Science.gov

Sample records for vertical ground-coupled heat

  1. Ground-coupled heat pump demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, T.

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of a field evaluation of an innovative ground-coupled heat pump system which features a unique collector design and system control strategy aimed at maximizing heat pump performance by minimizing ground temperature change. The collector design includes several short closed loops, each consisting of a pair of polyethylene pipes buried 12 to 18 inches apart in a horizontal trench approximately six feet below ground. A micropressor is used to control flow and optimize system operation. Extrapolation of the results of experiments conducted on a unit length (250 ft.) of collector field during the 1981-82 and 1982-83 heating seasons indicates that a system seasonal performance factor of 2.75 to 3.0 will be achievable in practice.

  2. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, P.D.

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  3. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Philip D.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  4. A refined computer program for the transient simulation of ground coupled heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J. W.; Metz, P. D.; Saunders, J. H.

    1983-04-01

    The use of the earth as a heat source/sink or storage medium for various heat pump based space conditioning systems were investigated. A computer program ground coupled system (GROCS) was developed to model the behavior of ground coupling devices. The GROCS was integrated with TRNSYS, the solar system simulation program, to permit the simulation of complete ground coupled heat pump systems. Experimental results were compared to GROCS simulation results for model validation. It is found that the model has considerable validity. A refined version of the GROCS-TRNSYS program developed to model vertical or horizontal earth coil systems, which considers system cycling is described. The design of the program and its interaction with TRNSYS are discussed.

  5. Performance comparison of air- and ground-coupled heat pump systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.D.; Kavanaugh, S.; Ramanathan, R.

    1984-01-01

    Research initiated in 1979 to compare the performance of air-coupled and ground-coupled heat pumps is described. Three heat pump systems were installed in small, neighboring all-electric residences served by the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company in Perkins, Oklahoma. An air-coupled heat pump and two ground-coupled heat pumps - one with solar assistance - were field tested. However, equipment and instrumentation problems precluded gathering meaningful data for the solar-assisted ground-coupled system. Generally, the unassisted ground-coupled heat pump system proved superior to the air-coupled system, both in reducing peak demand and in consuming less energy on an annual basis. The unassisted ground-coupled system reduced summer and winter peak demand, and experienced no performance degradation due to buildup of rejected waste heat in the ground well. A polyethylene U-tube ground heat exchanger was installed in both ground-coupled systems midway through the project, replacing a five-inch annular PVC pipe arrangement that had functioned poorly. The U-tube performed well throughout the remainder of research. Differing lifestyles and thermostat changes by building occupants during the monitoring period produced quite different demands and loads in the test houses, but when results were normalized through simulation, the superior performance of the unassisted ground-coupled heat pump was confirmed.

  6. Ground-Coupled Heating-Cooling Systems in Urban Areas: How Sustainable Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ground-coupled heating-cooling systems (GCHCSs) exchange heat between the built environment and the subsurface using pipework buried in trenches or boreholes. If heat pumps in GCHCSs are powered by "green electricity," they offer genuine carbon-free heating-cooling; for this reason, there has been a surge in the technology in recent years.…

  7. Antifreeze acceptability for ground-coupled heat pump ground loops in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Den Braven, K.R.

    1998-10-01

    When designing and installing closed-loop ground-coupled heat pumps systems, it is necessary to be aware of applicable environmental regulations. Within the United States, nearly half of the states have regulations specifying or restricting the use of particular antifreezes or other fluids within the ground loop of a ground-coupled heat pump system. A number of other states have regulations pending. While all of these regulations are based on the need to preserve groundwater and/or aquifer quality, the list of acceptable antifreezes varies among those states with specified fluids. Typical antifreezes in use include ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, brines, alcohols, and potassium acetate. Each of these has its benefits and drawbacks. The status of the regulations has been determined for all of the states. An overview of the regulations is presented in this paper, along with a summary of the states` concerns.

  8. Overview of ground coupled heat pump research and technology transfer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, V. D.; Mei, V. C.

    Highlights of DOE-sponsored ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are presented. ORNL, in cooperation with Niagara Mohawk Power Company, Climate Master, Inc., and Brookhaven National Laboratory developed and demonstrated an advanced GCHP design concept with shorter ground coils that can reduce installed costs for northern climates. In these areas it can also enhance the competitiveness of GCHP systems versus air-source heat pumps by lowering their payback from 6 to 7 years to 3 to 5 years. Ground coil heat exchanger models (based primarily on first principles) have been developed and used by others to generate less conservative ground coil sizing methods. An aggressive technology transfer initiative was undertaken to publicize results of this research and make it available to the industry. Included in this effort were an international workshop, trade press releases and articles, and participation in a live teleconference on GCHP technology.

  9. Thermal performance of soils and backfills in horizontal ground coupled heat pump system applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The goal of this research was to address the appropriateness of different soils, in an unsaturated state, for placement adjacent to the buried heat exchanger for GSHP systems. Soils for the study were selected based on an analysis of common soil parent materials that exist in the US in conjunction with the current EPRI soil thermal classification system. Six soils were chosen (Cecil (clay), Fordville (sand), Kranzburg (loam), Moody (silt), Sharpsburg (silt) and Vienna (sandy loam)) which provided at least one soil in each of the EPRI classifications. Initial laboratory studies were concentrated on determination of basic physical, water holding and thermal properties of each soil. Each soil was evaluated for ability to sustain thermal contact conductance under thermal loading, and comparison of the results allowed the soils to be ranked, best to worst. Additional laboratory studies were performed on each soil to rate the long-term thermal performance of each relative to potential for drying adjacent to the heat exchanger along with reduction in heat transfer rate due to soil drying. Tests were conducted over a range of initial water contents and densities that would be common for each soil. Results were used to verify a theoretical analysis of the thermal stability of each soil, based on texture, and to rank each soil according to thermal performance under extended thermal load. Results of the thermal conductivity tests, the thermal contact conductance tests and the thermal performance tests were utilized to propose a thermal performance index (TPI) for soils based on texture. The final soil ranking were then expressed relative to the EPRI soil thermal classification system which identified clay as best, followed by loam, sandy loam, silt, and sand.

  10. Mitigation potential of horizontal ground coupled heat pumps for current and future climatic conditions: UK environmental modelling and monitoring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García González, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Gan, Guohui; Wu, Yupeng; Hughes, Andrew; Mansour, Majdi; Blyth, Eleanor; Finch, Jon; Main, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    An increased uptake of alternative low or non-CO2 emitting energy sources is one of the key priorities for policy makers to mitigate the effects of environmental change. Relatively little work has been undertaken on the mitigation potential of Ground Coupled Heat Pumps (GCHPs) despite the fact that a GCHP could significantly reduce CO2 emissions from heating systems. It is predicted that under climate change the most probable scenario is for UK temperatures to increase and for winter rainfall to become more abundant; the latter is likely to cause a general rise in groundwater levels. Summer rainfall may reduce considerably, while vegetation type and density may change. Furthermore, recent studies underline the likelihood of an increase in the number of heat waves. Under such a scenario, GCHPs will increasingly be used for cooling as well as heating. These factors will affect long-term performance of horizontal GCHP systems and hence their economic viability and mitigation potential during their life span ( 50 years). The seasonal temperature differences encountered in soil are harnessed by GCHPs to provide heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. The performance of a GCHP system will depend on technical factors (heat exchanger (HE) type, length, depth, and spacing of pipes), but also it will be determined to a large extent by interactions between the below-ground parts of the system and the environment (atmospheric conditions, vegetation and soil characteristics). Depending on the balance between extraction and rejection of heat from and to the ground, the soil temperature in the neighbourhood of the HE may fall or rise. The GROMIT project (GROund coupled heat pumps MITigation potential), funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (UK), is a multi-disciplinary research project, in collaboration with EarthEnergy Ltd., which aims to quantify the CO2 mitigation potential of horizontal GCHPs. It considers changing environmental conditions and combines

  11. Development of a Validated Model of Ground Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) studies ground coupling, the use of the earth as a heat source/sink or storage element for solar heat pump space conditioning systems. This paper outlines the analytical and experimental research to date toward the development of an experimentally validated model of ground coupling and based on experimental results from December, 1978 to September, 1979, expores sensitivity of present model predictions to variations in thermal conductivity and other factors. Ways in which the model can be further refined are discussed.

  12. Vertical integration of thermally activated heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Many thermally activated heat pump systems are being developed along technology lines, such as, engine-driven and absorption heat pumps. Their thermal performances are temperature dependent. Based on the temperature-dependent behavior of heat pump cycle performance and the energy cascading idea, the concept of vertically integrating various thermally activated heat pump technologies to maximize resources utilization is explored. Based on a preliminary analysis, it is found that integrating a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to an engine-driven heat pump could improve its cooling performance by 36% and integrating an ejector to it could improve its cooling performance by 20%. The added advantage of an ejector-coupled engine-driven heat pump is its system simplicity which should result in equipment cost savings.

  13. Ground-coupling techniques for cooling in desert regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, T. L.

    1981-04-01

    Results compiled from a parametric study of several variables that effect ground-coupling techniques for buildings in hot, arid regions are discussed. Finite difference models were devised and analyzed by the computer program SPICE to quantify these effects. Earlier results showed that berming or burying a structure to a depth of 3.6 m and insulating only the roof plane reduce the cooling load by 40% and virtually eliminate the heating load compared to a well-insulated building on the surface. Soil isotherm contours and heat flux results from surface and earth-integrated buildings are presented to further compare their thermal behavior.

  14. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  15. Convective heat transfer around vertical jet fires: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kozanoglu, Bulent; Zárate, Luis; Gómez-Mares, Mercedes; Casal, Joaquim

    2011-12-15

    The convection heat transfer phenomenon in vertical jet fires was experimentally analyzed. In these experiments, turbulent propane flames were generated in subsonic as well as sonic regimes. The experimental data demonstrated that the rate of convection heat transfer increases by increasing the length of the flame. Assuming the solid flame model, the convection heat transfer coefficient was calculated. Two equations in terms of adimensional numbers were developed. It was found out that the Nusselt number attains greater values for higher values of the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. On the other hand, the Froude number was analyzed only for the subsonic flames where the Nusselt number grows by this number and the diameter of the orifice. PMID:21962859

  16. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}. PMID:27300823

  17. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu˜Pr1/4Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1/2Ra1/2 for Pr≪1 and Nu˜Pr0Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1Ra1/2 for Pr≫1 . These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 10-2 to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10-1.

  18. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  19. Vertical extension of the urban heat island above Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokoshchenko, M. A.; Korneva, I. A.; Kochin, A. V.; Dubovetsky, A. Z.; Novitsky, M. A.; Razin, P. Ye.

    2016-01-01

    The vertical extension of the urban "heat island" (UHI) has been studied on the basis of long-term data of contact air temperature measurements at three places for the example of Moscow. The existence of steady thermal anomaly related to the city in the form of a UHI in the surface layer at any time of the day and also the existence of a cold layer over it at heights higher than 100 m at night were confirmed. The mean daily altitudinal extension of this anomaly is approximately 300 m.

  20. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  1. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Effect of the heating surface enhancement on the heat transfer coefficient for a vertical minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to estimate effect of the heating surface enhancement on FC-72 flow boiling heat transfer for a vertical minichannel 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. Two types of enhanced heating surfaces were used: one with minicavities distributed unevenly, and the other with capillary metal fibrous structure. It was to measure temperature field on the plain side of the heating surface by means of the infrared thermography and to observe the two-phase flow patterns on the enhanced foil side. The paper analyses mainly the impact of the microstructured heating surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as heat transfer coefficient dependences on the distance along the minichannel length. The data obtained using two types of enhanced heating surfaces in experiments was compared with the data when smooth foil as the heating surface was used. The highest local values of heat transfer coefficient were obtained using enhanced foil with minicavities - in comparison to other cases. Local values of heat transfer coefficient received for capillary fibrous structure were the lowest, even compared with data obtained for smooth foil. Probably this porous structure caused local flow disturbances.

  3. Forced convection heat transfer of saturated liquid hydrogen in vertically-mounted heated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayasi, Hiroaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from the inner side of vertically-mounted heated pipes to forced flow of saturated liquid hydrogen was measured with a quasi-steady increase of a heat generation rate for wide ranges of flow rate and saturated pressure. The tube heaters have lengths L of 100 mm and 167 mm with the diameter D of 4 mm and lengths of 150 mm and 250 mm with the diameter of 6 mm. The heat fluxes at departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) were higher for higher flow velocity, lower pressures and shorter L/D. The effect of L/D on the DNB heat flux was clarified. It is confirmed that our DNB correlation can describe the experimental data.

  4. Heat and mass transfer in a vertical channel under heat-gravitational convection conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrichenko, Michail; Nemova, Darya; Reich, Elisaveta; Subbotina, Svetlana; Khayrutdinova, Faina

    2016-03-01

    Heat-gravitational motion of an air flow in a vertical channel with one-sided heating in an area with low Reynolds number is stated in Boussinesq approximation. Hydraulic variables field in a heat-gravitational motion is modeled with the application of ANSYS-FLUENT. It is converted to average velocity and temperature values in a cross section of the channel. The value of an average velocity is determined by rate of heat supply in a barotropic flow with a polytropic coefficient nvertical channel with free air access and in the absence of gaps. In a channel with closed air access inleakage of the cold air through gaps on an unheated side leads to decrease in an average speed at least twice in comparison to channel with free air access.

  5. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  6. Pulse-Heated Vertical Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Keith Edward

    1995-01-01

    Determination of plasma parameters in tokamak experiments is of primary importance for learning to control and optimize fusion plasmas. Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics play an important role in these experiments and are planned for future test reactors, since they require only simple collecting optics in the harsh reactor environment. A novel diagnostic system, which extracts information about plasma parameters by examining the ECE resulting from a perturbation of the plasma, was examined and applied on the PBX-M tokamak. This diagnostic uses a brief pulse of power from the lower hybrid current drive system to create a population of superthermal electrons. These electrons evolve according to the Fokker-Planck equation, which involves dependences on the magnetic field pitch, ion charge state, background density, and electric field. Coincident with the evolution of the electrons is the evolution of their ECE radiation. The diagnostic exploits the fact that the temporal changes in the radiation are dependent upon those parameters which affect the electrons. The analysis method, which compares measured experimental signal with simulated radiation (as functions of frequency and time) and determines most probable plasma parameter values, was computationally tested for effectiveness and robustness. The method was extended to include determination of parameters of the lower hybrid current drive power deposition. A measurement system, based on a grating polychromator, was assembled, tested, and calibrated, and pulse-heated vertical ECE data were collected from the PBX-M tokamak. A proof-of-principle test of the diagnostic yielded positive results, resulting in information about the lower hybrid current drive deposition location.

  7. A traceable physical calibration of the vertical advection-diffusion equation for modeling ocean heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Markus; Tailleux, Remi; Ferreira, David; Kuhlbrodt, Till; Gregory, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The classic vertical advection-diffusion (VAD) balance is a central concept in studying the ocean heat budget, in particular in simple climate models (SCMs). Here we present a new framework to calibrate the parameters of the VAD equation to the vertical ocean heat balance of two fully-coupled climate models that is traceable to the models' circulation as well as to vertical mixing and diffusion processes. Based on temperature diagnostics, we derive an effective vertical velocity w∗ and turbulent diffusivity kν∗ for each individual physical process. In steady state, we find that the residual vertical velocity and diffusivity change sign in middepth, highlighting the different regional contributions of isopycnal and diapycnal diffusion in balancing the models' residual advection and vertical mixing. We quantify the impacts of the time evolution of the effective quantities under a transient 1% CO2 simulation and make the link to the parameters of currently employed SCMs.

  8. Residential vertical geothermal heat pump system models: Calibration to data

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.; Pahud, D.; Hellstroem, G.A.J.

    1997-12-31

    A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was tuned to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnected to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonstrate its capabilities.

  9. Residential Vertical Geothermal Heat Pump System Models: Calibration to Data:

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Jeff W.; McDowell, T. P.; Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Pahud, D.; Hellstrom, G.

    1997-06-01

    A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was 'tuned' to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnect to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonatrate its capabilities.

  10. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  11. Vertical heat flux in the ocean: Estimates from observations and from a coupled general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Masson, Diane; Saenko, Oleg A.

    2016-06-01

    The net heat uptake by the ocean in a changing climate involves small imbalances between the advective and diffusive processes that transport heat vertically. Generally, it is necessary to rely on global climate models to study these processes in detail. In the present study, it is shown that a key component of the vertical heat flux, namely that associated with the large-scale mean vertical circulation, can be diagnosed over extra-tropical regions from global observational data sets. This component is estimated based on the vertical velocity obtained from the geostrophic vorticity balance, combined with estimates of absolute geostrophic flow. Results are compared with the output of a non-eddy resolving, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Reasonable agreement is found in the latitudinal distribution of the vertical heat flux, as well as in the area-integrated flux below about 250 m depth. The correspondence with the coupled model deteriorates sharply at depths shallower than 250 m due to the omission of equatorial regions from the calculation. The vertical heat flux due to the mean circulation is found to be dominated globally by the downward contribution from the Southern Hemisphere, in particular the Southern Ocean. This is driven by the Ekman vertical velocity which induces an upward transport of seawater that is cold relative to the horizontal average at a given depth. The results indicate that the dominant characteristics of the vertical transport of heat due to the mean circulation can be inferred from simple linear vorticity dynamics over much of the ocean.

  12. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer in a porous medium embedded with vertical flat plate is investigated by using thermal non-equilibrium model. Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside porous medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by natural convection and radiation. The vertical plate is maintained at isothermal temperature. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method. Results are presented in terms of isotherms and streamlines for various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio, and radiation parameter

  13. Instabilities and pattern evolution in a vertically heated annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, BoFu; Guo, ZhiWei; Ma, DongJun; Sun, DeJun

    2013-02-01

    The convection in an annular container with heated bottom, cooled top and insulated side walls are studied by both linear instability analysis and direct numerical simulation. The onset of convection is investigated by linear stability analysis and corresponding pattern selection mechanisms are discussed. The nonlinear evolution of different flow patterns and the convective heat transfer are simulated. The transition to oscillatory flow is also given by stability analysis where the base flow is a steady three dimensional flow. The stability predictions are in good agreement with the numerical simulations, including both the growth rate and the dimensionless frequency.

  14. Estimation of the average surface heat flux over an inhomogeneous terrain from the vertical velocity variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Evans, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    An indirect method of estimating the surface heat flux from observations of vertical velocity variance at the lower mid-levels of the convective atmospheric boundary layer is described. Comparison of surface heat flux estimates with those from boundary-layer heating rates is good, and this method seems to be especially suitable for inhomogeneous terrain for which the surface-layer profile method cannot be used.

  15. Computer cooling using a two phase minichannel thermosyphon loop heated from horizontal and vertical sides and cooled from vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper it is proposed to consider the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop. A closed thermosyphon loop consists of combined two heaters and a cooler connected to each other by tubes. The first heater may be a CPU processor located on the motherboard of the personal computer. The second heater may be a chip of a graphic card placed perpendicular to the motherboard of personal computer. The cooler can be placed above the heaters on the computer chassis. The thermosyphon cooling system on the use of computer can be modeled using the rectangular thermosyphon loop with minichannels heated at the bottom horizontal side and the bottom vertical side and cooled at the upper vertical side. The riser and a downcomer connect these parts. A one-dimensional model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. The separate two-phase flow model is used in calculations. A numerical investigation for the analysis of the mass flux rate and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been accomplished.

  16. MHD natural convection flow along a vertical wavy surface with heat generation and pressure work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, M. A.; Kabir, K. H.; Andallah, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of pressure work on MHD natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid along a uniformly heated vertical wavy surface with heat generation has been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are first transformed into a non-dimensional form using suitable set of dimensionless variables. The resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations are mapped into the domain of a vertical flat plate and then solved numerically employing the implicit finite difference method, known as Keller-box scheme. The numerical results for the velocity profiles, temperature profiles, skin friction coefficient, the rate of heat transfers, the streamlines and the isotherms are shown graphically and skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer have been shown in tabular form for different values of the selective set of parameters consisting of pressure work parameter Ge, the magnetic parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, heat generation parameter Q and the amplitude of the wavy surface.

  17. Interaction of radiation and free convection on a heated vertical plate - Experiment and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been conducted in order to explore the interaction between laminar free convective and radiative transport from an isolated vertical plate with isoflux heating. The analysis focuses on buoyancy-driven free convection from this vertical plate which is coupled to radiation through the thermal boundary condition. Model predictions are compared with both experimental results and the analysis conducted by Cess (1964), in order to illustrate those areas where the perturbation technique deviated from the present solution.

  18. Pool boiling heat transfer from vertical heater array in liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C.J.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    The heat transfer from an array of discrete sources is expected to differ from the behavior of a single heat source due to the interaction between the flow induced by individual heat sources. This study details the results from experiments conducted to study the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics from a vertical heater array with flush-mounted heat sources. The lower heaters were found to enhance the heat transfer from upper heaters. The bubble pumped convection due to the lower heaters enhanced the preboiling heat transfer coefficient at the upper heater by as much as 700%. The critical heat flux from the upper heaters was also enhanced up to 15%. Correlations are presented for both these effects. 21 refs.

  19. Transient conjugated mixed-convective heat transfer in a vertical plate channel with one wall heated discretely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, Y. L.

    This study presents a numerical solution of the unsteady conjugated mixed-convection heat transfer in a vertical plate channel with one wall suddenly subjected to either isoflux or isothermal discrete heat sources. The effects of the dimensionless heat source length H1, the dimensionless spacing between heat sources H2, the dimensionless channel length L, the dimensionless heated-plate thickness Bl, the wall-to-fluid conductivity ratio K and the ratio of Grashof number to Reynolds number Gr/Re on the interface heat flux, Nusselt number and bulk fluid temperature are discussed in detail. Results show that the discrete heating can cause the heat transfer direction conversely from the fluid to the heated plate during the transient period, which is more significant for the cases with larger L and H2. For the system with isoflux discrete heat sources, the time required to reach the steady-state is shorter for larger H2. While the trend is reverse for system with isothermal discrete heat sources. Additionally, a higher ratio of the input energy is axially conducted through the plate wall from heated sections to unheated regions for a larger H2 and Bl or smaller L.

