Science.gov

Sample records for vibration response characteristics

  1. Significant characteristics of social response to noise and vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishinomiya, G.

    1979-01-01

    Several surveys made since 1971 to investigate annoyance resulting from noise and vibration, from various sources were studied in order to quantify the relation between annoyance response to noise or vibration and properties of the respondent including factors such as noise exposure, etc. Samples collected by the social surveys and physical measurements were analyzed by multi-dimensional analysis.

  2. Response characteristics of vibration-sensitive neurons in the midbrain of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1989-01-01

    European grassfrogs (Rana temporaria) were stimulated with pulsed sinusoidal, vertical vibrations (10-300 Hz) and the responses of 46 single midbrain neurons were recorded in awake, immobilized animals. Most units (40) had simple V-shaped excitatory vibrational tuning curves. The distribution of best frequencies (BF's) was bimodal with peaks at 10 and 100 Hz and the thresholds ranged from 0.02 to 1.28 cm/s2 at the BF. Twenty-three neurons showed phasic-tonic and 11 neurons phasic responses. The dynamic range of seismic intensity for most neurons was 20-30 dB. In contrast to the sharp phase-locking in peripheral vibration-sensitive fibers, no phase-locking to the sinusoidal wave-form was seen in the midbrain neurons. The midbrain cells did not respond at low stimulus intensities (below 0.01-0.02 cm/s2) where a clear synchronization response occurs in saccular fibers. Six midbrain neurons had more complex response characteristics expressed by inhibition of their spontaneous activity by vibration or by bi- and trimodal sensory sensitivities. In conclusion, the vibration sensitive cells in the midbrain of the grassfrog can encode the frequency, intensity, onset and cessation of vibration stimuli. Seismic stimuli probably play a role in communication and detection of predators and the vibration-sensitive midbrain neurons may be involved in the central processing of such behaviorally significant stimuli. PMID:2784502

  3. Response characteristics of vibration-sensitive interneurons related to Johnston's organ in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hiroyuki; Rybak, Jürgen; Menzel, Randolf; Itoh, Tsunao

    2009-07-10

    Honeybees detect airborne vibration by means of Johnston's organ (JO), located in the pedicel of each antenna. In this study we identified two types of vibration-sensitive interneurons with arborizations in the primary sensory area of the JO, namely, the dorsal lobe-interneuron 1 (DL-Int-1) and dorsal lobe-interneuron 2 (DL-Int-2) using intracellular recordings combined with intracellular staining. For visualizing overlapping areas between the JO sensory terminals and the branches of these identified interneurons, the three-dimensional images of the individual neurons were registered into the standard atlas of the honeybee brain (Brandt et al. [2005] J Comp Neurol 492:1-19). Both DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2 overlapped with the central terminal area of receptor neurons of the JO in the DL. For DL-Int-1 an on-off phasic excitation was elicited by vibrational stimuli applied to the JO when the spontaneous spike frequency was low, whereas tonic inhibition was induced when it was high. Moreover, current injection into a DL-Int-1 led to changes of the response pattern from on-off phasic excitation to tonic inhibition, in response to the vibratory stimulation. Although the vibration usually induced on-off phasic excitation in DL-Int-1, vibration applied immediately after odor stimulation induced tonic inhibition in it. DL-Int-2 responded to vibration stimuli applied to the JO by a tonic burst and were most sensitive to 265 Hz vibration, which is coincident with the strongest frequency of airborne vibrations arising during the waggle dance. These results suggest that DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2 are related to coding of the duration of the vibration as sensed by the JO. PMID:19412925

  4. Vibration characteristics of electrorheological elastomer sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kexiang; Bai, Quan; Meng, Guang; Ye, Lin

    2011-05-01

    The vibration characteristics and control capabilities of a cantilever sandwich beam with electrorheological (ER) elastomers subjected to different electric fields are investigated in this study. Considering ER elastomers as viscoelastic damping materials with electrically controllable properties, a finite element model of a sandwich beam with an ER elastomer core is developed to predict the vibration responses of the proposed beam. An experimental analysis was also conducted to illustrate and evaluate the effects of an electric field on the frequency responses and natural frequencies of the sandwich beam. The results show that natural frequencies of the ER elastomer sandwich beam increase and vibration amplitudes at natural frequencies of the ER elastomer beam decrease, as the strength of the applied electric field increases. It is demonstrated that the vibration characteristics of ER elastomer beams are similar to those of ER fluid beams, which could be controlled by changing the strength of the applied electric field. This controllable characteristic of ER elastomer beams is useful for applications in engineering structures where variable performance is desired.

  5. Vibration, performance, flutter and forced response characteristics of a large-scale propfan and its aeroelastic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the vibration, performance, flutter, and forced response of the large-scale propfan, SR7L, and its aeroelastic model, SR7A, has been performed by applying available structural and aeroelastic analytical codes and then correlating measured and calculated results. Finite element models of the blades were used to obtain modal frequencies, displacements, stresses and strains. These values were then used in conjunction with a 3-D, unsteady, lifting surface aerodynamic theory for the subsequent aeroelastic analyses of the blades. The agreement between measured and calculated frequencies and mode shapes for both models is very good. Calculated power coefficients correlate well with those measured for low advance ratios. Flutter results show that both propfans are stable at their respective design points. There is also good agreement between calculated and measured blade vibratory strains due to excitation resulting from yawed flow for the SR7A propfan. The similarity of structural and aeroelastic results show that the SR7A propfan simulates the SR7L characteristics.

  6. Investigation of vibration characteristics of electric motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshis, A. K.; Tamoshyunas, Y. K.

    1973-01-01

    The vibration characteristics of electric motors were analyzed using mathematical statistics methods. The equipment used and the method of conducting the test are described. Curves are developed to show the visualization of the electric motor vibrations in the vertical direction. Additional curves are included to show the amplitude-phase frequency characteristic of dynamic rotor-housing vibrations at the first lug and the same data for the second lug of the electric motor. Mathematical models were created to show the transmission function of the dynamic rotor housing system.

  7. Effect of Vibration on Retention Characteristics of Screen Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Park, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of the effect of vibration on the retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems was performed. The functioning of surface tension devices using fine-mesh screens requires that the pressure differential acting on the screen be less than its pressure retention capability. When exceeded, screen breakdown will occur and gas-free expulsion of propellant will no longer be possible. An analytical approach to predicting the effect of vibration was developed. This approach considers the transmission of the vibration to the screens of the device and the coupling of the liquid and the screen in establishing the screen response. A method of evaluating the transient response of the gas/liquid interface within the screen was also developed.

  8. Vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo

    2015-02-01

    High power CO2 laser is widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. Vibration is a common phenomenon during laser working process, it will affect the working performance of high power CO2 laser, vibration must be strictly controlled in the condition where the laser pointing is required. This paper proposed a method to investigate the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser. An experiment device with vibration acceleration sensor was established to measure vibration signal of CO2 laser, the measured vibration signal was mathematically treated using space-frequency conversion, and then the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser can be obtained.

  9. Vibration characteristics of MR cantilever sandwich beams: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Prieto, Vianney; Parkin, Rob; Jackson, Mike; Silberschmidt, Vadim; Kęsy, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    The concept of vibration controllability with smart fluids within flexible structures has been of significant interest in the past two decades. Although much research has been done on structures with embedded electrorheological (ER) fluids, there has been little investigation of magnetorheological (MR) fluid adaptive structures. In particular, a body of research on the experimental work of cantilever MR beams is still lacking. This experimental study investigates the controllability of vibration characteristics of magnetorheological cantilever sandwich beams. These adaptive structures are produced by embedding an MR fluid core between two elastic layers. The structural behaviour of the MR beams can be varied by applying an external magnetic field to activate the MR fluid. The stiffness and damping structural characteristics are controlled, demonstrating vibration suppression capabilities of MR fluids as structural elements. MR beams were fabricated with two different materials for comparison purposes. Diverse excitation methods were considered as well as a range of magnetic field intensities and configurations. Moreover, the cantilever MR beams were tested in horizontal and vertical configurations. The effects of partial and full activation of the MR beams were outlined based on the results obtained. The controllability of the beam's vibration response was observed in the form of variations in vibration amplitudes and shifts in magnitudes of the resonant natural frequency.

  10. Vibration characteristics of floating slab track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yi

    2008-11-01

    Coupled equilibrium equations of suspended wheels and floating slab track system were solved with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the deflections, vibration velocities, and wheel-rail contact forces. The program was validated through several aspects. Cases with various vehicle speed, slab mass, and stiffness of slab bearing were analyzed to reveal the effects of slab bearing on track responses. The correlation between wheel-rail resonance and train speed was also discussed. It was found that rail deflections increase significantly as train speed increases. Although large slab mass may lower tuning frequency, it could also result in higher wheel-rail contact force and rail deflections. The floating slab track is effective in isolating loading above 10 Hz, which might present in some railway sections with irregularities. Adopting floating slab track for vibration control for environment along the railway may cause concerns about ride quality and track damages.

  11. Human response to vibration in residential environments.

    PubMed

    Waddington, David C; Woodcock, James; Peris, Eulalia; Condie, Jenna; Sica, Gennaro; Moorhouse, Andrew T; Steele, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main findings of a field survey conducted in the United Kingdom into the human response to vibration in residential environments. The main aim of this study was to derive exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to vibration from environmental sources. The sources of vibration considered in this paper are railway and construction activity. Annoyance data were collected using questionnaires conducted face-to-face with residents in their own homes. Questionnaires were completed with residents exposed to railway induced vibration (N?=?931) and vibration from the construction of a light rail system (N?=?350). Measurements of vibration were conducted at internal and external positions from which estimates of 24-h vibration exposure were derived for 1073 of the case studies. Sixty different vibration exposure descriptors along with 6 different frequency weightings were assessed as potential predictors of annoyance. Of the exposure descriptors considered, none were found to be a better predictor of annoyance than any other. However, use of relevant frequency weightings was found to improve correlation between vibration exposure and annoyance. A unified exposure-response relationship could not be derived due to differences in response to the two sources so separate relationships are presented for each source. PMID:24437758

  12. Simulation on Vibration Characteristics of Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siqi; Yan, Tie; Li, Wei; Bi, Fuqing

    2016-02-01

    Modal analysis theory of rock is proposed and the modeling of vibration characteristics of fractured rock is undertaken in this study. The modeling includes two aspects, namely, the natural frequency of rock with a single fracture and the crack expansion energy of rock with multiple fractures. Also, the results of numerical analysis are presented. Four main control parameters are considered, including the material properties, crack size, crack trend and the number of cracks. It is confirmed that the natural frequency of rock will be reduced by the cracks in it. The expansion energy of a single crack is inversely proportional to the number of such cracks in the rock. Namely, the more the similar cracks are, the less the energy required for a single crack expansion is and the smaller the excitation frequency needed for rock resonance is. The vibration characteristics of fractured rock are validated by numerical analysis. The natural frequency of rock increases with the increase of elastic modulus, and decreases with the increase of the angle, the length, the width and the number of cracks.

  13. Vibrational and acoustic response of ribbed plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Ten-Bin

    1993-01-01

    A self-consistent mathematical formulation, using the Fourier transform method and a direct Gaussian numerical integration scheme, is developed and verified for analysis of both vibrational and acoustic responses of infinite submerged ribbed plates. Further steps developed from standard theories make structural intensity, acoustic intensity, and acoustic power calculations possible in the nearfield and farfield and are demonstrated in this work. The direct numerical integration scheme adopted to obtain responses has proved to be straightforward and reliable. Although the double integration expression in some responses makes the technique infeasible, a practical way to overcome that difficulty is demonstrated using a standard branch-cut integration to eliminate one integration step analytically. The model and numerical scheme readily allow investigation of additional interesting topics, like the passband and stopband characteristic and the mode localization phenomenon that are observed in ribbed structures. Furthermore, an extension to comprehension of the mechanisms that generate the mode localization phenomenon on disordered structures has been realized. A secondary effort examines natural modes of vibration and acoustic radiation for finite stiffened multiple-span beams with the efficient transfer matrix method. This model shows that the mode localization phenomenon exists on disordered stiffened beams both under free-free and hinged-hinged end conditions. The sensitivity of the response to attachment disorder (perturbations in rib stiffness and location) has also been examined. An elaborate vibrational and acoustic experiment has been carried out on a baffled, stiffened, two-span, hinged beam to examine the existence of the localized modes and verify the predicted acoustic responses. Moreover, the radiation efficiency of finite beams has been investigated for comparison of the radiation behavior presented by the different stiffened beam arrangements. A thorough investigation of mode localization, frequency passbands and stopbands, structural and acoustic intensities, and radiated acoustic power is presented for analysis of submerged infinite ribbed plates with variable rib materials geometry and spacing (periodic and nonperiodic). A second investigation of localized natural modes is demonstrated for analysis and experiment of finite stiffened beams in air.

  14. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p <0.05) directly with the +G level reaching a maximum (3G) within a seconds compare to controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  15. Aircraft noise-induced building vibrations. [human annoyance responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Mayes, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The outdoor/indoor noise levels and associated vibration levels resulting from aircraft and nonaircraft events are recorded at 11 homesites, a historic building, and a school. In addition, limited subjective tests are conducted to examine the human detection/annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Results include relationships between aircraft noise and building vibration and between vibration and human response. Comparisons of building vibration data with existing criteria for building damage and human response are also considered.

  16. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. Using a perturbation expansion technique the free vibration solution is obtained in a closed-form, and the effects of system parameters on beam response are explored. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  17. Mechanical characteristics of strained vibrating strings and a vibration-induced electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivin, Yu. K.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanical characteristics of vibrating strings strained between rigid supports and a vibration-induced electric field are studied. Experiments are conducted with nylon, rubber, and metallic strings. Vibrations are excited by a pinch at different sites along the string. The motion of the string is filmed, and the attendant electric field is detected. Experimental data are analyzed under the assumption that the field is induced by unlike charges generated by the moving string. It is found that the field allows one to determine the time characteristics of the motion of the string and discriminate the types of its deformations. Young moduli observed under the static extension of thin nylon strings are compared with those calculated from the natural frequencies of vibration measured for differently strained strings. The mathematical pattern of the motion of the string is compared with the real situation.

  18. Hand-transmitted vibration and biodynamic response of the human hand-arm: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Dong, R G; Rakheja, S; Schopper, A W; Han, B; Smutz, W P

    2001-01-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) has been associated with prolonged exposure to vibration transmitted to the human hand-arm system from hand-held power tools, vibrating machines, or hand-held vibrating workpieces. The biodynamic response of the human hand and arm to hand transmitted vibration (HTV) forms an essential basis for effective evaluations of exposures, vibration-attenuation mechanisms, and potential injury mechanisms. The biodynamic response to HTV and its relationship to HAVS are critically reviewed and discussed to highlight the advances and the need for further research. In view of its strong dependence on the nature of HTV and the lack of general agreement on the characteristics of HTV, the reported studies are first reviewed to enhance an understanding of HTV and related issues. The characteristics of HTV and relevant unresolved issues are discussed on the basis of measured data, proposed standards, and measurement methods, while the need for further developments in measurement systems is emphasized. The studies on biodynamic response and their findings are grouped into four categories based on the methodology used and the objective. These include studies on (1) through-the-hand-arm response, expressed in terms of vibration transmissibility; (2) to-the-hand response, expressed in terms of the force-motion relationship of the hand-arm system; (3) to-the-hand biodynamic response function, expressed in terms of vibration energy absorption; and (4) computer modeling of the biodynamic response characteristics. PMID:11822480

  19. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  20. Vibration damping response of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanical vibration damping characteristics of glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite materials were studied. The objective was to develop an analytical model that incorporates the frequency dependence of the vibration damping loss factor and to experimentally determine the loss factor for frequencies up to 1,000 Hz. The analytical model requires as input the inplane material loss factors as functions of frequency. An experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated to determine these loss factors. Cantilever beam specimens were excited using an impulse from an instrumented force hammer. The loss factor was calculated using the half power band width technique. The apparatus was calibrated using a well characterized low damping material. The effect of clamping pressure and of the clamp block to specimen interface material was also investigated. While testing the composites, it became evident that the amplitude of vibration had a pronounced effect on the calculated loss factor. The analytical model was validated using two generic laminated configurations. The model predictions fell within the scatter of the experimental data.

  1. Vertical Vibration Characteristics of a High-Temperature Superconducting Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Ke Cai; Zhao, Li Feng; Ma, Jia Qing; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2013-06-01

    The vertical vibration characteristics of a high-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system are investigated experimentally. The displacement variations of the maglev vehicle system are measured with different external excitation frequency, in the case of a certain levitation gap. When the external vibration frequency is low, the amplitude variations of the response curve are small. With the increase of the vibration frequency, chaos status can be found. The resonance frequencies with difference levitation gap are also investigated, while the external excitation frequency range is 0-100 Hz. Along with the different levitation gap, resonance frequency is also different. There almost is a linear relationship between the levitation gap and the resonance frequency.

  2. Prediction of vibration characteristics in beam structure using sub-scale modeling with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zai, Behzad Ahmed; Sami, Saad; Khan, M. Amir; Ahmad, Furqan; Park, Myung Kyun

    2015-09-01

    Geometric or sub-scale modeling techniques are used for the evaluation of large and complex dynamic structures to ensure accurate reproduction of load path and thus leading to true dynamic characteristics of such structures. The sub-scale modeling technique is very effective in the prediction of vibration characteristics of original large structure when the experimental testing is not feasible due to the absence of a large testing facility. Previous researches were more focused on free and harmonic vibration case with little or no consideration for readily encountered random vibration. A sub-scale modeling technique is proposed for estimating the vibration characteristics of any large scale structure such as Launch vehicles, Mega structures, etc., under various vibration load cases by utilizing precise scaled-down model of that dynamic structure. In order to establish an analytical correlation between the original structure and its scaled models, different scale models of isotropic cantilever beam are selected and analyzed under various vibration conditions( i.e. free, harmonic and random) using finite element package ANSYS. The developed correlations are also validated through experimental testing. The prediction made from the vibratory response of the scaled-down beam through the established sets of correlation are found similar to the response measured from the testing of original beam structure. The established correlations are equally applicable in the prediction of dynamic characteristics of any complex structure through its scaled-down models. This paper presents modified sub-scale modeling technique that enables accurate prediction of vibration characteristics of large and complex structure under not only sinusoidal but also for random vibrations.

