Science.gov

Sample records for vestibular stochastic resonance

  1. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz (OTO) with SVS up to 700 µA. A sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) perceptual threshold was also measured on each test day and used to normalize the SVS levels across subjects. In roll-tilt thresholds with SVS, the characteristic SR curve was qualitatively exhibited in 10 of 12 subjects, and the improvement in motion threshold was significant in 6 subjects, indicating that optimal SVS improved passive body motion perception in a way that is consistent with classical SR theory. A probabilistic comparison to numeric simulations further validated these experimental results. On the second test session, 4 out of the 10 SR exhibitors showed repeated improvement with SVS compared to the no SVS condition. Data collection is ongoing for the last two test sessions in which SCC and OTO only perceptual motion recognition thresholds are being measured with SVS. The final results of these test sessions will give insight into whether vestibular perceptual SR can occur when only one type of vestibular sensor is sensing motion or if it is more evident when sensory integration between the SCC and OTO is occurring during the motion. The overall purpose of this research is to further quantify the effects of SVS on various sensorimotor tasks and to gain a more fundamental understanding of how SVS causes SR in the vestibular system. In the context of human space flight, results from this research will help in understanding how SVS may be practically implemented in the future as a component of a comprehensive countermeasure plan for G-transition adaptation.

  2. Stimulus Characteristics for Vestibular Stochastic Resonance to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrado, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Studies have shown that imperceptible stochastic vestibular electrical stimulation, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the amplitude characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standard balance task of standing on a block of foam with their eyes closed. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system using constant current stimulation through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. Amplitude of the signals varied in the range of 0-700 microamperes. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block, and inertial motion sensors were placed on the torso and head. Balance performance with stimulation was significantly greater (10%-25%) than with no stimulation. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-300 microamperes. Optimization of the amplitude of the stochastic signals for maximizing balance performance will have a significant impact on development of vestibular SR as a unique system to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long-duration space flight or in patients with balance disorders.

  3. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a significant impact on development of vestibular SR delivery systems to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long-duration spaceflight or in people with balance disorders.

  4. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  5. Optimization of Stimulus Characteristics for Vestibular Stochastic Resonance to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Acock, Keena; DeDios, Yiri E.; Heap, Erin; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrador, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Recent studies have shown that applying imperceptible stochastic noise electrical stimulation to the vestibular system significantly improved balance and ocular motor responses. The goal of this study was to optimize the amplitude of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standardized balance task of standing on a block of 10-cm-thick medium-density foam with their eyes closed. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block and using inertial motion sensors placed on the torso and head segments. Stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system through electrodes placed over the mastoid process. Subjects were tested at seven amplitudes in the 0.01-30Hz frequency range. The root mean square of the signal increased by 30 microamperes for each +/-100 microampere increment in the current range of 0 - +/-700 microampere. Six balance parameters were calculated to characterize the performance of subjects during the baseline and the stimulus periods for all seven amplitudes. Optimal stimulus amplitude was determined as the one at which the ratio of parameters from the stimulus period to the baseline period for any amplitude range was less than that for the no stimulus condition on a minimum of four of six parameters. Results from this study showed that balance performance at the optimal stimulus amplitude showed significant improvement with the application of the vestibular SR stimulation. The amplitude of optimal stimulus for improving balance performance in normal subjects was in the range of +/-100 - +/-300 microamps.

  6. Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Method to Improve Balance Function: Optimization of Stimulus Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrador, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Application of imperceptible SR noise coupled with sensory input through the proprioceptive, visual, or vestibular sensory systems has been shown to improve motor function. Specifically, studies have shown that that vestibular electrical stimulation by imperceptible stochastic noise, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standardized balance task of standing on a block of 10 cm thick medium density foam with their eyes closed for a total of 40 seconds. Stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears during the last 20 seconds of the test period. A custom built constant current stimulator with subject isolation delivered the stimulus. Stimulation signals were generated with frequencies in the bandwidth of 1-2 Hz and 0.01-30 Hz. Amplitude of the signals were varied in the range of 0- +/-700 micro amperes with the RMS of the signal increased by 30 micro amperes for each 100 micro amperes increase in the current range. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block and inertial motion sensors placed on the torso and head segments. Preliminary results indicate that balance performance is improved in the range of 10-25% compared to no stimulation conditions. Subjects improved their performance consistently across the blocks of stimulation. Further the signal amplitude at which the performance was maximized was different in the two frequency ranges. Optimization of the frequency and amplitude of the signal characteristics of the stochastic noise signals on maximizing balance performance will have a significant impact in its development as a unique system to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long duration space flight or for people with balance disorders.

  7. Stochastic resonance in the synaptic transmission between hair cells and vestibular primary afferents in development.

    PubMed

    Flores, A; Manilla, S; Huidobro, N; De la Torre-Valdovinos, B; Kristeva, R; Mendez-Balbuena, I; Galindo, F; Treviño, M; Manjarrez, E

    2016-05-13

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon of nonlinear systems in which the addition of an intermediate level of noise improves the response of such system. Although SR has been studied in isolated hair cells and in the bullfrog sacculus, the occurrence of this phenomenon in the vestibular system in development is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore for the existence of SR via natural mechanical-stimulation in the hair cell-vestibular primary afferent transmission. In vitro experiments were performed on the posterior semicircular canal of the chicken inner ear during development. Our experiments showed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent multiunit activity from E15 to P5 stages of development exhibited the SR phenomenon, which was characterized by an inverted U-like response as a function of the input noise level. The inverted U-like graphs of SR acquired their higher amplitude after the post-hatching stage of development. Blockage of the synaptic transmission with selective antagonists of the NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors abolished the SR of the afferent multiunit activity. Furthermore, computer simulations on a model of the hair cell - primary afferent synapse qualitatively reproduced this SR behavior and provided a possible explanation of how and where the SR could occur. These results demonstrate that a particular level of mechanical noise on the semicircular canals can improve the performance of the vestibular system in their peripheral sensory processing even during embryonic stages of development. PMID:26926966

  8. Stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaitoni, Luca; Hänggi, Peter; Jung, Peter; Marchesoni, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Over the last two decades, stochastic resonance has continuously attracted considerable attention. The term is given to a phenomenon that is manifest in nonlinear systems whereby generally feeble input information (such as a weak signal) can be be amplified and optimized by the assistance of noise. The effect requires three basic ingredients: (i) an energetic activation barrier or, more generally, a form of threshold; (ii) a weak coherent input (such as a periodic signal); (iii) a source of noise that is inherent in the system, or that adds to the coherent input. Given these features, the response of the system undergoes resonance-like behavior as a function of the noise level; hence the name stochastic resonance. The underlying mechanism is fairly simple and robust. As a consequence, stochastic resonance has been observed in a large variety of systems, including bistable ring lasers, semiconductor devices, chemical reactions, and mechanoreceptor cells in the tail fan of a crayfish. In this paper, the authors report, interpret, and extend much of the current understanding of the theory and physics of stochastic resonance. They introduce the readers to the basic features of stochastic resonance and its recent history. Definitions of the characteristic quantities that are important to quantify stochastic resonance, together with the most important tools necessary to actually compute those quantities, are presented. The essence of classical stochastic resonance theory is presented, and important applications of stochastic resonance in nonlinear optics, solid state devices, and neurophysiology are described and put into context with stochastic resonance theory. More elaborate and recent developments of stochastic resonance theory are discussed, ranging from fundamental quantum properties-being important at low temperatures-over spatiotemporal aspects in spatially distributed systems, to realizations in chaotic maps. In conclusion the authors summarize the achievements and attempt to indicate the most promising areas for future research in theory and experiment.

  9. Estimation of an Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). The goal of this project was to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection.

  10. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial measurement units placed on the upper and lower torso of the subjects. Additionally, each individual’s threshold for illusory motion perception of suprasensory electrical vestibular stimulation is measured multiple times within and across days to better understand how multiple SVS test methods compare. The second study aims to demonstrate stochastic resonance in the vestibular system using a perception based motion recognition task. This task measures an individual’s velocity threshold of motion recognition using a 6-degree of freedom Stewart platform and a 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. For this study, thresholds are determined using 150 trials in the upright, head-centered roll tilt motion direction at a 0.2 Hz frequency. We aim to demonstrate the characteristic bell shaped curve associated with stochastic resonance with each subject’s motion recognition thresholds at varying SVS levels ranging from 0 to 1500 micro A. The curve includes the individual’s baseline threshold with no SVS, optimal or minimal threshold at some mid-level of SVS, and finally degraded or increased threshold at a high SVS level. An additional aim is to formally retest each subject at his or her individual optimal SVS level on a different day than the original testing for additional validity. The overall purpose of this research is to further quantify the effects of SVS on various sensorimotor tasks and investigate the practical implications of its use in the context of human space flight so that it may be implemented in the future as a component of a comprehensive countermeasure plan for adaptation to G-transitions.

  11. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance in a Discordant Sensory Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, David R.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Layne, Charles S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges incurred when readapting to a gravitational environment. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training has been proposed as a countermeasure to improve locomotor performance during re-adaptation, and it is suggested that the benefits of SA training may be further enhanced by improving detection of weak sensory signals via mechanisms such as stochastic resonance when a non-zero level of stochastic white noise based electrical stimulation is applied to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of using SVS to improve short-term adaptation in a sensory discordant environment during performance of a locomotor task.

  12. Improving Sensorimotor Function and Adaptation using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during adaption to G-transitions that occur when entering and exiting microgravity. Post space flight, these sensorimotor disturbances can include postural and gait instability, visual performance changes, manual control disruptions, spatial disorientation, and motion sickness, all of which can hinder the operational capabilities of the astronauts. Crewmember safety would be significantly increased if sensorimotor changes brought on by gravitational changes could be mitigated and adaptation could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate and develop the use of electrical stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a countermeasure to augment sensorimotor function and facilitate adaptation. For this project, SVS will be applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes at imperceptible amplitude levels. We hypothesize that SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through the phenomena of stochastic resonance, which occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. In line with the theory of stochastic resonance, a specific optimal level of SVS will be found and tested for each subject [1]. Three experiments are planned to investigate the use of SVS in sensory-dependent tasks and performance. The first experiment will aim to demonstrate stochastic resonance in the vestibular system through perception based motion recognition thresholds obtained using a 6-degree of freedom Stewart platform in the Jenks Vestibular Laboratory at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. A range of SVS amplitudes will be applied to each subject and the subjectspecific optimal SVS level will be identified as that which results in the lowest motion recognition threshold, through previously established, well developed methods [2,3,4]. The second experiment will investigate the use of optimal SVS in facilitating sensorimotor adaptation to system disturbances. Subjects will adapt to wearing minifying glasses, resulting in decreased vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) gain. The VOR gain will then be intermittently measured while the subject readapts to normal vision, with and without optimal SVS. We expect that optimal SVS will cause a steepening of the adaptation curve. The third experiment will test the use of optimal SVS in an operationally relevant aerospace task, using the tilt translation sled at NASA Johnson Space Center, a test platform capable of recreating the tilt-gain and tilt-translation illusions associated with landing of a spacecraft post-space flight. In this experiment, a perception based manual control measure will be used to compare performance with and without optimal SVS. We expect performance to improve in this task when optimal SVS is applied. The ultimate goal of this work is to systematically investigate and further understand the potential benefits of stochastic vestibular stimulation in the context of human space flight so that it may be used in the future as a component of a comprehensive countermeasure plan for adaptation to G-transitions.

  13. Determine Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J.J.; Mulavara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface [1]. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training applications customized to each crewmember. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds [2]. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s long sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. Comparison of threshold of motion detection obtained from joystick data versus body sway suggests that perceptual thresholds were significantly lower. In the balance task, subjects stood on an unstable surface and had to maintain balance, and the stimulation was administered from 20-400% of subjects' vestibular threshold. Optimal stimulation amplitude was determined at which the balance performance was best compared to control (no stimulation). Preliminary results show that, in general, using stimulation amplitudes at 40-60% of perceptual motion threshold significantly improved the balance performance. We hypothesize that VSR stimulation will act synergistically with SA training to improve adaptability by increasing utilization of vestibular information and therefore will help us to optimize and personalize a SA countermeasure prescription. This combination may help to significantly reduce the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long-duration spaceflight.

  14. Stochastic resonance and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, José-Leonel; Trainor, Lynn

    1997-09-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) occurs in bistable nonlinear systems subject to noise, as the entrainment of their output by a weak periodic modulation added to the input. Electronic computation involves switching of memory elements between two states that correspond to 1 and 0, respectively. The possibility of switching errors due to SR in memory elements is considered, showing that it represents a negligible danger to reliable computation.

  15. Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Sensorimotor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that is wearable or portable and provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for SR training applications customized to each crewmember. Customizing stimulus intensity can maximize treatment effects. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. First we determined the percent time during stimulation periods for which perception of motion (activity above a pre-defined threshold) was reported using the joystick, and body sway (two standard deviation of the noise level in the baseline measurement) was detected by the sensors. The percentage time at each stimulation level for motion detection was normalized with respect to the largest value and a logistic regression curve fit was applied to these data. The threshold was defined at the 50% probability of motion detection. Comparison of threshold of motion detection obtained from joystick data versus body sway suggests that perceptual thresholds were significantly lower, and were not impacted by system noise. Further, in order to determine optimal stimulation amplitude to improve balance, two sets of experiments were carried out. In the first set of experiments, all subjects received the same level of stimuli and the intensity of optimal performance was projected back on subjects' vestibular threshold curve. In the second set of experiments, on different subjects, stimulation was administered from 20-400% of subjects' vestibular threshold obtained from joystick data. Preliminary results of our study show that, in general, using stimulation amplitudes at 40-60% of perceptual motion threshold improved balance performance significantly compared to control (no stimulation). The amplitude of vestibular stimulation that improved balance function was predominantly in the range of +/- 100 to +/- 400 micro A. We hypothesize that VSR stimulation will act synergistically with sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training to improve adaptability by increasing utilization of vestibular information and therefore will help us to optimize and personalize a SA countermeasure prescription. This combination will help to significantly reduce the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long-duration spaceflight.

  16. Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability

    PubMed Central

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Kofman, Igor S.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian T.; Goel, Rahul; Galvan-Garza, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) have been shown to improve stability during balance tasks in normal, healthy subjects by facilitating enhanced information transfer using stochastic resonance (SR) principles. We hypothesize that detection of time-critical sub-threshold sensory signals using low levels of bipolar binaural SVS based on SR principles will help improve stability of walking during support surface perturbations. In the current study 13 healthy subjects were exposed to short continuous support surface perturbations for 60 s while walking on a treadmill and simultaneously viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based SVS were applied to the vestibular organs. Multiple trials of the treadmill locomotion test were performed with stimulation current levels varying in the range of 0–1500 μA, randomized across trials. The results show that subjects significantly improved their walking stability during support surface perturbations at stimulation levels with peak amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA consistent with the SR phenomenon. Additionally, objective perceptual motion thresholds were measured separately as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and received 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli. The optimal improvement in walking stability was achieved on average with peak stimulation amplitudes of approximately 35% of perceptual motion threshold. This study shows the effectiveness of using low imperceptible levels of SVS to improve dynamic stability during walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill via the SR phenomenon. PMID:26347619

  17. Stochastic Resonance and Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, C.

    2014-12-01

    A dynamical system giving rise to multiple steady states and subjected to noise and a periodic forcing is analyzed from the standpoint of information theory. It is shown that stochastic resonance has a clearcut signature on information entropy, information transfer and other related quantities characterizing information transduction within the system.

  18. Stochastic resonance on a circle

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenfeld, K. ); Pierson, D.; Pantazelou, E.; Dames, C.; Moss, F. )

    1994-04-04

    We describe a new realization of stochastic resonance, applicable to a broad class of systems, based on an underlying excitable dynamics with deterministic reinjection. A simple but general theory of such single-trigger'' systems is compared with analog simulations of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, as well as experimental data obtained from stimulated sensory neurons in the crayfish.

  19. Stochastic resonance in visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Ajanta; Sarkar, Sandip

    2015-04-01

    It is well known from psychophysical studies that stochastic resonance, in its simplest threshold paradigm, can be used as a tool to measure the detection sensitivity to fine details in noise contaminated stimuli. In the present manuscript, we report simulation studies conducted in the similar threshold paradigm of stochastic resonance. We have estimated the contrast sensitivity in detecting noisy sine-wave stimuli, with varying area and spatial frequency, as a function of noise strength. In all the cases, the measured sensitivity attained a peak at intermediate noise strength, which indicate the occurrence of stochastic resonance. The peak sensitivity exhibited a strong dependence on area and spatial frequency of the stimulus. We show that the peak contrast sensitivity varies with spatial frequency in a nonmonotonic fashion and the qualitative nature of the sensitivity variation is in good agreement with human contrast sensitivity function. We also demonstrate that the peak sensitivity first increases and then saturates with increasing area, and this result is in line with the results of psychophysical experiments. Additionally, we also show that critical area, denoting the saturation of contrast sensitivity, decreases with spatial frequency and the associated maximum contrast sensitivity varies with spatial frequency in a manner that is consistent with the results of psychophysical experiments. In all the studies, the sensitivities were elevated via a nonlinear filtering operation called stochastic resonance. Because of this nonlinear effect, it was not guaranteed that the sensitivities, estimated at each frequency, would be in agreement with the corresponding results of psychophysical experiments; on the contrary, close agreements were observed between our results and the findings of psychophysical investigations. These observations indicate the utility of stochastic resonance in human vision and suggest that this paradigm can be useful in psychophysical studies. PMID:25398687

  20. Analysis of stochastic resonances.

    PubMed

    Chvosta, Petr; Reineker, Peter

    2003-12-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional diffusion of a particle in a piecewise linear potential superimposed with a step of a harmonically modulated height. Employing the matching conditions, we solve the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and we analyze nonlinear features of the particle's mean position as a function of time. We present detailed results in two physically relevant cases. First, we take the unperturbed potential as a symmetrical up-oriented tip, which is placed between two reflecting boundaries and we add the jump at the tip coordinate. The setting yields resonance-like behavior of the stationary-response amplitude. Second, if the discontinuity at origin is combined with the constant force in the symmetrical region between the boundaries, the stationary response displays a time-independent shift against the potential slope. The driving-induced force exhibits a resonance-like behavior both with respect to the diffusion constant and the slope of the unperturbed potential. PMID:14754271

  1. Stochastic resonance in neuron models

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, A. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1993-01-01

    Periodically stimulated sensory neurons typically exhibit a kind of statistical phase locking' to the stimulus: they tend to fire at a preferred phase of the stimulus cycle, but not at every cycle. Hence, the histogram of interspike intervals (ISIH), ie., of times between successive firings, is multimodal for these neurons, with peaks centered at integer multiples of the driving period. A particular kind of residence time histogram for a large class of noisy bistable systems has recently been shown to exhibit the major features of the neural data. In the present paper, the authors show that an excitable cell model, the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations, also reproduces these features when driven by additive periodic and stochastic forces. This model exhibits its own brand of stochastic resonance as the peaks of the ISIH successively go through a maximum when the noise intensity is increased. Further, the presence of a noise-induced limit cycle introduces a third time scale in the problem. This limit cycle is found to modify qualitatively the phase-locking picture, e.g., by suppressing certain peaks in the ISIH. Finally, the role of noise and possibly of stochastic resonance (SR) in the neural encoding of sensory information is discussed. 29 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Using Low Levels of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rahul; Kofman, Igor; Jeevarajan, Jerome; De Dios, Yiri; Cohen, Helen S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) has been associated with improved postural responses in the medio-lateral (ML) direction, but its effect in improving balance function in both the ML and anterior-posterior (AP) directions has not been studied. In this series of studies, the efficacy of applying low amplitude SVS in 0–30 Hz range between the mastoids in the ML direction on improving cross-planar balance function was investigated. Forty-five (45) subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in ML, AP and combined APML directions. Results show that binaural bipolar SVS given in the ML direction significantly improved balance performance with the peak of optimal stimulus amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA for all the three directions, exhibiting stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. Objective perceptual and body motion thresholds as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and were given 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli were also measured. In general, there was no significant difference between estimates of perceptual and body motion thresholds. The average optimal SVS amplitude that improved balance performance (peak SVS amplitude normalized to perceptual threshold) was estimated to be 46% in ML, 53% in AP, and 50% in APML directions. A miniature patch-type SVS device may be useful to improve balance function in people with disabilities due to aging, Parkinson’s disease or in astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. PMID:26295807

  3. Stochastic Resonance In Visual Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonotto, Enrico

    1996-03-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a well established physical phenomenon wherein some measure of the coherence of a weak signal can be optimized by random fluctuations, or "noise" (K. Wiesenfeld and F. Moss, Nature), 373, 33 (1995). In all experiments to date the coherence has been measured using numerical analysis of the data, for example, signal-to-noise ratios obtained from power spectra. But, can this analysis be replaced by a perceptive task? Previously we had demonstrated this possibility with a numerical model of perceptual bistability applied to the interpretation of ambiguous figures(M. Riani and E. Simonotto, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 72, 3120 (1994). Here I describe an experiment wherein SR is detected in visual perception. A recognizible grayscale photograph was digitized and presented. The picture was then placed beneath a threshold. Every pixel for which the grayscale exceeded the threshold was painted white, and all others black. For large enough threshold, the picture is unrecognizable, but the addition of a random number to every pixel renders it interpretable(C. Seife and M. Roberts, The Economist), 336, 59, July 29 (1995). However the addition of dynamical noise to the pixels much enhances an observer's ability to interpret the picture. Here I report the results of psychophysics experiments wherein the effects of both the intensity of the noise and its correlation time were studied.

  4. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    We study the translocation of a flexible polymer in a confined geometry subjected to a time-periodic external drive to explore stochastic resonance. We describe the equilibrium translocation process in terms of a Fokker-Planck description and use a discrete two-state model to describe the effect of the external driving force on the translocation dynamics. We observe that no stochastic resonance is possible if the associated free-energy barrier is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain experiences a stochastic resonance effect only in presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interaction. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  5. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  6. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly. PMID:27083746

  7. Stochastic resonance in geomagnetic polarity reversals.

    PubMed

    Consolini, Giuseppe; De Michelis, Paola

    2003-02-01

    Among noise-induced cooperative phenomena a peculiar relevance is played by stochastic resonance. In this paper we offer evidence that geomagnetic polarity reversals may be due to a stochastic resonance process. In detail, analyzing the distribution function P(tau) of polarity residence times (chrons), we found the evidence of a stochastic synchronization process, i.e., a series of peaks in the P(tau) at T(n) approximately (2n+1)T(Omega)/2 with n=0,1,...,j and T(omega) approximately 0.1 Myr. This result is discussed in connection with both the typical time scale of Earth's orbit eccentricity variation and the recent results on the typical time scale of climatic long-term variation. PMID:12633403

  8. Stochastic Resonance in Protein Folding Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Aram; Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin; Papoian, Garegin A

    2016-05-01

    Although protein folding reactions are usually studied under static external conditions, it is likely that proteins fold in a locally fluctuating cellular environment in vivo. To mimic such behavior in in vitro experiments, the local temperature of the solvent can be modulated either harmonically or using correlated noise. In this study, coarse-grained molecular simulations are used to investigate these possibilities, and it is found that both periodic and correlated random fluctuations of the environment can indeed accelerate folding kinetics if the characteristic frequencies of the applied fluctuations are commensurate with the internal timescale of the folding reaction; this is consistent with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance observed in many other condensed-matter processes. To test this theoretical prediction, the folding dynamics of phosphoglycerate kinase under harmonic temperature fluctuations are experimentally probed using Förster resonance energy transfer fluorescence measurements. To analyze these experiments, a combination of theoretical approaches is developed, including stochastic simulations of folding kinetics and an analytical mean-field kinetic theory. The experimental observations are consistent with the theoretical predictions of stochastic resonance in phosphoglycerate kinase folding. When combined with an alternative experiment on the protein VlsE using a power spectrum analysis, elaborated in Dave et al., ChemPhysChem 2016, 10.1002/cphc.201501041, the overall data overwhelmingly point to the experimental confirmation of stochastic resonance in protein folding dynamics. PMID:26992148

  9. Stochastic resonance of electrochemical aperiodic spike trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmananda, P.; Escalera Santos, Gerardo J.; Rivera, M.; Showalter, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Aperiodic stochastic resonance in an electrochemical system with excitable dynamics is characterized in experiments and simulations. Two different spike trains, one with stochastic and the other with chaotic interspike intervals, are imposed on the system as subthreshold aperiodic signals. Information transmission is quantified by the cross correlation between the subthreshold input signal and the noise induced system response. A maximum is exhibited in the input-output correlation as a function of the noise amplitude. Numerical simulations with an electrochemical model are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations.

  10. Stochastic resonance at nonequilibrium phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokov, V. N.; Koverda, V. P.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal pulsations in a transition from a nucleate to a film regime of water boiling on a wire heater with a periodic Joule heat release have been studied experimentally. At frequencies of the periodic action smaller than 0.1 Hz the intermittency of the nucleate and film boiling regimes was observed. In this case the amplitude of thermal pulsations increased. The experiments with an additional noise source were carried out. With an increase in the intensity of the noise the power of the output periodic mode increased and reaching the maximum began to decrease. The results are interpreted as stochastic resonance when the periodic component of pulsations increases in the presence of noise. The results show that in a complex system with nonequilibrium phase transitions there can occur both the extreme fluctuations with 1 / f power spectrum and stochastic resonance under external periodic action.

  11. Crossing resonance of stochastically interacting wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatchenko, V. A. Polukhin, D. S.

    2013-02-15

    The dynamic susceptibilities (Green's functions) of the system of two interacting wave fields of different physical natures with a stochastically inhomogeneous coupling parameter between them with zero mean value have been examined. The well-known self-consistent approximation taking into account all diagrams with noncrossing correlation/interaction lines has been generalized to the case of stochastically interacting wave fields. The analysis has been performed for spin and elastic waves. The results obtained taking into account the processes of multiple scattering of waves from inhomogeneities are significantly different from those obtained for this situation earlier in the Bourret approximation [R.C. Bourret, Nuovo Cimento 26, 1 (1962)]. Instead of frequencies degeneracy removal in the wave spectrum and the splitting of resonance peaks of dynamic susceptibilities, a wide single-mode resonance peak should be observed at the crossing point of the unperturbed dispersion curves. The fine structure appears at vertices of these wide peaks in the form of a narrow resonance on the Green's-function curve of one field and a narrow antiresonance on the vertex of the Green's-function curve of the other field.

  12. Stochastic resonance in mammalian neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Bruce J.; So, Paul; Netoff, Theoden I.; Spano, Mark L.; Schiff, Steven J.

    1998-09-01

    We present stochastic resonance observed in the dynamics of neuronal networks from mammalian brain. Both sinusoidal signals and random noise were superimposed into an applied electric field. As the amplitude of the noise component was increased, an optimization (increase then decrease) in the signal-to-noise ratio of the network response to the sinusoidal signal was observed. The relationship between the measures used to characterize the dynamics is discussed. Finally, a computational model of these neuronal networks that includes the neuronal interactions with the electric field is presented to illustrate the physics behind the essential features of the experiment. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779762

  13. Stochastic resonance in mammalian neuronal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gluckman, B.J.; So, P.; Netoff, T.I.; Spano, M.L.; Schiff, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    We present stochastic resonance observed in the dynamics of neuronal networks from mammalian brain. Both sinusoidal signals and random noise were superimposed into an applied electric field. As the amplitude of the noise component was increased, an optimization (increase then decrease) in the signal-to-noise ratio of the network response to the sinusoidal signal was observed. The relationship between the measures used to characterize the dynamics is discussed. Finally, a computational model of these neuronal networks that includes the neuronal interactions with the electric field is presented to illustrate the physics behind the essential features of the experiment. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Fractional Brownian motors and stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, Igor; Kharchenko, Vasyl

    2012-05-01

    We study fluctuating tilt Brownian ratchets based on fractional subdiffusion in sticky viscoelastic media characterized by a power law memory kernel. Unlike the normal diffusion case, the rectification effect vanishes in the adiabatically slow modulation limit and optimizes in a driving frequency range. It is shown also that the anomalous rectification effect is maximal (stochastic resonance effect) at optimal temperature and can be of surprisingly good quality. Moreover, subdiffusive current can flow in the counterintuitive direction upon a change of temperature or driving frequency. The dependence of anomalous transport on load exhibits a remarkably simple universality. PMID:23004727

  15. Stochastic resonance with a mesoscopic reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Parmananda, P

    2014-06-01

    In a mesoscopic reaction-diffusion system with an Oregonator reaction model, we show that intrinsic noise can drive a resonant stable pattern in the presence of the initial subthreshold perturbations. Both spatially periodic and aperiodic stochastic resonances are demonstrated by employing the Gillespies stochastic simulation algorithm. The mechanisms for these phenomena are discussed. PMID:25019857

  16. Spatiotemporal Stochastic Resonance:Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Jung

    1996-03-01

    The amplification of weak periodic signals in bistable or excitable systems via stochastic resonance has been studied intensively over the last years. We are going one step further and ask: Can noise enhance spatiotemporal patterns in excitable media and can this effect be observed in nature? To this end, we are looking at large, two dimensional arrays of coupled excitable elements. Due to the coupling, excitation can propagate through the array in form of nonlinear waves. We observe target waves, rotating spiral waves and other wave forms. If the coupling between the elements is below a critical threshold, any excitational pattern will die out in the absence of noise. Below this threshold, large scale rotating spiral waves - as they are observed above threshold - can be maintained by a proper level of the noise[1]. Furthermore, their geometric features, such as the curvature can be controlled by the homogeneous noise level[2]. If the noise level is too large, break up of spiral waves and collisions with spontaneously nucleated waves yields spiral turbulence. Driving our array with a spatiotemporal pattern, e.g. a rotating spiral wave, we show that for weak coupling the excitational response of the array shows stochastic resonance - an effect we have termed spatiotemporal stochastic resonance. In the last part of the talk I'll make contact with calcium waves, observed in astrocyte cultures and hippocampus slices[3]. A. Cornell-Bell and collaborators[3] have pointed out the role of calcium waves for long-range glial signaling. We demonstrate the similarity of calcium waves with nonlinear waves in noisy excitable media. The noise level in the tissue is characterized by spontaneous activity and can be controlled by applying neuro-transmitter substances[3]. Noise effects in our model are compared with the effect of neuro-transmitters on calcium waves. [1]P. Jung and G. Mayer-Kress, CHAOS 5, 458 (1995). [2]P. Jung and G. Mayer-Kress, Phys. Rev. Lett.62, 2682 (1995). [3] A. Cornell-Bell, Steven M. Finkbeiner, Mark.S. Cooper and Stephen J. Smith, SCIENCE, 247, 373 (1990).

  17. Improving the detection sensitivity of chromatography by stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jianru; Xiang, Bingren; Fan, Hongyan; Xu, Fengguo

    2014-05-01

    Improving the detection sensitivity of analytical instruments has been a challenging task for chemometricians since undetectability has been almost unavoidable in trace analysis, even under optimized experimental conditions and with the use of modern instruments. Various chemometrics methods have been developed which attempt to address this detection problem but with limited success (e.g., fast Fourier transform and wavelet transform). However, the application of stochastic resonance (SR) creates an entirely new and effective methodology. Stochastic resonance is a phenomenon which is manifested in non-linear systems where a weak signal can be amplified and optimized with the assistance of noise. In this review, we summarize the use of basic SR, optimization of parameters and its modifications, including periodic modulation stochastic resonance (PSRA), linear modulation stochastic resonance (LSRA), single-well potential stochastic resonance (SSR) and the Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) for amplifying sub-threshold small signals. We also review the advantages and the disadvantages of various SR procedures. PMID:24622614

  18. City traffic jam relief by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Toledo, B. A.; Muñoz, V.; Rogan, J.; Zarama, R.; Kiwi, M.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate traffic in a city by means of the evolution of a row of interacting cars, using a cellular automaton model, in a sequence of traffic lights synchronized by a "green wave". When our initial condition is a small density jammed state, its evolution shows the expected scaling laws close to the synchronization resonance, with a uniform car density along the street. However, for an initial large density jammed state, we observe density variations along the streets, which results in the breakdown of the scaling laws. This spatial disorder corresponds to a different attractor of the system. As we include velocity perturbations in the dynamics of the cars, all these attractors converge to a statistically equivalent system for all initial jammed densities. However, this emergent state shows a stochastic resonance-like behavior in which the average traffic velocity increases with respect to that of the system without noise, for several initial jammed densities. This result may help in the understanding of dynamics of traffic jams in cities.

  19. Stochastic Resonance Crossovers in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pinamonti, Giovanni; Marro, J.; Torres, Joaquín J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we numerically study the emergence of stochastic resonance as a mild phenomenon and how this transforms into an amazing enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio at several levels of a disturbing ambient noise. The setting is a cooperative, interacting complex system modelled as an Ising-Hopfield network in which the intensity of mutual interactions or “synapses” varies with time in such a way that it accounts for, e.g., a kind of fatigue reported to occur in the cortex. This induces nonequilibrium phase transitions whose rising comes associated to various mechanisms producing two types of resonance. The model thus clarifies the details of the signal transmission and the causes of correlation among noise and signal. We also describe short-time persistent memory states, and conclude on the limited relevance of the network wiring topology. Our results, in qualitative agreement with the observation of excellent transmission of weak signals in the brain when competing with both intrinsic and external noise, are expected to be of wide validity and may have technological application. We also present here a first contact between the model behavior and psychotechnical data. PMID:23272090

  20. Unidentified Bright Objects on Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Affect Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Chan; Chang, Dong Sik; Cho, Chin Saeng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in clinical manifestations of in two groups of vestibular neuritis (VN) patients with or without unidentified bright objects (UBOs). Methods A prospective, observational study with 46 patients diagnosed with VN between May 2013 and November 2013 was executed. A caloric test, a cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) test, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), spontaneous nystagmus test, head impulse test, and head-shaking nystagmus test were performed. Results Of the patients, 56.5% (n=26) were classified as UBO-positive by MRI. These showed lower caloric weakness and more prominent cVEMP asymmetry compared with the UBO-negative group (P<0.05). Total VN (TVN) was the most common in the UBO-positive group (45.0%), followed by superior VN (SVN, 30.0%), and inferior VN (IVN, 25.0%). However, in the UBO-negative group, SVN (75.0%) was the most common, followed by TVN and IVN (P<0.05). The recovery rate was not influenced by UBOs (P>0.05). Conclusion UBOs on T2-weighted or fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI may affect the patterns of the vestibular nerve in patients with VN. PMID:26622955

  1. Robust stochastic resonance for simple threshold neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2004-09-01

    Simulation and theoretical results show that memoryless threshold neurons benefit from small amounts of almost all types of additive noise and so produce the stochastic-resonance or SR effect. Input-output mutual information measures the performance of such threshold systems that use subthreshold signals. The SR result holds for all possible noise probability density functions with finite variance. The only constraint is that the noise mean must fall outside a “forbidden” threshold-related interval that the user can control—a new theorem shows that this condition is also necessary. A corollary and simulations show that the SR effect occurs for right-sided beta and Weibull noise as well. These SR results further hold for the entire uncountably infinite class of alpha-stable probability density functions. Alpha-stable noise densities have infinite variance and infinite higher-order moments and often model impulsive noise environments. The stable noise densities include the special case of symmetric bell-curve densities with thick tails such as the Cauchy probability density. The SR result for alpha-stable noise densities shows that the SR effect in threshold and thresholdlike systems is robust against occasional or even frequent violent fluctuations in noise. Regression analysis reveals both an exponential relationship for the optimal noise dispersion as a function of the alpha bell-curve tail thickness and an approximate linear relationship for the SR-maximal mutual information as a function of the alpha bell-curve tail thickness.

  2. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  3. Parametric resonances and stochastic layer induced by a phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Y.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1995-12-31

    The Hamiltonian system with phase modulation in a higher harmonic rf cavity is experimentally studied on the IUCF cooler ring. The Poincare maps in the resonant rotating frame are obtained from experimental data and compared with numerical tracking. The formation of the stochastic layer due to the overlap of parametric resonances is discussed. The dependence of the stochastic layer on the voltage of the higher harmonic rf cavity, amplitude and frequency of the phase modulation is studied.

  4. Coherent signal amplification in bistable nanomechanical oscillators by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badzey, Robert L.; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2005-10-01

    Stochastic resonance is a counterintuitive concept: the addition of noise to a noisy system induces coherent amplification of its response. First suggested as a mechanism for the cyclic recurrence of ice ages, stochastic resonance has been seen in a wide variety of macroscopic physical systems: bistable ring lasers, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), magnetoelastic ribbons and neurophysiological systems such as the receptors in crickets and crayfish. Although fundamentally important as a mechanism of coherent signal amplification, stochastic resonance has yet to be observed in nanoscale systems. Here we report the observation of stochastic resonance in bistable nanomechanical silicon oscillators. Our nanomechanical systems consist of beams that are clamped at each end and driven into transverse oscillation with the use of a radiofrequency source. Modulation of the source induces controllable switching of the beams between two stable, distinct states. We observe that the addition of white noise causes a marked amplification of the signal strength. Stochastic resonance in nanomechanical systems could have a function in the realization of controllable high-speed nanomechanical memory cells, and paves the way for exploring macroscopic quantum coherence and tunnelling.

  5. Tracking stochastic resonance curves using an assisted reference model

    SciTech Connect

    Calderón Ramírez, Mario; Rico Martínez, Ramiro; Parmananda, P.

    2015-06-15

    The optimal noise amplitude for Stochastic Resonance (SR) is located employing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) reference model with a nonlinear predictive capability. A modified Kalman Filter (KF) was coupled to this reference model in order to compensate for semi-quantitative forecast errors. Three manifestations of stochastic resonance, namely, Periodic Stochastic Resonance (PSR), Aperiodic Stochastic Resonance (ASR), and finally Coherence Resonance (CR) were considered. Using noise amplitude as the control parameter, for the case of PSR and ASR, the cross-correlation curve between the sub-threshold input signal and the system response is tracked. However, using the same parameter the Normalized Variance curve is tracked for the case of CR. The goal of the present work is to track these curves and converge to their respective extremal points. The ANN reference model strategy captures and subsequently predicts the nonlinear features of the model system while the KF compensates for the perturbations inherent to the superimposed noise. This technique, implemented in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, enabled us to track the resonance curves and eventually locate their optimal (extremal) values. This would yield the optimal value of noise for the three manifestations of the SR phenomena.

  6. Tracking stochastic resonance curves using an assisted reference model.

    PubMed

    Calderón Ramírez, Mario; Rico Martínez, Ramiro; Ramírez Álvarez, Elizeth; Parmananda, P

    2015-06-01

    The optimal noise amplitude for Stochastic Resonance (SR) is located employing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) reference model with a nonlinear predictive capability. A modified Kalman Filter (KF) was coupled to this reference model in order to compensate for semi-quantitative forecast errors. Three manifestations of stochastic resonance, namely, Periodic Stochastic Resonance (PSR), Aperiodic Stochastic Resonance (ASR), and finally Coherence Resonance (CR) were considered. Using noise amplitude as the control parameter, for the case of PSR and ASR, the cross-correlation curve between the sub-threshold input signal and the system response is tracked. However, using the same parameter the Normalized Variance curve is tracked for the case of CR. The goal of the present work is to track these curves and converge to their respective extremal points. The ANN reference model strategy captures and subsequently predicts the nonlinear features of the model system while the KF compensates for the perturbations inherent to the superimposed noise. This technique, implemented in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, enabled us to track the resonance curves and eventually locate their optimal (extremal) values. This would yield the optimal value of noise for the three manifestations of the SR phenomena. PMID:26117101

  7. Stochastic resonance in the Bénard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbini, Leonardo; Bordi, Isabella; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the effect of small stochastic perturbations on a dynamical system describing the Bénard thermal convection is studied. In particular, the two-dimensional Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations governing the dynamics of three interacting Rayleigh rolls with increasing horizontal wave numbers ( i.e., three horizontal modes in the Fourier transform) are reduced to a system of gradient type. The aim is to study the transition paths between the stable steady states, when a stochastic perturbation is taken into account, and the occurrence of stochastic resonance, when the system is perturbed by white noise and the first (gravest) mode is forced by an external periodic component. Results show that i) random transitions between stable steady states representing a clockwise and a counter-clockwise circulation occur through the two saddle points associated with the second mode and not through the (unstable) conductive state nor the saddle points related to the third mode; ii) the introduction of the third mode, as well as of others of smaller spatial scales, does not affect transitions that remain confined along the trajectories linking stable convective states through the saddle points associated with the second mode; iii) the system exhibits a stochastic resonance behavior leading to large amplification of the small amplitude periodic component compared to the one leading to the classical (one-dimensional) stochastic resonance.

  8. Stochastic resonance as an emergent property of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. A.; Goltsev, A. V.; Lee, K.-E.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2013-01-01

    In biological sensory systems, a presence of noise can actually enhance detection of weak signals. This phenomenon is called stochastic resonance (SR). We show that SR can emerge as a collective phenomenon in neural networks. We consider a cortical circuit model composed by stochastic excitatory and inhibitory neurons that form a sparsely connected network. We find that SR appears due to nonlinear dynamics in a region near the critical point of a dynamical phase transition to network oscillations. The critical point is actually an emergent threshold in the collective dynamics. Using the cortical model, we mimic experiments of Gluckman et al. [B. J. Gluckman et al., PRL 77, 4098 (1996)] that observed stochastic resonance in a response of CA1 networks from mammalian brain on periodic electric stimuli. Results of our numerical calculations are in agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with these experiments.

  9. In search for a possible statistical basis of Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Vodyanoy, Igor

    2000-03-01

    Stochastic Resonance (SR) is a phenomenon of enhancing the information content at the system output by adding noise to the input signal. Originally, SR was shown in dynamical systems ranging from glaciers to superconducting junctions. Later it was found to occur in non-dynamical systems with and without thresholds. Now a growing number of publications report SR practically everywhere: in meteorology, sociology, finance, psycho-physics, electrophysiology, chemistry, etc. We seek a general statistical mechanism which would capture and, thus, explain the essence of SR independently of the system where it is found. Though, at present, this problem is far from solved, we think that the doubly-stochastic Poisson process approach described here represents a significant step toward such a generalization. Using this approach, we show that, in contrast to the current point of view, an activation barrier is not a necessary prerequisite of a Stochastic Resonator.

  10. Nonadiabatic stochastic resonance of a nanomagnet excited by spin torque.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao; Boone, Carl T; Zhu, Jian; Krivorotov, Ilya N

    2010-07-23

    We report microwave-frequency magnetization dynamics coexcited by alternating spin torque and thermal fluctuations. In these dynamics, temperature strongly enhances the amplitude of magnetization precession and enables excitation of nonlinear dynamic states of magnetization by weak alternating spin torque. We explain these thermally-activated dynamics in terms of nonadiabatic stochastic resonance of magnetization driven by spin torque. PMID:20867878

  11. Stochastic resonance in non-dynamical systems without response thresholds.

    PubMed

    Bezrukov, S M; Vodyanoy, I

    1997-01-23

    The addition of noise to a system can sometimes improve its ability to transfer information reliably. This phenomenon--known as stochastic resonance--was originally proposed to account for periodicity in the Earth's ice ages, but has now been shown to occur in many systems in physics and biology. Recent experimental and theoretical work has shown that the simplest system exhibiting 'stochastic resonance' consists of nothing more than signal and noise with a threshold-triggered device (when the signal plus noise exceeds the threshold, the system responds momentarily, then relaxes to equilibrium to await the next triggering event). Here we introduce a class of non-dynamical and threshold-free systems that also exhibit stochastic resonance. We present and analyse a general mathematical model for such systems, in which a sequence of pulses is generated randomly with a probability (per unit time) that depends exponentially on an input. When this input is a sine-wave masked by additive noise, we observe an increase in the output signal-to-noise ratio as the level of noise increases. This result shows that stochastic resonance can occur in a broad class of thermally driven physico-chemical systems, such as semiconductor p-n junctions, mesoscopic electronic devices and voltage-dependent ion channels, in which reaction rates are controlled by activation barriers. PMID:9002515

  12. Human vestibular cortex as identified with caloric stimulation in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasold, Oliver; von Brevern, Michael; Kuhberg, Marc; Ploner, Christoph J; Villringer, Arno; Lempert, Thomas; Wenzel, Rüdiger

    2002-11-01

    Anatomic and electrophysiological studies in monkeys have yielded a detailed map of cortex areas receiving vestibular afferents. In contrast, comparatively little is known about the cortical representation of the human vestibular system. In this study we applied caloric stimulation and fMRI to further characterize human cortical vestibular areas and to test for hemispheric dominance of vestibular information processing. For caloric vestibular stimulation we used cold nitrogen to avoid susceptibility artifacts induced by water calorics. Right and left side vestibular stimulation was repetitively performed inducing a nystagmus for at least 90 s after the end of the stimulation in all subjects. Only the first 60 s of this nystagmus period was included for statistical analysis and compared with the baseline condition. Activation maps revealed a cortical network with right hemispheric dominance, which in all subjects comprised the temporoparietal junction extending into the posterior insula and, furthermore, the anterior insula, pre- and postcentral gyrus, areas in the parietal lobe, the ventrolateral portion of the occipital lobe, and the inferior frontal gyrus extending into the inferior part of the precentral sulcus. In conclusion, caloric stimulation in fMRI reveals a widespread cortical network involved in vestibular signal processing corresponding to the findings from animal experiments and previous functional imaging studies in humans. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a strong right hemispheric dominance of vestibular cortex areas regardless of the stimulated side, consistent with the current view of a rightward asymmetrical cortical network for spatial orientation. PMID:12414278

  13. Stochastic resonance in collective exciton-polariton excitations inside a GaAs microcavity.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, H; Trebaol, S; Morier-Genoud, F; Portella-Oberli, M T; Deveaud, B

    2014-08-01

    We report the first observation of stochastic resonance in confined exciton polaritons. We evidence this phenomena by tracking the polaritons behavior through two stochastic resonance quantifiers namely the spectral magnification factor and the signal-to-noise ratio. The evolution of the stochastic resonance in the function of the modulation amplitude of the periodic excitation signal is studied. Our experimental observations are well reproduced by numerical simulations performed in the framework of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation under stochastic perturbation. PMID:25126934

  14. Stochastic resonance in feedforward acupuncture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ying-Mei; Wang, Jiang; Men, Cong; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Yu, Hai-Tao; Chan, Wai-Lok

    2014-10-01

    Effects of noises and some other network properties on the weak signal propagation are studied systematically in feedforward acupuncture networks (FFN) based on FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model. It is found that noises with medium intensity can enhance signal propagation and this effect can be further increased by the feedforward network structure. Resonant properties in the noisy network can also be altered by several network parameters, such as heterogeneity, synapse features, and feedback connections. These results may also provide a novel potential explanation for the propagation of acupuncture signal.

  15. Spatio-temporal stochastic resonance in a gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinklage, Andreas; Klinger, Thomas; Wilke, Christian

    1999-11-01

    Noise is usually considered a troublesome feature of physical systems. But it was also realized that noise can play an important role in the formation of structures in states far from equilibrium; here the plasma of the positive column of a dc glow discharge was investigated. The effect of stochastic resonance(For reviews see: L. Gammaitoni et al.), Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 233 (1998); and Chaos FOCUS ISSUE 8, 533 (1998). was studied in a discharge plasma close to the threshold of ionization instability. Ionization waves were excited by superimposed noise and a maximum signal-to-noise ratio at an optimum level of noise indicates stochastic resonance. It can be shown that the noise drives the stable discharge into a convectively unstable regime leading to the formation of ionization wave-trains. The corresponding spatio-temporal dynamics was examined.

  16. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications. PMID:26067911

  17. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-06-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications.

  18. Stochastic resonance in a nonlinear mechanical vibration isolation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zeqi; Chen, Li-Qun; Brennan, Michael J.; Yang, Tiejun; Ding, Hu; Liu, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the effect that a stochastic resonance can have on a vibration isolation system. Rather than reducing the transmitted force, it is shown that it is possible to significantly mask the component of the force transmitted though the isolator, when the system is excited harmonically. This can be achieved by adding a very low intensity of random noise to the harmonic excitation force. The nonlinear mechanical vibration isolation system used in the study consists of a vertical linear spring in parallel with two horizontal springs, which are configured so that the potential energy of the system has a double-well. Prior to the analytical and numerical study, an experiment to demonstrate stochastic resonance in a mechanical system is described.

  19. Stochastic resonance in a biological motor under complex fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Hung; Tsong, Tian Yow

    2004-02-01

    The dynamics division approach proposed in this work enables us to handle dynamical equations with complex fluctuations. A Brownian motor with cyclic conformational changes is analyzed to understand effects of noise on its signal transduction, and on condition in which stochastic resonance may take place. The result reproduces several features of the experimental data on the electric activation of ion pumping by Na, K-ATPase.