  20. Vertical heat fluxes through the Beaufort Sea Thermohaline staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, Laurie; Dillon, Thomas M.

    1987-09-01

    Microstructure profiles of temperature, conductivity, and velocity shear during the Arctic Internal Wave Experiment (AIWEX) in March-April 1985 in the Beaufort Sea are used to investigate the thermodynamic processes in a diffusive thermohaline staircase. The staircase occurs between depths of about 320 and 430 m, above the core of the relatively warm, salty Atlantic water, where the mean temperature and salinity are increasing with depth. Individual isothermal layers can be tracked for at least several hours, suggesting a horizontal length scale of several hundred meters or more, assuming a typical relative velocity of 0.01 m s-1 at this time. Over the depth range 320-430 m the mean (average over several steps) density ratio = β varies between 4 and 6, while the typical temperature difference between layers decreases from 0.012° to 0.004°C. The mean thickness of the layers also varies, from 1 m at 320 m depth to 2 m at 430 m. The relationship proposed by Kelley (1984), relating layer height to , , and molecular properties of the fluid, overestimates the mean layer thickness by about a factor of 2. The variability of staircase characteristics suggests that oceanic staircases may rarely, if ever, be steady state, but in general be slowly evolving from previous perturbations. Heat fluxes estimated from laboratory-based flux laws, involving Rρ and ΔT, are in the range 0.02 heat fluxes through the maximum interfacial temperature gradients. There are no interfaces where the kinetic energy dissipation rate (averaged over 0.5 m) exceeds the lower limit for diapycnal mixing, 24.5νN2.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Free-Convection Heat Transfer in Vertical Tube at Large Grashof Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to study free-convection heat transfer in a stationary vertical tube closed at the bottom. The walls of the tube were heated, and heated air in the tube was continuously replaced by fresh cool air at the top. The tube was designed to provide a gravitational field with Grashof numbers of a magnitude comparable with those generated by the centrifugal field in rotating-blade coolant passages (10(8) to 10(13)). Local heat-transfer coefficients in the turbulent-flow range and the temperature field within the fluid were obtained.

  2. Experimental study on condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A in short vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenyun; Jia, Li; Tan, Zetao

    2015-06-01

    An experimental study on condensation heat transfer of R410A in short vertical tubes (8.02 mm ID and 10.7mm ID) was presented. Experiments were performed in eight short copper tubes length varied from 300mm to 600mm at mass fluxes range of 58-246 kg m-2s-1 and saturation temperature of 38°C. Effects of mass flux, tube length on condensation heat transfer coefficient were investigated. The distribution of temperature, thickness of condensate film and local condensation heat transfer coefficient along the tube were also analyzed. It is indicated that the entrance effect played an important role in condensation heat transfer of vertical tube, and the influence of entrance effect on average condensation heat transfer coefficients will weaken with the length of tube in the experimental condensation. The experimental results were compared with four well known correlations available in literatures, and the Chen correlation shows good agreement with the experimental data but with ±40% deviation. A new modified condensation heat transfer correlation with 12.7% mean deviation was developed to predict the condensation heat transfer coefficients in short vertical tube based on the experimental data.

  3. Heat-transfer characteristics of climbing film evaporation in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luopeng; Chen, Xue; Shen, Shengqiang

    2010-09-15

    Heat-transfer characteristics of climbing film evaporation were experimentally investigated on a vertical climbing film evaporator heated by tube-outside hot water. The experimental setup was designed for determining the effect of the height of feed water inside a vertical tube and the range of temperature difference on local heat transfer coefficient inside a vertical tube (h{sub i}). In this setup, the height of feed water was successfully controlled and the polypropylene shell effectively impedes the heat loss to the ground. The results indicated that a reduction in the height of feed water contributed to a significant increase in h{sub i} if no dry patches around the wall of the heated tube appeared inside the tube. The height ratio of feed water R{sub h} = 0.3 was proposed as the optimal one as dry patches destroyed the continuous climbing film when R{sub h} is under 0.3. It was found that the minimum temperature difference driving climbing film evaporation is suggested as 5 C due to a sharp reduction in h{sub i} for temperature difference below 5 C. The experiment also showed that h{sub i} increased with an increase in temperature difference, which proved the superiority of climbing film evaporation in utilizing low-grade surplus heating source due to its wide range of driving temperature difference. The experimental results were compared with the previous literature and demonstrated a satisfactory agreement. (author)

  4. Heat transfer analysis in a two-side heated smooth square vertical channel with adverse and favorable mixed convection

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Zhang, X.; Khan, J.A.; Bell, D.

    1997-07-01

    Experimental heat transfer measurements and analysis for mixed convection in a vertical square channel are presented. The flow direction is changed with respect to the earth's gravity field by selectively opening and closing the flow control valves. Desired flow directions are selected such that buoyancy assists or opposes the bulk flow direction pressure gradient. The heating condition is asymmetric. Most previous experiments used symmetrically heated circular tubes. Present configuration shows significant increase in the Nusselt number in both assisted and opposed flow conditions. In general, opposed flow shows higher heat transfer coefficients. Unlike symmetric heating conditions, Nusselt number ratio is observed to be increasing with increasing Gr/Re or Gr/Re{sup 2} ratios for both assisted and opposed flow conditions.

  5. The Reynolds analogy for the mixed convection over a vertical surface with prescribed heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyari, E.; Pop, I.

    2009-03-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface with prescribed heat flux is revisited in this Note. The subset of solutions which can be obtained with the aid of the Reynolds analogy is discussed in a close relationship with the dual solutions reported by Merkin and Mahmood [1] for impermeable, and more recently by Ishak et al. [2], for permeable surfaces.

  6. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  7. Heat transfer effects in vertically emplaced high level nuclear waste container

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.; Lei, Y.M.

    1994-05-01

    Modeling free convection heat transfer in an cylindrical annular enclosure is still an active area of research and an important problem to be addressed in the high level nuclear waste repository. For the vertically emplaced waste container, the air gap which is between the container shell and the rock borehole, have an important role of dissipating heat to surrounding rack. These waste containers are vertically emplaced in the borehole 300 meters below ground, and in a horizontal grid of 30 {times} 8 meters apart. The borehole will be capped after the container emplacement. The expected initial heat generated is between 3--4.74 kW per container depending on the type of waste. The goal of this study is to use a computer simulation model to find the borehole wall, air-gap and the container outer wall temperature distributions.

  8. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical channel in evaporating a heated falling glycols liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nait Alla, Abderrahman; Feddaoui, M'barek; Meftah, Hicham

    2015-12-01

    The interactive effects of heat and mass transfer in the evaporation of ethylene and propylene glycol flowing as falling films on vertical channel was investigated. The liquid film falls along a left plate which is externally subjected to a uniform heat flux while the right plate is the dry wall and is kept thermally insulated. The model solves the coupled governing equations in both phases together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by Tridiagonal Matrix Algorithm. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied glycols and water in the same conditions is made. The results indicate that water evaporates in more intense way in comparison to glycols and the increase of gas flow rate tends to improve slightly the evaporation.

  9. Experimental study on flow boiling heat transfer of LNG in a vertical smooth tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-10-01

    An experimental apparatus is set up in this work to study the upward flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of LNG (liquefied natural gas) in vertical smooth tubes with inner diameters of 8 mm and 14 mm. The experiments were performed at various inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa. The results were obtained over the mass flux range from 16 to 200 kg m-2 s-1 and heat fluxes ranging from 8.0 to 32 kW m-2. The influences of quality, heat flux and mass flux, tube diameter on the heat transfer characteristic are examined and discussed. The comparisons of the experimental heat transfer coefficients with the predicted values from the existing correlations are analyzed. The correlation by Zou et al. [16] shows the best accuracy with the RMS deviation of 31.7% in comparison with the experimental data.

  10. Effects of confining walls on heat transfer from a vertical array of isothermal horizontal elliptic cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, T.; Paknezhad, M.; Ashjaee, M.; Yazdani, S.

    2009-09-15

    Steady state two-dimensional natural convection heat transfer from the vertical array of five horizontal isothermal elliptic cylinders with vertical major axis which confined between two adiabatic walls has been studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The Rayleigh number based on cylinder major axis was in the range 10{sup 3}{<=}Ra{<=}2.5 x 10{sup 3}, and dimensionless wall spacing 1.5{<=} t/b{<=}9 and infinity. The effect of wall spacing and Rayleigh number on the heat transfer from the individual cylinder and the array were investigated. Experiments are performed for ratio wall spacing to major diameter t/b = 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and infinity. A correlation based on the experimental data for the average Nusselt number of the array as a function of Ra and t/b is presented in the aforementioned ranges. A relation has been derived for optimum wall spacing at which the Nusselt number of the array attains its maximum value. At optimum wall spacing, approximately 10% increase in the heat transfer from the confined array of elliptic cylinders has been observed as compared to the unconfined case. Also, a heat transfer correlation has been proposed for a single elliptic cylinder with vertical major axis and has been compared with earlier works. (author)

  11. Fundamental Study of Local Heat Transfer in Forced Convective Boiling of Ammonia on Vertical Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hun; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    In the present study, the fundamental experiments that investigate characteristics of local heat transfer in forced convective boiling on vertical flat plate with 2-mm channel height are taken to realize plate type compact evaporator for OTEC or STEC. The experiments are performed with ammonia as the working fluid. The experiments are also carried out with the following test conditions; saturated pressure = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 MPa, mass flux = 7.5, 10, 15 kg/(m2•s), heat flux = 15, 20, 25 kW/m2 and inlet quality = 0.1 ~ 0.4 [-]. The result shows that the wall superheated temperature of forced convective boiling is lower than that of pool boiling. And the heat transfer coefficient increases with an increase in quality and the decrease in the local heat flux and saturated pressure for prescribed experimental conditions. However, local heat transfer coefficients are not affected by mass fluxes in the prescribed experimental conditions. An empirical correlation that can predict the local heat transfer coefficient on vertical flat plate within experimental conditions is also proposed.

  12. Heat transfer to water from a vertical tube bundle under natural-circulation conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszczynski, M.J.; Viskanta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The natural circulation heat transfer data for longitudinal flow of water outside a vertical rod bundle are needed for developing correlations which can be used in best estimate computer codes to model thermal-hydraulic behavior of nuclear reactor cores under accident or shutdown conditions. The heat transfer coefficient between the fuel rod surface and the coolant is the key parameter required to predict the fuel temperature. Because of the absence of the required heat transfer coefficient data base under natural circulation conditions, experiments have been performed in a natural circulation loop. A seven-tube bundle having a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 was used as a test heat exchanger. A circulating flow was established in the loop, because of buoyancy differences between its two vertical legs. Steady-state and transient heat transfer measurements have been made over as wide a range of thermal conditions as possible with the system. Steady state heat transfer data were correlated in terms of relevant dimensionless parameters. Empirical correlations for the average Nusselt number, in terms of Reynolds number, Rayleigh number and the ratio of Grashof to Reynolds number are given.

  13. Impact of cosmological satellites on the vertical heating of the Milky Way disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moetazedian, R.; Just, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a high-resolution study of the impact of realistic satellite galaxies, extracted from cosmological simulations of Milky Way haloes including 6 Aquarius suites and Via Lactea II, on the dynamics of the Galactic disc. The initial conditions for the multicomponent Milky Way galaxy were generated using the GALIC code, to ensure a system in dynamical equilibrium state prior to addition of satellites. Candidate subhaloes that came closer than 25 kpc to the centre of the host dark matter haloes with initial mass enclosed within the tidal radius, Mtid ≥ 108 M⊙ = 0.003 Mdisc, were identified, inserted into our high-resolution N-body simulations and evolved for 2 Gyr. We quantified the vertical heating due to such impacts by measuring the disc thickness and squared vertical velocity dispersion σ z2 across the disc. According to our analysis, the strength of heating is strongly dependent on the high-mass end of the subhalo distribution from cosmological simulations. The mean increase of the vertical dispersion is ˜20 km2 s-2 Gyr-1 for R > 4 kpc with a flat radial profile while, excluding Aq-F2 results, the mean heating is < 12 km2 s-2 Gyr-1, corresponding to 28 and 17 per cent of the observed vertical heating rate in the solar neighbourhood. Taking into account the statistical dispersion around the mean, we miss the observed heating rate by more than 3σ. We observed a general flaring of the disc height in the case of all seven simulations in the outer disc.

  14. Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, J.L.; Lutz, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Residential water heating is an important consideration in California?s building energy efficiency standard. Explicit treatment of ground-coupled hot water piping is one of several planned improvements to the standard. The properties of water, piping, insulation, backfill materials, concrete slabs, and soil, their interactions, and their variations with temperature and over time are important considerations in the required supporting analysis. Heat transfer algorithms and models devised for generalized, hot water distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heat exchanger, nuclear waste repository, buried oil pipeline, and underground electricity transmission cable applications can be adapted to the simulation of under-slab water piping. A numerical model that permits detailed examination of and broad variations in many inputs while employing a technique to conserve computer run time is recommended.

  15. The effect of conjugate heat transfer on MHD mixed convection about a vertical slender hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ahmet

    2011-04-01

    The problem of steady laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection heat transfer about a vertical slender hollow cylinder is studied numerically, under the effect of wall conduction. A uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylinder. The non-similar solutions using the Keller box method are obtained. The wall conduction parameter, the magnetic parameter and the Richardson number are the main parameters. For various values of these parameters the local skin friction and local heat transfer parameters are determined. The validity of the methodology is checked by comparing the results with those available in the open literature and a fairly good agreement is observed. Finally, it is determined that the local skin friction and the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase the magnetic parameter Mn and buoyancy parameter Ri and decrease with conjugate heat transfer parameter p.

  16. Vortex ring head-on collision with a heated vertical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, G.; Hernández, R. H.; Nicot, C.; Plaza, F.

    2007-08-01

    We report experimental results of the normal impact of a vortex ring in air on a vertical heated plate at constant temperature. We address the case in which the natural convection boundary layer is laminar and the vortex ring is stable. Vortex rings are created by pushing air through a circular exit orifice of a cavity, using a piston-cylinder system. The impinging vortex ring perturbs both the thermal and dynamical boundary layers where we measure the total heat flux exchanged by the heated plate and visualize the vortex motion during the impact. This unsteady impingement process is investigated for different vortex sizes and self-induced velocities, characterized by the Reynolds number of the ring. As a result, a localized heat transfer enhancement is originated by the ring impingement, which increases with the Reynolds number.

  17. Unsteady Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of a Casson Fluid past an Oscillating Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating

    PubMed Central

    Hussanan, Abid; Zuki Salleh, Mohd; Tahar, Razman Mat; Khan, Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the heat transfer effect on the unsteady boundary layer flow of a Casson fluid past an infinite oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating is investigated. The governing equations are transformed to a systems of linear partial differential equations using appropriate non-dimensional variables. The resulting equations are solved analytically by using the Laplace transform method and the expressions for velocity and temperature are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some well-known solutions for Newtonian fluids. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, skin friction and Nusselt number are shown in various graphs and discussed for embedded flow parameters. It is found that velocity decreases as Casson parameters increases and thermal boundary layer thickness increases with increasing Newtonian heating parameter. PMID:25302782

  18. Augmentation of heat transfer in a bubble agitated vertical rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Asish; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Ghosh, Dibyendu Narayan

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of convective heat transfer between three parallel vertical plates symmetrically spaced with and without bubble agitation to ascertain the degree of augmentation of the heat transfer coefficients due to agitation. The centre plate was electrically heated, while the other side plates were water-cooled forming two successive parallel vertical rectangular channels of dimensions 20 cm × 3.5 cm × 35 cm (length W, gap L, height H) each. At the bottom of the hot and cold plates air spargers were fitted. Water/ethylene glycol (100%) was used to fill the channels. The superficial gas velocity ranged from 0.0016 to 0.01 m/s. Top, bottom and sides of the channels were open to the water/ethylene glycol in the chamber which is the novel aspect of this study. Experimental data have been correlated as under: Natural convective heat transfer: Nu = 0.60 Gr 0.29, r = 0.96, σ = 0.186, 1.17 E6 < Gr < 1.48 E7; Bubble agitated heat transfer: St = 0.11( ReFrPr 2)-0.23, r = 0.82, σ = 0.002, 1.20 E-2 < ( ReFrPr 2) < 1.36 E2.

  19. Experimental study on condensation heat transfer of steam on vertical titanium plates with different surface energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baojin, Qi; Li, Zhang; Hong, Xu; Yan, Sun

    2011-01-15

    Visual experiments were employed to investigate heat transfer characteristics of steam on vertical titanium plates with/without surface modifications for different surface energies. Stable dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation were achieved on two surface modification titanium plates, respectively. Dropwise and rivulet filmwise co-existing condensation form of steam was observed on unmodified titanium surfaces. With increase in the surface subcooling, the ratio of area ({eta}) covered by drops decreased and departure diameter of droplets increased, resulting in a decrease in condensation heat transfer coefficient. Condensation heat transfer coefficient decreased sharply with the values of {eta} decreasing when the fraction of the surface area covered by drops was greater than that covered by rivulets. Otherwise, the value of {eta} had little effect on the heat transfer performance. Based on the experimental phenomena observed, the heat flux through the surface was proposed to express as the sum of the heat flux through the dropwise region and rivulet filmwise region. The heat flux through the whole surface was the weighted mean value of the two regions mentioned above. The model presented explains the gradual change of heat transfer coefficient for transition condensation with the ratio of area covered by drops. The simulation results agreed well with the present experimental data when the subcooling temperature is lower than 10 C. (author)

  20. Vertical disc heating in Milky Way-sized galaxies in a cosmological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Springel, Volker; Gómez, Facundo A.; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Campbell, David J. R.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    Vertically extended, high velocity dispersion stellar distributions appear to be a ubiquitous feature of disc galaxies, and both internal and external mechanisms have been proposed to be the major driver of their formation. However, it is unclear to what extent each mechanism can generate such a distribution, which is likely to depend on the assembly history of the galaxy. To this end, we perform 16 high-resolution cosmological-zoom simulations of Milky Way-sized galaxies using the state-of-the-art cosmological magnetohydrodynamical code AREPO, and analyse the evolution of the vertical kinematics of the stellar disc in connection with various heating mechanisms. We find that the bar is the dominant heating mechanism in most cases, whereas spiral arms, radial migration and adiabatic heating from mid-plane density growth are all subdominant. The strongest source, though less prevalent than bars, originates from external perturbations from satellites/subhaloes of masses log10(M/M⊙) ≳ 10. However, in many simulations the orbits of newborn star particles become cooler with time, such that they dominate the shape of the age-velocity dispersion relation and overall vertical disc structure unless a strong external perturbation takes place.

  1. The global response to vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation derived from TRMM estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Woolnough, S.; Inness, P.

    2013-12-01

    The anomalous global atmospheric circulation associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is examined using composite vertical anomalous diabatic heating structures based on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates and reanalysis datasets and integrating a primitive equations model. Variations in the dynamical response from the observational and reanalysis products are investigated in relation to the detailed structure of the vertical structure of heating of the MJO, with specific focus of the role of the westward tilting with altitude in the heating, clearly evident in three reanalysis heating structures but is less well pronounced in the TRMM heating structures. It was found that the atmospheric response to the reanalysis heatings were far more consistent compared to the responses from the TRMM heating estimates. Examination of the moisture flux during the main active phase of the MJO revealed a surplus in moisture convergence ahead of the anomalous heating from each of the reanalysis integrations, which was found to be directly attributed to the vertical tilt in heating structure. In contrast, the response to the TRMM heatings showed no phase shift in moisture convergence in relation to the convective heating and was understood to be a consequence of the weaker representation of vertical tilting in heating structure. It was suggested that the westward tilt in heating could therefore play an important role in promoting convection east of the main heating region. The dynamical response to composite vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the MJO from simulations with Unified Model (UM) HadGEM3 with standard and enhanced (x1.5) entrainment rates are also examined to investigate the relationship between the dynamical response to the heating profile and quality of MJO simulations.

  2. Natural convection on a vertical plate in a saturated porous medium with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.; Sriti, M.; Achemlal, D.

    2014-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to re-exam a class of exact solutions for the two-dimensional free convection boundary layers induced by a heated vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with an exponential decaying heat generation. The temperature distribution of the plate has been assumed to vary as a power of the axial coordinate measured from the leading edge of the plate and subjected to an applied lateral mass flux. The boundary layer equations are solved analytically and numerically using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme coupled with the shooting iteration method. As for the classical problem without internal heat generation, it is proved that multiple (unbounded) solutions arise for any and for any suction/injection parameter. For such solutions, the asymptotic behavior as the similarity variable approaches infinity is determined.

  3. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  4. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size. PMID:23391481

  5. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ziya; Harmand, Souad

    2013-02-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size.

  6. Experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics and flow pattern in vertical narrow channels heated from one side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lihao; Li, Gang; Tao, Leren

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation for the flow boiling of water in a vertical rectangular channel was conducted to reveal the boiling heat transfer mechanism and flow patterns map aspects. The onset of nucleate boiling went upward with the increasing of the working fluid mass flow rate or the decreasing of the inlet working fluid temperature. As the vapour quality was increased, the local heat transfer coefficient increased first, then decreased, followed by various flow patterns. The test data from other researchers had a similar pattern transition for the bubble-slug flow and the slug-annular flow. Flow pattern transition model analysis was performed to make the comparison with current test data. The slug-annular and churn-annular transition models showed a close trend with current data except that the vapor phase superficial velocity of flow pattern transition was much higher than that of experimental data.