  3. Experimental investigations on vibration response of misaligned rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tejas H.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2009-10-01

    Misalignment is one of the most commonly observed faults in rotating machines. However, there have been relatively limited research efforts in the past to understand its effect on overall dynamics of the rotor system. In the existing literature, there is confusing spectral information on the rotor vibration characteristics of misalignment. The present study is aimed at understanding the dynamics of misaligned rotors and reducing the ambiguity so as to improve the reliability of the misalignment fault diagnosis. Influence of misalignment and its type on the forcing characteristics of flexible coupling is investigated followed by experimental investigation of the vibration response of misaligned coupled rotors supported on rolling element bearings. Steady-state vibration response at integer fraction of the first bending natural frequency is investigated. Effects of types of misalignments, i.e. parallel and angular misalignments, are investigated. The conventional Fourier spectrum (i.e. FFT) has limitations in revealing the directional nature of the vibrations arising out of rotor faults. In addition, it has been observed that several other rotor faults generate higher harmonics in the Fourier spectrum and hence there could be a level of uncertainty in the diagnosis when other faults are also suspect. The present work through use of full spectra has shown possibility of diagnosing misalignment through unique vibration features exhibited in the full spectra (i.e. forward/backward whirl). This provides an important tool to separate faults that generate similar frequency spectra (e.g. crack and misalignment) and lead to a more reliable misalignment diagnosis. Full spectra and orbit plots are efficiently used to reveal the unique nature of misalignment fault not clearly brought out by the previous studies, and new misalignment diagnostics recommendations are proposed.

  4. Vibration characteristics of a steadily rotating slender ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Partial differential equations are derived to describe the structural vibrations of a uniform homogeneous ring which is very flexible because the radius is very large compared with the cross sectional dimensions. Elementary beam theory is used and small deflections are assumed in the derivation. Four sets of structural modes are examined: bending and compression modes in the plane of the ring; bending modes perpendicular to the plane of the ring; and twisting modes about the centroid of the ring cross section. Spatial and temporal characteristics of these modes, presented in terms of vibration frequencies and ratios between vibration amplitudes, are demonstrated in several figures. Given a sufficiently high rotational rate, the dynamics of the ring approach those of a vibrating string. In this case, the velocity of traveling wave in the material of the ring approaches in velocity of the material relative to inertial space, resulting in structural modes which are almost stationary in space.

  5. Scale-model characterization of flow-induced vibrational response of FFTF reactor internals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J. A.; Mahoney, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Fast Test Reactor core internal and peripheral components were assessed for flow-induced vibrational characteristics under scaled and simulated prototype flow conditions in the Hydraulic Core Mockup as an integral part of the Fast Test Reactor Vibration Program. The Hydraulic Core Mockup was an 0.285 geometric scale model of the Fast Test Reactor internals designed to simulate prototype vibrational and hydraulic characteristics. Using water to simulate sodium coolant, vibrational characteristics were measured and determined for selected model components over the scaled flow range of 36 to 110%. Additionally, in-situ shaker tests were conducted on selected Hydraulic Core Mockup outlet plenum components to establish modal characteristics. Most components exhibited resonant response at all test flow rates; however, the measured dynamic response was neither abnormal nor anomalously flow-rate dependent, and the predicted prototype components' response were deemed acceptable.

  6. Substrate-borne vibrations induce behavioral responses in the leaf-dwelling cerambycid, Paraglenea fortunei.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Remi; Hosoda, Naoe; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Takanashi, Takuma

    2014-12-01

    Many insects utilize substrate-borne vibrations as a source of information for recognizing mates or predators. Among various substrates, plant leaves are commonly used for transmitting and receiving vibrational information. However, little is known about the utilization of vibrations by leaf-dwelling insects, especially coleopteran beetles. We conducted two experiments to examine the response of the leaf-dwelling cerambycid beetle, Paraglenea fortunei, to substrate-borne vibrations. We recorded and analyzed vibrations of host plant leaves from four different sources: wind (0.5 m/s), a beetle during landing, a walking beetle, and a beetle walking in the wind (0.5 m/s). We then measured the behavioral thresholds, the lowest amplitudes that induce behavioral responses, from beetles walking and resting on horizontal and vertical substrates with pulsed vibrations ranging from 20 Hz to 1 kHz. The vibrational characteristics of biotic and abiotic stimuli clearly differed. Beetle-generated vibrations (landing, walking, and walking in the wind) were broadly high in the low-frequency components above ∼30 Hz, while wind-generated vibrations showed a dominant peak at ∼30 Hz and a steep decrease thereafter. Among four situations, beetles walking on horizontal substrates showed lowest thresholds to vibrations of 75-500 Hz, which are characteristic of beetle-generated vibrations. Given that P. fortunei beetles are found on horizontal leaf surfaces of the host plant, vibrations transmitted though horizontal substrates may induce a strong freeze response in walking beetles to detect conspecifics or heterospecifics. Our findings provide evidence that leaf-dwelling beetles can discriminate among biotic and abiotic factors via differences in vibrational characteristics. PMID:25483790

  7. [Study on Vibrational Spectra Characteristics of Gem-Quality Natrolite].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-yu; Shen, Xi-tian; Lu, Ren; Zhao, Shan-rong

    2015-08-01

    Recently, there is a batch of colorless faceted gem-quality natrolite appear in the international jewelry market. In order to provide some information that can help us to distinguish them from the imitations. The infrared spectrometer and Raman spectrometer were employed to study the characteristics of the vibrational spectrum of three natrolite samples in this article. The typical infrared spectra shows that: the absorption region 4000~1200 cm(-1) is induced by stretching vibration of the hydroxyl group, the strong absorption peaks range from 1200~600 cm(-1) are relative with the anti-symmetry and symmetry stretching vibration of tetrahedral T-O bonds (T=Si or Al). The Raman spectra scattering peaks are located in the range of 300~600 and 700~1200 cm(-1). The low intensity Raman scattering spectrum in the range of 300~360 cm(-1) corresponds to the vibration of the water molecules in the crystal. The medium intensity Raman scattering spectrum is assigned to the deformation of SiO4 tetrahedra. The Raman spectra scattering peak at 726 cm(-1) is assigned to the stretching vibration of Al-O; The Si-O stretching vibration displays the Raman spectra scattering peaks at 974, 1038 and 1084 cm(-1). PMID:26672290

  8. Vibration monitoring with high frequency response based on coherent phase-sensitive OTDR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuelan; Zhu, Tao; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2011-05-01

    A coherent phase-sensitive OTDR system to detect distributed weak vibration is reported via heterodyne detection combined with moving averaging and moving differential signal processing. The location and high frequency response of weak vibration signal, such as pencil-break vibration which would match the characteristics of crack as a source of an acoustic emission signals, are easily monitored. Our experimental results show that spatial resolution of vibration is about 5m with 50 ns pump pulses, and the signal to noise ratio could be up to 6.5 dB. Also the frequency response could be up to 1 KHz. Both consecutive multiple events at the same location and multiple simultaneous events at different location with frequency components are identified which means our vibration testing system could be used for distributed multiple vibration events detection.

  9. Characteristics of Vibration that Alter Cardiovascular Parameters in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Rabey, Karyne N; Schmitt, Daniel; Norton, John N; Reynolds, Randall P

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that short-term exposure of mice to vibration within a frequency range thought to be near the resonant frequency range of mouse tissue and at an acceleration of 0 to 1 m/s2 would alter heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). We used radiotelemetry to evaluate the cardiovascular response to vibration in C57BL/6 and CD1 male mice exposed to vertical vibration of various frequencies and accelerations. MAP was consistently increased above baseline values at an acceleration near 1 m/s2 and a frequency of 90 Hz in both strains, and HR was increased also in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, MAP increased at 80 Hz in individual mice of both strains. When both strains were analyzed together, mean MAP and HR were increased at 90 Hz at 1 m/s2, and HR was increased at 80 Hz at 1 m/s2. No consistent change in MAP or HR occurred when mice were exposed to frequencies below 80 Hz or above 90 Hz. The increase in MAP and HR occurred only when the mice had conscious awareness of the vibration, given that these changes did not occur when anesthetized mice were exposed to vibration. Tested vibration acceleration levels lower than 0.75 m/s2 did not increase MAP or HR at 80 or 90 Hz, suggesting that a relatively high level of vibration is necessary to increase these parameters. These data are important to establish the harmful frequencies and accelerations of environmental vibration that should be minimized or avoided in mouse facilities. PMID:26224436

  10. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  11. Nuclear shell structure and response with quasiparticle-vibration coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Elena; Ring, Peter

    Extensions of the covariant density functional theory by quasiparticle-vibration coupling (QVC) are discussed. The formalism for one-body and two-body propagators in the nuclear medium allows calculations of single-particle energies and spectroscopic factors as well as the response to various types of excitations. In both cases QVC leads to a fragmentation of states, in agreement with experimental observations. Peculiarities of various 2p2h coupling schemes in the nuclear response function are discussed. The theory of the spin-isospin response includes both QVC and pion exchange and provides a framework for calculations of beta-decay, electron capture and charge-exchange reaction characteristics. The presented approaches are illustrated by realistic calculations for medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  12. Analysis of Vibrational Harmonic Response for Printing Double-Sheet Detecting System via ANSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Cai, Ji-Fei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang

    In order to explore the influence of the harmonic response of system vibration upon the stability of the double-sheet detector system, the mathematical model of vibrational system is established via the mechanical dynamic theory. Vibrational system of double-sheet detector is studied by theoretical modeling, and the dynamic simulation to obtain the amplitude/phase frequency response curve of the system based on ANSYS is completed to make a comparison with the theoretical results. It is shown that the theoretical value is basically consistent with that calculated through ANSYS. Conclusion vibrational characteristics of double-sheet detection system is obtained quickly and accurately, and propound solving measures by some crucial factors, such as the harmonic load, mass and stiffness, which will affect the vibration of the system, contribute to the finite element method is applied to the complex multiple-degree-of-freedom system.

  13. Vibration characteristics of aluminum material and its influences on laser Doppler voice acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-ze; Li, Li-yan; Tong, You-wan; Zeng, Hua-lin; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Laser Doppler technology is widely used in precision vibration measurement such as voice acquisition. The fundamental of voice acquisition is to detect the vibration of targets induced by sound wave using a Laser Doppler voice acquisition system, and then demodulate the voice signal from interference signal. Therefore the target's vibration characteristics will be the principal factor influencing the effect of voice acquisition. In this paper, we focus on the plane structure's vibration characteristics caused by voice. There are mainly two parts in this paper, simulation and experimental verify. In simulation, the finite element method is used. The Finite Element Analysis method is widely used in material properties analysis, dynamic analysis, and acoustic analysis. Through finite element analysis method, the plane structure models of thick smooth aluminum are established by ANSYS. Then the frequency responses of different constraints are compared. The Laser Doppler voice acquisition system is applied to test and verify the simulation results. The response characteristics of aluminum board under different excitation frequency are measured. The experimental results and simulation results are compared to verify the correctness and reasonableness of simulation. At the same time, this provides theoretical guidance for Laser Doppler voice acquisition system to choose targets and improve voice acquisition performance.

  14. A study of vibration system characteristics based on laser self-mixing interference effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Du, Zhengting; Deng, Jialiang; Cai, Xuguang; Yu, Benli; Lu, Liang

    2012-07-01

    For removing the limitations of traditional theoretical model and measurement technology of vibration system characteristics, a new vibration system extreme points (VSEP) model based on laser self-mixing interference (SMI) effect is proposed. The VSEP can be applied to study vibration systems due to compact, effective, and low cost. This paper derives the VSEP model from Lang-Kobayashi (L-K) rate equations and modifies the simplified half-cycle extreme points formula by using Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method. Finally, amplitude-frequency response curve which ?0 is 1.18595 103 rad, ? is 16.2460 s-2 and the piezoelectric coefficient of piezoelectric transducer which d33 is 0.66034 nm/V have been obtained by combining the modified VSEP model and SMI measurement method.

  15. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. The effects of system parameters on beam response are explored with a perturbation expansion technique. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  16. Human discomfort response to noise combined with vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted (1) to determine the effects of combined environmental noise and vertical vibration upon human subjective discomfort response, (2) to develop a model for the prediction of passenger discomfort response to the combined environment, and (3) to develop a set of noise-vibration curves for use as criteria in ride quality design. Subjects were exposed to parametric combinations of noise and vibrations through the use of a realistic laboratory simulator. Results indicated that accurate prediction of passenger ride comfort requires knowledge of both the level and frequency content of the noise and vibration components of a ride environment as well as knowledge of the interactive effects of combined noise and vibration. A design tool in the form of an empirical model of passenger discomfort response to combined noise and vertical vibration was developed and illustrated by several computational examples. Finally, a set of noise-vibration criteria curves were generated to illustrate the fundamental design trade-off possible between passenger discomfort and the noise-vibration levels that produce the discomfort.

  17. Challenges in testing and monitoring the in-operation vibration characteristics of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Meng, Fanzhong; Rixen, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper aims at discussing the main challenges in testing and monitoring the in-operation vibration characteristics of wind turbines by presenting the results of the analyses performed using analytical models, aeroelastic simulations and infield vibration measurements.

  18. Vibration transmissibility characteristics of the human hand-arm system under different postures, hand forces and excitation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewusi, S. A.; Rakheja, S.; Marcotte, P.; Boutin, J.

    2010-07-01

    Biodynamic responses of the hand-arm system have been mostly characterized in terms of driving-point force-motion relationships, which have also served as the primary basis for developing the mechanical-equivalent models. The knowledge of localized vibration responses of the hand-arm segments could help derive more effective biodynamic models. In this study, the transmission of z h-axis handle vibration to the wrist, elbow and the shoulder of the human hand and arm are characterized in the laboratory for the bent-arm and extended arm postures. The experiments involved six subjects grasping a handle subject to two different magnitudes of broad-band random vibration, and nine different combinations of hand grip and push forces. The vibration transmissibility data were acquired in the z h- and y h-axis at the wrist and shoulder, and along all the three axes around the elbow joint. The results show that the human hand-arm system in an extended arm posture amplifies the vibration transmitted to the upper-arm and the whole-body at frequencies below 25 Hz, but attenuates the vibration above 25 Hz more effectively than the bent-arm posture, except at the shoulder. The magnitudes of transmitted vibration under an extended arm posture along the y h-axis were observed to be nearly twice those for the bent-arm posture in the low frequency region. The results further showed that variations in the grip force mostly affect vibration transmissibility and characteristic frequencies of the forearm, while changes in the push force influenced the dynamic characteristics of the entire hand-arm system. The magnitudes of transmitted vibration in the vicinity of the characteristic frequencies were influenced by the handle vibration magnitude.

  19. The flaminio obelisk in Rome: vibrational characteristics as part of preservation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bongiovanni, G.; Celebi, M.; Clemente, P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to study the vibrational characteristics of the Flaminio Obelisk in Rome as part of general studies being performed for preservation purposes. The state of preservation of the monument is described as well as the sonic method used to evaluate the integrity of the sections. The results of the sonic tests are used to determine reductions in the cross-sectional properties. A stick model including two rotational frequency independent soil springs at the basement level of the obelisk is developed. A response spectrum and stress analysis according to the Italian Seismic Code is performed considering and evaluating the degraded characteristics of sections. -from Authors

  20. Vibration characteristics of rectangular plate in compressible inviscid fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chan-Yi; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a mathematical derivation of the vibration characteristics of an elastic thin plate placed at the bottom of a three dimensional rectangular container filled with compressible inviscid fluid. A set of beam functions is used as the admissible functions of the plate in a fluid-plate system, and the motion of the fluid induced by the deformation of the plate is obtained from a three-dimensional acoustic equation. Pressure from the fluid over the fluid-plate interface is integrated to form a virtual mass matrix. The frequency equation of the fluid-plate system is derived by combining mass, stiffness, and the virtual mass matrix. Solving the frequency equation makes it possible to obtain the dynamic characteristic of the fluid-plate system, such as resonant frequencies, corresponding mode shapes, and velocity of the fluid. Numerical calculations were performed for plates coupled with fluids with various degrees of compressibility to illustrate the difference between compressible and incompressible fluids in a fluid-plate system. The proposed method could be used to predict resonant frequencies and mode shapes with accuracy compared to that of incompressible fluid theory (IFT). The proposed method can be used to analyze cases involving high value of sound velocity, such as incompressible fluids. When the sound velocity approaches infinity, the results obtained for compressible fluids are similar to those of incompressible fluids. We also examined the influence of fluid compressibility on vibration characteristics in which a decrease in sound velocity was shown to correspond to a decrease in resonant frequency. Additional modes, not observed in incompressible fluids, were obtained in cases of low sound velocity, particularly at higher resonant frequencies. Fluid velocity plots clearly reveal that the additional resonant modes can be attributed to the compressible behavior of the fluid.

  1. Vibration transmissibility characteristics of reinforced viscoelastic pipes employing complex moduli master curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyadiji, S. O.; Tomlinson, G. R.

    1985-10-01

    Fibre and wire reinforced flexible viscoelastic pipes are used in situations where their static and dynamic characteristics provide much better performance than metallic pipes. Because of their vibration and shock attenuation characteristics, these viscoelastic pipes are used as flexible conduits in applications where it is desirable to minimize the transmission of vibration and structure-borne sound to the surroundings. In analyzing the vibration and structure-borne sound transmission and the vibrational power flow through systems that incorporate such pipes, knowledge of the mathematical models that satisfactorily predict the vibration transmissibility characteristics of the viscoelastic pipes is advantageous. It is shown that the use of the frequency and temperature dependent complex moduli of these pipes with the elementary and the more exact theories of the propagation of axial and flexural vibration through viscoelastic rods and beams provides satisfactory prediction of the vibration transmissibility characteristics of the reinforced viscoelastic pipes.

