.

    PubMed

    Plank, L D; Kunze, M E; Gaines, R A; Todd, P

    1988-10-01

    Density gradient electrophoresis permits the separation of cell types according to surface charge density with high resolution. Any source of flow compromises the resolving power of density gradient electrophoresis. Although procedures have been devised to successfully counteract electroosmotic and convective flows, the final collection of separands requires that they be pumped out of the electrophoresis column. Experiments were therefore designed to test the hypothesis that this flow could also be eliminated by trapping the separated bands in a gel, from which they could be collected by slicing the gel cylinder. Glutaraldehyde-fixed rat and rabbit erythrocytes were used as test particles in a phosphate-buffered isotonic Ficoll-sucrose density gradient in a 2.2 cm diameter, thermostated vertical glass column that could be opened at both ends. Two types of agarose were used as gel polymers: Electrophoresis grade agarose (J.T. Baker Chemical Co.) at final concentrations of 0.1 to 0.25% and SeaPrep ultralow gelling agarose (Marine Colloids Div., FMC Corp.) at a final concentration of 1.0%. Electrophoretic separability of the test particles and fluid stability were tested independently at 55 degrees C and 32 degrees C at which the two agaroses were, respectively, liquid. The experiments demonstrated that the higher temperatures required and the presence of agarose compromised neither the stability of the density gradient nor the migration properties of the cells, and cells can be separated in a sol at a temperature that is compatible with cell viability. PMID:2468483

  20. The influence of ALN-Al gradient material gradient index on ballistic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youcong; Liu, Qiwen; Li, Yao; Shen, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of the gradient material is superior to laminated material, and gradient materials have different gradient types. Using ls-dyna to simulate the ballistic performance of ALN-AL gradient target plates which contain three gradient index (b = 1, b = 0.5, b = 2). Through Hopkinson bar numerical simulation to the target plate materials, we obtained the reflection stress wave and transmission stress wave state of gradient material to get the best gradient index. The internal stress state of gradient material is simulated by amplification processing of the target plate model. When the gradient index b is equal to 1, the gradient target plate is best of all.