  7. Heat Transfer in MHD Mixed Convection Flow of a Ferrofluid along a Vertical Channel.

    PubMed

    Gul, Aaiza; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan; Khalid, Asma; Khan, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated heat transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow of ferrofluid along a vertical channel. The channel with non-uniform wall temperatures was taken in a vertical direction with transverse magnetic field. Water with nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) was selected as a conventional base fluid. In addition, non-magnetic (Al2O3) aluminium oxide nanoparticles were also used. Comparison between magnetic and magnetite nanoparticles were also conducted. Fluid motion was originated due to buoyancy force together with applied pressure gradient. The problem was modelled in terms of partial differential equations with physical boundary conditions. Analytical solutions were obtained for velocity and temperature. Graphical results were plotted and discussed. It was found that temperature and velocity of ferrofluids depend strongly on viscosity and thermal conductivity together with magnetic field. The results of the present study when compared concurred with published work. PMID:26550837

  8. Heat Transfer in MHD Mixed Convection Flow of a Ferrofluid along a Vertical Channel

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Aaiza; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan; Khalid, Asma; Khan, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated heat transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow of ferrofluid along a vertical channel. The channel with non-uniform wall temperatures was taken in a vertical direction with transverse magnetic field. Water with nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) was selected as a conventional base fluid. In addition, non-magnetic (Al2O3) aluminium oxide nanoparticles were also used. Comparison between magnetic and magnetite nanoparticles were also conducted. Fluid motion was originated due to buoyancy force together with applied pressure gradient. The problem was modelled in terms of partial differential equations with physical boundary conditions. Analytical solutions were obtained for velocity and temperature. Graphical results were plotted and discussed. It was found that temperature and velocity of ferrofluids depend strongly on viscosity and thermal conductivity together with magnetic field. The results of the present study when compared concurred with published work. PMID:26550837

  9. Two-phase distribution in the vertical flow line of a domestic wet central heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fsadni, A.-M.; Ge, Y. T.

    2013-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of bubble distribution in bubbly two-phase flow are reviewed in the context of the micro bubbles present in a domestic gas fired wet central heating system. The latter systems are mostly operated through the circulation of heated standard tap water through a closed loop circuit which often results in water supersaturated with dissolved air. This leads to micro bubble nucleation at the primary heat exchanger wall, followed by detachment along the flow. Consequently, a bubbly two-phase flow characterises the flow line of such systems. The two-phase distribution across the vertical and horizontal pipes was measured through a consideration of the volumetric void fraction, quantified through photographic techniques. The bubble distribution in the vertical pipe in down flow conditions was measured to be quasi homogenous across the pipe section with a negligible reduction in the void fraction at close proximity to the pipe wall. Such a reduction was more evident at lower bulk fluid velocities.

  10. Potential vertical movement of large heat-generating waste packages in salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Daniel James; Martinez, Mario J.; Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-05-01

    With renewed interest in disposal of heat-generating waste in bedded or domal salt formations, scoping analyses were conducted to estimate rates of waste package vertical movement. Vertical movement is found to result from thermal expansion, from upward creep or heave of the near-field salt, and from downward buoyant forces on the waste package. A two-pronged analysis approach was used, with thermal-mechanical creep modeling, and coupled thermal-viscous flow modeling. The thermal-mechanical approach used well-studied salt constitutive models, while the thermal-viscous approach represented the salt as a highly viscous fluid. The Sierra suite of coupled simulation codes was used for both approaches. The waste package in all simulations was a right-circular cylinder with the density of steel, in horizontal orientation. A time-decaying heat generation function was used to represent commercial spent fuel with typical burnup and 50-year age. Results from the thermal-mechanical base case showed approximately 27 cm initial uplift of the package, followed by gradual relaxation closely following the calculated temperature history. A similar displacement history was obtained with the package density set equal to that of salt. The slight difference in these runs is attributable to buoyant displacement (sinking) and is on the order of 1 mm in 2,000 years. Without heat generation the displacement stabilizes at a fraction of millimeter after a few hundred years. Results from thermal-viscous model were similar, except that the rate of sinking was constant after cooldown, at approximately 0.15 mm per 1,000 yr. In summary, all calculations showed vertical movement on the order of 1 mm or less in 2,000 yr, including calculations using well-established constitutive models for temperature-dependent salt deformation. Based on this finding, displacement of waste packages in a salt repository is not a significant repository performance issue.

  11. Characterization of heat loads from mitigated and unmitigated vertical displacement events in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Strait, E. J.; Wesley, J. C.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pitts, R. A.; Sugihara, M.; Watkins, J.

    2013-06-15

    Experiments have been conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to study the distribution and repeatability of heat loads and vessel currents resulting from vertical displacement events (VDEs). For unmitigated VDEs, the radiated power fraction appears to be of order 50%, with the remaining power dominantly conducted to the vessel walls. Shot-to-shot scatter in heat loads measured at one toroidal location is not large (<±50%), suggesting that toroidal asymmetries in conducted heat loads are not large. Conducted heat loads are clearly observed during the current quench (CQ) of both mitigated and unmitigated disruptions. Significant poloidal asymmetries in heat loads and radiated power are often observed in the experiments but are not yet understood. Energy dissipated resistively in the conducting walls during the CQ appears to be small (<5%). The mitigating effect of neon massive gas injection (MGI) as a function of MGI trigger delay has also been studied. Improved mitigation is observed as the MGI trigger delay is decreased. For sufficiently early MGI mitigation, close to 100% radiated energy and a reduction of roughly a factor 2 in vessel forces is achieved.

  12. An analytical model for particulate deposition on vertical heat transfer surfaces in a boiling environment

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Rider, J.L.; Waldman, L.A.

    1993-10-01

    A frequent problem in heat exchange equipment is the deposition of particulates entrained in the working fluid onto heat transfer surfaces. These deposits increase the overall heat transfer resistance and can significantly degrade the performance of the heat exchanger. Accurate prediction of the deposition rate is necessary to ensure that the design and specified operating conditions of the heat exchanger adequately address the effects of this deposit layer. Although the deposition process has been studied in considerable detail, much of the work has focused on investigating individual aspects of the deposition process. This paper consolidates this previous research into a mechanistically based analytical prediction model for particulate deposition from a boiling liquid onto vertical heat transfer surfaces. Consistent with the well known Kern-Seaton approach, the model postulates net particulate accumulation to depend on the relative contributions of deposition and reentrainment processes. Mechanisms for deposition include boiling, momentum, and diffusion effects. Reentrainment is presumed to occur via an intermittent erosion process, with the energy for particle removal being supplied by turbulent flow instabilities. The contributions of these individual mechanisms are integrated to obtain a single equation for the deposit thickness versus time. The validity of the resulting model is demonstrated by comparison with data published in the open literature. Model estimates show good agreement with data obtained over a range of thermal-hydraulic conditions in both flow and pool boiling environments. The utility of the model in performing parametric studies (e.g. to determine the effect of flow velocity on net deposition) is also demonstrated. The initial success of the model suggests that it could prove useful in establishing a range of heat exchanger. operating conditions to minimize deposition.

  13. Flow reversal and heat transfer of fully developed mixed convection in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chin-Hsiang; Kou, Hong-Sen; Huang, Wen-Hsiung

    1990-07-01

    The present analysis is concerned with flow reversal phenomena and heat transfer characteristics of the fully developed laminar combined free and forced convection in the heated vertical channels. Three fundamental combinations of thermal boundary conditions on the respective wall surface (namely isoflux-isoflux, isoflux-isothermal, and isothermal-isothermal) are considered separately so as to investigate extensively their distinct influence on the flow pattern. Results of the velocity distribution and temperature distribution as well as the Nusselt number in terms of bulk mean temperature are carried out. Based on the analytical solutions obtained, flow reversal adjacent to the relatively colder wall is found to exist within the channel as Re/Gr is below a threshold value related to the thermal boundary conditions. Parameter zones for the occurrence of reversed flow are presented. Comparisons and verification are made using the existing numerical solutions at locations far downstream of developing flow.

  14. An algorithm to estimate the heating budget from vertical hydrometeor profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Lang, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometeor profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a nonhydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algoritm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  15. Effect of segmental heating on mixed convection aiding flow in a vertical porous annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Ahmed N. J.; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Khaleed, H. M. T.

    2016-06-01

    Mixed convection flow in a vertical porous annulus embedded with fluid saturated porous medium for aiding is investigated. The annulus is imposed by 20%, 35% and 50% heater length at the bottom, mid and top sections of the annulus respectively. Darcy law with thermal non-equilibrium approach is considered. The governing partial differential equations are converted to simple algebraic equations using Finite Element Method (FEM). The effects of Peclet number Pe and conductivity ratio Kr on heat transfer and fluid flow behaviour are examined and it is found that for lower conductivity ratio, the heat transfer rate was higher with the increase in the Peclet number Pe, whereas this trend reversed when thermal conductivity ratio Kr is increased.

  16. An Algorithm to Estimate the Heating Budget from Vertical Hydrometeor Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Lang, Stephen; McCumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Penc, Richard

    1990-12-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometer profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a non-hydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algorithm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  17. Heat and mass transfer in two-component film evaporation in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, W. W.; Thiele, F.

    An elaborate physical model is developed for the problem of two-component film evaporation. Special attention is drawn to the accurate modeling of the two-phase multicomponent flow. This includes separate description of each phase, turbulent gas flow, and thermophysical properties depending on temperature and species concentrations. Whereas the basic equations for the film flow can be treated analytically those for the gas flow have to be solved numerically by means of an accurate finite difference method. An efficient overall iteration procedure links the solutions in both phases. The evaporation of benzene-methyl alcohol mixtures in vertical tube flows for various thermal flow conditions is investigated. Results are presented in terms of local temperature, heat and mass fluxes, and Stanton numbers for heat and mass transfer. They indicate a strong influence of the mixture composition.

  18. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-10-01

    Clouds forming during the summer monsoon over the Indian subcontinent affect its evolution through their radiative impact as well as the release of latent heat. While the latter is previously studied to some extent, comparatively little is known about the radiative impact of different cloud types and the vertical structure of their radiative heating/cooling effects. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to partly fill this knowledge gap by investigating and documenting the vertical distributions of the different cloud types associated with the Indian monsoon and their radiative heating/cooling using the active radar and lidar sensors onboard CloudSat and CALIPSO. The intraseasonal evolution of clouds from May to October is also investigated to understand pre-to-post monsoon transitioning of their radiative heating/cooling effects. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating (CRH) follows the northward migration and retreat of the monsoon from May to October. Throughout this time period, stratiform clouds radiatively warm the middle troposphere and cool the upper troposphere by more than ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by cloud fraction), with the largest impacts observed in June, July and August. During these months, the fraction of high thin cloud remains high in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Deep convective towers cause considerable radiative warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the TTL. This cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon periods compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1). The contrasting radiative warming effect of high clouds in the TTL is twice as large during active periods than in break periods. These results highlight the increasing importance of CRH with altitude, especially in the TTL. Stratiform (made up of alto- and nimbostratus clouds) and deep convection clouds radiatively cool the surface by approximately -100 and -400 W m-2 respectively while warming the

  19. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  20. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-02-01

    Every year the monsoonal circulation over the Indian subcontinent gives rise to a variety of cloud types that differ considerably in their ability to heat or cool the atmosphere. These clouds in turn affect monsoon dynamics via their radiative impacts, both at the surface and in the atmosphere. New generation of satellites carrying active radar and lidar sensors are allowing realistic quantification of cloud radiative heating (CRH) by resolving the vertical structure of the atmosphere in an unprecedented detail. Obtaining this information is a first step in closing the knowledge gap in our understanding of the role that different clouds play as regulators of the monsoon and vice versa. Here, we use collocated CloudSat-CALIPSO data sets to understand following aspects of cloud-radiation interactions associated with Indian monsoon circulation. (1) How does the vertical distribution of CRH evolve over the Indian continent throughout monsoon season? (2) What is the absolute contribution of different clouds types to the total CRH? (3) How do active and break periods of monsoon affect the distribution of CRH? And finally, (4) what are the net radiative effects of different cloud types on surface heating? In general, the vertical structure of CRH follows the northward migration and the retreat of monsoon from May to October. It is found that the alto- and nimbostratus clouds intensely warm the middle troposphere and equally strongly cool the upper troposphere. Their warming/cooling consistently exceeds ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by vertical cloud fraction) in monthly mean composites throughout the middle and upper troposphere respectively, with largest impact observed in June, July and August. Deep convective towers cause considerable warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Such cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon conditions compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1

  1. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  2. The effect of water subcooling on film boiling heat transfer from vertical cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1994-03-01

    The effect of subcooling on the film boiling heat transfer of water from vertical copper cylinders has been investigated experimentally using a transient quench technique. A lumped parameter model was utilized since the Blot numbers were always less than 0.05. The amount of subcooling varied from 0 K to 70 K and the initial cylinder wall temperatures were of the order of 1100 K. Heat transfer coefficient were measured at the midpoint of the cylinders and were obtained over quench times in which they were verified to be constant. Subcooling had a significant effect on both the film boiling heat transfer coefficient and the minimum film boiling temperature. As the subcooling varied from 0 K to 70 K, the h transfer coefficient increased by a factor of five. As the subcooling varied from 0 K to 60 K, the minimum film boiling temperature increased from approximately 600 K to 1000 K. An attempt to correlate the heat transfer coefficient data with a method recently proposed by Sakurai et al. was only successful at subcooled temperature differences less than 10 K. A modified correlation is presented using the Sakurai et al. parameters which better represents the data over the complete subcooling range.

  3. Heat pump R and D at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, R. D.; Creswick, F. A.

    Heat pump system and component performance evaluations at steady state and under frosting conditions are described. A computer model of electric motor driven heat pumps was developed to explore the practical limits of steady-state heating efficiency of conventional air-source heat pumps, and to demonstrate an approach to computer-aided heat pump design techniques. Scoping calculations of alternative heat pump systems, such as aircycle heat pumps and electric motor driven Stirling heat pumps are presented. Computer programs were written to model the expected performance of vertical-pipe ground-coupled heat exchangers, and for the detailed performance analysis of air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers with complex refrigerant circuiting by calculating the performance of each tube of the heat exchanger individually. Seasonal performance factors for air-source heat pumps using hour-by-hour calculations with empirical temperature dependent degradation factors were estimated.

  4. On the vertical exchange of heat, mass and momentum over complex, mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotach, Mathias; Gohm, Alexander; Lang, Moritz; Leukauf, Daniel; Stiperski, Ivana; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the atmosphere-climate system is the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between 'the earth's surface' and the atmosphere. Traditionally, it is understood that turbulent transport is responsible for this exchange and hence the understanding and physical description of the turbulence structure of the boundary layer is key to assess the effectiveness of earth-atmosphere exchange. This understanding is rooted in the (implicit) assumption of a scale separation or spectral gap between turbulence and mean atmospheric motions, which in turn leads to the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surface as a reference, for which both physical understanding and model parameterizations have successfully been developed over the years. Over mountainous terrain, however, the ABL is generically inhomogeneous due to both thermal (radiative) and dynamic forcing. This inhomogeneity leads to meso-scale and even sub-meso-scale flows such as slope and valley winds or wake effects. It is argued here that these (sub)meso-scale motions can significantly contribute to the vertical structure of the boundary layer and hence vertical exchange of heat and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. If model grid resolution is not high enough the latter will have to be parameterized (in a similar fashion as gravity wave drag parameterizations take into account the momentum transport due to gravity waves in large-scale models). In this contribution we summarize the available evidence of the contribution of (sub)meso-scale motions to vertical exchange in mountainous terrain from observational and numerical modeling studies. In particular, a number of recent simulation studies using idealized topography will be summarized and put into perspective – so as to identify possible limitations and areas of necessary future research.

  5. Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure: Effects of vertical control coil currents and ELMS

    SciTech Connect

    Radovinsky, A.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.

    1993-11-09

    The toroidal field coil and support structures for ITER are maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The time-varying currents in the poloidal field coil system will induce eddy currents in these structures. The associated Joule dissipation will cause local heating and require heat removal which will show up as a load on the cryogenic system. Studies of Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure (TFCS) due to the currents in the poloidal field coil system are presented. The two regimes considered in this study are the plasma vertical stability control and the Edge Loss Mode (ELM) events. The 3-D, thin-shell, eddy current program, EDDYCUFF was used to analyze the eddy currents and Joule losses in the cold structure. The current versus time scenarios were defined. Four control coil options were studied. All schemes use coils external to the TF cold structure. Analyses of power depositions during the plasma vertical stability control were performed for each of the four options. For each of these options three different recovery times were assumed. The times were 3, 1, and 1/3 seconds. Sets of four sequential ELMs, as well as isolated ELMs have been studied for various sets of active PF coils. The results showed that the lowest average power dissipation in the TF cold structure occurs when a subset of PF2 and PF7 are active, and all the other PF coils are passive. The general conclusion is that to minimize power dissipation in the TF cold structure it is preferable that only coils PF2 and PF7 are active. The other coils (PF3-PF6) should be passive and driven by a condition of constant flux. It is recommended in particular, that coils PF3 and PF5 be allowed to change currents to conserve flux, since they provide the maximum shielding of the TFCS from the fields caused by the active coils.

  6. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  7. Heat transfer correlations for low Reynolds number flows of water in vertical annuli

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Rao, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents heat transfer correlations for both buoyancy assisted and opposed laminar and transition flows of water in vertical annuli for Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 10/sup 4/ and Rayleigh numbers up to 10/sup 7/. The correlations are based on more than 800 data points collected for two annuli (diameter ratio of 1.17 and 2.0) with an isoflux inner wall and an adiabatic outer wall. Results demonstrated that the buoyancy assisted flow data could be divided into four regimes based on the values of Reynolds number: Laminar (Re < 800), Combined Laminar (800 < Re > 2100), Laminar/ Transition (2100 < Re < 5000), and Transition ( 5000 < Re 10,000). This data, except for transition flow, was correlated in terms of Gz to account for the effect on the Nusselt number of the axial distance from the bottom of the heated section. For buoyancy opposed flow, however, Richardson number more accurately classified the data. The data for this flow was correlated in three regions: Ri < 0.06, 0.06 < Ri < 0.47, and 0.47 < Ri < 3.0. The heat transfer correlations for both buoyancy assisted and opposed flows were within +-10 percent of the experimental data.

  8. Eutectic Bonding Utilizing Radio Frequency Induction Heating for Fabricating Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Yinhua; Chae, Su Jin; Nam, Minwoo; Kwon, Soon Hyeong; Cha, Yong Won; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their improved thermal, electrical, and optical performance compared to conventional LEDs. To fabricate VLEDs, a bonding technique is required following laser lift-off. Eutectic bonding techniques are preferred owing to their low-heat mechanism and production safety. However, the conventional resistance heating method for eutectic bonding process, the extremely longer process time becomes a problem such as cost rise, wapage. In this study, the thermal efficiency was measured according to the diameter of the coil in order to optimize the eutectic bonding of the RF induction heating method in order to solve this problem. We confirmed that successful eutectic bonding is possible with less than 30 min processing using Sn-Glass. In addition, Au (20 wt%)/Sn (80 wt%) alloy, a mainly used the eutectic bonding interlayer material for VLEDs, can also be used as an interlayer to provide void-free eutectic bonding in less than 30 min. PMID:26726547

  9. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  10. Performance prediction between horizontal and vertical source heat pump systems for greenhouse heating with the use of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benli, Hüseyin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the suitability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict the performance and comparison between a horizontal and a vertical ground source heat pump system. Performance forecasting is the precondition for the optimal control and energy saving operation of heat pump systems. In this study, performance parameters such as air temperature entering condenser fan-coil unit, air temperature leaving condenser fan-coil unit, and ground temperatures (2 and 60 m) obtained experimental studies are input data; coefficient of performance of system (COPsys) is in output layer. The back propagation learning algorithm with three different variants such as Levenberg-Marguardt, Pola-Ribiere conjugate gradient, and scaled conjugate gradient, and also tangent sigmoid transfer function were used in the network so that the best approach can be found. The results showed that LM with three neurons in the hidden layer is the most suitable algorithm with maximum correlation coefficients R2 of 0.999, minimum root mean square RMS value and low coefficient variance COV. The reported results confirmed that the use of ANN for performance prediction of COPsys,H-V is acceptable in these studies.

  11. Performance prediction between horizontal and vertical source heat pump systems for greenhouse heating with the use of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benli, Hüseyin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the suitability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict the performance and comparison between a horizontal and a vertical ground source heat pump system. Performance forecasting is the precondition for the optimal control and energy saving operation of heat pump systems. In this study, performance parameters such as air temperature entering condenser fan-coil unit, air temperature leaving condenser fan-coil unit, and ground temperatures (2 and 60 m) obtained experimental studies are input data; coefficient of performance of system (COPsys) is in output layer. The back propagation learning algorithm with three different variants such as Levenberg-Marguardt, Pola-Ribiere conjugate gradient, and scaled conjugate gradient, and also tangent sigmoid transfer function were used in the network so that the best approach can be found. The results showed that LM with three neurons in the hidden layer is the most suitable algorithm with maximum correlation coefficients R2 of 0.999, minimum root mean square RMS value and low coefficient variance COV. The reported results confirmed that the use of ANN for performance prediction of COPsys,H-V is acceptable in these studies.

  12. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Downward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    Experiments were performed on boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically downward in a copper smooth tube of 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and quality from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C. Pressure drops were measured and flow patterns were observed at mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s) and quality from 0.1 to 0.9. The characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified by comparing the measurements with the data for the vertically upward flow previously obtained.

  13. Unsteady Convection Flow and Heat Transfer over a Vertical Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient. PMID:25264737

  14. Unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical stretching surface.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient. PMID:25264737

  15. Vertical characteristics of PM2.5 during the heating season in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yu-fen; Han, Su-qin; Wu, Jian-hui; Bi, Xiao-hui; Shi, Guo-liang; Wang, Jiao; Yao, Qing; Cai, Zi-ying; Liu, Jing-le; Feng, Yin-chang

    2015-08-01

    In this study, PM2.5 samples were collected at four heights (10m, 40m, 120m and 220m) at a meteorological tower in the daytime and nighttime during the heating season in Tianjin, China. The vertical variation and diurnal variability of the concentrations of PM2.5 and main chemical compositions were analyzed in clear days and heavy pollution days. Generally, mass concentrations of PM2.5 and the chemical compositions showed a decreasing trend with increasing height, while mass percentages of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and OC showed an increasing trend with increasing height. Concentrations of ion species and carbon compound in PM2.5 samples in the daytime were higher than those collected at night, which was due to intense human activities and suitable meteorological condition in the daytime. The ratios of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) and OC/EC were also considered, and we have observed that their levels on heavy pollution days were higher than those on clear days. In addition, source apportionments were identified quantitatively using the CMB-iteration model. The results indicated that contributions of secondary ion species increased with increasing height, while contributions of other pollutant sources decreased, and contributions of vehicle exhaust were relatively high on clear days. PMID:25863506

  16. Ground-coupled airwaves at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, and their potential for eruption monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Cassandra M.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Thompson, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    An abnormally high number of explosion quakes were noted during the monitoring effort for the 2007 eruption of Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. In this study, we manually cataloged the explosion quakes from their characteristic ground-coupled airwaves. This study investigates how the ground-coupled airwaves might be used in a monitoring or analysis effort by estimating energy release and gas mass release. Over 3 × 104 quakes were recorded. The energy release from the explosions is approximated to be 3 × 1011 J, and the total gas mass (assuming 100 % water) released was 450 t. The tracking of explosion quakes has the potential to estimate relative eruption intensity as a function of time and is thus a useful component of a seismic monitoring program.