  2. Damage Identification of Piles Based on Vibration Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Yao, Wenjuan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    A method of damage identification of piles was established by using vibration characteristics. The approach focused on the application of the element strain energy and sensitive modals. A damage identification equation of piles was deduced using the structural vibration equation. The equation contained three major factors: change rate of element modal strain energy, damage factor of pile, and sensitivity factor of modal damage. The sensitive modals of damage identification were selected by using sensitivity factor of modal damage firstly. Subsequently, the indexes for early-warning of pile damage were established by applying the change rate of strain energy. Then the technology of computational analysis of wavelet transform was used to damage identification for pile. The identification of small damage of pile was completely achieved, including the location of damage and the extent of damage. In the process of identifying the extent of damage of pile, the equation of damage identification was used in many times. Finally, a stadium project was used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method of damage identification for piles. The correctness and practicability of the proposed method were verified by comparing the results of damage identification with that of low strain test. The research provided a new way for damage identification of piles. PMID:25506062

  3. Thermoregulatory responses to heat and vibration in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaul, W. A.; Spear, R. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vibration on thermoregulatory responses was studied in heat-acclimated men exposed suddenly to simultaneous heat and whole body vibrations (WBVs) at two intensity levels, each at graded frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz. The mean rectal temperature (Tre) became elevated more quickly in the WBV exposures than in the controls (heat exposure alone). Both intensity- and frequency-dependent WBV relationships were recorded in localized blood flows and in sweat rates. Thus, vibration appears to reduce the efficiency of the cooling mechanisms during a heat exposure.

  4. Vibration response mechanism of faulty outer race rolling element bearings for quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lingli; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Feibin; Zhang, Jianyu; Lee, Seungchul

    2016-03-01

    For the quantitative fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings, a nonlinear vibration model for fault severity assessment of rolling element bearings is established in this study. The outer race defect size parameter is introduced into the dynamic model, and vibration response signals of rolling element bearings under different fault sizes are simulated. The signals are analyzed quantitatively to observe the relationship between vibration responses and fault sizes. The impact points when the ball rolls onto and away from the defect are identified from the vibration response signals. Next, the impact characteristic that reflects the fault severity in rolling element bearings is obtained from the time interval between two impact points. When the width of the bearing fault is small, the signals are presented as clear single impact. The signals gradually become double impacts with increasing size of defects. The vibration signals of a rolling element bearings test rig are measured for different outer race fault sizes. The experimental results agree well with the results from simulations. These results are useful for understanding the vibration response mechanism of rolling element bearings under various degrees of fault severity.

  5. Investigation of vibrational characteristics in BBO crystals by femtosecond CARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuanqin; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Sheng; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2012-10-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is utilized to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics in BBO crystals at room temperature. Time-resolved two-beam and three-beam CARS are detected. The vibrational dephasing time is analyzed and the changes of vibrational mode intensities with the polarization of pump pulses are observed.

  6. Bridge Condition Assessment based on Vibration Responses of Passenger Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Yabe, Akito

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of assessing the condition of existing short- and medium-span reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges based on vibration monitoring data obtained from a public bus. This paper not only describes details of a prototype monitoring system that uses information technology and sensors capable of providing more accurate knowledge of bridge performance than conventional ways but also shows a few specific examples of bridge condition assessment based on vehicle vibrations measured by using an in-service public bus equipped with vibration measurement instrumentation. This paper also describes a sensitivity analysis of deteriorating bridges based on simulation of the acceleration response of buses conducted by the "substructure method" employing a finite element model to verify the above bridge performance results. The main conclusions obtained in this study can be summarized as follows: (1) Because the vibration responses of passenger vehicles, such as buses, have a good linear relationship with the vibration responses of the target bridges, the proposed system can be used as a practical monitoring system for bridge condition assessment. (2) The results of sensitivity analysis performed by the substructure method show that bus vibration responses are useful for evaluating target bridge performance. (3) The proposed method was applied to a network of real bridges in a local area to evaluate its effectiveness. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used to prioritize the repair/strengthening works of existing bridges based on various vibration information in order to help bridge administrators establish rational maintenance strategies.

  7. An optimized semiclassical approximation for vibrational response functions

    PubMed Central

    Gerace, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    The observables of multidimensional infrared spectroscopy may be calculated from nonlinear vibrational response functions. Fully quantum dynamical calculations of vibrational response functions are generally impractical, while completely classical calculations are qualitatively incorrect at long times. These challenges motivate the development of semiclassical approximations to quantum mechanics, which use classical mechanical information to reconstruct quantum effects. The mean-trajectory (MT) approximation is a semiclassical approach to quantum vibrational response functions employing classical trajectories linked by deterministic transitions representing the effects of the radiation-matter interaction. Previous application of the MT approximation to the third-order response function R(3)(t3, t2, t1) demonstrated that the method quantitatively describes the coherence dynamics of the t3 and t1 evolution times, but is qualitatively incorrect for the waiting-time t2 period. Here we develop an optimized version of the MT approximation by elucidating the connection between this semiclassical approach and the double-sided Feynman diagrams (2FD) that represent the quantum response. Establishing the direct connection between 2FD and semiclassical paths motivates a systematic derivation of an optimized MT approximation (OMT). The OMT uses classical mechanical inputs to accurately reproduce quantum dynamics associated with all three propagation times of the third-order vibrational response function. PMID:23556706

  8. An optimized semiclassical approximation for vibrational response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-03-01

    The observables of multidimensional infrared spectroscopy may be calculated from nonlinear vibrational response functions. Fully quantum dynamical calculations of vibrational response functions are generally impractical, while completely classical calculations are qualitatively incorrect at long times. These challenges motivate the development of semiclassical approximations to quantum mechanics, which use classical mechanical information to reconstruct quantum effects. The mean-trajectory (MT) approximation is a semiclassical approach to quantum vibrational response functions employing classical trajectories linked by deterministic transitions representing the effects of the radiation-matter interaction. Previous application of the MT approximation to the third-order response function R(3)(t3, t2, t1) demonstrated that the method quantitatively describes the coherence dynamics of the t3 and t1 evolution times, but is qualitatively incorrect for the waiting-time t2 period. Here we develop an optimized version of the MT approximation by elucidating the connection between this semiclassical approach and the double-sided Feynman diagrams (2FD) that represent the quantum response. Establishing the direct connection between 2FD and semiclassical paths motivates a systematic derivation of an optimized MT approximation (OMT). The OMT uses classical mechanical inputs to accurately reproduce quantum dynamics associated with all three propagation times of the third-order vibrational response function.

  9. Characteristics of the Ultrasonic Linear Motor Using Radial and Nonaxisymmetric Vibration Modes of an Annular Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Takehiro; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    1995-09-01

    This paper deals with an ultrasonic linear motor using nonaxisymmetric ((1, 1)) vibration and radial (R, 1) vibration modes of a piezoelectric ceramic annular plate. A new method of making these modes degenerate is proposed. By applying this method to a vibrator, the neutral axis of vibration for ((1, 1))-mode is fixed on the prescribed position, and the difference between the two resonance frequencies is adjusted to the optimum state for a stator vibrator. The construction and some operational characteristics of the linear motor are presented. The maximum efficiency of the prototype motor was about 48%.

  10. Vibration characteristics of OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental vibration tests covering a range of torque and speed conditions were performed on the OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Signals from accelerometers located on the transmission housing were analyzed by using Fourier spectra, power spectral density functions, and averaging techniques. Most peaks of the Fourier spectra occurred at the spiral bevel and planetary gear mesh harmonics. The highest level of vibration occurred at the spiral bevel meshing frequency. Transmission speed and vibration measurement location had a significant effect on measured vibration; transmission torque and measurement direction had a small effect.

  11. Nonlinear characteristics analysis of vortex-induced vibration for a three-dimensional flexible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Jiang, Naibin; Zang, Fenggang; Zhang, Yixiong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Wanjun

    2016-05-01

    Vortex-induced vibration of a three-dimensional flexible tube is one of the key problems to be considered in many engineering situations. This paper aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and response characteristics of a three-dimensional tube under turbulent flow. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model are solved with the finite volume approach, and the dynamic equilibrium equations are discretized by the finite element theory. A three-dimensional fully coupled numerical model for vortex-induced vibration of flexible tube is proposed. The model realized the fluid-structure interaction with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. Based on this model, Response regimes, trajectory, phase difference, fluid force coefficient and vortex shedding frequency are obtained. The nonlinear phenomena of lock-in, phase-switch are captured successfully. Meanwhile, the limit cycle, bifurcation of lift coefficient and displacement are analyzed using phase portrait and Poincare section. The results reveal that, a quasi-upper branch occurs in the present fluid-flexible tube coupling system with high mass-damping and low mass ratio. There is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in the three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow.

  12. Vibrational characteristics of FRP-bonded concrete interfacial defects in a low frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tin Kei; Lau, Denvid

    2014-04-01

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) is a critical load-bearing component of strengthened or retrofitted civil infrastructures, the betterment of structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology for such composites is imperative. Henceforth the vibrational characteristics of near surface interfacial defects involving delamination and trapped air pockets at the FRP-concrete interface are investigated in this study using a finite element approach. Intuitively, due to its lower interfacial stiffness compared with an intact interface, a damaged region is expected to have a set of resonance frequencies different from an intact region when excited by acoustic waves. It has been observed that, when excited acoustically, both the vibrational amplitudes and frequency peaks in the response spectrum of the defects demonstrate a significant deviation from an intact FRP-bonded region. For a thin sheet of FRP bonded to concrete with sizable interfacial defects, the fundamental mode under free vibration is shown to be relatively low, in the order of kHz. Due to the low resonance frequencies of the defects, the use of low-cost equipment for interfacial defect detection via response spectrum analysis is highly feasible.

  13. Rocket Launch-Induced Vibration and Ignition Overpressure Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E.; Margashayam, Ravi N.; Nayfeh, Jamal F.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rocket-induced vibration and ignition overpressure response environments are predicted in the low-frequency (5 to 200 hertz) range. The predictions are necessary to evaluate their impact on critical components, structures, and facilities in the immediate vicinity of the rocket launch pad.

  14. Experimental measurements of the Space Shuttle main engine fuel and oxygen turbopump vibration characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, E. J.; Flack, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The vibration characteristics of the SSME (Space Shuttle main engine) are dealt with. The Space Shuttle engine consists of a main rocket nozzle and attached to it are high pressure fuel and oxygen pumps. Various vibration problems have been encountered with both the hydrogen and oxygen pumps. The vibration spectrum of the hydrogen and oxygen pumps has been analyzed by various techniques using synchronous tracking filters and FFT analyzers. The experimental data has been correlated to theoretical predictions of resonance frequencies.

  15. Analytical design and evaluation of an active control system for helicopter vibration reduction and gust response alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Zwicke, P. E.; Gold, P.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to define the basic configuration of an active control system for helicopter vibration and gust response alleviation. The study culminated in a control system design which has two separate systems: narrow band loop for vibration reduction and wider band loop for gust response alleviation. The narrow band vibration loop utilizes the standard swashplate control configuration to input controller for the vibration loop is based on adaptive optimal control theory and is designed to adapt to any flight condition including maneuvers and transients. The prime characteristics of the vibration control system is its real time capability. The gust alleviation control system studied consists of optimal sampled data feedback gains together with an optimal one-step-ahead prediction. The prediction permits the estimation of the gust disturbance which can then be used to minimize the gust effects on the helicopter.

  16. Vibration characteristics of hexagonal radial rib and hoop platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    Experiment and analysis have been used to characterize the modes of vibration of planar radial rib and hoop hexagonal platforms. Finite element analysis correlated very well with experimental results. The sensitivity of mode shapes and frequencies to cable stiffness and initial tension is presented. Threshold values have been identified, above which changes in cable stiffness do not affect the first few platform vibration modes. Primary vibration modes of the radial rib platform involve beam bending. Vibration modes of the hoop platform exhibit both beam bending and frame bending and torsion. Results indicate for low order polygonal structures, the radial rib concept produced a higher fundamental frequency. For high order polygonal structures, the hoop concept has the potential to achieve a higher fundamental frequency than the radial rib concept.

  17. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations on vibration characteristics of a loaded ship model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pu; Hong, Ming; Wang, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, vibration characteristics of the structure in the finite fluid domain are analyzed using a coupled finite element method. The added mass matrix is calculated with finite element method (FEM) by 8-node acoustic fluid elements. Vibration characteristics of the structure in finite fluid domain are calculated combining structure FEM mass matrix. By writing the relevant programs, numerical analysis on vibration characteristics of a submerged cantilever rectangular plate in finite fluid domain and loaded ship model is performed. A modal identification experiment for the loaded ship model in air and in water is conducted and the experiment results verify the reliability of the numerical analysis. The numerical method can be used for further research on vibration characteristics and acoustic radiation problems of the structure in the finite fluid domain.

  19. Tissue response to mechanical vibrations for "sonoelasticity imaging".

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Huang, S R; Musulin, R A; Lerner, R M

    1990-01-01

    The goal of "sonoelasticity imaging" is to differentiate between normal soft tissues and hard lesions. This is done by measuring and then displaying the ultrasound Doppler spectrum of regions within tissues which are mechanically forced with low frequency (20-1000 Hz) vibrations. The resolution and sensitivity of the technique ultimately rest on the spatial resolution of ultrasound Doppler detection, the low frequency mechanical properties of tissues, and the vibration response of layered, inhomogeneous regions with hard tumor inclusions and complicated boundary conditions set by the presence of skin, bones and other regions. An initial investigation has measured some tissue stiffness parameters, and applied these in a NASTRAN finite element analysis to simulate a prostate tumor in the pelvic cavity. The measurements show a wide separation between the elastic modulus of tumors and soft tissues such as muscle and prostate. NASTRAN analyses show the ability to delineate regions of different elasticity based on the pattern of vibration amplitudes. The ability to change vibration frequency within the 100-300 Hz band seems particularly helpful in simulations and experiments which visualize small stiff inclusions in tissues. Preliminary results support the postulate that sonoelasticity imaging can provide useful information concerning tissue properties that are not otherwise obtainable. PMID:2194336

  20. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  1. Estimate of the changes in the characteristics of a PZT vibrator under a space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Moojoon

    2015-03-01

    To utilize lead zirconate titanate (PZT) vibrators in the aerospace industry, we formulate the changes in the characteristics of the vibrator for the transverse mode and the thickness mode as functions of the temperature. For practical use, we adopted a few linear functions and a square function as regression functions in order to estimate the characteristics of the commercialized PZT-5 series of ceramics. The input admittance characteristics were calculated using the characteristic functions suggested in this study, and the results showed good agreement with the measured ones.

  2. Causes and Characteristics of the Electromagnetic Vibration of a Capacitor Motor under Load Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsuka, Isao; Tsuboi, Kazuo

    The capacitor motors (CRMs) are widely used to drive industrial equipment and electric home appliances. Recently, the reduction of the vibration and noise of CRMs has become increasingly important from the standpoint of environmental improvement. However, electromagnetic vibration of CRMs under load has not been analyzed sufficiently. The present paper theoretically and experimentally discusses the causes and characteristics of CRM electromagnetic vibration under load. The primary conclusions are as follows: (1) The general formula for dominant electromagnetic vibration caused by electromagnetic force wave was derived, including the influences not only of a backward magnetic field but also of magnetic saturation. (2) The dominant electromagnetic vibration of CRMs was theoretically attributed to three types of electromagnetic force waves. Two types of electromagnetic force wave are generated by the interaction of two forward magnetic fluxes, such as those of a three-phase squirrel-cage induction motor, and the other type of electromagnetic force wave is generated under the influence of a backward magnetic flux. (3) The characteristics of dominant electromagnetic vibration depending on load and running capacitor were classified theoretically and experimentally into three types based on the characteristics of the electromagnetic force wave and equivalent circuit current. (4) The influences of magnetic saturation in dominant electromagnetic vibration were verified experimentally and their causes were clarified theoretically in relation to electromagnetic force waves.

  3. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness. PMID:23464015

  4. The effects of whole-body vibration on human biodynamic response.

    PubMed

    Smith, S D

    1995-01-01

    The objective of vibration research at the Armstrong Laboratory includes the expansion and improvement of the measurement, quantification, analysis, and modeling of human vibration response. The driving-point impedance and transmissibility techniques have been expanded and are rigorously applied in the research efforts. Driving-point impedance is defined as the ratio between the transmitted force and input velocity at the point of load application. Transmissibility is typically defined as the ratio between the acceleration level measured at some location on the body and the input acceleration at the seat. These two ratios are used to assess the magnitude and frequency location of resonance behaviors where maximum motions occur in the body. From these data, analytical models are developed which can simulate the motions and coupling behaviors, and predict the stiffness and damping characteristics of the affected anatomical structures. The ultimate goal of the research is to provide new and improved data and modeling capability for revising exposure standards and for developing equipment design guidelines and criteria for improving tolerance and reducing physiological consequences. This paper describes the results of recent studies conducted to identify the biodynamic behavior of major anatomical structures affected by seated whole-body vibration, to develop an analytical model for simulating human vibration response, and to apply the model to evaluate the effects of seat cushion materials on the transmission/attenuation pathways. PMID:11538949

  5. Optimization of Training Sets for Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns from Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been used for a number of years to process holography-generated characteristic patterns of vibrating structures. This technology depends critically on the selection and the conditioning of the training sets. A scaling operation called folding is discussed for conditioning training sets optimally for training feed-forward neural networks to process characteristic fringe patterns. Folding allows feed-forward nets to be trained easily to detect damage-induced vibration-displacement-distribution changes as small as 10 nm. A specific application to aerospace of neural-net processing of characteristic patterns is presented to motivate the conditioning and optimization effort.

  6. Analysis of proposed criteria for human response to vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janeway, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    The development of criteria for human vibration response is reviewed, including the evolution of the ISO standard 2631. The document is analyzed to show why its application to vehicle ride evaluation is strongly opposed. Alternative vertical horizontal limits for comfort are recommended in the ground vehicle ride frequency range above 1 Hz. These values are derived by correlating the absorbed power findings of Pradko and Lee with other established criteria. Special emphasis is placed on working limits in the frequency range of 1 to 10 Hz since this is the most significant area in ground vehicle ride evaluation.