  20. Thermal enhancement and stochastic resonance of polaron ratchets.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, L S; Eremko, A A; Piette, B M A G; Zakrzewski, W J

    2014-06-01

    We study the ratchet drift of large polarons (solitons) in molecular diatomic chains induced by unbiased time periodic electric fields at nonzero temperature below its critical value. We show that, at a nonzero temperature, the critical value of the intensity of the electric field above which the ratchet phenomenon takes place is lower than at zero temperature for the same frequency of the field. We show that there is a range of temperatures for which the polaron drift is larger than that at zero temperature. We also show that temperature decreases the value of the lowest critical period of the field. And, finally, we demonstrate that there is a stochastic resonance in a polaron ratchet, namely that there is an optimal temperature at which the polaron drift is a maximum. The values of the stochastic resonance temperature, the lowest critical values of the field intensity, and its period depend on various parameters of the system and, in particular, on the anisotropy of the chain parameters. This temperature induced decrease of the critical value of the field intensity and its period, as well as the stochastic resonance itself, may be important for practical applications of the ratchet phenomenon in systems involving conducting polymers and other low-dimensional materials. They may also be important in some biological macromolecules where the ratchet phenomenon could take place in biomotors and energy and/or charge transport. PMID:25019849

  1. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  2. Stochastic resonance in a generalized Von Foerster population growth model

    SciTech Connect

    Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    The stochastic dynamics of a population growth model, similar to the Von Foerster model for human population, is studied. The influence of fluctuating environment on the carrying capacity is modeled as a multiplicative dichotomous noise. It is established that an interplay between nonlinearity and environmental fluctuations can cause single unidirectional discontinuous transitions of the mean population size versus the noise amplitude, i.e., an increase of noise amplitude can induce a jump from a state with a moderate number of individuals to that with a very large number, while by decreasing the noise amplitude an opposite transition cannot be effected. An analytical expression of the mean escape time for such transitions is found. Particularly, it is shown that the mean transition time exhibits a strong minimum at intermediate values of noise correlation time, i.e., the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. Applications of the results in ecology are also discussed.

  3. Stochastic Dipolar Recoupling in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-02

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body system000.

  4. Activity-dependent stochastic resonance in recurrent neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volman, Vladislav; Levine, Herbert

    2008-06-01

    We use a biophysical model of a local neuronal circuit to study the implications of synaptic plasticity for the detection of weak sensory stimuli. Networks with fast plastic coupling show behavior consistent with stochastic resonance. The addition of an additional slow coupling that accounts for the asynchronous release of neurotransmitter results in qualitatively different properties of signal detection, and also leads to the appearance of transient post-stimulus bistability. Our results suggest testable hypothesis with regard to the self-organization and dynamics of local neuronal circuits.

  5. Study of stochastic resonance in a quantum dot network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Hiroki; Oya, Takahide

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports a study of stochastic resonance in a huge quantum dot network for single-electron (SE) circuits. Such circuits, which are controlled by the Coulomb blockade, are one type of next-generation information-processing device. However, they are very sensitive to noises such as thermal noise and device mismatch noise. Thus, we introduce the stochastic resonance phenomenon into the circuit to improve its noise tolerance. Stochastic resonance is a phenomenon that was discovered in the brains of living things in noisy environments and was modeled for neural networks. When the phenomenon occurs, its harnessing of noise energy makes weak signals become clear. In current research, SE devices that operate with stochastic resonance have been reported. However, signals were attenuated in particularly noisy environments. In contrast, it was reported that a huge molecular network amplified weak signals by harnessing noise energy. The report said the current-voltage characteristics of the molecular network described the Coulomb blockade under a noisy environment. Thus, a huge quantum dot network that is partly similar to a molecular network is expected to amplify the weak signal harnessing noise, when the current-voltage characteristics of the network show the Coulomb blockade. To confirm this, in this study we use the Monte Carlo method to simulate the noisy-environment operation of a quantum dot network comprising quantum dots and tunneling junctions. We observe the current-voltage characteristics of the network, when changing the network size (5×5, 10×10, and 100×100) and the noise intensity (0 K, 2 K, 5 K, and 10 K for operating temperature, and 0%, 5%, 10%, and 30% for device mismatch). As a result, we are able to observe the Coulomb blockade under the appropriate noise strength, which in this study is 5 K or less with thermal noise, and 30% with device mismatch. From the results, we conclude the network operates correctly under appropriate noise strength. Moreover, the noise energy amplifies the network current, indicating that SE circuits can function as signal-amplifying devices.

  6. Attention Excludes Noise. Does It Exclude Stochastic Resonance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lawrence M.; Kitajo, Keiichi

    2005-11-01

    The most highly confirmed models of attentional psychophysics imply that focused attention, as compared to unfocused attention, always excludes, or filters out, both external and internal noise. This filtering action of attention would appear to exclude the possibility of stochastic resonance (SR) in the detection and discrimination of attended signals. In contrast, recent experiments have definitively demonstrated the presence of SR in detection and discrimination of (presumably attended) sensory signals by humans. Here we discuss this apparent conflict between theory and experiment, propose several alternative views of attention that do allow SR, and present the results of preliminary experiments intended to test our ideas.

  7. Model for stochastic-resonance-type behavior in sensory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yunfan; Matthews, Nestor; Qian, Ning

    2002-03-01

    Recently it was found that noise could help improve human detection of sensory stimuli via stochastic-resonance-type behavior. Specifically, the ability of an individual to detect a weak tactile stimulus could be enhanced by adding a certain amount of noise. Here we propose, from the perspective of classical signal detection theory, a simple and general model to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We demonstrate that noise-mediated enhancements and decrements in human sensation can be well reproduced by our model. The predicted upper bound of the performance improvement by adding noise is also consistent with the experimental data. We suggest additional experiments to further test the model.

  8. Activity-dependent stochastic resonance in recurrent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Volman, Vladislav; Levine, Herbert

    2008-06-01

    We use a biophysical model of a local neuronal circuit to study the implications of synaptic plasticity for the detection of weak sensory stimuli. Networks with fast plastic coupling show behavior consistent with stochastic resonance. The addition of an additional slow coupling that accounts for the asynchronous release of neurotransmitter results in qualitatively different properties of signal detection, and also leads to the appearance of transient post-stimulus bistability. Our results suggest testable hypothesis with regard to the self-organization and dynamics of local neuronal circuits. PMID:18643209

  9. Resonant Phenomenon in a Stochastic Delayed Bistable Chemical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunxuan; Yang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the resonant phenomenon for a bistable chemical system in the presence of noises and delayed feedback is investigated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is calculated when periodic signal is introduced additively (or multiplicatively). The impacts of the parameter ? of the reaction, time delay ?, strength K of the feedback loop, multiplicative ( D) and additive ( Q) noise strengths and cross-correlation strength ? between two noises on the SNR are discussed. When the periodic signal is introduced additively, our results show (i) the SNR as a function of the parameter ? exhibits a maximum, the existence of the maximum is a characteristic of the parametric resonance (PR) phenomenon; (ii) the SNR as a function of D exhibits only a maximum, however, for the case of SNR as a function of Q exhibits not only a maximum, but also a minimum. The existence of the maximum and minimum in the SNR is the identifying characteristics of the stochastic resonance (SR) and reverse-resonance (RR); and (iii) the increases of ?, K and ? enhance the SR and weaken the RR. Finally, we compare the resonant phenomenon for the additive periodic signal with that for multiplicative one in the chemical system.

  10. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  11. Environmental Fluctuations and Stochastic Resonance in Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kapil; Davtyan, Aram; Papoian, Garegin A; Gruebele, Martin; Platkov, Max

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic resonance is a mechanism whereby a weak signal becomes detectable through the addition of noise. It is common in many macroscopic biological phenomena, but here we ask whether it can be observed in a microscopic biological phenomenon, protein folding. We investigate the folding kinetics of the protein VlsE, with a folding relaxation time of about 0.7 seconds at 38 °C in vitro. First we show that the VlsE unfolding/refolding reaction can be driven by a periodic thermal excitation above the reaction threshold. We detect the reaction by fluorescence from FRET labels on VlSE and show that accurate rate coefficients and activation barriers can be obtained from modulated kinetics. Then we weaken the periodic temperature modulation below the reaction threshold, and show that addition of artificial thermal noise speeds up the reaction from an undetectable to a detectable rate. We observe a maximum in the recovered signal as a function of thermal noise, a stochastic resonance. Simulation of a small model-protein, analysis in an accompanying theory paper, and our experimental result here all show that correlated noise is a physically and chemically plausible mechanism by which cells could modulate biomolecular dynamics during threshold processes such as signaling. PMID:26711088

  12. Planetary gearbox fault diagnosis using an adaptive stochastic resonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Han, Dong; Lin, Jing; He, Zhengjia

    2013-07-01

    Planetary gearboxes are widely used in aerospace, automotive and heavy industry applications due to their large transmission ratio, strong load-bearing capacity and high transmission efficiency. The tough operation conditions of heavy duty and intensive impact load may cause gear tooth damage such as fatigue crack and teeth missed etc. The challenging issues in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes include selection of sensitive measurement locations, investigation of vibration transmission paths and weak feature extraction. One of them is how to effectively discover the weak characteristics from noisy signals of faulty components in planetary gearboxes. To address the issue in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes, an adaptive stochastic resonance (ASR) method is proposed in this paper. The ASR method utilizes the optimization ability of ant colony algorithms and adaptively realizes the optimal stochastic resonance system matching input signals. Using the ASR method, the noise may be weakened and weak characteristics highlighted, and therefore the faults can be diagnosed accurately. A planetary gearbox test rig is established and experiments with sun gear faults including a chipped tooth and a missing tooth are conducted. And the vibration signals are collected under the loaded condition and various motor speeds. The proposed method is used to process the collected signals and the results of feature extraction and fault diagnosis demonstrate its effectiveness.

  13. Precision constrained stochastic resonance in a feedforward neural network.

    PubMed

    Mtetwa, Nhamoinesu; Smith, Leslie S

    2005-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon in which the response of a nonlinear system to a subthreshold information-bearing signal is optimized by the presence of noise. By considering a nonlinear system (network of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons) that captures the functional dynamics of neuronal firing, we demonstrate that sensory neurons could, in principle harness SR to optimize the detection and transmission of weak stimuli. We have previously characterized this effect by use of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Here in addition to SNR, we apply an entropy-based measure (Fisher information) and compare the two measures of quantifying SR. We also discuss the performance of these two SR measures in a full precision floating point model simulated in Java and in a precision limited integer model simulated on a field programmable gate array (FPGA). We report in this study that stochastic resonance which is mainly associated with floating point implementations is possible in both a single LIF neuron and a network of LIF neurons implemented on lower resolution integer based digital hardware. We also report that such a network can improve the SNR and Fisher information of the output over a single LIF neuron. PMID:15732404

  14. PULSAR STATE SWITCHING FROM MARKOV TRANSITIONS AND STOCHASTIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.

    2013-09-20

    Markov processes are shown to be consistent with metastable states seen in pulsar phenomena, including intensity nulling, pulse-shape mode changes, subpulse drift rates, spin-down rates, and X-ray emission, based on the typically broad and monotonic distributions of state lifetimes. Markovianity implies a nonlinear magnetospheric system in which state changes occur stochastically, corresponding to transitions between local minima in an effective potential. State durations (though not transition times) are thus largely decoupled from the characteristic timescales of various magnetospheric processes. Dyadic states are common but some objects show at least four states with some transitions forbidden. Another case is the long-term intermittent pulsar B1931+24 that has binary radio-emission and torque states with wide, but non-monotonic duration distributions. It also shows a quasi-period of 38 ± 5 days in a 13 yr time sequence, suggesting stochastic resonance in a Markov system with a forcing function that could be strictly periodic or quasi-periodic. Nonlinear phenomena are associated with time-dependent activity in the acceleration region near each magnetic polar cap. The polar-cap diode is altered by feedback from the outer magnetosphere and by return currents from the equatorial region outside the light cylinder that may also cause the neutron star to episodically charge and discharge. Orbital perturbations of a disk or current sheet provide a natural periodicity for the forcing function in the stochastic-resonance interpretation of B1931+24. Disk dynamics may introduce additional timescales in observed phenomena. Future work can test the Markov interpretation, identify which pulsar types have a propensity for state changes, and clarify the role of selection effects.

  15. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances on scale-free neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matja; Duan, Zhisheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2009-06-01

    We study the effects of periodic subthreshold pacemaker activity and time-delayed coupling on stochastic resonance over scale-free neuronal networks. As the two extreme options, we introduce the pacemaker, respectively, to the neuron with the highest degree and to one of the neurons with the lowest degree within the network, but we also consider the case when all neurons are exposed to the periodic forcing. In the absence of delay, we show that an intermediate intensity of noise is able to optimally assist the pacemaker in imposing its rhythm on the whole ensemble, irrespective to its placing, thus providing evidences for stochastic resonance on the scale-free neuronal networks. Interestingly thereby, if the forcing in form of a periodic pulse train is introduced to all neurons forming the network, the stochastic resonance decreases as compared to the case when only a single neuron is paced. Moreover, we show that finite delays in coupling can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances independently of the placing of the pacemaker, but they can also altogether destroy stochastic resonance. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances manifest as well-expressed maxima of the correlation measure, appearing at every multiple of the pacemaker period. We argue that fine-tuned delays and locally active pacemakers are vital for assuring optimal conditions for stochastic resonance on complex neuronal networks.

  16. Parameter-Induced Stochastic Resonance of Weak Periodic Signal Excitation with α Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Kou, Jie; Jiao, Shang-Bin

    In view of the nonlinear bistable system, this paper studied the parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomenon of low-frequency weak signal excitation under α stable noise environment, and explored the action laws of the α stable noise distribution parameters α, β, μ, σ and the bistable system parameters a, b on stochastic resonance effect. The results show that in different α stable noise, adjusting the bistable system parameters can induce stochastic resonance; Moreover, when a(or b) is fixed, the intervals of b(or a) which can induce stochastic resonance are multiple and don't change with any α stable distribution parameter. Further, by combining with the parameter compensation method for researching on high-frequency weak signal, the same action laws as the low-frequency signal are got. The conclusions are significant for using parameter-induced stochastic resonance principle in weak signal detection in the abnormal diffusion dynamical system.

  17. Stochastic Resonance in a Thermohaline Circulation Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Faranda, Davide; Willeit, Matteo

    2010-05-01

    We perform an analysis of the uncoupled version of the Rooth 3-box model of the thermohaline circulation (THC). The model consists of three boxes, representing is avery simplified way the northern, tropical and southern Atlantic ocean. We first study the bistable behaviour and the bifurcation points, showing the distribution of THC strength values for different freshwatwer fluxes, using random initial conditions. Subsequently, we perturb our models with noise of various intensity, finding the stationary distribution of THC strength for different value of the fluxes. We then combine a weak periodic forcing (period of 19ky) and "plausible" stochastic noise in freshwater fluxes to study stochastic resonance. In three different cases we observe a strong response to the frequency of the forcing for a given interval of noise strenght. In the most relevant case of antisymmetric periodic forcing, using the noise strength value which maximizes the response to the periodic forcing, we find that the average waiting time between the transitions from a positive to a negative circulation is close to half of the period of the forcing.

  18. A neuron model of stochastic resonance using rectangular pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M

    2015-02-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is the enhanced representation of a weak input signal by the addition of an optimal level of broadband noise to a nonlinear (threshold) system. Since its discovery in the 1980s the domain of input signals shown to be applicable to SR has greatly expanded, from strictly periodic inputs to now nearly any aperiodic forcing function. The perturbations (noise) used to generate SR have also expanded, from white noise to now colored noise or vibrational forcing. This study demonstrates that a new class of perturbations can achieve SR, namely, series of stochastically generated biphasic pulse trains. Using these pulse trains as 'noise' we show that a Hodgkin Huxley model neuron exhibits SR behavior when detecting weak input signals. This result is of particular interest to neuroscience because nearly all artificial neural stimulation is implemented with square current or voltage pulses rather than broadband noise, and this new method may facilitate the translation of the performance gains achievable through SR to neural prosthetics. PMID:25186655

  19. A Neuron Model of Stochastic Resonance Using Rectangular Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is the enhanced representation of a weak input signal by the addition of an optimal level of broadband noise to a nonlinear (threshold) system. Since its discovery in the 1980s the domain of input signals shown to be applicable to SR has greatly expanded, from strictly periodic inputs to now nearly any aperiodic forcing function. The perturbations (noise) used to generate SR have also expanded, from white noise to now colored noise or vibrational forcing. This study demonstrates that a new class of perturbations can achieve SR, namely, series of stochastically generated biphasic pulse trains. Using these pulse trains as ‘noise’ we show that a Hodgkin Huxley model neuron exhibits SR behavior when detecting weak input signals. This result is of particular interest to neuroscience because nearly all artificial neural stimulation is implemented with square current or voltage pulses rather than broadband noise, and this new method may facilitate the translation of the performance gains achievable through SR to neural prosthetics. PMID:25186655

  20. Stochastic resonance in periodic potentials driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaihe; Jin, Yanfei

    2013-11-01

    We studied the motion of an underdamped Brownian particle in a periodic potential subject to a harmonic excitation and a colored noise. The average input energy per period and the phase lag are calculated to quantify the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR). The numerical results show that most of the out-of-phase trajectories make a transition to the in-phase state as the temperature increases. And the colored noise delays the transitions between these two dynamical states. The each curve of the average input energy per period and the phase lag versus the temperature exist a mono peak and SR appears in this system. Moreover, the optimal temperature where the SR occurs becomes larger and the region of SR grows wider as the correlation time of colored noise increases.

  1. Effects of Colored Noise on Stochastic Resonance in Sensory Neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, D.; Mar, D.J.; Collins, J.J.; Grigg, P.

    1999-03-01

    Noise can assist neurons in the detection of weak signals via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). We demonstrate experimentally that SR-type effects can be obtained in rat sensory neurons with white noise, 1/f noise, or 1/f{sup 2} noise. For low-frequency input noise, we show that the optimal noise intensity is the lowest and the output signal-to-noise ratio the highest for conventional white noise. We also show that under certain circumstances, 1/f noise can be better than white noise for enhancing the response of a neuron to a weak signal. We present a theory to account for these results and discuss the biological implications of 1/f noise. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Noise-hidden signal recovery via stochastic resonance in the SOI waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Heng; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Li, Shaopeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to recover weak pulse signals buried in noise via stochastic resonance (SR) based on optical bistability induced by the free-carrier dispersion effect in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide resonator. The bistable system threshold is determined by the resonator parameters including the waveguide length, mirror reflectivity, and the free-carrier lifetime. A signal with different power levels can be detected by changing the free-carrier lifetime using a reverse-biased p-i-n junction embedded in the SOI waveguide. The influence of the system parameters on the SR is quantitatively analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient between the input and output signals. A cross-correlation gain of 5.6 is obtained by optimizing the system parameters of the SOI waveguide resonator. The results show the potential of using this structure to reconstruct and extract weak signals in all-optical integrated systems.

  3. Temperature-driven coherence resonance and stochastic resonance in a thermochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, A.; Gorecki, J.; Gorecki, A.; Nowakowski, B.

    2014-02-01

    We perform the stochastic analysis of a thermochemical system using a master equation which describes a chemical reaction and includes discrete and continuous temperature jumps. We study the time evolution of the system selecting the temperature of the thermostat as an easily tunable control parameter. Depending on the thermostat temperature, the system can be in an excitable, oscillatory, or stationary regime. Stochastic time series for the system temperature are generated and the distributions of interspike intervals are analyzed in the three dynamical regimes separated by a homoclinic bifurcation and a Hopf bifurcation. Different constructive roles of internal fluctuations are exhibited. A noise-induced transition is observed in the vicinity of the Hopf bifurcation. Coherence resonance and stochastic resonance are found in the oscillatory regime. In a range of thermostat temperatures, a nontrivial behavior of the highly nonlinear system is revealed by the existence of both a minimum and a maximum in the scaled standard deviation of interspike intervals as a function of particle number. This high sensitivity to system size illustrates that controlling dynamics in nanoreactors may remain a difficult task.

  4. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dongxu; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P

    2014-11-15

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  5. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Dongxu; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2014-11-01

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  6. Vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2015-04-01

    Vestibular migraine is now considered a distinct diagnostic entity by both the Barany Society and the International Headache Society. The recognition of vestibular migraine as a diagnostic entity required decades and was presaged by several reports indicating that a large proportion of patients with migraine headaches have vestibular symptoms and that a large proportion of patients with undiagnosed episodic vestibular symptoms have migraine headache. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, challenges to diagnosis include variability in terms of the character of dizziness, the presence or absence of clearly defined attacks, the duration of attacks, and the temporal association between headache or other migrainous features and vestibular symptoms. Also, symptoms of vestibular migraine often overlap with symptoms of other causes of dizziness, especially Ménière's disease and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This article will discuss the demographics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, physical examination findings, laboratory testing, comorbidities, treatment options, and pathophysiology of vestibular migraine. Future research in the field of vestibular migraine should include both clinical and basic science efforts to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition. Controlled treatment trials for vestibular migraine are desperately needed. PMID:25728541

  7. Entropic stochastic resonance without external force in oscillatory confined space

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-05-21

    We have studied the dynamics of Brownian particles in a confined geometry of dumbbell-shape with periodically oscillating walls. Entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) behavior, characterizing by a maximum value of the coherent factor Q at some optimal level of noise, is observed even without external periodic force in the horizontal direction, which is necessary for conventional ESR where the wall is static and the particle is subjected to the force. Interestingly, the ESR can be remarkably enhanced by the particle gravity G, in contrast to the conventional case. In addition, Q decreases (increases) with G in the small (large) noise limit, respectively, while it non-monotonically changes with G for moderate noise levels. We have applied an effective 1D coarsening description to illustrate such a nontrivial dependence on G, by investigating the property of the 1D effective potential of entropic nature and paying special attention to the excess part resulting from the boundary oscillation. Dependences of the ESR strength with other related parameters are also discussed.

  8. COMMUNICATION: Stochastic resonance and the evolution of Daphnia foraging strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dees, Nathan D.; Bahar, Sonya; Moss, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Search strategies are currently of great interest, with reports on foraging ranging from albatrosses and spider monkeys to microzooplankton. Here, we investigate the role of noise in optimizing search strategies. We focus on the zooplankton Daphnia, which move in successive sequences consisting of a hop, a pause and a turn through an angle. Recent experiments have shown that their turning angle distributions (TADs) and underlying noise intensities are similar across species and age groups, suggesting an evolutionary origin of this internal noise. We explore this hypothesis further with a digital simulation (EVO) based solely on the three central Darwinian themes: inheritability, variability and survivability. Separate simulations utilizing stochastic resonance (SR) indicate that foraging success, and hence fitness, is maximized at an optimum TAD noise intensity, which is represented by the distribution's characteristic width, σ. In both the EVO and SR simulations, foraging success is the criterion, and the results are the predicted characteristic widths of the TADs that maximize success. Our results are twofold: (1) the evolving characteristic widths achieve stasis after many generations; (2) as a hop length parameter is changed, variations in the evolved widths generated by EVO parallel those predicted by SR. These findings provide support for the hypotheses that (1) σ is an evolved quantity and that (2) SR plays a role in evolution.

  9. Stochastic Resonance in Time-to-Contact Judgments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, Manish; Gazula, Harshvardhan; Hsiang, Simon M.; Delucia, Patricia R.

    2015-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a counterintuitive phenomenon in which additive noise enhances performance of a nonlinear system. Previous studies demonstrated SR effect on human tactile sensitivity by adding noise of same modality and cross modality. Similarly, enhancement of human hearing through additive noise has been studied. In this study, we investigate the effect of noise in visual perception, specifically time-to-contact (TTC) judgments. This study explores four research questions: (1) Does noise help in TTC judgments? (2) How does noise affect speed and accuracy of TTC judgments? (3) Does cross modal noise help in TTC judgments? (4) How does cross modal noise affect speed and accuracy of TTC judgments? Through simulation, we show that noise in optical cue can enhance weak signals. We also demonstrate that noise can improve speed of TTC judgments at the expense of accuracy. Similarly, we demonstrate SR by adding noise of cross modality. These findings provide plausible hypotheses regarding how much noise should be added to enhance TTC judgments.

  10. Entropic stochastic resonance without external force in oscillatory confined space.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-05-21

    We have studied the dynamics of Brownian particles in a confined geometry of dumbbell-shape with periodically oscillating walls. Entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) behavior, characterizing by a maximum value of the coherent factor Q at some optimal level of noise, is observed even without external periodic force in the horizontal direction, which is necessary for conventional ESR where the wall is static and the particle is subjected to the force. Interestingly, the ESR can be remarkably enhanced by the particle gravity G, in contrast to the conventional case. In addition, Q decreases (increases) with G in the small (large) noise limit, respectively, while it non-monotonically changes with G for moderate noise levels. We have applied an effective 1D coarsening description to illustrate such a nontrivial dependence on G, by investigating the property of the 1D effective potential of entropic nature and paying special attention to the excess part resulting from the boundary oscillation. Dependences of the ESR strength with other related parameters are also discussed. PMID:26001449

  11. Static Magnetic Field Induced Stochastic Resonance in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Megan; Frisch, Paul; McLeod, Kenneth; Laramee, Craig

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems are naturally complex, making singular responses difficult to detect. However, when the emergent behavior is investigated, the collective properties may be observed and characterized. These responses to external stimuli at are often evident at the genomic level. When an optimal dose of external noise is used to perturb the system, it may work in synergy with the system's intrinsic noise to produce a change in stable state. This phenomenon, known as stochastic resonance (SR), is responsible for shifts in gene expression. This paper proposes that static magnetic fields (SMFs) elicit a SR genomic response in biological systems under environmentally relevant exposures. Using single reporter biomarkers as well as gene expression microarrays, the responses of three cell model systems (MCF-10A; Rat-1; Caco-2) to SMF exposure were examined. Results show that while responses for a single gene do occur, they are difficult to replicate and are near the detection cutoff limits. However, the system as a whole displays a shift in the pattern of gene expression. The replication of this pattern across different experimental platforms provides evidence that the cells are responding to the noise presented by the SMFs.

  12. Stochastic resonance and the evolution of Daphnia foraging strategy.

    PubMed

    Dees, Nathan D; Bahar, Sonya; Moss, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Search strategies are currently of great interest, with reports on foraging ranging from albatrosses and spider monkeys to microzooplankton. Here, we investigate the role of noise in optimizing search strategies. We focus on the zooplankton Daphnia, which move in successive sequences consisting of a hop, a pause and a turn through an angle. Recent experiments have shown that their turning angle distributions (TADs) and underlying noise intensities are similar across species and age groups, suggesting an evolutionary origin of this internal noise. We explore this hypothesis further with a digital simulation (EVO) based solely on the three central Darwinian themes: inheritability, variability and survivability. Separate simulations utilizing stochastic resonance (SR) indicate that foraging success, and hence fitness, is maximized at an optimum TAD noise intensity, which is represented by the distribution's characteristic width, sigma. In both the EVO and SR simulations, foraging success is the criterion, and the results are the predicted characteristic widths of the TADs that maximize success. Our results are twofold: (1) the evolving characteristic widths achieve stasis after many generations; (2) as a hop length parameter is changed, variations in the evolved widths generated by EVO parallel those predicted by SR. These findings provide support for the hypotheses that (1) sigma is an evolved quantity and that (2) SR plays a role in evolution. PMID:19029598

  13. Improving energy harvesting by stochastic resonance in a laminated bistable beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, HaiTao; Qin, WeiYang; Deng, Wangzheng; Tian, Ruilan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a bistable energy harvesting device as piezoelectric beam acted upon by a harmonic axial load and a transverse random excitation. A comprehensive analytical study for stochastic resonance in the bistable mechanical system is carried out, from which the system can harvest energy at a high efficiency. The bistable electromechanical model is set up and the corresponding equations are derived by extended Hamilton principle. The condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is derived by Kramers rate. Numerical simulation is carried out and results are obtained. Stochastic resonance is proved and observed when the system is excited by a Gaussian white noise. The output voltage and power conversion in the condition of stochastic resonance is noticeably higher than those in other conditions. These results can provide a theoretical method for preliminary design and optimization of parameters, which can improve the efficiency of energy harvester.

  14. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuefeng; Cao, Guangzhan; Liu, Hongjun

    2014-04-15

    Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  15. Stochastic resonance phenomenon in Monte Carlo simulations of silver adsorbed on gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, María Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of observing the stochastic resonance phenomenon was analyzed by means of Monte Carlo simulations of silver adsorbed on 100 gold surfaces. The coverage degree was studied as a function of the periodical variation of the chemical potential. The signal-noise relationship was studied as a function of the amplitude and frequency of chemical potential and temperature. When this value is plotted as a function of temperature, a maximum is found, indicating the possible presence of stochastic resonance.

  16. Vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The key signs and symptoms of vestibular neuritis are rotatory vertigo with an acute onset lasting several days, horizontal spontaneous nystagmus (with a rotational component) toward the unaffected ear, a pathologic head-impulse test toward the affected ear, a deviation of the subjective visual vertical toward the affected ear, postural imbalance with falls toward the affected ear, and nausea. The head-impulse test and caloric irrigation show an ipsilateral deficit of the vestibuloocular reflex. Vestibular neuritis is the third most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo. It has an annual incidence of 3.5 per 100,000 population and accounts for 7% of the patients at outpatient clinics specializing in the treatment of vertigo. The reactivation of a latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is the most likely cause, as HSV-1 DNA and RNA have been detected in human vestibular ganglia. Vestibular neuritis is a diagnosis of exclusion. Relevant differential diagnoses are vestibular pseudoneuritis due to acute pontomedullary brainstem lesions or cerebellar nodular infarctions, vestibular migraine, and monosymptomatically beginning Ménière's disease. Recovery from vestibular neuritis is due to a combination of (a) peripheral restoration of labyrinthine function, usually incomplete but can be improved by early treatment with corticosteroids, which cause a recovery rate of 62% within 12 months; (b) mainly somatosensory and visual substitution; and (c) central compensation, which can be improved by vestibular exercise. PMID:19834862

  17. Effects of time delay on the stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-03-01

    The effects of time delay on stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks are investigated. Without delay, an intermediate intensity of additive noise is able to optimize the temporal response of the neural system to the subthreshold periodic signal imposed on all neurons constituting the network. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance of neuronal activity in the small-world network. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of weak external forcing. It is found that the delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances are most efficient when the forcing frequency is close to the global-resonance frequency of each individual neuron. Furthermore, the impact of time delay on stochastic resonance is largely independent of the small-world topology, except for resonance peaks. Considering that information transmission delays are inevitable in intra- and inter-neuronal communication, the presented results could have important implications for the weak signal detection and information propagation in neural systems. PMID:23556965

  18. Effects of time delay on the stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-03-01

    The effects of time delay on stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks are investigated. Without delay, an intermediate intensity of additive noise is able to optimize the temporal response of the neural system to the subthreshold periodic signal imposed on all neurons constituting the network. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance of neuronal activity in the small-world network. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of weak external forcing. It is found that the delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances are most efficient when the forcing frequency is close to the global-resonance frequency of each individual neuron. Furthermore, the impact of time delay on stochastic resonance is largely independent of the small-world topology, except for resonance peaks. Considering that information transmission delays are inevitable in intra- and inter-neuronal communication, the presented results could have important implications for the weak signal detection and information propagation in neural systems.

  19. Feasibility of energy harvesting from a rotating tire based on the theory of stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Nakano, K.

    2014-11-01

    Recently the use of nonlinear bi-stable micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) to achieve automobile tire vibration power generation has made some progress. However, the theory of stochastic resonance has not been successfully applied to automobile tires, which can produce a larger vibrational response than for a typical resonance while inputting a weak periodic force and noise excitation into a nonlinear bi-stable system. Hence, in this paper, in view of the principle of stochastic resonance, a new model is derived by positioning a magnetic end mass attached to a cantilever beam and another permanent magnet with the same polarity on the frame. Due to the road noise excitation along with the periodic force inputted to the mechanism, whether the phenomenon of stochastic resonance can happen will be discussed. Meanwhile, on the basis of Kramers rate and duffing equations the preliminary experimental device is also designed.

  20. Stochastic Resonance Improves Broadband Encoding in the Cricket Cercal System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Jacob

    1996-03-01

    In any physical or biological system a certain amount of environmental noise is unavoidable, and the information therein irrelevant to the organism. Traditionally in signal analysis noise is considered detrimental to the process of signal encoding, and merely a necessary evil to be avoided. It has been observed recently, however, that in some nonlinear systems power from random input noise actually improves the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over a limited operating range, particularly near threshold. This effect is known as stochastic resonance (SR). By taking advantage of SR during the neural encoding process, a cell can optimize its information flow properties. Previous experimental work in SR has investigated only the coding of sinusoidal signals embedded in a broadband white noise background. In this work we demonstrate SR for not only the sine wave case, but also for extended bandwidth stimuli in the presence of white noise, and for cases in which the signal and white noise background frequency spectra are completely non-overlapping. We have investigated the effects of noise on information transfer in the cricket cercal system, a mechanosensory system sensitive to small near-field air particle disturbances, by presenting known wind stimuli to the cricket through audio speakers in a controlled environment along with varying levels of uncorrelated white noise background air current. Spike trains from the second layer of neuronal processing, the primary sensory interneurons, were recorded with intracellular electrodes with the signal and noise presented along the cell's preferred direction. Through the statistical techniques of Shannon's information theory we quantified the amount of information contained in the elicited spike trains about the signal in the various noise environments, as well as the SNR and other measures of the encoding process. An enhancement of output SNR was observed over the entire frequency operating range of the neurons, for almost an entire order of magnitude of near-threshold signal amplitudes. Additionally, we found that the amount of information about the signal carried, on average, by each spike was INCREASED for small signals when presented with noise - implying that added input noise can, in certain situations, actually improve the accuracy of the encoding process itself.

  1. What Is Stochastic Resonance? Definitions, Misconceptions, Debates, and Its Relevance to Biology

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Abbott, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic resonance is said to be observed when increases in levels of unpredictable fluctuations—e.g., random noise—cause an increase in a metric of the quality of signal transmission or detection performance, rather than a decrease. This counterintuitive effect relies on system nonlinearities and on some parameter ranges being “suboptimal”. Stochastic resonance has been observed, quantified, and described in a plethora of physical and biological systems, including neurons. Being a topic of widespread multidisciplinary interest, the definition of stochastic resonance has evolved significantly over the last decade or so, leading to a number of debates, misunderstandings, and controversies. Perhaps the most important debate is whether the brain has evolved to utilize random noise in vivo, as part of the “neural code”. Surprisingly, this debate has been for the most part ignored by neuroscientists, despite much indirect evidence of a positive role for noise in the brain. We explore some of the reasons for this and argue why it would be more surprising if the brain did not exploit randomness provided by noise—via stochastic resonance or otherwise—than if it did. We also challenge neuroscientists and biologists, both computational and experimental, to embrace a very broad definition of stochastic resonance in terms of signal-processing “noise benefits”, and to devise experiments aimed at verifying that random variability can play a functional role in the brain, nervous system, or other areas of biology. PMID:19562010

  2. Coherence resonance and stochastic synchronization in a nonlinear circuit near a subcritical Hopf bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Anna; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schll, Eckehard

    2013-10-01

    We analyze noise-induced phenomena in nonlinear dynamical systems near a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. We investigate qualitative changes of probability distributions (stochastic bifurcations), coherence resonance, and stochastic synchronization. These effects are studied in dynamical systems for which a subcritical Hopf bifurcation occurs. We perform analytical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit. For the generalized Van der Pol model we uncover the similarities between the behavior of a self-sustained oscillator characterized by a subcritical Hopf bifurcation and an excitable system. The analogy is manifested through coherence resonance and stochastic synchronization. In particular, we show both experimentally and numerically that stochastic oscillations that appear due to noise in a system with hard excitation, can be partially synchronized even outside the oscillatory regime of the deterministic system.

  3. Stochastic resonance at a subharmonic of a periodic modulation signal in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, N V; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N

    2013-10-31

    The stochastic excitation of a subharmonic of a periodic modulation signal in the intensity spectrum of a solid-state laser is experimentally studied upon modulation of the pump rate by the noise and periodic signal. The stochastic resonance (SR) is observed in the presence of bistability in the laser. The conditions for SR at a subharmonic of the periodic modulation signal are determined. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  4. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  5. Thermal noise induced stochastic resonance in self organizing Fe nanoparticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Satyendra Prakash; Sen, P.

    2014-12-01

    The natural world is replete with examples of multistable systems, known to respond to periodic modulations and produce a signal that exhibits resonance with noise amplitude. This is a concept not demonstrated in pure materials, which involve a measured physical property. In a thermoremanent magnetization experiment with a common magnetic material, Fe, in the nanoparticulate form, we establish how magnetization in a system of dilute spins during dissipation of stored magnetic energy breaks up into spontaneous oscillatory behavior. Starting at 175 K and aided by temperature (stochastic noise) the oscillation amplitude goes through a maximum reminiscent of stochastic resonance. Our observation of thermal noise induced coherent resonance is due to intrinsic self-organizing magnetic dynamics of the Fe nanoparticle system without applying any external periodic force. These results yield new possibilities in the design of magnetic materials and a platform to understand stochastic interference and phase synchronization in neural activity, as models for neural communication.

  6. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neuronitis Purulent Labyrinthitis Ear Disorders Caused by Drugs Acoustic Neuroma Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ... Neuronitis Purulent Labyrinthitis Ear Disorders Caused by Drugs Acoustic Neuroma NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. CONSUMERS: ...

  7. Vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Michael; Versino, Maurizio; Brandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular migraine is a chameleon among the episodic vertigo syndromes because considerable variation characterizes its clinical manifestation. The attacks may last from seconds to days. About one-third of patients presents with monosymptomatic attacks of vertigo or dizziness without headache or other migrainous symptoms. During attacks most patients show spontaneous or positional nystagmus and in the attack-free interval minor ocular motor and vestibular deficits. Women are significantly more often affected than men. Symptoms may begin at any time in life, with the highest prevalence in young adults and between the ages of 60 and 70. Over the last 10 years vestibular migraine has evolved into a medical entity in dizziness units. It is the most common cause of spontaneous recurrent episodic vertigo and accounts for approximately 10% of patients with vertigo and dizziness. Its broad spectrum poses a diagnostic problem of how to rule out Menière's disease or vestibular paroxysmia. Vestibular migraine should be included in the International Headache Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a subcategory of migraine. It should, however, be kept separate and distinct from basilar-type migraine and benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood. We prefer the term "vestibular migraine" to "migrainous vertigo," because the latter may also refer to various vestibular and non-vestibular symptoms. Antimigrainous medication to treat the single attack and to prevent recurring attacks appears to be effective, but the published evidence is weak. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is required to evaluate medical treatment of this condition. PMID:20816468

  8. Investigations of stochastic resonance in two-terminal device with vanadium dioxide film

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, V. Sh. Bortnikov, S. G.; Badmaeva, I. A.

    2014-05-28

    The results of stochastic resonance investigation in a nonlinear system, consisting of a microstructure with a polycrystalline vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) film grown on sapphire and resistor in series are reported. Nonlinearity of the system was provided due to insulator-metal phase transition in VO{sub 2}. In the stochastic resonance regime at 100 Hz signal frequency, the transition coefficient of signal-to-noise ratio reached 87 in contrast to 250 for microstructures with VO{sub 2} films grown on silica in our previous investigations. The measured characteristics of microstructures with VO{sub 2} films grown on silica and sapphire substrates were found to be qualitatively similar. For both substrates, a stochastic resonance was observed at threshold switching voltage from insulating to metallic state of VO{sub 2}. For sapphire substrate the output signal-to-noise ratio rose at higher signal frequencies. The stochastic resonance phenomenon in VO{sub 2} films is explained in terms of the monostable damped oscillator model.

  9. [Vestibular migraine].

    PubMed

    Lempert, T

    2009-08-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) presents with attacks of spontaneous or positional vertigo lasting seconds to days. Headaches are often absent during acute attacks, but other symptoms of migraine, such as photophobia or auras may be present. Like migraine headaches VM triggers may include stress, sleep deprivation and hormonal changes. During acute attacks there may be central spontaneous or positional nystagmus and, less commonly, unilateral vestibular hypofunction. In the symptom-free interval vestibular testing shows mostly minor and non-specific findings. The pathogenesis of VM is uncertain but migraine mechanisms may interfere with the vestibular system at the level of the labyrinth, brainstem and cerebral cortex. Treatment includes vestibular suppressants for acute attacks and migraine prophylaxis for patients with frequent recurrences. Avoidance of triggers, stress management and biofeedback may also play a role. However, treatment efficacy has not been validated by properly controlled clinical trials. VM is not included in the 2004 International Headache Society Classification, where basilar-type migraine must have at least two posterior circulation manifestations so that isolated vertigo would not satisfy this criterion. PMID:19629427

  10. [Vestibular migraine].

    PubMed

    Trinus, K F; Klymenko, O I

    2003-01-01

    Among varieties of migraine characteristic of liquidators of effects of the Chernobyl catastrophy and ChNPP personnel migraine with a manifest vestibular component holds a prominent place. As many as 803 middle-aged patients, average age (39.6 +/- 11.8) years, were examined. Among these were the ChNPP personnel, liquidators, and migrators from Pripyat, who had received low doses of radiation to 0.5 rem. Used in the examination were questionnaire survey (HOACK), vestibular tests (Uemura, Fukuda, etc.), nistagmography, cardiography with Takagasi loading tests, multisensory evoked potentials. Virtually all examinees demonstrated disturbances in the vestibular function. Of these, 92.4 percent of subjects had headache complaints. In 35 percent of the examinees, pain was of a typical migranous character. Additional signs included asthenization, vegetative symptomatology, vestibulocardial syndrome, emotional derangements. The histamine blocking agents dimenhydrinate and betaserk proved to be the most effective treatment options in the above patient population. PMID:12712619

  11. Stochastic resonance in the electrically stimulated auditory nerve: predictions using a stochastic model of neural responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie

    2003-05-01

    The incorporation of low levels of noise into an electrical stimulus has been shown to improve auditory thresholds in human subjects. In this paper, thresholds for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli are predicted by utilizing a stochastic neural-behavioral model of ensemble fiber responses to bi-phasic stimuli. A neural spike count comparison rule has been presented for both threshold and intensity discrimination under the assumption that loudness is a monotonic function of the number of neuron spikes. An alternative approach which we have pursued involves analyzing the neural response to each individual pulse within a pulse train to investigate the threshold behavior. The refractory effect is described using a Markov model for a noise-free pulse-train stimulus. A recursive method using the conditional probability is utilized to track the neural responses to each successive pulse for a noise-modulated pulse-train stimulus. After determining the stochastic properties of the auditory nerve response to each pulse within the pulse train, a logarithmic rule is hypothesized for pulse-train threshold and the predictions are shown to match psychophysical data not only for noise-free stimuli but also for noise-modulated stimuli. Results indicate that threshold decreases as noise variance increases.

  12. Internal stochastic resonance under two-parameter modulation in intercellular calcium ion oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya Ping; Li, Qian Shu

    2004-05-01

    Internal stochastic resonance (ISR) in a model of intercellular calcium ion oscillations is investigated under the modulation of two parameters, viz., degree of extracellular stimulation (β) and leak rate (kf). ISR can occur when either β or kf is subjected to a noise. Internal stochastic biresonance (ISBR) can occur when noise is added to the two parameters simultaneously. The distance to the bifurcation point is found to be able to enhance or suppress the ISBR, and to affect the number of peaks of ISR.

  13. Internal stochastic resonance under two-parameter modulation in intercellular calcium ion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya Ping; Li, Qian Shu

    2004-05-01

    Internal stochastic resonance (ISR) in a model of intercellular calcium ion oscillations is investigated under the modulation of two parameters, viz., degree of extracellular stimulation (beta) and leak rate (k(f)). ISR can occur when either beta or k(f) is subjected to a noise. Internal stochastic biresonance (ISBR) can occur when noise is added to the two parameters simultaneously. The distance to the bifurcation point is found to be able to enhance or suppress the ISBR, and to affect the number of peaks of ISR. PMID:15267806

  14. A digital accelerometer array utilizing suprathreshold stochastic resonance for detection of sub-Brownian noise floor accelerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Olsson, Roy H.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing Stochastic resonance in micromechanical sensor systems as a means for increasing signal to noise for physical sensors. A careful study of this field reveals that in the case of a single sensing element, stochastic resonance offers no real advantage. We have, however, identified a system that can utilize very similar concepts to stochastic resonance in order to achieve an arrayed sensor system that could be superior to existing technologies in the field of inertial sensors, and could offer a very low power technique for achieving navigation grade inertial measurement units.

  15. Stochastic resonance on a modular neuronal network of small-world subnetworks with a subthreshold pacemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2011-12-01

    We study the phenomenon of stochastic resonance on a modular neuronal network consisting of several small-world subnetworks with a subthreshold periodic pacemaker. Numerical results show that the correlation between the pacemaker frequency and the dynamical response of the network is resonantly dependent on the intensity of additive spatiotemporal noise. This effect of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance of the system depends extensively on the local and the global network structure, such as the intra- and inter-coupling strengths, rewiring probability of individual small-world subnetwork, the number of links between different subnetworks, and the number of subnetworks. All these parameters play a key role in determining the ability of the network to enhance the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker, and only they bounded to a rather sharp interval of values warrant the emergence of the pronounced stochastic resonance phenomenon. Considering the rather important role of pacemakers in real-life, the presented results could have important implications for many biological processes that rely on an effective pacemaker for their proper functioning.

  16. Abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Vestibular Schwannoma as the Most Common Cause of MRI Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Jin Woo; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear in most cases. This study aimed to assess abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SSNHL and evaluate the value of MRI in identifying the cause of SSNHL.A retrospective analysis of the charts and MRI findings of 291 patients with SSNHL was performed.In 291 patients, MRI abnormality, which was considered a cause of SSNHL, was detected in 13 patients. Vestibular schwannoma involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) and/or cerebellopontine angle was observed in 9 patients. All 9 patients had intrameatal tumors, and 6 of the 9 patients displayed extrameatal extension of their tumors. The tumor was small (<1 cm) or medium-sized (1.1-2.9 cm) in these 6 patients. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma, labyrinthine hemorrhage, IAC metastasis, and a ruptured dermoid cyst were each observed in 1 patient.The most commonly observed MRI abnormality in patients with SSNHL was vestibular schwannoma, and all of the lesions were small or medium-sized tumors involving the IAC. PMID:27124066

  17. Two-level noise and stochastic resonance in individual permalloy nanoscale magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Bern Willem

    We present the results of a study on stochastic resonance in individual magnetic random telegraph oscillators. We have fabricated sub-micron magnetic samples, which have multiple stable magnetic states. We are able to observe random telegraph switching between magnetic states and tune the energetics by varying the temperature and applied external field. If a small AC field is applied to the system, it will modulate the energy well depth for the two states and the system shows stochastic resonance near the matching condition 2fA = oD, where o D is the drive frequency and fA is the characteristic frequency of magnetic transitions. We fit our measured data for the resonance amplitude and phase of the particle as a function of temperature to a linear-response model and obtain good agreement. At low temperatures we observe a peak in the phase lag of the returned signal, which is consistent with linear-response theories. At higher temperatures, our fitted model parameters suggest that the particle has an energy surface that is not sinusoidal. This contradicts our initial approximation for the energy surface, but it is consistent with a model for magnetic energy that takes into account the magnetization dynamics near the conditions for random telegraph switching. Our work is the first clear observation of stochastic resonance in a single superparamagnetic particle where the energetics are modulated by an applied field. In addition, our work is the first physical system where stochastic resonance has been characterized with sufficient detail to allow for comparison to linear-response models.

  18. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  19. Optimizing the Adaptive Stochastic Resonance and Its Application in Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaole; Yang, Jianhua; Liu, Houguang; Cheng, Gang; Chen, Xihui; Xu, Dan

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an adaptive stochastic resonance method based on the improved artificial fish swarm algorithm. By this method, we can enhance the weak characteristic signal which is submerged in a heavy noise. We can also adaptively lead the stochastic resonance to be optimized to the greatest extent. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by both numerical simulation and lab experimental vibration signals including normal, a chipped tooth and a missing tooth of planetary gearboxes under the loaded condition. Both theoretical and experimental results show that this method can effectively extract weak characteristics in a heavy noise. In the experiment, each weak fault feature is extracted successfully from the fault planetary gear. When compared with the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) method, the method proposed in this paper has been found to give remarkable performance.