  17. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical tube in evaporating a heated falling alcohols liquid film into a stream of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senhaji, S.; Feddaoui, M.; Mediouni, T.; Mir, A.

    2009-03-01

    A numerical study of the evaporation in mixed convection of a pure alcohol liquid film: ethanol and methanol was investigated. It is a turbulent liquid film falling on the internal face of a vertical tube. A laminar flow of dry air enters the vertical tube at constant temperature in the downward direction. The wall of the tube is subjected to a constant and uniform heat flux. The model solves the coupled parabolic governing equations in both phases including turbulent liquid film together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by TDMA method. A Van Driest model is adopted to simulate the turbulent liquid film flow. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied alcohols and water in the same conditions is made.

  18. The numerical calculation of heat transfer performance for annular flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shufeng; Wu, Yuyuan; Zhao, Rongyi

    2001-04-01

    According to a separated phase flow model for vertical annular two-phase flow in an annular channel, the liquid film thickness, distributions of velocities and temperatures in the liquid layer are predicted in the range of heat fluxes: 6000-12000 W/m 2, mass flux: 500-1100 kg/m2 s. The pressure drop along the flow channel and heat transfer coefficient are also calculated. The liquid film thickness is in the order of micrometers and heat transfer coefficient is 2800-7800 W/m2 K of liquid nitrogen boiling in narrow annular channels. The measured heat transfer coefficient is 29% higher than the calculated values. With the mass flux increasing and the gap of the annular channel decreasing, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient increase.

  19. Circulation, heat exchange and vertical structure of the Hornsund - the Svalbard Archipelago fiord.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakacki, Jaromir; Przyborska, Anna; Kosecki, Szymon; Sundfjord, Arild

    2015-04-01

    The Hornsund fjord is located in the southwestern part of Spitsbergen- the biggest island of the Svalbard Archipelago. The fjord is influenced by two major currents in this area. The first one is the current carrying the cold and less saline waters around the southern Spitsbergen tip, often called the Sørkapp Current or the South Cape Current. The second is the well-known West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), carrying salty and warm Atlantic Waters through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean. From a biological point of view, Hornsund can be treated as a young unstable system or cold system, which suggests that it is under an influence of the South Cape Current. Because of limited measurements in this area, the hydrodynamic model MIKE3D has been implemented for this fjord to diagnose which current has the main influence on Hornsund. The fjord domain was extended into the shelf area. At the lateral boundary of the extended domain, data from the ROMS simulation of the Svalbard area made by the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research (IMR) with resolution of 800 m have been used. Atmospheric data from European Centre for Medium Weather Forecast (ECMWF) were employed as well as from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS, 1 and 0.5 degrees) reanalysis that uses metrological data from Polish Polar Station located in Hornsund. Based on 5 years of simulation (2005-2010) seasonal and annual general circulation in the fjord has been described. Estimation of the heat transport between fjord and ocean, and between fjord and atmosphere will permit to establish the heat budget and help to evaluate the influence of the South Cape Current and WSC on the fjord ecosystem development. An influence of the fresh water fluxes and vertical structure of water masses and their transformations will be also discussed. This work was partially performed in the frame of the projects GAME (DEC-2012/04/A/NZ8/00661) and AWAKE2 (Pol-Nor/198675/17/2013)

  20. Comparison of practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods to a Fort Polk data/model benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Hughes, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    The results of five practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing programs are compared against a detailed simulation model that has been calibrated to monitored data taken from one military family housing unit at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The calibration of the detailed model to data is described in a companion paper. The assertion that the data/detailed model is a useful benchmark for practical sizing methods is based on this calibration. The results from the comparisons demonstrate the current level of agreement between vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods in common use. It is recommended that the calibration and comparison exercise be repeated with data sets from additional sites in order to build confidence in the practical sizing methods.

  1. Numerical modeling of a 2K J-T heat exchanger used in Fermilab Vertical Test Stand VTS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2014-07-01

    Fermilab Vertical Test Stand-1 (VTS-1) is in operation since 2007 for testing the superconducting RF cavities at 2 K. This test stand has single layer coiled finned tubes heat exchanger before J-T valve. A finite difference based thermal model has been developed in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to study its thermal performance during filling and refilling to maintain the constant liquid level of test stand. The model is also useful to predict its performance under other various operating conditions and will be useful to design the similar kind of heat exchanger for future needs. Present paper discusses the different operational modes of this heat exchanger and its thermal characteristics under these operational modes. Results of this model have also been compared with the experimental data gathered from the VTS-1 heat exchanger and they are in good agreement with the present model.

  2. High Rayleigh number convection in rectangular enclosures with differentially heated vertical walls and aspect ratios between zero and unity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Siavash A.

    1988-01-01

    High Rayleigh number convection in a rectangular cavity with insulated horizontal surfaces and differentially heated vertical walls was analyzed for an arbitrary aspect ratio smaller than or equal to unity. Unlike previous analytical studies, a systematic method of solution based on linearization technique and analytical iteration procedure was developed to obtain approximate closed-form solutions for a wide range of aspect ratios. The predicted velocity and temperature fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and numerical data.

  3. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  4. MHD Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid past a Flat Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmed I.

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  5. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  6. Free convection flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating in the presence of heat generation and viscous dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, M.; Narahari, M.; Jaafar, A.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of heat generation and viscous dissipation on free convective flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical porous plate with Newtonian heating have been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are solved by using an analytical technique known as Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). The effects of heat source parameter (Q), suction parameter (s), Eckert number (Ec) and Grashof number (Gr) on the velocity and temperature fields are determined. The study revealed that the fluid temperature increases by increasing heat generation and Eckert number whereas it decreases with increasing suction velocity. The present results are compared with the exact solution results in the absence of viscous dissipation and it is found that the HAM results coincide with the exact solution results.

  7. Measuring the electrical properties of soil using a calibrated ground-coupled GPR system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, C.P.; Olhoeft, G.R.; Wright, D.L.; Powers, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating vadose zone soil properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) include measuring travel time, fitting diffraction hyperbolae, and other methods exploiting geometry. Additional processing techniques for estimating soil properties are possible with properly calibrated GPR systems. Such calibration using ground-coupled antennas must account for the effects of the shallow soil on the antenna's response, because changing soil properties result in a changing antenna response. A prototype GPR system using ground-coupled antennas was calibrated using laboratory measurements and numerical simulations of the GPR components. Two methods for estimating subsurface properties that utilize the calibrated response were developed. First, a new nonlinear inversion algorithm to estimate shallow soil properties under ground-coupled antennas was evaluated. Tests with synthetic data showed that the inversion algorithm is well behaved across the allowed range of soil properties. A preliminary field test gave encouraging results, with estimated soil property uncertainties (????) of ??1.9 and ??4.4 mS/m for the relative dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, respectively. Next, a deconvolution method for estimating the properties of subsurface reflectors with known shapes (e.g., pipes or planar interfaces) was developed. This method uses scattering matrices to account for the response of subsurface reflectors. The deconvolution method was evaluated for use with noisy data using synthetic data. Results indicate that the deconvolution method requires reflected waves with a signal/noise ratio of about 10:1 or greater. When applied to field data with a signal/noise ratio of 2:1, the method was able to estimate the reflection coefficient and relative permittivity, but the large uncertainty in this estimate precluded inversion for conductivity. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  8. Inverse conjugate mixed convection in a vertical substrate with protruding heat sources: a combined experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, Shaik Imran; Balaji, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the results of a combined numerical and experimental study to estimate the heat inputs of three protruding heat sources of the same size placed on a vertically placed PCB board of height 150 mm, depth 250 mm, and thickness 5 mm. First, limited measurements of temperatures were recorded at eight locations along the height of the back of the PCB board for different (and known) values of heat inputs of the protruding heat sources and different velocities. These were followed by three-dimensional calculations of fluid flow and conjugate heat transfer for various heat transfer coefficients on the backside of the PCB board. The difference between the CFD predicted and experimentally measured temperature distributions on the back of the PCB board was minimized using least squares and the best value of heat transfer coefficient was obtained. Using this `data assimilated' CFD model, detailed CFD simulations were done for various values of heat input values and Reynolds numbers (each of these can be different from one another) of the flow. The temperatures at the same eight locations at the back of the PCB board were noted. An artificial neural network was then developed with ten inputs (eight temperatures together with the input velocity and the ambient temperature) to estimate the three outputs (three heat inputs) after carrying out extensive studies on the architecture of the network. This inverse solution was then tested with experiments for validating the ANN approach to solve the inverse conjugate heat transfer problem. Finally, with the ANN estimated heat inputs, CFD simulations were again run to compare the temperature distribution at the back of the PCB board with measurements.

  9. Experimental investigation of free-convection heat transfer in vertical tube at large Grashof numbers / E. R. G. Eckert, A. J. Diaguila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1952-01-01

    Local free-convection heat-transfer coefficients and temperature fields in the turbulent flow range were obtained within a vertical, stationary tube closed at the boom, heated along its walls, and having a length-to-diameter ratio of 5. Convective heat-transfer coefficients were correlated by the general relations for free-convection heat transfer. These coefficients, converted to dimensionless Nusselt numbers were 35 percent below known relations for vertical flat plates. Air temperature measurements within the tube indicated a thin boundary layer along the heated wall surface and unstable conditions in the air flow.

  10. Experimental investigation on heat transfer and frictional characteristics of vertical upward rifled tube in supercritical CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Pan, Jie; Zhu, Xiaojing; Bi, Qincheng; Chen, Tingkuan; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2011-02-15

    Water wall design is a key issue for supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. On account of the good heat transfer performance, rifled tube is applied in the water wall design of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler in China. In order to investigate the heat transfer and frictional characteristics of the rifled tube with vertical upward flow, an in-depth experiment was conducted in the range of pressure from 12 to 30 MPa, mass flux from 230 to 1200 kg/(m{sup 2} s), and inner wall heat flux from 130 to 720 kW/m{sup 2}. The wall temperature distribution and pressure drop in the rifled tube were obtained in the experiment. The normal, enhanced and deteriorated heat transfer characteristics were also captured. In this paper, the effects of pressure, inner wall heat flux and mass flux on heat transfer characteristics are analyzed, the heat transfer mechanism and the frictional resistance performance are discussed, and the corresponding empirical correlations are presented. The experimental results show that the rifled tube can effectively prevent the occurrence of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and keep the tube wall temperature in a permissible range under the operating condition of supercritical CFB boiler. (author)

  11. Theoretical determination of design parameters for an arrayed heat sink with vertical plate fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Chen, Yi-Jin

    2016-05-01

    This paper employs theoretical approach to determine the adequate design parameters of an arrayed plate-fins heat sink based on maximizing heat flow. According to analyzed results, increasing the dimensions of configurative parameters does not always yield the significant increase in the heat flow. As the fin length and fin space increases until a critical value, the heat flow will significantly reduce the increment or decay, respectively.

  12. Diurnal and vertical variability of the sensible heat and carbon dioxide budgets in the atmospheric surface layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casso-Torralba, P.; de Arellano, J. V. -G.; Bosveld, F.; Soler, M.R.; Vermeulen, A.; Werner, C.; Moors, E.

    2008-01-01

    The diurnal and vertical variability of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric surface layer are studied by analyzing measurements from a 213 in tower in Cabauw (Netherlands). Observations of thermodynamic variables and CO2 mixing ratio as well as vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes are used to retrieve the contribution of the budget terms in the scalar conservation equation. On the basis of the daytime evolution of turbulent fluxes, we calculate the budget terms by assuming that turbulent fluxes follow a linear profile with height. This assumption is carefully tested and the deviation ftom linearity is quantified. The budget calculation allows us to assess the importance of advection of heat and CO2 during day hours for three selected days. It is found that, under nonadvective conditions, the diurnal variability of temperature and CO2 is well reproduced from the flux divergence measurements. Consequently, the vertical transport due to the turbulent flux plays a major role in the daytime evolution of both scalars and the advection is a relatively small contribution. During the analyzed days with a strong contribution of advection of either heat or carbon dioxide, the flux divergence is still an important contribution to the budget. For heat, the quantification of the advection contribution is in close agreement with results from a numerical model. For carbon dioxide, we qualitatively corroborate the results with a Lagrangian transport model. Our estimation of advection is compared with, traditional estimations based on the Net Ecosystem-atmosphere Exchange (NEE). Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Seismic-geodynamic constraints on three-dimensional structure, vertical flow, and heat transfer in the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forte, A.M.; Woodward, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Joint inversions of seismic and geodynamic data are carried out in which we simultaneously constrain global-scale seismic heterogeneity in the mantle as well as the amplitude of vertical mantle flow across the 670 km seismic discontinuity. These inversions reveal the existence of a family of three-dimensional (3-D) mantle models that satisfy the data while at the same time yielding predictions of layered mantle flow. The new 3-D mantle models we obtain demonstrate that the buoyancy forces due to the undulations of the 670 km phase-change boundary strongly inhibit the vertical flow between the upper and lower mantle. The strong stabilizing effect of the 670 km topography also has an important impact on the predicted dynamic topography of the Earth's solid surface and on the surface gravity anomalies. The new 3-D models that predict strongly or partially layered mantle flow provide essentially identical fits to the global seismic data as previous models that have, until now, predicted only whole-mantle flow. The convective vertical transport of heat across the mantle predicted on the basis of the new 3-D models shows that the heat flow is a minimum at 1000 km depth. This suggests the presence at this depth of a globally defined horizon across which the pattern of lateral heterogeneity changes rapidly. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 2; One-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    We develop and test a 1-point closure turbulence model with the following features: 1) we include the salinity field and derive the expression for the vertical turbulent diffusivities of momentum K(sub m) , heat K(sub h) and salt K(sub s) as a function of two stability parameters: the Richardson number R(sub i) (stratification vs. shear) and the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient vs. temperature gradient). 2) to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML), all previous models have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum, heat and salt. We propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, the three diffusivities have the same functional dependence on R( sub i) and R(sub rho) as derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking.measured by Gargett et al. The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we employ the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. 3) in the local model, the turbulent diffusivities K(sub m,h,s) are given as analytical functions of R(sub i) and R(sub rho). 5) the model is used in an O-GCM and several results are presented to exhibit the effect of double diffusion processes. 6) the code is available upon request.

  15. The vertical structure of diabatic heating associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation simulated by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Pfaendtner, James; Sud, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    The diabatic heating structure of the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres model of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is illustrated with composite charts made for those times when this low-frequency mode reaches its maximum and minimum amplitudes. These composite charts compare the vertically integrated diabatic heating with potential functions, the vertical distribution of diabatic heating with the east-west mass flux function in the tropics, and the vertical profiles of diabatic heating at the centers of maximum and minimum MJO amplitude. Three interesting features of the model MJO's diabatic heating are revealed: (1) the maximum heating rate of this low-frequency mode is located over the Asian monsoon region and its amplitude is about a half of the maximum value of the seasonal mean heating rate in this region, (2) the vertical diabatic heating rate profile has a maximum at 500 mbar and resembles the seasonal mean total heating profile, and (3) the total diabatic heating is for the most part composed of the latent heat released by cumulus convection.

  16. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Upward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    In the present study, experiments were performed to examine characteristics of flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically upward in a copper smooth tube with 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and qualities from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C, and pressure drops were also measured at mass fluxes of 100 and 200 kg/(m2•s) and qualities from 0.1 to 0.9. Three types of flow pattern were observed in the tube: A slug, a slug-annular and an annular flow. Based on the measurements, the characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified. The measured pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient were compared with correlations.

  17. Evaporation heat transfer and friction characteristics of R-134a flowing downward in a vertical corrugated tube

    SciTech Connect

    Aroonrat, Kanit; Wongwises, Somchai

    2011-01-15

    Differently from most previous studies, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the pure refrigerant HFC-134a during evaporation inside a vertical corrugated tube are experimentally investigated. The double tube test sections are 0.5 m long with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and heating water flowing in the annulus. The inner tubes are one smooth tube and two corrugated tubes, which are constructed from smooth copper tube of 8.7 mm inner diameter. The test runs are performed at evaporating temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 C, heat fluxes of 20, 25, and 30 kW/m{sup 2}, and mass fluxes of 200, 300, and 400 kg/m{sup 2} s. The quality of the refrigerant in the test section is calculated using the temperature and pressure obtained from the experiment. The pressure drop across the test section is measured directly by a differential pressure transducer. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and evaporation temperature on the heat transfer coefficient and two-phase friction factor are also discussed. It is found that the percentage increases of the heat transfer coefficient and the two-phase friction factor of the corrugated tubes compared with those of the smooth tube are approximately 0-10% and 70-140%, respectively. (author)

  18. The effect of thermal dispersion on unsteady MHD convective heat transfer through vertical porous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadien, Ghada F.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of thermal dispersion on unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow is presented. A viscous incompressible conducting fluid in the vicinity of a semi infinite vertical porous through a moving plate in the presence of a magnetic fluid is studied. A cod (FORTRAN) was constructed for numerical computations for the velocity and temperature for various values of the affected parameters were carried out.

  19. Boundary Layer Flow, Heat, and Chemical Transfer near Vertical Heated Boreholes in Water-Saturated Rock: A Mechanism for Developing a Large Scale Underground Hydrothermal Experiment (DUSEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, D. M.; Lowell, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate a means of developing a large-scale hydrothermal experiment at the DUSEL site in the Homestake Mine, South Dakota, or elsewhere, by considering boundary layer flow, heat, and chemical transfer near an internally heated vertical borehole or borehole array emplaced in a water-saturated porous medium with homogeneous permeability. We use scale analysis to determine the relationships between vertical fluid velocity u, boundary layer thickness δ and the Rayleigh number Ra for both a single borehole maintained at constant temperature and a linear array of boreholes maintained at constant heat flux. For a single borehole, u ~ (a/y)Ra and δ ~ yRa^-1/2, whereas for the borehole array u ~(a/y) Ra^-1/3 and δ ~ yRa^-1/3, where y is the borehole height and a is the thermal diffusivity. We find that for y = 100 m, optimum initial permeability lies between ~ 10^-10 -10^-12 m^2 and the optimum heat flux is ~ 60 W/m^2. We also use scale analysis to determine the permeability change resulting from thermoelastic stresses generated by heating the rock near the boreholes and find that these stresses do not significantly impact the permeability so long as the initial porosity is ~ 5%, or the initial crack aspect ratios are less than or equal to 10^-2. Finally, we use scale analysis to investigate mineral dissolution within the boundary layer flow adjacent to the boreholes. Using the above velocity scaling and assuming linear reaction kinetics, and a crustal porosity of 5%, thermodynamic equilibrium may be obtained at the top of a 100 m high borehole provided reaction rate constants are in the range of ~ 10^-7 - 10^-8 s-1.

  20. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Smitka, Martin E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)

  1. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadir, G. A.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2016-06-01

    This work is continuation of the paper Part A. Due to large number of results, the paper is divided into two section with section-A (Part A) discussing the effect of various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio etc. on streamlines and isothermal lines. Section-B highlights the heat transfer characteristics in terms of Nusselt number The Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside the medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by convection and radiation. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method.

  2. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, Martin; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT).

  3. Turbulent combined-convection boundary layer with aiding flows along a heated vertical flat plate at higher freestream velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedina, Mohammad Zoynal; Islam, Mohammed Moinul; Hanif, Md. Abu; Alam, Md. Jahangir

    2016-07-01

    A numerical investigation is performed in the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer with aiding flows in air along a heated vertical flat plate at a higher freestream velocity (Reδ0 = 600) by time-developing direct numerical simulation (DNS). At higher freestream velocity, the transition from laminar to turbulent delays for aiding flows and relatively a lower and higher heat transfer rates are observed, respectively, in the laminar and turbulent region compared to that of lower freestream velocity. The wall shear stresses are higher in the laminar region compared to that in the turbulent region, and at higher freestream velocity, the wall shear stress in the transition region shows a higher peak value. The intensity of velocity and temperature fluctuations for aiding flows with higher freestream velocity become appreciably lower than that for lower freestream velocity due to the laminarization of the boundary layer.

  4. Stability of a vertical liquid film with consideration of the marangoni effect and heat exchange with the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, O. A.

    2014-05-01

    The stability of a free vertical liquid film under the combined action of gravity and thermocapillary forces has been studied. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes and thermal conductivity equations is obtained for the case of plane steady flow with constant film thickness. It is shown that if the free surfaces of the film are perfectly heat insulated, the liquid flow rate through the cross section of the layer is zero. It is found that to close the model with consideration of the heat exchange with the environment, it is necessary to specify the liquid flow rate and the derivative of the temperature with respect to the longitudinal coordinate or the flow rate and the film thickness. The stability of the solution with constant film thickness at small wave numbers is studied. A solution of the spectral problem for perturbations in the form of damped oscillations is obtained.