  7. Modeling vibration response and damping of cables and cabled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, Kaitlin S.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    In an effort to model the vibration response of cabled structures, the distributed transfer function method is developed to model cables and a simple cabled structure. The model includes shear effects, tension, and hysteretic damping for modeling of helical stranded cables, and includes a method for modeling cable attachment points using both linear and rotational damping and stiffness. The damped cable model shows agreement with experimental data for four types of stranded cables, and the damped cabled beam model shows agreement with experimental data for the cables attached to a beam structure, as well as improvement over the distributed mass method for cabled structure modeling.

  8. Description of the traction characteristics of the neodymium compensators of the automatic vibration isolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.; Panchenko, Y. V.; Gurov, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the method of calculation of neodymium magnets was presented. The calculation of the neodymium magnets characteristics and stiffness correctors of the vibration isolator according to the requirements for vibration isolation devices with stiffness compensators was performed. This research has been performed with the support of the President scholarship for young scientists, order No. 184 of Ministry of education and science of the Russian Federation of the 10th of March 2015.

  9. Training Data Optimized and Conditioned to Learn Characteristic Patterns of Vibrating Blisks and Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we have been training artificial neural networks to interpret the characteristic patterns (see the leftmost image) generated from electronic holograms of vibrating structures. These patterns not only visualize the vibration properties of structures, but small changes in the patterns can indicate structural changes, cracking, or damage. Neural networks detect these small changes well. Our objective has been to adapt the neural-network, electronic-holography combination for inspecting components in Glenn's Spin Rig.

  10. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-01

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  11. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states.

    PubMed

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-01

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde. PMID:26450293

  12. Thermal vibration characteristics of armchair boron-nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Anirban; Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-12-01

    A nanomechanical resonator based sensor works by detecting small changes in the natural frequency of the device in presence of external agents. In this study, we address the length and the temperature-dependent sensitivity of precompressed armchair Boron-Nitride nanotubes towards their use as sensors. The vibrational data, obtained using molecular dynamics simulations, are analyzed for frequency content through the fast Fourier transformation. As the temperature of the system rises, the vibrational spectrum becomes noisy, and the modal frequencies show a red-shift irrespective of the length of the nanotube, suggesting that the nanotube based sensors calibrated at a particular temperature may not function desirably at other temperatures. Temperature-induced noise becomes increasingly pronounced with the decrease in the length of the nanotube. For the shorter nanotube at higher temperatures, we observe multiple closely spaced peaks near the natural frequency, that create a masking effect and reduce the sensitivity of detection. However, longer nanotubes do not show these spurious frequencies, and are considerably more sensitive than the shorter ones.

  13. Vibration Characteristics of Partially Covered Double-Sandwich Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qinghua; Levy, Cesar

    1996-01-01

    The differential equations of motion together with the boundary conditions for a partially covered, double-sandwich cantilever beam are derived. Bending and extension, rotational and longitudinal inertia of damping layers, and shear deformation and rotational and longitudinal inertia of the constraining layers and the primary beam are included in the equations. The theory is applicable for long as well as short, soft, or stiff damping layer, double-sandwich beams. Also, the effects of different parameters on the system loss factor and resonance frequency are discussed. Differences are found to exist with the previous beam model (called the Euler beam model) when the damping layers are stiff, when the thickness of the damping layer is large compared to the primary-beam thickness, and in the case of higher modes of vibration.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of torsional vibration characteristics of helicopter rotor blades. Part 1: Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of structural vibration characteristics of rotor blades was carried out. Coupled equations of motion for flapwise bending and torsion were formulated for rotor blades with noncollinear elastic and mass axes. The finite element method was applied for a detailed representation of blade structural properties. Coupled structural mass and stiffness coefficients were evaluated. The range of validity of a set of coupled equations of motion linearized with respect to eccentricity between elastic and mass axes was investigated. The sensitivity of blade vibration characteristics to torsion were evaluated by varying blade geometric properties, boundary conditions, and eccentricities between mass and elastic axes.

  15. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron–vibration coupling

    PubMed Central

    Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage) transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V 2k to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes. PMID:26425436

  16. An analytical and experimental study of the vibration response of a clamped ribbed plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tian Ran

    2012-02-01

    An analytical solution is presented in this paper for the vibration response of a ribbed plate clamped on all its boundary edges by employing a traveling wave solution. A clamped ribbed plate test rig is also assembled in this study for the experimental investigation of the ribbed plate response and to provide verification results to the analytical solution. The dynamic characteristics and mode shapes of the ribbed plate are measured and compared to those obtained from the analytical solution and from finite element analysis (FEA). General good agreements are found between the results. Discrepancies between the computational and experimental results at low and high frequencies are also discussed. Explanations are offered in the study to disclose the mechanism causing the discrepancies. The dependency of the dynamic response of the ribbed plate on the distance between the excitation force and the rib is also investigated experimentally. It confirms the findings disclosed in a previous analytical study [T.R. Lin, J. Pan, A closed form solution for the dynamic response of finite ribbed plates, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 119 (2006) 917-925] that the vibration response of a clamped ribbed plate due to a point force excitation is controlled by the plate stiffness when the source is more than a quarter plate bending wavelength away from the rib and from the plate boundary. The response is largely affected by the rib stiffness when the source location is less than a quarter bending wavelength away from the rib.

  17. Vibration testing based on impulse response excited by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosoya, Naoki

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes an innovative vibration testing method based on impulse response excited by laser ablation. In conventional vibration testing using an impulse hammer, high-frequency elements of over tens of kilohertz are barely present in the excitation force. A pulsed high-power YAG laser is used in this study for producing an ideal impulse force on a structural surface. Illuminating a point on a metal with the well-focused YAG laser, laser ablation is caused by generation of plasma on the metal. As a result, an ideal impulse excitation force generated by laser ablation is applied to the point on the structure. Therefore, it is possible to measure high-frequency FRFs due to the laser excitation. A water droplet overlay on the metal is used to adjust the force magnitude of laser excitation. An aluminum block that has nine natural frequencies below 40 kHz is employed as a test piece. The validity of the proposed method is verified by comparing the FRFs of the block obtained by the laser excitation, impulse hammer, and finite element analysis. Furthermore, the relationship between accuracy of FRF measurements and sensitivity of sensors is investigated.

  18. Bolt loosening detection using vibration characteristics of thin plate with piezoelectric elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Ohya, Yusuke; Okuma, Masaaki

    2004-07-01

    Many researchers have made efforts to develop structural health monitoring methods to detect damages, cracks, corrosion and bolt loosening using modal characteristics of structures. However, modal characteristics are affected by not only damages but also boundary conditions and loading conditions etc. In fact, local damages induce very slight change of modal parameter. Therefore, it will be difficult to apply most of these conventional methods to actual structures. In this paper, we propose a new structural health monitoring method to detect bolt loosening using the characteristics of local vibration modes of a thin plate sensor sandwiched between a bolt, a nut and washers in main structures. This sensor consists of a thin plate and some piezoelectric elements. In local mode vibration of the thin plate sensor, the bolt"s axial tension determines its boundary condition. Bolt loosening changes the boundary condition and natural frequencies of the sensor. However, main structure"s characteristics don"t affect sensor"s modal characteristics. Since our method attempts using local vibration modes it is important to distinguish the local vibration modes of interest from the global ones related to structures. We propose a technique to distinguish local modes using finite element method. Finally, we confirm the validity of the thin plate sensor experimentally.

  19. Vibration Characteristics of Piezoelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate by Fluid Flow in Intravascular Oxygenator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi‑Beum; Hong, Chul‑Un; Kwon, Tae‑Kyu

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the enhancement in oxygen transfer rate in hollow-fiber-membrane (HFM) modules using a plumbum piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator and a piezoelectric poly vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor. We developed a vibrating intravascular lung assist device (VIVLAD) for patients having chronic respiratory problems and performed experiments on hydrodynamic flow through a bundle of sinusoidal vibrating hollow fibers. These modules were used to provide some insight into how wall vibrations might enhance the performance of an intravascular lung assist device. The experimental design and procedure are then applied to the fabrication of a device used to assess the effectiveness of membrane vibrations. The test section was a cylindrical duct with an inner diameter of 30 mm. The flow rate was controlled by a pump and monitored by a built-in flowmeter. The vibration apparatus was composed of a piezovibrator, a function generator, and a power amplifier. The direction of vibration was radial to the fluid flow. Gas flow rates of up to 6 L/min through 120-cm-long hollow fibers were achieved by exciting the piezovibrator. The time and frequency responses of PVDF sensors were investigated through various frequencies in VIVLAD. In these devices, the flow of blood and the source of oxygen were separated by a semipermeable membrane that allows oxygen and carbon dioxide to diffuse into and out of the fluid, respectively. Results of the experiments have shown that a vibrating intravascular lung assist device performs effectively.

  20. Evaluation of human response to structural vibrations induced by sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Louis C.; Czech, J.

    1992-01-01

    The topic is addressed of building vibration response to sonic boom and the evaluation of the associated human response to this vibration. An attempt is made to reexamine some of the issues addressed previously and to offer fresh insight that may assist in reassessing the potential impact of sonic boom over populated areas. Human response to vibration is reviewed first and a new human vibration response criterion curve is developed as a function of frequency. The difference between response to steady state versus impulsive vibration is addressed and a 'vibration exposure' or 'vibration energy' descriptor is suggested as one possible way to evaluate duration effects on response to transient vibration from sonic booms. New data on the acoustic signature of rattling objects are presented along with a review of existing data on the occurrence of rattle. Structural response to sonic boom is reviewed and a new descriptor, 'Acceleration Exposure Level' is suggested which can be easily determined from the Fourier Spectrum of a sonic boom. A preliminary assessment of potential impact from sonic booms is provided in terms of human response to vibration and detection of rattle based on a synthesis of the preceding material.

  1. Effect of vibration on retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems. [for surface tension propellant acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Aydelott, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The design of surface tension propellant acquisition systems using fine-mesh screen must take into account all factors that influence the liquid pressure differentials within the system. One of those factors is spacecraft vibration. Analytical models to predict the effects of vibration have been developed. A test program to verify the analytical models and to allow a comparative evaluation of the parameters influencing the response to vibration was performed. Screen specimens were tested under conditions simulating the operation of an acquisition system, considering the effects of such parameters as screen orientation and configuration, screen support method, screen mesh, liquid flow and liquid properties. An analytical model, based on empirical coefficients, was most successful in predicting the effects of vibration.

  2. [Short-term memory characteristics of vibration intensity tactile perception on human wrist].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fei; Chen, Li-Juan; Lu, Wei; Song, Ai-Guo

    2014-12-25

    In this study, a recall experiment and a recognition experiment were designed to assess the human wrist's short-term memory characteristics of tactile perception on vibration intensity, by using a novel homemade vibrotactile display device based on the spatiotemporal combination vibration of multiple micro vibration motors as a test device. Based on the obtained experimental data, the short-term memory span, recognition accuracy and reaction time of vibration intensity were analyzed. From the experimental results, some important conclusions can be made: (1) The average short-term memory span of tactile perception on vibration intensity is 3 ± 1 items; (2) The greater difference between two adjacent discrete intensities of vibrotactile stimulation is defined, the better average short-term memory span human wrist gets; (3) There is an obvious difference of the average short-term memory span on vibration intensity between the male and female; (4) The mechanism of information extraction in short-term memory of vibrotactile display is to traverse the scanning process by comparison; (5) The recognition accuracy and reaction time performance of vibrotactile display compares unfavourably with that of visual and auditory. The results from this study are important for designing vibrotactile display coding scheme. PMID:25516517

  3. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  4. Studies on vibration characteristics of a pear using finite element method*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hui-zhi; Wang, Jun; Li, Yong-hui

    2006-01-01

    The variation of the vibration characteristics of a Huanghua pear was investigated using finite element simulations. A new image processing technique was used to obtain the unsymmetrical and un-spherical geometrical model of a pear. The vibration characteristics of this type of pear with the correlation of its behavior with geometrical configurations and material characteristics were investigated using numerical modal analysis. The results showed that the eigenfrequency increased with the increasing pear Youngs modulus, while decreased with increasing pear density, and decreased with increasing pear volume. The results of this study provided foundation for further investigations of the physical characteristics of fruits and vegetables by using finite element simulations. PMID:16691644

  5. Seismic site-response analysis based on random vibration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, T.; Jang, H.

    2013-12-01

    Local geology influences earthquake ground motions, which is of importance in specifying ground motion levels for seismic design in practice. This effect is quantified through site response analysis, which involves the propagation of seismic waves from bedrock to the free surface through soft layers. Site response analysis provides a set or several sets of scale factors given as function of frequency at the surface. Empirical characterization of site response requires a large data set over a wide range of magnitudes and distances of events. In reality, especially in low to moderate seismicity regions such as the Korean Peninsula, empirical characterization of site response is not plausible. Thus numerical modeling is only a viable tool for site response in those regions. On the other hand, most of conventional modeling procedures include a step for developing some appropriate synthetic waveforms as input motions to be used in site response analyses. The waveforms are typically synthesized by matching the spectrum, such as uniform hazard response spectrum, on basement rock obtained from the seismic hazard analysis. However, these synthetics are fundamentally problematic in spite of spectral matching because it is based on the amplitude spectrum only without phase information. As an alternative, an approach based on random vibration theory (RVT) is introduced without the need of waveform generations. RVT explains that a given response spectrum can be converted into a power spectrum density function. It is performed in the frequency domain and deals with the statistical representation of responses. It requires the transfer function for the velocity profile of a site. The transfer function is initially developed by computations of receiver functions using the reflectivity method assuming no attenuation for the profile under consideration of various incidence angles. Then the transfer function is iteratively updated with varying attenuation until the results are compatible with the observed modulus and damping which can be obtained through the in-situ or lab tests for the profile. After the final iteration on the transfer function, the maximum amplification responses can be obtained with the extreme values of shear stress and strain on the profile. Thus this approach combines the observational results of material properties with the analytical results based on the reflectivity calculations of a layered structure, which makes it able to estimate site response in reducing unphysical manipulations.

  6. Optimization of Training Sets For Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An artificial neural network is disclosed that processes holography generated characteristic pattern of vibrating structures along with finite-element models. The present invention provides for a folding operation for conditioning training sets for optimally training forward-neural networks to process characteristic fringe pattern. The folding pattern increases the sensitivity of the feed-forward network for detecting changes in the characteristic pattern The folding routine manipulates input pixels so as to be scaled according to the location in an intensity range rather than the position in the characteristic pattern.

  7. Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Electronic Holograms of Vibrating Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-element-model-trained artificial neural networks can be used to process efficiently the characteristic patterns or mode shapes from electronic holograms of vibrating blades. The models used for routine design may not yet be sufficiently accurate for this application. This document discusses the creation of characteristic patterns; compares model generated and experimental characteristic patterns; and discusses the neural networks that transform the characteristic patterns into strain or damage information. The current potential to adapt electronic holography to spin rigs, wind tunnels and engines provides an incentive to have accurate finite element models lor training neural networks.

  8. Piezoelectric Instruments of High Natural Frequency Vibration Characteristics and Protection Against Interference by Mass Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohlka, Werner

    1943-01-01

    The exploration of the processes accompanying engine combustion demands quick-responding pressure-recording instruments, among which the piezoelectric type has found widespread use because of its especially propitious properties as vibration-recording instruments for high frequencies. Lacking appropriate test methods, the potential errors of piezoelectric recorders in dynamic measurements could only be estimated up to now. In the present report a test method is described by means of which the resonance curves of the piezoelectric pickup can be determined; hence an instrumental appraisal of the vibration characteristics of piezoelectric recorders is obtainable.

  9. Free vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially buried in elastic foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tj, Haryadi Gunawan; Mikami, Takashi; Kanie, Shunji; Sato, Motohiro

    2006-03-01

    Free vibrations of cylindrical shells partially buried in elastic foundations based on the finite element method were examined. The shells are discretized into cylindrical finite elements and the distribution of the foundation in the circumferential direction is defined by the expansion of Fourier series. The present formulation can be simply applied to consider non-uniformities in the foundation both in the circumferential and longitudinal directions. Convergence issues with the present method are explained. Numerical results of the natural frequency and mode for various shell geometries and foundation parameters are given to provide a clearer picture of the shell characteristics in linear vibrations. The relative stiffness ratio of foundation and shell is discussed. The results of free vibration analysis for partially suspended shells on elastic foundations are also presented.

  10. Nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of gear pair system with time-varying characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Wang, Jin-Jin; Liu, Jin-Jie; Li, Ya-Qian

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we investigate the nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of a gear pair system involving backlash, time-varying meshing stiffness and static transmission error. Firstly, a gear pair model is established in a strongly nonlinear form, and its nonlinear vibration characteristics are systematically investigated through different approaches. Several complicated phenomena such as period doubling bifurcation, anti period doubling bifurcation and chaos can be observed under the internal parametric excitation. Then, an active compensation controller is designed to suppress the vibration, including the chaos. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed controller is verified numerically. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  11. The transmission of vertical vibration through seats: Influence of the characteristics of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    The transmission of vibration through a seat depends on the impedance of the seat and the apparent mass of the seat occupant. This study was designed to determine how factors affecting the apparent mass of the body (age, gender, physical characteristics, backrest contact, and magnitude of vibration) affect seat transmissibility. The transmission of vertical vibration through a car seat was measured with 80 adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with two backrest conditions (no backrest and backrest), and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Linear regression models were used to study the effects of subject physical characteristics (age, gender, and anthropometry) and features of their apparent mass (resonance frequency, apparent mass at resonance and at 12 Hz) on the measured seat transmissibility. The strongest predictor of both the frequency of the principal resonance in seat transmissibility and the seat transmissibility at resonance was subject age, with other factors having only marginal effects. The transmissibility of the seat at 12 Hz depended on subject age, body mass index, and gender. Although subject weight was strongly associated with apparent mass, weight was not strongly associated with seat transmissibility. The resonance frequency of the seat decreased with increases in the magnitude of the vibration excitation and increased when subjects made contact with the backrest. Inter-subject variability in the resonance frequency and transmissibility at resonance was less with greater vibration excitation, but was largely unaffected by backrest contact. A lumped parameter seat-person model showed that changes in seat transmissibility with age can be predicted from changes in apparent mass with age, and that the dynamic stiffness of the seat appeared to increase with increased loading so as to compensate for increases in subject apparent mass associated with increased sitting weight.