  20. Stochastic and coherence resonance in feed-forward-loop neuronal network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Li, Chunguang

    2009-05-01

    The relationships between noise and complex dynamic behaviors of neuronal ensembles are key questions in computational neuroscience, particularly in understanding some basic signal transmission mechanisms of the brain. Here we systemically investigate both the stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR) in the triple-neuron feed-forward-loop (FFL) network motifs by computational modeling. We use the Izhikevich neuron model as well as the chemical coupling to build the FFL motifs, and consider all possible motif types. The simulation results demonstrate that these motifs can exploit noise to enrich its dynamic performance. With a proper choice of noise intensities, both the SR and CR can be exhibited in many types of the FFLs. On the other hand, our results also indicate that the coupling strength serves as a control parameter, which has great impacts on the stochastic dynamics of the FFL motifs. Additionally, biological implications of presented results in the field of neuroscience are outlined.

  1. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  2. Broadband vibration energy harvesting by application of stochastic resonance from rotational environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Kaizuka, T.; Su, D.; Nakano, K.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2015-11-01

    A model for energy harvesting from a rotating automotive tyre is suggested in which the principle of stochastic resonance is advantageously exploited. A bistable response characteristic is obtained by recourse a small harvester comprising a magnetically repellant configuration in which an instrumented cantilever beam can flip between two physical response states when suitably excited by the rotation of a car wheel into which it is fitted. The rotation of the wheel creates a periodic modulation which enables stochastic resonance to take place and as a consequence of this for energy to be harvested from road noise transmitted through the tyre. An optimised mathematical model of the system is presented based on a series of experimental tests and it is shown that a ten-fold increase in harvested energy over a comparable monostable case is feasible. The suggested application for this harvester is to provide electrical power for a tyre pressure monitoring system.

  3. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N2) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  4. How does stochastic resonance work within the human brain? - Psychophysics of internal and external noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Takatsugu; Kitajo, Keiichi; Nozaki, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2010-10-01

    We review how research on stochastic resonance (SR) in neuroscience has evolved and point out that the previous studies have overlooked the interaction between internal and external noise. We propose a new psychometric function incorporating SR effects, and show that a Bayesian adaptive method applied to the function efficiently estimates the parameters of the function. Using this procedure in visual detection experiments, we provide significant insight into the relationship between internal and external noise in SR within the human brain.

  5. Noise-Induced Entrainment and Stochastic Resonance in Human Brain Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Toshio; Kai, Shoichi

    2002-05-01

    We present the first observation of stochastic resonance (SR) in the human brain's visual processing area. The novel experimental protocol is to stimulate the right eye with a subthreshold periodic optical signal and the left eye with a noisy one. The stimuli bypass sensory organs and are mixed in the visual cortex. With many noise sources present in the brain, higher brain functions, e.g., perception and cognition, may exploit SR.

  6. Stochastic resonance in the fractional Langevin equation driven by multiplicative noise and periodically modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Mao-Kang

    2013-10-01

    First we study the time and frequency characteristics of fractional calculus, which reflect the memory and gain properties of fractional-order systems. Then, the fractional Langevin equation driven by multiplicative colored noise and periodically modulated noise is investigated in the over-damped case. Using the moment equation method, the exact analytical expression of the output amplitude is derived. Numerical results indicate that the output amplitude presents stochastic resonance driven by periodically modulated noise. For low frequency signal, the higher the system order is, the bigger the resonance intensity will be; while the result of high frequency signal is quite the contrary. This is consistent with the frequency characteristics of fractional calculus.

  7. Using Resonant Bars and Interferometers to Search for Stochastic Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, John T.

    2002-10-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGW) may result from gravitational waves emitted in the early universe (e.g., during inflation) or from a superposition of many unresolved astrophysical sources. Pairs of resonant bar detectors, as well as pairs of prototype interferometers, have been used to set limits on SBGW strength by looking for correlations between the random signals in the two detectors, and data from the two LIGO interferometers are being analyzed right now for this purpose. I will describe a parallel analysis being carried out to look for SBGW-induced correlations between the LIGO detector in Livingston, LA and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector in Baton Rouge, LA.

  8. Selective effects of noise by stochastic multi-resonance in coupled cells system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiqian; Liu, Jianqing; Chen, Hanshuang

    2008-05-01

    By investigating a stochastic model for intracellular calcium oscillations proposed by Höfer, we have analyzed the transmission behavior of calcium signaling in a one-dimensional two-way coupled hepatocytes system. It is shown that when the first cell is subjected to the external noise, the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the cell exhibits two maxima as a function of external noise intensity, indicating the occurrence of stochastic bi-resonance (SBR). It is more important that when cells are coupled together, the resonant behavior in the 1st cell propagates along the chain with different features through the coupling effect. The cells whose locations are comparatively close to or far from the 1st cell can show SBR, while the cells located in the middle position can display stochastic multi-resonance (SMR). Furthermore, the number of cells that can show SMR increases with coupling strength enhancing. These results indicate that the cells system may make an effective choice in response to external signaling induced by noise, through the mechanism of SMR by adjusting coupling strength.

  9. Effects of time delay on stochastic resonance of the stock prices in financial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Cheng; Li, Chun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    The effect of time delay on stochastic resonance of the stock prices in finance system was investigated. The time delay is introduced into the Heston model driven by the extrinsic and intrinsic periodic information for stock price. The signal power amplification (SPA) was calculated by numerical simulation. The results indicate that an optimal critical value of delay time maximally enhances the reverse-resonance in the behaviors of SPA as a function of long-run variance of volatility or cross correlation coefficient between noises for both cases of intrinsic and extrinsic periodic information. Moreover, in both cases, being a critical value in the delay time, when the delay time takes value below the critical value, reverse-resonance increases with the delay time increasing, however, when the delay time takes value above the critical value, the reverse-resonance decrease with the delay time increasing.

  10. Far from Equilibrium Percolation, Stochastic and Shape Resonances in the Physics of Life

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, Nicola; Ansuini, Alessio; Bianconi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Key physical concepts, relevant for the cross-fertilization between condensed matter physics and the physics of life seen as a collective phenomenon in a system out-of-equilibrium, are discussed. The onset of life can be driven by: (a) the critical fluctuations at the protonic percolation threshold in membrane transport; (b) the stochastic resonance in biological systems, a mechanism that can exploit external and self-generated noise in order to gain efficiency in signal processing; and (c) the shape resonance (or Fano resonance or Feshbach resonance) in the association and dissociation processes of bio-molecules (a quantum mechanism that could play a key role to establish a macroscopic quantum coherence in the cell). PMID:22072921

  11. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker. PMID:23767608

  12. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  13. Improving Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Long Duration Space Flight by Enhancing Vestibular Information Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E; Galvan, R.; Goel, R.; Miller, C.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Jeevarajan, J.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bergquist, F.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after gravitational transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" - immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals (Vestibular Stochastic Resonance, VSR) especially when combined with balance training exercises such as sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. This countermeasure to improve detection of vestibular signals is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation). To determine efficacy of vestibular stimulation on physiological and perceptual responses during otolith-canal conflicts and dynamic perturbations we have conducted a series of studies: We have shown that imperceptible binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system across the mastoids enhances balance performance in the mediolateral (ML) plane while standing on an unstable surface. We have followed up on the previous study showing VSR stimulation improved balance performance in both ML and anteroposterior planes while stimulating in the ML axis only. We have shown the efficacy of VSR stimulations on enhancing physiological and perceptual responses of whole-body orientation during low frequency perturbations (0.1 Hz) on the ocular motor system using a variable radius centrifuge on both physiological (using eye movements) and perceptual responses (using a joystick) to track imposed oscillations. The variable radius centrifuge provides a selective tilting sensation that is detectable only by the otolith organs providing conflicting information from the canal organs of the vestibular system (intra-vestibular conflict). These results indicate that VSR can improve performance in sensory conflict scenarios like that experienced during space flight. We have showed the efficacy of VSR stimulation to improve balance and locomotor control on subjects exposed to continuous, sinusoidal lateral motion of the support surface while walking on a treadmill while viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. We have shown the safety of short term continuous use of up to 4 hours of VSR stimulation and its efficacy in improving balance and locomotor function in Parkinson's Disease patients. This technique for improving vestibular signal detection may thus provide additional information to improve strategic abilities. We hypothesize that VSR stimulation will act synergistically with SA training to improve adaptability by increased utilization of vestibular information and therefore serve to optimize and personalize the SA countermeasure prescription. This forms the basis of its usefulness both as a training modality and further help in significantly reducing the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long duration space flight.

  14. The vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The end organs, central nervous system connections, and static and dynamic characteristics of the vestibular system are presented. Vestibular servation in man and vestibular side effect prevention from space missions involving artificial gravity generation are also considered. Vestibular models and design criteria for rotating space vehicles are appended.

  15. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bryan K; Roberts, Dale C; Della Santina, Charles C; Carey, John P; Zee, David S

    2015-04-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice, and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  16. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  17. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks. PMID:25273205

  18. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  19. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, B.deB. |

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  20. Coherence and stochastic resonance in threshold crossing detectors with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert; Longtin, André

    2006-12-01

    We consider the dynamical behavior of threshold systems driven by external periodic and stochastic signals and internal delayed feedback. Specifically, the effect of positive delayed feedback on the sensitivity of a threshold crossing detector (TCD) to periodic forcing embedded in noise is investigated. The system has an intrinsic ability to oscillate in the presence of positive feedback. We first show conditions under which such reverberatory behavior is enhanced by noise, which is a form of coherence resonance (CR) for this system. Further, for input signals that are subthreshold in the absence of feedback, the open-loop stochastic resonance (SR) characteristic can be sharply enhanced by positive delayed feedback. This enhancement is shown to depend on the stimulus period, and is maximal when this period is matched to an integer multiple of the delay. Reverberatory oscillations, which are particularly prominent after the offset of periodic forcing, are shown to be eliminated by a summing network of such TCDs with local delayed feedback. Theoretical analysis of the crossing rate dynamics qualitatively accounts for the existence of CR and the resonant behavior of the SR effect as a function of delay and forcing frequency.

  1. Nonlinear restoration of pulse and high noisy images via stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qibing; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Li, Shaopeng

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel scheme for restoring pulse and high noisy images using stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability and provides a cross-correlation gain higher than 8. As opposed to previously reported designs, this unique approach employs a continuous noise and pulse signal for the generation of modulation instability. The visibility and quality of output images can be improved by appropriately adjusting the system parameters. This provides a simple and feasible method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications.

  2. Note: On-line weak signal detection via adaptive stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo Kong, Fanrang

    2014-06-15

    We design an instrument with a novel embedded adaptive stochastic resonance (SR) algorithm that consists of a SR module and a digital zero crossing detection module for on-line weak signal detection in digital signal processing applications. The two modules are responsible for noise filtering and adaptive parameter configuration, respectively. The on-line weak signal detection can be stably achieved in seconds. The prototype instrument exhibits an advance of 20 dB averaged signal-to-noise ratio and 5 times averaged adjust R-square as compared to the input noisy signal, in considering different driving frequencies and noise levels.

  3. Conductance with stochastic resonance in Mn{sub 12} redox network without tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Yoshiaki; Segawa, Yuji; Kawai, Tomoji; Kuroda-Sowa, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-06-09

    Artificial neuron-based information processing is one of the attractive approaches of molecular-scale electronics, which can exploit the ability of molecular system for self-assembling or self-organization. The self-organized Mn{sub 12}/DNA redox network shows nonlinear current-voltage characteristics that can be described by the Coulomb blockade network model. As a demonstration of the nonlinear network system, we have observed stochastic resonance without tuning for weak periodic input signals and thermal noise, which suggests a route to neural network composed of molecular materials.

  4. Nonlinear restoration of pulse and high noisy images via stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qibing; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Li, Shaopeng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for restoring pulse and high noisy images using stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability and provides a cross-correlation gain higher than 8. As opposed to previously reported designs, this unique approach employs a continuous noise and pulse signal for the generation of modulation instability. The visibility and quality of output images can be improved by appropriately adjusting the system parameters. This provides a simple and feasible method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications. PMID:26530885

  5. Central cross-modal stochastic resonance in human tactile blink reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hideaki; Miyaoka, Tsuyoshi; Horiguchi, Jun; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    We study cross-modal stochastic resonance in the human brain. The neural circuit in the brainstem for integration of both the auditory afferent pathway used to apply background noise and the tactile sensory pathway used to apply a signal is well known, so we expect a direct integration of signal and noise in this distinct circuit of the brain. Our results indeed confirm an optimization of response probabilities of tactile blink reflex by auditory noise, suggesting the direct involvement of background noise in the cross-modal sensory integration.

  6. The noise makes the signal: what a small fry should know about stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    We are traditionally educated to consider noise a nuisance, hindering the transmission and detection of signals. Recently, however, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, the appropriate amount of noise can facilitate signal detection in noisy environments. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost any scale, from celestial mechanics to ion channels. The present mini-review outlines the basic mechanism underlying SR phenomena, and discusses recent quantum optical scenarios, in the deep quantum regime.

  7. Non-linear resonant coupling of tsunami edge waves using stochastic earthquake source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Eric L.

    2016-02-01

    Non-linear resonant coupling of edge waves can occur with tsunamis generated by large-magnitude subduction zone earthquakes. Earthquake rupture zones that straddle beneath the coastline of continental margins are particularly efficient at generating tsunami edge waves. Using a stochastic model for earthquake slip, it is shown that a wide range of edge-wave modes and wavenumbers can be excited, depending on the variability of slip. If two modes are present that satisfy resonance conditions, then a third mode can gradually increase in amplitude over time, even if the earthquake did not originally excite that edge-wave mode. These three edge waves form a resonant triad that can cause unexpected variations in tsunami amplitude long after the first arrival. An M ˜ 9, 1100 km-long continental subduction zone earthquake is considered as a test case. For the least-variable slip examined involving a Gaussian random variable, the dominant resonant triad includes a high-amplitude fundamental mode wave with wavenumber associated with the along-strike dimension of rupture. The two other waves that make up this triad include subharmonic waves, one of fundamental mode and the other of mode 2 or 3. For the most variable slip examined involving a Cauchy-distributed random variable, the dominant triads involve higher wavenumbers and modes because subevents, rather than the overall rupture dimension, control the excitation of edge waves. Calculation of the resonant period for energy transfer determines which cases resonant coupling may be instrumentally observed. For low-mode triads, the maximum transfer of energy occurs approximately 20-30 wave periods after the first arrival and thus may be observed prior to the tsunami coda being completely attenuated. Therefore, under certain circumstances the necessary ingredients for resonant coupling of tsunami edge waves exist, indicating that resonant triads may be observable and implicated in late, large-amplitude tsunami arrivals.

  8. Non-linear resonant coupling of tsunami edge waves using stochastic earthquake source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear resonant coupling of edge waves can occur with tsunamis generated by large-magnitude subduction zone earthquakes. Earthquake rupture zones that straddle beneath the coastline of continental margins are particularly efficient at generating tsunami edge waves. Using a stochastic model for earthquake slip, it is shown that a wide range of edge-wave modes and wavenumbers can be excited, depending on the variability of slip. If two modes are present that satisfy resonance conditions, then a third mode can gradually increase in amplitude over time, even if the earthquake did not originally excite that edge-wave mode. These three edge waves form a resonant triad that can cause unexpected variations in tsunami amplitude long after the first arrival. An M ∼ 9, 1100 km-long continental subduction zone earthquake is considered as a test case. For the least-variable slip examined involving a Gaussian random variable, the dominant resonant triad includes a high-amplitude fundamental mode wave with wavenumber associated with the along-strike dimension of rupture. The two other waves that make up this triad include subharmonic waves, one of fundamental mode and the other of mode 2 or 3. For the most variable slip examined involving a Cauchy-distributed random variable, the dominant triads involve higher wavenumbers and modes because subevents, rather than the overall rupture dimension, control the excitation of edge waves. Calculation of the resonant period for energy transfer determines which cases resonant coupling may be instrumentally observed. For low-mode triads, the maximum transfer of energy occurs approximately 20–30 wave periods after the first arrival and thus may be observed prior to the tsunami coda being completely attenuated. Therefore, under certain circumstances the necessary ingredients for resonant coupling of tsunami edge waves exist, indicating that resonant triads may be observable and implicated in late, large-amplitude tsunami arrivals.

  9. The cavity resonator design: stochastic optimization of the transmission line method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurečka, Stanislav; Müllerová, Jarmila; Dado, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Stable cavity resonators provide an ideal solution for high quality applications in telecommunications, laser sources, sensors, oscillators and filters, instrumentation and other large area of applications. For the determination of the electromagnetic field (EMF) properties in a cavity resonator several numerical methods are widely used. In our approach we used the transmission line modeling method (TLM). It is a wide-band time-domain numerical method suitable for solution of the electromagnetic field in a studied region. TLM method is based on the isomorphism between the theory of passive electrical network and the wave equation describing the properties of the EMF. TLM method offers two important advantages over the time-domain techniques such as the finite-difference time domain methods. The electric and magnetic field are resolved synchronously in time and space and TLM in implicitly stable method due to the mapping to electrical circuits. The EMF in the rectangular cavity is in our approach determined by the TLM method and the frequency spectrum is computed by the Fourier transform of the time signal. The theoretical model of the cavity EMF power spectral density function contains information about the geometrical configuration of the resonator. In our work we use the genetic algorithm for the determination of optimal dimensions of the cavity resonator expected for the proposed output resonant frequency. The stochastic modification of the theoretical model parameters is controlled by the genetic operators of mutation, crossover and selection, leading to overall improvement of the theoretical model estimation during the optimization process.

  10. The cavity resonator design: stochastic optimization of the transmission line method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurečka, Stanislav; Müllerová, Jarmila; Dado, Milan

    2011-09-01

    Stable cavity resonators provide an ideal solution for high quality applications in telecommunications, laser sources, sensors, oscillators and filters, instrumentation and other large area of applications. For the determination of the electromagnetic field (EMF) properties in a cavity resonator several numerical methods are widely used. In our approach we used the transmission line modeling method (TLM). It is a wide-band time-domain numerical method suitable for solution of the electromagnetic field in a studied region. TLM method is based on the isomorphism between the theory of passive electrical network and the wave equation describing the properties of the EMF. TLM method offers two important advantages over the time-domain techniques such as the finite-difference time domain methods. The electric and magnetic field are resolved synchronously in time and space and TLM in implicitly stable method due to the mapping to electrical circuits. The EMF in the rectangular cavity is in our approach determined by the TLM method and the frequency spectrum is computed by the Fourier transform of the time signal. The theoretical model of the cavity EMF power spectral density function contains information about the geometrical configuration of the resonator. In our work we use the genetic algorithm for the determination of optimal dimensions of the cavity resonator expected for the proposed output resonant frequency. The stochastic modification of the theoretical model parameters is controlled by the genetic operators of mutation, crossover and selection, leading to overall improvement of the theoretical model estimation during the optimization process.

  11. Stochastic resonance in feedforward-loop neuronal network motifs in astrocyte field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Chunguang

    2013-10-21

    Elucidating the underlying dynamical properties of neuronal network motifs, statistically significant patterns of interconnections, is essential to understand the dynamics of the whole networks. Besides, the brain is intrinsically noisy. Various noise-induced dynamical behaviors, in particular, the stochastic resonance (SR), have been found in both neuronal systems and neuronal network motifs. However, the effect of astrocytes, active partners in neuronal signal processing, has not yet received much attention. In this paper, we study the effect of astrocytes on the stochastic behaviors of the typical triple-neuron feedforward-loop (FFL) neuronal network motifs. The neurons are described by the Hodgkin-Huxley model, while the astrocytes are modeled by extending the Li-Rinzel model to a two-dimensional field with the effect of diffusion. The mutual neuron-astrocyte interactions are established correspondingly. Simulation results indicate that the stochastic behaviors of the FFL motifs show bell-shaped dependence on the intensities of both noise and astrocyte-neuron coupling. Moreover, in the presence of astrocytes, the performance of the FFL motifs on weak signal transmission in both noisy and noise-free environments can be significantly improved. From this point of view, the astrocytes can be regarded as a possible internal source of "noise", which assist the neurons in signal processing. PMID:23871712

  12. The resonance overlap criterion and the onset of stochastic behavior in the restricted three-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, J.

    1980-01-01

    The resonance overlap criterion for the onset of stochastic behavior is applied to the planar circular-restricted three-body problem with small mass ratio (mu). Its predictions for mu = 0.001, 0.0001, and 0.00001 are compared to the transitions observed in the numerically determined Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and found to be in remarkably good agreement. In addition, an approximate scaling law for the onset of stochastic behavior is derived.

  13. A novel diversiform stochastic resonance of a domain wall and its performance at different states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Ouyang, Kesai; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The response of an underdamped stochastic resonance (SR) with a new pining potential model of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips driven by additive Gaussian white noise to an additive weak harmonic forcing is investigated. We address that the new nonlinear system can be converted between bi-stable and mono-stable freely by tuning the system parameters. Analytical expressions of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the bi-stable stage is obtained based on the linear response theory. In addition, another type of SR, which occurs when the system is mono-stable, is also reported with the intrinsic frequency derived analytically. The SR in mono-stable stage confirms to the typical physical resonance better with frequency-selection characteristic. Numerical simulation of both stages is carried out with outputs conforming to the theoretical derivation. Owing to the diversity of potential model, the new system possesses considerable merits for engineering applications.

  14. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  15. Design and manufacture of perpendicular bi-stable cantilever for vibrational energy harvesting on the basis of stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Nakano, K.; Kim, B.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes extremely simple configuration of novel vibrational energy harvester, which can harness low frequency (less than 5 Hz, such as various environmental vibrations) over a broad frequency band for the first time. A design that utilizes a phenomenon called stochastic resonance can give significantly enhanced vibration mode for increasing efficiency, and simple bi-stable cantilever with tip mass installed a basement vertically fulfils the requirements for stochastic resonance. We fabricated bi-stable cantilever with tip mass and validated whether the cantilever could be used as an effective low frequency vibration energy harvester. In the experiment, when a 1 Hz periodic force and environmental noise vibration were applied, stochastic resonance occurred. The amplitude of the energy harvester increased over tenfold (over 30 mm).

  16. Model for biological communication in a nanofabricated cell-mimic driven by stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Karig, David K.; Siuti, Piro; Dar, Roy D.; Retterer, Scott. T.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells offer natural examples of highly efficient networks of nanomachines. Accordingly, both intracellular and intercellular communication mechanisms in nature are looked to as a source of inspiration and instruction for engineered nanocommunication. Harnessing biological functionality in this manner requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology, and nanofabrication. Here, we present a model system that exemplifies the synergism between these realms of research. We propose a synthetic gene network for operation in a nanofabricated cell mimic array that propagates a biomolecular signal over long distances using the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Our system consists of a bacterial quorum sensing signal molecule, a bistable genetic switch triggered by this signal, and an array of nanofabricated cell mimic wells that contain the genetic system. An optimal level of noise in the system helps to propagate a time-varying AHL signal over long distances through the array of mimics. This noise level is determined both by the system volume and by the parameters of the genetic network. Our proposed genetically driven stochastic resonance system serves as a testbed for exploring the potential harnessing of gene expression noise to aid in the transmission of a time-varying molecular signal. PMID:21731597

  17. Postural Stability in Parkinson's Disease Patients Is Improved after Stochastic Resonance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaut, Oliver; Brenig, Daniel; Marek, Milena; Allert, Niels; Wüllner, Ullrich

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) increases the risk of falls and is not improved by pharmacological therapy. Objective. We performed a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled study to test the effects of stochastic resonance (whole body vibration) therapy on postural stability in PD. Methods. Fifty-six PD participants were allocated to either experimental or sham groups. The experimental group received four series of vibration over eight days, with each series consisting of six stimulus trains of 60-second duration using a randomized whole body vibration. Participants allocated to the control group received a sham treatment. Results. Within-group analysis revealed that postural stability in the experimental group improved by 17.5% (p = 0.005) comparing experimental and sham groups. The between-group analysis of change after treatment comparing both groups also showed a significant improvement of postural stability (p = 0.03). Only in the within-group analysis several items were improved after Bonferroni correction, too, rigor 41.6% (p = 0.001), bradykinesia 23.7% (p = 0.001), tremor 30.8% (p = 0.006), and UPDRSIII sum score 23.9% (p = 0.000), but did not reach the level of significance in the between-group analysis. Conclusions. Stochastic resonance therapy significantly enhanced postural stability even in individuals with increased risk of falling. Thus it offers a potential supplementation to canonical treatments of PD. PMID:26925293

  18. Resonant behavior of stochastic oscillations of general relativistic disks driven by a memory-damped friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Yun; Chen, Pei-Jie; Zhang, Liang-Ying

    2015-05-01

    By using a generalized Langevin equation to describe the vertical oscillations of a general relativistic disk subjected to a memory-damped friction and a stochastic force, we derive the power spectrum density (PSD) of accretion disk oscillating luminosity by the method of Laplace transform, and discuss the influence of the system parameters on the resonant behavior in PSD curves. The results show that as the damping strength α and memory time τ of the friction increase, the variation of PSD with spectrum frequency f from monotonous decreasing to occurring maximums, and the phenomenon of a general stochastic resonance (SR) with a single peak and multi-peaks can be found in PSD curves. The radial distance parameter n, the mass M, and spin parameter a* of the black hole determine the inherent frequency of vertical oscillations in the disk, and they have significant influences on the SR phenomena in a system of black hole binaries. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11045004) and the Key Program of the Scientific Research Foundation of the Education Bureau of Hubei Province, China (Grant No. D20132603).

  19. Evidence of stochastic resonance in the mating behavior of Nezara viridula (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezia, S.; Curcio, L.; Fiasconaro, A.; Pizzolato, N.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.; Lo Bue, P.; Peri, E.; Colazza, S.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the role of the noise in the mating behavior between individuals of Nezara viridula (L.), by analyzing the temporal and spectral features of the non-pulsed type female calling song emitted by single individuals.We have measured the threshold level for the signal detection, by performing experiments with the calling signal at different intensities and analyzing the insect response by directionality tests performed on a group of male individuals. By using a sub-threshold signal and an acoustic Gaussian noise source, we have investigated the insect response for different levels of noise, finding behavioral activation for suitable noise intensities. In particular, the percentage of insects which react to the sub-threshold signal, shows a non-monotonic behavior, characterized by the presence of a maximum, for increasing levels of the noise intensity. This constructive interplay between external noise and calling signal is the signature of the non-dynamical stochastic resonance phenomenon. Finally, we describe the behavioral activation statistics by a soft threshold model which shows stochastic resonance. We find that the maximum of the ensemble average of the input-output cross-correlation occurs at a value of the noise intensity very close to that for which the behavioral response has a maximum.

  20. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; West, W. P.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Mordijck, S.

    2009-10-16

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p{sub e} in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q{sub 95} resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p{sub e} reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q{sub 95} resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  1. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Frerichs, H.; Groth, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q(95) resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q(95) resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  2. Vestibular Disorders Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... I can't think straight. Vestibular disorders can affect your cognitive functions, making it difficult to concentrate. Read ... more New Master Class in Vestibular Assessment Apr. 28, 2016 | 11:13am ...

  3. Medication (for Vestibular Disorders)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asymmetric input into the central vestibular apparatus or asymmetrical central processing. If this process is acute, vertigo, ... asymmetric input into the central vestibular apparatus or asymmetrical central processing. Many pathways and neurotransmitters are involved ...

  4. Multi-stable stochastic resonance and its application research on mechanical fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jimeng; Chen, Xuefeng; He, Zhengjia

    2013-10-01

    It is difficult to extract the fault features of a rotating machine via vibration analysis due to interference from background noise. Stochastic resonance (SR), used as a method of utilising noise to amplify weak signals in nonlinear dynamical systems, can detect weak signals overwhelmed in the noise. However, the detection effect of current SR methods is still unsatisfactory. To further increase the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and improve the detection effect of SR, the present study proposes an improved SR method with a multi-stable model for identifying the defect-induced rotating machine faults by analysing the influence relationship between the resonance model and the resonance effect. Due to the structural characteristics of three potential wells and two barriers, the proposed resonance model can not only further amplify weak signals, but also convert into a monostable model, a bistable model or a tristable model. This result is achieved by adjusting system parameters and thus obtaining a better matching of the input signals and resonance models. Therefore, the multi-stable SR method, combined with the characteristics of the multi-stable model, can both increase the output SNR and improve the detection effect and also detect the low SNR signals and enhance the processing capability of SR for weak signals. Finally, the proposed method is applied to a gearbox fault diagnosis in a rolling mill in which two local faults located in the big gear and the pinion, respectively, are found successfully. It can be concluded that multi-stable SR method has practical value in engineering. The influence relationship between a resonance model and SR is analysed. An improved SR method with a multi-stable model is presented. The signal processing performance of multi-stable SR is analysed comparatively. Simulation and application show the validity and superiority of multi-stable SR.

  5. Resonant excitation of the magnetosphere by stochastic and unsteady hydromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A.

    2011-05-15

    The effect of the magnetospheric MHD cavity on the excitation of the magnetosphere by stochastic and unsteady hydromagnetic waves incident from the solar wind is investigated theoretically by using a one-dimensional nonuniform model of the medium. It is shown that most of the energy of stochastic waves is reflected from the magnetopause and that the only waves that penetrate into the magnetosphere are those with frequencies in narrow spectral ranges near the eigenfrequencies of the cavity. These waves lead to steadystate excitation of the eigenmodes of the cavity, the energy of which is determined by the spectral density of the energy flux of the incident waves at the corresponding eigenfrequencies. The energy of the eigenmodes penetrates through the opacity barrier in the vicinity of the Alfven resonance points (each corresponding to a particular mode), where the perturbation amplitude is sharply amplified, so the total energy localized close to the Alfven resonance point is much higher than the total energy of the corresponding eigenmode. In the vicinities, the perturbation energy is dissipated by the finite conductivity of the ionosphere, the dissipation power being equal to the energy flux of the incident waves that penetrates into the magnetosphere. The case of unsteady waves is analyzed by considering a wave pulse as an example. It is shown that most of the energy of the wave pulse is reflected from the magnetopause. The portion of the incident perturbation that penetrates into the magnetosphere leads to unsteady excitation of the eigenmodes of the magnetospheric cavity, which are then slowly damped because part of the energy of the cavity is emitted through the magnetopause back to the solar wind while the other part penetrates into the vicinities of the Alfven resonance points. In the vicinities, the perturbation is an Alfven wave standing between magnetically conjugate ionospheres and its energy is dissipated by the finite conductivity of the ionosphere at a rate slower than the damping rate of the eigenmodes of the cavity.

  6. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  7. Stochastic bifurcations and coherencelike resonance in a self-sustained bistable noisy oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, A; Vadivasova, T; Anishchenko, V; Koseska, A; Kurths, J

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the influence of additive Gaussian white noise on two different bistable self-sustained oscillators: Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator with hard excitation and a model of a synthetic genetic oscillator. In the deterministic case, both oscillators are characterized with a coexistence of a stable limit cycle and a stable equilibrium state. We find that under the influence of noise, their dynamics can be well characterized through the concept of stochastic bifurcation, consisting in a qualitative change of the stationary amplitude distribution. For the Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator analytical results, obtained for a quasiharmonic approach, are compared with the result of direct computer simulations. In particular, we show that the dynamics is different for isochronous and anisochronous systems. Moreover, we find that the increase of noise intensity in the isochronous regime leads to a narrowing of the spectral line. This effect is similar to coherence resonance. However, in the case of anisochronous systems, this effect breaks down and a new phenomenon, anisochronous-based stochastic bifurcation occurs. PMID:20365322

  8. Stochastic resonance in a linear system with random damping parameter driven by trichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Heng; Liu, Jing

    2014-09-01

    The stochastic resonance (SR) in a second-order linear system driven by a trichotomous noise and an external periodic signal is investigated. By the use of the properties of the trichotomous noise and the Shapiro-Loginov formula, the exact expression for the output spectral amplification (SPA) of the system is obtained. The non-monotonic influence of the coefficient of the trichotomous noise on the SPA is found. It is shown that the SPA is a non-monotonic function of the amplitude, the correlation rate and the probability of the trichotomous noise. The SPA varies non-monotonically with the frequency of the driving signal, the damping coefficient and the frequency of the linear system.

  9. Complementarity of phase transition and stochastic resonance in spatially restricted systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargunin, Artjom; Örd, Teet; Tammelo, Risto

    2008-06-01

    We study the linear response in a soft potential, the Landau-type temperature dependence of which is responsible for the monostable-to-bistable transformation. The system can be considered as a model of a sample with internal noise, where a second-order phase transition takes place in the bulk limit. The intensity of noise influencing the order parameter is supposed to be a function of the volume. We demonstrate that the anomaly of susceptibility at the phase transition point described by the Landau phase transition theory transforms into the maximal response caused by stochastic resonance if the volume of the system decreases. The phenomenon can be treated also as an increase in the diffuseness of a phase transition with lowering of the critical temperature. We suggest that it is this crossover that contributes to the mechanism of dielectric peculiarities in ceramic and relaxor ferroelectrics.

  10. Noise enhancement of information transfer in crayfish mechanoreceptors by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, John K.; Wilkens, Lon; Pantazelou, Eleni; Moss, Frank

    1993-09-01

    IN linear information theory, electrical engineering and neurobiology, random noise has traditionally been viewed as a detriment to information transmission. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a nonlinear, statistical dynamics whereby information flow in a multistate system is enhanced by the presence of optimized, random noise1 4. A major consequence of SR for signal reception is that it makes possible substantial improvements in the detection of weak periodic signals. Although SR has recently been demonstrated in several artificial physical systems5,6, it may also occur naturally, and an intriguing possibility is that biological systems have evolved the capability to exploit SR by optimizing endogenous sources of noise. Sensory systems are an obvious place to look for SR, as they excel at detecting weak signals in a noisy environment. Here we demonstrate SR using external noise applied to crayfish mechanoreceptor cells. Our results show that individual neurons can provide a physiological substrate for SR in sensory systems.

  11. The Recovery of Weak Impulsive Signals Based on Stochastic Resonance and Moving Least Squares Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kuosheng.; Xu, Guanghua.; Liang, Lin.; Tao, Tangfei.; Gu, Fengshou.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test. PMID:25076220

  12. Encoding efficiency of suprathreshold stochastic resonance on stimulus-specific information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the encoding efficiency of suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) based on a local information-theoretic measure of stimulus-specific information (SSI), which is the average specific information of responses associated with a particular stimulus. The theoretical and numerical analyses of SSIs reveal that noise can improve neuronal coding efficiency for a large population of neurons, which leads to produce increased information-rich responses. The SSI measure, in contrast to the global measure of average mutual information, can characterize the noise benefits in finer detail for describing the enhancement of neuronal encoding efficiency of a particular stimulus, which may be of general utility in the design and implementation of a SSR coding scheme.

  13. Stochastic Resonance in a Bacterium Growth System with Time Delay and Colored Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenghong; Wu, Jiancheng

    2015-04-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in a bacterium growth system that is with two different kinds of time delays and is driven by colored noises is investigated. Based on the extended unified colored noise theory and the method of the probability density approximation, the Fokker-Planck equation and the stationary probability density function are derived. Then via the theory of adiabatic limit, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is obtained. The different effects of the time delays existed in the nonlinear system and the noise correlation times on the stationary probability density and the signal-to-noise rate are discussed respectively. Finally, numerical simulations are offered and are consistent with approximate analytical results.

  14. Improved detection of magnetic signals by a MEMS sensor using stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Tapia, Jesus A; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon. PMID:25329563

  15. Improved Detection of Magnetic Signals by a MEMS Sensor Using Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Tapia, Jesus A.; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M.; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A.; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon. PMID:25329563

  16. Model for biological communication in a nanofabricated cell-mimic driven by stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Siuti, Piro; Dar, Roy D.; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Simpson, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Cells offer natural examples of highly efficient networks of nanomachines. Accordingly, both intracellular and intercellular communication mechanisms in nature are looked to as a source of inspiration and instruction for engineered nanocommunication. Harnessing biological functionality in this manner requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology, and nanofabrication. Recent years have seen the amassing of a tremendous wealth of data from the sequencing of new organisms and from high throughput expression experiments. At the same time, a deeper fundamental understanding of individual cell function has been developed, as exemplified by the growth of fields such as noise biology, which seeks to characterize the role of noise in gene expression. The availability of well characterized biological components coupled with a deeper understanding of cell function has led to efforts to engineer both living cells and to create bio-like functionality in non-living substrates in the field of synthetic biology. Here, we present a model system that exemplifies the synergism between these realms of research. We propose a synthetic gene network for operation in a nanofabricated cell mimic array that propagates a biomolecular signal over long distances using the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Our system consists of a bacterial quorum sensing signal molecule, a bistable genetic switch triggered by this signal, and an array of nanofabricated cell mimic wells that contain the genetic system. An optimal level of noise in the system helps to propagate a time-varying AHL signal over long distances through the array of mimics. This noise level is determined both by the system volume and by the parameters of the genetic network. Our proposed genetically driven stochastic resonance system serves as a testbed for exploring the potential harnessing of gene expression noise to aid in the transmission of a time-varying molecular signal.

  17. Noise-enhanced stability and double stochastic resonance of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the transient and resonant properties of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz (RH) and Schweitzer-Ebeling-Tilch (SET) models, which is driven by the simultaneous action of multiplicative and additive noise and periodic forcing. It is shown that the cross-correlation between two noises (λ) can break the symmetry of the potential to generate motion of the ABPs. In case of no correlation between two noises, the mean first passage time (MFPT) is a monotonic decrease depending on the multiplicative noise, however in case of correlation between two noises, the MFPT exhibits a maximum, depending on the multiplicative noise for both models, this maximum for MFPT identifies the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect of the ABPs. By comparing with case of no correlation (λ =0.0 ), we find two maxima in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depending on the cross-correlation intensity, i.e. the double stochastic resonance is shown in both models. For the RH model, the SNR exhibits two maxima depending on the multiplicative noise for small cross-correlation intensity, while in the SET model, it exhibits only a maximum depending on the multiplicative noise. Whether λ =0.0 or not, the MFPT is a monotonic decrease, and the SNR exhibits a maximum, depending on the additive noise in both models.

  18. Double-maximum enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio gain via stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-08-01

    This paper studies the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of a parallel array of nonlinear elements that transmits a common input composed of a periodic signal and external noise. Aiming to further enhance the SNR gain, each element is injected with internal noise components or high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations. We report that the SNR gain exhibits two maxima at different values of the internal noise level or of the sinusoidal vibration amplitude. For the addition of internal noise to an array of threshold-based elements, the condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is analytically investigated in the limit of weak signals. Interestingly, when the internal noise components are replaced by high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations, the SNR gain displays the vibrational multiresonance phenomenon. In both considered cases, there are certain regions of the internal noise intensity or the sinusoidal vibration amplitude wherein the achieved maximal SNR gain can be considerably beyond unity for a weak signal buried in non-Gaussian external noise. Due to the easy implementation of sinusoidal vibration modulation, this approach is potentially useful for improving the output SNR in an array of nonlinear devices. PMID:25215715

  19. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  20. Review of book vestibular crises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical practice, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with vestibular crises is discussed. Classifications for vestibular disorders are given. Information on the frequency of vestibular crises is given.

  1. Stochastic resonance in the presence or absence of external signal in the continuous stirred tank reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    1999-07-01

    A two variable model, which has been proposed to describe a first-order, exothermic, irreversible reaction A→B carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), is investigated when the control parameter is modulated by random and/or periodic forces. Within the bistable region where a limit cycle and a stable node coexist, stochastic resonance (SR) is observed when both random and periodic modulations are present. In the absence of periodic external signal noise induced coherent oscillations (NICO) appear when the control parameter is randomly modulated near the supercritical Hopf bifurcation point. In addition, the NICO-strength goes through a maximum with the increment of the noise intensity, characteristic for the occurrence of internal signal stochastic resonance (ISSR).

  2. Vestibular Perception following Acute Unilateral Vestibular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sian; Kaski, Diego; Cutfield, Nicholas; Seemungal, Barry; Golding, John F.; Gresty, Michael; Glasauer, Stefan; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP) system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO) and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN) acutely (2 days after onset) and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks). Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s2). We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any ‘perceptual noise’ added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced – asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of perceptual processes (ultimately cortical) participating in vestibular compensation, suppressing asymmetry acutely in unilateral vestibular lesions. PMID:23671577

  3. Sucrose quantitative and qualitative analysis from tastant mixtures based on Cu foam electrode and stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hui, Guohua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Jian; Zheng, Le

    2016-04-15

    Quantitative and qualitative determination of sucrose from complex tastant mixtures using Cu foam electrode was investigated in this study. Cu foam was prepared and its three-dimensional (3-D) mesh structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cu foam was utilized as working electrode in three-electrode electrochemical system. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) scanning results exhibited the oxidation procedure of sucrose on Cu foam electrode. Amperometric i-t scanning results indicated that Cu foam electrode selectively responded to sucrose from four tastant mixtures with low limit of detection (LOD) of 35.34μM, 49.85μM, 45.89μM, and 26.81μM, respectively. The existence of quinine, NaCl, citric acid (CA) and their mixtures had no effect on sucrose detection. Furthermore, mixtures containing different tastants could be discriminated by non-linear double-layered cascaded series stochastic resonance (DCSSR) output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen peak parameters of CV measurement data. The proposed method provides a promising way for sweetener analysis of commercial food. PMID:26675854

  4. A new multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance for enhanced fault diagnosis in wind turbine drivetrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingbing; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    It is very difficult to detect weak fault signatures due to the large amount of noise in a wind turbine system. Multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance (MSTSR) has proved to be an effective way to extract weak signals buried in strong noise. However, the MSTSR method originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has disadvantages such as shift variance and the aliasing effects in engineering application. In this paper, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is introduced into the MSTSR method, which makes it possible to further improve the system output signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy of fault diagnosis by the merits of DTCWT (nearly shift invariant and reduced aliasing effects). Moreover, this method utilizes the relationship between the two dual-tree wavelet basis functions, instead of matching the single wavelet basis function to the signal being analyzed, which may speed up the signal processing and be employed in on-line engineering monitoring. The proposed method is applied to the analysis of bearing outer ring and shaft coupling vibration signals carrying fault information. The results confirm that the method performs better in extracting the fault features than the original DWT-based MSTSR, the wavelet transform with post spectral analysis, and EMD-based spectral analysis methods.

  5. Adaptive bistable stochastic resonance and its application in mechanical fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi; Tao, Yi; He, Ye; Tang, Baoping

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an important approach to detect weak vibration signals from heavy background noise. In order to increase the calculation speed and improve the weak feature detection performance, a new bistable model has been built. With this model, an adaptive and fast SR method based on dyadic wavelet transform and least square system parameters solving is proposed in this paper. By adding the second-order differential item into the traditional bistable model, noise utilization can be increased and the quality of SR output signal can be improved. The iteration algorithm for implementing the adaptive SR is given. Compared with the traditional adaptive SR method, this algorithm does not need to set up the searching range and searching step size of the system parameters, but only requires a few iterations. The proposed method, discrete wavelet transform and the traditional adaptive SR method are applied to analyzing simulated vibration signals and extracting the fault feature of a rotor system. The contrastive results verify the superiority of the proposed method, and it can be effectively applied to weak mechanical fault feature extraction.

  6. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:24353303

  7. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system. PMID:26343662

  8. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system. PMID:26343662

  9. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic field caused by vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations at diverted tokamak edge

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G.; Chang, C. S.; Joseph, I.; Moyer, R. A.

    2010-10-15

    A kinetic transport simulation for the first 4 ms of the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) application has been performed for the first time in realistic diverted DIII-D tokamak geometry [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], with the self-consistent evaluation of the radial electric field and the plasma rotation. It is found that, due to the kinetic effects, the stochastic parallel thermal transport is significantly reduced when compared to the standard analytic model [A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978)] and the nonaxisymmetric perpendicular radial particle transport is significantly enhanced from the axisymmetric level. These trends agree with recent experimental result trends [T. E. Evans, R. A. Moyer, K. H. Burrell et al., Nat. Phys. 2, 419 (2006)]. It is also found, as a side product, that an artificial local reduction of the vacuum RMP fields in the vicinity of the magnetic separatrix can bring the kinetic simulation results to a more detailed agreement with experimental plasma profiles.

  10. Stochastic and equilibrium pictures of the ultracold Fano-Feshbach-resonance molecular conversion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi; Zhang, Chen; Greene, Chris H.

    2013-05-01

    The ultracold molecular conversion rate occurring in an adiabatic ramp through a Fano-Feshbach resonance is studied and compared in two statistical models. One model, the so-called stochastic phase-space sampling (SPSS) [Hodby , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.120402 94, 120402 (2005)] evaluates the overlap of two atomic distributions in phase space by sampling atomic pairs according to a phase-space criterion. The other model, the chemical equilibrium theory (ChET) [Watabe and Nikuni, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.77.013616 77, 013616 (2008)] considers atomic and molecular distributions in the limit of the chemical and thermal equilibrium. The present study applies SPSS and ChET to a prototypical system of K+K→ K2 in all the symmetry combinations, namely Fermi-Fermi, Bose-Bose, and Bose-Fermi cases. To examine implications of the phase-space criterion for SPSS, the behavior of molecular conversion is analyzed using four distinct geometrical constraints. Our comparison of the results of SPSS with those of ChET shows that while they appear similar in most situations, the two models give rise to rather dissimilar behaviors when the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate strongly affects the molecule formation.

  11. Adaptive stochastic resonance method for impact signal detection based on sliding window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jimeng; Chen, Xuefeng; He, Zhengjia

    2013-04-01

    Aiming at solving the existing sharp problems in impact signal detection by using stochastic resonance (SR) in the fault diagnosis of rotating machinery, such as the measurement index selection of SR and the detection of impact signal with different impact amplitudes, the present study proposes an adaptive SR method for impact signal detection based on sliding window by analyzing the SR characteristics of impact signal. This method can not only achieve the optimal selection of system parameters by means of weighted kurtosis index constructed through using kurtosis index and correlation coefficient, but also achieve the detection of weak impact signal through the algorithm of data segmentation based on sliding window, even though the differences between different impact amplitudes are great. The algorithm flow of adaptive SR method is given and effectiveness of the method has been verified by the contrastive results between the proposed method and the traditional SR method of simulation experiments. Finally, the proposed method has been applied to a gearbox fault diagnosis in a hot strip finishing mill in which two local faults located on the pinion are obtained successfully. Therefore, it can be concluded that the proposed method is of great practical value in engineering.

  12. Enhanced coding in a cochlear-implant model using additive noise: Aperiodic stochastic resonance with tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert P.; Roper, Peter

    2000-05-01

    Analog electrical stimulation of the cochlear nerve (the nerve of hearing) by a cochlear implant is an effective method of providing functional hearing to profoundly deaf people. Recent physiological and computational experiments have shown that analog cochlear implants are unlikely to convey certain speech cues by the temporal pattern of evoked nerve discharges. However, these experiments have also shown that the optimal addition of noise to cochlear implant signals can enhance the temporal representation of speech cues [R. P. Morse and E. F. Evans, Nature Medicine 2, 928 (1996)]. We present a simple model to explain this enhancement of temporal representation. Our model derives from a rate equation for the mean threshold-crossing rate of an infinite set of parallel discriminators (level-crossing detectors); a system that well describes the time coding of information by a set of nerve fibers. Our results show that the optimal transfer of information occurs when the threshold level of each discriminator is equal to the root-mean-square noise level. The optimal transfer of information by a cochlear implant is therefore expected to occur when the internal root-mean-square noise level of each stimulated fiber is approximately equal to the nerve threshold. When interpreted within the framework of aperiodic stochastic resonance, our results indicate therefore that for an infinite array of discriminators, a tuning of the noise is still necessary for optimal performance. This is in contrast to previous results [Collins, Chow, and Imhoff, Nature 376, 236 (1995); Chialvo, Longtin, and Müller-Gerking, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1798 (1997)] on arrays of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons.

  13. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-09-01

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 13C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different 13C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly 13C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly 13C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled 13C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of 13C-labeled solids.

  14. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis On this page: What is ... about vestibular schwannomas? What is a vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma)? Inner ear with vestibular schwannoma (tumor) A ...

  15. Types of Vestibular Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... include complications from aging, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. Acoustic Neuroma Acoustic neuroma (also called a vestibular schwannoma) is a ... This nerve is also referred to as the acoustic nerve, hence the name.) As an acoustic neuroma ...