  5. Vertical Mass, Momentum, Moisture, and Heat Fluxes in Hurricanes above 10 km during CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Paul; Herman, Robert; Dean-Day, Jon; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The third and fourth NASA Convection and Moisture Experiments (CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4) during the Atlantic hurricane seasons of 1998 and 2001, respectively, have yielded comprehensive multi-aircraft datasets using, both remote and in-situ instrumentation. Among these are high-frequency in-situ measurements of vertical wind, horizontal wind, temperature, and water vapor, made from NASA's DC-8 aircraft in the upper portions of the hurricane (typically above 10 km). Wind and temperature measurements were made at 20 hz by the NASA/Ames Meteorological Measurement System, while water vapor was measured at 1 hz by the NASA/JPL Laser Hygrometer. Fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture at these levels are important, since modeling studies have shown that ice processes, which are dominant at temperatures below -40C (where the DC-8 flies) are important for hurricane intensification. Also, there are indications from satellite studies that latent heat release at DC-8 levels is significant, perhaps a third of those in the mid-troposphere. Preliminary results show that typical updrafts in the eyewall region are comparable to or higher than previous observations of tropical convection, with several instances of updraft magnitudes of 15 meters per second (the maximum observed was 21 meters per second). They also show significant supersaturations (10-20% or more) in the updrafts, which would enhance the latent heat release at the upper levels of the hurricane. This paper will examine the magnitude and distribution of small and mesoscale vertical fluxes of mass, momentum, moisture, and heat. The goal is to examine the role of these fluxes in the overall budgets of the respective quantities in the upper portions of the hurricane.

  6. Study on heat transfer characteristic of ethanol-water mixture condensation on a vertical micro-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiping; Wang, Jinshi; Qin, Junchao; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2013-07-01

    In present experiment, the vapor mixture with different velocities (2mṡs-1, 4mṡs-1) and different ethanol mass fraction (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 50%) flew through vertical micro-tube and condensed on the outer tube surface at pressure 31.16kPa, 47.36kPa. The condensation modes were observed by CCD camera, and the characteristics of the heat transfer coefficients versus the vapor-to-surface temperature differences for different experimental conditions were obtained. The condensation heat transfer coefficients of vapor mixture decrease with the vapor concentration increasing. The maximum peak value of heat transfer coefficients, up to 39 kWṡm-2ṡK1, which was about 3-4 times greater than that of steam, appeared when the ethanol mass fraction was 2%. A heat transfer coefficient correlation including the effects of all the tested parameters is proposed by using the multiple linear least squares method based on the experimental data. The calculated values agreed well with the experimental data and the deviations between them were from -20% to 20%.

  7. MHD Forced Convective Laminar Boundary Layer Flow from a Convectively Heated Moving Vertical Plate with Radiation and Transpiration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to where is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  8. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  9. Experimental and analytical study of inverted annular flow film boiling heat transfer in a vertical tube using R-134a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nakla, Meamer A.

    An experimental investigation of inverted annular film boiling heat transfer has been performed for vertical up-flow in a round tube. The working fluid was R-134a and the flow conditions covered a pressure range of 640 to 2390 kPa (water equivalent range: 4000 to 14000 kPa) and a mass flux range of 500 to 4000 kgm-2s-1 (water equivalent range: 700 to 5700 kgm-2s-1 ). The inlet qualities of the tests ranged from -0.75 to -0.03. The hot-patch technique is used to obtain the subcooled film boiling measurements. The parametric trends of the heat transfer coefficient with respect to mass flux, inlet quality, heat flux and pressure are examined and compared to reported parametric trends from the literature. The comparison shows agreement between observed effects of flow parameters with those reported by other researchers. The heat transfer vs. quality curve is divided into four different regions. It is shown that these regions are dependent on pressure, mass flux and local quality. A two-fluid one-dimensional model has been developed to predict the wall temperature of an internally-heated tube during IAFB. The model is derived using basic conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. To simplify the derivation of the constitutive heat transfer relations, flow between two parallel plates is assumed. The model features shear stress and interfacial relations that make it accurately predicts the parametric effects and heat transfer characteristics of IAFB over a wide range of flow conditions. The model predicts wall temperatures of R-134a-cooled tubes with an average error of -1.21% and an RMS error of 6.37%. This corresponds to average and RMS errors in predicted heat transfer coefficients of 1.33% and 10.07%, respectively. Using water data, the model predicts wall temperatures with an average error of -1.76% and an RMS error of 7.78% which corresponds to average and RMS errors in predicted heat transfer coefficients of 4.16% and 15.06%, respectively.

  10. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  11. Characteristics, vertical structures, and heat/salt transports of mesoscale eddies in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yu, Weidong; Yuan, Yeli; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gengxin; Liu, Lin; Duan, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry sea surface height measurements reveal high mesoscale eddy activity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO). In this study, the characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the SETIO are investigated by analyzing 564 cyclonic eddy (CE) tracks and 695 anticyclonic eddy (AE) tracks identified from a new version of satellite altimetry data with a daily temporal resolution. The mean radius, lifespan, propagation speed, and distance of CEs (AEs) are 149 (153) km, 50 (46) days, 15.3 (16.6) cm s-1, and 651 (648) km, respectively. Some significant differences exist in the eddy statistical characteristics between the new-version daily altimeter data and the former weekly data. Mean vertical structures of anomalous potential temperature, salinity, geostrophic current, as well as heat and salt transports of the composite eddies, are estimated by analyzing Argo profile data matched to altimeter-detected eddies. The composite analysis shows that eddy-induced ocean anomalies are mainly confined in the upper 300 dbar. In the eddy core, CE (AE) could induce a cooling (warming) of 2°C between 60 and 180 dbar and maximum positive (negative) salinity anomalies of 0.1 (-0.3) psu in the upper 50 (110) dbar. The meridional heat transport induced by the composite CE (AE) is southward (northward), whereas the salt transport of CE (AE) is northward (southward). Most of the meridional heat and salt transports are carried in the upper 300 dbar.

  12. Nonsimilar hydromagnetic simultaneous heat and mass transfer by mixed convection from a vertical plate embedded in a uniform porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Chamkha, A.J.; Khaled, A.R.A.

    1999-08-27

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from different geometries embedded in porous media has many engineering and geophysical applications, such as migration of water in geothermal reservoirs, underground spreading of chemical wastes and other pollutants, thermal insulation, enhanced oil recovery, packed-bed catalytic reactors, cooling of nuclear reactors, grain storage, and evaporative cooling and solidification. This work considers steady, laminar, hydromagnetic simultaneous heat and mass transfer by mixed convection flow over a permeable vertical plate immersed in a uniform porous medium for the cases of power law variations of both the wall temperature and concentration and the wall heat flux and mass flux. Appropriate transformations are employed to transform the governing differential equations to a nonsimilar form. The transformed equations are solved numerically by an accurate, implicit, iterative, finite difference method. The obtained results are validated by favorable comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem. A parametric study illustrating the influence of all involved parameters on the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers is conducted. The results of this parametric study are shown graphically, and the physical aspects of the problem are discussed.

  13. Thermobaric deep convection, baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomo, Kazunori

    2006-09-01

    Numerical experiments with two- and three-dimensional nonhydrostatic models in a rotating frame have been executed to investigate thermobaric deep convection, subsequent baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport, using hydrographic data around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Overturning of the water column due to thermobaric convection is apt to occur on the southern and northern flanks of the rise, and induces upward heat transport. The depth of overturning is two times larger on the northern flank (˜1.5 km) than on the southern flank (˜0.7 km). To the contrary, no overturning occurs over the top of the rise in 90 days. Baroclinic instability develops at a density front formed between the overturned and unoverturned regions since a density contrast at the front is enhanced by thermobaricity. Heat transport due to baroclinic instability is similarly upward, and at peak becomes comparable to that due to the overturning. Applicability of the results to the cooling events previously reported is also discussed.

  14. A new thermo-hydrodynamic method for estimating convective heat flux associated with vertical fluid migration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, O.; Kovalchuk, L.

    2002-12-01

    Ample field observations in areas of known oil and gas deposists reveal an existence of excess temperature anomalies associated with the hydrocarbon-bearing structures. These observations are explained in terms of upward migration of heated fluids. In this case there is a deviation from a linear temperature distribution with depth due to a convective component of the heat flux. We propose a new method based on in situ measurements of the thermal field that allows one to take into account both conductive and convective components of the heat flow. In addition to the usual measurements of temperature, we determine the the curvature of the geothermograms, which characterizes the degree of deviation of the heat transfer from a conductive regime. Correspondingly, in addition to the commonly used geothermal gradient, we introduce new parameters, such as the radius of curvature of the geotherms (R), the coefficient of curvature of the geotherms (K), the Knudsen criterion (Kn), and parameter F. We present analytic expressions for the determination of these parameters, and evaluate these parameters for several natural objects. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method for 1) forecasts of the presence of the deep-seated hydrocarbon deposits; 2) estimates of the abnornally elevated gas content in the deep-seated coal deposits, and determination of zones with high risk of methane bursts; 3) studies of the hydro-geothermal conditions of the geothermal areas; 4) determination and localization of leaks along the buried industrial pipelines. We present examples illustrating the application of our method for the abovementioned tasks.

  15. Chemically Reacting Hydromagnetic Unsteady Flow of a Radiating Fluid Past a Vertical Plate with Constant Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The combined effects of thermal radiation absorption and magnetic field on an unsteady chemically reacting convective flow past an impulsively started vertical plate is studied in the presence of a constant wall heat flux. Boundary layer equations are derived and the resulting approximate nonlinear partial differential equations are solved numerically using a semi-discretization finite difference technique. A parametric study of all parameters involved is conducted, and a representative set of numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles as well as the skin-friction parameter and Sherwood number are illustrated graphically to show typical trends of the solutions. Further validation with previous works is carried out and an excellent agreement is achieved.

  16. Natural convection flow of Cu-H2O nanofluid along a vertical wavy surface with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiba, Farjana; Molla, Md. Mamun; Khan, M. A. Hakim

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study on natural convection flow of Cu-Water nanofluid along a vertical wavy surface with uniform heat flux has been carried out. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into parabolic partial differential equations by applying a suitable set of variables. The resulting nonlinear system of equations are then mapped into a regular rectangular computational domain and solved numerically by using an implicit finite difference method. Numerical results are thoroughly discussed in terms of velocity and temperature distributions, surface temperature distribution, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number coefficient for selected key parameters such as solid volume fraction of nanofluid (ϕ) and amplitude (α) of surface waviness. In addition, velocity vectors, streamlines and isotherms are plotted to visualize momentum and thermal flow pattern within the boundary layer region.

  17. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  18. Study of dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer using CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Bejaoui, Salma; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we developed a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to simulate dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer (EVA 702). The carrier's motion imposed the choice of a dynamic mesh based on two methods: "spring based smoothing" and "local remeshing". The dryer airflow is considered as turbulent ( Re = 1.09 × 105 at the dryer inlet), therefore the Re-Normalization Group model with Enhanced Wall Treatment was used as a turbulence model. The resolution of the governing equation was performed with Fluent 6.3 whose capacities do not allow the direct resolution of drying problems. Thus, a user defined scalar equation was inserted in the CFD code to model moisture content diffusion into tiles. User-defined functions were implemented to define carriers' motion, thermo-physical properties… etc. We adopted also a "two-step" simulation method: in the first step, we follow the heat transfer coefficient evolution (Hc). In the second step, we determine the mass transfer coefficient (Hm) and the features fields of drying air and ceramic tiles. The found results in mixed convection mode (Fr = 5.39 at the dryer inlet) were used to describe dynamic and thermal fields of airflow and heat and mass transfer close to the ceramic tiles. The response of ceramic tiles to heat and mass transfer was studied based on Biot numbers. The evolutions of averages temperature and moisture content of ceramic tiles were analyzed. Lastly, comparison between experimental and numerical results showed a good agreement.

  19. The effects of Prandtl number on flow over a vertical heated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameen, Abdulvahab; S, Ajithkumar; S, Anillal

    2015-11-01

    Flow over a two dimensional heated cylinder is analyzed numerically using a hybrid finite element-finite volume method. We assume the flow direction to be opposite to the direction of gravity. It is fundamental in fluid dynamics that the von Karman vortex street appears in the wake of the cylinder above the Reynolds number of approximately 47. On heating the cylinder surface, the Strouhal number (St), which is the non dimensional representation of the vortex shedding frequency, increases. The gradual increase in St is followed by a sudden drop at a particular value of Richardson number (Ri), defined as the relative dominance of the buoyancy force to the inertia force reported as a sudden breakdown of the Karman vortex. Our simulations show that upon further increase in Ri, recirculation bubble reappears. The present numerical work discusses the physical reasons behind this phenomenon and the effects of Prandtl number (defined as the ratio of viscous diffusion to the moment um diffusion) on Richardson number at which break down occurs.

  20. Effects of vertically ribbed surface roughness on the forced convective heat losses in central receiver systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Ralf; Frantz, Cathy; Fritsch, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    External receiver configurations are directly exposed to ambient wind. Therefore, a precise determination of the convective losses is a key factor in the prediction and evaluation of the efficiency of the solar absorbers. Based on several studies, the forced convective losses of external receivers are modeled using correlations for a roughened cylinder in a cross-flow of air. However at high wind velocities, the thermal efficiency measured during the Solar Two experiment was considerably lower than the efficiency predicted by these correlations. A detailed review of the available literature on the convective losses of external receivers has been made. Three CFD models of different level of detail have been developed to analyze the influence of the actual shape of the receiver and tower configuration, of the receiver shape and of the absorber panels on the forced convective heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer coefficients deduced from the correlations have been compared to the results of the CFD simulations. In a final step the influence of both modeling approaches on the thermal efficiency of an external tubular receiver has been studied in a thermal FE model of the Solar Two receiver.

  1. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 3; Two-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In papers 1 and 2 we have presented the results of the most updated 1-point closure model for the turbulent vertical diffusivities of momentum, heat and salt, K(sub m,h,s). In this paper, we derive the analytic expressions for K(sub m,h,s) using a new 2-point closure model that has recently been developed and successfully tested against some approx. 80 turbulence statistics for different flows. The new model has no free parameters. The expressions for K(sub m, h. s) are analytical functions of two stability parameters: the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient/temperature gradient) and the Richardson number R(sub i) (temperature gradient/shear). The turbulent kinetic energy K and its rate of dissipation may be taken local or non-local (K-epsilon model). Contrary to all previous models that to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML) have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum. heat and salt, we propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, K(sub m,h,s) have the same functional dependence on R(sub i) and R(sub rho) derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking measured by Gargett et al. (1981). The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we use the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. Using the new K(sub m,h, s), we run an O-GCM and present a variety of results that we compare with Levitus and the KPP model. Since the traditional 1-point (used in papers 1 and 2) and the new 2-point closure models used here represent different modeling philosophies and procedures, testing them in an O-GCM is indispensable. The basic motivation is to show that the new 2-point closure model gives results that are overall superior to the 1-point closure in spite of the fact that the latter rely on several adjustable parameters while the new 2-point

  2. Estimation of lacustrine groundwater discharge using heat as a tracer and vertical hydraulic gradients - a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, S.; Lewandowski, J.; Nützmann, G.

    2015-03-01

    Lacustrine groundwater discharge (LGD) can play a major role in water and nutrient balances of lakes. Unfortunately, studies often neglect this input path due to methodological difficulties in the determination. In a previous study we described a method which allows the estimation of LGD and groundwater recharge using hydraulic head data and groundwater net balances based on meteorological data. The aim of this study is to compare these results with discharge rates estimated by inverse modelling of heat transport using temperature profiles measured in lake bed sediments. We were able to show a correlation between the fluxes obtained with the different methods, although the time scales of the methods differ substantially. As a consequence, we conclude that the use of hydraulic head data and meteorologically-based groundwater net balances to estimate LGD is limited to time scales similar to the calibration period.

  3. Particle image velocimetry measurements for opposing flow in a vertical channel with a differential and asymmetric heating condition

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Suastegui, L.; Trevino, C.

    2007-10-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were carried out in an experimental investigation of laminar mixed convection in a vertical duct with a square cross-section. The main downward water-flow is driven by gravity while a portion of a lateral side is heated, and buoyancy forces produce non-stationary vortex structures close to the heated region. Various ranges of the Grashof number, Gr are studied in combination with the Reynolds number, Re varying from 300 to 700. The values of the generalized buoyancy parameter or Richardson number, Ri = Gr/Re{sup 2} parallel to the Grashof number are included in the results. The influence of these nondimensional parameters and how they affect the fluid flow structure and vortex sizes and locations are reported. The flow patterns are nonsymmetric, periodic, and exhibit increasing complexity and frequency for increasing buoyancy. For the averaged values of the resulting vortex dimensions, it was found that a better and more congruent representation occurs when employing the Grashof and Reynolds numbers as independent parameters. (author)

  4. A Study on a Performance of Water-Spray-Type Ice Thermal Energy Storage Vessel with Vertical Heat Exchanger Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Sasaguchi, Kengo; Fukuda, Toshihito; Koyama, Shigeru

    A system with a water-embedded-trpe ice storage vessel is widely used because of its simple structure and compactness. However, the water-embedded-type ice storage vessel has a disadvantage, that is, the solidification rate is very small. The use of falling water film seems to be one of promising ways for solving this disadvantage. We have found in a previous study that the use of the falling water film is very effective, especially for high initial water temperatures. In the present study, we eexamined the performance of a faling-water-film-type ice thermal energy storage vessel with pratical size, having vertical heat exchanger plates. The ice making performance coefficient, η, increases with time, and it becomes am aximum value of 2.5, after that, it decreases gradually. In order to make ice efficiently, it is necessary to set a flow rate of refrigerant properly and to adjust a difference between the evaporating temperature of refrigerant and the freezing point of water so that the refrigerant evaporates in the heat exchanger plates overall.

  5. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-05-27

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures the water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.

  6. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-05-27

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures themore » water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.« less

  7. The Correlation of Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Experimental Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M; Miller, W A

    1999-11-14

    Absorption chillers are gaining global acceptance as quality comfort cooling systems. These machines are the central chilling plants and the supply for cotnfort cooling for many large commercial buildings. Virtually all absorption chillers use lithium bromide (LiBr) and water as the absorption fluids. Water is the refrigerant. Research has shown LiBr to he one of the best absorption working fluids because it has a high affinity for water, releases water vapor at relatively low temperatures, and has a boiling point much higher than that of water. The heart of the chiller is the absorber, where a process of simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs as the refrigerant water vapor is absorbed into a falling film of aqueous LiBr. The more water vapor absorbed into the falling film, the larger the chiller's capacity for supporting comfort cooling. Improving the performance of the absorber leads directly to efficiency gains for the chiller. The design of an absorber is very empirical and requires experimental data. Yet design data and correlations are sparse in the open literature. The experimental data available to date have been derived at LiBr concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 mass fraction. No literature data are readily available for the design operating conditions of 0.62 and 0.64 mass fraction of LiBr and absorber pressures of 0.7 and 1.0 kPa.

  8. Influence of vertical and lateral heat transfer on permafrost thaw, peatland landscape transition, and groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Hayashi, Masaki; Quinton, William L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2016-02-01

    Recent climate change has reduced the spatial extent and thickness of permafrost in many discontinuous permafrost regions. Rapid permafrost thaw is producing distinct landscape changes in the Taiga Plains of the Northwest Territories, Canada. As permafrost bodies underlying forested peat plateaus shrink, the landscape slowly transitions into unforested wetlands. The expansion of wetlands has enhanced the hydrologic connectivity of many watersheds via new surface and near-surface flow paths, and increased streamflow has been observed. Furthermore, the decrease in forested peat plateaus results in a net loss of boreal forest and associated ecosystems. This study investigates fundamental processes that contribute to permafrost thaw by comparing observed and simulated thaw development and landscape transition of a peat plateau-wetland complex in the Northwest Territories, Canada from 1970 to 2012. Measured climate data are first used to drive surface energy balance simulations for the wetland and peat plateau. Near-surface soil temperatures simulated in the surface energy balance model are then applied as the upper boundary condition to a three-dimensional model of subsurface water flow and coupled energy transport with freeze-thaw. Simulation results demonstrate that lateral heat transfer, which is not considered in many permafrost models, can influence permafrost thaw rates. Furthermore, the simulations indicate that landscape evolution arising from permafrost thaw acts as a positive feedback mechanism that increases the energy absorbed at the land surface and produces additional permafrost thaw. The modeling results also demonstrate that flow rates in local groundwater flow systems may be enhanced by the degradation of isolated permafrost bodies.

  9. Characterizing fractured rock aquifers using heated Distributed Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensing to determine borehole vertical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, T. O.; Bour, O.; Selker, J. S.; Le Borgne, T.; Bense, V.; Hochreutener, R.; Lavenant, N.

    2013-12-01

    In highly heterogeneous media, fracture network connectivity and hydraulic properties can be estimated using methods such as packer- or cross-borehole pumping-tests. Typically, measurements of hydraulic head or vertical flow in such tests are made either at a single location over time, or at a series of depths by installing a number of packers or raising or lowering a probe. We show how this often encountered monitoring problem, with current solutions sacrificing either one of temporal or spatial information, can be addressed using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS). Here, we electrically heat the conductive cladding materials of cables deployed in boreholes to determine the vertical flow profile. We present results from heated fiber optic cables deployed in three boreholes in a fractured rock aquifer at the much studied experimental site near Ploemeur, France, allowing detailed comparisons with alternative methods (e.g. Le Borgne et al., 2007). When submerged in water and electrically heated, the cable very rapidly reaches a steady state temperature (less than 60 seconds). The steady state temperature of the heated cable, measured using the DTS method, is then a function of the velocity of the fluid in the borehole. We find that such cables are sensitive to a wide range of fluid velocities, and thus suitable for measuring both ambient and pumped flow profiles at the Ploemeur site. The cables are then used to monitor the flow profiles during all possible configurations of: ambient flow, cross-borehole- (pumping one borehole, and observing in another), and dipole-tests (pumping one borehole, re-injection in another). Such flow data acquired using DTS may then be used for tomographic flow inversions, for instance using the approach developed by Klepikova et al., (submitted). Using the heated fiber optic method, we are able to observe the flow response during such tests in high spatial detail, and are also able to capture temporal flow dynamics occurring at the

  10. Non-equilibrium pressure control of the height of a large-scale, ground-coupled, rotating fluid column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, R. L.; Zardadkhan, I. R.