  12. Characteristic of torsional vibration of mill main drive excited by electromechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifang; Yan, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    In the study of electromechanical coupling vibration of mill main drive system, the influence of electrical system on the mechanical transmission is considered generally, however the research for the mechanism of electromechanical interaction is lacked. In order to research the electromechanical coupling resonance of main drive system on the F3 mill in a plant, the cycloconverter and synchronous motor are modeled and simulated by the MTLAB/SIMULINK firstly, simulation result show that the current harmonic of the cycloconverter can lead to the pulsating torque of motor output. Then the natural characteristics of the mechanical drive system are calculated by ANSYS, the result show that the modal frequency contains the component which is close to the coupling vibration frequency of 42Hz. According to the simulation result of the mechanical and electrical system, the closed loop feedback model including the two systems are built, and the mechanism analysis of electromechanical coupling presents that there is the interaction between the current harmonic of electrical system and the speed of the mechanical drive system. At last, by building and computing the equivalent nonlinear dynamics model of the mechanical drive system, the dynamic characteristics of system changing with the stiffness, damping coefficient and the electromagnetic torque are obtained. Such electromechanical interaction process is suggested to consider in research of mill vibration, which can induce strong coupling vibration behavior in the rolling mill drive system.

  13. Insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations in the mining industry. [elastodynamic response of rubber insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeveleanu, C.

    1974-01-01

    The insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations is considered for some ore preparing and sorting implements: rotary crushers, resonance screens, hammer mills, etc. The appearance of subharmonic vibrations is analyzed, and the conditions for their appearance are determined. A method is given for calculating the insulation of these vibrations by means of elastic elements made of rubber. The insulation of the random vibrations produced by Symons crushers is calculated by determining the transmissability and deformation of the insulation system for a narrow band random response.

  14. City dweller responses to multiple stressors intruding into their homes: noise, light, odour, and vibration.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eja

    2015-03-01

    Urban densification increases exposure to noise, light, odour, and vibration in urban dwellings. Exposure from combined environmental stressors intruding into the home could increase the risk of adverse effects on wellbeing, even when the exposure is at a relatively low level. This study assesses the prevalence of annoyance with a combination of potential environmental stressors common in urban areas and the association with wellbeing. A questionnaire was sent by mail to residents in five areas in Halmstad (Sweden) with similar socioeconomic and housing characteristics but different exposure (response rate 56%; n=385). Of the respondents, 50% were annoyed to some degree by at least one of the suggested stressors, most commonly by noise and vibration from local traffic. Structural equation modelling showed that annoyance led to lowered quality of life via the mediating construct residential satisfaction, which in turn was influenced by place attachment and perceived restoration possibilities in the dwelling. Stress had a negative impact on quality of life, but was not directly correlated to annoyance. Stress was however correlated with sensitivity. The findings suggest that dose-response relationships for environmental stressors should be studied in a broader context of environmental and individual factors. Also relatively low levels of exposure should be mitigated, especially if several stressors are present. PMID:25794188

  15. City Dweller Responses to Multiple Stressors Intruding into Their Homes: Noise, Light, Odour, and Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eja

    2015-01-01

    Urban densification increases exposure to noise, light, odour, and vibration in urban dwellings. Exposure from combined environmental stressors intruding into the home could increase the risk of adverse effects on wellbeing, even when the exposure is at a relatively low level. This study assesses the prevalence of annoyance with a combination of potential environmental stressors common in urban areas and the association with wellbeing. A questionnaire was sent by mail to residents in five areas in Halmstad (Sweden) with similar socioeconomic and housing characteristics but different exposure (response rate 56%; n = 385). Of the respondents, 50% were annoyed to some degree by at least one of the suggested stressors, most commonly by noise and vibration from local traffic. Structural equation modelling showed that annoyance led to lowered quality of life via the mediating construct residential satisfaction, which in turn was influenced by place attachment and perceived restoration possibilities in the dwelling. Stress had a negative impact on quality of life, but was not directly correlated to annoyance. Stress was however correlated with sensitivity. The findings suggest that dose-response relationships for environmental stressors should be studied in a broader context of environmental and individual factors. Also relatively low levels of exposure should be mitigated, especially if several stressors are present. PMID:25794188

  16. Teacher Characteristics for Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychly, Laura; Graves, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Culturally responsive pedagogy, as defined by one of the most prominent authors in the field, Geneva Gay (2002), is "using the cultural characteristics, experiences, and perspectives of ethnically diverse students as conduits for teaching them more effectively". Culturally responsive pedagogy can be thought of, then, as teaching practices that…

  17. The interior working mechanism and temperature characteristics of a fluid based micro-vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhao, Shougen; Wu, Dafang; Jing, Xingjian

    2016-01-01

    Micro-vibration isolation is a hot topic in spacecraft vibration control, and fluid based vibration isolators alternatively provide a good and reliable solution to this challenging issue. In this paper, a novel fluid based micro-vibration isolator (FBMVI) is investigated. According to its inherent working principle and deformation pattern, the generation mechanisms of the damping and stiffness characteristics are derived, which are nonlinear functions of the environmental temperature. Then a lumped parameter model which is expressed by the physical design parameters (PDPs) is constructed, and the corresponding performance objective indices (POIs) are also obtained by applying the equivalence of mechanical impedance. Based on the finite element analysis of the internal damping component, a single variable method is further adopted to carry out the parametric study, and the influences of each PDP on the POIs are analyzed in details. Finally, experiments are conducted to identify the variation of fluid bulk modulus with the outside environmental temperature, and to validate the performance of the isolator under different temperature environments. The tested results show great consistence compared with the predicted tendencies of the parametric study. The results of this study can provide a very useful insight into and/or an important guidance for the design and application of this type of FBMVIs in engineering practice.

  18. The bio-response of osteocytes and its regulation on osteoblasts under vibration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Tong; Sun, Lian-Wen; Qi, Hong-Yu; Shi, Hao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Vibration, especially at low magnitude and high frequency (LMHF), was demonstrated to be anabolic for bone, but how the LMHF vibration signal is perceived by osteocytes is not fully studied. On the other hand, the mechanotransduction of osteocytes under shear stress has been scientists' primary focus for years. Due to the small strain caused by low-magnitude vibration, whether the previous explanation for shear stress will still work for LMHF vibration is unknown. In this study, a finite element method (FEM) model based on the real geometrical shape of an osteocyte was built to compare the mechanical behaviors of osteocytes under LMHF vibration and shear stress. The bio-response of osteocytes to vibration under different frequencies, including the secretion of soluble factors and the concentration of intracellular calcium, were studied. The regulating effect of the conditioned medium (CM) from vibrated osteocytes on osteoblasts was also studied. The FEM analysis result showed the cell membrane deformation under LMHF vibration was very small (with a peak value of 1.09%) as compared to the deformation caused by shear stress (with a peak value of 6.65%). The F-actin stress fibers of osteocytes were reorganized, especially on the nucleus periphery after LMHF vibration. The vibration at 30 Hz has a promoting effect on osteocytes and the osteogenesis of osteoblasts, whereas vibration at 90 Hz was suppressive. These results lead to a conclusion that the bio-response of osteocytes to LMHF vibration is frequency-dependent and is more related to the cytoskeleton on nuclear periphery rather than the membrane deformation. PMID:26715381

  19. Directionality in the mechanical response to substrate vibration in a treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Umbonia crassicornis).

    PubMed

    Cocroft, R B; Tieu, T D; Hoy, R R; Miles, R N

    2000-01-01

    The use of substrate vibrations in communication and predator-prey interactions is widespread in arthropods. In many contexts, localization of the vibration source plays an important role. For small species on solid substrates, time and amplitude differences between receptors in different legs may be extremely small, and the mechanisms of vibration localization are unclear. Here we ask whether directional information is contained in the mechanical response of an insect's body to substrate vibration. Our study species was a membracid treehopper (Umbonia crassicornis) that communicates using bending waves in plant stems. We used a bending-wave simulator that allows precise control of the frequency, intensity and direction of the vibrational stimulus. With laser-Doppler vibrometry, we measured points on the substrate and on the insect's thorax and middle leg. Transfer functions showing the response of the body relative to the substrate revealed resonance at lower frequencies and attenuation at higher frequencies. There were two modes of vibration along the body's long axis, a translational and a rotational mode. Furthermore, the transfer functions measured on the body differed substantially depending on whether the stimulus originated in front of or behind the insect. Directional information is thus available in the mechanical response of the body of these insects to substrate vibration. These results suggest a vibration localization mechanism that could function at very small spatial scales. PMID:11016785

  20. Spectral response characteristics of concave grating demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fuyuan; Wang, Minghua

    2006-09-01

    Based on the characteristic of vector waves which taken part in the multiple beams interference in the focal field of concave grating demultiplexer, the reversibility between emission efficiency and receiving efficiency of the optical waveguides, and the amplitude superposition theorem of multiple beams interference, an original analytic expression of simple spectral response efficiency of concave grating demultiplexer is derived. As the spectral distribution of the actual input optical signal is considered, the Gaussian function spectral distribution for example, the actual responsibility and crosstalk of the concave grating demultiplexer for this input optical signal are introduced. Several analytic expressions offer some useful foundation and novel method for analyzing the responsibility and crosstalk of concave grating demultiplexer. A computing instance of concave grating demultiplexer is given, this instance shows that the actual response efficiency characteristic curve which engaged the Gaussian function spectral distribution of input optical signal is smoother than the simple spectral response efficiency characteristic curve which ignored input optical signal spectral width, the smoothness of actual response efficiency characteristic curve and the actual responsibility are dependent on the spectral half width at one of e square of the maximal intensity of actual input optical signal.

  1. Transfer matrix method for determination of the natural vibration characteristics of elastically coupled launch vehicle boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Laith K.; Zhou, Qinbo; Hendy, Hossam; Rui, Xiaoting

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of natural vibration characteristics has become one of important steps of the manufacture and dynamic design in the aerospace industry. This paper presents a new scenario called virtual cutting in the context of the transfer matrix method of linear multibody systems closed-loop topology for computing the free vibration characteristics of elastically coupled flexible launch vehicle boosters. In this approach, the coupled system is idealized as a triple-beam system-like structure coupled by linear translational springs, where a non-uniform free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam is used. A large thrust-to-weight ratio leads to large axial accelerations that result in an axial inertia load distribution from nose to tail. Consequently, it causes the development of significant compressive forces along the length of the launch vehicle. Therefore, it is important to take into account this effect in the transverse vibration model. This scenario does not need the global dynamics equations of a system, and it has high computational efficiency and low memory requirements. The validity of the presented scenario is achieved through comparison to other approaches published in the literature.

  2. Vibration and damping characteristics analysis of a rotating annular plate with electrorheological treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jia-Yi

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the vibration and damping analysis of a rotating sandwich annular plate with an electrorheological (ER) fluid core layer is studied. The equation of motion for the rotating sandwich system is derived and calculated by the discrete layer annular finite element method. The rheological properties of ER fluid materials, such as viscosity, plasticity, and elasticity can be changed by applying different electric fields, so ER fluid is adopted to control the vibration and damping characteristics of the rotating sandwich annular plate system. Besides, the extensional and shear modulus of ER fluid are described by complex quantities and the complex eigenvalues of the system are calculated numerically, and from these, natural frequencies and loss factors are extracted. Natural frequency and modal loss of the rotating sandwich annular plate with different rotational speeds, applied electric fields, thickness of ER layer, and some designed parameters are also presented and discussed in this study.

  3. Vibration and flutter characteristics of the SR7L large-scale propfan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the vibration characteristics and aeroelastic stability of the SR7L Large-Scale Advanced Propfan was performed using a finite element blade model and an improved aeroelasticity code. Analyses were conducted for different blade pitch angles, blade support conditions, number of blades, rotational speeds, and freestream Mach numbers. A finite element model of the blade was used to determine the blade's vibration behavior and sensitivity to support stiffness. The calculated frequencies and mode shape obtained with this model agreed well with the published experimental data. A computer code recently developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and based on three-dimensional, unsteady, lifting surface aerodynamic theory was used for the aeroelastic analysis to examine the blade's stability at a cruise condition of Mach 0.8 at 1700 rpm. The results showed that the blade is stable for that operating point. However, a flutter condition was predicted if the cruise Mach number was increased to 0.9.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  5. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  6. Seismic response reduction of a piping system by a dynamic vibration absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroe

    1995-11-01

    A number of studies have been conducted on seismic response reduction technique of piping systems. Among them, seismic supports including elastic-plastic damping devices are rapidly being developed for real application. Dynamic vibration absorbers, which are directly attached to pipe, provide another technique for seismic response reduction. When they are successfully applied to a piping system, they can reduce the number of supports with rigid structures and can be useful for improvement of piping layout. In order to obtain above improvements by the dynamic vibration absorbers, its effectiveness in reducing the large vibration response of the piping system must be verified under the strong earthquake condition. Typical problems to be solved are strength of device against strong excitation, adaptation for multimode`s vibration of pipe, and performance with non-linear behavior of pipe system. Shake table tests are very effective to investigate these problems. The authors have developed a dynamic vibration absorber which uses an air cylinder coil spring and magnetic damping devices and applied it to a real scale piping model. Vibration test results using 3-dimensional piping model have shown the good performance of the absorber, although some problems remain to be solved before actual application. In this paper the authors report the performance of this newly developed dynamic vibration absorber for seismic response reduction of piping systems.

  7. Flight and Analytical Methods for Determining the Coupled Vibration Response of Tandem Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeates, John E , Jr; Brooks, George W; Houbolt, John C

    1957-01-01

    Chapter one presents a discussion of flight-test and analysis methods for some selected helicopter vibration studies. The use of a mechanical shaker in flight to determine the structural response is reported. A method for the analytical determination of the natural coupled frequencies and mode shapes of vibrations in the vertical plane of tandem helicopters is presented in Chapter two. The coupled mode shapes and frequencies are then used to calculate the response of the helicopter to applied oscillating forces.

  8. Responses of the frog primary vestibular afferents to direct vibration of the semicircular canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Responses of primary afferents (PA) of lateral semicircular canal to sinusoidal vibration of the canal wall within the range 0.05-200 Hz (mean amplitudes 5-15 microns) in immobilized frogs were studied. Dynamic characteristics (gain, phase) of relative linear velocity of the vibrator (micron X/s) were examined. At 0.2 Hz, the gain was 5.35 + or - 3.19 imp X/s /micron X/s (mean; S.D.; n=14) and linearly decreased if the frequency rose. Phase lag of relative velocity at 0.05 Hz was 49.8 deg + or - 16.5 deg (n=13) and at 1 Hz 97 deg + or - 9.4 deg (n=22). At 100 Hz phase lag was about 240 deg. Three groups of PA are described: wide range PA reacting in the range from 0.05 up to 60-180 Hz; high frequency PA responding in the range from 20-40 up to 100-150 Hz; and low frequency PA responding in the range from 0.05 up to 2-20 Hz.

  9. Vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084

    2013-12-07

    Based on density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory calculations, we systematically investigate the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strains. It is found that under hole doping, the phonon frequencies of the ZO and TO branches at different wave vector q shift linearly with different slopes. Under electron doping, although the phonon frequencies shift irregularly, the shifting values are different at different phonon wave vectors. Interestingly, we find that external strain can restrain the irregular vibration responses of h-BN sheet to electron doping. The critical factor is revealed to be the relative position of the nearly free electron and boron p{sub z} states of h-BN sheet. Under external strains, the vibration responses of h-BN sheet are also found to be highly dependent on the phonon branches. Different vibration modes at different q points are revealed to be responsible for the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain. Our results point out a new way to detect the doping or strain status of h-BN sheet by measuring the vibration frequencies at different wave vector.

  10. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  11. The use of statistical characteristics of reducer vibrations as diagnostic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balitskiy, F. Y.; Genkin, M. D.; Ivanova, M. A.; Sokolova, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a statistical analysis of the vibrations of the experimental RS-1 reducer stand, with a spiral-gear transmission, operating on a closed circuit, are presented. The analysis was carried out on the Minsk-2 and Minsk-32 digital computers, with two-channel analog-digital converter, built in the Institute of the Science of Mechanics. Two-dimensional distribution patterns, conditional dispersions and dispersion ratios were calculated. The octave-band-filtered first harmonics of the tooth frequency f sub z of the vibrations at two different measurement points were considered as the components of the vibration process to be analyzed. The regression lines, corresponding to different values of the loading torque, are presented. Since it was not the gear drive parameters which were determined by diagnostic methods, but the characteristics most sensitive to change in state of the object of the investigation, the loading torque, which is the simplest and most accessible for measurement, was chosen as the condition parameter.

  12. Effects of surface relaxation and reconstruction on the vibration characteristics of nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Yang, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2016-04-01

    Surface effects on the free vibration characteristics of nanobeams are investigated by a modified continuum model. In this paper, the relationship between the parameters of the modified continuum model of surface effects including surface elasticity, surface density, and residual surface stresses, and the parameters of the atomistic lattice model such as surface relaxation and reconstruction in nanobeams is characterized by an atomistic lattice model. The surface effects are incorporated into nanobeams to develop a modified continuum model depicting the free vibrational behavior of nanobeams. The model is validated with the experimental data of an effective size-dependent Young’s modulus and the previous theoretical results. The results demonstrate that both surface elasticity and surface density vary exponentially with surface layer thickness. Therefore, surface elasticity and density can be affected by surface relaxation and residual surface stresses can be induced by surface reconstruction. The natural frequencies of doubly clamped nanobeams can be affected by the dimensions of the nanobeams, surface layer thickness, and residual surface stress. This work may be helpful for understanding surface effects and their influence on the vibrational behavior of nanobeams.