  16. Motorist's vestibular disorientation syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Page, N G; Gresty, M A

    1985-01-01

    Six patients are described who experienced difficulty in driving a motor car. Four had illusions that the car was turning, which occurred particularly on open, featureless roads or the brows of hills and caused the driver to stop. All patients had peripheral or central neurootological abnormalities, but the only finding consistent with the directionality of the symptoms was an unpleasantly increased sense of circularvection during optokinetic stimulation in the direction of the illusion. These problems occur because of a false sense of orientation arising either from inappropriate signals from disordered vestibular canal and otolith organs or from a disordered central interpretation of vestibular information, and become manifest in the absence of adequate visual stabilisation. The other two patients with lateralised vestibular disease made inappropriate steering adjustments in the direction of the imbalance of vestibular tone. PMID:3875689

  17. Comorbidities in vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Scott D Z; Neff, Brian A; Shepard, Neil T; Staab, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of clinical and epidemiological evidence supports a specific relationship between vestibular symptoms and migraine. Without a biomarker or complete understanding of pathophysiology, diagnosis of vestibular migraine (VM) currently depends upon symptoms in two dimensions: episodic vestibular symptoms temporally related to migraine symptoms. The Bárány Society and the International Headache Society have recently developed consensus diagnostic criteria. However, many issues remain unsettled, including the type, duration, and timing of vestibular symptoms related to headache that should be required for diagnosing VM. This paper focuses on the challenging third dimension of comorbidity, a frequent cause of diagnostic uncertainty that may confound clinical application and research validation of VM criteria. Several other neurotologic conditions occur more frequently in migraineurs than controls, including benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière's disease, and motion sickness. Patients with VM also have high rates of chronic subjective dizziness, which may be associated with anxious, introverted temperaments that can affect clinical presentation and treatment response. Broadly inclusive studies of well-characterized patients with other neurotologic and psychiatric comorbidities are needed to fully understand how vestibular symptoms and migraine interact in order to truly validate vestibular migraine, distill its essential features, define its boundaries, and characterize overlapping comorbidities. PMID:25564081

  18. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (EVAS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... referred to as EVA syndrome (EVA). CAUSES During fetal development, the vestibular aqueduct starts out as a wide tube. By the fifth week it narrows, and by midterm it approaches adult dimension and shape. However, the vestibular aqueduct continues ...

  19. Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method based on electronic nose and non-linear stochastic resonance technique

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liu; Yuanyuan, Han; Yanping, Cai; Jiaojiao, Jin; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear data processing technique is studied. E-nose responses to prawns stored at 4°C are measured. Meanwhile, physical/chemical indexes (firmness, pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), total viable count (TVC), and human sensory evaluation) are examined to provide freshness references for e-nose analysis. E-nose measurement data is analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), stochastic resonance (SR), and double-layered cascaded serial stochastic resonance (DCSSR). PCA partially discriminates prawns under different storage time. SR and DCSSR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum eigen values discriminate prawns successfully. Multi-variables regressions (MVR) are conducted between physical/chemical indexes and SR/DCSSR output SNR minimal (SNR-Min) values. Results indicate that SNR-Min values present more significant linearity relation with physical/chemical indexes. Prawn freshness forecasting model is developed via Harris fitting regression on DCSSR SNR-Min values. Validating experiments demonstrate that forecasting accuracy of this model is 94.29%. PMID:25551520

  20. Spike-Interval Triggered Averaging Reveals a Quasi-Periodic Spiking Alternative for Stochastic Resonance in Catfish Electroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lankheet, Martin J. M.; Klink, P. Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G.; Noest, André J.

    2012-01-01

    Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in quasi-periodically produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709

  1. Muscle-specific modulation of vestibular reflexes with increased locomotor velocity and cadence.

    PubMed

    Dakin, Christopher J; Inglis, John Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-07-01

    Vestibular information is one of the many sensory signals used to stabilize the body during locomotion. When locomotor velocity increases, the influence of these signals appears to wane. It is unclear whether vestibular signals are globally attenuated with velocity or are influenced by factors such as whether a muscle is contributing to balance control. Here we investigate how vestibular sensory signals influence muscles of the leg during locomotion and what causes their attenuation with increasing locomotor velocity. We hypothesized that 1) vestibular signals influence the activity of all muscles engaged in the maintenance of medio-lateral stability during locomotion and 2) increases in both cadence and velocity would be associated with attenuation of these signals. We used a stochastic vestibular stimulus and recorded electromyographic signals from muscles of the ankle, knee, and hip. Participants walked using two cadences (52 and 78 steps/min) and two walking velocities (0.4 and 0.8 m/s). We observed phase-dependent modulation of vestibular influence over ongoing muscle activity in all recorded muscles. Within a stride, reversals of the muscle responses were observed in the biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and rectus femoris. Vestibular-muscle coupling decreases with increases in both cadence and walking velocity. These results show that the observed vestibular suppression is muscle- and phase dependent. We suggest that the phase- and muscle-specific influence of vestibular signals on locomotor activity is organized according to each muscle's functional role in body stabilization during locomotion. PMID:23576695

  2. Recovery from vestibular ototoxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Gianna-Poulin, C.; Pesznecker, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine whether subjects with documented vestibular ototoxicity recover vestibular function and, if so, investigate the recovery dynamics. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective reviews and repeated measures. SETTING: Clinical research and technology center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight subjects who received vestibulotoxic medications were followed for at least 12 months after initial treatment. CONTROLS: Our subject sample was compared with a published database of normal individuals. INTERVENTIONS: All 28 subjects received systemically administered medications known to be ototoxic. The subjects' treating physicians controlled medication, dosage, and administration schedules. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tests of horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular function were performed. Subjects' auditory and vestibular symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven subjects (39%) showed changes in horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular gain constant (GC) and/or time constant (TC) consistent with vestibular ototoxicity. When tested 1 year after ototoxic drug administration, eight of the nine subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in GC showed a recovery of GC to normal limits. Only one of the eight subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in TC showed recovery of TC to within normal limits. Ototoxicity onset and recovery were independent of baseline vestibular function, and ototoxicity onset did not correlate with cumulative dose of ototoxic medication. There was no relationship between subjective symptoms and ototoxicity onset. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of GC after vestibular ototoxicity is more commonly observed than recovery of TC. Because ototoxic changes developed and continued in an unpredictable time and manner in relation to ototoxic drug administration, we propose that once ototoxic changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex are detected, ototoxic medications should be discontinued as soon as possible.

  3. Preservation of auditory and vestibular function after surgical removal of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Brackmann, D. E.; Hitselberger, W. E.; Purdy, J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) surgery continues to improve rapidly. Advances can be attributed to several fields, but the most important contributions have arisen from the identification of the genes responsible for the dominant inheritance of neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) and the development of magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement for the early anatomic confirmation of the pathognomonic, bilateral vestibular schwannomas in NF2. These advances enable early diagnosis and treatment when the tumors are small in virtually all subjects at risk for NF2. The authors suggest that advising young NF2 patients to wait until complications develop, especially hearing loss, before diagnosing and operating for bilateral eighth nerve schwannomas may not always be in the best interest of the patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of preservation of both auditory and vestibular function in a patient after bilateral vestibular schwannoma excision.

  4. Structural and functional connectivity mapping of the vestibular circuitry from human brainstem to cortex.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, V; Keeser, D; Hergenroeder, T; Erat, O; Ertl-Wagner, B; Brandt, T; Dieterich, M

    2016-04-01

    Structural and functional interconnections of the bilateral central vestibular network have not yet been completely delineated. This includes both ipsilateral and contralateral pathways and crossing sites on the way from the vestibular nuclei via the thalamic relay stations to multiple "vestibular cortex" areas. This study investigated "vestibular" connectivity in the living human brain in between the vestibular nuclei and the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) by combined structural and functional connectivity mapping using diffusion tensor imaging and functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in 24 healthy right-handed volunteers. We observed a congruent functional and structural link between the vestibular nuclei and the ipsilateral and contralateral PIVC. Five separate and distinct vestibular pathways were identified: three run ipsilaterally, while the two others cross either in the pons or the midbrain. Two of the ipsilateral projections run through the posterolateral or paramedian thalamic subnuclei, while the third bypasses the thalamus to reach the inferior part of the insular cortex directly. Both contralateral pathways travel through the posterolateral thalamus. At the cortical level, the PIVC regions of both hemispheres with a right hemispherical dominance are interconnected transcallosally through the antero-caudal splenium. The above-described bilateral vestibular circuitry in its entirety takes the form of a structure of a rope ladder extending from the brainstem to the cortex with three crossings in the brainstem (vestibular nuclei, pons, midbrain), none at thalamic level and a fourth cortical crossing through the splenium of the corpus callosum. PMID:25552315

  5. Can Electrical Vestibular Noise Be Used for the Treatment of Brain Diseases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kwak, Shin

    2005-11-01

    The therapy currently available for the treatment of degenerative neurological diseases is far from satisfactory, and a novel therapeutic strategy, especially for pharmacologically unresponsive patients, would be welcomed. The vestibular nerves are known to influence neuronal circuits in the medullary cardiovascular areas and, through the cerebellar vermis, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. By means of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), it may now be possible to ameliorate blunted responsiveness of degenerated neuronal circuits in the brains of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and/or Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, through a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. We evaluate the effect of 24-hour noisy GVS on long-term heart rate dynamics in seven MSA patients, and on daytime locomotor activity dynamics in twelve patients with either PD or levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism. Short-range heart rate variability and long-range anti-correlation of trunk activity are significantly increased by the noisy GVS compared with sham stimulation, suggestive of improved autonomic and motor responsiveness. The noisy GVS is effective in boosting the neuro-degenerative brains of MSA and/or PD patients, including those unresponsive to standard levodopa therapy.

  6. Management of vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, Alexandre R

    2011-05-01

    Vestibular migraine is considered to be the second most common cause of vertigo and the most common cause of spontaneous episodic vertigo. The duration of attacks varies from seconds to days, usually lasting minutes to hours, and they mostly occur independently of headaches. Long-lasting individual attacks are treated with generic antivertiginous and antiemetic drugs. Specific antimigraine drugs are unlikely to be very effective for rescue. The mainstay of the management of vestibular migraine is prophylactic medication. To date, there are no controlled trials available; the body of knowledge builds on case series and retrospective or observational studies. Most drugs are also used for the prevention of migraine headaches. The choice of medication should be guided by its side effect profile and the comorbidities of patients. Betablockers such as propanolol or metoprolol are preferred in patients with hypertension but in the absence of asthma. Anticonvulsants include topiramate when patients are obese, valproic acid and lamotrigine. Lamotrigine is preferred if vertigo is more frequent than headaches. Calcium antagonists include verapamil and flunarizine. If patients have anxiety, tricyclic antidepressants such as amitryptiline or nortryptiline or SSRIs and benzodiazepines such as clonazepam are recommended. Acetazolamide is effective in rare genetic disorders related to migraine-like episodic ataxia; however, its place in vestibular migraine is still to be established. Nonpharmacological measures such as diet, sleep, hygiene and avoidance of triggers are recommended as they are for migraine. Vestibular rehabilitation might be useful when there are complications such as loss of confidence in balance or visual dependence. PMID:21694818

  7. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  8. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  9. Study of detecting mechanism of carbon nanotubes gas sensor based on multi-stable stochastic resonance model.

    PubMed

    Jingyi, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The detecting mechanism of carbon nanotubes gas sensor based on multi-stable stochastic resonance (MSR) model was studied in this paper. A numerically stimulating model based on MSR was established. And gas-ionizing experiment by adding electronic white noise to induce 1.65 MHz periodic component in the carbon nanotubes gas sensor was performed. It was found that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum displayed 2 maximal values, which accorded to the change of the broken-line potential function. The experimental results of gas-ionizing experiment demonstrated that periodic component of 1.65 MHz had multiple MSR phenomena, which was in accordance with the numerical stimulation results. In this way, the numerical stimulation method provides an innovative method for the detecting mechanism research of carbon nanotubes gas sensor. PMID:26198910

  10. Robust myoelectric signal detection based on stochastic resonance using multiple-surface-electrode array made of carbon nanotube composite paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirata, Kento; Inden, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya; Oya, Takahide; Hagiwara, Yosuke; Kaeriyama, Shunichi; Nakamura, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the robust detection of surface electromyogram (EMG) signals based on the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon, in which the response to weak signals is optimized by adding noise, combined with multiple surface electrodes. Flexible carbon nanotube composite paper (CNT-cp) was applied to the surface electrode, which showed good performance that is comparable to that of conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes. The SR-based EMG signal system integrating an 8-Schmitt-trigger network and the multiple-CNT-cp-electrode array successfully detected weak EMG signals even when the subject’s body is in the motion, which was difficult to achieve using the conventional technique. The feasibility of the SR-based EMG detection technique was confirmed by demonstrating its applicability to robot hand control.

  11. Co-existing responses and stochastic resonance in post-buckled structures: A combined numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    Much of what is known about co-existing responses in nonlinear systems under both deterministic and random dynamic loading is limited to phenomenological investigations of discrete systems, most commonly, the Duffing equation. From these results alone, it is difficult to extrapolate the behavior of the distributed nonlinear systems more commonly seen in real structures such as buckled beams and curved panels. This is because, beyond the simple increase in dimension, real systems bring with them imperfections and more complex forms of energy dissipation. The possibility of co-existing responses, particularly in the case of simultaneous “safe” and “unsafe” solutions (e.g. snap-through and non-snap-through), poses potential problems for engineers as it multiplies the workload, since one must be very careful to ensure that a particular simulation or experiment has captured the most critical response. Even in the case where random forces dominate the overall loading of a system, a situation in which one might anticipate an equally random response, a very small harmonic component can have an influence beyond its proportion. This effect, known as stochastic resonance, is quite counterintuitive to the analyst more familiar with linear systems where the principles of superposition and scalar multiplication of solutions make this impossible. In this paper, the effect of the damping and noise level on the number of co-existing responses in nonlinear systems is investigated. Stochastic resonance is also demonstrated, first with a double-well Duffing oscillator, and then it is shown to exist experimentally, we believe for the first time, on a macroscopic structure, that being, an (imperfect) buckled beam.

  12. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-05-15

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5-2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s(-2) ) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300-350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P < 0.001) and remained elevated after 30 min. Over-estimation of whole-body rotation (30-180 deg every 5 s) before conditioning was significantly reduced (41.1 to 21.5%; P = 0.033). Conditioning reduced illusory vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P < 0.01) and the effect persisted for at least 1 h (24% reduction; P < 0.05). We conclude that a system of vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing. PMID:25809702

  13. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis On this page: What is ... get additional information? What is a vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma)? A vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic ...

  14. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; Fusconi, M.; De Virgilio, A.; Pagliuca, G.; Marinelli, C.; de Vincentiis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes. PMID:24741601

  15. New concepts in molecular and energy transport within carbon nanotubes: thermopower waves and stochastically resonant ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Our laboratory has been interested in how carbon nanotubes can be utilized to illustrate new concepts in molecular and energy transfer. In the first example, we predict and demonstrate the concept of thermopower waves for energy generation [1]. Coupling an exothermic chemical reaction with a thermally conductive CNT creates a self-propagating reactive wave driven along its length. We realize such waves in MWNT and show that they produce concomitant electrical pulses of high specific power >7 kW/kg. Such waves of high power density may find uses as unique energy sources. In the second system, we fabricate and study SWNT ion channels for the first time [2] and show that the longest, highest aspect ratio, and smallest diameter synthetic nanopore examined to date, a 500 μm SWNT, demonstrates oscillations in electro-osmotic current at specific ranges of electric field, that are the signatures of coherence resonance, yielding self-generated rhythmic and frequency locked transport. The observed oscillations in the current occur due to a coupling between stochastic pore blocking and a diffusion limitation that develops at the pore mouth during proton transport. [4pt] [1] Choi W, Hong S, Abrahamson JT, Han JH, Song C, Nair N, Baik S, Strano MS: Chemically driven carbon-nanotube-guided thermopower waves. NATURE MATERIALS, 9 (2010) 423-429.[0pt] [2] Lee, CY, Choi W, Han, JH, Strano MS: Coherence Resonance in a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Ion Channel. SCIENCE, 239

  16. Improving Early Adaptation Following Long Duration Spaceflight by Enhancing Vestibular Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Kofman, Igor; DeDios, Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Cohen, Helen; Jeevarajan, Jerome; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after g-transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" -immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance (SR) to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals especially when combined with balance training exercises for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. The countermeasure to improve post-flight balance and locomotor disturbances is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The techniques for improving signal detection using SVS may thus provide additional information to improve such strategic abilities and thus help in significantly reducing the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long duration space flight. We have conducted a series of studies to document the efficacy of SVS stimulation on balance/locomotion tasks on unstable surfaces and motion tracking tasks during intra-vestibular system conflicts. In an initial study, we showed that SVS improved overall balance performance while standing on an unstable surface indicating that SVS may be sufficient to provide a comprehensive countermeasure approach for improving postural stability. In a second study, we showed that SVS improved locomotor performance on a treadmill mounted on an oscillating platform indicating that SVS may also be used to maximize locomotor performance during walking in unstable environments. In a third study, SVS was evaluated during an otolith-canal conflict scenario in a variable radius centrifuge at low frequency of oscillation (0.1 Hz) on both eye movements and perceptual responses (using a joystick) to track imposed oscillations. The variable radius centrifuge provides a selective tilting sensation that is detectable only by the otolith organs providing conflicting information from the canal organs of the vestibular system (intra-vestibular conflict). Results show that SVS significantly reduced the timing difference between both the eye movement responses as well as the perceptual tracking responses with respect to the imposed tilt sensations. These results indicate that SVS can improve performance in sensory conflict scenarios like that experienced during space flight. Such a SR countermeasure will act synergistically along with the pre-and in-flight adaptability training protocols providing an integrated, multi-disciplinary countermeasure capable of fulfilling multiple requirements making it a comprehensive and cost effective countermeasure approach to enhance sensorimotor capabilities following long-duration space flight.

  17. Signal amplification factor in stochastic resonance: An analytic non-perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Asish Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The response of an overdamped bistable system driven by a Gaussian white noise and perturbed by a weak monochromatic force (signal) is studied analytically. In order to get amplitude-dependent signal amplification factor a non-perturbative scheme is put forward by taking into account all the terms of a perturbation series with amplitude of the signal as an expansion parameter. An approximate analytic expression of the signal amplification factor is derived and compared with the numerical results. The contributions of infinite number of relaxation modes of the stochastic dynamics to the response are also taken into account in the final expression. The calculation of the response based on the derived expression requires only the knowledge of the first non-trivial eigenvalue and the lowest eigenfunction of the unperturbed Fokker-Planck operator.

  18. Derivation of a wave kinetic equation from the resonant-averaged stochastic NLS equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    We suggest a new derivation of a wave kinetic equation for the spectrum of the weakly nonlinear Schrödinger equation with stochastic forcing. The kinetic equation is obtained as a result of a double limiting procedure. Firstly, we consider the equation on a finite box with periodic boundary conditions and send the size of the nonlinearity and of the forcing to zero, while the time is correspondingly rescaled; then, the size of the box is sent to infinity (with a suitable rescaling of the solution). We report here the results of the first limiting procedure, analysed with full rigour in [8], and show how the second limit leads to a kinetic equation for the spectrum, if some further hypotheses (commonly employed in the weak turbulence theory) are accepted. Finally we show how to derive from these equations the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra.

  19. Interaction of brain areas of visual and vestibular simultaneous activity with fMRI.

    PubMed

    Della-Justina, Hellen M; Gamba, Humberto R; Lukasova, Katerina; Nucci-da-Silva, Mariana P; Winkler, Anderson M; Amaro, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Static body equilibrium is an essential requisite for human daily life. It is known that visual and vestibular systems must work together to support equilibrium. However, the relationship between these two systems is not fully understood. In this work, we present the results of a study which identify the interaction of brain areas that are involved with concurrent visual and vestibular inputs. The visual and the vestibular systems were individually and simultaneously stimulated, using flickering checkerboard (without movement stimulus) and galvanic current, during experiments of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-four right-handed and non-symptomatic subjects participated in this study. Single visual stimulation shows positive blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses (PBR) in the primary and associative visual cortices. Single vestibular stimulation shows PBR in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, inferior parietal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and lobules V and VI of the cerebellar hemisphere. Simultaneous stimulation shows PBR in the middle and inferior frontal gyri and in the precentral gyrus. Vestibular- and somatosensory-related areas show negative BOLD responses (NBR) during simultaneous stimulation. NBR areas were also observed in the calcarine gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus and precuneus during simultaneous and single visual stimulations. For static visual and galvanic vestibular simultaneous stimulation, the reciprocal inhibitory visual-vestibular interaction pattern is observed in our results. The experimental results revealed interactions in frontal areas during concurrent visual-vestibular stimuli, which are affected by intermodal association areas in occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes. PMID:25300959

  20. Stochastic approach to diffusion inside the chaotic layer of a resonance.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Martín F; Bazzani, Armando; Cincotta, Pablo M; Giordano, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    We model chaotic diffusion in a symplectic four-dimensional (4D) map by using the result of a theorem that was developed for stochastically perturbed integrable Hamiltonian systems. We explicitly consider a map defined by a free rotator (FR) coupled to a standard map (SM). We focus on the diffusion process in the action I of the FR, obtaining a seminumerical method to compute the diffusion coefficient. We study two cases corresponding to a thick and a thin chaotic layer in the SM phase space and we discuss a related conjecture stated in the past. In the first case, the numerically computed probability density function for the action I is well interpolated by the solution of a Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, whereas it presents a nonconstant time shift with respect to the concomitant FP solution in the second case suggesting the presence of an anomalous diffusion time scale. The explicit calculation of a diffusion coefficient for a 4D symplectic map can be useful to understand the slow diffusion observed in celestial mechanics and accelerator physics. PMID:24580301

  1. Stochastic approach to diffusion inside the chaotic layer of a resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestre, Martín F.; Bazzani, Armando; Cincotta, Pablo M.; Giordano, Claudia M.

    2014-01-01

    We model chaotic diffusion in a symplectic four-dimensional (4D) map by using the result of a theorem that was developed for stochastically perturbed integrable Hamiltonian systems. We explicitly consider a map defined by a free rotator (FR) coupled to a standard map (SM). We focus on the diffusion process in the action I of the FR, obtaining a seminumerical method to compute the diffusion coefficient. We study two cases corresponding to a thick and a thin chaotic layer in the SM phase space and we discuss a related conjecture stated in the past. In the first case, the numerically computed probability density function for the action I is well interpolated by the solution of a Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, whereas it presents a nonconstant time shift with respect to the concomitant FP solution in the second case suggesting the presence of an anomalous diffusion time scale. The explicit calculation of a diffusion coefficient for a 4D symplectic map can be useful to understand the slow diffusion observed in celestial mechanics and accelerator physics.

  2. A Stochastic, Resonance-Free Multiple Time-Step Algorithm for Polarizable Models That Permits Very Large Time Steps.

    PubMed

    Margul, Daniel T; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics remains one of the most widely used computational tools in the theoretical molecular sciences to sample an equilibrium ensemble distribution and/or to study the dynamical properties of a system. The efficiency of a molecular dynamics calculation is limited by the size of the time step that can be employed, which is dictated by the highest frequencies in the system. However, many properties of interest are connected to low-frequency, long time-scale phenomena, requiring many small time steps to capture. This ubiquitous problem can be ameliorated by employing multiple time-step algorithms, which assign different time steps to forces acting on different time scales. In such a scheme, fast forces are evaluated more frequently than slow forces, and as the former are often computationally much cheaper to evaluate, the savings can be significant. Standard multiple time-step approaches are limited, however, by resonance phenomena, wherein motion on the fastest time scales limits the step sizes that can be chosen for the slower time scales. In atomistic models of biomolecular systems, for example, the largest time step is typically limited to around 5 fs. Previously, we introduced an isokinetic extended phase-space algorithm (Minary et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2004, 93, 150201) and its stochastic analog (Leimkuhler et al. Mol. Phys. 2013, 111, 3579) that eliminate resonance phenomena through a set of kinetic energy constraints. In simulations of a fixed-charge flexible model of liquid water, for example, the time step that could be assigned to the slow forces approached 100 fs. In this paper, we develop a stochastic isokinetic algorithm for multiple time-step molecular dynamics calculations using a polarizable model based on fluctuating dipoles. The scheme developed here employs two sets of induced dipole moments, specifically, those associated with short-range interactions and those associated with a full set of interactions. The scheme is demonstrated on the polarizable AMOEBA water model. As was seen with fixed-charge models, we are able to obtain large time steps exceeding 100 fs, allowing calculations to be performed 10 to 20 times faster than standard thermostated molecular dynamics. PMID:27054809

  3. Childhood Vestibular Disorders: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Zarin; Stakiw, Daria B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that childhood disorders affecting the vestibular system, although rare, do exist. Describing symptoms associated with the vestibular mechanism for children may be difficult, resulting in misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing these conditions. The pathophysiology, symptoms, and management options of the more common…

  4. Childhood Vestibular Disorders: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Zarin; Stakiw, Daria B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that childhood disorders affecting the vestibular system, although rare, do exist. Describing symptoms associated with the vestibular mechanism for children may be difficult, resulting in misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing these conditions. The pathophysiology, symptoms, and management options of the more common

  5. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  6. Modulation of human vestibular reflexes with increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Horslen, Brian C; Dakin, Christopher J; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G

    2014-08-15

    Anxiety and arousal have been shown to facilitate human vestibulo-ocular reflexes, presumably through direct neural connections between the vestibular nuclei and emotional processing areas of the brain. However, the effects of anxiety, fear and arousal on balance-relevant vestibular reflexes are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to manipulate standing height to determine whether anxiety and fear can modulate the direct relationship between vestibular signals and balance reflexes during stance. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS; 2-25 Hz) was used to evoke ground reaction forces (GRF) while subjects stood in both LOW and HIGH surface height conditions. Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate the SVS-GRF relationship, in terms of coupling (coherence and cumulant density) and gain, in the medio-lateral (ML) and antero-posterior (AP) directions. The short- and medium-latency cumulant density peaks were both significantly increased in the ML and AP directions when standing in HIGH, compared to LOW, conditions. Likewise, coherence was statistically greater between 4.3 Hz and 6.7 Hz in the ML, and between 5.5 and 17.7 Hz in the AP direction. When standing in the HIGH condition, the gain of the SVS-GRF relationship was increased 81% in the ML direction, and 231% in the AP direction. The significant increases in coupling and gain observed in both experiments demonstrate that vestibular-evoked balance responses are augmented in states of height-induced postural threat. These data support the possibility that fear or anxiety-mediated changes to balance control are affected by altered central processing of vestibular information. PMID:24973412

  7. Modulation of human vestibular reflexes with increased postural threat

    PubMed Central

    Horslen, Brian C; Dakin, Christopher J; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and arousal have been shown to facilitate human vestibulo-ocular reflexes, presumably through direct neural connections between the vestibular nuclei and emotional processing areas of the brain. However, the effects of anxiety, fear and arousal on balance-relevant vestibular reflexes are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to manipulate standing height to determine whether anxiety and fear can modulate the direct relationship between vestibular signals and balance reflexes during stance. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS; 2–25 Hz) was used to evoke ground reaction forces (GRF) while subjects stood in both LOW and HIGH surface height conditions. Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate the SVS–GRF relationship, in terms of coupling (coherence and cumulant density) and gain, in the medio-lateral (ML) and antero-posterior (AP) directions. The short- and medium-latency cumulant density peaks were both significantly increased in the ML and AP directions when standing in HIGH, compared to LOW, conditions. Likewise, coherence was statistically greater between 4.3 Hz and 6.7 Hz in the ML, and between 5.5 and 17.7 Hz in the AP direction. When standing in the HIGH condition, the gain of the SVS–GRF relationship was increased 81% in the ML direction, and 231% in the AP direction. The significant increases in coupling and gain observed in both experiments demonstrate that vestibular-evoked balance responses are augmented in states of height-induced postural threat. These data support the possibility that fear or anxiety-mediated changes to balance control are affected by altered central processing of vestibular information. PMID:24973412

  8. Effect of stochastic resonance whole body vibration on functional performance in the frail elderly: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jessica; Radlinger, Lorenz; Baur, Heiner; Rogan, Slavko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and the effect size of a four-week stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) intervention on functional performance and strength in frail elderly individuals. Twenty-seven participants have been recruited and randomly distributed in an intervention group (IG) and a sham group (SG). Primary outcomes were feasibility objectives like recruitment, compliance and safety. Secondary outcomes were short physical performance battery (SPPB), isometric maximum voluntary contraction (IMVC) and isometric rate of force development (IRFD). The intervention was feasible and safe. Furthermore it showed significant effects (p=0.035) and medium effect size (0.43) within the IG in SPPB. SR-WBV training over four weeks with frail elderly individuals is a safe intervention method. The compliance was good and SR-WBV intervention seems to improve functional performance. Further research over a longer time frame for the strength measurements (IMVC and IRFD) is needed to detect potential intervention effects in the force measurements as well. Clinical Trial register: NTC01704976. PMID:25042993

  9. First cross-correlation analysis of interferometric and resonant-bar gravitational-wave data for stochastic backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgamy, M.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McCaulley, B. J.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Miller, P.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moody, V.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nettles, D.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Paik, H.-J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Weaver, J.; Webber, D.; Weber, A.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2007-07-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant-bar detector, taken during LIGO’s fourth science run, were examined for cross correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850 950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Ωgw(f)≤1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational-wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5×10-23Hz-1/2. In the traditional units of h1002Ωgw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, 2 orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  10. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  11. Role of the Insula and Vestibular System in Patients with Chronic Subjective Dizziness: An fMRI Study Using Sound-Evoked Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Indovina, Iole; Riccelli, Roberta; Chiarella, Giuseppe; Petrolo, Claudio; Augimeri, Antonio; Giofrè, Laura; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Staab, Jeffrey P.; Passamonti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD) is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence), long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD. We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC. We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients with CSD. Furthermore, altered connectivity between the anterior insula and middle occipital cortex may underlie the greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation in CSD patients relative to controls. PMID:26696853

  12. Gain in stochastic resonance: Precise numerics versus linear response theory beyond the two-mode approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado-Pascual, Jesús; Denk, Claus; Gómez-Ordóñez, José; Morillo, Manuel; Hänggi, Peter

    2003-03-01

    In the context of the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), we study the correlation function, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the ratio of output over input SNR, i.e., the gain, which is associated to the nonlinear response of a bistable system driven by time-periodic forces and white Gaussian noise. These quantifiers for SR are evaluated using the techniques of linear response theory (LRT) beyond the usually employed two-mode approximation scheme. We analytically demonstrate within such an extended LRT description that the gain can indeed not exceed unity. We implement an efficient algorithm, based on work by Greenside and Helfand (detailed in the Appendix), to integrate the driven Langevin equation over a wide range of parameter values. The predictions of LRT are carefully tested against the results obtained from numerical solutions of the corresponding Langevin equation over a wide range of parameter values. We further present an accurate procedure to evaluate the distinct contributions of the coherent and incoherent parts of the correlation function to the SNR and the gain. As a main result we show for subthreshold driving that both the correlation function and the SNR can deviate substantially from the predictions of LRT and yet the gain can be either larger or smaller than unity. In particular, we find that the gain can exceed unity in the strongly nonlinear regime which is characterized by weak noise and very slow multifrequency subthreshold input signals with a small duty cycle. This latter result is in agreement with recent analog simulation results by Gingl et al. [ICNF 2001, edited by G. Bosman (World Scientific, Singapore, 2002), pp. 545 548; Fluct. Noise Lett. 1, L181 (2001)].

  13. Frequency adaptation in controlled stochastic resonance utilizing delayed feedback method: two-pole approximation for response function.

    PubMed

    Tutu, Hiroki

    2011-06-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) enhanced by time-delayed feedback control is studied. The system in the absence of control is described by a Langevin equation for a bistable system, and possesses a usual SR response. The control with the feedback loop, the delay time of which equals to one-half of the period (2π/Ω) of the input signal, gives rise to a noise-induced oscillatory switching cycle between two states in the output time series, while its average frequency is just smaller than Ω in a small noise regime. As the noise intensity D approaches an appropriate level, the noise constructively works to adapt the frequency of the switching cycle to Ω, and this changes the dynamics into a state wherein the phase of the output signal is entrained to that of the input signal from its phase slipped state. The behavior is characterized by power loss of the external signal or response function. This paper deals with the response function based on a dichotomic model. A method of delay-coordinate series expansion, which reduces a non-Markovian transition probability flux to a series of memory fluxes on a discrete delay-coordinate system, is proposed. Its primitive implementation suggests that the method can be a potential tool for a systematic analysis of SR phenomenon with delayed feedback loop. We show that a D-dependent behavior of poles of a finite Laplace transform of the response function qualitatively characterizes the structure of the power loss, and we also show analytical results for the correlation function and the power spectral density. PMID:21797301

  14. Partial Recovery of Audiological, Vestibular, and Radiological Findings following Spontaneous Intralabyrinthine Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pézier, Thomas; Hegemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and sudden vestibular loss vary widely between units. With the increasing access to both magnetic resonance imaging and objective vestibular testing, our understanding of the various aetiologies at hand is increasing. Despite this, the therapeutic options are limited and without a particularly strong evidence base. We present a rare, yet increasingly diagnosed, case of intralabyrinthine haemorrhage (ILH) together with radiological, audiological, and vestibular test results. Of note, this occurred spontaneously and has shown partial recovery in all the mentioned modalities. PMID:24455375

  15. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  16. Vestibular Interactions in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Rajiv; Protti, Dario A.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the vast majority of all information en route to the cerebral cortex must first pass through the thalamus. The long held view that the thalamus serves as a simple hi fidelity relay station for sensory information to the cortex, however, has over recent years been dispelled. Indeed, multiple projections from the vestibular nuclei to thalamic nuclei (including the ventrobasal nuclei, and the geniculate bodies)- regions typically associated with other modalities- have been described. Further, some thalamic neurons have been shown to respond to stimuli presented from across sensory modalities. For example, neurons in the rat anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei of the thalamus respond to visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and somatosensory stimuli and integrate this information to compute heading within the environment. Together, these findings imply that the thalamus serves crucial integrative functions, at least in regard to vestibular processing, beyond that imparted by a “simple” relay. In this mini review we outline the vestibular inputs to the thalamus and provide some clinical context for vestibular interactions in the thalamus. We then focus on how vestibular inputs interact with other sensory systems and discuss the multisensory integration properties of the thalamus. PMID:26696836

  17. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about age-related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities such as standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multisensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper, we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multisensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults. PMID:26779116

  18. Vestibular Deficits Following Youth Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Master, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the prevalence and recovery of pediatric patients with concussion who manifest clinical vestibular deficits, and to describe the correlation of these deficits with neurocognitive function, based on computerized neurocognitive testing, in a sample of pediatric patients with concussion. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients age 5–18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from 7/1/2010–12/31/2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits was obtained, and all related visits for those patients were reviewed. Results 247 patients were chosen from 3740 eligible visits for detailed review and abstraction. 81% showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical exam. Those patients with vestibular signs on initial exam took a significantly longer time to return to school (median 59 days vs. 6 days, p=0.001) or to be fully cleared (median 106 days vs. 29 days, p=0.001). They additionally scored more poorly on initial computerized neurocognitive testing, and took longer for neurocognitive deficits to recover. Those patients with three or more prior concussions had a higher prevalence of vestibular deficits and took longer for those deficits to resolve. Conclusion Vestibular deficits in children and adolescents with a history of concussion are highly prevalent. These deficits appear to be associated with extended recovery times and poorer performance on neurocognitive testing. Further studies evaluating the effectiveness of vestibular therapy on improving such deficits are warranted. PMID:25748568

  19. Neuropharmacology of Vestibular System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and drug mechanisms of action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulator receptors and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. A critical review of the pharmacology and highlights of the major advances are discussed in each case. PMID:20808544

  20. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  1. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Hung-Ching; Lee, Guo-She

    2014-01-01

    Background Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT). In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT) system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g) with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC) between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05). The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old. Conclusion Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with age, and the function of visual-vestibulo-ocular reflex declined 10 years earlier than the function of vestibulo-ocular reflex. PMID:25214774

  2. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu-Bo; Yu, Chun-Jiang; Ji, Hong-Ming; Qu, Yan-Ming; Chen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS), as a method for predicting hearing prognosis, has not been systematically considered. The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN). This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test, and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation. Methods: A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively. Each patient received a caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test, and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week, 3, and 6 months, postoperatively. All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach. During the operation, the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon. Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106, 35.80%). These patients were not subsequently evaluated. In 26 patients (nine females, seventeen males), tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females, 24 males), tumors arose from the IVN. Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors, the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study. Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors, whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors. Conclusions: Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN. These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery. Using this information, we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients. PMID:26996474

  3. Vestibular dysfunction in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Frohman, E M; Tusa, R; Mark, A S; Cornblath, D R

    1996-04-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has occasionally been associated with clinical or laboratory evidence (magnetic resonance imaging,[MRI], visual evoked response, and brainstem auditory evoked response [BAER] of cranial neuropathy. In most cases, the relationship of cranial nerve involvement to CIDP remains unclear. A 45-year-old woman noted foot numbness, limb weakness, gait and postural instability, and oscillopsia. An IgG kappa monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance was found. Bilateral vestibulopathy was documented by clinical examination, bithermal calorics, rotary chair testing, BAERs, and dynamic posturography. MRI with gadolinium demonstrated enhancement of cranial nerve VIII bilaterally. Over the next 6 years, the patients's relapsing and remitting course of CIDP and vestibulopathy was assessed by quantitative muscle and vestibular function testing (clinically and neurophysiologically), and dynamic visual acuity. There was a striking synchronization between her CIDP and vestibulopathy with respect to clinical course including relapses and responses to immune therapy. The response to therapy, and evidence derived from clinical and laboratory investigations, suggest that the vestibular dysfunction was immune mediated. PMID:8619531

  4. [Inferior vestibular neuritis: diagnosis using VEMP].

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Repik, I

    2012-02-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are a new method to establish the functional status of the otolith organs. The sacculocollic reflex of the cervical VEMP to air conduction (AC) reflects predominantly saccular function due to saccular afferents to the inferior vestibular nerve. We describe a case of inferior vestibular neuritis as a rare differential diagnosis of vestibular neuritis. Clinical signs were a normal caloric response, unilaterally absent AC cVEMPs and bilaterally preserved ocular VEMPs (AC oVEMPs). PMID:22037927

  5. Compensation Following Bilateral Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew A.; Yates, Bill J.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10?days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained. PMID:22207864

  6. Habituation of vestibular responses: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    An historical survey of vestibular habituation experiments has been undertaken. Methodological problems are presented briefly, and the influence of arousal on vestibular responses is detailed. Data obtained from animals and from man are treated separately. At least for man, the term habituation may be better defined by a dynamic change in the form of vestibular responses than by a simple response reduction.

  7. Brainstem abnormalities and vestibular nerve enhancement in acute Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Borreliosis is a widely distributed disease. Neuroborreliosis may present with unspecific symptoms and signs and often remains difficult to diagnose in patients with central nervous system symptoms, particularly if the pathognomonic erythema chronica migrans does not develop or is missed. Thus, vigilance is mandatory in cases with atypical presentation of the disease and with potentially severe consequences if not recognized early. We present a patient with neuroborreliosis demonstrating brain stem and vestibular nerve abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. Case presentation A 28-year-old Caucasian female presented with headaches, neck stiffness, weight loss, nausea, tremor, and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T2-weighted hyperintense signal alterations in the pons and in the vestibular nerves as well as bilateral post-contrast enhancement of the vestibular nerves. Serologic testing of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. Conclusion Patients infected with neuroborreliosis may present with unspecific neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging as a noninvasive imaging tool showing signal abnormalities in the brain stem and nerve root enhancement may help in establishing the diagnosis. PMID:24359885

  8. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of the round window membrane can, for example, also be caused by an implosive inner ear barotrauma during the decompression phase of diving. Dehiscence of the anterior semicircular canal, a relatively rare disorder, can be treated conservatively (avoiding stimuli which cause dizziness), by non-ablative „resurfacing" or by „plugging" the semicircular canal. A perilymph fistula can cause a Tullio-phenomenon resulting from a traumatic dislocation or hypermobility of the stapes, which can be surgically corrected. Vestibular disorders can also result from otosurgical therapy. When balance disorders persist following stapedectomy it is necessary to carry out a revision operation in order to either exclude a perilymph fistula or shorten the piston. Surgically reducing the size of open mastoid cavities (using for example porous hydroxylapatite or cartilage) can result in a reduction of vertiginous symptoms while nursing or during exposure to ambient air. Vestibular disturbances can occur both before and after vestibular nerve surgery (acoustic neuroma). Initially, good vestibular compensation can be expected after surgically removing the acoustic neuroma. An aberrant regeneration of nerve fibers of the vestibulocochlear nerve has been suggested as a cause for secondary worsening. Episodes of vertigo can be caused by an irritation of the vestibular nerve (vascular loop). Neurovascular decompression is generally regarded as the best surgical therapy. In the elderly, vestibular disturbances can severely limit quality of life and are often aggravated by multiple comorbidities. Antivertiginous drugs (e.g. dimenhydrinate) in combination with movement training can significantly reduce symptoms. Administering antivertiginous drugs over varying periods of time (e.g. transdermal scopolamine application via patches) as well as kinetosis training can be used as both prophylactically and as a therapy for kinetosis. Exposure training should be used as a prophylactic for height vertigo. PMID:22073053

  9. Multi-frequency weak signal detection based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongying; li, Pei; An, Shujun; Shi, Peiming

    2016-03-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. A novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting multi-frequency signals buried under heavy background noise is proposed based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance (SR). First, the noisy signal is processed by parameter compensation, with the noise and system parameters expanded 10 times to counteract the effect of the damping term. The processed signal is decomposed into multiple signals of different scale frequencies by wavelet transform. Following this, we adjust the size of the scaled signals' amplitudes and reconstruct the signals; the weak signal frequency components are then enhanced by multi-stable stochastic resonance. The enhanced components of the signal are processed through a band-pass filter, leaving the enhanced sections of the signal. The processed signal is analyzed by FFT to achieve detection of the multi-frequency weak signals. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can enhance the signal amplitude, can effectively detect multi-frequency weak signals buried under heavy noise and is valuable and usable for bearing fault signal analysis.

  10. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in vestibular schwannoma and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Giannuzzi, Annalisa; Astore, Serena; Trabalzini, Franco; Nuti, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the incidence and characteristics of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVN) in 49 patients with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging evidence of vestibular schwannoma and 53 patients with idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and normal radiological findings. The sensitivity and specificity of the hyperventilation test were compared with other audio-vestibular diagnostic tests (bedside examination of eye movements, caloric test, auditory brainstem responses) in the two groups of patients. The hyperventilation test scored the highest diagnostic efficiency (sensitivity 65.3 %; specificity 98.1 %) of the four tests in the differential diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma and idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Small tumors with a normal caloric response or caloric paresis were associated with ipsilateral HVN and larger tumors and severe caloric deficits with contralateral HVN. These results confirm that the hyperventilation test is a useful diagnostic test for predicting vestibular schwannoma in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:23108420

  11. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information. PMID:26098730

  12. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations. PMID:25992076

  13. Vestibular Stimulation for Stress Management in Students

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although several methods are developed to alleviate stress among college students, logistic limitations in adopting them have limited their utility. Aim Hence, we aimed to test a very practical approach to alleviate stress among college students by achieving vestibular stimulation using swings. Materials and Methods In this study 60 male and female participants were randomly assigned into vestibular stimulation or control groups. Depression, anxiety, stress scores, sleep quality, heart rate, blood pressure, Autonomic functions, respiratory, haematological, cognitive function, Quality of life were recorded before and after 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th days of vestibular stimulation. Results STAI S and STAI T scores were significantly improved on day 28th following vestibular stimulation. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were significantly decreased and remained within normal limits in vestibular group on day 28th following vestibular stimulation. Postural fall in blood pressure was significantly improved on day 14 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. Respiratory rate was significantly improved on day 7 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. PSQI sleep disturbance, PSQI sleep latency, PSQI total score and bleeding time was significantly improved following vestibular stimulation. Conclusion Our study supports the adoption of vestibular stimulation for stress management. Hence, placement of swings in college campuses must be considered, which may be a simple approach to alleviate stress among college students. PMID:27042457

  14. Visual mental imagery during caloric vestibular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Fred W.; Merfeld, Daniel M.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated high-resolution mental imagery and mental rotation, while the participants received caloric vestibular stimulation. High-resolution visual mental imagery tasks have been shown to activate early visual cortex, which is deactivated by vestibular input. Thus, we predicted that vestibular stimulation would disrupt high-resolution mental imagery; this prediction was confirmed. In addition, mental rotation tasks have been shown to activate posterior parietal cortex, which is also engaged in the processing of vestibular stimulation. As predicted, we also found that mental rotation is impaired during vestibular stimulation. In contrast, such stimulation did not affect performance of a low-imagery control task. These data document previously unsuspected interactions between the vestibular system and the high-level visual system. PMID:15896815

  15. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95?mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  16. Interaction of somatoform and vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Best, C; Eckhardt‐Henn, A; Diener, G; Bense, S; Breuer, P; Dieterich, M

    2006-01-01

    Background The high coincidence of organic vestibular and somatoform vertigo syndromes has appeared to support pathogenic models showing a strong linkage between them. It was hypothesised that a persisting vestibular dysfunction causes the development of anxiety disorders. Objective To determine the relation between vestibular deficits and somatoform vertigo disorders in an interdisciplinary prospective study. Methods Participants were divided into eight diagnostic groups: healthy volunteers (n = 26) and patients with benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV, n = 11), vestibular neuritis (n = 11), Menière's disease (n = 7), vestibular migraine (n = 15), anxiety (n = 23), depression (n = 12), or somatoform disorders (n = 22). Neuro‐otological diagnostic procedures included electro‐oculography with rotatory and caloric testing, orthoptic examination with measurements of subjective visual vertical (SVV) and ocular torsion, and a neurological examination. Psychosomatic diagnostic procedures comprised interviews and psychometric instruments. Results Patients with BPPV (35.3%) and with vestibular neuritis (52.2%) had pathological test values on caloric irrigation (p<0.001). Otolith dysfunction with pathological tilts of SVV and ocular torsion was found only in patients with vestibular neuritis (p<0.001). Patients with Menière's disease, vestibular migraine, and psychiatric disorders showed normal parameters for vestibular testing but pathological values for psychometric measures. There was no correlation between pathological neurological and pathological psychometric parameters. Conclusions High anxiety scores are not a result of vestibular deficits or dysfunction. Patients with Menière's disease and vestibular migraine but not vestibular deficits showed the highest psychiatric comorbidity. Thus the course of vertigo syndromes and the possibility of a pre‐existing psychopathological personality should be considered pathogenic factors in any linkage between organic and psychometric vertigo syndromes. PMID:16614028

  17. [Spectrum analysis of vestibular nystagmus].

    PubMed

    Telezhnikov, A V; Bazarov, V G; Savchuk, L A; Beliakova, I A; Kaduk, V G

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for the spectral analysis of nystagmograms obtained by rotary stimulation with the rate of 180 degrees/s for 20 s has been developed with the aim to reveal the most typical changes in the vestibular nystagmus with one or another form of the cochleovestibular pathology. A signal recorded in the analogous form was processed by computer EC-1022. Periodograms were calculated by the method of the fast Fourier transform and periodogram smoothing by averaging of realization sites. In case of Ménière's disease the third harmonic was not recorded on periodograms when right and left labyrinths were stimulated and in the case of neurites of acoustic nerves, the third or fifth harmonic was not observed. A supposition is advanced that the third harmonic reflects the state of the peripheral area of the vestibular analyzer, while the fifth harmonic--the central one. PMID:2785934

  18. Vestibular Function Research aboard Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, R. W.; Daunton, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    NASA is planning to perform a series of Vestibular Function Research (VFR) investigations on the early STS missions to investigate those neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome. The first flight is scheduled for the 1981 Spacelab III Mission in which four frog specimens, mounted on a frog tilting/centrifuge device, will be subjected to periodic acceleration stimuli and periods of artificial gravity. The vestibular nerve firing responses of each frog specimen will be monitored through implanted neutral bouyancy microelectrodes and transmitted to the ground for quick analysis during the flight. The experimentation will be directed at investigating: (1) adaptation to weightlessness; (2) response to acceleration stimuli; (3) response to artificial gravity (in a weightlessness environment) and (4) readaptation to earth's gravity upon return.