    2013-05-01

    When a ground-coupled, rotating fluid column is modeled incorporating non-equilibrium pressure forces in the Navier-Stokes equations, a new exact solution results. The solution has been obtained in a similar manner to the classical equilibrium solution. Unlike the infinite-height, classical solution, the non-equilibrium pressure solution yields a ground-coupled rotating fluid column of finite height. A viscous, non-equilibrium Rankine vortex velocity distribution, developed previously, was used to demonstrate how the viscous and non-equilibrium pressure gradient forces, arising in the vicinity of the velocity gradient discontinuity that is present in the classical Rankine vortex model, effectively isolate the rotating central fluid column from the outer potential vortex region. Thus, the non-equilibrium region acts to confine and shield the central, rigid-body-like, rotating fluid core, justifying this examination of how such a rotating fluid column can interact with the ground. The resulting non-equilibrium ground-coupled, rotating fluid column solution was employed to estimate the central column heights of three well-documented dust devils, and the central column height predictions were consistent with published dust devil height statistics.

  11. Numerical study of mixed convection around a sphere rotating about its vertical axis in a Newtonian fluid at rest and subject to a heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hatem, N.; Philippe, C.; Mbow, C.; Kabdi, Z.; Najoua, S.; Daguenet, M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors study numerically the steady state laminar mixed convection around a sphere heated by a nonuniform flux in a Newtonian fluid. The sphere rotates around its vertical axis. The governing transfer equations in this three-dimensional problem are solved by using the method of Cebeci-Keller. Three types of convection are considered: pure rotation, pure natural convection, and mixed convection. The profiles of the coefficients of heat transfer and local friction, as well as the profiles of temperature, will be determined for various distributions of a heat flux. In the case of a two-dimensional problem, the results agree with those in the literature.

  12. The transverse instability in a differentially heated vertical cavity filled with molecular radiating gases. I. Linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borget, V.; Bdéoui, F.; Soufiani, A.; Le Quéré, P.

    2001-05-01

    Radiation effects on the onset of the transverse instability in a differentially heated vertical cavity containing molecular emitting and absorbing gases in the so-called conduction regime is studied theoretically. Radiative transfer is treated using the full integro-differential formulation. The neutral stability curves are determined using a combined Galerkin-collocation method based on Chebyshev polynomials. A modified correlated-k model and the absorption distribution function model are used in order to take into account the spectral structure of the absorption coefficient for radiating molecules such as H2O and CO2. For transparent media, perfect agreement is found with the available data reported in the literature and, particularly, the principle of exchange of stability is found to hold for Prandtl number values less than 12.46. The study of gray media allows us to examine the basic mechanisms that yield to the onset of transverse instability as traveling waves. For real radiating gases, a parametric study for H2O and CO2 is reported. It is shown that the radiative transfer delays the onset of the transverse instability and this delay increases with temperature and decreases with boundary emissivities, while layer depth effects depend on the level of saturation of the gas active absorption bands. Whatever the gas considered, it is found that neither radiation effect on the basic flow nor the radiative power disturbances can be neglected.

  13. Experimental study of the Marangoni flow in evaporating water droplet placed on vertical vibration and heated hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Seok; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-11-01

    In general, the heated surface generates a Marangoni flow inside a droplet yielding a coffee stain effect in the end. This study aims to visualize and control the Marangoni flow by using periodic vertical vibration. While the droplet is evaporating, the variation of contact angle and internal volume of droplet was observed by using the combination of a continuous light and a DSLR still camera. Regarding the internal velocity, the PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) system was applied to visualize the internal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the temperature gradient inside and surface tension on the droplet, a commercial software Comsol Multiphysics was used. In the result, the internal velocity increases with the increase of the plate temperature and both flow directions of Marangoni and gravitational flow are opposite so that there seems to be a possibility to control the coffee stain effect. In addition, the Marangoni flow was controlled at relatively lower range of frequency 30 ~ 50Hz. Work supported by Korea government Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy KETEP grant No. 20134030200290, Ministry of Education NRF grant No. NRF2013R1A1A2005347.

  14. Heat transfer analysis in a second grade fluid over and oscillating vertical plate using fractional Caputo-Fabrizio derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nehad Ali; Khan, Ilyas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives approach to the thermal analysis of a second grade fluid over an infinite oscillating vertical flat plate. Together with an oscillating boundary motion, the heat transfer is caused by the buoyancy force induced by temperature differences between the plate and the fluid. Closed form solutions of the fluid velocity and temperature are obtained by means of the Laplace transform. The solutions of ordinary second grade and Newtonian fluids corresponding to time derivatives of integer and fractional orders are obtained as particular cases of the present solutions. Numerical computations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the effects of the Caputo-Fabrizio time-fractional parameter α, the material parameter α _2 , and the Prandtl and Grashof numbers on the velocity field. A comparison for time derivative of integer order versus fractional order is shown graphically for both Newtonian and second grade fluids. It is found that fractional fluids (second grade and Newtonian) have highest velocities. This shows that the fractional parameter enhances the fluid flow.

  15. Effect of a finite external heat transfer coefficient on the Darcy-Bénard instability in a vertical porous cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, A.; Storesletten, L.

    2013-04-01

    The onset of thermal convection in a vertical porous cylinder is studied by considering the heating from below and the cooling from above as caused by external forced convection processes. These processes are parametrised through a finite Biot number, and hence through third-kind, or Robin, temperature conditions imposed on the lower and upper boundaries of the cylinder. Both the horizontal plane boundaries and the cylindrical sidewall are assumed to be impermeable; the sidewall is modelled as a thermally insulated boundary. The linear stability analysis is carried out by studying separable normal modes, and the principle of exchange of stabilities is proved. It is shown that the Biot number does not affect the ordering of the instability modes that, when the radius-to-height aspect ratio increases, are displayed in sequence at the onset of convection. On the other hand, the Biot number plays a central role in determining the transition aspect ratios from one mode to its follower. In the limit of a vanishingly small Biot number, just the first (non-axisymmetric) mode is displayed at the onset of convection, for every value of the aspect ratio.

  16. Heat Transfer Mechanism of a Vertical Wall Inside a Two-Phase Closed Thermosiphon Evaporator and Its Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O-Uchi, Masaki; Hirose, Koichi; Saito, Futami

    The inside heat transfer coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, and heat flow rate at the heating section of the thermosiphon were determined for each heating method. In order to observe the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator, a thermosiphon unit made of glass was assembled and conducted separately. The results of these experiments with these two units are summarized as follows. (1) Nucleate boiling due to the internal heat transfer mechanism improves the heat transfer characteristics of the thermosiphon unit. Under the specific heating conditions with dropwise condensation, there are two types of heat transfer mechanism occur in the evaporator accompanying nucleate boiling, i. e. latent heat transfer and sensible heat transfer. (2) In the case of latent heat transfer, the inside heat transfer coefficient has an upper limit which can be used as a criterion to determine the type of internal heat transfer mechanism.

  17. Heat flux measurement from vertical temperature profile and thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Finizola, Anthony; Beauducel, François; Brothelande, Elodie; Allemand, Pascal; Delacourt, Christophe; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal systems are associated to most of the dormant volcanoes. Heat is transported by steam from the hot magma body in the connected porosity and the fissures of the rock to the surface. If the flux is low enough (<500 W/m²), the steam mainly condensates in the soil close to surface, and a significant proportion of the heat is transported to the surface by conduction, producing a gradient of temperature and a thermal anomaly detectable at the surface. Detecting and monitoring these fluxes is crucial for hazard management, since it reflects the state of the magma body in depth. In order to quantify this flux two methods are considered. First, a vertical profile of temperature is measured by a series of thermocouples, and the conducted flux is estimated thanks to the Fourier law. Secondly, a more recent method uses the thermal infrared imagery to monitor the surface temperature anomaly (STA) between the studied zone and an equivalent zone not affected by the geothermal flux. The heat flux from the soil to the atmosphere is computed as the sum of (1) the radiative flux, (2) the sensible flux and (3) the residual steam flux. These two methods are complementary and have an equivalent uncertainty of approximately 20%, which would allow to track the major changes in the hydrothermal system. However, the surface and sub-surface temperatures are strongly influenced by the climate. For instance, it has been widely demonstrated that the surface temperature dramatically decreases after a rainfall. In order to estimate the reliability of the measurements, a numerical model simulating the evolution of the subsurface temperature in low flux fumarolic zone has been built. In depth, the heat can be transported either by conduction, or by the rising steam, or by condensed water. In surface, both the radiative flux and the sensible flux (convection of the atmosphere) are taken into account. This model allows to estimate the changes of temperature due to a variation of solar

  18. Intraseasonal variations in the surface layer heat balance of the central equatorial Indian Ocean: The importance of zonal advection and vertical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.; Foltz, G. R.

    2013-06-01

    examine the ocean mixed layer response to intraseasonal atmospheric forcing using moored time series data in the central equatorial Indian Ocean for October 2004 to March 2005, a period coincident with two active phases of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Both MJO events were accompanied by a sea surface temperature decrease that was partially the consequence of reduced net surface heat flux. In addition, during the first event in October-November 2004, advection by an enhanced Wyrtki Jet contributed substantial cooling, while during the second event in December 2004 to January 2005, vertical processes, most likely related to entrainment mixing, were pronounced. Heavy rainfall at the mooring location during the first event may have contributed to the formation of a 30-40 m thick barrier layer that limited turbulent vertical transfers between the mixed layer and the thermocline. There was no barrier layer present during the second event, which presumably allowed for much freer vertical turbulent exchanges.

  19. Effects of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convection stagnation point flow toward a vertical plate in a porous medium with radiation and heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Niranjan; Sivasankaran, S.; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convection with the stagnation point flow towards a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium with radiation and internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. Then they are solved by shooting technique with Runge-Kutta fourth order iteration. The obtained numerical results are illustrated graphically and the heat and mass transfer rates are given in tabular form. The velocity and temperature profiles overshoot near the plate on increasing the chemical reaction parameter, Richardson number and magnetic field parameter.

  20. A rigorous bound on the vertical transport of heat in Rayleigh-Bénard convection at infinite Prandtl number with mixed thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Jared P.; Wittenberg, Ralf W.

    2014-09-01

    A rigorous upper bound on the Nusselt number is derived for infinite Prandtl number Rayleigh-Bénard convection for a fluid constrained between no-slip, mixed thermal vertical boundaries. The result suggests that the thermal boundary condition does not affect the qualitative nature of the heat transport. The bound is obtained with the use of a nonlinear, stably stratified background temperature profile in the bulk, notwithstanding the lack of boundary control of the temperature due to the Robin boundary conditions.

  1. Survey of advanced-heat-pump developments for space conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of heat pump projects with special emphasis on those supported by DOE, EPRI, and the Gas Research Institute is presented. Some historical notes on heat pump development are discussed. Market and equipment trends, well water and ground-coupled heat pumps, heat-actuated heat pump development, and international interest in heat pumps are also discussed. 30 references.

  2. Ground coupling and single-blow thermal storage in a double-envelope house

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H. T.; Jones, R. F.

    1981-04-01

    The possibility of ground thermal storage and coupling in a double shell house was investigated. Temperature distribution in the ground, utilization of measured ground temperatures, and the amount of heat retrieval are assessed. One experimental model and several hypothetical models are introduced, and their affects and advantages are compared.

  3. Ground coupling and single-blow thermal storage in a double-envelope house

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaffari, H T; Jones, R F

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of ground thermal storage and coupling in a double-shell house is investigated. Temperature distribution in the ground, utilizing measured ground temperatures, is obtained, and the amount of heat retrieval is assessed. One experimental model and several hypothetical models are introduced; their effects and advantages are compared.

  4. Direct measurements of vertical heat flux and Na flux in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere by lidar at Boulder (40°N, 105°W), Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Chu, X.; Gardner, C. S.; Barry, I. F.; Smith, J. A.; Fong, W.; Yu, Z.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    The vertical transport of heat and constituent by gravity waves and tides plays a fundamental role in establishing the thermal and constituent structures of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), but has not been thoroughly investigated by observations. In particular, direct measurements of vertical heat flux and metal constituent flux caused by dissipating waves are extremely rare, which demand precise measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions over a long period. Such requirements are necessary to overcome various uncertainties to reveal the small quantities of the heat and constituent fluxes induced by dissipating waves. So far such direct observations have only been reported for vertical heat and Na fluxes using a Na Doppler lidar at Starfire Optical Range (SOR) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Furthermore, estimate of eddy heat and constituent fluxes from the turbulent mixing generated by breaking waves is even more challenging due to the even smaller temporal and spatial scales of the eddy. Consequently, the associated coefficients of thermal (kH) and constituent (kzz) diffusion have not been well characterized and remain as large uncertainties in models. We attempt to address these issues with direct measurements by a Na Doppler lidar with exceptional high-resolution measurement capabilities. Since summer 2010, we have been operating a Na Doppler lidar at Boulder, Colorado. The efficiency of the lidar has been greatly improved in summer of 2011 and achieved generally over 1000 counts of Na signal per lidar pulse in winter. In 2013, we made extensive Na lidar observations in 98 nights. These data covering each month of a full year will be used to characterize the seasonal variations of heat and Na fluxes and to be compared with the pioneering observations at SOR. In November 2013, we further upgraded the lidar with two new frequency shifters and a new data acquisition scheme, which are optimized for estimating eddy fluxes and reducing the

  5. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Eidietis, N. W.; Parks, P. B.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2015-10-15

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. This IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.

  6. The effect of transpiration on coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1997-03-01

    Effect of transpiration velocity on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a permeable vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion is numerically analyzed. The plate is maintained at a uniform temperature and species concentration with constant transpiration velocity. The transformed governing equations are solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are presented. In general, it has been found for thermally assisted flow that the local surface heat and mass transfer rates increase owing to suction of fluid. This trend reversed for blowing of fluid. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  7. Analysis of fluid motion and heat transport on magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer past a vertical power law stretching sheet with hydrodynamic and thermal slip effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahtani, Badr; Abel, M. Subhas; Aly, Emad H.

    2015-12-01

    The present model is committed to the study of MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer past a nonlinear vertically stretching porous stretching sheet with the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip. The boundary value problem, consisting of boundary layer equations of motion and heat transfer, which are nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, with the aid of similarity transformation. This problem has been solved, using Runge Kutta fourth order method with shooting technique. The effects of various physical parameters, such as, stretching parameter m, magnetic parameter M, porosity parameter fw, buoyancy parameter λ, Prandtl number Pr, Eckert number Ec, hydrodynamic slip parameter γ, and thermal slip parameter δ, on flow and heat transfer characteristics, are computed and represented graphically.

  8. Nonlinear Radiation Heat Transfer Effects in the Natural Convective Boundary Layer Flow of Nanofluid Past a Vertical Plate: A Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  9. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. Furthermore, this IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.

  10. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  11. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  12. Comparison of air-launched and ground-coupled configurations of SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2015-04-01

    A stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) system produces waveforms consisting of a sequence of sine waves with linearly increasing frequency. By adopting a wide frequency bandwidth, SFCW GPR systems offer an optimal resolution at each achievable measurement depth. Furthermore, these systems anticipate an improved penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as compared to time-domain impulse GPRs, because energy is focused in one single frequency at a time and the phase and amplitude of the reflected signal is recorded for each discrete frequency step. However, the search for the optimal practical implementation of SFCW GPR technology to fulfil these theoretical advantages is still ongoing. In this study we compare the performance of a SFCW GPR system for air-launched and ground-coupled antenna configurations. The first is represented by a 3d-Radar Geoscope GS3F system operated with a V1213 antenna array. This array contains 7 transmitting and 7 receiving antennae resulting in 13 measurement channels at a spacing of 0.075 m and providing a total scan width of 0.975 m. The ground-coupled configuration is represented by 3d-Radar's latest-generation SFCW system, GeoScope Mk IV, operated with a DXG1212 antenna array. With 6 transmitting and 5 receiving antennae this array provides 12 measurement channels and an effective scan width of 0.9 m. Both systems were tested on several sites representative of various application environments, including a test site with different road specimens (Belgian Road Research Centre) and two test areas in different agricultural fields in Flanders, Belgium. For each test, data acquisition was performed using the full available frequency bandwidth of the systems (50 to 3000 MHz). Other acquisition parameters such as the frequency step and dwell time were varied in different tests. Analyzing the data of the different tests in time, frequency and wavelet domain allows to evaluate different performance

  13. The vertical distribution of radiogenic heat production in the Precambrian crust of Norway and Sweden: Geothermal implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Christophe; Jaupart, Claude

    The present geology of southern Scandinavia offers the unique opportunity to sample deep and intermediate levels from the same crustal section for both heat flow and heat production. In the central part of southern Norway, amphibolite facies terranes appear to lie on top of the same deeper crustal formations which crop out on their western and eastern margins. An extensive data set on the geochemistry of all types of rocks in the region culled from the literature is used to derive values for radiogenic heat production for each kind of crustal facies. Using constraints from heat flow data in the same area allows a reliable model of the distribution of crustal heat production. The average heat production of granulite facies terranes is 0.4 µW/m³, similar to values in other parts of the world. For amphibolite facies rocks, the value is 1.6 µW/m³. The present shield also includes heat producing element enriched granites formed in later events and the average heat production of presently exposed crust is 2.7 µ/m³. Using heat flow and radioactivity data from ten stations, the reduced heat flow in the area is 22 ± 2 mW/m². This corresponds to the heat flow at the top of 28 km of deep crustal facies, implying that the mantle heat flow is probably as low as 10 mW/m². Over the whole crustal thickness, the average amount of radiogenic heat is 31 mW/m².

  14. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  15. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  17. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  18. Heat Budget Calculation in the Convective Boundary Layer on a 4 × 4 Vertical versus Time Grid from Aircraft and Surface Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, John C.

    2000-09-01

    Aircraft, portable tower, and radiosonde measurements from 4 August 1989 (day 68) of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), over fairly flat terrain in Kansas, are used for the reconstruction of the heat conservation equation. The calculation grid consists of three grouped flight levels and the surface, and three 1-h blocks, within the midday convective boundary layer (CBL). The day chosen had a week warm front disturbance in addition to the usual summertime southern flow over the midwestern United States. Significant vertical and temporal structure, which should not be bulk averaged, was observed for all terms. The upper layer showed warming sustained at a constant rate around noon and appeared decoupled from the surface and the middle levels in the later hours. Excess warming was due to advection and possibly entrainment. Consequently, the heat flux divergence also had a nonzero vertical gradient. Advection proves to be an important term and does not average out when driven by a synoptic feature. Its east-west component improved the balance of the heat equation at all levels. Partial flight intertrack and total CBL volume standard deviations for terms and residuals are carried through explicitly.

  19. Ground-coupled acoustic airwaves from Mount St. Helens provide constraints on the May 18, 1980 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Malone, Stephen D.

    2007-06-01

    The May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption perturbed the atmosphere and generated atmosphere-to-ground coupled airwaves, which were recorded on at least 35 seismometers operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN). From 102 distinct travel time picks we identify coherent airwaves crossing Washington State primarily to the north and east of the volcano. The travel time curves provide evidence for both stratospheric refractions (at 200 to 300 km from the volcano) as well as probable thermospheric refractions (at 100 to 350 km). The very few first-hand reports of audible volcano sounds within about 80 km of the volcano coincide with a general absence of ground-coupled acoustic arrivals registered within about 100 km and are attributed to upward refraction of sound waves. From the coherent refracted airwave arrivals, we identify at least four distinct sources which we infer to originate 10 s, 114 s, ˜ 180 s and 319 s after the onset of an 8:32:11 PDT landslide. The first of these sources is attributed to resultant depressurization and explosion of the cryptodome. Most of the subsequent arrivals also appear to be coincident with a source located at or near the presumed volcanic conduit, but at least one of the later arrivals suggests an epicenter displaced about 9 km to the northwest of the vent. This dislocation is compatible with the direction of the sector collapse and lateral blast. We speculate that this concussion corresponds to a northern explosion event associated with hot cryptodome entering the Toutle River Valley.

  20. Ground-coupled acoustic airwaves from Mount St. Helens provide constraints on the May 18, 1980 eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.B.; Malone, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption perturbed the atmosphere and generated atmosphere-to-ground coupled airwaves, which were recorded on at least 35 seismometers operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN). From 102 distinct travel time picks we identify coherent airwaves crossing Washington State primarily to the north and east of the volcano. The travel time curves provide evidence for both stratospheric refractions (at 200 to 300 km from the volcano) as well as probable thermospheric refractions (at 100 to 350 km). The very few first-hand reports of audible volcano sounds within about 80 km of the volcano coincide with a general absence of ground-coupled acoustic arrivals registered within about 100 km and are attributed to upward refraction of sound waves. From the coherent refracted airwave arrivals, we identify at least four distinct sources which we infer to originate 10 s, 114 s, ∼ 180 s and 319 s after the onset of an 8:32:11 PDT landslide. The first of these sources is attributed to resultant depressurization and explosion of the cryptodome. Most of the subsequent arrivals also appear to be coincident with a source located at or near the presumed volcanic conduit, but at least one of the later arrivals suggests an epicenter displaced about 9 km to the northwest of the vent. This dislocation is compatible with the direction of the sector collapse and lateral blast. We speculate that this concussion corresponds to a northern explosion event associated with hot cryptodome entering the Toutle River Valley.

  1. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  2. Combined effect of buoyancy force and Navier slip on MHD flow of a nanofluid over a convectively heated vertical porous plate.