  13. Characteristics of vibration energy harvesting using giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kotaro; Horibe, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Shigekazu; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2015-12-01

    This work deals with the dynamic bending and energy harvesting characteristics of giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning both numerically and experimentally. The giant magnetostrictive cantilever is fabricated using a thin Terfenol-D layer, SUS layer, movable proof mass, etc, and, is designed to automatically adjust its own resonant frequency to match the external vibration frequency in real time. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, and the resonant frequency, induced voltage and stress in the magnetostrictive cantilevers were predicted. The resonant frequency and induced voltage were also measured, and comparison was made between simulation and experiment. The time-varying behavior and self-tuning ability are discussed in detail.

  14. Vibration characteristics of a large wind turbine tower on non-rigid foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, S. T.; Cang, T. Y. P.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Timmerman, D. H.; Fenton, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of the Mod-OA wind turbine supported by nonrigid foundations were investigated for a range of soil rigidities. The study shows that the influence of foundation rotation on the fundamental frequency of the wind turbine is quite significant for cohesive soils or loose sand. The reduction in natural frequency can be greater than 20 percent. However, for a foundation resting on well graded, dense granular materials or bedrock, such effect is small and the foundation can be treated as a fixed base.

  15. A numerical method for determining the natural vibration characteristics of rotating nonuniform cantilever blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.; Malatino, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the free vibration characteristics of a rotating blade having nonuniform spanwise properties and cantilever boundary conditions. The equations which govern the coupled flapwise, chordwise, and torsional motion of such a blade are solved using an integrating matrix method. By expressing the equations of motion and matrix notation, utilizing the integrating matrix as an operator, and applying the boundary conditions, the equations are formulated into an eigenvalue problem whose solutions may be determined by conventional methods. Computer results are compared with experimental data.

  16. Vibration-Induced Motor Responses of Infants With and Without Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Teulier, Caroline; Smith, Beth A.; Kim, Byungji; Beutler, Benjamin D.; Martin, Bernard J.; Ulrich, Beverly D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The severity of myelomeningocele (MMC) stems both from a loss of neurons due to neural tube defect and a loss of function in viable neurons due to reduced movement experience during the first year after birth. In young infants with MMC, the challenge is to reinforce excitability and voluntary control of all available neurons. Muscle vibration paired with voluntary movement may increase motoneuron excitability and contribute to improvements in neural organization, responsiveness, and control. Objectives This study examined whether infants with or without MMC respond to vibration by altering their step or stance behavior when supported upright on a treadmill. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Twenty-four 2- to 10-month-old infants, 12 with typical development (TD) and 12 with MMC (lumbar and sacral lesions), were tested. Infants were supported upright with their feet in contact with a stationary or moving treadmill during 30-second trials. Rhythmic alternating vibrations were applied to the right and left rectus femoris muscles, the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, or the sole of the foot. Two cameras and behavior coding were used to determine step count, step type, and motor response to vibration onset. Results Step count decreased and swing duration increased in infants with TD during vibration of the sole of the foot on a moving treadmill (FT-M trials). Across all groups the percentage of single steps increased during vibration of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle on a moving treadmill. Infants with MMC and younger infants with TD responded to onset of vibration with leg straightening during rectus femoris muscle stimulation and by stepping during FT-M trials more often than older infants with TD. Conclusions Vibration seems a viable option for increasing motor responsiveness in infants with MMC. Follow-up studies are needed to identify optimal methods of administering vibration to maximize step and stance behavior in infants. PMID:22228610

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Roger H. L.; Kiriakidis, Alejandro C.; Peng, Steve W.

    1997-07-01

    This study aims at the development of an effective nondestructive evaluation technique to predict the remaining useful life of a ceramic candle filter during a power plant's annual maintenance shutdown. The objective of the present on-going study is to establish the vibration signatures of ceramic candle filters at varying degradation levels due to different operating hours, and to study the various factors involving the establishment of the signatures.

  18. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Compression Behavior and Microstructural Characteristics of Commercially Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherzadeh, Saeed; Abrinia, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The principle objective of this research is to investigate the modeling of compression behavior and microstructural evolution of pure aluminum in the ultrasonic-assisted compression test. A dislocation density-based constitutive model was developed based on the existing frameworks and calibrated using experimental data to predict the stress-strain response of pure aluminum during UAC tests. An experimental set-up was designed to work at resonance condition with frequency of around 20 kHz and variant longitudinal vibration amplitudes at the range of 0~20 μm. The verified model and experimental samples were used for parameter studies and the study of grain formation of aluminum after conventional and ultrasonic upsetting. Results showed that the developed constitutive model was able to predict compression behavior of aluminum suitably. An increase in the flow stress drop, residual flow stress, and dislocation density occurred when the applied vibration intensity was raised. In addition, it was observed that the more homogenous microstructure with nearly equiaxed grains and also the higher microhardness values can be achieved when ultrasonic vibration is imposed on samples during compression test.

  19. Structure response and damage produced by ground vibration from surface mine blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.; Stagg, M.S.; Kopp, J.W.; Dowding, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Direct measurements were made of ground-vibration-produced structure responses and damage in 76 homes for 219 production blasts. These results were combined with damage data from nine other blasting studies, including the three analyzed previously for Bureau of Mines Bulletin 656. Safe levels of ground vibration from blasting range from 0.5 to 2.0 in/sec peak particle velocity for residential-type structures. The damage threshold values are functions of the frequencies of the vibration transmitted into the residences and the types of construction. Particularly serious are the low-frequency vibrations that exist in soft foundation materials and/or result from long blast-to-residence distances. These vibrations produce not only structure resonances but also excessive levels of displacement and strain. Threshold damage was defined as the occurrence of cosmetic damage; that is, the most superficial interior cracking of the type that develops in all homes independent of blasting. Homes with plastered interior walls are more susceptible to blast-produced cracking than gypsum wallboard. Structure response amplification factors were measured. Typical values were 1.5 for structures as a whole (racking) and 4 for midwalls, at their respective resonance frequencies. For blast vibrations above 40 Hz, all amplification factors for frame residential structures were less than unity. The human response and annoyance problem from ground vibration is aggravated by wall rattling, secondary noises, and the presence of airblast. Approximately 5 to 10% of the neighbors will judge peak particle velocity levels of 0.5 to 0.75 in/sec as less than acceptable (i.e., unacceptable) based on direct reactions to the vibration. Even lower levels cause psychological response problems, and thus social, economic, and public relations factors become critical for continued blasting.

  20. Vibration characteristics of NiTi-Al MMC beam fabricated with ultrasonic welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Wang, Yiqing; Kuang, Xinbin; Zhang, Teng; Liu, Hongzhong; Lu, Bingheng; Xu, Minglong

    2015-12-01

    A free-vibration differential equation of the compound beam of NiTi-Al MMC (metal matrix composite) is built considering the recovery stress of NiTi foil and based on Timoshenko beam theory to predict the frequency tuning characteristics of the compound beam. The clamped-free (CF) beam is under compressive stress state due to the recovery stress in the NiTi foil, which may cause a reduction in its natural frequency. For an 80 mm CF beam with 8% NiTi (prestrain 3%) embedded in Al matrix, the natural frequency decreases by 52.1% when temperature is up to 70 °C. However the stress state of clamped-clamped (CC) beam depends on the combined effect of recovery stress and thermal expansion of NiTi. At least 20% NiTi should be embedded in Al matrix to increase the natural frequency of CC beam. Finally, the NiTi-Al MMC beam is prepared by ultrasonic welding process. A thermal modal experiment is conducted to study the vibration characteristics of the compound beam. The results show that the natural frequency of the compound beam could be tuned effectively by volume fraction of the NiTi embedded in Al foil, which is consistent with theoretical calculations.

  1. Vibration characteristics of thin rotating cylindrical shells with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shupeng; Chu, Shiming; Cao, Dengqing

    2012-08-01

    An analysis is presented for the vibration characteristics of thin rotating cylindrical shells with various boundary conditions by use of Fourier series expansion method. Based on Sanders' shell equations, the governing equations of motion which take into account the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces as well as the initial hoop tension due to rotating are derived. The displacement field is expressed as a product of Fourier series expressions which represents the axial modal displacements and trigonometric functions which represents the circumferential modal displacements. Stokes' transformation is employed to derive the derivatives of the Fourier series expressions. Then, through the process of formula derivation, an explicit expression of the exact frequency equation can be obtained for a thin rotating cylinder with classical boundary conditions of any type. Once the frequency equation has been determined, the frequencies are calculated numerically. To validate the present analysis, comparisons between the results of the present method and previous studies are performed and very good agreement is achieved. Finally, the method is applied to investigate the vibration characteristics of thin rotating cylindrical shells under various boundaries, and the results are presented.

  2. Theoretical and experimental analyses of a nonlinear magnetic vibration isolator with quasi-zero-stiffness characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daolin; Yu, Qiping; Zhou, Jiaxi; Bishop, S. R.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear magnetic low-frequency vibration isolator designed with the characteristic of quasi-zero stiffness (QZS). An approximate expression of the magnet repulsive force is proposed and a unique analytical relationship between the stiffness of vertical spring and initial gap settings of the magnet springs is derived for the QZS system. Based on the harmonic balance (HB) method, the force transmissibility is formulated and the jumping frequencies, effect of excitation force and damping ratio are discussed for characteristic analysis. An experimental prototype is developed and tested. The performance of the QZS system is verified through a series of experimental studies showing that the new model greatly outperforms standard linear isolation systems especially in low-frequency domain. The tuning techniques for adapting to the change of loading mass and adjusting the QZS property in practice are also addressed.

  3. Assessing the influence of antivibration glove on digital vascular responses to acute hand-arm vibration.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Md H; Yokoyama, Kenjiro; Laskar, Md S; Inoue, Masaiwa; Takahashi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Shinji; Harada, Noriaki

    2007-05-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of an antivibration glove on digital vascular responses in healthy subjects exposed to short-term grasping of a vibrating handle. To measure finger blood flow (FBF) and finger skin temperature (FST) once at the end of every min, a blood flowmeter sensor was attached to the dorsum and a thermistor sensor was attached to the medial surface of the subject's middle phalanx of the third finger of the right hand. After 5 min of baseline measurements without or with an antivibration glove meeting ISO standard 10819, worn on the right hand, subjects gripped a vibrating handle with the same hand for a period of 5 min. Vibration was generated at two frequencies of 31.5 Hz and 250 Hz with a frequency weighted rms acceleration of 5.5 m/s(2). FBF and FST continued to be recorded for a further 5 min after release of the vibrating handle. Statistical analysis showed no significant change after vibration exposure in either FST or FBF at 250 Hz, compared to baseline (control) measurements while using the antivibration glove. At 31.5 Hz, FBF data exhibited a significant difference between before and after grasping of vibrating handle, which was less under the condition of wearing the antivibration glove than under the condition of bare hand. The results provide evidence that the antivibration glove considerably influenced finger vascular changes in healthy subjects induced by vibration exposure, especially against high frequency vibration. Further studies are required to assess finger vascular responses to hand-transmitted vibration with antivibration gloves of different manufacturers. PMID:17575396

  4. Vibration characteristics of aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves and their effect on wetting behavior of solder droplets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhiwu; Zheng, Kun; Yan, Jiuchun; Yang, Shiqin

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of an aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves were investigated with a combination of numerical simulation and experimental testing. The wetting behavior of solder droplets on the vibrating aluminum surface was also examined. The results show that the vibration pattern of the aluminum surface is inhomogeneous. The amplitude of the aluminum surface exceeds the excitation amplitude in some zones, while the amplitude decreases nearly to zero in other zones. The distribution of the zero-amplitude zones is much less dependent on the strength of the vibration than on the location of the vibration source. The surface of the liquid solder vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency that is higher than the vibration source, and the amplitude of the liquid solder is almost twice that of the aluminum surface. The vibration of the surface of the base metal (liquid solder) correlates with the oxide film removal effect. Significant removal of the oxide film can be achieved within 2s when the amplitude of the aluminum surface is higher than 5.4 μm or when the amplitude of the liquid solder surface is higher than 10.2 μm. PMID:24295911

  5. Response of a flexible filament in a flowing soap film subject to a forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Laibing; Xiao, Qing; Wu, Haijun; Wu, Yanfeng; Yin, Xiezhen

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between flexible plates and fluids are important physical phenomena. A flag in wind is one of the most simplified and classical models for studying the problem. In this paper, we investigated the response of a flag in flow with an externally forced vibration by using flexible filaments and soap film. Experiments show that for a filament that is either in oscillation or stationary, the external forced vibration leads to its oscillation. A synchronization phenomenon occurs in the experiments. A small perturbation leads to a large response of flapping amplitude in response. The insight provided here is helpful to the applications in the flow control, energy harvesting, and bionic propulsion areas.

  6. Visual Stimulation Facilitates Penile Responses to Vibration in Men with and without Erectile Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Erick; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared reflexogenic and psychogenic penile responses in men with and without erectile disorder. Hypothesized that men with psychogenic dysfunction respond minimally to vibrotactile stimulation. As predicted, responses were different in the vibration condition. Interpretations are provided in terms of attention and appraisal. (BF)

  7. Reflex responses of gamma motoneurones to vibration of the muscle they innervate.

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, C; Noth, J

    1976-01-01

    1. High frequency vibration was applied to the tendon of the non-contracting triceps surae muscle while recording the background discharges of single gamma fibres only small nerve bundles were cut, leaving most of the nerve supply to the triceps intact. 2. 22% out of a total of sixty-three gamma efferents were tonically inhibited by vibration. The inhibition appeared between 25 and 50mum peak-to-peak amplitude of vibration and increased to a plateau for amplitudes of about 100mum. The dependence of the tonic vibration reflex of alpha-efferents on the amplitude of vibration was found to be similar. Increasing the frequency of vibration from 150 to 300 Hz increased the degree of inhibition. 3. 33% of the fusimotor neurones investigated responded to muscle vibration with an increase in discharge rate. The threshold amplitudes of this reflex ranged from 20 to 50mum. Some features of the reflex, in particular the parallel post-vibratory facilitation found in alpha and gamma efferents, pointed to a polysynaptic pathway organized in an alpha-gamma linkage. 4. All gamma efferents inhibited by vibration showed inhibitory responses to antidromic stimulation of the parent ventral root, and most of them were inhibited by ramp stretch of the triceps. The gamma motoneurones facilitated by vibration, however, were excited by muscle stretch and were less susceptible to antidromic inhibition, some lacking it completely. 5. Cutting the nerves to triceps abolished the inhibitory as well as the excitatory responses of gamma efferents to muscle vibration. Both fusimotor reflexes were preserved after spinal section and subsequent administration of L-DOPA. 6. It is concluded that both of the fusimotor reflex effects of vibration are caused by excitation of primary spindle endings within the triceps. The inhibition of fusimotor neurones is thought to be mediated by Renshaw cells activated during vibration. The significance of positive feed-back on to gamma motoneurones as a result of autogenetic facilitation by Ia afferents is discussed in connexion with stability in the stretch reflex loop. PMID:933019

  8. Dose-response relation for vascular disorders induced by vibration in the fingers of forestry workers.

    PubMed Central

    Bovenzi, M; Franzinelli, A; Mancini, R; Cannavà, M G; Maiorano, M; Ceccarelli, F

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study the relation between the prevalence of vascular disorders (white finger) and vibration exposure in a group of 222 forestry workers, of whom 164 (73.9%) had work experience limited to antivibration (AV) chain saws only and 58 (26.1%) had operated both non-AV and AV chain saws. METHODS--The chain saw operators and 195 control workers never exposed to hand transmitted vibration were interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. The diagnosis of vibration induced white finger (VWF) was made on the basis of subjective symptoms of finger blanching and the results of a cold test with plethysmographic measurement of systolic blood pressure of the finger. Vibration was measured on a representative sample of AV and non-AV chain saws. Daily vibration exposure was assessed as eight hour energy equivalent frequency weighted acceleration (A(8)). A lifetime vibration dose was estimated for each of the forestry workers. RESULTS--The overall prevalence of VWF among the forestry workers was 23.4%. The diagnosis of VWF was made in 13.4% of the forestry workers who handled only AV chain saws and in 51.7% of those who had also operated non-AV chain saws in the past. Raynaud's phenomenon was found in 2.6% of the controls. In the forestry workers, the risk for VWF showed positive increments with each increment of vibration dose, suggesting a monotonic dose-response relation. The responsiveness to cold in the digital arteries of the forestry workers was also found to increase with increasing vibration dose and severity of VWF. The estimated relation between VWF and vibration exposure showed that the expected prevalence of VWF increased almost linearly to either A(8) (with exposure duration unchanged) or the number of years of exposure (with equivalent acceleration unchanged). CONCLUSIONS--In this study of VWF among forestry workers, the estimated dose-response relation showed that if the magnitude of vibration acceleration is doubled, the total duration of exposure should be halved to produce an equivalent effect. On the basis of the assessment of vibration exposure, the estimated risk for VWF in the study population was found to be lower than that predicted by the international standard ISO 5349. These findings suggest a revision of the risk estimates for VWF currently provided by ISO 5349. PMID:8535491

  9. Subjective response to combined noise and vibration during flight of a large twin-jet airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    A NASA twin-jet airplane was used to obtain controlled noise and vibration environments during flight while obtaining subjective responses from 13 passenger-subjects (6 females and 7 males). Subjective ratings of overall comfort, comfort when considering only vibration, and comfort when considering only noise were obtained during times of different vibration and noise environments. Passenger-subjects were able to distinguish and rate noise better than vibration. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in ratings of ride comfort due to both sex type and flight experience. Males rated flying discomfort much more severely than females when rating the overall ride and the ride when considering only the noise environment. Experienced passengers also rated the overall ride to be more uncomfortable than inexperienced passengers.