  19. Molecular aging of the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Brosel, Sonja; Laub, Christoph; Averdam, Anne; Bender, Andreas; Elstner, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Dizziness and imbalance frequently affect the elderly and contribute to falls and frailty. In many geriatric patients, clinical testing uncovers a dysfunction of the vestibular system, but no specific etiology can be identified. Neuropathological studies have demonstrated age-related degeneration of peripheral and central vestibular neurons, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In contrast, recent studies into age-related hearing loss strongly implicate mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death of cochlear hair cells. While some data suggest that analogous biological pathomechanisms may underlie vestibular dysfunction, actual proof is missing. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular causes of vestibular dysfunction. PMID:26739358

  20. Movement Symmetries and the Mammalian Vestibular System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, Gin; Boyle, Richard

    2000-03-01

    Unity of movement requires vertebrates to have an ability to symmetrize along the midline. For example, human erect stance involves symmetry with respect to gravity. The mammalian vestibular system provides a mechanism for maintaining symmetries, which is also open to influence and adaptation by the rest of the organism. The vestibular system includes the inner ear endorgans and central nuclei, along with projections to oculomotor, cerebellar, thalamic, and spinal motor centers. The vestibular endorgans - the semicircular canals and the otoliths - use sensory hairs to register inertia. The vestibular endorgans are right-left symmetric and the semicircular canals form an approximately orthogonal coordinate system for angular motion. Primary afferent axons project from the endorgans to the vestibular nuclei (and a few other places). The vestibular nuclei integrate vestibular, visual, and somatosensory signals, along with a proposed copy of the voluntary motor command and signals from other central structures. The relationship between the canals and the otoliths gives rise to symmetries among neurons, in the organization among the several vestibular nuclei, and in the projections from the vestibular nuclei. These symmetries organize the space of body movements so that functional relationships are maintained in spite of the many free variables of body movement. They also provide a foundation for adaptive reinterpretation of the relationship between canal and otolith signals, for example in freefall.

  1. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  2. Prosthetic implantation of the human vestibular system

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Justin S.; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Nowack, Amy; Shepherd, Sarah J.; Bierer, Steven M.; Jameyson, Elyse; Kaneko, Chris R. S.; Phillips, James O.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis A functional vestibular prosthesis can be implanted in human such that electrical stimulation of each semicircular canal produces canal-specific eye movements while preserving vestibular and auditory function. Background A number of vestibular disorders could be treated with prosthetic stimulation of the vestibular end organs. We have previously demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that a vestibular neurostimulator, based on the Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant, can produce canal-specific electrically evoked eye movements while preserving auditory and vestibular function. An investigational device exemption has been obtained from the FDA to study the feasibility of treating uncontrolled Ménière’s disease with the device. Methods The UW/Nucleus vestibular implant was implanted in the perilymphatic space adjacent to the three semicircular canal ampullae of a human subject with uncontrolled Ménière’s disease. Pre and postoperative vestibular and auditory function were assessed. Electrically evoked eye movements were measured at two time points postoperatively. Results Implantation of all semicircular canals was technically feasible. Horizontal canal and auditory function were largely, but not totally, lost. Electrode stimulation in two of three canals resulted in canal-appropriate eye movements. Over time, stimulation thresholds increased. Conclusions Prosthetic implantation of the semicircular canals in humans is technically feasible. Electrical stimulation resulted in canal-specific eye movements, although thresholds increased over time. Preservation of native auditory and vestibular function, previously observed in animals, was not demonstrated in a single subject with advanced Ménière’s disease. PMID:24317220

  3. Occupational noise induced vestibular malfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Hinchcliffe, R; Coles, R R; King, P F

    1992-01-01

    This paper comprises a review of the evidence for the possibility that exposure to noise may damage the vestibular receptors in the internal ear as well as those in the cochlea. The review covers lay and medical publications, observations on patients, experimental studies, and compensation claims. It concludes that the verdict must be "not proven"--that is, although such damage is possible, the evidence is not strong enough to regard it as probable. PMID:1733458

  4. Changing perspective: The role of vestibular signals.

    PubMed

    Deroualle, Diane; Borel, Liliane; Devèze, Arnaud; Lopez, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Social interactions depend on mechanisms such as the ability to take another person's viewpoint, i.e. visuo-spatial perspective taking. However, little is known about the sensorimotor mechanisms underpinning perspective taking. Because vestibular signals play roles in mental rotation and spatial cognition tasks and because damage to the vestibular cortex can disturb egocentric perspective, vestibular signals stand as important candidates for the sensorimotor foundations of perspective taking. Yet, no study merged natural full-body vestibular stimulations and explicit visuo-spatial perspective taking tasks in virtual environments. In Experiment 1, we combined natural vestibular stimulation on a rotatory chair with virtual reality to test how vestibular signals are processed to simulate the viewpoint of a distant avatar. While they were rotated, participants tossed a ball to a virtual character from the viewpoint of a distant avatar. Our results showed that vestibular signals influence perspective taking in a direction-specific way: participants were faster when their physical body rotated in the same direction as the mental rotation needed to take the avatar's viewpoint. In Experiment 2, participants realized 3D object mental rotations, which did not involve perspective taking, during the same whole-body vestibular stimulation. Our results demonstrated that vestibular stimulation did not affect 3D object mental rotations. Altogether, these data indicate that vestibular signals have a direction-specific influence on visuo-spatial perspective taking (self-centered mental imagery), but not a general effect on mental imagery. Findings from this study suggest that vestibular signals contribute to one of the most crucial mechanisms of social cognition: understanding others' actions. PMID:26311354

  5. Compensation of Vestibular Function and Plasticity of Vestibular Nucleus after Unilateral Cochleostomy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Hyun, Jaihwan; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Kim, Dong Woon; Park, Sung Jae; Choi, Jin Woong; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo frequently occur after cochlear implantation (CI) surgery, particularly during the early stages. It could recover over time but some of the patients suffered from delayed or sustained vestibular symptoms after CI. This study used rat animal models to investigate the effect of unilateral cochleostomy on the vestibular organs over time. Twenty-seven Sprague Dawley rats underwent cochleostomy to evaluate the postoperative changes in hearing threshold, gain and symmetry of the vestibular ocular response, overall balance function, number of hair cells in the crista, and the c-Fos activity in the brainstem vestibular nucleus. Loss of vestibular function was observed during the early stages, but function recovered partially over time. Histopathological findings demonstrated a mild decrease in vestibular hair cells numbers. Increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the vestibular nucleus, observed in the early stages after cochleostomy, decreased over time. Cochleostomy is a risk factor for peripheral vestibular organ damage that can cause functional impairment in the peripheral vestibular organs. Altered vestibular nucleus activity may be associated with vestibular compensation and plasticity after unilateral cochleostomy. PMID:26881130

  6. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  7. Advances in Auditory and Vestibular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2010-01-01

    Auditory and Vestibular medicine is becoming more accepted as a specialty of its own, Medical NeurOtology. Recent advances in the field have been instrumental in the understanding of the scientific foundations, pathophysiology, clinical approach and management of patients with hearing and vestibular disorders. This paper will review these advances. PMID:20711412

  8. Incomplete segregation of endorgan-specific vestibular ganglion cells in mice and rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maklad, A.; Fritzsch, B.

    1999-01-01

    The endorgan-specific distribution of vestibular ganglion cells was studied in neonatal and postnatal rats and mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) and dextran amines for retrograde and anterograde labeling. Retrograde DiI tracing from the anterior vertical canal labeled neurons scattered throughout the whole superior vestibular ganglion, with denser labeling at the dorsal and central regions. Horizontal canal neurons were scattered along the dorsoventral axis with more clustering toward the dorsal and ventral poles of this axis. Utricular ganglion cells occupied predominantly the central region of the superior vestibular ganglion. This utricular population overlapped with both the anterior vertical and horizontal canals' ganglion cells. Posterior vertical canal neurons were clustered in the posterior part of the inferior vestibular ganglion. The saccular neurons were distributed in the two parts of the vestibular ganglion, the superior and inferior ganglia. Within the inferior ganglion, the saccular neurons were clustered in the anterior part. In the superior ganglion, the saccular neurons were widely scattered throughout the whole ganglion with more numerous neurons at the posterior half. Small and large neurons were labeled from all endorgans. Examination of the fiber trajectory within the superior division of the vestibular nerve showed no clear lamination of the fibers innervating the different endorgans. These results demonstrate an overlapping pattern between the different populations within the superior ganglion, while in the inferior ganglion, the posterior canal and saccular neurons show tighter clustering but incomplete segregation. This distribution implies that the ganglion cells are assigned for their target during development in a stochastic rather than topographical fashion.

  9. Vestibular assistance systems: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Perez Fornos, A; Guinand, N; van de Berg, R; Stokroos, R; Kingma, H

    2016-04-01

    The handicap resulting from a bilateral vestibular deficit is often underestimated. In most cases the deficit settles gradually. Patients do not understand what is happening to them and have many difficulties to describe their symptoms. They have to consult several doctors with different medical specialties before diagnosis. Once the diagnosis is made there is no biological way to "repair" the deficient vestibular apparatus and vestibular exercises are mildly effective. Attempts have been made to help patients using substitution devices replacing the defective vestibular information by tactile or acoustic cues. Currently, efforts are being made towards the development of a vestibular implant, conceptually similar to the cochlear implant for the rehabilitation of deaf patients. In recent years, several experiments on animal models have demonstrated the feasibility of this project. This paper reports the steps accomplished in human experiments and the main results obtained in our laboratory. PMID:27083882

  10. Vestibular tests in the selection of cosmonauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiczkowa, Janusza

    Vestibulo-vegetative disorders in cosmonauts and astronauts occurring during space flight compel otolaryngologists to search for vestibular tests enabling a precise evaluation of the activity of the vestibular apparatus and showing disposition to motion sickness. Otoneurological investigation of Polish candidates for cosmonaut status consisted of the following vestibular tests: caloric, rotatory, optokinetic, swinging torsion, statokinesimetric and vestibulo-vegetative. The value of various vestibular tests for aviation and space medicine is presented in this paper, taking into account the results of investigations of the equilibrium system with the group of pilots selected for space flight as well as extensive experience with candidates for the air service and also trained pilots and patients. The relatively frequent lack of correlation between the results of the applied tests, which renders difficult the proper evaluation of the equilibrium system, is emphasized in the paper. Finally, the results of investigations of acute habituation of the vestibular apparatus are discussed.

  11. Management of sporadic vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Matthew L; Link, Michael J; Wanna, George B; Driscoll, Colin L W

    2015-06-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) comprise 8% of all intracranial tumors and 90% of cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal neoplasms. Secondary to the widespread adoption of screening protocols for asymmetrical hearing loss and the increasing use of advanced imaging, the number of VS diagnosed each year continues to rise, while the average size has declined. Microsurgery remains the treatment of choice for large tumors, however the management of small- to medium-sized VS remains highly controversial with options including observation, radiotherapy, or microsurgery. Within this chapter, the authors provide an overview of the contemporary management of VS, reviewing important considerations and common controversies. PMID:25886814

  12. Prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in patients with vestibular schwannoma using video head-impulses and vestibular-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachael L; Kong, Jonathan; Flanagan, Sean; Pogson, Jacob; Croxson, Glen; Pohl, David; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2015-05-01

    We sought to investigate the utility of new non-invasive tests of semicircular-canal and otolith function that are usable in the neuro-otology office practice in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Fifty patients with vestibular schwannoma were assessed using a 5-item battery consisting of air-conducted cervical- and bone conducted ocular-vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (AC cVEMPs and BC oVEMPs) and video head impulse testing (vHIT) in all three canal planes. VEMP asymmetry ratios, latencies, and vHIT gains were used to determine the test sensitivity, relationship with tumour size and the pattern of vestibular nerve involvement. The percentage of abnormalities for each of the five tests for the entire sample ranged between 36.2-61.7%. In 58.3 % of patients, test abnormalities were referable to both superior and inferior vestibular nerve divisions. Selective inferior nerve dysfunction was identified in 10.4% and superior nerve dysfunction in 12.5%. The remaining 18.8% of patients demonstrated a normal test profile. The sensitivity of the 5-item battery increased with tumour size and all patients with medium to large (>14 mm) schwannoma had at least two abnormal vestibular test result. Our results indicate that dysfunction of the superior and inferior vestibular nerve evolves in parallel for most patients with schwannoma. Unexplained vHIT and VEMP asymmetry should alert otologists and neurologists to undertake imaging in patients presenting with non-specific disequilibrium or vertigo. PMID:25794859

  13. Endolymphatic space size in patients with vestibular migraine and Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takafumi; Yoshida, Tadao; Suga, Kenji; Kato, Masahiro; Otake, Hironao; Kato, Ken; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sone, Michihiko; Sugiura, Saiko; Kuno, Kayao; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Naganawa, Shinji; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    Ménière's disease (MD) is characterized by episodic vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and tinnitus. Vestibular migraine (VM) is a relatively new disorder that is characterized by episodic vertigo or dizziness, coexisting migraine and absence of hearing loss. It is occasionally difficult to distinguish between VM and vestibular MD with headache. Because endolymphatic hydrops (EH) is a characteristic sign of MD, we attempted to evaluate endolymphatic space size in both diseases. Endolymphatic space size in the vestibule and the cochlea was evaluated in seven patients with VM and in seven age- and sex-matched patients with vestibular MD. For visualization of the endolymphatic space, 3T magnetic resonance imaging was taken 4 h after intravenous injection of gadolinium contrast agents using three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and HYbriD of reversed image of positive endolymph signal and native image of positive perilymph signal techniques. In the vestibule of VM patients, EH was not observed, with the exception of two patients with unilateral or bilateral EH. In contrast, in the vestibule of patients with vestibular MD, all patients had significant EH, bilaterally or unilaterally. These results indicate that endolymphatic space size is significantly different between patients with VM and vestibular MD. PMID:25099513

  14. Clinical and Radiographic Factors Predicting Hearing Preservation Rates in Large Vestibular Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Daniel; Westerberg, Brian D; Dong, Charles; Akagami, Ryojo

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Postoperative hearing preservation rates for patients with large vestibular schwannomas range from 0 to 43%. The clinical and radiographic factors predicting hearing preservation in smaller vestibular schwannomas are well described; however, their importance in larger tumors is unclear. We investigated factors predicting hearing preservation in large vestibular schwannomas. Design Retrospective review. Setting Quaternary care academic center. Participants A total of 85 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas > 3 cm underwent retrosigmoid resections. Main Outcomes Measures Preoperative and postoperative serviceable hearing rates. Methods Clinical and radiographic data including preoperative and postoperative audiograms, preoperative symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging features, and postoperative facial weakness were analyzed. Results Hearing was preserved in 41% of patients (17 of 42) with preoperative serviceable hearing. Hypertension and diabetes increased the likelihood of preoperative hearing loss. Preoperative tinnitus predicted a lower likelihood of hearing preservation. No radiographic factors predicted hearing preservation; however, larger tumor size, smaller fourth ventricular width, and the presence of a cerebrospinal fluid cleft surrounding the tumor predicted postoperative facial weakness. Conclusion Systemic comorbidities may influence hearing loss preoperatively in patients with large vestibular schwannomas. The absence of tinnitus may reflect hearing reserve and propensity for hearing preservation. Preoperative radiographic features did not predict hearing preservation despite some associations with postoperative facial weakness. PMID:27175312

  15. Vestibular schwannoma and tuberculoma occurring In collision in the posterior fossa: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Mahore, Amit; Ramdasi, Raghvendra; Bhatjiwale, Mrudul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Though acoustic schwannoma is the most common primary tumour in the cerebello-pontine angle, its occurrence with tuberculoma has never been reported. Presentation of case A case of a vestibular schwannoma and tuberculoma occurring as collision tumors in the posterior fossa in a 46 years old female is reported. She presented with chronic raised intracranial pressure manifesting as headache, occasional diplopia, speech disturbance, and unsteady gait. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated a vestibular schwannoma and tuberculoma in the right cerebello-pontine angle. The lesions were resected through retro sigmoid route. The caudal mass was vestibular schwannoma while the rostral and medial portion was tuberculoma. Discussion The occurrence of a vestibular schwannoma and tuberculoma in collision has hitherto never been reported. The pathogenesis, surgical challenges and management of such a rare entity is discussed and the relevant literature is briefly reviewed. Conclusion The association of vestibular schwannoma and tuberculoma is rare. Surgical excision of lesions occurring in collision can be formidable. They require careful planning and strategy. PMID:26722713

  16. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, Paulus S.; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  17. Adaptive modification of vestibularly perceived rotation.

    PubMed

    Bloomberg, J; Melvill Jones, G; Segal, B

    1991-01-01

    Results from Bloomberg et al. (1991) led to the hypothesis that saccades which accompany the dark-tested vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) tend to move the eyes towards a vestibularly derived percept of an intended oculomotor goal: also that this is so even when that percept has been adaptively modified by suitably prolonged visual-vestibular conflict. The present experiments investigate these implications by comparing the combined VOR + saccade performance with a presumed "motor readout" of the normal and adaptively modified vestibular percept. The methods employed were similar to those of an earlier study Bloomberg et al. (1988) in which it was found that after cessation of a brief passive whole body rotation in the dark, a previously seen earth-fixed target can be accurately located by saccadic eye movements based on a vestibular memory of the preceding head rotation; the so-called "Vestibular Memory-Contingent Saccade" (VMCS) paradigm. The results showed that the vestibular perceptual response, as measured after rotation by means of the VMCS paradigm, was on average indistinguishable from the combined VOR + saccade response measured during rotation. Furthermore, this was so in both the normal and adapted states. We conclude that these findings substantiate the above hypothesis. The results incidentally reaffirm the adaptive modifiability of vestibular perception, emphasing the need for active maintenance of its proper calibration according to behavioural context. PMID:1855564

  18. Detachment stabilization with n/m=1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation field applied to the stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Devicea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Yamada, I.; Tamura, N.; Feng, Y.; Sato, K.; Goto, M.; Narushima, Y.; Akiyama, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Shoji, M.; Morita, S.; Peterson, B. J.; Funaba, H.; Ohyabu, N.; Narihara, K.; Morisaki, T.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; LHD Experimental Group; Reiter, D.

    2010-05-01

    It is found that the remnant island structure created by n/m=1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation field in the stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A. Komori et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104015 (2009)] has a stabilizing effect on formation of radiating plasma, realizing stably sustained divertor detachment operation with the core plasma being unaffected. The data from the several diagnostics, (profiles of electron temperature and density, radiation and temporal evolution of divertor particle flux) indicate selective cooling around X-point of the island and thus peaked radiation there, which is stabilized outside of the last closed flux surface throughout the detachment phase. The vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy measurements of high Z impurity (iron) emission shows significant decrease during the detachment, indicating core plasma decontamination. The results from the three-dimensional (3D) edge transport code, edge Monte Carlo 3D (EMC3) [Y. Feng et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 44, 57 (2004)]-EIRENE [D. Reiter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 172 (2005)] show similar tendency in the radiation pattern. The island size and its radial location are varied to investigate the magnetic topology effects on the detachment control. The divertor particle flux and neutral pressure exhibit intermittent oscillation as well as modification of recycling pattern during the detachment, which are found to reflect the island structure.

  19. Detachment stabilization with n/m=1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation field applied to the stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Yamada, I.; Tamura, N.; Sato, K.; Goto, M.; Narushima, Y.; Akiyama, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Shoji, M.; Morita, S.; Peterson, B. J.; Funaba, H.; Ohyabu, N.; Narihara, K.; Morisaki, T.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2010-05-15

    It is found that the remnant island structure created by n/m=1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation field in the stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A. Komori et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104015 (2009)] has a stabilizing effect on formation of radiating plasma, realizing stably sustained divertor detachment operation with the core plasma being unaffected. The data from the several diagnostics, (profiles of electron temperature and density, radiation and temporal evolution of divertor particle flux) indicate selective cooling around X-point of the island and thus peaked radiation there, which is stabilized outside of the last closed flux surface throughout the detachment phase. The vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy measurements of high Z impurity (iron) emission shows significant decrease during the detachment, indicating core plasma decontamination. The results from the three-dimensional (3D) edge transport code, edge Monte Carlo 3D (EMC3) [Y. Feng et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 44, 57 (2004)]-EIRENE [D. Reiter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 172 (2005)] show similar tendency in the radiation pattern. The island size and its radial location are varied to investigate the magnetic topology effects on the detachment control. The divertor particle flux and neutral pressure exhibit intermittent oscillation as well as modification of recycling pattern during the detachment, which are found to reflect the island structure.

  20. Progress Toward Development of a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis for Treatment of Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    FRIDMAN, GENE Y.; DELLA SANTINA, CHARLES C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation–inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices appropriate for use in clinical trials. PMID:23044664

  1. Progress toward development of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis for treatment of bilateral vestibular deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation-inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices appropriate for use in clinical trials. PMID:23044664

  2. Vestibular implants: Hope for improving the quality of life of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Guinand, N; van de Berg, R; Ranieri, M; Cavuscens, S; DiGiovanna, J; Nguyen, T A K; Micera, S; Stokroos, R; Kingma, H; Guyot, J P; Perez Fornos, A

    2015-08-01

    The vestibular system plays an essential role in crucial tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation. Currently, there is no effective treatment for a bilateral loss of the vestibular function (BVL). The quality of life of affected patients is significantly impaired. During the last decade, our group has explored the potential of using electrical stimulation to artificially restore the vestibular function. Our vestibular implant prototype consists of a custom modified cochlear implant featuring one to three vestibular electrodes implanted in the proximity of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve; in addition to the main cochlear array. Special surgical techniques for safe implantation of these devices have been developed. In addition, we have developed stimulation strategies to generate bidirectional eye movements as well as the necessary interfaces to capture the signal from a motion sensor (e.g., gyroscope) and use it to modulate the stimulation signals delivered to the vestibular nerves. To date, 24 vestibular electrodes have been implanted in 11 BVL patients. Using a virtual motion profile to modulate the "baseline" electrical stimulation, vestibular responses could be evoked with 21 electrodes. Eye movements with mean peak eye velocities of 32°/s and predominantly in the plane of the stimulated canal were successfully generated. These are within the range of normal compensatory eye movements during walking and were large enough to have a significant effect on the patients' visual acuity. These results indicate that electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve has a significant functional impact; eye movements generated this way could be sufficient to restore gaze stabilization during essential everyday tasks such as walking. The innovative concept of the vestibular implant has the potential to restore the vestibular function and have a central role in improving the quality of life of BVL patients in the near future. PMID:26737951

  3. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  4. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  5. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  6. The altered vestibular-evoked myogenic and whole-body postural responses in old men during standing.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian H; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Allen, Matti D; Rice, Charles L; Inglis, J Timothy

    2014-12-01

    Age-related decrements within the sensorimotor system may lead to alterations and impairments in postural control, but a link to a vestibular mechanism is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether vestibular control of standing balance is altered with adult aging. Eight old (~77 years) and eight young (~26 years) men stood without aids on a commercially available force plate with their head turned to the right, arms relaxed at their sides and eyes closed while receiving stochastic vestibular stimuli (0-25 Hz, root mean square amplitude=0.85 mA). Surface electromyography signals were sampled from the left soleus, medial gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior. Whole-body balance, as measured by the anteroposterior forces and muscle responses, was quantified using frequency (coherence and gain functions) and time (cumulant density function) domain correlations with the vestibular stimuli. Old men exhibited a compressed frequency response of the vestibular reflex with a greater relative gain at lower frequencies for the plantar flexors and anteroposterior forces than young. In the time domain, the peak amplitude of the short latency response was 45-64% lower for the plantar flexors and anteroposterior forces (p≤0.05) in the old than young, but not for the tibialis anterior (p=0.21). The old men had a 190% and 31% larger medium latency response for only the tibialis anterior and anteroposterior forces, respectively, than young (p≤0.01). A strong correlation between the tibialis anterior and the force response was also detected (r=0.80, p<0.01). In conclusion, net vestibular-evoked muscle responses led to smaller short and larger medium latency peak amplitudes in anteroposterior forces for the old. The present results likely resulted from a compressed and lower operational frequency range of the vestibular reflexes and the activation of additional muscles (tibialis anterior) to maintain standing balance. PMID:25456846

  7. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... of someone with EVA Left: MRI scan showing enlargement of the endolymphatic sac and duct (indicated by the arrow). Right: CT scan showing enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (indicated by the arrow). ...

  8. Vestibular function tests in children.

    PubMed Central

    Snashall, S E

    1983-01-01

    Vestibular function tests were performed on a series of 57 children between the ages of 1 and 16 years. Inattention and immaturity of eye movement control created difficulties in the analysis of the electronystagmography traces in some instances. With the eyes closed, spontaneous and positional nystagmus occurred in 20% of asymptomatic children and this was thought to be physiological. Changes in external ear pressure (fistula test) enhanced this spontaneous nystagmus. Smooth pursuit ataxia and optokinetic abnormalities were common in the children with reading disabilities and those with congenital deafness, and were thought to be soft neurological signs of brainstem dysfunction. The torsion swing chair test was acceptable and gave easily readable responses. Caloric abnormalities were very common in children with reading disabilities and provided useful information in those with congenital and acquired disorders of hearing and balance. It was concluded that normal data were required for children of all ages in order to improve our understanding of electronystagmography in children. PMID:6876045

  9. Dara vestibular equipment onboard MIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, P.; Kellig, A.; Hoffmann, H.-U.; Ruyters, G.

    We have described the vestibular and visuo-oculomotoric equipment which has been developed under various DARA contracts since 1991, and used aboard MIR in the frame of the following missions: • German MIR'92 mission (VOG) • Extensions to MIR '92, e.g. the use of VOG by V. Polyakov during his record stay in space from 1993 to 1994 • EUROMIR'94 (VOG) • EUROMIR'95 (VOG, OKS and BIVOG) • Joint German /Russian experiments in 1997/98 (BIVOG) The hardware is supplemented by various stimuli and measurements. New developments for a next generation BIVOG, which may become the Space Station 3D eye tracking system, have shortly been addressed.

  10. Basic Concepts in Understanding Recovery of Function in Vestibular Reflex Networks during Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Peusner, Kenna D.; Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C.

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and inputoutput connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation. PMID:22363316

  11. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    All 139 research papers published under this ten-year program are listed. Experimental work was carried out at the Ames Research Center involving man's sensitivity to rotational acceleration, and psychophysical functioning of the semicircular canals; vestibular-visual interactions and effects of other sensory systems were studied in flight simulator environments. Experiments also dealt with the neurophysiological vestibular functions of animals, and flight management investigations of man-vehicle interactions.

  12. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage. PMID:24298911

  13. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes

    PubMed Central

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage. PMID:24298911

  14. Outcome analysis of individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Angel, C. R.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Gianna, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of vestibular rehabilitation protocols in subjects with peripheral vestibular disorders compared with normal and abnormal control subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study using repeated measure, matched control design. Subjects were solicited consecutively according to these criteria: vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) sensory organization tests (SOTs) 5 and 6 and underwent rehabilitation; vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of SOTs 5 and 6 and did not undergo rehabilitation; and normal subjects (normal SOTs). SETTING: Tertiary neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Men and women over age 18 with chronic vestibular disorders and chief complaints of unsteadiness, imbalance, and/or motion intolerance, and normal subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Pre- and post-rehabilitation assessment included CDP, vestibular disability, and activities of daily living questionnaires. Individualized rehabilitation plans were designed and implemented to address the subject's specific complaints and functional deficits. Supervised sessions were held at weekly intervals, and self-administered programs were devised for daily home use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CDP composite and SOT scores, number of falls on CDP, and self-assessment questionnaire results. RESULTS: Subjects who underwent rehabilitation (Group A) showed statistically significant improvements in SOTs, overall composite score, and reduction in falls compared with abnormal (Group B) control groups. Group A's performances after rehabilitation were not significantly different from those of normal subjects (Group C) in SOTs 3 through 6, and close to normal on SOTs 1 and 2. Subjects in Group A also reported statistically significant symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome measures of vestibular protocol physical therapy confirmed objective and subjective improvement in subjects with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders. These findings support results reported by other investigators.

  15. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in a large series of vestibular patients.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Melillo, M G; Vassallo, A; Mazzone, S

    2011-02-01

    The Hyperventilation Test is widely used in the "bed-side examination" of vestibular patients. It can either activate a latent nystagmus in central or peripheral vestibular diseases or it can interact with a spontaneous nystagmus, by reducing it or increasing it. Aims of this study were to determine the incidence, patterns and temporal characteristics of Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in patients suffering from vestibular diseases, as well as its contribution to the differential diagnosis between vestibular neuritis and neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve, and its behaviour in some central vestibular diseases. The present study includes 1202 patients featuring, at vestibular examination, at least one sign of vestibular system disorders or patients diagnosed with a "Migraine-related vertigo" or "Chronic subjective dizziness". The overall incidence of Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus was 21.9%. It was detected more frequently in retrocochlear vestibular diseases rather than in end-organ vestibular diseases: 5.3% in Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, 37.1% in Menière's disease, 37.6% in compensated vestibular neuritis, 77.2% in acute vestibular neuritis and 91.7% in neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve. In acute vestibular neuritis, three HVIN patterns were observed: Paretic pattern: temporary enhancement of the spontaneous nystagmus; Excitatory pattern: temporary inhibition of the spontaneous nystagmus; Strong excitatory pattern: temporary inversion of the spontaneous nystagmus. Excitatory patterns proved to be time-dependent in that they disappeared and were replaced by the paretic pattern over a period of maximum 18 days since the beginning of the disorder. In acoustic neuroma, Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus was frequently observed (91.7%), either in the form of an excitatory pattern (fast phases towards the affected site) or in the form of a paretic pattern (fast phases towards the healthy side). The direction of the nystagmus is only partially related to tumour size, whereas other mechanisms, such as demyelination or a break in nerve fibres, might have an important role in triggering the situation. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus has frequently been detected in cases of demyelinating diseases and in cerebellar diseases: in multiple sclerosis, hyperventilation inhibits a central type of spontaneous nystagmus or evokes nystagmus in 75% of patients; in cerebellar diseases, hyperventilation evokes or enhances a central spontaneous nystagmus in 72.7% of patients. In conclusion the Hyperventilation Test can provide patterns of oculomotor responses that indicate a diagnostic investigation through cerebral magnetic resonance imaging enhanced by gadolinium, upon suspicion of neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve or of a central disease. In our opinion, however, Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus always needs to be viewed within the more general context of a complete examination of the vestibular and acoustic system. PMID:21808459

  16. On the recall of vestibular sensations.

    PubMed

    zu Eulenburg, Peter; Müller-Forell, W; Dieterich, M

    2013-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies on the recall or imagination of a distinctive task in the motor network or of sensations in sensory systems (visual, acoustic, nociceptive, gustatory, and olfactory) demonstrated that the respective primary cortex is often involved in the mental imagery process. Our aim was to examine this phenomenon in the vestibular system using fMRI. Sixteen healthy subjects were asked to remember the feeling of a rotatory chair procedure in contrast to an identical situation at rest. Shortly afterwards they were asked to recall the vestibular experience in a 1.5-T scanner. The resulting activations were then compared with the responses of a galvanic vestibular control experiment and a rest condition. The vestibular recall showed significant bihemispheric activations in the inferior frontal gyri, the anterior operculum, the middle cingulate, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the premotor motor cortex, and the anterior insula. We found activations in regions known to play a role in spatial referencing, motor programs, and attention in the recall of vestibular sensations. But important known relay stations for the cortical processing of vestibular information showed neither relevant activations nor deactivations. PMID:22367249

  17. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  18. Top-down approach to vestibular compensation: translational lessons from vestibular rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Gottshall, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation from a unified translational research perspective. Laboratory studies illustrate neurobiological principles of vestibular compensation at the molecular, cellular and systems levels in animal models that inform vestibular rehabilitation practice. However, basic research has been hampered by an emphasis on ‘naturalistic’ recovery, with time after insult and drug interventions as primary dependent variables. The vestibular rehabilitation literature, on the other hand, provides information on how the degree of compensation can be shaped by specific activity regimens. The milestones of the early spontaneous static compensation mark the re-establishment of static gaze stability, which provides a common coordinate frame for the brain to interpret residual vestibular information in the context of visual, somatosensory and visceral signals that convey gravitoinertial information. Stabilization of the head orientation and the eye orientation (suppression of spontaneous nystagmus) appear to be necessary by not sufficient conditions for successful rehabilitation, and define a baseline for initiating retraining. The lessons from vestibular rehabilitation in animal models offer the possibility of shaping the recovery trajectory to identify molecular and genetic factors that can improve vestibular compensation. PMID:22981400

  19. Dysconnectivity Within the Default Mode in First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Stochastic Dynamic Causal Modeling Study With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bastos-Leite, António J.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Silveira, Celeste; Norton, Andreia; Reis, Salomé; Friston, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first stochastic dynamic causal modeling (sDCM) study of effective connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) in schizophrenia. Thirty-three patients (9 women, mean age = 25.0 years, SD = 5) with a first episode of psychosis and diagnosis of schizophrenia—according to the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, revised criteria—were studied. Fifteen healthy control subjects (4 women, mean age = 24.6 years, SD = 4) were included for comparison. All subjects underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) interspersed with 2 periods of continuous picture viewing. The anterior frontal (AF), posterior cingulate (PC), and the left and right parietal nodes of the DMN were localized in an unbiased fashion using data from 16 independent healthy volunteers (using an identical fMRI protocol). We used sDCM to estimate directed connections between and within nodes of the DMN, which were subsequently compared with t tests at the between subject level. The excitatory effect of the PC node on the AF node and the inhibitory self-connection of the AF node were significantly weaker in patients (mean values = 0.013 and −0.048 Hz, SD = 0.09 and 0.05, respectively) relative to healthy subjects (mean values = 0.084 and −0.088 Hz, SD = 0.15 and 0.77, respectively; P < .05). In summary, sDCM revealed reduced effective connectivity to the AF node of the DMN—reflecting a reduced postsynaptic efficacy of prefrontal afferents—in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. PMID:24939881

  20. Depersonalisation/derealisation symptoms in vestibular disease

    PubMed Central

    Sang, F Yen Pik; Jáuregui‐Renaud, K; Green, D A; Bronstein, A M; Gresty, M A

    2006-01-01

    Background Depersonalisation is a subjective experience of unreality and detachment from the self often accompanied by derealisation; the experience of the external world appearing to be strange or unreal. Feelings of unreality can be evoked by disorienting vestibular stimulation. Objective To identify the prevalence of depersonalisation/derealisation symptoms in patients with peripheral vestibular disease and experimentally to induce these symptoms by vestibular stimulation. Methods 121 healthy subjects and 50 patients with peripheral vestibular disease participated in the study. For comparison with the patients a subgroup of 50 age matched healthy subjects was delineated. All completed (1) an in‐house health screening questionnaire; (2) the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ‐12); (3) the 28‐item depersonalisation/derealisation inventory of Cox and Swinson (2002). Experimental verification of “vestibular induced” depersonalisation/derealisation was assessed in 20 patients and 20 controls during caloric irrigation of the labyrinths. Results The frequency and severity of symptoms in vestibular patients was significantly higher than in controls. In controls the most common experiences were of “déjà vu” and “difficulty in concentrating/attending”. In contrast, apart from dizziness, patients most frequently reported derealisation symptoms of “feel as if walking on shifting ground”, “body feels strange/not being in control of self”, and “feel ‘spacey' or ‘spaced out'”. Items permitted discrimination between healthy subjects and vestibular patients in 92% of the cases. Apart from dizziness, caloric stimulation induced depersonalisation/derealisation symptoms which healthy subjects denied ever experiencing before, while patients reported that the symptoms were similar to those encountered during their disease. Conclusions Depersonalisation/derealisation symptoms are both different in quality and more frequent under conditions of non‐physiological vestibular stimulation. In vestibular disease, frequent experiences of derealisation may occur because distorted vestibular signals mismatch with the other sensory input to create an incoherent frame of spatial reference which makes the patient feel he or she is detached or separated from the world. PMID:16464901

  1. Vestibular dysfunction in DFNB1 deafness.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Kelley M; Blanton, Susan H; Welch, Katherine O; Norris, Virginia W; Nuzzo, Regina L; Wegelin, Jacob A; Marin, Ruth S; Nance, Walter E; Pandya, Arti; Arnos, Kathleen S

    2011-05-01

    Mutations of GJB2 and GJB6 (connexin-26 and 30) at the DFNB1 locus are the most common cause of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic deafness. Despite their widespread expression throughout the vestibular system, vestibular dysfunction has not been widely recognized as a commonly associated clinical feature. The observations of vertigo accompanying DFNB1 deafness in several large families prompted our hypothesis that vestibular dysfunction may be an integral, but often overlooked, component of DFNB1 deafness. Our aim was to define the prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in Cases of DFNB1 deafness and Controls with other forms of deafness. We developed and used a survey to assess symptoms of vestibular dysfunction, medical, and family history was distributed to Cases with deafness due to pathogenic GJB2 and/or GJB6 mutations and deaf Controls without DFNB1 deafness. Our results showed: Surveys were returned by 235/515 Cases (46%) with DFNB1 mutations and 121/321 Controls (38%) without these mutations. The mean age of Cases (41) was younger than Controls (51; P < 0.001). Vestibular dysfunction was reported by 127 (54%) of Cases and was present at significantly higher rates in Cases than in deaf Controls without DFNB1 deafness (P < 0.03). Most (63%) had to lie down in order for vertigo to subside, and 48% reported that vertigo interfered with activities of daily living. Vertigo was reported by significantly more Cases with truncating than non-truncating mutations and was also associated with a family history of dizziness. We conclude that vestibular dysfunction appears to be more common in DFNB1 deafness than previously recognized and affects activities of daily living in many patients. PMID:21465647

  2. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  3. Vestibular Dysfunction in DFNB1 deafness

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Kelley M; Blanton, Susan H; Welch, Katherine O; Norris, Virginia W; Nuzzo, Regina L; Wegelin, Jacob A.; Marin, Ruth S; Nance, Walter E; Pandya, Arti; Arnos, Kathleen S

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of GJB2 and GJB6 (connexin-26 and 30) at the DFNB1 locus are the most common cause of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic deafness. Despite their widespread expression throughout the vestibular system, vestibular dysfunction has not been widely recognized as a commonly associated clinical feature. The observations of vertigo accompanying DFNB1 deafness in several large families prompted our hypothesis that vestibular dysfunction may be an integral, but often overlooked, component of DFNB1 deafness. Our aim was to define the prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in Cases of DFNB1 deafness and Controls with other forms of deafness. We developed and used a survey to assess symptoms of vestibular dysfunction, medical, and family history was distributed to Cases with deafness due to pathogenic GJB2 and/or GJB6 mutations and deaf Controls without DFNB1 deafness. Our results showed: Surveys were returned by 235/515 Cases (46%) with DFNB1 mutations and 121/ 321 Controls (38%) without these mutations. The mean age of Cases (41) was younger than Controls (51; p<0.001). Vestibular dysfunction was reported by 127 (54%) of Cases and was present at significantly higher rates in Cases than in deaf Controls without DFNB1 deafness (p< 0.03). Most (63%) had to lie down in order for vertigo to subside, and 48% reported that vertigo interfered with activities of daily living. Vertigo was reported by significantly more Cases with truncating than non-truncating mutations and was also associated with a family history of dizziness. We conclude that vestibular dysfunction appears to be more common in DFNB1 deafness than previously recognized and affects activities of daily living in many patients. PMID:21465647

  4. Pharmacotherapy of vestibular disorders and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Michael; Kremmyda, Olympia; Brandt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are with a life-time prevalence of ~30% among the most common symptoms and are often associated with nystagmus or other oculomotor disorders. The prerequisite for a successful treatment is a precise diagnosis of the underlying disorder. In this overview, the current pharmacological treatment options for peripheral and central vestibular, cerebellar, and oculomotor disorders including nystagmus are described. There are basically seven groups of drugs that can be used (the "7 As"): antiemetics; anti-inflammatory, anti-Menière's, and antimigraine medications; antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and aminopyridines. In acute vestibular neuritis, recovery of the peripheral vestibular function can be improved by treatment with oral corticosteroids. In Menière's disease, a long-term high-dose treatment with betahistine-dihydrochloride (at least 48 mg three times daily) had a significant effect on the frequency of the attacks; the underlying mode of action is evidently an increase in inner-ear blood flow. The use of aminopyridines is a well-established therapeutic principle in the treatment of downbeat and upbeat nystagmus as well as episodic ataxia type 2 and cerebellar gait disorders. As was shown in animal experiments, these potassium channel blockers increase the activity and excitability and normalize irregular firing of cerebellar Purkinje cells. They evidently augment the inhibitory influence of these cells on vestibular and deep cerebellar nuclei. A few studies showed that baclofen improves periodic alternating nystagmus; gabapentin and memantine improve pendular and infantile nystagmus. However, many other eye-movement disorders such as ocular flutter, opsoclonus, central positioning, and see-saw nystagmus are still difficult to treat. Although substantial progress has been made, further state-of-the-art trials must still be performed on many vestibular and oculomotor disorders, namely Menière's disease, vestibular paroxysmia, vestibular migraine, and many forms of central eye-movement disorders. PMID:24057832

  5. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and some of our findings from their application. For example, our research has demonstrated that maculas of adult mammals retain the property of synaptic plasticity. Ribbon synapses increase numerically and undergo changes in type and distribution (p<0.0001) in type II hair cells after exposure to microgravity for as few as nine days. The finding of macular synaptic plasticity is pertinent to the clinic, and may help explain some. balance disorders in humans. The software used in our investigations will be demonstrated for those interested in applying it in their own research.

  6. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, Susan J.; Whitney, Susan L.; Cass, Stephen P.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Fife, Terry D.; Furman, Joseph M.; Getchius, Thomas S. D.; Goebel, Joel A.; Shepard, Neil T.; Woodhouse, Sheelah N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncompensated vestibular hypofunction results in postural instability, visual blurring with head movement, and subjective complaints of dizziness and/or imbalance. We sought to answer the question, “Is vestibular exercise effective at enhancing recovery of function in people with peripheral (unilateral or bilateral) vestibular hypofunction?” Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed in 5 databases published after 1985 and 5 additional sources for relevant publications were searched. Article types included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case control series, and case series for human subjects, published in English. One hundred thirty-five articles were identified as relevant to this clinical practice guideline. Results/Discussion: Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of benefit over harm, clinicians should offer vestibular rehabilitation to persons with unilateral and bilateral vestibular hypofunction with impairments and functional limitations related to the vestibular deficit. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of harm over benefit, clinicians should not include voluntary saccadic or smooth-pursuit eye movements in isolation (ie, without head movement) as specific exercises for gaze stability. Based on moderate evidence, clinicians may offer specific exercise techniques to target identified impairments or functional limitations. Based on moderate evidence and in consideration of patient preference, clinicians may provide supervised vestibular rehabilitation. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence, clinicians may prescribe a minimum of 3 times per day for the performance of gaze stability exercises as 1 component of a home exercise program. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence (range of supervised visits: 2-38 weeks, mean = 10 weeks), clinicians may consider providing adequate supervised vestibular rehabilitation sessions for the patient to understand the goals of the program and how to manage and progress themselves independently. As a general guide, persons without significant comorbidities that affect mobility and with acute or subacute unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week supervised sessions for 2 to 3 weeks; persons with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 4 to 6 weeks; and persons with bilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 8 to 12 weeks. In addition to supervised sessions, patients are provided a daily home exercise program. Disclaimer: These recommendations are intended as a guide for physical therapists and clinicians to optimize rehabilitation outcomes for persons with peripheral vestibular hypofunction undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. Video Abstract available for more insights from the author (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A124). PMID:26913496

  7. Stochastic games.

    PubMed

    Solan, Eilon; Vieille, Nicolas

    2015-11-10

    In 1953, Lloyd Shapley contributed his paper "Stochastic games" to PNAS. In this paper, he defined the model of stochastic games, which were the first general dynamic model of a game to be defined, and proved that it admits a stationary equilibrium. In this Perspective, we summarize the historical context and the impact of Shapley's contribution. PMID:26556883

  8. Stochastic games

    PubMed Central

    Solan, Eilon; Vieille, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In 1953, Lloyd Shapley contributed his paper “Stochastic games” to PNAS. In this paper, he defined the model of stochastic games, which were the first general dynamic model of a game to be defined, and proved that it admits a stationary equilibrium. In this Perspective, we summarize the historical context and the impact of Shapley’s contribution. PMID:26556883

  9. Auditory and Vestibular Issues Related to Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Richard W.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Human spaceflight provides unique opportunities to study human vestibular and auditory systems. This session will discuss 1) vestibular adaptive processes reflected by pronounced perceptual and motor coordination problems during, and after, space missions; 2) vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques (used to promote recovery after living in altered gravity environments) that may be relevant to treatment of vestibular disorders on earth; and 3) unique acoustical challenges to hearing loss prevention and crew performance during spaceflight missions.