    PubMed

    Mutuku-Njane, Winifred Nduku; Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (f w ), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter ( β ), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate. PMID:24222749

  3. Combined Effect of Buoyancy Force and Navier Slip on MHD Flow of a Nanofluid over a Convectively Heated Vertical Porous Plate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (fw), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter (β), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate. PMID:24222749

  4. Experimental Investigation on the Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Vertical Upward Flow of Supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hyungrae Kim; Yoon Yeong Bae; Hwan Yeol Kim; Jin Ho Song; Bong Hyun Cho

    2006-07-01

    The SCWR (Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor) is one of the feasible options for the 4. generation nuclear power plant, which is being pursued by an international collaborative organization, the Gen IV International Forum (GIF). The major advantages of the SCWR include a high thermal efficiency and a maximum use of the existing technologies. In the SCWR, the coolant(water) of a supercritical pressure passes the pseudo-critical temperature as it flows upward through the sub-channels of the fuel assemblies. At certain conditions a heat transfer deterioration may occur near the pseudo-critical temperature and it may cause an excessive rise of the fuel surface temperature. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the heat transfer coefficient is necessary for the thermal-hydraulic design of a fuel pin, a fuel assembly, and the reactor core. A test facility, SPHINX, dedicated to produce heat transfer data and study flow characteristics, uses supercritical pressure CO{sub 2} as a medium to take advantage of the relatively low critical temperature and pressure; and similar physical properties with water. The produced data includes the temperature of the heating surface, the heat transfer coefficient, and the pressure drop at varying mass fluxes, heat fluxes, and operating pressures. The test section is a circular tube of ID 4.4 mm. The test range of the mass flux is 400 {approx} 1200 kg/m{sup 2}s and the maximum heat flux is 150 kW/m{sup 2}. The tests were performed for three different pressures, 7.75, 8.12, and 8.85 MPa. The test results are compared with the existing correlations of the heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the deterioration conditions observed in our test are compared against the criteria for a different fluid or a different tube size. (authors)

  5. Forced and mixed convection heat transfer to supercritical CO{sub 2} vertically flowing in a uniformly-heated circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Kang, Deog-Ji

    2010-11-15

    An experiment of heat transfer to CO{sub 2}, which flows upward and downward in a circular tube with an inner diameter of 6.32 mm, was carried out with mass flux of 285-1200 kg/m{sup 2} s and heat flux of 30-170 kW/m{sup 2} at pressures of 7.75 and 8.12 MPa, respectively. The corresponding Reynolds number at the tube test section inlet ranges from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 3.8 x 10{sup 5}. The tube inner diameter corresponds to the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the fuel assembly sub-channel, which is being studied at KAERI. Among the tested correlations, the Bishop correlation predicted the experimental data most accurately, but only 66.9% of normal heat transfer data were predicted within {+-}30% error range. The Watts and Chou correlation, which is claimed to be valid for both the normal and deteriorated heat transfer regime, showed unsatisfactory performance. A significant decrease in Nusselt number was observed in the range of 10{sup -6}heat transfer deterioration regime. The heat transfer deteriorated when the value of the buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} exceeded 2.0 x 10{sup -5} close to the Jackson and Hall's criterion. As soon as the heat transfer deteriorated, it entered a new regime and did not return to a normal heat transfer regime, although the value of buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} reduced below the deterioration criterion 2.0 x 10{sup -5}. It may justify the requirement of developing separate correlations for the normal and deterioration regimes, as proposed in this paper. (author)

  6. Effect of sea-ice melt on inherent optical properties and vertical distribution of solar radiant heating in Arctic surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granskog, Mats A.; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Sagan, Sławomir; Kowalczuk, Piotr; Raczkowska, Anna; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2015-10-01

    The inherent optical properties (IOPs) of Polar Waters (PW) exiting the Arctic Ocean in the East Greenland Current (EGC) and of the inflowing Atlantic waters (AW) in the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) were studied in late summer when surface freshening due to sea-ice melt was widespread. The absorption and attenuation coefficients in PW were significantly higher than previous observations from the western Arctic. High concentrations of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) resulted in 50-60% more heat deposition in the upper meters relative to clearest natural waters. This demonstrates the influence of terrigenous organic material inputs on the optical properties of waters in the Eurasian basin. Sea-ice melt in CDOM-rich PW decreased CDOM absorption, but an increase in scattering nearly compensated for lower absorption, and total attenuation was nearly identical in the sea-ice meltwater layer. This suggests a source of scattering material associated with sea-ice melt, relative to the PW. In the AW, melting sea-ice forms a stratified surface layer with lower absorption and attenuation, than well-mixed AW waters in late summer. It is likely that phytoplankton in the surface layer influenced by sea-ice melt are nutrient limited. The presence of a more transparent surface layer changes the vertical radiant heat absorption profile to greater depths in late summer both in EGC and WSC waters, shifting accumulation of solar heat to greater depths and thus this heat is not directly available for ice melt during periods of stratification.

  7. Investigations of heat transfer, entropy generation and pressure build up for upward flow in a vertical channel equipped with a fin array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitallah, Medhat A.; Zohir, Alaa E.

    2015-11-01

    The optimal thermal systems design criteria by maximizing the amount of heat transfer per pressure losses is a very important topic. In this work, flow and convection and radiation heat transfer characteristics are studied numerically for a flow in a vertical channel equipped with transverse fin array. The influences of fin height on heat transfer characteristics and fluid flow is investigated. Large number of fins is used (40 fins) in order to reach the fully developed conditions after few fins from the entrance. Based on the calculated data of temperature and velocity, the local entropy generation is calculated through the whole channel by solving the entropy generation equation. The results are validated against the available data in the literature and both results are in a good agreement. Optimizations for flow conditions and channel geometry are performed in order to obtain maximum heat transfer per pumping power losses. The results showed that the highest values of total heat transfer per pumping power losses are obtained at fin height to the gap width values of 0.1 and 0.3. The effect of heat transfer by radiation on entropy generation is examined and, the effect of the ratio, Gr/Re2, on the pressure field is also investigated. It was found that a positive pressure gradient appears downstream in the channel when the value of Gr/Re2 exceeds a certain limit. For Gr/Re2 values between 0 and 9, the pressure gradient is negative; however, when the value Gr/Re2 exceeds 9, the pressure starts to build up through the channel axis.

  8. Convective heat transfer to CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure flowing vertically upward in tubes and an annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol

    2009-01-15

    The Super-Critical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been chosen by the Generation IV International Forum as one of the candidates for the next generation nuclear reactors. Heat transfer to water from a fuel assembly may deteriorate at certain supercritical pressure flow conditions and its estimation at degraded conditions as well as in normal conditions is very important to the design of a safe and reliable reactor core. Extensive experiments on a heat transfer to a vertically upward flowing CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure in tubes and an annular channel have been performed. The geometries of the test sections include tubes of an internal diameter (ID) of 4.4 and 9.0 mm and an annular channel (8 x 10 mm). The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and Nusselt numbers were derived from the inner wall temperature converted by using the outer wall temperature measured by adhesive K-type thermocouples and a direct (tube) or indirect (annular channel) electric heating power. From the test results, a correlation, which covers both a deteriorated and a normal heat transfer regime, was developed. The developed correlation takes different forms in each interval divided by the value of parameter Bu. The parameter Bu (referred to as Bu hereafter), a function of the Grashof number, the Reynolds number and the Prandtl number, was introduced since it is known to be a controlling factor for the occurrence of a heat transfer deterioration due to a buoyancy effect. The developed correlation predicted the HTCs for water and HCFC-22 fairly well. (author)

  9. Unsteady hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid and heat transfer over a vertical stretching sheet with thermal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, Sharena Mohamad; Ali, Anati

    2015-10-22

    In this paper, the hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid over a vertical stretching sheet with thermal radiation is investigated. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. These nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method (RKF45 Method). The behavior of velocity and temperature profiles of hydromagnetic fluid flow of dusty fluid is analyzed and discussed for different parameters of interest such as unsteady parameter, fluid-particle interaction parameter, the magnetic parameter, radiation parameter and Prandtl number on the flow.

  10. Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF.

  11. Heat Transfer Analysis of MHD Thin Film Flow of an Unsteady Second Grade Fluid Past a Vertical Oscillating Belt

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Taza; Islam, Saeed; Shah, Rehan Ali; Khan, Ilyas; Khalid, Asma; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to study the thin film layer flowing on a vertical oscillating belt. The flow is considered to satisfy the constitutive equation of unsteady second grade fluid. The governing equation for velocity and temperature fields with subjected initial and boundary conditions are solved by two analytical techniques namely Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM) and Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). The comparisons of ADM and OHAM solutions for velocity and temperature fields are shown numerically and graphically for both the lift and drainage problems. It is found that both these solutions are identical. In order to understand the physical behavior of the embedded parameters such as Stock number, frequency parameter, magnetic parameter, Brinkman number and Prandtl number, the analytical results are plotted graphically and discussed. PMID:25383797

  12. Experimental investigation on heat transfer coefficient during upward flow condensation of R410A in vertical smooth tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunxiao; Jia, Li

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on condensation of R410A upward flow in vertical tubes with the same inner diameter of 8.02mm and different lengths of 300 mm, 400 mm, 500 mm and 600mm. Condensation experiments were performed at mass fluxes of 103-490 kg m-2s-1. The saturation temperatures of experimental condition were 31°C, 38°C and 48°C, alternatively. The average vapor quality in the test section is between 0.91 and 0.98. The effects of tube length, mass flux and condensation temperature on condensation were discussed. Four correlations used for the upward flow condensation were compared with the experimental data obtained from various experimental conditions. A modified correlation was proposed within a ±15% deviation range.

  13. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but thismore » phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. Furthermore, this IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.« less

  14. Exergy Analysis of a Two-Stage Ground Source Heat Pump with a Vertical Bore for Residential Space Conditioning under Simulated Occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-06-26

    This twelve-month field study analyzes the performance of a 7.56W (2.16- ton) water-to-air-ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) to satisfy domestic space conditioning loads in a 253 m2 house in a mixed-humid climate in the United States. The practical feasibility of using the ground as a source of renewable energy is clearly demonstrated. Better than 75% of the energy needed for space heating was extracted from the ground. The average monthly electricity consumption for space conditioning was only 40 kWh at summer and winter thermostat set points of 24.4°C and 21.7°C, respectively. The WA-GSHP shared the same 94.5 m vertical bore ground loop with a separate water-to-water ground-source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for meeting domestic hot water needs in the same house. Sources of systemic irreversibility, the main cause of lost work are identified using Exergy and energy analysis. Quantifying the sources of Exergy and energy losses is essential for further systemic improvements. The research findings suggest that the WA-GSHPs are a practical and viable technology to reduce primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 targets of using renewable energy resources.

  15. Exergy Analysis of a Two-Stage Ground Source Heat Pump with a Vertical Bore for Residential Space Conditioning under Simulated Occupancy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Van D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2015-06-26

    This twelve-month field study analyzes the performance of a 7.56W (2.16- ton) water-to-air-ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) to satisfy domestic space conditioning loads in a 253 m2 house in a mixed-humid climate in the United States. The practical feasibility of using the ground as a source of renewable energy is clearly demonstrated. Better than 75% of the energy needed for space heating was extracted from the ground. The average monthly electricity consumption for space conditioning was only 40 kWh at summer and winter thermostat set points of 24.4°C and 21.7°C, respectively. The WA-GSHP shared the same 94.5 m vertical boremore » ground loop with a separate water-to-water ground-source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for meeting domestic hot water needs in the same house. Sources of systemic irreversibility, the main cause of lost work are identified using Exergy and energy analysis. Quantifying the sources of Exergy and energy losses is essential for further systemic improvements. The research findings suggest that the WA-GSHPs are a practical and viable technology to reduce primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 targets of using renewable energy resources.« less

  16. Effect of thermal-hydrogeological and borehole heat exchanger properties on performance and impact of vertical closed-loop geothermal heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, S. Emad; Schincariol, Robert A.

    2013-10-01

    Ground-source geothermal systems are drawing increasing attention and popularity due to their efficiency, sustainability and being implementable worldwide. Consequently, design software and regulatory guidelines have been developed. Interaction with the subsurface significantly affects the thermal performance, sustainability, and impacts of such systems. Reviewing the related guidelines and the design software, room for improvement is evident, especially in regards to interaction with groundwater movement. In order to accurately evaluate the thermal effect of system and hydrogeological properties on a borehole heat exchanger, a fully discretized finite-element model is used. Sensitivity of the loop outlet temperatures and heat exchange rates to hydrogeological, system and meteorological factors (i.e. groundwater flux, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of solids, porosity, thermal dispersivity, grout thermal conductivity, background and inlet temperatures) are analyzed over 6-month and 25-year operation periods. Furthermore, thermal recovery during 25 years after system decommissioning has been modeled. The thermal plume development, transport and dissipation are also assessed. This study shows the importance of subsurface thermal conductivity, groundwater flow (flux > 10-7 m/s), and background and inlet temperature on system performance and impact. It also shows the importance of groundwater flow (flux > 10-8 m/s) on thermal recovery of the ground over other factors.

  17. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 1: Critical heat flux, boiling crisis onset and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. The same loop was used in two experiments with different heated section internal diameter (10 and 6 mm). The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were recorded. The values of critical heat flux (CHF) were found at different positions of the test section, and the post-CHF regime was studied. The predictions of CHF by existing correlations were good in the downstream portion of the section, however CHF anomalies have been observed near the entrance, in the low quality region. In resonance with this, the re-wetting of the surface has distinct hysteresis behavior in each of the two CHF regions. Furthermore, hydraulics effects of crisis, namely on friction, were studied (Part 2). This research is the starting point to future works addressing transients conducing to boiling crisis in helium natural circulation loops.

  18. Investigation of combined heat and mass transfer between vertical parallel plates in a two-layer flow of couple stress nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Sultan, Faqiha; Riaz, Fatima; Jamil, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This study is an investigation of fully-developed laminar flow in a two-layer vertical channel; one part filled with couple stress nanofluid and the other part with clear couple stress fluid. The flow is examined for combined heat and mass transfer using uniform wall temperature and concentration boundary conditions. Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) is used to solve the nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the flow in each region. This method is based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM)which is an effective method to analytically approximate the solution of highly nonlinear problems. The influence of pertinent parameters is observed on velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions, specifically, the effect of Brownian parameter on couple stress fluid is mentioned.

  19. On the Influence of Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Free Convective Heat and Mass Transfer Flow over a Vertical Channel with Constant Suction and Viscous Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanta, Ime Jimmy; Usman, Halima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the combined effects of Soret and Dufour on free convective heat and mass transfer on the unsteady one-dimensional boundary layer flow over a vertical channel in the presence of viscous dissipation and constant suction. The governing partial differential equations are solved numerically using the implicit Crank-Nicolson method. The velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are discussed numerically and presented through graphs. Numerical values of the skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number at the plate are discussed numerically for various values of physical parameters and are presented through tables. It has been observed that the velocity and temperature increase with the increase in the viscous dissipation parameter and Dufour number, while an increase in Soret number causes a reduction in temperature and a rise in the velocity and concentration. PMID:27419208

  20. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcha, N.; Smolentsev, S.; Abdou, M.; Moreau, R.

    2013-02-01

    We consider magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rectangular duct flows with volumetric heating. The flows are upward, subject to a strong transverse magnetic field perpendicular to the temperature gradient, such that the flow dynamics is quasi-two-dimensional. The internal volumetric heating imitates conditions of a blanket of a fusion power reactor, where a buoyancy-driven flow is imposed on the forced flow. Studies of this mixed-convection flow include analysis for the basic flow, linear stability analysis and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS)-type computations. The parameter range covers the Hartmann number (Ha) up to 500, the Reynolds number (Re) from 1000 to 10 000, and the Grashof number (Gr) from 105 to 5 × 108. The linear stability analysis predicts two primary instability modes: (i) bulk instability associated with the inflection point in the velocity profile near the "hot" wall and (ii) side-wall boundary layer instability. A mixed instability mode is also possible. An equation for the critical Hartmann number has been obtained as a function of Re and Gr. Effects of Ha, Re, and Gr on turbulent flows are addressed via nonlinear computations that demonstrate two characteristic turbulence regimes. In the "weak" turbulence regime, the induced vortices are localized near the inflection point of the basic velocity profile, while the boundary layer at the wall parallel to the magnetic field is slightly disturbed. In the "strong" turbulence regime, the bulk vortices interact with the boundary layer causing its destabilization and formation of secondary vortices that may travel across the flow, even reaching the opposite wall. In this regime, the key phenomena are vortex-wall and various vortex-vortex interactions. Flow and magnetic field effects on heat transfer are also analyzed.

  1. The relationship between latent heating, vertical velocity, and precipitation processes: The impact of aerosols on precipitation in organized deep convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-06-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updrafts/downdrafts in the middle/lower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  2. Steady and oscillatory laminar opposing mixed convection in a vertical channel of finite length subjected to symmetrical isothermal discrete heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Suástegui, Lorenzo; Treviño, César; Cajas, Juan Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Transient laminar opposing mixed convection in a gravity driven downward flow confined inside a vertical rectangular channel has been investigated, with both walls suddenly subjected to symmetrical isothermal heat sources over a finite portion of the channel walls. The unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations have been solved numerically for a wide parametric set. Studies are carried out for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 200 and several values of buoyancy strength or Richardson number. The effect of Reynolds number and opposing buoyancy on the temporal evolution of the overall flow structure, temperature field, and Nusselt number from the heated surfaces is investigated using fixed geometrical parameters and considering heat losses to the channel walls. In this parameter space, for a given Reynolds number and relatively small values of the buoyancy parameter, the transient process leads to a final symmetric or asymmetric steady-state. However, as the value of buoyancy strength increases, the flow and temperature fields become more complex and an oscillatory flow with a fundamental frequency sets in when a critical value of the Richardson number is reached. Numerical predictions show that the critical value of the Richardson number between the two regimes strongly depends on the value of the Reynolds number, and the time scales, natural frequencies, and phase-space portraits of flow oscillation are presented and discussed in detail. Stability of the symmetric response has been analyzed. The results include the effects of Prandtl number and heat losses to the channel walls on the evolution of the final flow and thermal responses.

  3. Infrasound and Seismic Observation of the Hayabusa Reentry: Burst Signals and Air-to-Ground Coupling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Furumoto, M.; Fujita, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Hayabusa, the world's first sample-return minor body explorer, reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 13, 2010. This was the third direct reentry event from the interplanetary transfer orbit to the Earth at a velocity of over 11.2 km/s, and was the world's first case of a direct reentry of the spacecraft itself from the interplanetary transfer orbit. This was the very good and rare opportunity to study bolide class meteor phenomena by various aspects. Multi-site ground observations of the Hayabusa reentry were carried out in the Woomera Prohibited Area, Australia (Fujita et al., 2011). The observations were configured with optical imaging, spectroscopies, and shockwave detection with infrasound and seismic sensors. At three main stations (GOS2, GOS2A, and GOS2B), we installed small aperture infrasound/seismic arrays, as well as three single component seismic sub stations (GOS2B-sub1, to GOS2B-sub3) (Yamamoto et al., 2011; Ishihara et al., 2012). The infrasound and seismic sensors clearly recorded sonic-boom-type shockwaves from the Hayabusa sample return capsule (Ishihara et al., 2012). In addition, following capsule signal, lots of signals that probably correspond shockwave from disrupted fragments of spacecraft and energetic bursts of the spacecraft were also recorded (Yamamoto et al., 2011). In this study, we analyze signals generated by hypersonic motion of the disrupted fragments and energetic burst of the spacecraft. In addition, we examine the air-to-ground coupling process by comparing the waveforms computed by finite difference scheme with the actual ones. At all three arrayed main stations, after the capsule's shockwave arrival, we detect multiple shockwave signals by both infrasound and seismic sensors. For some of these signals arrive within 10 seconds after capsule's signal, we can identify one to one correspondence with optically tracked disrupted fragments of the spacecraft. Far after the capsule's signal, we also detect some arrivals of wave

  4. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, W J; Hu, X L; Ying, L Y; Chen, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Akiyama, H; Cai, Z P; Zhang, B P

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs. PMID:25873327

  5. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W. J.; Hu, X. L.; Ying, L. Y.; Chen, S. Q.; Zhang, J. Y.; Akiyama, H.; Cai, Z. P.; Zhang, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs. PMID:25873327

  6. Analysis of hyperbolic signatures from small discontinuities using an UWB ground-coupled radar: FDTD simulations and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnard, Florence; Tebchrany, Elias; Baltazart, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a well-known non-destructive technique based on electromagnetic wave propagation that is able to detect by reflection or scattering of waves dielectric discontinuities in the underground. Our application is mainly concerned with civil engineering to perform supervision, inventory, and soil characterization. Because the air-coupled radar suffers from a significant reflection at the ground interface that reduces energy transfer of electromagnetic radiation in the sub-surface and penetration depth, we have developed an ultra-wide band (UWB) ground-coupled radar made of a pair of partially shielded compact planar bowtie slot antennas. As the antenna dimension (36*23 cm2) is close to the A4 sheet size, the maturity of the microstrip technology has allowed to design a particular geometry on the FR4 substrate (h=1.5 mm) which is able to operate at frequencies from 460 MHz to beyond 4 GHz in air. Contrary to a commercial GPR where details on antenna design are not available, it appears here possible to know and control the radiation characteristics and develop full-wave FDTD modeling that can represent field experiments for comparisons and analyses. The objective of this work is to improve, by means of a parametric study, the knowledge of physical phenomena involved in dielectric polarization when waves interact with buried discontinuities and particularly cracks, pipes, delaminations that can be distinguished by their shape, size, dielectric contrast with the surrounding medium, orientation relative to the electric field… Thus, we have first characterized by FDTD modeling and field measurements in a wet sand the radar link in two perpendicular polarizations (parallel and mirror) in the presence of a common soil (epsilon'=5.5, sigma=0.01 S/m) considering variable offsets. Afterwards, we have studied and analyzed the hyperbola signatures generated by the presence of buried canonical objects (pipes, strips) with several dielectric

  7. The vertical fluxes of heat and constituent induced by the semidiurnal tide in the region of 80-105 km at Boulder (40.1°N, 105.2°W), Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical fluxes of heat and Na induced by dissipating semidiurnal tides in the mesopause region (80-105 km) are calculated using the direct measurements of vertical winds, temperatures and Na densities by the Na Doppler lidar at Boulder (40.1°N, 105.2°W), CO. The amplitudes and phases of the semidiurnal tides are derived first and a analytical method is developed to compute the vertical fluxes of heat and Na induced by dissipation semidiurnal tides. The derived heat/Na fluxes are highly sensitive to the phase differences of the semidiurnal tides in vertical winds with those in temperatures/Na densities. The uncertainties of the fluxes are estimated. The data collected from March 2013 to February 2014 are used for such study, thus the seasonal variations of the vertical fluxes are examined. The results are also compared with the previous flux measurements at Starfire Optical Range (SOR, 35.0°N, 106.5°W), New Mexico and Maui (20.7°N, 156.3°W), Hawaii.