  10. Vibrational response of Au-Ag nanoboxes and nanocages to ultrafast laser-induced heating.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Hristina; Lin, Chien-Hua; Hu, Min; Chen, Jingyi; Siekkinen, Andrew R; Xia, Younan; Sader, John E; Hartland, Gregory V

    2007-04-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy has been used to investigate the vibrational properties of hollow cubic nanoparticles: Au-Ag nanoboxes and nanocages. In these experiments, laser-induced heating was used to coherently excite the breathing vibrational modes of the particle. The vibrational periods scale with the edge length of the particle and the nanocages and nanoboxes showing equivalent responses despite a large difference in their morphology. The measured vibrational periods are compared to finite element calculations, where the particles are modeled as a hollow cube, with the principle crystal axes parallel to the sides of the cube. Very good agreement is obtained between the calculations and the experimental data, with the experimental frequencies being slightly lower than the calculated values (by approximately 7%). These results demonstrate the importance of accurately modeling the particles in order to interpret experimental data. PMID:17358093

  11. Quantification of the effects of audible rattle and source type on the human response to environmental vibration.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, J; Sica, G; Peris, E; Sharp, C; Moorhouse, A T; Waddington, D C

    2016-03-01

    The present research quantifies the influence of source type and the presence of audible vibration-induced rattle on annoyance caused by vibration in residential environments. The sources of vibration considered are railway and the construction of a light rail system. Data were measured in the United Kingdom using a socio-vibration survey (N = 1281). These data are analyzed using ordinal logit models to produce exposure-response relationships describing community annoyance as a function of vibration exposure. The influence of source type and the presence of audible vibration-induced rattle on annoyance are investigated using dummy variable analysis, and quantified using odds-ratios and community tolerance levels. It is concluded that the sample population is more likely to express higher levels of annoyance if the vibration source is construction compared to railway, and if vibration-induced rattle is audible. PMID:27036258

  12. Free-vibration characteristics and correlation of a space station split-blanket solar array

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, K.S.; Shaker, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a zero-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The zero-g configuration corrresponds to an on-orbit configuration of the Space Station solar array. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the natural frequencies of the array; the second uses the finite element method program, MSC/NASTRAN. The stiffness matrix from the NASTRAN solution was found to be erroneously grounded. The results from the two methods are compared. It is concluded that the grounding does not seriously compromise the solution to the elastic modes of the solar array. However, the correct rigid body modes need to be included to obtain the correct dynamic model.

  13. Effects of blood in veins of dragonfly wing on the vibration characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dan; Yin, Yajun; Zhao, Hongxiao; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    How the blood in veins of dragonfly wing affects its vibration characteristics is investigated. Based on the experimental results of the wing's morphology and microstructures, including the veins, the membranes and the pterostigma, accurate three-dimensional finite element models of the dragonfly forewing are developed. Considering the blood in veins, the total mass, mass distribution and the moments of inertia of the wing are studied. The natural frequencies/modal shapes are analyzed when the veins are filled with and without blood, respectively. The based natural frequency of the model with blood (189 Hz) is much closer to the experimental result. Relative to bending modal shapes, the torsional ones are affected more significantly by the blood. The results in this article reveal the multi-functions of the blood in dragonfly wings and have important implications for the bionic design of flapping-wing micro air vehicles. PMID:25577611

  14. Vibration Characteristics Assessment of External Store Panels Furnished in a 50kg-Class Micro-Satellite ``SOHLA-1''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Sonoda, Yusuke; Kakiuchi, Katsu; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko; Honda, Hisayoshi; Moribe, Kohei; Chiba, Masakatsu; Nakamura, Yosuke

    The paper reports the vibration characteristics assessment of grid panels which were furnished in the main structure of 50kg-class micro-satellite ``SOHLA-1''. Three different types of grid panels with dimensions of 141.1 × 423.0 × 10.0mm, triangle-grid-type panel, rectangle-grid-type panel and frame-type panel, were investigated to find their dynamics through impulse test. Vibration characteristics were also simulated by a FEM computer soft NASTRAN. Application of flame-retardant type magnesium alloy to the panel was made to confirm the structural effectiveness of magnesium alloy panel.

  15. Deducing Electronic Unit Internal Response During a Vibration Test Using a Lumped Parameter Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    During random vibration testing of electronic boxes there is often a desire to know the dynamic response of certain internal printed wiring boards (PWBs) for the purpose of monitoring the response of sensitive hardware or for post-test forensic analysis in support of anomaly investigation. Due to restrictions on internally mounted accelerometers for most flight hardware there is usually no means to empirically observe the internal dynamics of the unit, so one must resort to crude and highly uncertain approximations. One common practice is to apply Miles Equation, which does not account for the coupled response of the board in the chassis, resulting in significant over- or under-prediction. This paper explores the application of simple multiple-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter modeling to predict the coupled random vibration response of the PWBs in their fundamental modes of vibration. A simple tool using this approach could be used during or following a random vibration test to interpret vibration test data from a single external chassis measurement to deduce internal board dynamics by means of a rapid correlation analysis. Such a tool might also be useful in early design stages as a supplemental analysis to a more detailed finite element analysis to quickly prototype and analyze the dynamics of various design iterations. After developing the theoretical basis, a lumped parameter modeling approach is applied to an electronic unit for which both external and internal test vibration response measurements are available for direct comparison. Reasonable correlation of the results demonstrates the potential viability of such an approach. Further development of the preliminary approach presented in this paper will involve correlation with detailed finite element models and additional relevant test data.

  16. Crack detection in structures using deviation from normal distribution of measured vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnaashari, Erfan; Sinha, Jyoti K.

    2014-09-01

    Cracks are one of the common defects in structural components that may ultimately lead to failure of structures if not detected. Generally, most of the vibration based crack detection methods transform measured vibration responses from time-domain into frequency-domain using Fourier or wavelet transform for damage detection. However, it would be more convenient if the vibration responses could be analysed in their original time-domain. Therefore, a practical method based on probability distribution function is proposed which performs all the data processing in time-domain for the purpose of crack detection in beam-like structures. The application of the proposed method to both numerical and experimental examples and their results are presented.

  17. Nonlinear Vibration Response Measured at Umbo and Stapes in the Rabbit Middle ear.

    PubMed

    Peacock, John; Pintelon, Rik; Dirckx, Joris

    2015-10-01

    Using laser vibrometry and a stimulation and signal analysis method based on multisines, we have measured the response and the nonlinearities in the vibration of the rabbit middle ear at the level of the umbo and the stapes. With our method, we were able to detect and quantify nonlinearities starting at sound pressure levels of 93-dB SPL. The current results show that no significant additional nonlinearity is generated as the vibration signal is passed through the middle ear chain. Nonlinearities are most prominent in the lower frequencies (125Hz to 1kHz), where their level is about 40dB below the vibration response. The level of nonlinearities rises with a factor of nearly 2 as a function of sound pressure level, indicating that they may become important at very high sound pressure levels such as those used in high-power hearing aids. PMID:26162416

  18. Analysis of non-linear response of the human body to vertical whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Tarabini, Marco; Solbiati, Stefano; Moschioni, Giovanni; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The human response to vibration is typically studied using linear estimators of the frequency response function, although different literature works evidenced the presence of non-linear effects in whole-body vibration response. This paper analyses the apparent mass of standing subjects using the conditioned response techniques in order to understand the causes of the non-linear behaviour. The conditioned apparent masses were derived considering models of increasing complexity. The multiple coherence function was used as a figure of merit for the comparison between the linear and the non-linear models. The apparent mass of eight male subjects was studied in six configurations (combinations of three vibration magnitudes and two postures). The contribution of the non-linear terms was negligible and was endorsed to the change of modal parameters during the test. Since the effect of the inter-subject variability was larger than that due to the increase in vibration magnitude, the biodynamic response should be more meaningfully modelled using a linear estimator with uncertainty rather than looking for a non-linear modelling. PMID:25105223

  19. Scanning LDV for vibration measurement of filiform hairs in crickets in response to induced airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santulli, C.; Finn, T. J.; Seidel, R.; Jeronimidis, G.

    2006-06-01

    Cercal hairs represent in cricket a wind sensitive escape system, able to detect the airflow generated from predating species. These sensors have been studied as a biomimetic concept to allow the development of MEMS for biomedical use. In particular, the behaviour of the hairs, including airflow response, resonant frequency and damping, has been investigated up to a frequency of 20 kHz. The microscopic nature of the hairs, the complex vibrations of excited hairs and the high damping of the system suggested that the use of Laser Doppler vibrometry could possibly improve the test performance. Two types of tests were performed: in the first case the hairs were indirectly excited using the signal obtained from a vibrating aluminium plate, whilst in the second case the hairs were directly excited using a white noise chirp. The results from the first experiment indicated that the hairs move in-phase with the exciting signal up to frequencies in the order of 10 kHz, responding to the vibration modes of the plate with a signal attenuation of 12 to 20 dB. The chirp experiment revealed the presence of rotational resonant modes at 6850 and 11300 Hz. No clear effect of hair length was perceivable on the vibration response of the filiform sensors. The obtained results proved promising to support the mechanical and vibration characterisation of the hairs and suggest that scanning Laser vibrometry can be used extensively on highly dampened biological materials.

  20. Postural responses to continuous unilateral neck muscle vibration in standing patients with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bove, Marco; Brichetto, Giampaolo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Marchese, Roberta; Schieppati, Marco

    2007-03-15

    Several observations support the notion that integration of neck proprioceptive input is impaired in cervical dystonia (CD). An example is the inconsistent or opposite to normal effect of lateral neck muscle vibration on body rotation during stepping. We hypothesized that lateral neck vibration produces abnormal responses also in a static task. Normal subjects and patients with CD stood quietly with eyes closed, without or with vibration applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and center of foot pressure and body sway were recorded by a dynamometric platform. Patients had a larger than normal sway under control condition. They showed little or no postural responses to vibration. When body tilt occurred, it was rarely in the frontal plane as in normal subjects, but in the sagittal plane. No relationship existed between vibration-induced tilt during stance and body rotation during stepping. Therefore, in CD, proprioceptive neck input is less used for the construction of the postural vertical during quiet stance than it is used for the definition of the subjective straight ahead during a dynamic task. PMID:17226858

  1. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  2. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  3. Lumped Parameter Modeling for Rapid Vibration Response Prototyping and Test Correlation for Electronic Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Present preliminary work using lumped parameter models to approximate dynamic response of electronic units to random vibration; Derive a general N-DOF model for application to electronic units; Illustrate parametric influence of model parameters; Implication of coupled dynamics for unit/board design; Demonstrate use of model to infer printed wiring board (PWB) dynamics from external chassis test measurement.

  4. Selective vibration sensing: a new concept for activity-sensing rate-responsive pacing.

    PubMed

    Lau, C P; Stott, J R; Toff, W D; Zetlein, M B; Ward, D E; Camm, A J

    1988-09-01

    A clinically available model of an activity-sensing, rate-responsive pacemaker (Activitrax, Medtronic) utilizes body vibration during exercise as an indicator of the need for a rate increase. Although having the advantage of rapid onset of rate response, this system lacks specificity and the rate response does not closely correlate with the level of exertion. In addition, this pacemaker is susceptible to the effects of extraneous vibration. In this study involving 20 normal subjects fitted with an external Activitrax pacemaker, the rate responses to a variety of exercises were studied and were compared with the corresponding sinus rates. The vibration generated at the level of the pacemaker was also measured by accelerometers in three axes. Only a fair correlation (r = 0.51) was achieved between the pacemaker rate and the sinus rate. The total root mean square value of acceleration in either the anteroposterior or the vertical axes was found to have a better correlation (r = 0.8). As the main accelerations during physical activities were in the lower frequency range (0.1-4 Hz), a low-pass filter was used to reduce the influence of extraneous vibration. Selective sensing of the acceleration level may be usefully implemented in an algorithm for activity pacing. PMID:2460835

  5. Free vibration characteristics of multiple load path blades by the transfer matrix method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Joshi, Arun M.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of free vibrational characteristics is basic to any dynamic design, and these characteristics can form the basis for aeroelastic stability analyses. Conventional helicopter blades are typically idealized as single-load-path blades, and the transfer matrix method is well suited to analyze such blades. Several current helicopter dynamic programs employ transfer matrices to analyze the rotor blades. In this paper, however, the transfer matrix method is extended to treat multiple-load-path blades, without resorting to an equivalent single-load-path approximation. With such an extension, these current rotor dynamic programs which employ the transfer matrix method can be modified with relative ease to account for the multiple load paths. Unlike the conventional blades, the multiple-load-path blades require the introduction of the axial degree-of-freedom into the solution process to account for the differential axial displacements of the different load paths. The transfer matrix formulation is validated through comparison with the finite-element solutions.

  6. Analysis of vibrational response in graphite oxide nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prias Barragan, Jhon Jairo; Gross, Katherine; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Ariza Calderon, Hernando; Prieto, Pedro

    In this work, we present a new low-cost fabrication process to obtain graphite oxide nanoplatelets from bamboo pyroligneous acid (GO-BPA) by thermal decomposition method using a pyrolysis system for different carbonization temperatures from 673 to 973 K. The GO-BPA samples were characterized by using Raman, FTIR, XRD, SEM and TEM techniques, whose results suggest that increased carbonization temperature increases graphite conversion, boundary defects, desorption of some organic compounds and phonon response, respectively. We discuss potential applications of the GO-BPA samples involving phonon response that would benefit from a fully scaled technology, advanced electronic sensors and devices.

  7. Vibration characteristics of walls and a plate glass window representative of those of a wood-frame house

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    Mechanical excitation was used, and measurements of acceleration response, natural frequencies, and nodal patterns were performed. Results indicate that the wall sections and the complete wall did not act as a unit in responding to sinusoidal vibration inputs. Calculated frequencies of the components that account for this independent behavior of the studs and face sheets agreed resonably well with experimental frequencies. Experimental vibrations of the plate glass window agreed with the calculated behavior, and responses of the window exposed to airplane flyover noise were readily correlated with the test results.

  8. Acute Cardiovascular Response during Resistance Exercise with Whole-body Vibration in Sedentary Subjects: A Randomized Cross-over Trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, Thaisa; Polito, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the acute cardiovascular responses during and after resistance exercise with and without whole-body vibration. Nineteen sedentary adults randomly performed one session of isometric squats without vibration and the same exercise with vibration. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were measured. SBP, DBP and HR were also measured for 20 min after the sessions. The exercise with vibration demonstrated significant values ​​(P < 0.05) for SBP (second to sixth sets), DBP (third to sixth sets) and SVR (second to sixth sets) compared with the exercise without vibration. After the sessions, the values ​​of SBP for both exercises were significantly lower than the respective resting values; with no difference between the sessions. In conclusion, exercise with vibration caused increases in SBP, DBP and SVR compared with exercise with no vibration in sedentary adults. PMID:26031551

  9. Effects of gear crack propagation paths on vibration responses of the perforated gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Qibin; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behaviors of a perforated gear system considering effects of the gear crack propagation paths and this study focuses on the effects of a crack propagating through the rim on the time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) and vibration responses. Considering the effects of the extended tooth contact, a finite element (FE) model of a gear pair is established based on ANSYS software. TVMS of the perforated gear with crack propagating through tooth and rim are calculated by using the FE model. Furthermore, a lumped mass model is adopted to investigate the vibration responses of the perforated gear system. The results show that there exist three periods related to slots of the gear body in a rotating period of the perforated gear. Gear cracks propagating through tooth and rim both reduce the gear body stiffness and lead to reduction of TVMS besides the crack tooth contact moment, and the TVMS weakening for the former is less than that for the latter. Moreover, the results also show that the gear crack propagating through the rim (CPR) has a greater effect on vibration responses than the gear crack propagating through the tooth (CPT) under the same crack level. Vibration level increases with the increasing crack depth, especially for the gear with CPR.

  10. Experimental studies for determining human discomfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate several problems related to methodology and design of experiments to obtain human comfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration. Specifically, the studies were directed to the determination of (1) the adequacy of frequency averaging of vibration data to obtain discomfort predictors, (2) the effect of practice on subject ratings, (3) the effect of the demographic factors of age, sex, and weight, and (4) the relative importance of seat and floor vibrations in the determination of measurement and criteria specification location. Results indicate that accurate prediction of discomfort requires knowledge of both the acceleration level and frequency content of the vibration stimuli. More importantly, the prediction of discomfort was shown to be equally good based upon either floor accelerations or seat accelerations. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the discomfort levels in different seats resulting from similar vibratory imputs were equal. Therefore, it was recommended that criteria specifications and acceleration measurements be made at the floor location. The results also indicated that practice did not systematically influence discomfort responses nor did the demographic factors of age, weight, and sex contribute to the discomfort response variation.

  11. Bone cell responses to high-frequency vibration stress: does the nucleus oscillate within the cytoplasm?

    PubMed

    Bacabac, Rommel G; Smit, Theo H; Van Loon, Jack J W A; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Helder, Marco; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2006-05-01

    Mechanosensing by cells directs changes in bone mass and structure in response to the challenges of mechanical loading. Low-amplitude, high-frequency loading stimulates bone growth by enhancing bone formation and inhibiting disuse osteoporosis. However, how bone cells sense vibration stress is unknown. Hence, we investigated bone cell responses to vibration stress at a wide frequency range (5-100 Hz). We used NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release, and COX-2 mRNA expression as parameters for bone cell response since these molecules regulate bone adaptation to mechanical loading. NO release positively correlated whereas PGE2 release negatively correlated to the maximum acceleration rate of the vibration stress. COX-2 mRNA expression increased in a frequency-dependent manner, which relates to increased NO release at high frequencies, confirming our previous results. The negatively correlated release of NO and PGE2 suggests that these signaling molecules play different roles in bone adaptation to high-frequency loading. The maximum acceleration rate is proportional to omega3 (frequency=omega/2pi), which is commensurate with the Stokes-Einstein relation for modeling cell nucleus motion within the cytoplasm due to vibration stress. Correlations of NO and PGE2 with the maximum acceleration rate then relate to nucleus oscillations, providing a physical basis for cellular mechanosensing of high-frequency loading. PMID:16675843

  12. Short term response of insulin, glucose, growth hormone and corticosterone to acute vibration in rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Leon, H. A.; Chackerian, M.