  10. Longitudinal performance of an implantable vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Ling, Leo; Oxford, Trey; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Rubinstein, Jay T; Phillips, James O

    2015-04-01

    Loss of vestibular function may be treatable with an implantable vestibular prosthesis that stimulates semicircular canal afferents with biphasic pulse trains. Several studies have demonstrated short-term activation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) with electrical stimulation. Fewer long-term studies have been restricted to small numbers of animals and stimulation designed to produce adaptive changes in the electrically elicited response. This study is the first large consecutive series of implanted rhesus macaque to be studied longitudinally using brief stimuli designed to limit adaptive changes in response, so that the efficacy of electrical activation can be studied over time, across surgeries, canals and animals. The implantation of a vestibular prosthesis in animals with intact vestibular end organs produces variable responses to electrical stimulation across canals and animals, which change in threshold for electrical activation of eye movements and in elicited slow phase velocities over time. These thresholds are consistently lower, and the slow phase velocities higher, than those obtained in human subjects. The changes do not appear to be correlated with changes in electrode impedance. The variability in response suggests that empirically derived transfer functions may be required to optimize the response of individual canals to a vestibular prosthesis, and that this function may need to be remapped over time. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25245586

  11. Caloric vestibular stimulation modulates nociceptive evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick; Bottini, Gabriella; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Vestibular stimulation has been reported to alleviate central pain. Clinical and physiological studies confirm pervasive interactions between vestibular signals and somatosensory circuits, including nociception. However, the neural mechanisms underlying vestibular-induced analgesia remain unclear, and previous clinical studies cannot rule out explanations based on alternative, non-specific effects such as distraction or placebo. To investigate how vestibular inputs influence nociception, we combined caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) with psychophysical and electrocortical responses elicited by nociceptive-specific laser stimulation in humans (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs). Cold water CVS applied to the left ear resulted in significantly lower subjective pain intensity for experimental laser pain to the left hand immediately after CVS, relative both to before CVS and to 1 h after CVS. This transient reduction in pain perception was associated with reduced amplitude of all LEP components, including the early N1 wave reflecting the first arrival of nociceptive input to primary somatosensory cortex. We conclude that cold left ear CVS elicits a modulation of both nociceptive processing and pain perception. The analgesic effect induced by CVS could be mediated either by subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, or by direct modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex. PMID:26282602

  12. Sensorial countermeasures for vestibular spatial disorientation.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Aurore C; Quarck, Gaëlle; Denise, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Spatial disorientation is defined as an erroneous body orientation perceived by pilots during flights. Limits of the vestibular system provoke frequent spatial disorientation mishaps. Although vestibular spatial disorientation is experienced frequently in aviation, there is no intuitive countermeasure against spatial disorientation mishaps to date. The aim of this review is to describe the current sensorial countermeasures and to examine future leads in sensorial ergonomics for vestibular spatial disorientation. This work reviews: 1) the visual ergonomics, 2) the vestibular countermeasures, 3) the auditory displays, 4) the somatosensory countermeasures, and, finally, 5) the multisensory displays. This review emphasizes the positive aspects of auditory and somatosensory countermeasures as well as multisensory devices. Even if some aspects such as sensory conflict and motion sickness need to be assessed, these countermeasures should be taken into consideration for ergonomics work in the future. However, a recent development in aviation might offer new and better perspectives: unmanned aerial vehicles. Unmanned aerial vehicles aim to go beyond the physiological boundaries of human sensorial systems and would allow for coping with spatial disorientation and motion sickness. Even if research is necessary to improve the interaction between machines and humans, this recent development might be incredibly useful for decreasing or even stopping vestibular spatial disorientation. PMID:24834571

  13. Hippocampal Spatial Representations Require Vestibular Input

    PubMed Central

    Stackman, Robert W.; Clark, Ann S.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is essential for forming declarative representations of the relationships among multiple stimuli. The rodent hippocampal formation, including the entorhinal cortex and sub-icular complex, is critical for spatial memory. Two classes of hippocampal neurons fire in relation to spatial features. Place cells collectively map spatial locations, with each cell firing only when the animal occupies that cell’s “place field,” a particular subregion of the larger environment. Head direction (HD) cells encode directional heading, with each HD cell firing when the rat’s head is oriented in that cell’s particular “preferred firing direction.” Both landmarks and internal cues (e.g., vestibular, motor efference copy) influence place and HD cell activity. However, as is the case for navigation, landmarks are believed to exert greater influence over place and HD cell activity. Here we show that temporary inactivation of the vestibular system led to the disruption of location-specific firing in hippocampal place cells and direction-specific discharge of postsubicular HD cells, without altering motor function. Place and HD cell activity recovered over a time course similar to that of the restoration of vestibular function. These results indicate that vestibular signals provide an important influence over the expression of hippocampal spatial representations, and may explain the navigational deficits of humans with vestibular dysfunction. PMID:12099481

  14. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in peripheral vestibular structures and vestibular nuclear complex of rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F X; Pang, Y W; Zhang, M M; Zhang, T; Dong, Y L; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Li, J L; Li, Y Q

    2011-01-26

    Glutamate transmission from vestibular end organs to central vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) plays important role in transferring sensory information about head position and movements. Three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) have been considered so far the most specific markers for glutamatergic neurons/cells. In this study, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were immunohistochemically localized to axon terminals in VNC and somata of vestibular primary afferents in association with their central and peripheral axon endings, and VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 were co-localized to hair cells of otolith maculae and cristae ampullaris. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 defined three subsets of Scarpa's neurons (vestibular ganglionic neurons): those co-expressing VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 or expressing only VGLUT2, and those expressing neither. In addition, many neurons located in all vestibular subnuclei were observed to contain hybridized signals for VGLUT2 mRNA and a few VNC neurons, mostly scattered in medial vestibular nucleus (MVe), displayed VGLUT1 mRNA labelling. Following unilateral ganglionectomy, asymmetries of VGLUT1-immunoreactivity (ir) and VGLUT2-ir occurred between two VNCs, indicating that the VNC terminals containing VGLUT1 and/or VGLUT2 are partly of peripheral origin. The present data indicate that the constituent cells/neurons along the vestibular pathway selectively apply VGLUT isoforms to transport glutamate into synaptic vesicles for glutamate transmission. PMID:21081152

  15. Eye Movements as Indicators of Vestibular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Menshikova, Galina Ya; Kovalev, Artem I; Klimova, Oxana A; Chernorizov, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality technologies are in wide use in sport psychology. An advantage of this kind of technology is the possibility to assess sportspeople's readiness to perform complex movements. This study is aimed at developing a method for the evaluation of vestibular function disturbances in young skaters. Such disturbances may occur while skaters are performing rotation movements. To achieve this goal, we induced a vection illusion, accompanied by virtual environment rotation in a CAVE virtual reality system. Vestibular disturbances were tested for two groups-professional skaters and people who had very little or no skating experience. The quantitative evaluation of vestibular dysfunction was based on eye movement characteristics, which were recorded in subjects experiencing a vection illusion. PMID:26562924

  16. Vestibular function in HIV patients: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Giordano, L; Pistorio, V; Bussi, M

    2006-06-01

    Main purpose of this study was to evaluate vestibular function, focusing attention on percentage of peripheral damage in 30 HIV positive patients (23 male, 7 female), age range 26-68 years, belonging to Categories A-C of CDC classification of infection, underwent electronystagmography with bithermic stimulation according to Freyss (125 cc of water at 30 degrees C and 44 degrees C in 30 sec). The angular velocity of slow phase was considered as the main value of labirinthine functionality. Peripheral vestibular damage has been found in 35.7% of Class A patients; a similar percentage of peripheral signs was found in Classes B and C, where, on the contrary, increased central vestibular signs were observed. In order to evaluate equilibrium in these patients, a Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) test was performed. Scores were >21 points in 85.7% of Class A patients and decreased in Classes B and C. PMID:17063983

  17. Head injury and blast exposure: vestibular consequences.

    PubMed

    Akin, Faith W; Murnane, Owen D

    2011-04-01

    Young adults are more likely to suffer blast injury and traumatic brain injury (TBI) than other age groups. This article reviews the literature on the vestibular consequences of blast exposure and TBI and concussion. In addition, the vestibular test findings obtained from 31 veterans with a history of blast exposure and/or mild TBI are presented. The authors discuss loss of horizontal semicircular canal function and postural instability related to head injury. Preliminary data suggest the novel theory that otolith organs are uniquely vulnerable to head injury and blast exposure. PMID:21474007

  18. A systems concept of the vestibular organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayne, R.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive model of vestibular organ function is presented. The model is based on an analogy with the inertial guidance systems used in navigation. Three distinct operations are investigated: angular motion sensing, linear motion sensing, and computation. These operations correspond to the semicircular canals, the otoliths, and central processing respectively. It is especially important for both an inertial guidance system and the vestibular organs to distinguish between attitude with respect to the vertical on the one hand, and linear velocity and displacement on the other. The model is applied to various experimental situations and found to be corroborated by them.

  19. Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting as Oral Dysgeusia: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a fifty-year-old male patient who was referred to the Oral Medicine Department with a complaint of a salty taste. History taking subsequently revealed that the patient was also experiencing intermittent numbness of his left lower lip, tinnitus, and a feeling of fullness in the left ear. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed which revealed a large vestibular schwannoma affecting the left vestibulocochlear nerve, which was treated surgically. This case shows the importance of taking a detailed history in a patient presenting with an initial complaint of oral dysgeusia. It also highlights the possibility of significant underlying pathology, presenting with initial low level, nonspecific complaints such as an altered taste, and the rationale for imaging patients who report unilateral facial hypoesthesia. PMID:27022490

  20. [Consequences of misdiagnosis: unrecognized acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) in MRI].

    PubMed

    von Kummer, R; Becker, H

    2011-04-01

    This report concerns a 43-year-old male plumber with relapsing acute hearing loss on the right side and vertiginous attacks. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed twice after otolaryngology and neurological examinations over an interval of 2 months and according to the reports no evidence of an acoustic neuroma was found. Approximately 2 years later a right-sided hourglass-shaped acoustic neuroma 4 mm in diameter was diagnosed with MRI located in the vestibule and the fundus of the internal auditory canal. In retrospect it had also been visible on the earlier MRI. The tumor was resected via the labyrinth and the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma was confirmed histologically. The patient brought a lawsuit against the radiologist who carried out both previous MRI examinations with the wrong interpretation. The lawsuit terminated in a settlement between the parties after presentation of the neuroradiological expert opinion. PMID:21465279

  1. Vestibular convergence patterns in vestibular nuclei neurons of alert primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory signal convergence is a fundamental and important aspect of brain function. Such convergence may often involve complex multidimensional interactions as those proposed for the processing of otolith and semicircular canal (SCC) information for the detection of translational head movements and the effective discrimination from physically congruent gravity signals. In the present study, we have examined the responses of primate rostral vestibular nuclei (VN) neurons that do not exhibit any eye movement-related activity using 0.5-Hz translational and three-dimensional (3D) rotational motion. Three distinct neural populations were identified. Approximately one-fourth of the cells exclusively encoded rotational movements (canal-only neurons) and were unresponsive to translation. The canal-only central neurons encoded head rotation in SCC coordinates, exhibited little orthogonal canal convergence, and were characterized with significantly higher sensitivities to rotation as compared to primary SCC afferents. Another fourth of the neurons modulated their firing rates during translation (otolith-only cells). During rotations, these neurons only responded when the axis of rotation was earth-horizontal and the head was changing orientation relative to gravity. The remaining one-half of VN neurons were sensitive to both rotations and translations (otolith + canal neurons). Unlike primary otolith afferents, however, central neurons often exhibited significant spatiotemporal (noncosine) tuning properties and a wide variety of response dynamics to translation. To characterize the pattern of SCC inputs to otolith + canal neurons, their rotational maximum sensitivity vectors were computed using exclusively responses during earth-vertical axis rotations (EVA). Maximum sensitivity vectors were distributed throughout the 3D space, suggesting strong convergence from multiple SCCs. These neurons were also tested with earth-horizontal axis rotations (EHA), which would activate both vertical canals and otolith organs. However, the recorded responses could not be predicted from a linear combination of EVA rotational and translational responses. In contrast, one-third of the neurons responded similarly during EVA and EHA rotations, although a significant response modulation was present during translation. Thus this subpopulation of otolith + canal cells, which included neurons with either high- or low-pass dynamics to translation, appear to selectively ignore the component of otolith-selective activation that is due to changes in the orientation of the head relative to gravity. Thus contrary to primary otolith afferents and otolith-only central neurons that respond equivalently to tilts relative to gravity and translational movements, approximately one-third of the otolith + canal cells seem to encode a true estimate of the translational component of the imposed passive head and body movement.

  2. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Piras, Gianluca; Brandolini, Cristina; Castellucci, Andrea; Modugno, Giovanni Carlo

    2013-02-01

    To assess the usefulness of vestibular testing in patients with acoustic neuroma, considering two main aspects: to compare diagnostic sensitivity of the current vestibular tests, especially considering ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) and to identify pre-operative localization of the tumor (inferior vestibular nerve vs. superior vestibular nerve) only with the help of vestibular electrophysiological data. Twenty-six patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma (mainly intracanalicular type) were studied with a full audio-vestibular test battery (pure tone and speech audiometry, caloric bithermal test, vibration-induced nystagmus test (VIN), cervical and OVEMPs). 18 patients (69 %) showed abnormal caloric responses. 12 patients (46.2 %) showed a pattern of VIN test suggestive of vestibular asymmetry. 16 patients (61.5 %) showed abnormal OVEMPs (12 only to AC, 4 both to AC and BC). 10 patients (38.5 %) showed abnormal cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (5 both to AC and BC, 5 only to AC). In one case, results of vestibular evoked potentials and caloric test were confirmed by intra-operative and post-operative findings. Results of electrophysiological tests in AN patients could be helpful for planning the proper surgical approach, considering that sensitivity of every exam is quite low in intracanalicular lesion; clinical data allow a better interpretation of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. PMID:22526579

  3. From ear to uncertainty: vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), can modulate cognitive function. PMID:24324413

  4. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  5. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space.

    PubMed

    Minor, L B

    1998-03-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed. PMID:9525484

  6. Vestibular migraine: diagnosis challenges and need for targeted treatment.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Felipe; Villa, Thaís Rodrigues

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population suffers from vestibular migraine. Despite the recently published diagnostic criteria, it is still underdiagnosed condition. The exact neural mechanisms of vestibular migraine are still unclear, but the variability of symptoms and clinical findings both during and between attacks suggests an important interaction between trigeminal and vestibular systems. Vestibular migraine often begins several years after typical migraine and has a variable clinical presentation. In vestibular migraine patients, the neurological and neurotological examination is mostly normal and the diagnosis will be based in the patient clinical history. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and therapeutic recommendations are based on migraine guidelines. Controlled studies on the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions in the treatment of vestibular migraine should be performed. PMID:27191239

  7. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  8. Inferior vestibular neuritis: 3 cases with clinical features of acute vestibular neuritis, normal calorics but indications of saccular failure

    PubMed Central

    Monstad, Per; Økstad, Siri; Mygland, Åse

    2006-01-01

    Background Vestibular neuritis (VN) is commonly diagnosed by demonstration of unilateral vestibular failure, as unilateral loss of caloric response. As this test reflects the function of the superior part of the vestibular nerve only, cases of pure inferior nerve neuritis will be lost. Case presentations We describe three patients with symptoms suggestive of VN, but normal calorics. All 3 had unilateral loss of vestibular evoked myogenic potential. A slight, asymptomatic position dependent nystagmus, with the pathological ear down, was observed. Conclusion We believe that these patients suffer from pure inferior nerve vestibular neuritis. PMID:17169144

  9. Estimation of Optical Stimulus Amplitude for Balance Training Using Electrical Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts following gravitational transitions. By training astronauts preflight with supra-threshold noisy stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS), the central nervous system can be trained to reweight sensory information by utilizing veridical information from other sensory inputs, such as vision and proprioception, for postural and gait control. This, in turn, can enhance functional performance in novel gravitational environments. The optimal maximum amplitude of stimulation to simulate the effect of deterioration in vestibular inputs for preflight training or for evaluating vestibular contribution in functional tests in general, however, has not yet been identified. Most studies have used arbitrary but fixed maximum current amplitudes from 3 to 5 mA in the medio-lateral (ML) direction to disrupt balance function in both ML and anterior-posterior directions in healthy adults. The goal of this study was to determine the minimum SVS level that yields an equivalently degraded balance performance. Fourteen subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in the ML direction. Objective perceptual motion thresholds, were estimated ahead of time by having subjects sit on a chair with their eyes closed and giving 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimulation at various current amplitudes. Results from the balance task suggest that using stimulation amplitudes of 280% of motion-perceptual threshold (2.2 mA on average) significantly degraded balance performance and increasing the stimulation amplitude did not lead to further degradation. We anticipate that preflight training using supra-threshold SVS stimulation will be a component of preflight sensorimotor adaptability training designed to improve adaptability to novel gravitational environments. This combination may help to significantly reduce the time to recover functional performance after long-duration spaceflight or after landing in a novel gravitational environment (e.g. Moon or Mars). Another application of using electrical stimulation of the vestibular system is in the evaluation of tests for vestibular function by simulating acute deterioration of vestibular sensory inputs.

  10. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an increase in the efficacy of a vestibular neurostimulator by eliciting centrally adapted behavioral responses without concurrent adaptive increase of galvanic afferent activation in the periphery. PMID:26438271

  11. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or “à la carte” VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life. PMID:25610424

  12. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or "à la carte" VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life. PMID:25610424

  13. Stochastic Modeling of Laminar-Turbulent Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Choudhari, Meelan

    2002-01-01

    Stochastic versions of stability equations are developed in order to develop integrated models of transition and turbulence and to understand the effects of uncertain initial conditions on disturbance growth. Stochastic forms of the resonant triad equations, a high Reynolds number asymptotic theory, and the parabolized stability equations are developed.

  14. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  15. Perspectives in vestibular diagnostics and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Arneborg

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular diagnostics and therapy ist the mirror of technological, scientific and socio-economics trends as are other fields of clinical medicine. These trends have led to a substantial diversification of the field of neurotology. The improvements in diagnostics have been characterized by the introduction of new receptor testing tools (e.g., VEMPs), progress in imaging (e.g., the endolymphatic hydrops) and in the description of central-vestibular neuroplasticity. The etiopathology of vestibular disorders has been updated by geneticists (e.g., the description of the COCH gene mutations), the detection of structural abnormalities (e.g., dehiscence syndromes) and related disorders (e.g. migraine-associated vertigo). The therapeutic options were extended by re-evaluation of techniques known a long time ago (e.g., saccus exposure), the development of new approaches (e.g., dehiscence repair) and the introduction of new drug therapy concepts (e.g., local drug delivery). Implantable, neuroprosthetic solutions have not yet reached experimental safety and validity and are still far away. However, externally worn neuroprosthetic solution were introduced in the rehab of vestibular disorders (e.g., VertiGuard system). These and related trends point into a medical future which is characterized by presbyvertigo as classical sign of the demographic changes ahead, by shortage of financial resources and a medico-legally over-regulated, even hostile environment for physicians in clinical medicine. PMID:22558055

  16. Immunological Influences on the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this project were to examine the influence of immune signaling molecules on the survival and replacement of sensory hair cells in the vestibular organs. We have made considerable progress toward that goal, particularly in the characterization of mechanisms that underlie hair cell death.

  17. Widespread Vestibular Activation of the Rodent Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Javier; Drawitsch, Florian; Brichta, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes. PMID:25878265

  18. Vesibulotoxicity and Management of Vestibular Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The toxicity of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics for vestibular hair cells has been used to special advantage in the treatment of Meniere's disease. Intratympanic (middle ear) injections of these drugs are being increasingly used to control vertigo in this disorder when it has not responded to medical therapy. The mechanisms by which these drugs

  19. TEMPORAL INTEGRATION OF AUDITORY AND VESTIBULAR STIMULI

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Nai-Yuan N.; Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Integration of balance-related cues from the vestibular and other sensory systems requires that they be perceived simultaneously despite arriving asynchronously at the central nervous system. Failure to perform temporal integration of multiple sensory signals represents a novel mechanism to explain symptoms in patients with imbalance. This study tested the ability of normal observers to compensate for sensory asynchronies between vestibular and auditory inputs. Study Design Double-blinded experimental design. Methods We performed whole-body rotations about the earth-vertical axis following a raised-cosine trajectory at 0.5 and 1.0 Hz to several peak velocities up to a maximum of 180 deg/sec in five normal subjects. Headphones were used to present a diotic auditory stimulus at various times relative to the onset of the rotation. Subjects were required to indicate which cue occurred first. Results The vestibular stimulus needed to be presented 61 ms before the auditory stimulus (at a stimulus frequency of 0.5 Hz) and 19 ms (at 1.0 Hz). Stimuli presented within a window of 300 ms (at 0.5 Hz) and 200 ms (at 1.0 Hz) were judged to be simultaneous. Conclusion The central nervous system must accommodate for delays in perception of vestibular and other sensory cues. Inaccurate temporal integration of these inputs represents a novel explanation for symptoms of imbalance. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:22473616

  20. Vesibulotoxicity and Management of Vestibular Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The toxicity of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics for vestibular hair cells has been used to special advantage in the treatment of Meniere's disease. Intratympanic (middle ear) injections of these drugs are being increasingly used to control vertigo in this disorder when it has not responded to medical therapy. The mechanisms by which these drugs…

  1. Genetics of recurrent vertigo and vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Gazquez, Irene; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2011-09-01

    We present recent advances in the genetics of recurrent vertigo, including familial episodic ataxias, migraneous vertigo, bilateral vestibular hypofunction and Meniere's disease.Although several vestibular disorders are more common within families, the genetics of vestibulopathies is largely not known. Genetic loci and clinical features of familial episodic ataxias have been defined in linkage disequilibrium studies with mutations in neuronal genes KCNA1 and CACNA1A. Migrainous vertigo is a clinical disorder with a high comorbidity within families much more common in females with overlapping features with episodic ataxia and migraine. Bilateral vestibular hypofunction is a heterogeneous clinical group defined by episodes of vertigo leading to progressive loss of vestibular function which also can include migraine. Meniere's disease is a clinical syndrome characterized by spontaneous episodes of recurrent vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus and aural fullness and familial Meniere's disease in around 10-20% of cases. An international collaborative effort to define the clinical phenotype and recruiting patients with migrainous vertigo and Meniere's disease is ongoing for genome-wide association studies. PMID:22379397

  2. New Insights into Pathophysiology of Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, and nucleus raphe magnus) are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory–inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs, and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic mechanisms of VM. PMID:25705201

  3. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, and nucleus raphe magnus) are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs, and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic mechanisms of VM. PMID:25705201

  4. Postural Compensation for Unilateral Vestibular Loss

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Robert J.; Statler, Kennyn D.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Horak, Fay B.

    2011-01-01

    Postural control of upright stance was investigated in well-compensated, unilateral vestibular loss (UVL) subjects compared to age-matched control subjects. The goal was to determine how sensory weighting for postural control in UVL subjects differed from control subjects, and how sensory weighting related to UVL subjects’ functional compensation, as assessed by standardized balance and dizziness questionnaires. Postural control mechanisms were identified using a model-based interpretation of medial–lateral center-of-mass body-sway evoked by support-surface rotational stimuli during eyes-closed stance. The surface-tilt stimuli consisted of continuous pseudorandom rotations presented at four different amplitudes. Parameters of a feedback control model were obtained that accounted for each subject’s sway response to the surface-tilt stimuli. Sensory weighting factors quantified the relative contributions to stance control of vestibular sensory information, signaling body-sway relative to earth-vertical, and proprioceptive information, signaling body-sway relative to the surface. Results showed that UVL subjects made significantly greater use of proprioceptive, and therefore less use of vestibular, orientation information on all tests. There was relatively little overlap in the distributions of sensory weights measured in UVL and control subjects, although UVL subjects varied widely in the amount they could use their remaining vestibular function. Increased reliance on proprioceptive information by UVL subjects was associated with their balance being more disturbed by the surface-tilt perturbations than control subjects, thus indicating a deficiency of balance control even in well-compensated UVL subjects. Furthermore, there was some tendency for UVL subjects who were less able to utilize remaining vestibular information to also indicate worse functional compensation on questionnaires. PMID:21922014

  5. Vestibular function in families with inherited autosomal dominant hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Street, Valerie A.; Kallman, Jeremy C.; Strombom, Paul D.; Bramhall, Naomi F.; Phillips, James O.

    2008-01-01

    The inner ear contains the developmentally related cochlea and peripheral vestibular labyrinth. Given the similar physiology between these two organs, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction may be expected to occur simultaneously in individuals segregating mutations in inner ear genes. Twenty-two different genes have been discovered that when mutated lead to non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss. A review of the literature indicates that families segregating mutations in 13 of these 22 genes have undergone formal clinical vestibular testing. Formal assessment revealed vestibular dysfunction in families with mutations in ten of these 13 genes. Remarkably, only families with mutations in the COCH and MYO7A genes self-report considerable vestibular challenges. Families segregating mutations in the other eight genes do not self-report significant balance problems and appear to compensate well in everyday life for vestibular deficits discovered during formal clinical vestibular assessment. An example of a family (referred to as the HL1 family) with progressive hearing loss and clinically-detected vestibular hypofunction that does not report vestibular symptoms is described in this review. Notably, one member of the HL1 family with clinically-detected vestibular hypofunction reached the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. PMID:18776598

  6. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome: a slowly progressive disorder with stereotypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Daniele; Bella, Eleonora Dalla; Dacci, Patrizia; Mariotti, Caterina; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a newly described condition with onset in adulthood, characterized by progressive balance impairment and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs, which can severely affect patients' quality of life. Its pathogenesis remains obscure and the diagnosis challenging. We described four patients complaining of slowly progressive gait unbalance and sensory disturbances at the feet followed, after a period ranging 2-6 years, by cerebellar dysfunction. All patients showed gait and limb ataxia, positive Romberg sign, cerebellar dysarthria, gaze-evoked nystagmus, absent deep tendon reflexes, and impaired vibratory sensation. Nerve conduction studies revealed axonal sensory neuropathy, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar atrophy, and otoneurological investigation demonstrated bilateral vestibular areflexia with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes. The diagnosis of CANVAS should be suspected on clinical ground based on homogeneous course of symptoms and signs, and addressed by video-oculography eye movement recording. PMID:26566912

  7. Vestibular Function and Quality of Life in Vestibular Schwannoma: Does Size Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Judith Nastjenka; Glaser, Miriam; Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Goldbrunner, Roland; Cnyrim, Christian; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Strupp, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) frequently suffer from disabling vestibular symptoms. This prospective follow-up study evaluates vestibular and auditory function and impairment of quality of life due to vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance in patients with unilateral VS of different sizes before/after microsurgical or radiosurgical treatment. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with unilateral VS were included. Twenty-two received microsurgery, 16 CyberKnife radiosurgery. Two follow-ups took place after a median of 50 and 186.5 days. Patients received a standardized neuro-ophthalmological examination, electronystagmography with bithermal caloric testing, and pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was evaluated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Patient data was grouped and analyzed according to the size of the VS (group 1: <20 mm vs group 2: ≥20 mm). Results: In group 1, the median loss of vestibular function was +10.5% as calculated by Jongkees Formula (range −43 to +52; group 2: median +36%, range −56 to +90). The median change of DHI scores was −9 in group 1 (range −68 to 30) and +2 in group 2 (−54;+20). Median loss of hearing was 4 dB (−42; 93) in group 1 and 12 dB in group 2 (5; 42). Conclusion: Loss of vestibular function in VS clearly correlates with tumor size. However, loss of vestibular function was not strictly associated with a long-term deterioration of quality of life. This may be due to central compensation of vestibular deficits in long-standing large tumors. Loss of hearing before treatment was significantly influenced by the age of the patient but not by tumor size. At follow-up 1 and 2, hearing was significantly influenced by the size of the VS and the manner of treatment. PMID:21941519

  8. Descriptive epidemiology of vestibular schwannomas1

    PubMed Central

    Propp, Jennifer M.; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.; Preston-Martin, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, commonly termed acoustic neuromas, arise from the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve (acoustic nerve) and are benign, slow-growing brain tumors that negatively impact patient quality of life. They are thought to account for the majority of intracranial nerve sheath tumors. To describe incidence rate patterns and trends of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS and the subset of vestibular schwannomas in two population-based incidence registries, data were obtained from 11 Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) collaborating state registries and the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program (LACCSP) (1975–1998). Average annual incidence rates were tabulated by age, gender, race, year, and region and were age-adjusted to the year 2000 U.S. standard population. Multiplicative Poisson regression models were used to compare trends in primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS overall and in subgroups, including vestibular schwannomas, controlling for age, gender, race, microscopic confirmation, and region. Join-point regression analysis was used to identify any sharp changes in incidence over time. The overall incidence of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS was 1.1 per 100,000 person-years (CBTRUS, 1995–1999 and LACCSP, 1995–1998). The incidence of vestibular schwannomas was similar for both data sets: 0.6 per 100,000 person-years (CBTRUS, 1995–1999) and 0.8 per 100,000 person-years (LACCSP, 1995–1998). Moreover, the incidence of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS overall (CBTRUS, 1985–1999 and LACCSP, 1975–1998) and of vestibular schwannomas (CBTRUS, 1992–1999 and LACCSP, 1992–1998) increased over time. However, the incidence of benign schwannomas in sites other than the acoustic nerve either decreased (CBTRUS, 1992–1999) or experienced no significant change (LACCSP, 1992–1998). While improvements in diagnosis and reporting may explain some of these trends, further consideration of potential etiologic factors may be warranted. PMID:16443943

  9. Diverse spatial reference frames of vestibular signals in parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodong; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reference frames are important for understanding how sensory cues from different modalities are coordinated to guide behavior, and the parietal cortex is critical to these functions. We compare reference frames of vestibular self-motion signals in the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), and dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd). Vestibular heading tuning in VIP is invariant to changes in both eye and head positions, indicating a body (or world)-centered reference frame. Vestibular signals in PIVC have reference frames that are intermediate between head- and body-centered. In contrast, MSTd neurons show reference frames between head- and eye-centered, but not body-centered. Eye and head position gain fields were strongest in MSTd and weakest in PIVC. Our findings reveal distinct spatial reference frames for representing vestibular signals, and pose new challenges for understanding the respective roles of these areas in potentially diverse vestibular functions. PMID:24239126

  10. Anxiety Changes Depersonalization and Derealization Symptoms in Vestibular Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Ognyan I.; Georgieva-Zhostova, Spaska O.; Berthoz, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Background. Depersonalization and derealization are common symptoms reported in the general population. Objective. The aim of the present study was to establish the relationship between anxiety and depersonalization and derealization symptoms in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Methods. Twenty-four vestibular patients with anxiety and 18 vestibular patients without anxiety were examined for depersonalization and derealization symptoms. They were also compared to healthy controls. Results. The results revealed that anxiety consistently changes depersonalization and derealization symptoms in vestibular patients. They are more frequent, more severe, and qualitatively different in vestibular patients with anxiety than in those without anxiety. Conclusion. Anxiety has an effect on depersonalization and derealization symptoms in vestibular patients. The various hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of this effect were discussed. PMID:24803735

  11. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  12. Prediction in the Vestibular Control of Arm Movements.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Jean; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, Etienne; Simoneau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of vestibular signals to motor control has been evidenced in postural, locomotor, and oculomotor studies. Here, we review studies showing that vestibular information also contributes to the control of arm movements during whole-body motion. The data reviewed suggest that vestibular information is used by the arm motor system to maintain the initial hand position or the planned hand trajectory unaltered during body motion. This requires integration of vestibular and cervical inputs to determine the trunk motion dynamics. These studies further suggest that the vestibular control of arm movement relies on rapid and efficient vestibulomotor transformations that cannot be considered automatic. We also reviewed evidence suggesting that the vestibular afferents can be used by the brain to predict and counteract body-rotation-induced torques (e.g., Coriolis) acting on the arm when reaching for a target while turning the trunk. PMID:26595953

  13. Asymmetry of balance responses to monaural galvanic vestibular stimulation in subjects with vestibular schwannoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Welgampola, Miriam S.; Ramsay, Elijane; Gleeson, Michael J.; Day, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated the potential of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to quantify lateralised asymmetry of the vestibulospinal pathways by measuring balance responses to monaural GVS in 10 subjects with vestibular schwannoma and 22 healthy control subjects. Methods Subjects standing without vision were stimulated with 3 s, 1 mA direct current stimuli delivered monaurally. The mean magnitude and direction of the evoked balance responses in the horizontal plane were measured from ground-reaction forces and from displacement and velocity of the trunk. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) to 500 Hz air and bone-conducted tones were also recorded. Results In healthy subjects, the magnitudes of the force, velocity and displacement responses were not significantly different for left compared to right ear stimulation. Their individual asymmetry ratios were always <30%. Subjects with vestibular schwannoma had significantly smaller force, velocity and displacement responses to stimulation of the affected compared with non-affected ear. Their mean asymmetry ratios were significantly elevated for all three measures (41.2 ± 10.3%, 40.3 ± 15.1% and 21.9 ± 14.6%). Conclusions Asymmetry ratios of balance responses to monaural GVS provide a quantitative and clinically applicable lateralising test of the vestibulospinal pathways. Significance This method offers a more clinically relevant measure of standing balance than existing vestibular function tests which assess only vestibuloocular and vestibulocollic pathways. PMID:23643313

  14. Stochastic model of the residual acceleration environment in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinals, Jorge

    1994-01-01

    We describe a theoretical investigation of the effects that stochastic residual accelerations (g-jitter) onboard spacecraft can have on experiments conducted in a microgravity environment. We first introduce a stochastic model of the residual acceleration field, and develop a numerical algorithm to solve the equations governing fluid flow that allow for a stochastic body force. We next summarize our studies of two generic situations: stochastic parametric resonance and the onset of convective flow induced by a fluctuating acceleration field.

  15. New methods for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are common complaints, with a lifetime prevalence of over 30%. This review provides a brief summary of the recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances in the field of neuro-otology. A special focus is placed on the clinical usefulness of vestibular tests. While these have markedly improved over the years, treatment options for vestibular disorders still remain limited. Available therapies for selected vestibular diseases are discussed. PMID:21173877

  16. Stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  17. [VESTIBULAR FUNCTION AFTER REPEATED SPACE FLIGHTS].

    PubMed

    Naumov, I A; Kornilova, L N; Glukhikh, D O; Pavlova, A S; Khabarova, E V; Ekimovsky, G A; Vasin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Results of the vestibular function testing of 32 cosmonauts on return from repeated 125- to 215-day space flights (SF) on the International space station are presented. The cosmonauts were tested twice before flight (baseline data collection) and on days 1-2, 4-5 and 8-9 after landing. Electro- and video-oculography were used to register simultaneously eye and head movements. It was found that deadaptation following a repeated stay in long-duration SF takes statistically much shorter time. Most often, atypical vestibular disorders and changed patterns of the otolith-semicircular canal interaction are observed in cosmonauts who have made their maiden flights to microgravity. PMID:26934788

  18. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  19. Signal processing for a vestibular neurostimulator.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Jay T; Nie, Kaibao; Bierer, Steven; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2010-01-01

    An implanted vestibular neurostimulator has been developed based on commercial cochlear implant technology. It has been implanted chronically in Rhesus monkeys and the physiology of electrical stimulation of the vestibular periphery has been studied. We are currently proposing a human feasibility study of implantation of the device for the treatment of incapacitating Meniere's disease. Because no animal model of Meniere's disease exists, signal processing for such a device must be based on prior observations of human subjects who have suffered Meniere's attacks while their eye-movements could be quantified. Based on such data, and on the leading theories for the pathophysiology of a Meniere's attack, our animal data suggests that fixed amplitude, constant frequency biphasic pulse trains should be adequate to suppress the symptoms of an attack when they occur. The intensity of the stimuli and efficacy of vertigo suppression should be readily modulated either by amplitude or frequency adjustments. PMID:21097347

  20. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  1. Experiment M131. Human vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The lower susceptibility to vestibular stimulation aloft, compared with that on ground under experimental conditions, is attributed to a precondition, namely, either there is no need to adapt, or, as exemplified by the Skylab 3 pilot, adaptation to weightlessness is achieved. Findings in some of the astronauts emphasize the distinction between two categories of vestibular side effects: immediate reflex phenomena (illusions, sensations of turning, etc.), and delayed epiphenomena that include the constellation of symptoms and syndromes comprising motion sickness. The drug combinations 1-scopolamine and d-amphetamine and promethazine hydrochloride and ephedrine sulfate are effective in prevention and treatment of motion sickness. It is concluded that prevention of motion sickness in any stressful motion environment involves selection, adaptation, and the use of drugs.

  2. The vestibular system of the owl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Five owls were given vestibular examinations, and two of them were sacrificed to provide serial histological sections of the temporal bones. The owls exhibited a curious variability in the postrotatory head nystagmus following abrupt deceleration; sometimes a brisk nystagnus with direction opposite to that appropriate to the stimulus would occur promptly after deceleration. It was found also that owls can exhibit a remarkable head stability during angular movement of the body about any axis passing through the skull. The vestibular apparatus in the owl is larger than in man, and a prominent crista neglecta is present. The tectorial membrane, the cupula, and the otolithic membranes of the utricle, saccule, and lagena are all attached to surfaces in addition to the surfaces hearing hair cells. These attachments are very substantial in the utricular otolithic membrane and in the cupula.

  3. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  4. What is the minimal vestibular function required for compensation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Wade, S. W.; Nashner, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Living with an uncompensated, abnormal vestibular system requires oppressive modification of life style and often prevents return to work and activities of daily living. Patients with vestibular abnormalities were studied to determine the minimal residual vestibular function required to achieve compensation. Three groups of patients with (a) complete unilateral loss of vestibular function with normal horizontal canal-vestibulo-ocular (HCVOR) function in the opposite ear, (b) complete unilateral loss with abnormal HCVOR function in the opposite ear, and (c) bilateral reduction of vestibular function from aminoglycoside toxicity underwent vestibuloocular (VOR), optokinetic (OKN), visual-VOR (VVOR), and computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) tests before and after therapeutic procedures. Results suggest that a minimal VOR response amplitude must be present for compensation of VVOR function to occur. The roles of VOR and OKN phase shifts in vestibular compensation are more complicated and require further study. Compensation of vestibulospinal function does not necessarily accompany VOR or VVOR compensation. Ascending and descending vestibular compensatory mechanisms may involve different spatial sensory inputs. Results of these studies have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with vestibular disorders, including selection and monitoring of patients for therapeutic regimens such as vestibular nerve section and streptomycin therapy.

  5. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0–20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls. PMID:25620919

  6. Clinical application of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP).

    PubMed

    Murofushi, Toshihisa

    2016-08-01

    The author reviewed clinical aspects of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). Now two types of VEMPs are available. The first one is cervical VEMP, which is recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle and predominantly reflects sacculo-collic reflex. The other is ocular VEMP, which is usually recorded below the lower eye lid and predominantly reflects utriculo-ocular reflex. VEMPs play important roles not only for assessment of common vestibular diseases but also for establishment of new clinical entities. Clinical application in Meniere's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular migraine, idiopathic otolithic vertigo, and central vertigo/dizziness was reviewed. PMID:26791591

  7. Direction Specific Biases in Human Visual and Vestibular Heading Perception

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    Heading direction is determined from visual and vestibular cues. Both sensory modalities have been shown to have better direction discrimination for headings near straight ahead. Previous studies of visual heading estimation have not used the full range of stimuli, and vestibular heading estimation has not previously been reported. The current experiments measure human heading estimation in the horizontal plane to vestibular, visual, and spoken stimuli. The vestibular and visual tasks involved 16 cm of platform or visual motion. The spoken stimulus was a voice command speaking a heading angle. All conditions demonstrated direction dependent biases in perceived headings such that biases increased with headings further from the fore-aft axis. The bias was larger with the visual stimulus when compared with the vestibular stimulus in all 10 subjects. For the visual and vestibular tasks precision was best for headings near fore-aft. The spoken headings had the least bias, and the variation in precision was less dependent on direction. In a separate experiment when headings were limited to ±45°, the biases were much less, demonstrating the range of headings influences perception. There was a strong and highly significant correlation between the bias curves for visual and spoken stimuli in every subject. The correlation between visual-vestibular and vestibular-spoken biases were weaker but remained significant. The observed biases in both visual and vestibular heading perception qualitatively resembled predictions of a recent population vector decoder model (Gu et al., 2010) based on the known distribution of neuronal sensitivities. PMID:23236490

  8. Audiological and vestibular function tests in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, P L; Gupta, O P; Agrawal, M K; Mishr, S K

    1977-12-01

    A battery of audiological and vestibular function tests have been performed in 72 cases of confirmed hypothyroidism. The severity of hypothyroidism was graded as mild, moderate or severe depending upon serum protein-bound iodine estimation. The incidence of hearing impairment, tinnitus and vertigo was correlated with the severity of the disease process. The site of lesion causing sensorineural hearing impairment in 25 cases was pinpointed audiologically. PMID:926972

  9. Galvanic vestibular stimulation: a novel modulatory countermeasure for vestibular-associated movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V; Gonzalez-Castaño, Alexander; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E

    2014-01-01

    Motion sickness or kinetosis is the result of the abnormal neural output originated by visual, proprioceptive and vestibular mismatch, which reverses once the dysfunctional sensory information becomes coherent. The space adaptation syndrome or space sickness relates to motion sickness; it is considered to be due to yaw, pith, and roll coordinates mismatch. Several behavioural and pharmacological measures have been proposed to control these vestibular-associated movement disorders with no success. Galvanic vestibular stimulation has the potential of up-regulating disturbed sensory-motor mismatch originated by kinetosis and space sickness by modulating the GABA-related ion channels neural transmission in the inner ear. It improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent proprioceptive volleys, which would ultimately modulate the motor output restoring the disordered gait, balance and human locomotion due to kinetosis, as well as the spatial disorientation generated by gravity transition. PMID:24637984

  10. Cochlear obliteration after translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Beutner, Caroline; Mathys, Christian; Turowski, Bernd; Schipper, Jörg; Klenzner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the temporal occurrence of cochlear obliteration following translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma resection. A retrospective chart review, cross-sectional study, and sequential analysis of the time series were performed. The retrospective study included patients undergoing translabyrinthine resection for stage T1-T2 vestibular schwannoma from 2007 to 2010 without prior therapy and postoperative follow-up including MRI of the brain and the cerebellopontine angle. Already 3 months after surgery a radiographic labyrinthine change was observed in 66.7 %, a partial obstruction in 50 %, and an obstruction limited to the saccule in 16.7 %. Only 33.3 % of the patients showed an unchanged inner ear. In consideration of early cochlear obstruction after translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma resection, temporary follow-up is necessary. Since the indications for cochlear implantation (CI) have been extended, especially concerning patients with single-side deafness, a simultaneous or early second-stage CI after tumour removal should be discussed. PMID:24414527

  11. Vestibular compensation and orientation during locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphan, T.; Imai, T.; Moore, S. T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Body, head, and eye movements were studied in three dimensions while walking and turning to determine the role of the vestibular system in directing gaze and maintaining spatial orientation. The body, head, and eyes were represented as three-dimensional coordinate frames, and the movement of these frames was related to a trajectory frame that described the motion of the body on a terrestrial plane. The axis-angle of the body, head, and eye rotation were then compared to the axis-angle of the rotation of the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA). We inferred the role of the vestibular system during locomotion and the contributions of the VCR and VOR by examining the interrelationship between these coordinate frames. Straight walking induced head and eye rotations in a compensatory manner to the linear accelerations, maintaining head pointing and gaze along the direction of forward motion. Turning generated a combination of compensation and orientation responses. The head leads and steers the turn while the eyes compensate to maintain stable horizontal gaze in space. Saccades shift horizontal gaze as the turn is executed. The head pitches, as during straight walking. It also rolls so that the head tends to align with the orientation of the GIA. Head orientation changes anticipate orientation changes of the GIA. Eye orientation follows the changes in GIA orientation so that the net orientation gaze is closer to the orientation of the GIA. The study indicates that the vestibular system utilizes compensatory and orienting mechanisms to stabilize spatial orientation and gaze during walking and turning.

  12. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  13. Stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    'Stochastic thermodynamics as a conceptual framework combines the stochastic energetics approach introduced a decade ago by Sekimoto [1] with the idea that entropy can consistently be assigned to a single fluctuating trajectory [2]'. This quote, taken from Udo Seifert's [3] 2008 review, nicely summarizes the basic ideas behind stochastic thermodynamics: for small systems, driven by external forces and in contact with a heat bath at a well-defined temperature, stochastic energetics [4] defines the exchanged work and heat along a single fluctuating trajectory and connects them to changes in the internal (system) energy by an energy balance analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. Additionally, providing a consistent definition of trajectory-wise entropy production gives rise to second-law-like relations and forms the basis for a 'stochastic thermodynamics' along individual fluctuating trajectories. In order to construct meaningful concepts of work, heat and entropy production for single trajectories, their definitions are based on the stochastic equations of motion modeling the physical system of interest. Because of this, they are valid even for systems that are prevented from equilibrating with the thermal environment by external driving forces (or other sources of non-equilibrium). In that way, the central notions of equilibrium thermodynamics, such as heat, work and entropy, are consistently extended to the non-equilibrium realm. In the (non-equilibrium) ensemble, the trajectory-wise quantities acquire distributions. General statements derived within stochastic thermodynamics typically refer to properties of these distributions, and are valid in the non-equilibrium regime even beyond the linear response. The extension of statistical mechanics and of exact thermodynamic statements to the non-equilibrium realm has been discussed from the early days of statistical mechanics more than 100 years ago. This debate culminated in the development of linear response theory for small deviations from equilibrium, in which a general framework is constructed from the analysis of non-equilibrium states close to equilibrium. In a next step, Prigogine and others developed linear irreversible thermodynamics, which establishes relations between transport coefficients and entropy production on a phenomenological level in terms of thermodynamic forces and fluxes. However, beyond the realm of linear response no general theoretical results were available for quite a long time. This situation has changed drastically over the last 20 years with the development of stochastic thermodynamics, revealing that the range of validity of thermodynamic statements can indeed be extended deep into the non-equilibrium regime. Early developments in that direction trace back to the observations of symmetry relations between the probabilities for entropy production and entropy annihilation in non-equilibrium steady states [5-8] (nowadays categorized in the class of so-called detailed fluctuation theorems), and the derivations of the Bochkov-Kuzovlev [9, 10] and Jarzynski relations [11] (which are now classified as so-called integral fluctuation theorems). Apart from its fundamental theoretical interest, the developments in stochastic thermodynamics have experienced an additional boost from the recent experimental progress in fabricating, manipulating, controlling and observing systems on the micro- and nano-scale. These advances are not only of formidable use for probing and monitoring biological processes on the cellular, sub-cellular and molecular level, but even include the realization of a microscopic thermodynamic heat engine [12] or the experimental verification of Landauer's principle in a colloidal system [13]. The scientific program Stochastic Thermodynamics held between 4 and 15 March 2013, and hosted by The Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita), was attended by more than 50 scientists from the Nordic countries and elsewhere, amongst them many leading experts in the field. During the program, the most recent developments, open questions and new ideas in stochastic thermodynamics were presented and discussed. From the talks and debates, the notion of information in stochastic thermodynamics, the fundamental properties of entropy production (rate) in non-equilibrium, the efficiency of small thermodynamic machines and the characteristics of optimal protocols for the applied (cyclic) forces were crystallizing as main themes. Surprisingly, the long-studied adiabatic piston, its peculiarities and its relation to stochastic thermodynamics were also the subject of intense discussions. The comment on the Nordita program Stochastic Thermodynamics published in this issue of Physica Scripta exploits the Jarzynski relation for determining free energy differences in the adiabatic piston. This scientific program and the contribution presented here were made possible by the financial and administrative support of The Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics.

  14. Integration of vestibular and head movement signals in the vestibular nuclei during whole-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were obtained from 107 horizontal semicircular canal-related central vestibular neurons in three alert squirrel monkeys during passive sinusoidal whole-body rotation (WBR) while the head was free to move in the yaw plane (2.3 Hz, 20 degrees /s). Most of the units were identified as secondary vestibular neurons by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular nerve (61/80 tested). Both non-eye-movement (n = 52) and eye-movement-related (n = 55) units were studied. Unit responses recorded when the head was free to move were compared with responses recorded when the head was restrained from moving. WBR in the absence of a visual target evoked a compensatory vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) that effectively reduced the head velocity in space by an average of 33 +/- 14%. In 73 units, the compensatory head movements were sufficiently large to permit the effect of the VCR on vestibular signal processing to be assessed quantitatively. The VCR affected the rotational responses of different vestibular neurons in different ways. Approximately one-half of the units (34/73, 47%) had responses that decreased as head velocity decreased. However, the responses of many other units (24/73) showed little change. These cells had signals that were better correlated with trunk velocity than with head velocity. The remaining units had responses that were significantly larger (15/73, 21%) when the VCR produced a decrease in head velocity. Eye-movement-related units tended to have rotational responses that were correlated with head velocity. On the other hand, non-eye-movement units tended to have rotational responses that were better correlated with trunk velocity. We conclude that sensory vestibular signals are transformed from head-in-space coordinates to trunk-in-space coordinates on many secondary vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei by the addition of inputs related to head rotation on the trunk. This coordinate transformation is presumably important for controlling postural reflexes and constructing a central percept of body orientation and movement in space.

  15. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  16. Hearing in Static Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma Declines More Than in the Contralateral Ear

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neel B.; Nieman, Carrie L.; Redleaf, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of static vestibular schwannomas on hearing. Study Design Retrospective review of audiometric measures in 15 patients with documented nongrowth of internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle enhancing masses. Methods Data from patients seen in an ambulatory tertiary care setting between the years of 2002 and 2012 with a diagnosis of acoustic neuroma or vestibular schwannoma were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included preexisting otologic disease, prior therapy for the schwannoma, and tumor growth. Radiology reports were reviewed to ensure nongrowth and were confirmed by taking magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements ourselves. Audiologic measurements included pure tone average, enhanced pure tone average (average of .5, 1, 2, and 4 KHz thresholds), 4 KHz threshold, 8 KHz threshold, and speech discrimination. The data were analyzed using mixed effect model with unstructured variance-covariance structure. Results Difference in audiometric measures between ears significantly (P < .05) increased for all measures except 8 KHz. Conclusion Spontaneous decline in hearing relative to time is exaggerated in the affected ear despite no vestibular schwannoma growth. This finding can be useful for patient counseling and treatment decision making. PMID:25586948

  17. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar afferents projected throughout the cochlear nuclei, to the dorsolateral regions of the cerebellar nuclei, and to lateral regions of the superior, lateral, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei.

  18. Current Treatment of Vestibular, Ocular Motor Disorders and Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common complaints with a lifetime prevalence of about 30%. The various forms of vestibular disorders can be treated with pharmacological therapy, physical therapy, psychotherapeutic measures or, rarely, surgery. In this review, the current pharmacological treatment options for peripheral and central vestibular, cerebellar and ocular motor disorders will be described. They are as follows for peripheral vestibular disorders. In vestibular neuritis recovery of the peripheral vestibular function can be improved by treatment with oral corticosteroids. In Menière's disease a recent study showed long-term high-dose treatment with betahistine has a significant effect on the frequency of the attacks. The use of aminopyridines introduced a new therapeutic principle in the treatment of downbeat and upbeat nystagmus and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA 2). These potassium channel blockers presumably increase the activity and excitability of cerebellar Purkinje cells, thereby augmenting the inhibitory influence of these cells on vestibular and cerebellar nuclei. A few studies showed that baclofen improves periodic alternating nystagmus, and gabapentin and memantine, pendular nystagmus. However, many other eye movement disorders such as ocular flutter opsoclonus, central positioning, or see-saw nystagmus are still difficult to treat. Although progress has been made in the treatment of vestibular neuritis, downbeat and upbeat nystagmus, as well as EA 2, state-of-the-art trials must still be performed on many vestibular and ocular motor disorders, namely Menière's disease, bilateral vestibular failure, vestibular paroxysmia, vestibular migraine, and many forms of central eye movement disorders. PMID:21179531

  19. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  20. Sensory processing in the vestibular nuclei during active head movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; Boyle, R.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Many secondary vestibular neurons are sensitive to head on trunk rotation during reflex-induced and voluntary head movements. During passive whole body rotation the interaction of head on trunk signals related to the vestibulo-collic reflex with vestibular signals increases the rotational gain of many secondary vestibular neurons, including many that project to the spinal cord. In some units, the sensitivity to head on trunk and vestibular input is matched and the resulting interaction produces an output that is related to the trunk velocity in space. In other units the head on trunk inputs are stronger and the resulting interaction produces an output that is larger during the reflex. During voluntary head movements, inputs related to head on trunk movement combine destructively with vestibular signals, and often cancel the sensory reafferent consequences of self-generated movements. Cancellation of sensory vestibular signals was observed in all of the antidromically identified secondary vestibulospinal units, even though many of these units were not significantly affected by reflexive head on trunk movements. The results imply that the inputs to vestibular neurons related to head on trunk rotation during reflexive and voluntary movements arise from different sources. We suggest that the relative strength of reflexive head on trunk input to different vestibular neurons might reflect the different functional roles they have in controlling the posture of the neck and body.