  8. Uncertainties in vertical groundwater fluxes from 1-D steady state heat transport analyses caused by heterogeneity, multidimensional flow, and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Dylan J.; Cartwright, Ian; Post, Vincent E. A.; Simmons, Craig T.; Banks, Eddie W.

    2016-02-01

    Steady state 1-D analytical solutions to estimate groundwater fluxes from temperature profiles are an attractive option because they are simple to apply, with no complex boundary or initial conditions. Steady state solutions have been applied to estimate both aquifer scale fluxes as well as to estimate groundwater discharge to streams. This study explores the sources of uncertainty in flux estimates from regional scale aquifers caused by sensor precision, aquifer heterogeneity, multidimensional flow and variations in surface temperature due to climate change. Synthetic temperature profiles were generated using 2-D groundwater flow and heat transport models with homogeneous and heterogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties. Temperature profiles were analyzed assuming temperature can be determined with a precision between 0.1°C and 0.001°C. Analysis of synthetic temperature profiles show that the Bredehoeft and Papadopulos (1965) method can provide good estimates of the mean vertical Darcy flux over the length of the temperature profile. Reliable flux estimates were obtained when the ratio of vertical to horizontal flux was as low as 0.1, and in heterogeneous media, providing that temperature at the upper boundary was constant in time. However, temporal increases in surface temperature led to over-estimation of fluxes. Overestimates increased with time since the onset of, and with the rate of surface warming. Overall, the Bredehoeft and Papadopulos (1965) method may be more robust for the conditions with constant temperature distributions than previously thought, but that transient methods that account for surface warming should be used to determine fluxes in shallow aquifers.

  9. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer over a vertical porous plate through a porous medium in the presence of thermal and mass diffusion with a constant heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, F. S.; Hassanien, I. A.; Bakr, A. A.

    2004-10-01

    In this work, the effects of a temperature-dependent heat source on the hydromagnetic free-convective flow (set up due to temperature as well as species concentration) of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid past a steady vertical porous plate through a highly porous medium has been analyzed when the free stream oscillates in magnitude. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface, which absorbs the micropolar fluid with constant suction velocity. The method of solution can be applied for a small perturbation approximation. The numerical results of velocity and temperature distributions of micropolar fluids are compared with the corresponding flow problems for a Newtonian fluid. The effects of the material parameters on velocity, angular momentum, concentration, and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. In addition, the skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are shown in tabular form.

  10. Oscillatory MHD Convective Flow of Second Order Fluid Through Porous Medium in a Vertical Rotating Channel in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, B. P.; Singh, K. D.; Bansal, A. K.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of an oscillatory magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convective flow of a second order (viscoelastic), incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid through a porous medium bounded by two infinite vertical parallel porous plates is presented. The two porous plates with slip-flow condition and the no-slip condition are subjected respectively to a constant injection and suction velocity. The pressure gradient in the channel varies periodically with time. A magnetic field of uniform strength is applied in the direction perpendicular to the planes of the plates. The induced magnetic field is neglected due to the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number. The temperature of the plate with no-slip condition is non-uniform and oscillates periodically with time and the temperature difference of the two plates is assumed high enough to induce heat radiation. The entire system rotates in unison about the axis perpendicular to the planes of the plates. Adopting complex variable notations, a closed form solution of the problem is obtained. The analytical results are evaluated numerically and then presented graphically to discuss in detail the effects of different parameters of the problem. The velocity, temperature and the skin-friction in terms of its amplitude and phase angle have been shown graphically to observe the effects of the viscoelastic parameter γ, rotation parameter Ω, suction parameter λ , Grashof number Gr, Hartmann number M, the pressure A, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter N and the frequency of oscillation ω .

  11. Thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Grout is used to seal the annulus between the borehole and heat exchanger loops in vertical geothermal (ground coupled, ground source, GeoExchange) heat pump systems. The grout provides a heat transfer medium between the heat exchanger and surrounding formation, controls groundwater movement and prevents contamination of water supply. Enhanced heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) and reduced up-front loop installation costs can be achieved through optimization of the grout thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported was to characterize thermal conductivity and other pertinent properties of conventional and filled cementitious grouts. Cost analysis and calculations of the reduction in heat exchanger length that could be achieved with such grouts were performed by the University of Alabama. Two strategies to enhance the thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts were used simultaneously. The first of these was to incorporate high thermal conductivity filler in the grout formulations. Based on previous tests (Allan and Kavanaugh, in preparation), silica sand was selected as a suitable filler. The second strategy was to reduce the water content of the grout mix. By lowering the water/cement ratio, the porosity of the hardened grout is decreased. This results in higher thermal conductivity. Lowering the water/cement ratio also improves such properties as permeability, strength, and durability. The addition of a liquid superplasticizer (high range water reducer) to the grout mixes enabled reduction of water/cement ratio while retaining pumpability. Superplasticizers are commonly used in the concrete and grouting industry to improve rheological properties.

  12. Numerical investigation of coupled turbulent flow, heat transfer, and macroscopic solidification in a vertical twin-roll thin-strip caster

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedein, S.H.; Hasan, M.

    1997-08-29

    A vertical twin-roll continuous thin-strip casting process for stainless steel has been mathematically modeled. The model takes into account the coupled turbulent flow, heat transfer, and macroscopic solidification aspects of the process. A low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulence model was used to account for the turbulent effects. The transport equations for the wedge-shaped caster`s cavity were solved using a boundary-fitted nonorthogonal coordinate system. A control-volume-based, iterative finite difference scheme on a staggered grid was used to solve the discretized transformed equations. The SIMPLE algorithm was employed to resolve the velocity-pressure coupling in the momentum equations. The parameters examined in this study include the Darcy coefficient and turbulent damping factor for the mushy region, the roll gap, and the inlet nozzle width. The effects of these process parameters on the turbulent flow and temperature fields, the turbulent eddy viscosity distributions, and the extents of the mushy and solidified regions were ascertained. A change of the Darcy coefficient above 800 did not show any significant effect on the results. The three types of liquid-fraction-dependent turbulent damping factor used for modeling the mushy region did not show a measurable effect on the solidified shell thickness but showed a noticeable influence on the velocity and temperature distributions in both liquid and mushy regions. For a fixed width of the nozzle, an increase in the roll gap increased the penetration depth of the plunging inlet jet but decreased the extent of the mushy region. The solidified shell profile was insensitive to the change of the roll gap. For a fixed roll gap, an increase in the width of the nozzle decreased the penetration depth of the nozzle but increased the extent of the mushy region, while the solidified shell thickness remained practically unaffected.

  13. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  14. Measured water heating performance of a vertical-bore water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for domestic water heating over twelve months under simulated occupancy loads

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents monthly performance metrics of a 5.275 kW (1.5 ton) WW-GSHP providing 227 L day-1 domestic hot water at 49 C. Daily water use is simulated as stipulated in the Building America Research Benchmark Definition capturing the living habits of the average U.S household. The 94.5m vertical-bore ground loop is shared with a separate GSHP for space conditioning the 251m2 residential home. Data on entering water temperatures, energy extracted from the ground, delivered energy, compressor electricity use, COP, WW-GSHP run times, and the impact of fan and pump energy consumption on efficiency are presented for each month. Factors influencing performance metrics are highlighted.

  15. Recent results from a continuous wave stepped frequency GPR system using a new ground-coupled multi-element antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linford, Neil; Linford, Paul; Payne, Andy

    2016-04-01

    The recent availability of multi-channel GPR instrumentation has allowed high-speed acquisition of densely sampled data sets over unprecedented areas of coverage. Such instrumentation has been of particular interest for the mapping of near-surface archaeological remains where the ability to collect GPR data at very close sample spacings (<0.1m) can provide a unique insight to both image and assess the survival of historic assets at a landscape scale. This paper reviews initial results obtained with a 3d-Radar GeoScope MkIV continuous wave stepped frequency (CWSF) GPR system utilising both initial prototypes and production versions of a newly introduced ground coupled antenna array. Whilst this system originally utilised an air-coupled antenna array there remained some debate over the suitability of an air-coupled antenna for all site conditions, particularly where a conductive surface layer, typical of many archaeological sites in the UK, may impede the transfer of energy into the ground. Encouraging results obtained from an initial prototype ground-coupled antenna array led to the introduction of a full width 22 channel G1922 version in March 2014 for use with the MkIV GeoScope console, offering faster acquisition across a wider frequency bandwidth (60MHz to 3GHz) with a cross-line 0.075m spacing between the individual elements in the array. Field tests over the Roman remains at Silchester corroborated the results from the earlier prototype, demonstrating an increased depth of penetration at the site compared to the previous air-coupled array. Further field tests were conducted with the G1922 over a range of sites, including Roman villa sites, formal post-medieval garden remains and a medieval farmstead to assess the response of the ground-coupled antenna to more challenging site conditions, particularly through water saturated soils. A full production DXG1820 version of the antenna became available for field work in 2015 offering optimisation of the individual

  16. Natural convection immersion cooling of an array of vertically oriented heated protrusions in an enclosure filled with a dielectric liquid: Effects of enclosure width, Prandtl number and component orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Scott T.

    1991-12-01

    The natural convection heat transfer characteristics of a 3 x 3 array of vertically oriented heated protrusions, immersed in a dielectric liquid, were investigated. Aluminum blocks, 24 x 8 x 6 mm, were used to simulate 20 pin dual in-line packages. Surface temperature measurements of the components were made by imbedding copper-constantan thermocouples below the surface of each component face. A constant heat flux was provided to each component using an Inconel foil heating element. Power supplied to each component varied from 0.115 to 2.90 W. The aluminum blocks were mounted on a plexiglass substrate to form a 3 x 3 array of simulated electronic components. The circuit board containing the components was placed in a rectangular, plexiglass enclosure with inner dimensions: L = 203.2 mm H = 152.0 mm W = 82.6 mm, and a wall thickness of 25.4 mm. The upper boundary was maintained at 10 C, while all other exterior surfaces were insulated. The chamber width, measured from the surface of the circuit board to the opposite, inner wall of the enclosure, was varied from 42 to 7 mm by inserting plexiglass spacers into the enclosure. Two dielectric liquids, FC-75 and FC-43, were used as working fluids. Nondimensional data from this study was combined with the data obtained for a horizontal component orientation, to develop an empirical correlation which predicts the Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, component orientation, and chamber width.

  17. Development of ITER Divertor Vertical Target with Annular Flow Concept - II: Development of Brazing Technique for CFC/CuCrZr Joint and Heating Test of Large-Scale Mock-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Ezato, K.; Dairaku, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Sato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Akiba, M.; Ibbott, C.; Tivey, R.

    2004-12-15

    The first fabrication and heating test of a large-scale carbon-fiber-composite (CFC) monoblock divertor mock-up using an annular flow concept has been performed to demonstrate its manufacturability and thermomechanical performance. This mock-up is based on the design of the lower part of the vertical target of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor adapted for the annular flow concept. The annular cooling tube consists of two concentric tubes: an outer tube made of CuCrZr and an inner stainless steel tube with a twisted external fin. Prior to the fabrication of the mock-up, brazed joint tests between the CFC monoblock and the CuCrZr tube have been carried out to find the suitable heat treatment mitigating loss of the high mechanical strength of the CuCrZr material. A basic mechanical examination of CuCrZr undergoing the brazing heat treatment and finite element method analyses are also performed to support the design of the mock-up. High heat flux tests on the large-scale divertor mock-up have been performed in an ion beam facility. The mock-up has successfully withstood more than 1000 thermal cycles of 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 15 s and 3000 cycles of >10 MW/m{sup 2} for 15 s, which simulates the heat load condition of the ITER divertor. No degradation of the thermal performance of the mock-up has been observed throughout the thermal cycle test although in the tile with exposure to the heat flux of 20 MW/m{sup 2}, the erosion depth has been measured as 5.8 and 8.8 mm at the 300th and 500th cycles.

  18. Influence of thermophoresis on heat and mass transfer under non-Darcy MHD mixed convection along a vertical flat plate embedded in a porous medium in the presence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishan, N.; Jagadha, S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the influence of thermophoresis on MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer of a viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluid along a vertical flat plate with radiation effects. The plate is permeable and embedded in a porous medium. To describe the deviation from the Darcy model the Forchheimer flow model is used. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. The nonlinear ordinary differential equations are linearized by using quasilinearization technique and then solved numerically by using implicit finite difference scheme. The numerical results are analyzed for the effects of various physical parameters such as magnetic parameter Ha, mixed convection parameter Ra d /Pe d , Reynolds number Red, radiation parameter R, thermophoretic parameter τ, Prandtl number Pr, and Schmidt number Sc. The heat transfer coefficient is also tabulated for different values of physical parameters.

  19. Downflow dryout in a heated ribbed vertical annulus with a cosine power profile (Results from test series ECS-2, WSR, and ECS-2cE)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, T.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Condie, K.G.

    1990-12-01

    Experiments designed to investigate surface dryout in a heated, ribbed annulus test section simulating one of the annular coolant channels of a Savannah River Plant production reactor Mark 22 fuel assembly have been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The inner surface of the annulus was constructed of aluminum and was electrically heated to provide an axial cosine power profile and a flat azimuthal power shape. Data presented in this report are from the ECS-2, WSR, and ECS-2cE series of tests. These experiments were conducted to examine the onset of wall thermal excursion for a range of flow, inlet fluid temperature, and annulus outlet pressure. Hydraulic boundary conditions on the test section represent flowrates (0.1--1.4 1/s), inlet fluid temperatures (293--345 K), and outlet pressures (-18--139.7 cm of water relative to the bottom of the heated length (61--200 cm of water relative to the bottom of the lower plenum)) expected to occur during the Emergency Coolant System (ECS) phase of postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident in a production reactor. The onset of thermal excursion based on the present data is consistent with data gathered in test rigs with flat axial power profiles. The data indicate that wall dryout is primarily a function of liquid superficial velocity. Air entrainment rate was observed to be a strong function of the boundary conditions (primarily flowrate and liquid temperature), but had a minor effect on the power at the onset of thermal excursion for the range of conditions examined. 14 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Hall Effects And Rotation Effects On MHD Flow Past An Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate With Combined Heat And Mass Transfer Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhsudar, M.; Pandurangan, J.; Muthucumaraswamy, R.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical solution of flow past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate in the presence of Hall current and MHD relative to a rotating fluid with uniform temperature and mass diffusion is presented. The dimensionless equations are solved using the Laplace method. The axial and transverse velocity, temperature and concentration fields are studied for different parameters such as the Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), Rotation parameter (Ω), Schmidt number, Prandtl number, thermal Grashof number (Gr) and mass Grashof number (Gc). It has been observed that the temperature of the plate decreases with increasing values of the Prandtl number and the concentration near the plate increases with decreasing values of Schmidt number. It is also observed that both axial and transverse velocities increase with decreasing values of the magnetic field parameter or rotation parameter, but the trend gets reversed with respect to the Hall parameter. The effects of parameters m, M, Ω, Gr and Gc on the axial and transverse velocity profiles are shown graphically.

  1. Heat transfer to and from a reversible thermosiphon placed in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekelia, Bidzina

    The primary focus of this work is an assessment of heat transfer to and from a reversible thermosiphon imbedded in porous media. The interest in this study is the improvement of underground thermal energy storage (UTES) system performance with an innovative ground coupling using an array of reversible (pump-assisted) thermosiphons for air conditioning or space cooling applications. The dominant mechanisms, including the potential for heat transfer enhancement due to natural convection, of seasonal storage of "cold" in water-saturated porous media is evaluated experimentally and numerically. Winter and summer modes of operation are studied. A set of 6 experiments are reported that describe the heat transfer in both fine and coarse sand in a 0.32 cubic meter circular tank, saturated with water, under freezing (due to heat extraction) and thawing (due to heat injection) conditions, driven by the heat transfer to or from the vertical thermosiphon in the center of the tank. It was found that moderate to strong natural convection was induced at Rayleigh numbers of 30 or higher. Also, near water freezing temperatures (0°C-10°C), due to higher viscosity of water at lower temperatures, almost no natural convection was observed. A commercial heat transfer code, ANSYS FLUENT, was used to simulate both the heating and cooling conditions, including liquid/solid phase change. The numerical simulations of heat extraction from different permeability and temperature water-saturated porous media showed that enhancement to heat transfer by convection becomes significant only under conditions where the Rayleigh number is in the range of 100 or above. Those conditions would be found only for heat storage applications with higher temperatures of water (thus, its lower viscosity) and large temperature gradients at the beginning of heat injection (or removal) into (from) soil. For "cold" storage applications, the contribution of natural convection to heat transfer in water

  2. Hybrid Heat Pumps Using Selective Water Sorbents (SWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M. R.

    2006-11-30

    The development of the ground-coupled and air-coupled Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system is essential in meeting the goals of Zero Energy Houses (ZEH), a viable concept vigorously pursued under DOE sponsorship. ORNL has a large Habitat for Humanity complex in Lenoir City where modem buildings technology is incorporated on a continual basis. This house of the future is planned for lower and middle income families in the 21st century. The work undertaken in this CRADA is an integral part of meeting DOE's objectives in the Building America program. SWS technology is a prime candidate for reducing the footprint, cost and improve the performance of ground-coupled heat pumps. The efficacy of this technique to exchange energy with the ground is a topic of immense interest to DOE, builders and HVAC equipment manufacturers. If successful, the SWS concept will become part of a packaged ZEH kit for affordable and high-end houses. Lennox Industries entered into a CRADA with Oak Ridge National Laboratory in November 2004. Lennox, Inc. agreed to explore ways of using Selective Water Sorbent materials to boost the efficiency of air-coupled heat pumps whereas ORNL concentrated on ground-coupled applications. Lennox supplied ORNL with heat exchangers and heat pump equipment for use at ORNL's Habitat for Humanity site in Lenoir City, Tennessee. Lennox is focused upon air-coupled applications of SWS materials at the Product Development and Research Center in Carrollton, TX.

  3. Investigation of direct expansion in ground source heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, M. D.

    A fully instrumented subscale ground coupled heat pump system was developed, and built, and used to test and obtain data on three different earth heat exchanger configurations under heating conditions (ground cooling). Various refrigerant flow control and compressor protection devices were tested for their applicability to the direct expansion system. Undistributed Earth temperature data were acquired at various depths. The problem of oil return at low evaporator temperatures and low refrigerant velocities was addressed. An analysis was performed to theoretically determine what evaporator temperature can be expected with an isolated ground pipe configuration with given length, pipe size, soil conditions and constant heat load. Technical accomplishments to data are summarized.

  4. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  5. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  6. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  7. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  8. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  9. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  10. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  11. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  12. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report consists of brief summaries of the activities of the Geo-Heat Center during the report period. Technical assistance was given to requests from 20 states in the following applications: space and district heating; geothermal heat pumps; greenhouses; aquaculture; industrial plants; electric power; resource/well; equipment; and resort/spa. Research and development activities progressed on (1) compilation of data on low-temperature resources and (2) evaluation of groundwater vs. ground-coupled heat pumps. Also summarized are technology transfer activities and geothermal progress monitoring activities.

  13. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  14. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  15. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  16. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  17. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  18. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  19. Ground energy coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  20. Vertical Seismoelectric Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araji, A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismoelectric method corresponds to the measurement of electromagnetic disturbances associated with the passage of seismic waves in a porous medium. The coupling is due to the existence of the electric double layer at the solid/water interfaces. We consider the case of vertical seismoelectric profiling in which we trigger a seismic source in a vertical borehole and measure the seismoelectric response on the surface. We aim to image hetrogeneities in that section of the subsurface by utilizing the seismoelectric sources created at interfaces. An iterative source localization inversion algorithm is used to achieve the imaging of interfaces.

  1. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T. ); McAssey, E. ); Qureshi, Z. )

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  2. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T.; McAssey, E.; Qureshi, Z.

    1989-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  3. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  4. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  5. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  6. The effects of soil vertical discretization, soil thermal properties, and soil heat convection by liquid water transfer on the water and energy cycles in a coupled land-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuxing; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Chéruy, Frédérique; Ducharne, Agnès

    2015-04-01

    The soil heat transfer is an important component in general circulation model (GCM), and accurate representation of subsurface thermodynamics is essential for earth system modeling. The accuracy of the soil thermodynamics simulation is affected by many factors: (1) the bottom boundary layer position used in numerical scheme; (2) the soil thermal property (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) parameterization; as well as (3) the physical processes considered in the model. However, the impact of their correct representation on the quality of the simulated climate is poorly documented, and the way state-of-the art land surface model (LSM) used for climate simulations account for them is highly variable. For instance bottom boundary layer position varies from 2 m to 10 m or even more (100 m), the parameterizations of the soil thermal properties not always account for the soil texture effects, and the soil heat convection process is neglected in most soil thermodynamics models. In this work, we revisited the soil thermodynamics model included in the ORCHIDEE LSM in order (1) to determine the soil bottom layer depth which allows for simulating the annual cycle of temperature; (2) to improve the parameterization of the soil thermal properties (thermal conductivity and heat capacity) by accounting for both soil moisture and soil texture effects on the soil thermal properties; (3) to take into account the heat generated by liquid water movement in soil thermodynamics. The developpement of the parameterizations has been done in a 1-D framework where the results of the Finite Difference Method have been compared to the analytical solution. Sensitivity experiments with the LMDZ-ORCHIDEE coupled model (atmosphere-land component of IPSL-CM model) have been then designed to evaluate the impact of the soil thermal properties and soil heat convection on the water and energy cycles of the land-atmosphere. Main results are: (1) the 8 meter soil depth is proposed as a minimum

  7. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  8. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  9. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  10. On the vertical structure of damped steady circulation in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Stevens, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the vertical structure of steady motion in a dissipative tropical atmosphere forced by steady isolated diabatic heating. Vertical modes appropriate to the problem are obtained, and the forcing is projected onto these modes. With the use of an analytic expression obtained by Gill (1980) for the horizontal structure, these modes are summed to obtain the amplitude and the vertical structure of the response in the region to the east of the heating.