  1. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials☆

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Neil P.M.; Paillard, Aurore C.; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin. PMID:24321822

  2. Vestibular influences on autonomic cardiovascular control in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Costa, F.; Kaufmann, H.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that anatomical connections exist between vestibular and autonomic nuclei. Animal studies have shown functional interactions between the vestibular and autonomic systems. The nature of these interactions, however, is complex and has not been fully defined. Vestibular stimulation has been consistently found to reduce blood pressure in animals. Given the potential interaction between vestibular and autonomic pathways this finding could be explained by a reduction in sympathetic activity. However, rather than sympathetic inhibition, vestibular stimulation has consistently been shown to increase sympathetic outflow in cardiac and splanchnic vascular beds in most experimental models. Several clinical observations suggest that a link between vestibular and autonomic systems may also exist in humans. However, direct evidence for vestibular/autonomic interactions in humans is sparse. Motion sickness has been found to induce forearm vasodilation and reduce baroreflex gain, and head down neck flexion induces transient forearm and calf vasoconstriction. On the other hand, studies using optokinetic stimulation have found either very small, variable, or inconsistent changes in heart rate and blood pressure, despite substantial symptoms of motion sickness. Furthermore, caloric stimulation severe enough to produce nystagmus, dizziness, and nausea had no effect on sympathetic nerve activity measured directly with microneurography. No effect was observed on heart rate, blood pressure, or plasma norepinephrine. Several factors may explain the apparent discordance of these results, but more research is needed before we can define the potential importance of vestibular input to cardiovascular regulation and orthostatic tolerance in humans.

  3. Dynamic tilt thresholds are reduced in vestibular migraine

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Richard F.; Priesol, Adrian J.; Nicoucar, Keyvan; Lim, Koeun; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular symptoms caused by migraine, referred to as vestibular migraine, are a frequently diagnosed but poorly understood entity. Based on recent evidence that normal subjects generate vestibular-mediated percepts of head motion and reflexive eye movements using different mechanisms, we hypothesized that percepts of head motion may be abnormal in vestibular migraine. We therefore measured motion detection thresholds in patients with vestibular migraine, migraine patients with no history of vestibular symptoms, and normal subjects using the following paradigms: roll rotation while supine (dynamically activating the semicircular canals); quasi-static roll tilt (statically activating the otolith organs); and dynamic roll tilt (dynamically activating the canals and otoliths). Thresholds were determined while patients were asymptomatic using a staircase paradigm, whereby the peak acceleration of the motion was decreased or increased based on correct or incorrect reports of movement direction. We found a dramatic reduction in motion thresholds in vestibular migraine compared to normal and migraine subjects in the dynamic roll tilt paradigm, but normal thresholds in the roll rotation and quasi-static roll tilt paradigms. These results suggest that patients with vestibular migraine may have enhanced perceptual sensitivity (e.g. increased signal-to-noise ratio) for head motions that dynamically modulate canal and otolith inputs together. PMID:22348937

  4. Effect of meprobamate on the vestibulosensory and vestibular somatic reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of meprobamate on the vestibular illusion of counter-rotation, movement coordination and vertical writing was investigated by a double blind trial method and placebo. The results confirm the possibility of the meprobamate application for prophylaxis and correction of vestibular disturbances.

  5. A Computational Framework for Electrical Stimulation of Vestibular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Prisca; Capogrosso, Marco; Bassi Luciani, Lorenzo; Panarese, Alessandro; Micera, Silvestro

    2015-09-01

    The vestibular organs are very important to generate reflexes critical for stabilizing gaze and body posture. Vestibular diseases significantly reduce the quality of life of people who are affected by them. Some research groups have recently started developing vestibular neuroprostheses to mitigate these symptoms. However, many scientific and technological issues need to be addressed to optimise their use in clinical trials. We developed a computational model able to mimic the response of human vestibular nerves and which can be exploited for "in-silico" testing of new strategies to design implantable vestibular prostheses. First, a digital model of the vestibular system was reconstructed from anatomical data. Monopolar stimulation was delivered at different positions and distances from ampullary nerves. The electrical potential induced by the injected current was computed through finite-element methods and drove extra-cellular stimulation of fibers in the vestibular, facial, and cochlear nerves. The electrical activity of vestibular nerves and the resulting eye movements elicited by different stimulation protocols were investigated. A set of electrode configurations was analyzed in terms of selectivity at increasing injected current. Electrode position along the nerve plays a major role in producing undesired activity in other nontargeted nerves, whereas distance from the fiber does not significantly affect selectivity. Indications are provided to minimize misalignment in nonoptimal electrode locations. Eye movements elicited by the different stimulation protocols are calculated and compared to experimental values, for the purpose of model validation. PMID:25751868

  6. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Julian; Habs, Maximilian; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1) whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2) whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF) were tested for symptoms of hemineglect. Methods Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing. Results Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction. Conclusions A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields. PMID:26247469

  7. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  8. Clinical Manifestation and Prognosis of Vestibular Migraine According to the Vestibular Function Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Jung, Jae Yun; Chung, You Sun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives According to previous reports, patients with vestibular migraine (VM) display variable results from vestibular function tests (VFT): central, peripheral, or normal. The aim of this study was to classify the VM patients into the three groups according to interictal VFT findings (central, peripheral or normal) and to clarify the relationship between VFT results and the clinical manifestations and prognosis in each group. Subjects and Methods We reviewed the medical records of 81 patients diagnosed as VM using the criteria of Neuhauser, et al. between December 2004 and June 2009. Patients were divided into three groups according to the results of VFT. We compared the clinical manifestations and prognosis between groups. Characteristics including dizziness, the nature of headache, associated otologic symptoms, hearing threshold, duration of illness, and recovery time were analyzed. Results The number of patients with central, peripheral vestibular dysfunction and normal finding in VFT were 15, 28, and 38 respectively. There were no significant differences in the nature of headache, associated otologic symptoms, hearing threshold, duration of illness, and recovery time. A small difference was observed in the mean age and characteristics of dizziness, but these were not significant. Conclusions In patients with VM, classification according to the type of vestibular dysfunction was not helpful in the prediction of prognosis and clinical manifestations. PMID:24653898

  9. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T. A. K.; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of “optimal” stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high baseline stimulation rates. We also modeled comodulation and found synergistic combinations of stimulation parameters to achieve equivalent output to only amplitude modulation. This may be an important strategy to reduce current spread and misalignment. The model outputs reflected observed trends in clinical testing and aspects of existing vestibular prosthetic literature. Importantly, the model provided insight to efficiently explore the stimulation parameter space, which was helpful, given limited available patient time. PMID:27148528

  10. Tinnitus, Oscillopsia, and Hyperventilation-Induced Nystagmus: Vestibular Paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K; Gold, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular paroxysmia is the name given to vascular compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Substantial evidence has been discovered in support of vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve as the etiology for trigeminal neuralgia, and effective therapies have been targeted to address this pathophysiology. Perhaps due to the common and often vaguely-described symptoms of dizziness and tinnitus, vascular compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve as a cause of symptoms has remained controversial. Recent clinical studies, however, have better defined diagnostic criteria for vestibular paroxysmia. In this report we discuss a case of vestibular paroxysmia, highlighting some findings of the condition that also uniquely separate it from other more common vestibular disorders. Finally, we discuss current clinical management of vestibular paroxysmia. PMID:27158666

  11. An electronic prosthesis mimicking the dynamic vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Shkel, Andrei M; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a functional architecture, system level design, and electronic evaluation of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis. The sensing unit of the prosthesis is a custom-designed one-axis micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope. Similar to the natural semicircular canal, the MEMS gyroscope senses angular motion of the head and generates voltages proportional to the corresponding angular acceleration. The voltage is then converted into electric current pulses according to the physiological data relating angular acceleration to the spike count in the vestibular nerve. The current pulses can be delivered to stimulate the corresponding vestibular nerve branch. Electronic properties of the vestibular prosthesis prototype have been systematically evaluated and found to meet the design specifications. A unique feature of the present vestibular implant prototype is the scalability: the sensing unit, pulse generator, and the current source can be potentially implemented on a single chip using integrated MEMS technology. PMID:16439834

  12. Efficacy of electrotactile vestibular substitution in patients with peripheral and central vestibular loss

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Y.P.; Tyler, M.E.; Skinner, K.L.; Hogle, R.A.; Bach-y-Rita, P.

    2008-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction of either central or peripheral origin can significantly affect balance, posture, and gait. We conducted a pilot study to test the effectiveness of training with the BrainPort® balance device in subjects with a balance dysfunction due to peripheral or central vestibular loss. The BrainPort® balance device transmits information about the patient’s head position via electrotactile stimulation of the tongue. Head position data is sensed by an accelerometer and displayed on the tongue as a pattern of stimulation. This pattern of stimulation moves forward, backward, and laterally on the tongue in direct response to head movements. Users of the device were trained to use this stimulation to adjust their position in order to maintain their balance. Twenty-eight subjects with peripheral or central vestibular loss were trained with the BrainPort balance device and tested using the following standardized quantitative measurements of the treatment effects: Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). All subjects had chronic balance problems and all but one had previously participated in vestibular rehabilitation therapy. The scores on the clinical tests upon entry into the study were compared to their scores following training with the BrainPort balance device. Our results exhibit consistent positive and statistically significant improvements in balance, posture and gait. These results exceed what could normally be achieved in three to five days of traditional balance training alone. Since this was not a controlled study, we are unable to distinguish the degree to which these improvements are attributable to training with the BrainPort balance device versus the balance exercises performed by all subjects as a part of the BrainPort training sessions. Nonetheless, after training with the BrainPort balance device, all subjects demonstrated significant improvements in performance beyond what might be expected from conventional vestibular rehabilitation therapy. PMID:18413905

  13. Postural and locomotor control in normal and vestibularly deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, P-P; Degallaix, L; Josset, P; Gasc, J-P; Cullen, K E

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how vestibular information is used to maintain posture and control movement by studying vestibularly deficient mice (IsK−/− mutant). In these mutants, microscopy showed degeneration of the cristae of the semicircular canals and of the maculae of the utriculi and sacculi, while behavioural and vestibulo-ocular reflex testing showed that vestibular function was completely absent. However, the histology of Scarpa's ganglia and the vestibular nerves was normal in mutant mice, indicating the presence of intact central pathways. Using X-ray and high-speed cineradiography, we compared resting postures and locomotion patterns between these vestibularly deficient mice and vestibularly normal mice (wild-type and IsK+/−). The absence of vestibular function did not affect resting posture but had profound effects on locomotion. At rest, the S-shaped, sagittal posture of the vertebral column was the same for wild-type and mutant mice. Both held the head with the atlanto-occipital joint fully flexed, the cervico-thoracic junction fully flexed, and the cervical column upright. Wild-type mice extended the head and vertebral column and could walk in a straight line. In marked contrast, locomotion in vestibularly deficient mice was characterized by circling episodes, during which the vertebral column maintained an S-shaped posture. Thus, vestibular information is not required to control resting posture but is mandatory for normal locomotion. We propose that vestibular inputs are required to signal the completion of a planned trajectory because mutant mice continued rotating after changing heading direction. Our findings support the hypothesis that vertebrates limit the number of degrees of freedom to be controlled by adopting just a few of the possible skeletal configurations. PMID:15243133

  14. The role of the vestibular system in manual target localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Susan R.; Mueller, S. Alyssa

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts experience perceptual and sensory-motor disturbances during spaceflight and immediately after return to the 1-g environment of Earth. During spaceflight, sensory information from the eyes, limbs and vestibular organs is reinterpreted by the central nervous system so that astronauts can produce appropriate body movements in microgravity. Alterations in sensory-motor function may affect eye-head-hand coordination and, thus, the crewmember's ability to manually locate objects in extrapersonal space. Previous reports have demonstrated that crewmembers have difficulty in estimating joint and limb position and in pointing to memorized target positions on orbit and immediately postflight. One set of internal cues that may assist in the manual localization of objects is information from the vestibular system. This system contributes to our sense of the body's position in space by providing information on head position and movement and the orientation of the body with respect to gravity. Research on the vestibular system has concentrated on its role in oculo-motor control. Little is known about the role that vestibular information plays in manual motor control, such as reaching and pointing movements. Since central interpretation of vestibular information is altered in microgravity, it is important to determine its role in this process. This summer, we determined the importance of vestibular information in a subject's ability to point accurately toward a target in extrapersonal space. Subjects were passively rotated across the earth-vertical axis and then asked to point back to a previously-seen target. In the first paradigm, the subjects used both visual and vestibular cues for the pointing response, while, in the second paradigm, subjects used only vestibular information. Subjects were able to point with 85 percent accuracy to a target using vestibular information alone. We infer from this result that vestibular input plays a role in the spatial programming of manual responses.

  15. Epidemiology of vertigo, migraine and vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Lempert, Thomas; Neuhauser, Hannelore

    2009-03-01

    Both migraine and vertigo are common in the general population with lifetime prevalences of about 16 % for migraine and 7 % for vertigo. Therefore, a concurrence of the two conditions can be expected in about 1.1 % of the general population by chance alone. However, recent epidemiological evidence suggests that the actual comorbidity is higher, namely 3.2 %. This can be explained by the fact that several dizziness and vertigo syndromes occur more frequently in migraineurs than in controls including benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, motion sickness, cerebellar disorders and anxiety syndromes which may present with dizziness. In addition, there is increasing recognition of a syndrome called vestibular migraine (VM), which is vertigo directly caused by migraine. VM affects more than 1 % of the general population, about 10 % of patients in dizziness clinics and at least 9 % of patients in migraine clinics.Clinically, VM presents with attacks of spontaneous or positional vertigo lasting seconds to days. Migrainous accompaniments such as headache, phonophobia, photophobia or auras are common but not mandatory. Cochlear symptoms may be associated but are mostly mild and non-progressive. During acute attacks one may find central spontaneous or positional nystagmus and, less commonly, unilateral vestibular hypofunction. In the symptom-free interval, vestibular testing adds little to the diagnosis as findings are mostly minor and non-specific. In the absence of controlled studies, treatment of VM is adopted from the migraine sphere comprising avoidance of triggers, stress management as well as pharmacotherapy for acute attacks and prophylaxis. PMID:19225823

  16. Recurrent Miller Fisher syndrome with vestibular involvement.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, G; Boschi, A; Deggouj, N; van Pesch, V; Sindic, C J M

    2011-01-01

    We describe a patient who had four relapses of Miller Fisher syndrome over a period of 20 years. The classical triad - ophthalmoparesis, ataxia and areflexia - was present during the first two attacks; ataxia was not observed during the third episode. The final recurrence was characterized by signs suggestive of a central involvement of the oculomotor pathways, subclinical slowing of the visual-evoked potentials, and peripheral vestibular hyporeactivity. Brain imaging was normal, but high levels of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies were detectable during the second relapse and persisted after the fourth recurrence despite complete clinical recovery. PMID:21934313

  17. Vestibular and oculomotor abnormalities in vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Corvera, J; Benitez, L D; Lopez-Rios, G; Rabiela, M T

    1980-01-01

    The early diagnosis of vertebrobasilar insufficiency in patients with vertigo as their only symptom was attempted using a battery of vestibulo-oculomotor tests. With this testing procedure, we were able to find abnormal vestibulo-oculomotor mechanisms that could account for the vertigo in 41 of 42 patients. These abnormalities, however, did not fall into an easily recognizable pattern that could be considered characteristic of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. The large intersubject variability probably arises from the very different and widespread lesions that occur at the vestibular and neurological levels as a consequence of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. PMID:6968173

  18. 'Carrusel': an expert system for vestibular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, C; Gallego, J; Gavilán, J

    1990-01-01

    Neuro-otology is the only field of otolaryngology in which diagnoses are mainly deductive. Although many technological advances have indeed occurred, the patient history still remains the most important part of the evaluation of a patient complaining of vertigo and/or dizziness. The use of artificial intelligence methods as an aid for the solution of clinical problems is not new. "Carrusel" is a Prolog build-up expert system dealing with the diagnosis of vestibular disorders that achieves a success rate of 97% when compared to the human experts involved in its design. PMID:2239202

  19. Vestibular function in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Harth, O.; Thuemler, R.; Baldrighi, G.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents new results about the interdependence of optical illusory sensations and eye movements in man. To establish to what degree certain illusions previously obtained during centrifugation and parabolic flight can be explained by eye movements and by neuronal integration in the brain, real eye movements were measured as they occurred in the dark without optical fixation, during rectilinear accelerations on the ground, and during weightlessness in parabolic flight. Results provide valuable insight into normal vestibular function as well as resolution of within-the-eye and behind-the-eye contributions to the above illusions.

  20. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  1. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  2. Extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Hongming; Zhou, Yuan; Dong, Pin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To retrospectively describe our 10-year experience with extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas by presenting their clinical features, diagnostic methods, surgical decisions, and treatment outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China. The medical records of 46 patients diagnosed with schwannoma in the extracranial head and neck region as confirmed on paraffin-embedded sections from January 2003 to December 2012 were reviewed. Results: All tumors were benign, and 52% presented as asymptomatic palpable solitary masses. Compressive symptoms, which can represent meaningful indicators of the nerve of origin were commonly noted. The most common nerve of origin was the brachial plexus (n=13, 28.3%). Conclusion: While postoperative histopathologic examination is still the gold standard, fine needle aspiration cytology, CT scan, and magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of schwannomas. As schwannomas are radioresistant, and as, despite their benign nature, can cause severe secondary symptoms, the best treatment of choice is complete excision with preservation of functions. PMID:26593174

  3. Vestibular Schwannoma in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2010-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal MRI as a screening method. Of the 295 patients with SSNHL, VS was found in 12 (4%). All patients had intrameatal or small to medium-sized tumors. There were three cases with SSNHL in one ear and an incidental finding of intracanalicular VS in the contralateral ear. There were four cases of VS that showed good recovery from SSNHL with corticosteroid treatment. There were two cases that mimicked labyrinthitis with hearing loss and vertigo. A greater number of cases than expected of VS were detected in patients with SSNHL, as a result of increasing widespread use of MRI. Various unusual findings in these patients were identified. MRI would seem to be mandatory in all cases of SSNHL. PMID:22451804

  4. Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm after Gamma Knife Surgery for Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Mamoru; Kawarabuki, Kentaro; Inoue, Yasuo; Ohta, Tsutomu

    2016-01-15

    Ruptured aneurysms of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) after radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma (VS) are rare, and no definite treatment has been established for distal AICA pseudoaneurysms. We describe a 61-year-old man who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for left VS. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial regression of the tumor. Twelve years after GKS, he suffered from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initial angiogram showed no vascular lesions; second left vertebral angiogram, 10 days after admission, demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm in the lateral pontine segment of the left AICA. The proximal portion of the AICA was occluded by a coil. Postoperative MRI revealed an infarction on the left side of the pons and brachium pontis. Although the patient suffered from mild postoperative cerebellar ataxia and facial and abducens nerve palsy, he was discharged 1 month postoperatively requiring no assistance with activities of daily living. Twelve months later, he recovered satisfactorily with a modified Rankin Scale grade of 1, and no recanalization of the aneurysm was found on MR angiography. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for ruptured aneurysms at distal AICA carries the risk of brain stem infarction, but should be considered when no other option is available such as after radiotherapy for VS. PMID:26667081

  5. Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm after Gamma Knife Surgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Mamoru; KAWARABUKI, Kentaro; INOUE, Yasuo; OHTA, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysms of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) after radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma (VS) are rare, and no definite treatment has been established for distal AICA pseudoaneurysms. We describe a 61-year-old man who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for left VS. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial regression of the tumor. Twelve years after GKS, he suffered from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initial angiogram showed no vascular lesions; second left vertebral angiogram, 10 days after admission, demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm in the lateral pontine segment of the left AICA. The proximal portion of the AICA was occluded by a coil. Postoperative MRI revealed an infarction on the left side of the pons and brachium pontis. Although the patient suffered from mild postoperative cerebellar ataxia and facial and abducens nerve palsy, he was discharged 1 month postoperatively requiring no assistance with activities of daily living. Twelve months later, he recovered satisfactorily with a modified Rankin Scale grade of 1, and no recanalization of the aneurysm was found on MR angiography. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for ruptured aneurysms at distal AICA carries the risk of brain stem infarction, but should be considered when no other option is available such as after radiotherapy for VS. PMID:26667081

  6. Altered vestibular function in fetal and newborn rats gestated in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Alberts, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers evaluated vestibular development and function in rat pups flown during gestation on the NASA-NIH R1 and R2 missions. Fetal and postnatal vestibular function were examined. Altered vestibular-mediated responses in the experimental fetal pups are attributed to either direct effect of gravity on the vestibular system or indirect effects of microgravity transduced through the mother. The postnatal tests confirmed the hypothesis that the vestibular system continually adapts and responds to tonic stimulation.

  7. Galvanic vestibular stimulation speeds visual memory recall.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Nicholls, Sophie; Pattenden, Charlotte; Kilduff, Patrick; Milberg, William

    2008-08-01

    The experiments of Alessandro Volta were amongst the first to indicate that visuo-spatial function can be altered by stimulating the vestibular nerves with galvanic current. Until recently, the beneficial effects of the procedure were masked by the high levels of electrical current applied, which induced nystagmus-related gaze deviation and spatial disorientation. However, several neuropsychological studies have shown that much weaker, imperceptible currents that do not elicit unpleasant side-effects can help overcome visual loss after stroke. Here, we show that visual processing in neurologically healthy individuals can also benefit from galvanic vestibular stimulation. Participants first learnt the names of eight unfamiliar faces and then after a short delay, answered questions from memory about how pairs of these faces differed. Mean correct reaction times were significantly shorter when sub-sensory, noise-enhanced anodal stimulation was administered to the left mastoid, compared to when no stimulation was administered at all. This advantage occurred with no loss in response accuracy, and raises the possibility that the procedure may constitute a more general form of cognitive enhancement. PMID:18584162

  8. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  9. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy: review of indications, mechanisms, and key exercises.

    PubMed

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  10. Diversity of vestibular nuclei neurons targeted by cerebellar nodulus inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Blázquez, Pablo M; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A functional role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula (lobules X and IXc,d of the vermis) for vestibular processing has been strongly suggested by direct reciprocal connections with the vestibular nuclei, as well as direct vestibular afferent inputs as mossy fibres. Here we have explored the types of neurons in the macaque vestibular nuclei targeted by nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition using orthodromic identification from the caudal vermis. We found that all nodulus-target neurons are tuned to vestibular stimuli, and most are insensitive to eye movements. Such non-eye-movement neurons are thought to project to vestibulo-spinal and/or thalamo-cortical pathways. Less than 20% of nodulus-target neurons were sensitive to eye movements, suggesting that the caudal vermis can also directly influence vestibulo-ocular pathways. In general, response properties of nodulus-target neurons were diverse, spanning the whole continuum previously described in the vestibular nuclei. Most nodulus-target cells responded to both rotation and translation stimuli and only a few were selectively tuned to translation motion only. Other neurons were sensitive to net linear acceleration, similar to otolith afferents. These results demonstrate that, unlike the flocculus and ventral paraflocculus which target a particular cell group, nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition targets a large diversity of cell types in the vestibular nuclei, consistent with a broad functional significance contributing to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-thalamic and vestibulo-spinal pathways. PMID:24127616

  11. New insights into vestibular neuropharmacology: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Chabbert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological investigations have highlighted the high prevalence of vestibular dysfunctions in the adult population and its association with aging. Despite a large and unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical options of targeted and efficient drugs to reduce the symptoms associated with vestibular deficits remains largely insufficient. This special issue of the Journal of Vestibular Research is devoted to the session: New insights on vestibular neuropharmacology: From bench to bedside, that was organized at the 2012 Midwinter Meeting of the Association of Research in Otolaryngology. This special issue intends 1. to emphasize the current state of the medical need for potent pharmacological treatments of vestibular deficits while highlighting questions regarding the molecular targets, the therapeutic window and the role of pharmacological treatment versus physiotherapy; 2. to give an overview of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and the mechanism of action of the drugs currently used in the treatment of vestibular disorders and 3. to present recent discoveries in basic research, that may lead to future drug identification to efficiently alleviate the vertigo crisis and protect the vestibule. This theme should target a broad audience ranging from ENT clinicians to scientists, including pharmacologists and pharmacists. PMID:24177343

  12. Nystagmus in Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Krakovitz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is one of the commonly identified congenital temporal bone abnormalities associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss may be unilateral or bilateral, and typically presents at birth or in early childhood. Vestibular symptoms have been reported in up to 50% of affected individuals, and may be delayed in onset until adulthood. The details of nystagmus in patients with EVA have not been previously reported. The objectives were to describe the clinical history, vestibular test findings and nystagmus seen in a case series of patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct anomaly. Chart review, included computed tomography temporal bones, infrared nystagmography with positional and positioning testing, caloric testing, rotary chair and vibration testing. Clinical history and nystagmus varied among the five patients in this series. All patients were initially presumed to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but repositioning treatments were not effective, prompting referral, further testing and evaluation. In three patients with longstanding vestibular complaints, positional nystagmus was consistently present. One patient had distinct recurrent severe episodes of positional nystagmus. Nystagmus was unidirectional and horizontal. In one case horizontal nystagmus was consistently reproducible with seated head turn to the affected side, and reached 48 d/s. Nystagmus associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct is often positional, and can be confused with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Unexplained vestibular symptoms in patients with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss should prompt diagnostic consideration of EVA. PMID:26557362

  13. Nystagmus in Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    White, Judith; Krakovitz, Paul

    2015-01-21

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is one of the commonly identified congenital temporal bone abnormalities associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss may be unilateral or bilateral, and typically presents at birth or in early childhood. Vestibular symptoms have been reported in up to 50% of affected individuals, and may be delayed in onset until adulthood. The details of nystagmus in patients with EVA have not been previously reported. The objectives were to describe the clinical history, vestibular test findings and nystagmus seen in a case series of patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct anomaly. Chart review, included computed tomography temporal bones, infrared nystagmography with positional and positioning testing, caloric testing, rotary chair and vibration testing. Clinical history and nystagmus varied among the five patients in this series. All patients were initially presumed to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but repositioning treatments were not effective, prompting referral, further testing and evaluation. In three patients with longstanding vestibular complaints, positional nystagmus was consistently present. One patient had distinct recurrent severe episodes of positional nystagmus. Nystagmus was unidirectional and horizontal. In one case horizontal nystagmus was consistently reproducible with seated head turn to the affected side, and reached 48 d/s. Nystagmus associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct is often positional, and can be confused with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Unexplained vestibular symptoms in patients with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss should prompt diagnostic consideration of EVA. PMID:26557362

  14. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  15. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  16. Pharmacotherapy of vestibular and ocular motor disorders, including nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Michael; Thurtell, Matthew J; Shaikh, Aasef G; Brandt, Thomas; Zee, David S; Leigh, R John

    2011-07-01

    We review current pharmacological treatments for peripheral and central vestibular disorders, and ocular motor disorders that impair vision, especially pathological nystagmus. The prerequisites for successful pharmacotherapy of vertigo, dizziness, and abnormal eye movements are the "4 D's": correct diagnosis, correct drug, appropriate dosage, and sufficient duration. There are seven groups of drugs (the "7 A's") that can be used: antiemetics; anti-inflammatory, anti-Ménière's, and anti-migrainous medications; anti-depressants, anti-convulsants, and aminopyridines. A recovery from acute vestibular neuritis can be promoted by treatment with oral corticosteroids. Betahistine may reduce the frequency of attacks of Ménière's disease. The aminopyridines constitute a novel treatment approach for downbeat and upbeat nystagmus, as well as episodic ataxia type 2 (EA 2); these drugs may restore normal "pacemaker" activity to the Purkinje cells that govern vestibular and cerebellar nuclei. A limited number of trials indicate that baclofen improves periodic alternating nystagmus, and that gabapentin and memantine improve acquired pendular and infantile (congenital) nystagmus. Preliminary reports suggest suppression of square-wave saccadic intrusions by memantine, and ocular flutter by beta-blockers. Thus, although progress has been made in the treatment of vestibular neuritis, some forms of pathological nystagmus, and EA 2, controlled, masked trials are still needed to evaluate treatments for many vestibular and ocular motor disorders, including betahistine for Ménière's disease, oxcarbazepine for vestibular paroxysmia, or metoprolol for vestibular migraine. PMID:21461686

  17. In the presence of others: Self-location, balance control and vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Falconer, C J; Deroualle, D; Mast, F W

    2015-11-01

    The degree to which others in our environment influence sensorimotor processing has been a particular focus of cognitive neuroscience for the past two decades. This process of self-other resonance, or shared body representation, has only recently been extended to more global bodily processes such as self-location, self-motion perception, balance and perspective taking. In this review, we outline these previously overlooked areas of research to bridge the distinct field of social neuroscience with global self-perception, vestibular processing and postural control. Firstly, we outline research showing that the presence and movement of others can modulate two fundamental experiences of the self: self-location (the experience of where the self is located in space) and self-motion perception (the experience that oneself has moved or has been moved in space). Secondly, we outline recent research that has shown perturbations in balance control as a result of instability in others in our environment. Conversely to this, we also highlight studies in virtual reality demonstrating the potential benefits of the presence of others in our environment for those undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. Thirdly, we outline studies of first- and third-person perspective taking, which is the ability to have or take a visuo-spatial perspective within and out-with the confines of our own body. These studies demonstrate a contamination of perspective taking processes (i.e. automatic, implicit, third-person perspective taking) in the presence of others. This collection of research highlights the importance of social cues in the more global processing of the self and its accompanying sensory inputs, particularly vestibular signals. Future research will need to better determine the mechanisms of self-other resonance within these processes, including the role of individual differences in the susceptibility to the influence of another. PMID:26602955

  18. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  19. Long-term follow-up of vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Nuti, Daniele

    2009-05-01

    The long-term outcome of vestibular neuritis was evaluated in 35 patients using 4 bedside tests (head impulse, head heave, head shake, vibration), the caloric test and two surveys that explored the degree of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory [DHI]) and the anxiety and depression levels (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]). Sixty-six percent of patients showed a positive bedside clinical test or calorics abnormalities. DHI scores were significantly higher in the patients group, while HADS scores were comparable between patients and controls. Disability from vestibular neuritis is primarily due to the vestibular disturbance itself, rather than purely psychological factors. PMID:19645942

  20. Overview of the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, Alexandre R; Staab, Jeffrey P; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-08-01

    Classifications and definitions are essential to facilitate communication; promote accurate diagnostic criteria; develop, test, and use effective therapies; and specify knowledge gaps. This article describes the development of the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders (ICVD) initiative. It describes its history, scope, and goals. The Bárány Society has played a central role in organizing the ICVD by establishing internal development processes and outreach to other scientific societies. The ICVD is organized in four layers. The current focus is on disorders with a high epidemiologic importance, such as Menière disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular migraine, and behavioral aspects of vestibular disorders. PMID:26231270

  1. The Development of the Vestibular Apparatus Under Conditions of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinnikov, Y. A.; Gazenko, O. G.; Lychakov, D. V.; Palmbakh, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on the effect of space flight conditions on morphogenesis and the structure of the vestibular apparatus in amphibian and fish larvae. Larval development proceeded in weightlessness without serious morphological defects. The vestibular apparatus developed; its organization in the experimental animals did not differ qualitatively from that in the controls. The specific external stimulus (gravitation) appears not to be a necessary condition for the development of a gravitation receptor in ontogenesis although the appearance of the vestibular apparatus in phylogenesis was apparently related to this stimulus.

  2. Vestibular contributions to a right-hemisphere network for bodily awareness: combining galvanic vestibular stimulation and the "Rubber Hand Illusion".

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Berlot, Eva; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    An altered sense of one's own body is a common consequence of vestibular damage, and also of damage to vestibular networks in the right hemisphere. However, few experimental studies have investigated whether vestibular signals contribute to bodily awareness. We addressed this issue by combining an established experimental model of bodily awareness (Rubber Hand Illusion -RHI) with galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in healthy participants. Brief left anodal and right cathodal GVS (which predominantly activates vestibular networks in the right hemisphere), or right anodal and left cathodal GVS, or sham stimulation were delivered at random, while participants experienced either synchronous or asynchronous visuo-tactile stimulation of a rubber hand and their own hand. The drift in the perceived position of the participant's hand towards the rubber hand was used as a proxy measure of the resulting multisensory illusion of body ownership. GVS induced strong polarity-dependent effects on this measure of RHI: left anodal and right cathodal GVS produced significantly lower proprioceptive drift than right anodal and left cathodal GVS. We suggest that vestibular inputs influence the multisensory weighting functions that underlie bodily awareness: the right hemisphere vestibular projections activated by the left anodal and right cathodal GVS increased the weight of intrinsic proprioceptive signals about hand position, and decreased the weight of visual information responsible for visual capture during the RHI. PMID:25619847

  3. [Principles and elaboration of a vestibular rehabilitation technic, vestibular habituation training].

    PubMed

    Norré, M E; de Weerdt, W

    1979-01-01

    In the scope of the treatment of some vertiginous patients, the vestibular habituation training has to be considered as a valuable technique, superior to the merely medical treatment by drugs. Bsed on the fundamental principles of the vestibular physiopathology, its aim is to favour the compensatory and adaptive functions of the vestibular regulation centres in case of a peripheral dysfunction, either a unilateral hypofunction or some type of paroxysmal positional vertigo. The repeating of the provoking manoeuvres results in a habituation effect, so that the centres accept this abnormal stimulation pattern and are able to transform it in an equilibrated elaboration of the reflexes. In this way, every dizzy sensation can be abolished. So each case presenting provoked dizziness, either on the base of unilateral vestibular hypofunction, or as a typical paroxysmal positional vertigo, can be treated in this way. The patients are selected by anamnesis and thorough functional evaluation with search for positional nystagmus, caloric and rotation tests, recorded by E.N.G. Afterwards movements and positions provoking dizziness are tested in a practical way, leading to a selection of movements which are used in order to compose the treatment schedule. This test battery permits also to realize a close and precise follow-up of these patients, besides the classical clinical and E.N.G. evaluations. A preliminary report of 62 cases is presented. We found a positive result in more than 2/3 of the cases after 2 months. This technique being subject of further intensive investigations in our department, we make reservations as to future changes in the technique and procedures presented in this study. We would like to emphasize this treatment has to be integrated in a global clinical approach to the dizzy patient. PMID:314768

  4. Optokinetic and Vestibular Responsiveness in the Macaque Rostral Vestibular and Fastigial Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ayanna S.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2009-01-01

    We recorded from rostral vestibular (VN) and rostral fastigial nuclei (FN) neurons that did not respond to eye movements during three-dimensional (3D) vestibular and optokinetic stimulation (OKS). The majority of neurons in both areas (76 and 69% in VN and FN, respectively) responded during both rotational and translational motion. Preferred directions scattered throughout 3D space for translation but showed some preference for pitch/roll over yaw for rotation. VN/FN neurons were also tested during OKS while monkeys suppressed their optokinetic nystagmus by fixating a head-fixed target. Only a handful of cells (VN: 17%, FN: 6%) modulated during 0.5-Hz OKS suppression, but the number of responsive cells increased (VN: 40%, FN: 48%) during 0.02-Hz OKS. Preferred directions for rotation and OKS were not matched on individual neurons, and OKS gains were smaller than the respective gains during rotation. These results were generally similar for VN and FN neurons. We conclude that optokinetic-vestibular convergence might not be as prevalent as earlier studies have suggested. PMID:19073813

  5. Multisensory effects on somatosensation: a trimodal visuo-vestibular-tactile interaction.

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular information about self-motion is combined with other sensory signals. Previous research described both visuo-vestibular and vestibular-tactile bilateral interactions, but the simultaneous interaction between all three sensory modalities has not been explored. Here we exploit a previously reported visuo-vestibular integration to investigate multisensory effects on tactile sensitivity in humans. Tactile sensitivity was measured during passive whole body rotations alone or in conjunction with optic flow, creating either purely vestibular or visuo-vestibular sensations of self-motion. Our results demonstrate that tactile sensitivity is modulated by perceived self-motion, as provided by a combined visuo-vestibular percept, and not by the visual and vestibular cues independently. We propose a hierarchical multisensory interaction that underpins somatosensory modulation: visual and vestibular cues are first combined to produce a multisensory self-motion percept. Somatosensory processing is then enhanced according to the degree of perceived self-motion. PMID:27198907

  6. Balancing awareness: Vestibular signals modulate visual consciousness in the absence of awareness.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Roy; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    The processing of visual and vestibular information is crucial for perceiving self-motion. Visual cues, such as optic flow, have been shown to induce and alter vestibular percepts, yet the role of vestibular information in shaping visual awareness remains unclear. Here we investigated if vestibular signals influence the access to awareness of invisible visual signals. Using natural vestibular stimulation (passive yaw rotations) on a vestibular self-motion platform, and optic flow masked through continuous flash suppression (CFS) we tested if congruent visual-vestibular information would break interocular suppression more rapidly than incongruent information. We found that when the unseen optic flow was congruent with the vestibular signals perceptual suppression as quantified with the CFS paradigm was broken more rapidly than when it was incongruent. We argue that vestibular signals impact the formation of visual awareness through enhanced access to awareness for congruent multisensory stimulation. PMID:26204565

  7. Payload specialist Wubbo Ockels prepares to use vestibular sled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Wubbo J. Ockels prepares to lower the eye-gear portion of the vestibular sled helmet for a test on the busy sled. The scientist has sensors on his face and forehead for system monitoring.

  8. Certain aspects of the vestibular problem in space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Vestibulovegetative disorders on manned space flights are discussed. A study relating to the vestibular stimuli in respiration, diaphoresis cardiac rhythm and a broad complex of hemodynamic indices was conducted. Certain tests for astronaut candidates are discussed.

  9. Vestibular function and temporal bone imaging in DFNB1.

    PubMed

    Oonk, A M M; Beynon, A J; Peters, T A; Kunst, H P M; Admiraal, R J C; Kremer, H; Verbist, B; Pennings, R J E

    2015-09-01

    DFNB1 is the most prevalent type of hereditary hearing impairment known nowadays and the audiometric phenotype is very heterogeneous. There is, however, no consensus in literature on vestibular and imaging characteristics. Vestibular function and imaging results of 44 DFNB1 patients were evaluated in this retrospective study. All patients displayed a response during rotational velocity step testing. In 65% of the cases, the caloric results were within normal range bilaterally. The video head impulse test was normal in all patients. In 34.4% of the CT scans one or more temporal bone anomalies were found. The various anomalies found, were present in small numbers and none seemed convincingly linked to a specific DFNB1genotype. The group of DFNB1 patients presented here is the largest thus far evaluated for their vestibular function. From this study, it can be assumed that DFNB1 is not associated with vestibular dysfunction or specific temporal bone anomalies. PMID:26188104

  10. Surgical access to separate branches of the cat vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radkevich, L. A.; Ayzikov, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A posteroventral approach for access to separate branches of the cat vestibular nerve is presented which permits simultaneous surgical access to the ampullary and otolithic nerves. Surgical procedures are discussed.

  11. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. The European vestibular experiments in spacelab-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, J.; von Baumgarten, R.; Vogel, H.; Wetzig, J.; Benson, A.; Berthoz, A.; Vieville, Th.; Brandt, Th.; Probst, Th.; Brand, U.; Bruzek, W.; Dichgans, J.; Scherer, H.

    A series of experiments /1/ were performed in the Spacelab-1 mission on November/December, 1983, pre-, in-, and postflight. These experiments covered various aspects of the functions of the vestibular system, the inflight tests comprising threshold measurements for linear movements in three orthogonal axes, optokinetic stimulation, vestibulo-ocular reflexes under linear and angular accelerations, caloric stimulation with and without linear accelerations; pre- and postflight tests repeated the inflight protocol with the addition of subjective vertical and eye counter-rotation measurements using a tilt table. One of the most surprising and significant results was the caloric test: strong caloric nystagmus on the two subjects tested was recorded inflight; this was contrary to what was expected from Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric nystagmus.

  13. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David; Morris, Rachael; Milberg, William; Sakel, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for four consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and 1-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy. PMID:24391559

  14. Vestibular ataxia and its measurement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Methods involved in and results obtained with a new comprehensive ataxia test battery are described, and definitions of spontaneous and induced vestibular ataxia in man are given in terms of these findings. In addition, the topic of alcohol-induced ataxia in relation to labyrinth function is investigated. Items in the test battery comprise a sharpened Romberg test, in which the subject stands on the floor with eyes closed and arms folded against his chest, feet heel-to-toe, for 60 seconds; an eyes-open walking test; an eyes-open standing test; an eyes-closed standing test; an eyes-closed on-leg standing test; an eyes-closed walk a line test; an eyes-closed heel-to-toe walking test; and supplementary ataxia tests such as the classical Romberg test.

  15. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  16. Timing of neuron development in the rodent vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The timing of cell generation (onset and duration) in the developing rat vestibular and proprioceptive systems is investigated. The results clearly indicate a defined time-span for generation of all neurons in the central nervous system nuclei studied. This cytogenetic period in both vestibular and proprioceptive sensory nuclei is determined to occur during and immediately after placentation, a potentially critical period for spaceflight exposure due to alterations in maternal physiology.

  17. Restoration of 3D Vestibular Sensation in Rhesus Monkeys Using a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Davidovics, Natan; Chiang, Bryce; Ahn, Joong Ho; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    Profound bilateral loss of vestibular hair cell function can cause chronically disabling loss of balance and inability to maintain stable vision during head and body movements. We have previously shown that chinchillas rendered bilaterally vestibular-deficient via intratympanic administration of the ototoxic antibiotic gentamicin regain a more nearly normal 3-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) when head motion information sensed by a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) is encoded via rate-modulated pulsatile stimulation of vestibular nerve branches. Despite significant improvement versus the unaided condition, animals still exhibited some 3D VOR misalignment (i.e., the 3D axis of eye movement responses did not precisely align with the axis of head rotation), presumably due to current spread between a given ampullary nerve’s stimulating electrode(s) and afferent fibers in nontargeted branches of the vestibular nerve. Assuming that effects of current spread depend on relative orientation and separation between nerve branches, anatomic differences between chinchilla and human labyrinths may limit the extent to which results in chinchillas accurately predict MVP performance in humans. In this report, we describe the MVP-evoked 3D VOR measured in alert rhesus monkeys, which have labyrinths that are larger than chinchillas and temporal bone anatomy more similar to humans. Electrodes were implanted in five monkeys treated with intratympanic gentamicin to bilaterally ablate vestibular hair cell mechanosensitivity. Eye movements mediated by the 3D VOR were recorded during passive sinusoidal (0.2–5 Hz, peak 50°/s) and acceleration-step (1000°/s2 to 150°/s) whole-body rotations in darkness about each semicircular canal axis. During constant 100 pulse/s stimulation (i.e., MVP powered ON but set to stimulate each ampullary nerve at a constant mean baseline rate not modulated by head motion), 3D VOR responses to head rotation exhibited profoundly low gain [(mean eye velocity amplitude)/(mean head velocity amplitude) < 0.1] and large misalignment between ideal and actual eye movements. In contrast, motion-modulated sinusoidal MVP stimuli elicited a 3D VOR with gain 0.4–0.7 and axis misalignment of 21–38°, and responses to high-acceleration transient head rotations exhibited gain and asymmetry closer to those of unilaterally gentamicin-treated animals (i.e., with one intact labyrinth) than to bilaterally gentamicin-treated animals without MVP stimulation. In comparison to responses observed under similar conditions in chinchillas, acute responses to MVP stimulation in rhesus macaque monkeys were slightly better aligned to the desired rotation axis. Responses during combined rotation and prosthetic stimulation were greater than when either stimulus was presented alone, suggesting that the central nervous system uses MVP input in the context of multisensory integration. Considering the similarity in temporal bone anatomy and VOR performance between rhesus monkeys and humans, these observations suggest that an MVP will likely restore a useful level of vestibular sensation and gaze stabilization in humans. PMID:21888961

  18. Restoration of 3D vestibular sensation in rhesus monkeys using a multichannel vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Davidovics, Natan S; Chiang, Bryce; Ahn, Joong Ho; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-11-01

    Profound bilateral loss of vestibular hair cell function can cause chronically disabling loss of balance and inability to maintain stable vision during head and body movements. We have previously shown that chinchillas rendered bilaterally vestibular-deficient via intratympanic administration of the ototoxic antibiotic gentamicin regain a more nearly normal 3-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) when head motion information sensed by a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) is encoded via rate-modulated pulsatile stimulation of vestibular nerve branches. Despite significant improvement versus the unaided condition, animals still exhibited some 3D VOR misalignment (i.e., the 3D axis of eye movement responses did not precisely align with the axis of head rotation), presumably due to current spread between a given ampullary nerve's stimulating electrode(s) and afferent fibers in non-targeted branches of the vestibular nerve. Assuming that effects of current spread depend on relative orientation and separation between nerve branches, anatomic differences between chinchilla and human labyrinths may limit the extent to which results in chinchillas accurately predict MVP performance in humans. In this report, we describe the MVP-evoked 3D VOR measured in alert rhesus monkeys, which have labyrinths that are larger than chinchillas and temporal bone anatomy more similar to humans. Electrodes were implanted in five monkeys treated with intratympanic gentamicin to bilaterally ablate vestibular hair cell mechanosensitivity. Eye movements mediated by the 3D VOR were recorded during passive sinusoidal (0.2-5 Hz, peak 50°/s) and acceleration-step (1000°/s(2) to 150°/s) whole-body rotations in darkness about each semicircular canal axis. During constant 100 pulse/s stimulation (i.e., MVP powered ON but set to stimulate each ampullary nerve at a constant mean baseline rate not modulated by head motion), 3D VOR responses to head rotation exhibited profoundly low gain [(mean eye velocity amplitude)/(mean head velocity amplitude) < 0.1] and large misalignment between ideal and actual eye movements. In contrast, motion-modulated sinusoidal MVP stimuli elicited a 3D VOR with gain 0.4-0.7 and axis misalignment of 21-38°, and responses to high-acceleration transient head rotations exhibited gain and asymmetry closer to those of unilaterally gentamicin-treated animals (i.e., with one intact labyrinth) than to bilaterally gentamicin-treated animals without MVP stimulation. In comparison to responses observed under similar conditions in chinchillas, acute responses to MVP stimulation in rhesus macaque monkeys were slightly better aligned to the desired rotation axis. Responses during combined rotation and prosthetic stimulation were greater than when either stimulus was presented alone, suggesting that the central nervous system uses MVP input in the context of multisensory integration. Considering the similarity in temporal bone anatomy and VOR performance between rhesus monkeys and humans, these observations suggest that an MVP will likely restore a useful level of vestibular sensation and gaze stabilization in humans. PMID:21888961

  19. Orbital Spaceflight During Pregnancy Shapes Function of Mammalian Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, April E.; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bruce, Laura L.; Alberts, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Pregnant rats were flown on the NASA Space Shuttle during the early developmental period of their fetuses’ vestibular apparatus and onset of vestibular function. The authors report that prenatal spaceflight exposure shapes vestibular-mediated behavior and central morphology. Postflight testing revealed (a) delayed onset of body righting responses, (b) cardiac deceleration (bradycardia) to 70° head-up roll, (c) decreased branching of gravistatic afferent axons, but (d) no change in branching of angular acceleration receptor projections with comparable synaptogenesis of the medial vestibular nucleus in flight relative to control fetuses. Kinematic analyses of the dams’ on-orbit behavior suggest that, although the fetal otolith organs are unloaded in microgravity, the fetus’ semicircular canals receive high levels of stimulation during longitudinal rotations of the mother’s weightless body. Behaviorally derived stimulation from maternal movements may be a significant factor in studies of vestibular sensory development. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that gravity and angular acceleration shape prenatal organization and function within the mammalian vestibular system. PMID:18298265

  20. Vestibular activity and cognitive development in children: perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette R.; Hamilton, Derek A.; Wiener, Sidney I.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular signals play an essential role in oculomotor and static and dynamic posturomotor functions. Increasing attention is now focusing on their impact on spatial and non-spatial cognitive functions. Movements of the head in space evoke vestibular signals that make important contributions during the development of brain representations of body parts relative to one another as well as representations of body orientation and position within the environment. A central nervous system pathway relays signals from the vestibular nuclei to the hippocampal system where this input is indispensable for neuronal responses selective for the position and orientation of the head in space. One aspect of the hippocampal systems’ processing to create episodic and contextual memories is its role in spatial orientation and navigation behaviors that require processing of relations between background cues. These are also impaired in adult patients with vestibular deficits. However little is known about the impact of vestibular loss on cognitive development in children. This is investigated here with a particular emphasis upon the hypothetical mechanisms and potential impact of vestibular loss at critical ages on the development of respective spatial and non-spatial cognitive processes and their brain substrates. PMID:24376403

  1. Orbital spaceflight during pregnancy shapes function of mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Ronca, April E; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bruce, Laura L; Alberts, Jeffrey R

    2008-02-01

    Pregnant rats were flown on the NASA Space Shuttle during the early developmental period of their fetuses' vestibular apparatus and onset of vestibular function. The authors report that prenatal spaceflight exposure shapes vestibular-mediated behavior and central morphology. Postflight testing revealed (a) delayed onset of body righting responses, (b) cardiac deceleration (bradycardia) to 70 degrees head-up roll, (c) decreased branching of gravistatic afferent axons, but (d) no change in branching of angular acceleration receptor projections with comparable synaptogenesis of the medial vestibular nucleus in flight relative to control fetuses. Kinematic analyses of the dams' on-orbit behavior suggest that, although the fetal otolith organs are unloaded in microgravity, the fetus' semicircular canals receive high levels of stimulation during longitudinal rotations of the mother's weightless body. Behaviorally derived stimulation from maternal movements may be a significant factor in studies of vestibular sensory development. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that gravity and angular acceleration shape prenatal organization and function within the mammalian vestibular system. PMID:18298265

  2. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  3. Synchronization of noisy systems by stochastic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Neiman, A.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Moss, F.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Shulgin, B.; Collins, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    We study, in terms of synchronization, the {ital nonlinear response} of noisy bistable systems to a stochastic external signal, represented by Markovian dichotomic noise. We propose a general kinetic model which allows us to conduct a full analytical study of the nonlinear response, including the calculation of cross-correlation measures, the mean switching frequency, and synchronization regions. Theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations of a noisy overdamped bistable oscillator. We show that dichotomic noise can instantaneously synchronize the switching process of the system. We also show that synchronization is most pronounced at an optimal noise level{emdash}this effect connects this phenomenon with aperiodic stochastic resonance. Similar synchronization effects are observed for a stochastic neuron model stimulated by a stochastic spike train. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Synchronization of noisy systems by stochastic signals.

    PubMed

    Neiman, A; Schimansky-Geier, L; Moss, F; Shulgin, B; Collins, J J

    1999-07-01

    We study, in terms of synchronization, the nonlinear response of noisy bistable systems to a stochastic external signal, represented by Markovian dichotomic noise. We propose a general kinetic model which allows us to conduct a full analytical study of the nonlinear response, including the calculation of cross-correlation measures, the mean switching frequency, and synchronization regions. Theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations of a noisy overdamped bistable oscillator. We show that dichotomic noise can instantaneously synchronize the switching process of the system. We also show that synchronization is most pronounced at an optimal noise level-this effect connects this phenomenon with aperiodic stochastic resonance. Similar synchronization effects are observed for a stochastic neuron model stimulated by a stochastic spike train. PMID:11969761

  5. Role of vestibular information in initiation of rapid postural responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have difficulty maintaining balance without stepping when standing in tandem, on compliant surfaces, across narrow beams, or on one foot, especially with eyes closed. Normal individuals (with no sensory impairment) maintain balance in these tasks by employing quick, active hip rotation (a "hip strategy"). The absence of a hip strategy in vestibular patients responding to translations of a short support surface has previously been taken as evidence that the use of hip strategy requires an intact vestibular system. However, many tasks requiring hip strategy alter one or a combination of important system characteristics, such as initial state of the body (tandem stance), dynamics (compliant surfaces), or biomechanical limits of stability (narrow beams). Therefore, the balance deficit in these tasks may result from a failure to account for these support surface alterations when planning and executing sensorimotor responses. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular information is critical to trigger a hip strategy even on an unaltered support surface, which imposes no changes on the system characteristics. We recorded the postural responses of vestibular patients and control subjects with eyes closed to rearward support surface translations of varying velocity, in erect stance on a firm, flat surface. Subjects were instructed to maintain balance without stepping, if possible. Faster translation velocities (25 cm/s or more) produced a consistent pattern of early hip torque (first 400 ms) in control subjects (i.e., a hip strategy). Most of the patients with bilateral vestibular loss responded to the same translation velocities with similar torques. Contrary to our hypothesis, we conclude that vestibular function is not necessary to trigger a hip strategy. We postulate, therefore, that the balance deficit previously observed in vestibular patients during postural tasks that elicit a hip strategy may have been due to the sensorimotor consequences of the system alterations imposed by the postural tasks used in those studies. Preliminary results from two younger patients who lost vestibular function as infants indicate that age, duration of vestibular loss, and/or the timing of the loss may also be factors that can influence the use of hip strategy as a rapid postural response.

  6. Prevalence of Vestibular Disorder in Older People Who Experience Dizziness.

    PubMed

    Chau, Allan T; Menant, Jasmine C; Hübner, Patrick P; Lord, Stephen R; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people, it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological, and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim is to accurately identify the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy-six participants aged 51-92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years) were tested using the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for htDVA score, DHI score, sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1-2 Hz with peak velocity at 30°/s) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase, transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150°/s(2) to a constant velocity rotation of 50°/s) VOR gain and time constant (TC), optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain, and TC (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50°/s). We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38 and 1% of participants, respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5-1 Hz), and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction. PMID:26733940

  7. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research including major findings that have advanced our understanding of how this system exerts its influence on reflexive and cognitive challenges encountered during daily life. In particular, we highlight the contributions of different animal models and the advantage of using a comparative research approach. Cross-species comparisons have established that the morpho-physiological properties underlying vestibular signal processing are evolutionarily inherent, thereby disclosing general principles. Based on the documented success of this approach, we suggest that future research employing a balanced spectrum of standard animal models such as fish/frog, mouse and primate will optimize our progress in understanding vestibular processing in health and disease. Moreover, we propose that this should be further supplemented by research employing more "exotic" species that offer unique experimental access and/or have specific vestibular adaptations due to unusual locomotor capabilities or lifestyles. Taken together this strategy will expedite our understanding of the basic principles underlying vestibular computations to reveal relevant translational aspects. Accordingly, studies employing animal models are indispensible and even mandatory for the development of new treatments, medication and technical aids (implants) for patients with vestibular pathologies. PMID:27083880

  8. Vestibular rehabilitation ameliorates chronic dizziness through the SIRT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Tsai, Kun-Ling; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Dizziness is a common clinical symptom frequently referred to general neurologists and practitioners. Exercise intervention, in the form of vestibular rehabilitation, is known as an effective clinical management for dizziness. This intervention is reported to have a functional role in correcting dizziness, improving gaze stability, retraining balance and gait, and enhancing physical fitness. Dizziness is known to be highly related to inflammation and oxidative stress. SIRT1 is a major molecule for the regulation of inflammation and mitigation of oxidative stress in chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the bio-molecular roles of SIRT1 involved in the pathogenesis of dizziness are still largely unclear. In this study, a total of 30 subjects were recruited (15 patients with chronic dizziness, and 15 age/gender matched non-dizzy control subjects). The dizzy subjects group received 18 sessions of 30-min vestibular training. We found that the mRNA and protein expression levels of SIRT1 in the blood samples of chronic dizzy patients were repressed compared with those of healthy controls. After vestibular training, the dizzy patients had significant symptomatic improvements. The SIRT1 expression and its downstream genes (PPAR-γ and PGC-1α) were upregulated after vestibular exercises in dizzy subjects. Notably, the catalytic activity of SIRT1, NADPH and antioxidant enzyme activities were also activated in dizzy patients after vestibular training. Furthermore, vestibular exercise training reduced oxidative events and p53 expression in patients with dizziness. This study demonstrated that vestibular exercise training improved dizziness symptoms, and mechanisms for alleviation of chronic dizziness may partly involve the activation of the SIRT1 axis and the repression of redox status. PMID:24624081

  9. Prevalence of Vestibular Disorder in Older People Who Experience Dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Allan T.; Menant, Jasmine C.; Hübner, Patrick P.; Lord, Stephen R.; Migliaccio, Americo A.

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people, it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological, and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim is to accurately identify the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy-six participants aged 51–92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years) were tested using the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for htDVA score, DHI score, sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1–2 Hz with peak velocity at 30°/s) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase, transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150°/s2 to a constant velocity rotation of 50°/s) VOR gain and time constant (TC), optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain, and TC (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50°/s). We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38 and 1% of participants, respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5–1 Hz), and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction. PMID:26733940

  10. Sensorintegrative dysfunction underlying vestibular disorders after traumatic brain injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Franke, Laura M; Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Ochs, Alfred L; Lew, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular symptoms are persistent and problematic sequelae of blast exposure. Several lines of evidence suggest that these symptoms often stem from injury to the central nervous system. Current methods of assessing the vestibular system have described vestibular deficits that follow traumatic brain injury and differentiate blunt and blast trauma but have not examined the full range of vestibular functions that depend on the cerebral structures above the midbrain. Damage to the central vestibular circuits can lead to deficits in vital processes of spatial perception and navigation, in addition to dizziness and disequilibrium, and may also affect emotional functioning, particularly noradrenergically modulated states of anxiety. Perceptual functions can be assessed to determine the extent of central nervous system involvement in vestibular symptoms and to provide greater confidence when vestibular dysfunction is to be excluded. The ability to detect central vestibular dysfunction will significantly enhance our response to the dizziness and balance symptoms that are a common source of distress for Veterans. PMID:23341274

  11. Fifth Symposium on the Role of the Vestibular Organs in Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Vestibular problems of manned space flight are investigated for weightlessness and reduced gravity conditions with emphasis on space station development. Intensive morphological studies on the vestibular system and its central nervous system connections are included.

  12. Sensitivity of human visual and vestibular cortical regions to egomotion-compatible visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Velia; Smith, Andrew T

    2010-08-01

    The analysis and representation of visual cues to self-motion (egomotion) is primarily associated with cortical areas MST, VIP, and (recently) cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv). Various other areas, including visual areas V6 and V6A, and vestibular areas parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), putative area 2v (p2v), and 3aNv, are also potentially suited to processing egomotion (in some cases based on multisensory cues), but it is not known whether they are in fact involved in this process. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, we presented human participants with 2 types of random dot kinematograms. Both contained coherent motion but one simulated egomotion while the other did not. An area in the parieto-occipital sulcus that may correspond to V6, PIVC, and p2v were all differentially responsive to egomotion-compatible visual stimuli, suggesting that they may be involved in encoding egomotion. More generally, we show that the use of such stimuli provides a simple and reliable fMRI localizer for human PIVC and p2v, which hitherto required galvanic or caloric stimulation to be identified. PMID:20034998

  13. Effects of microgravity on vestibular ontogeny: direct physiological and anatomical measurements following space flight (STS-29)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Fermin, C.; Hester, P. Y.; Vellinger, J.

    1993-01-01

    Does space flight change gravity receptor development? The present study measured vestibular form and function in birds flown as embryos for 5 days in earth orbit (STS-29). No major changes in vestibular gross morphology were found. Vestibular response mean amplitudes and latencies were unaffected by space flight. However, the results of measuring vestibular thresholds were mixed and abnormal responses in 3 of the 8 flight animals raise important questions.

  14. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  15. Projections from the parabrachial nucleus to the vestibular nuclei: potential substrates for autonomic and limbic influences on vestibular responses.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Carey D

    2004-01-16

    Previous anatomical studies in rabbits and rats have shown that the superior vestibular nucleus (SVN), medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and inferior vestibular nucleus (IVN) project to the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and Kölliker-Fuse (KF) nucleus. Adult male albino rabbits and Long-Evans rats received iontophoretic injections of biotinylated dextran amine, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Fluoro-Gold or tetramethylrhodamine dextran amine into either the vestibular nuclei or the PBN and KF nuclei. The results were similar in both rats and rabbits. Injections of retrograde tracers into the vestibular nuclei produced retrogradely labeled neurons bilaterally in caudal third of the medial, external medial, and external lateral PBN in both species, with more variable labeling in KF. Rats also had consistent bilateral (predominantly contralateral) labeling in the ventrolateral PBN. The most prominent labeling was produced from injections that included the SVN, with fewer labeled neurons observed from injections in the caudal MVN and the IVN. Anterograde transport of BDA from injections into the PBN and KF nuclei of rabbits revealed prominent projections to the SVN, dorsal aspect of the rostral MVN, caudal MVN, pars beta of the LVN and IVN. These connections appear to contain a component that is reciprocal to the vestibulo-parabrachial pathway and a non-reciprocal component to regions connected with the vestibulocerebellum and vestibulo-motor reflex pathways. These connections support the concept that a synthesis of autonomic, vestibular and limbic information is an integral property of pathways related to balance control in both the brain stem and forebrain. It is suggested that these projections may contribute broadly to both performance tradeoffs in vestibular-related pathways during variations in the behavioral context and affective state and the close association between anxiety and balance function. PMID:14670639

  16. Vestibular afferent responses to microrotational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1991-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recording/labeling techniques were used to investigate vestibular afferent responses in the bullfrog, to very small amplitude (less than 5 deg p-p) sinusoidal rotations in the vertical plane over the frequency range of 0.063-4 Hz. Robust responses to peak accelerations as low as 0.031 deg/sec per sec were obtained from units subsequently traced to either the central portion of the anterior canal crista or the striolar region of the utricle. All of these microrotationally sensitive afferent neurons had irregular resting discharge rates, and the majority had transfer ratios (relative to rotational velocity) of 1-40 spikes/sec per deg/sec. Individual utricular afferent velocity transfer ratios were nearly constant over the frequency range of 0.125-4 Hz. Canal units displayed decreasing response transfer ratios as stimulus frequencies increased. These findings indicate that, although utricular striolar and central crista afferent velocity transfer ratios to microrotations were very similar, utricular striolar afferent neurons were more faithful sensors of very small amplitude rotational velocity in the vertical plane.

  17. Deconvolution of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Basel, Türker

    2012-02-01

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) and the associated variance modulation can be understood by a convolution model. Two functions of time are incorporated into the model: the motor unit action potential (MUAP) of an average motor unit, and the temporal modulation of the MUAP rate of all contributing motor units, briefly called rate modulation. The latter is the function of interest, whereas the MUAP acts as a filter that distorts the information contained in the measured data. Here, it is shown how to recover the rate modulation by undoing the filtering using a deconvolution approach. The key aspects of our deconvolution algorithm are as follows: (1) the rate modulation is described in terms of just a few parameters; (2) the MUAP is calculated by Wiener deconvolution of the VEMP with the rate modulation; (3) the model parameters are optimized using a figure-of-merit function where the most important term quantifies the difference between measured and model-predicted variance modulation. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated with simulated data. An analysis of real data confirms the view that there are basically two components, which roughly correspond to the waves p13-n23 and n34-p44 of the VEMP. The rate modulation corresponding to the first, inhibitory component is much stronger than that corresponding to the second, excitatory component. But the latter is more extended so that the two modulations have almost the same equivalent rectangular duration. PMID:22079097

  18. Microgravity vestibular investigations (10-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.

    1992-01-01

    Our perception of how we are oriented in space is dependent on the interaction of virtually every sensory system. For example, to move about in our environment we integrate inputs in our brain from visual, haptic (kinesthetic, proprioceptive, and cutaneous), auditory systems, and labyrinths. In addition to this multimodal system for orientation, our expectations about the direction and speed of our chosen movement are also important. Changes in our environment and the way we interact with the new stimuli will result in a different interpretation by the nervous system of the incoming sensory information. We will adapt to the change in appropriate ways. Because our orientation system is adaptable and complex, it is often difficult to trace a response or change in behavior to any one source of information in this synergistic orientation system. However, with a carefully designed investigation, it is possible to measure signals at the appropriate level of response (both electrophysiological and perceptual) and determine the effect that stimulus rearrangement has on our sense of orientation. The environment of orbital flight represents the stimulus arrangement that is our immediate concern. The Microgravity Vestibular Investigations (MVI) represent a group of experiments designed to investigate the effects of orbital flight and a return to Earth on our orientation system.

  19. Internal models and neural computation in the vestibular system

    PubMed Central

    Angelaki, Dora E.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is vital for motor control and spatial self-motion perception. Afferents from the otolith organs and the semicircular canals converge with optokinetic, somatosensory and motor-related signals in the vestibular nuclei, which are reciprocally interconnected with the vestibulocerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei. Here, we review the properties of the many cell types in the vestibular nuclei, as well as some fundamental computations implemented within this brainstem–cerebellar circuitry. These include the sensorimotor transformations for reflex generation, the neural computations for inertial motion estimation, the distinction between active and passive head movements, as well as the integration of vestibular and proprioceptive information for body motion estimation. A common theme in the solution to such computational problems is the concept of internal models and their neural implementation. Recent studies have shed new insights into important organizational principles that closely resemble those proposed for other sensorimotor systems, where their neural basis has often been more difficult to identify. As such, the vestibular system provides an excellent model to explore common neural processing strategies relevant both for reflexive and for goal-directed, voluntary movement as well as perception. PMID:19937232

  20. Action Representation in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Demougeot, Laurent; Toupet, Michel; Van Nechel, Christian; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    During mental actions subjects feel themselves performing a movement without any corresponding motor output. Although broad information is available regarding the influence of central lesions on action representation, little is known about how peripheral damages affect mental events. In the current study, we investigated whether lack of vestibular information influences action representation. Twelve healthy adults and twelve patients with bilateral vestibular damage actually performed and mentally simulated walking and drawing. The locomotor paths implied one (first walking task) and four (second walking task) changes in the walking direction. In the drawing task, participants drew on a sheet of paper a path that was similar to that of the second walking task. We recorded and compared between the two groups the timing of actual and mental movements. We found significant temporal discrepancies between actual and mental walking movements in the group of patients. Conversely, drawing actual and drawing mental durations were similar. For the control group, an isochrony between mental and actual movements was observed for the three tasks. This result denotes an inconsistency between action representation and action execution following vestibular damage, which is specific to walking movements, and emphasizes the role of the vestibular system upon mental states of actions. This observation may have important clinical implications. During action planning vestibular patients may overestimate the capacity of their motor system (imaging faster, executing slower) with harmful consequences for their health. PMID:22039548

  1. Binding body and self in visuo-vestibular conflicts.

    PubMed

    Macauda, Gianluca; Bertolini, Giovanni; Palla, Antonella; Straumann, Dominik; Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2015-03-01

    Maintenance of the bodily self relies on the accurate integration of multisensory inputs in which visuo-vestibular cue integration is thought to play an essential role. Here, we tested in healthy volunteers how conflicting visuo-vestibular bodily input might impact on body self-coherence in a full body illusion set-up. Natural passive vestibular stimulation was provided on a motion platform, while visual input was manipulated using virtual reality equipment. Explicit (questionnaire) and implicit (skin temperature) measures were employed to assess illusory self-identification with either a mannequin or a control object. Questionnaire results pointed to a relatively small illusion, but hand skin temperature, plausibly an index of illusory body ownership, showed the predicted drop specifically in the condition when participants saw the mannequin moving in congruence with them. We argue that this implicit measure was accessible to visuo-vestibular modulation of the sense of self, possibly mediated by shared neural processes in the insula involved in vestibular and interoceptive signalling, thermoregulation and multisensory integration. PMID:25557766

  2. [Pharmacotherapy of Vestibular Disorders, Nystagmus and Cerebellar Disorders].

    PubMed

    Feil, K; Böttcher, N; Kremmyda, O; Muth, C; Teufel, J; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T; Strupp, M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently different groups of drugs for the pharmacotherapy of vertigo, nystagmus and cerebellar disorders: antiemetics; anti-inflammatories, antimenieres, and antimigraineous medications and antidepressants, anticonvulsants, aminopyridines as well as acetyl-DL-leucine. In acute unilateral vestibulopathy, corticosteroids improve the recovery of peripheral vestibular function, but currently there is not sufficient evidence for a general recommendation. There is insufficient evidence to support the view that 16 mg t. i. d. or 48 mg t. i. d. betahistine has an effect in Menière's disease. Therefore, higher dosages are recommended. In animal studies, it was shown that betahistine increases cochlear blood flow. In vestibular paroxysmia, oxcarbazepine was effective (one randomized controlled trial (RCT)). Aminopyridines are recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus (two RCTs) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, one RCT). There has been no RCT on the efficacy of beta-blockers or topiramate but one RCT on flunarizine in vestibular migraine. Based on clinical experience, a treatment analogous to that for migraine without aura can be recommended. Acetyl-DL-leucine improved cerebellar ataxia (two observational studies); it also accelerated central compensation in an animal model of acute unilateral lesion, but RCTs were negative. There are ongoing RCTs on treatment of vestibular paroxysmia with carbamazepine (VESPA), acute unilateral vestibulopathy with betahistine (BETAVEST), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with vitamin D (VitD@BPPV), EA2 with 4-aminopyridine versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), and cerebellar ataxias with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT). PMID:26421856

  3. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  4. Oscillatory neural responses evoked by natural vestibular stimuli in humans.

    PubMed

    Gale, Steven; Prsa, Mario; Schurger, Aaron; Gay, Annietta; Paillard, Aurore; Herbelin, Bruno; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Lopez, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-03-01

    While there have been numerous studies of the vestibular system in mammals, less is known about the brain mechanisms of vestibular processing in humans. In particular, of the studies that have been carried out in humans over the last 30 years, none has investigated how vestibular stimulation (VS) affects cortical oscillations. Here we recorded high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in healthy human subjects and a group of bilateral vestibular loss patients (BVPs) undergoing transient and constant-velocity passive whole body yaw rotations, focusing our analyses on the modulation of cortical oscillations in response to natural VS. The present approach overcame significant technical challenges associated with combining natural VS with human electrophysiology and reveals that both transient and constant-velocity VS are associated with a prominent suppression of alpha power (8-13 Hz). Alpha band suppression was localized over bilateral temporo-parietal scalp regions, and these alpha modulations were significantly smaller in BVPs. We propose that suppression of oscillations in the alpha band over temporo-parietal scalp regions reflects cortical vestibular processing, potentially comparable with alpha and mu oscillations in the visual and sensorimotor systems, respectively, opening the door to the investigation of human cortical processing under various experimental conditions during natural VS. PMID:26683063

  5. The bilateral central vestibular system: its pathways, functions, and disorders.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The bilateral anatomical organization of the vestibular system provides three functional advantages: optimal differentiation of head motion and orientation, sensory substitution of a unilateral peripheral failure, and central compensation of a peripheral or central vestibular tone imbalance. The structure is based on bilaterally ascending and descending pathways and at least four crossings: three in the brain stem and one in the cortex. The resulting sensorimotor functions can be subdivided into three major groups: (1) reflexive control of gaze, head, and body in three spatial planes (yaw, pitch, roll) at the brain stem/cerebellar level; (2) perception of self-motion and control of voluntary movement and balance at the cortical/subcortical level; and (3) higher vestibular cognitive functions (e.g., spatial memory and navigation). The bilateral representation of the vestibular system in multiple multisensory cortical areas and the vestibular dominance of the nondominant hemisphere raise the question of how one global percept of motion and orientation in space is formed. PMID:25581203

  6. Regeneration of Vestibular Horizontal Semicircular Canal Afferents in Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Asim; Zakir, Mridha; Dickman, J. David

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous regeneration of vestibular and auditory receptors and their innervating afferents in birds, reptiles, and amphibians are well known. Here, we produced a complete vestibular receptor loss and epithelial denervation using an ototoxic agent (streptomycin), after which we quantitatively characterized the afferent innervation of the horizontal semicircular canals following completed regeneration. We found that calyx, dimorph, and bouton afferents all regenerate in a manner the recapitulates the epithelial topography of normal birds, but over a slow time course. Similar to previous findings in the vestibular otolith maculae, regeneration occurs according to a three-stage temporal sequence. Bouton afferents regenerate during the first month of regeneration, followed by calyceal-bearing afferents in the second and third months. Calyx afferents were the last to regenerate in the final stage of recovery after 3 mo. We also found that regenerated afferents exhibited terminal morphologies that are significantly smaller, less complex, and innervate fewer receptor cells over smaller epithelial areas than those that develop through normative morphogenesis. These structural fiber changes in afferent innervation correlate to alterations in gaze responses during regeneration, although the exact underlying mechanisms responsible for behavioral changes remain unknown. Plasticity in central vestibular neurons processing motion information seem to be required to explain the observed morphologic and response adaptations observed in regenerating vestibular systems. PMID:19515948

  7. Vestibular deficits do not underlie looping behavior in achiasmatic fish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Yu; Tschopp, Markus; Straumann, Dominik; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2010-07-01

    Zebrafish belladonna (bel) mutants carry a mutation in the lhx2 gene that encodes a Lim domain homeobox transcription factor, leading to a defect in the retinotectal axon pathfinding. As a result, a large fraction of homozygous bel mutants is achiasmatic. Achiasmatic bel mutants display ocular motor instabilities, both reserved optokinetic response (OKR) and spontaneous eye oscillations, and an unstable swimming behavior, described as looping. All these unstable behaviors have been linked to the underlying optic nerve projection defect. Looping has been investigated under different visual stimuli and shown to be vision dependent and contrast sensitive. In addition, looping correlates perfectly with reversed OKR and the spontaneous oscillations of the eyes. Hence, it has been hypothesized that looping is a compensatory response to the perception of self-motion induced by the spontaneous eye oscillations. However, both ocular and postural instabilities could also be caused by a yet unidentified vestibular deficit. Here, we performed a preliminary test of the vestibular function in achiasmatic bel larval mutants in order to clarify the potential role of a vestibular deficit in looping. We found that the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) is normally directed in both bel mutants and wild types and therefore exclude the possibility that nystagmus and looping in reverse to the rotating optokinetic drum can be attributed to an underlying vestibular deficit. PMID:20798832

  8. Extraterrestrial vestibular research, a new partial field of medical research into the human vestibular apparatus.

    PubMed

    Pichler, H J

    1967-01-01

    The first otologic professorial chair in the world was established by Politzer in Vienna as long ago as 1861. In 1914 an assistant of the 1st Vienna Ear Clinic with Politzer as its head, Barany, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his fundamental investigations into the organ of equilibration and for his discovery of the caloric sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Since that time Barany is regarded as the founder of the physiology of the vestibular apparatus. During the period 1959 to 1963 a new conception of fundamental research into the vestibule was demanded and elaborated in Vienna with the postulate that, in all theoretical deliberations and practical experience, one should take into consideration that our experiments into the vestibule do not take place on a static platform but rather on a diversely moving one, namely the surface of the earth. This led to new findings in the field of research into the otolith apparatus. In 1962 it was discovered that the gravitation of the sun at the distance of earth-sun represents a supraliminal stimulus, namely both in the aphelion as well as in the perihelion position of the earth. In 1965 it was suggested in Vienna that a new branch of research into the vestibule should be established on an international level, the so-called extraterrestrial vestibular research. The importance of this new branch of research is discussed for all problems of orientation of human beings in space. PMID:12199253

  9. Stochastic Gain in Population Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, Arne; Rhl, Torsten; Schuster, Heinz Georg

    2004-07-01

    We introduce an extension of the usual replicator dynamics to adaptive learning rates. We show that a population with a dynamic learning rate can gain an increased average payoff in transient phases and can also exploit external noise, leading the system away from the Nash equilibrium, in a resonancelike fashion. The payoff versus noise curve resembles the signal to noise ratio curve in stochastic resonance. Seen in this broad context, we introduce another mechanism that exploits fluctuations in order to improve properties of the system. Such a mechanism could be of particular interest in economic systems.

  10. Stochastic gradient method with accelerated stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    We implement the simple method to accelerate the convergence speed to the steady state and enhance the mixing rate to the stochastic gradient Langevin method. The ordinary stochastic gradient method is based on mini-batch learning for reducing the computational cost when the amount of data is extraordinary large. The stochasticity of the gradient can be mitigated by the injection of Gaussian noise, which yields the stochastic Langevin gradient method; this method can be used for Bayesian posterior sampling. However, the performance of the stochastic Langevin gradient method depends on the mixing rate of the stochastic dynamics. In this study, we propose violating the detailed balance condition to enhance the mixing rate. Recent studies have revealed that violating the detailed balance condition accelerates the convergence to a stationary state and reduces the correlation time between the samplings. We implement this violation of the detailed balance condition in the stochastic gradient Langevin method and test our method for a simple model to demonstrate its performance.

  11. Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in vestibular neuritis: comparison between air- and bone-conducted stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Yang, Tae-Ho; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Jeong, Seul-Ki

    2013-08-01

    To clarify the changes of cervical (cVEMP) and ocular (oVEMP) vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by air-conducted sound (ACS) and bone-conducted vibration (BCV) in patients with vestibular neuritis (VN), patients with VN (n = 30) and normal controls (n = 45) underwent recording of cVEMP and oVEMP in response to ACS (1,000 Hz, 5 ms, tone bursts) and BCV (500 Hz, short tone burst). Patients with VN showed a high proportion of oVEMP abnormalities in response to both ACS (80.0 %) and BCV at the forehead (Fz, 73.3 %) or the mastoid (76.7 %). In contrast, cVEMPs were mostly normal with both ACS and BCV in the patients. The dissociations in the abnormalities of cVEMP and oVEMP induced by ACS and BCV at the mastoids and at the forehead in patients with VN suggest that oVEMP reflects functions of the superior vestibular nerve and most likely the utricular function. The results of our study suggest that oVEMP induced by either ACS or BCV appears to depend on integrity of the superior vestibular nerve, possibly due to the utricular afferents travelling in it. In contrast, cVEMP elicited by either ACS or BCV may reflect function of the saccular afferents running in the inferior vestibular nerve. PMID:23670310

  12. A real-time research platform to study vestibular implants with gyroscopic inputs in vestibular deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T A Khoa; Ranieri, Maurizio; DiGiovanna, Jack; Peter, Otto; Genovese, Vincenzo; Perez Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2014-08-01

    Researchers have succeeded in partly restoring damaged vestibular functionality in several animal models. Recently, acute interventions have also been demonstrated in human patients. Our previous work on a vestibular implant for humans used predefined stimulation patterns; here we present a research tool that facilitates motion-modulated stimulation. This requires a system that can process gyroscope measurements and send stimulation parameters to a hybrid vestibular-cochlear implant in real-time. To match natural vestibular latencies, the time from sensor input to stimulation output should not exceed 6.5 ms. We describe a system based on National Instrument's CompactRIO platform that can meet this requirement and also offers floating point precision for advanced transfer functions. It is designed for acute clinical interventions, and is sufficiently powerful and flexible to serve as a development platform for evaluating prosthetic control strategies. Amplitude and pulse frequency modulation to predetermined functions or sensor inputs have been validated. The system has been connected to human patients, who each have received a modified MED-EL cochlear implant for vestibular stimulation, and patient tests are ongoing. PMID:25073124

  13. Stochastic symmetries of Wick type stochastic ordinary differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Gazanfer

    2015-04-01

    We consider Wick type stochastic ordinary differential equations with Gaussian white noise. We define the stochastic symmetry transformations and Lie equations in Kondratiev space (S)-1N. We derive the determining system of Wick type stochastic partial differential equations with Gaussian white noise. Stochastic symmetries for stochastic Bernoulli, Riccati and general stochastic linear equation in (S)-1N are obtained. A stochastic version of canonical variables is also introduced.

  14. The Effects of Aging on Clinical Vestibular Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Maxime; Houde, Marie-Soleil; Landry, Simon P.; Champoux, François

    2015-01-01

    Balance disorders are common issues for aging populations due to the effects of normal aging on peripheral vestibular structures. These changes affect the results of vestibular function evaluations and make the interpretation of these results more difficult. The objective of this article is to review the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant vestibular measures. We will first focus on otolith function assessment methods cervical-VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular-VEMP (oVEMP), then the caloric and video-head impulse test (vHIT) methods for semicircular canals assessment. cVEMP and oVEMP are useful methods, though research on the effects of age for some parameters are still inconclusive. vHIT results are largely independent of age as compared to caloric stimulation and should therefore be preferred for the evaluation of the semicircular canals function. PMID:26441824

  15. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-01-01

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity. PMID:24421761

  16. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-01-01

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity. PMID:24421761

  17. Visuo-vestibular eye movements: infantile strabismus in 3 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Michael C

    2005-06-01

    Infantile strabismus is accompanied by latent nystagmus, primary inferior oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence. If we examine the evolutionary underpinnings of these ocular rotations, we can construct a unifying mechanism for the sensorimotor abnormalities that arise in humans with infantile strabismus. Latent nystagmus, primary inferior oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence correspond to visual balancing reflexes that are operative in lateral-eyed animals in yaw, pitch, and roll, respectively. In humans with infantile strabismus, these subcortical visual reflexes are reactivated by a physiologic imbalance in binocular visual input, which resets central vestibular tone in 3-dimensional space. These visual reflexes reveal the evolutionary role of the eyes as sensory balance organs that can directly modulate central vestibular tone. Latent nystagmus, primary oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence should be reclassified as visuo-vestibular eye movements. PMID:15955986

  18. Magnetic vestibular stimulation modulates default mode network fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Boegle, Rainer; Stephan, Thomas; Ertl, Matthias; Glasauer, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-02-15

    Strong magnetic fields (>1Tesla) can cause dizziness and it was recently shown that healthy subjects (resting in total darkness) developed a persistent nystagmus even when remaining completely motionless within a MR tomograph. Consequently, it was speculated that this magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) might influence fMRI results, as nystagmus is indicative of an imbalance in the vestibular system, potentially influencing other systems via multisensory vestibular interactions. The objective of our study was to investigate whether MVS does indeed modulate BOLD signal fluctuations. We recorded eye movements, as well as, resting-state fMRI of 30 volunteers in darkness at 1.5T and 3.0T to answer the question whether MVS modulated parts of the default mode resting-state network (DMN) in accordance with the Lorentz-force model for MVS, while distinguishing this from the known signal increase due to field strength related imaging effects. Our results showed that modulation of the default mode network occurred mainly in areas associated with vestibular and ocular motor function, and was in accordance with the Lorentz-force model, i.e., double than the expected signal scaling due to field strength alone. We discuss the implications of our findings for the interpretation of studies using resting-state fMRI, especially those concerning vestibular research. We conclude that MVS needs to be considered in vestibular research to avoid biased results, but it might also offer the possibility of manipulating network dynamics and may thus help in studying the brain as a dynamical system. PMID:26666898

  19. Motor Performance is Impaired Following Vestibular Stimulation in Ageing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Quail, Stephanie L.; Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5–6, 8–9 and 27–28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod) and newly-developed behavioral tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus). In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2–3 Hz) and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip (FS) from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27–28 months) that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13 and 27–28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13 and 27–28 months. Conclusion: this study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioral changes in task performance were observed. PMID:26869921

  20. The Vestibular Effects of Repeated Low-Level Blasts.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Philip D; Pinto, Robin L; Burrows, Holly L; Brungart, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use a prospective cohort of United States Marine Corps (USMC) instructors to identify any acute or long-term vestibular dysfunction following repeated blast exposures during explosive breaching training. They were assessed in clinic and on location during training at the USMC Methods of Entry School, Quantico, VA. Subjects received comprehensive baseline vestibular assessments and these were repeated in order to identify longitudinal changes. They also received shorter assessments immediately following blast exposure in order to identify acute findings. The main outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, vestibular Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of subjective vestibular function, videonystagmography (VNG), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), rotary chair (including the unilateral centrifugation test), computerized dynamic posturography, and computerized dynamic visual acuity. A total of 11 breachers and 4 engineers were followed for up to 17 months. No acute effects or longitudinal deteriorations were identified, but there were some interesting baseline group differences. Upbeat positional nystagmus was common, and correlated (p<0.005) with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several instructors had abnormally short low-frequency phase leads on rotary chair testing. This study evaluated breaching instructors over a longer test period than any other study, and the results suggest that this population appears to be safe from a vestibular standpoint at the current exposure levels. Upbeat positional nystagmus correlated with a history of mTBI in this population, and this has not been described elsewhere. The data trends also suggest that this nystagmus could be an acute blast effect. However, the reasons for the abnormally short phase leads seen in rotary chair testing are unclear at this time. Further investigation seems warranted. PMID:25790248

  1. Prevalence of vestibular dysfunction and associated factors in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ja-Won; Chang, Mun Young; Woo, Sook-young; Kim, Seonwoo; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the nationwide prevalence of dizziness and vestibular dysfunction in the Korean population and determine the associated factors. Design Cross-sectional analysis of a nationwide health survey. Methods We obtained data from the 2009 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the South Korean civilian, non-institutionalised population aged 40 years and older (N=3267). A field survey team performed interviews and physical examinations. Structured questionnaires were handed out and balance function tests using the modified Romberg test of standing balance on firm and compliant support surfaces were performed on participants. Failure on the modified Romberg test was regarded to indicate vestibular dysfunction. Results The prevalence of dizziness during the past year was 16.70% (95% CI 14.65% to 18.76%). The presence of vestibular dysfunction was noted in 1.84% (95% CI 1.18% to 2.51%). In addition, the prevalence of experiencing falls and positional dizziness were 1.46% (95% CI 0.87% to 2.06%) and 1.73% (95% CI 1.17% to 2.29%), respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that dizziness was associated with increased age, female gender, hearing loss and stress. Vestibular dysfunction was associated with increased age, history of dizziness and hearing loss. Conclusions Vertigo and dizziness are the greatest contributors to the burden of disability in the aged population. Screening for dizziness and vestibular dysfunction, and management of associated factors might be important for improving compromised quality of life due to postural imbalance caused by vestibular problems. PMID:26503384

  2. A model analysis of static stress in the vestibular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Background The scheme of the core vestibular membranes, consisting of serially connected utricle, ampulla and semicircular canal, first appeared hundreds of millions of years ago in primitive fish and has remained largely unchanged during the subsequent course of evolution. The labyrinths of higher organisms build on this core structure, with the addition of the phylogenetically newer membrane structures, namely, saccule, lagena and cochlea. An analysis of static stress in these core vestibular membranes may contribute to a better understanding of the role of stress in the evolution of derivative membrane structures over the long term as well as the short-term membrane distortions seen in Meniere's disease. Methods A model of these core vestibular membranes is proposed in order to analyze the distribution of stress in the walls of the component chambers. The model uses basic geometrical elements of hollow cylinders and spheres to emulate the actual structures. These model elements lend themselves to a mathematical analysis of static stress in their membranes. Results Hoop stress, akin to the stress in hoops used to reinforce barrel walls, is found to be the predominant stress in the model membranes. The level of hoop stress depends not only on pressure but as well on a geometric stress factor that incorporates membrane shape, thickness and curvature. This result implies that hoop stress may be unevenly distributed in the membranes of the several vestibular chambers due to variations in these dimensional parameters. These results provide a theoretical framework for appraising hoop stress levels in any vestibular labyrinth whose dimensions are known. Conclusion Static hoop stress disparities are likely to exist in the vestibular membranes given their complex physical configurations. Such stress disparities may contribute to the development of membrane pathologies as seen in Meniere's Disease. They may also factor in the evolutionary development of other derivative membrane structures such as the saccule, the lagena, and the cochlea found in higher animals. PMID:19723316

  3. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Frances L.; Kirk, Matthew E.; Rennie, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  4. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies < 6.0 ms) were scored and latencies and amplitudes quantified. Vestibular response latencies were significantly longer (P < 0.01) and amplitudes significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than those observed in 2-week-old birds. Mean response threshold for anesthetized embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P < 0.03) than those observed in 2-week-old birds (-23.0dBre 1.0 g/ms). Latency/intensity functions (that is, slopes) were not significantly different between embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P < 0.001). We presume that these differences reflect the refinement of sensory function that occurs following 19 to 20 days of incubation. The recording of vestibular evoked potentials provides an objective, direct and noninvasive measure of peripheral vestibular function in the embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  5. Pitfalls in detecting vestibular decruitment with air calorics.

    PubMed

    Torok, N

    1979-01-01

    Vestibular decruitment is a pathological finding which indicates retrolabyrinthine disease. In the overwhelming majority of cases, it is consistent with posterior fossa pathology. Weak and strong caloric stimulations must be applied with precision for detecting decruitment. Air-caloric stimulation has inherent limitation in regards to reproducing the strength of the stimulus. Thus, it is inadequate for decruitment detection. It is, therefore, advisable to use water-caloric testing to assess vestibular decruitment or recruitment as one of the most revealing diagnostic clues in our neurotologic armamentarium. PMID:314616

  6. Interrelated striated elements in vestibular hair cells of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Bourne, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of interrelated striated organelles in types I and II vestibular hair cells of the rat which appear to be less developed in cochlear hair cells have been revealed by unusual fixation procedures, suggesting that contractile elements may play a role in sensory transduction in the inner ear, especially in the vestibular system. Included in the series of interrelated striated elements are the cuticular plate and its basal attachments to the hair cell margins, the connections of the strut array of the kinociliary basal body to the cuticular plate, and striated organelles associated with the plasma membrane and extending below the apical junctional complexes.

  7. Sensitization as a Basic Principle of Vestibular Adaptation to Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Eberhard R.

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of basic mechanisms of physiological adaptation to weightlessness suffers (1) on the rare flight opportunities, and (2) on the collection of data with a rough time resolution. The comparative approach using data from animal and human research might be helpful to overcome these problems even for human research. The advantage of the comparative approach became obvious for vestibular adaptation to microgravity. Neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, behavioural and psychophysical studies in snails, fish, amphibian, rodents, monkey and men clearly revealed vestibular sensitization as a basic mechanism of adaptation to weightlessness.

  8. The possibility of seeding vestibular schwannomas through surgery: Limited experience with two cases

    PubMed Central

    Roser, Florian; Ebner, Florian Heinrich; Skardelly, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background: We present two exceptional cases of possible tumor seeding in benign vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients occurring years after initial microsurgical resection. Case Description: We retrospectively analyzed the surgical management, histology and documented the growth of new tumor occurrence in close vicinity of the original schwannomas by serial magnetic resonance imaging over a period of 10 years. None of the patients had stigmata of neurofibromatosis, making it a reasonable assumption that the second tumor was due to surgical seeding during the first surgery. Moreover, in the second case, a microsurgical re-exploration showed that the recurrent tumor did not show any adhesion or contact to the caudal cranial nerves as anticipated had this been a new cranial nerve schwannoma. Conclusions: Surgical seeding of VSs is a rare complication but can occur despite benign histology and generous irrigation during surgery. PMID:27217967

  9. Stochastic cellular automata model of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsev, A. V.; de Abreu, F. V.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-06-01

    We propose a stochastic dynamical model of noisy neural networks with complex architectures and discuss activation of neural networks by a stimulus, pacemakers, and spontaneous activity. This model has a complex phase diagram with self-organized active neural states, hybrid phase transitions, and a rich array of behaviors. We show that if spontaneous activity (noise) reaches a threshold level then global neural oscillations emerge. Stochastic resonance is a precursor of this dynamical phase transition. These oscillations are an intrinsic property of even small groups of 50 neurons.

  10. Polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei of the squirrel monkey and their potential role in vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, C.; Igarashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Polyamine synthesis increases in response to injurious stimuli including axotomy and denervation. Reduced eye nystagmus and head-deviation have been observed in unilateral labyrinthectomized (UL) guinea pigs treated with an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). We quantified polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei (LVN) of control and UL squirrel monkeys during the phase of vestibular compensation (VC) and performed an experiment to determine if DFMO reduces nystagmus previously observed in the guinea pig. Polyamines were detected in the LVN of control and UL squirrel monkeys. Putrescine and spermidine increased in the ipsilateral LVN 3 days after UL with no change in the contralateral LVN. No left-right differences were noted in the 5-day post-UL monkey. DFMO reduced nystagmus in a UL squirrel monkey. These findings suggest that polyamines are important in vestibular function and may contribute to nystagmus observed in VC.

  11. Distinct vestibular effects on early and late somatosensory cortical processing in humans.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Christian; van Elk, Michiel; Bernasconi, Fosco; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-01-15

    In non-human primates several brain areas contain neurons that respond to both vestibular and somatosensory stimulation. In humans, vestibular stimulation activates several somatosensory brain regions and improves tactile perception. However, less is known about the spatio-temporal dynamics of such vestibular-somatosensory interactions in the human brain. To address this issue, we recorded high-density electroencephalography during left median nerve electrical stimulation to obtain Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs). We analyzed SEPs during vestibular activation following sudden decelerations from constant-velocity (90/s and 60/s) earth-vertical axis yaw rotations and SEPs during a non-vestibular control period. SEP analysis revealed two distinct temporal effects of vestibular activation: An early effect (28-32ms post-stimulus) characterized by vestibular suppression of SEP response strength that depended on rotation velocity and a later effect (97-112ms post-stimulus) characterized by vestibular modulation of SEP topographical pattern that was rotation velocity-independent. Source estimation localized these vestibular effects, during both time periods, to activation differences in a distributed cortical network including the right postcentral gyrus, right insula, left precuneus, and bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex. These results suggest that vestibular-somatosensory interactions in humans depend on processing in specific time periods in somatosensory and vestibular cortical regions. PMID:26466979

  12. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies. PMID:27065839

  13. A New Quantity to Characterize Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Xin; Zhai, Ji-Quan; Xu, Wei-Wei; Sun, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Pei-Heng

    2015-09-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant Nos 2011CB922104 and 2011CBA00202, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11474154, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province under Grant No BK2012013, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No 20120091110030, the Dengfeng Project B of Nanjing University and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Manipulating Techniques of Electromagnetic Waves, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions.

  14. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that raphe-vestibular connections are organized to selectively modulate processing in regions of the vestibular nuclear complex that receive input from specific cerebellar zones. This represents a potential mechanism whereby motor activity and behavioral arousal could influence the activity of cerebellovestibular circuits.

  15. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, A L; Balaban, C D

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that raphe-vestibular connections are organized to selectively modulate processing in regions of the vestibular nuclear complex that receive input from specific cerebellar zones. This represents a potential mechanism whereby motor activity and behavioral arousal could influence the activity of cerebellovestibular circuits. PMID:12890525

  16. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  17. Mechanisms for vestibular disorders in space flight. Facts and hypotheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsnev, E. I.

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the vestibular disorders associated with space flight. It is found there is still no complete understanding of the changes occurring in the sensory systems of the body during weightlessness. Results of studies are presented, including results of a ground model.

  18. Update on the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Roger; Teufel, Julian; Feil, Katharina; Muth, Caroline; Strupp, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An overview of the current pharmacotherapy of central vestibular syndromes and the most common forms of central nystagmus as well as cerebellar disorders is given. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus, a frequent form of acquired persisting fixation nystagmus, and upbeat nystagmus. Animal studies showed that this non-selective blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels increases Purkinje cell excitability and normalizes the irregular firing rate, so that the inhibitory influence of the cerebellar cortex on vestibular and deep cerebellar nuclei is restored. The efficacy of 4-AP in episodic ataxia type 2, which is most often caused by mutations of the PQ-calcium channel, was demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial. It was also shown in an animal model (the tottering mouse) of episodic ataxia type 2. In a case series, chlorzoxazone, a non-selective activator of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, was shown to reduce the DBN. The efficacy of acetyl-DL-leucine as a potential new symptomatic treatment for cerebellar diseases has been demonstrated in three case series. The ongoing randomized controlled trials on episodic ataxia type 2 (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. acetazolamide vs. placebo; EAT2TREAT), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG-trial), cerebellar gait disorders (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. placebo; FACEG) and cerebellar ataxia (acetyl-DL-leucine vs. placebo; ALCAT) will provide new insights into the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders. PMID:27083881

  19. Vestibular benefits to task savings in motor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Selen, L. P. J.; Medendorp, W. P.

    2013-01-01

    In everyday life, we seamlessly adapt our movements and consolidate them to multiple behavioral contexts. This natural flexibility seems to be contingent on the presence of movement-related sensorimotor cues and cannot be reproduced when static visual or haptic cues are given to signify different behavioral contexts. So far, only sensorimotor cues that dissociate the sensorimotor plans prior to force field exposure have been successful in learning two opposing perturbations. Here we show that vestibular cues, which are only available during the perturbation, improve the formation and recall of multiple control strategies. We exposed subjects to inertial forces by accelerating them laterally on a vestibular platform. The coupling between reaching movement (forward-backward) and acceleration direction (leftward-rightward) switched every 160 trials, resulting in two opposite force environments. When exposed for a second time to the same environment, with the opposite environment in between, subjects sh