    1971-01-01

    Study carried out to obtain some notion of the initial phasing and interactive effects among some hormones known to be responsive to vibration stress. Sprague-Dawley derived rats were exposed to the acute effects of confinement and confinement with lateral (plus or minus G sub y) vibration. The coincident monitoring of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and corticosterone plasma levels, during and immediately subsequent to exposure to brief low level vibration, exhibits the effects of inhibition of insulin release by epinephrine. The ability of insulin (IRI) to return rapidly to basal levels, from appreciably depressed levels during vibration, in the face of elevated levels of glucose is also shown. Corticosterone responds with almost equal rapidity, but in opposite phase to the IRI. The immuno-assayable growth hormone (IGH) dropped from a basal level of 32 ng/ml to 7.3 ng/ml immediately subsequent to vibration and remained at essentially that level throughout the experiment (60 min). Whether these levels represent a real fall in the rat or whether they merely follow the immuno-logically deficient form is still in question.

  13. Theoretical relationship between vibration transmissibility and driving-point response functions of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between the vibration transmissibility and driving-point response functions (DPRFs) of the human body is important for understanding vibration exposures of the system and for developing valid models. This study identified their theoretical relationship and demonstrated that the sum of the DPRFs can be expressed as a linear combination of the transmissibility functions of the individual mass elements distributed throughout the system. The relationship is verified using several human vibration models. This study also clarified the requirements for reliably quantifying transmissibility values used as references for calibrating the system models. As an example application, this study used the developed theory to perform a preliminary analysis of the method for calibrating models using both vibration transmissibility and DPRFs. The results of the analysis show that the combined method can theoretically result in a unique and valid solution of the model parameters, at least for linear systems. However, the validation of the method itself does not guarantee the validation of the calibrated model, because the validation of the calibration also depends on the model structure and the reliability and appropriate representation of the reference functions. The basic theory developed in this study is also applicable to the vibration analyses of other structures.

  14. Response to psychological stressors in hand-arm vibration syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Harada, N; Iwamoto, M; Hirosawa, I; Nakamoto, M; Sobhan, F; Morie, T; Kosiyama, Y

    1995-01-01

    We investigated urinary catecholamines' response to acute psychological stress test in hand-arm vibration syndrome patients. Thirteen patients with vibration-induced white finger (VWF) in higher frequency of attack, 7 patients with VWF in lower frequency, 6 patients without VWF and 17 healthy subjects were examined. All subjects were male and their average age (SD) was 59.2 (6.4), 56.3 (2.9), 58.2 (4.7) and 56.8 (4.9), respectively. After an initial rest for 1 hour, acute psychological stress test with stressors--mirror drawing, watching horror video and arithmetic under intermittent noise was performed for 1 hour. Subjective complaints to the stress test were greater in patients with hand-arm vibration syndrome than in the healthy controls. The patient group with VWF in higher frequency indicated significant increases of urinary catecholamines (p < 0.05); average values (SD) at rest period and at stress test were 2.42 (1.17) and 3.71 (1.82) micrograms/h for norepinephrine, and 1.47 (0.73) and 2.66 (1.79) micrograms/h for epinephrine, respectively. Increasing tendency of urinary catecholamines was observed in other three groups, however, they were not statistically significant. The sympathoadrenal medullary response to psychological stressors increased especially in hand-arm vibration syndrome patients with VWF in higher frequency. PMID:9150971

  15. Synchronous and non-synchronous responses of systems with multiple identical nonlinear vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Jimmy S.; Shaw, Steven W.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we investigate the nonlinear dynamic response of systems composed of a primary inertia to which multiple identical vibration absorbers are attached. This problem is motivated by observations of systems of centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers that are designed to reduce engine order torsional vibrations in rotating systems, but the results are relevant to translational systems as well. In these systems the total absorber mass is split into multiple equal masses for purposes of distribution and/or balance, and it is generally expected that the absorbers will act in unison, corresponding to a synchronous response. In order to capture nonlinear effects of the responses of the absorbers, specifically, their amplitude-dependent frequency, we consider them to possess nonlinear stiffness. The equations of motion for the system are derived and it is shown how one can uncouple the equations for the absorbers from that for the primary inertia, resulting in a system of identical resonators that are globally coupled. These symmetric equations are scaled for weak nonlinear effects, near resonant forcing, and small damping. The method of averaging is applied, from which steady-state responses and their stability are investigated. The response of systems with two, three, and four absorbers are considered in detail, demonstrating a rich variety of bifurcations of the synchronous response, resulting in responses with various levels of symmetry in which sub-groups of absorbers are mutually synchronous. It is also shown that undamped models with more than two absorbers possess a degenerate response, which is made robust by the addition of damping to the model. Design guidelines are proposed based on the nature of the system response, with the aim of minimizing the acceleration of the primary system. It is shown that the desired absorber parameters are selected so that the system achieves a stable synchronous response which does not undergo jumps via saddle-node bifurcations, nor instabilities related to the underlying symmetry of the system.

  16. Physical Processes of Vibration Effect on the Characteristics of Measuring Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhorukov, M. P.; Shinyakov, Yu. A.; Suntsov, S. B.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes of vibration effect are investigated by numerical modeling. An optimized model is presented that allows the dimensionality of a computational grid to be reduced and the modeling results equivalent to a detailed model to be obtained based on original physical-mathematical model of the process of vibration effect.

  17. Vibrational frequency response to impact loading of skull models.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Carolyn E; Vandevord, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    More than 73% of soldiers returning from duty are injured by explosive devices. The shock waves generated are believed to cause injury via intracranial pressure and skull flexure. Prior modal analyses of spherical shells as skull substitutes using analytical solutions to the wave equation indicate the impact point and opposite side as areas of intense bending. In this study, finite element models extend modal analyses and applied impulse scenarios for a variety of altered spherical geometries. Holes of differing sizes, the direction of impact, and the presence of water inside were considered. The finite element model matched the analytical modal frequencies within 4%. The discrete modal frequencies are lost as the geometry deviates from the ideal sphere. The frequency response to impact was complex with many participating modal frequencies. The deformation near holes increased as the hole increased in size. Impacts in line with holes increased the minimum to maximum spread by 30% whereas angled impacts caused more pronounced motion near holes. Filling the sphere interior with liquid diverted some load from the shell and decreased the maximum deflections by 80%. Avenues of further research focused on more accurate geometries are discussed. PMID:22846278

  18. Vibration and Operational Characteristics of a Composite-Steel (Hybrid) Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; DeLuca, Samuel; Pelagalli, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid gears have been tested consisting of metallic gear teeth and shafting connected by composite web. Both free vibration and dynamic operation tests were completed at the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Test Facility, comparing these hybrid gears to their steel counterparts. The free vibration tests indicated that the natural frequency of the hybrid gear was approximately 800 Hz lower than the steel test gear. The dynamic vibration tests were conducted at five different rotational speeds and three levels of torque in a four square test configuration. The hybrid gears were tested both as fabricated (machined, composite layup, then composite cure) and after regrinding the gear teeth to the required aerospace tolerance. The dynamic vibration tests indicated that the level of vibration for either type of gearing was sensitive to the level of load and rotational speed.

  19. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  20. Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G. Kirk; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Powers, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

  1. Dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation in photoactive yellow protein: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Leitner, David M.

    2011-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation (VER) from the chromophore to the protein and solvent environment following photoexcitation of photoactive yellow protein are presented. The computed protein response to photoexcitation appears prominently between times of 0.1 and 0.3 ps. Contributions from individual residues to this response are analyzed. The frequency-dependent VER rate also reveals dynamic coupling between the chromophore and residues that hydrogen bond to it. Resonances in the VER rate appear at frequencies comparable to the oscillations observed in recent fluorescence decay studies.

  2. Evaluating Attenuation of Vibration Response using Particle Impact Damping for a Range of Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert; Craigmyle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from a series of acoustically excited tests to determine the effectiveness of these dampers for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid panel for a launch vehicle application. Vibration attenuation trends are examined for variations in particle damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level was achieved, suggesting that comparatively small, strategically placed, particle damper devices might be advantageously used in launch vehicle design. These test results were compared to baseline acoustic response tests without particle damping devices, over a range of isolation and damping parameters. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  3. Psychophysical relationships characterizing human response to whole-body sinusoidal vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation determined that the psychophysical relationships between subjective discomfort evaluations to vibratory stimuli and subjective evaluations of the intensity of vibratory stimuli can be expressed in a linear fashion. Furthermore, significant differences were found to exist between discomfort and intensity subjective response for several but not all discrete frequencies investigated. The implication of these results is that ride quality criteria based upon subjective evaluation of vibration intensity should be applied cautiously in the development of criteria for human comfort.

  4. Analytical and experimental evaluations of Space Shuttle TPS tile vibration response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical studies and laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the vibration response of the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) tiles due to the intense rocket generated acoustic noise during lift-off. The TPS tiles are mounted over the exterior of the Space Shuttle Orbiter structure through Strain Isolation Pads (SIP) which protect the tiles from thermal induced shear loads at their interface. The analytical predictions indicate that the response of a typical tile is governed by the structural vibration inputs through the SIP under the tile at frequencies below 250 Hz, and by the direct acoustic excitation over the exterior surface of the tile at frequencies above 250 Hz. An evaluation of the laboratory test data for this same tile, in which conditioned (partial) coherent output spectral analysis procedures were used, leads to exactly the same conclusion. The results demonstrate the power of conditioned spectral analysis procedures in identifying vibration response mechanisms when two or more of the inputs are highly correlated.

  5. Frequency analysis and the use of response spectra for blast vibration assessment in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.

    1996-12-01

    In the period 1989 to 1994, the US Bureau of Mines assisted the Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) in studying a high-complaint situation near an active surface coal mine. As part of a review for its project report, the Bureau had to address issues on the adequacy of the safe blasting criteria and analysis procedures in its 1980 report RI 8507, Structure Response and Damage Produced by Ground Vibration From Surface Mine Blasting. Because the criteria in RI 8507 are used in assessing current blasting, key questions were raised about how protective these criteria are and whether they used the most current or, at least, the most conservative (protective) analysis procedures. These issues were frequency determination, response measurement, control of vibration through design, and the use of scaled distances for amplitude estimates. The first two of these four issues are highly relevant to regulatory compliance and safe vibrations as measured at the compliance stations and are addressed in this paper. Part 1 discusses frequency analyses methods including zero crossings and its variants as well as some Fourier methods. Specifically, it describes the approach to frequency made for RI 8507 in the late 1970`s and suggests future possibilities. Part 2 describes response spectra analysis methods, some applications to mine blasting, and why this approach was not recommended for residences by the Bureau in 1980 and still not today.

  6. SA1 and RA Afferent Responses to Static and Vibrating Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Bensmaïa, S. J.; Craig, J. C.; Yoshioka, T.; Johnson, K. O.

    2007-01-01

    SA1 and RA afferent fibers differ both in their ability to convey information about the fine spatial structure of tactile stimuli and in their frequency sensitivity profiles. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which the spatial resolution of the signal conveyed by SA1 and RA fibers depends on the temporal properties of the stimulus. To that end, we recorded the responses evoked in SA1 and RA fibers of macaques by static and vibrating gratings that varied in spatial period, vibratory frequency, and amplitude. Gratings were oriented either parallel to the long axis of the finger (vertical) or perpendicular to it (horizontal). We examined the degree to which afferent responses were dependent on the spatial period, vibratory frequency, amplitude, and orientation of the gratings. We found that the spatial modulation of the afferent responses increased as the spatial period of the gratings increased; the spatial modulation was the same for static and vibrating gratings, despite large differences in evoked spike rates; the spatial modulation in SA1 responses was independent of stimulus amplitude over the range of amplitudes tested, whereas RA modulation decreased slightly as the stimulus amplitude increased; vertical gratings evoked stronger and more highly modulated responses than horizontal gratings; the modulation in SA1 responses was higher than that in RA responses at all frequencies and amplitudes. The behavioral consequences of these neurophysiological findings are examined in a companion paper. PMID:16236779

  7. Hormonal and Neuromuscular Responses to Mechanical Vibration Applied to Upper Extremity Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Fabiani, Leila; Baldini, Giuliano; Cardelli, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Aldo; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. Methods Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG), a low vibration group (LVG), or a control group (CG). A randomized double-blind, controlled-parallel study design was employed. The measurements and interventions were performed at the Laboratory of Biomechanics of the University of L'Aquila. The HVG and LVG participants were exposed to a series of 20 trials ×10 s of synchronous whole-body vibration (WBV) with a 10-s pause between each trial and a 4-min pause after the first 10 trials. The CG participants assumed an isometric push-up position without WBV. The outcome measures were growth hormone (GH), testosterone, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during bench-press, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during handgrip, and electromyography root-mean-square (EMGrms) muscle activity (pectoralis major [PM], triceps brachii [TB], anterior deltoid [DE], and flexor carpi radialis [FCR]). Results The GH increased significantly over time only in the HVG (P = 0.003). Additionally, the testosterone levels changed significantly over time in the LVG (P = 0.011) and the HVG (P = 0.001). MVC during bench press decreased significantly in the LVG (P = 0.001) and the HVG (P = 0.002). In the HVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the TB (P = 0.006) muscle. In the LVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the DE (P = 0.009) and FCR (P = 0.006) muscles. Conclusion Synchronous WBV acutely increased GH and testosterone serum concentrations and decreased the MVC and their respective maximal EMGrms activities, which indicated a possible central fatigue effect. Interestingly, only the GH response was dependent on the acceleration with respect to the subjects' responsiveness. PMID:25368995

  8. Universal response spectrum procedure for predicting walking-induced floor vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James; Racic, Vitomir; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Floor vibrations caused by people walking are an important serviceability problem both for human occupants and vibration-sensitive equipment. Present design methodologies available for prediction of vibration response due to footfall loading are complex and suffer from division between low and high frequency floors. In order to simplify the design process and to avoid the problem of floor classification, this paper presents a methodology for predicting vibration response metrics due to pedestrian footfalls for any floor type having natural frequency in the range 1-20 Hz. Using a response spectrum approach, a database of 852 weight-normalised vertical ground reaction force (GRF) time histories recorded for more than 60 individuals walking on an instrumented treadmill was used to calculate response metrics. Chosen metrics were peak values of 1 s peak root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration and peak envelope one-third octave velocities. These were evaluated by weight-normalising the GRFs and applying to unit-mass single degree of freedom oscillators having natural frequencies in the range 1-20 Hz and damping ratios in the range 0.5-5%. Moreover, to account for effect of mode shape and duration of crossing (i.e. duration of dynamic loading), the recorded GRFs were applied for three most typical mode shapes and floor spans from 5 m to 40 m. The resulting peak values as functions of frequency i.e. spectra are condensed to statistical representations for chosen probability of being exceeded over a wide range of applications. RMS (acceleration) spectra show strong peaks corresponding to the first harmonic of pacing rate followed by clear minima at approximately 3.5 Hz, a second much smaller peak corresponding to the second harmonic and a steady decline with increasing frequency beginning around 5 Hz. One-third octave spectra show asymptotic trends with frequency, span and damping. A comprehensive validation exercise focusing on the acceleration RMS spectra was based on a representative range of floor samples for which modal properties had been identified and walking response studied during experimental campaigns of vibration serviceability evaluation. Due to the statistical approach an exact validation would not be possible, hence measured peak RMS values were matched to distributions for the equivalent idealised structure. In the vast majority of cases the measured values, intended to represent worst-case conditions, fitted the upper decile of the corresponding simulated spectra indicating consistency with the proposed approach.

  9. Free vibration of Euler and Timoshenko nanobeams using boundary characteristic orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Laxmi; Chakraverty, S.

    2014-03-01

    Vibration analysis of nonlocal nanobeams based on Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories is considered. Nonlocal nanobeams are important in the bending, buckling and vibration analyses of beam-like elements in microelectromechanical or nanoelectromechanical devices. Expressions for free vibration of Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko nanobeams are established within the framework of Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory. The problem has been solved previously using finite element method, Chebyshev polynomials in Rayleigh-Ritz method and using other numerical methods. In this study, numerical results for free vibration of nanobeams have been presented using simple polynomials and orthonormal polynomials in the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The advantage of the method is that one can easily handle the specified boundary conditions at the edges. To validate the present analysis, a comparison study is carried out with the results of the existing literature. The proposed method is also validated by convergence studies. Frequency parameters are found for different scaling effect parameters and boundary conditions. The study highlights that small scale effects considerably influence the free vibration of nanobeams. Nonlocal frequency parameters of nanobeams are smaller when compared to the corresponding local ones. Deflection shapes of nonlocal clamped Euler-Bernoulli nanobeams are also incorporated for different scaling effect parameters, which are affected by the small scale effect. Obtained numerical solutions provide a better representation of the vibration behavior of short and stubby micro/nanobeams where the effects of small scale, transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are significant.

  10. Vibration response of geometrically nonlinear elastic beams to pulse and impact loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.

    1983-01-01

    The governing equations for the geometrically nonlinear deformation of elastic beams subjected to dynamic bending loads are developed and solved for various initial conditions. Of primary interest is the response to pulse loading and simulated impact. Both transient and several cycle solutions are generated for the free vibration response to pulse loading. The results obtained are compared to a first mode analysis approximation. A model is developed to simulate impact loading by the distribution of additional mass to the elastic system and subjecting it to a velocity pulse. The governing equations are solved using second order finite differences in space and time. The solutions obtained are in reasonable agreement with experimental results.

  11. Computation of acoustic power, vibration response and acoustic pressures of fluid-filled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. H.

    1982-05-01

    Acoustic power radiated into the fluid around a pipe subjected to time harmonic excitation, the vibration response of the pipe wall, and the pressures in the exterior and interior fluids are computed. Pressure fields and pipe displacements are represented by Fourier transformations, and the acoustic power in the surrounding fluid is obtained from the stationary phase approximation to the far field pressure. The integral representations of fluid pressures, pipe displacements and radiated power are evaluated by a simple numerical quadrature scheme. Decibel level versus frequency plots for the responses in the individual circumferential harmonics of a water filled steel pipe surrounded by air are presented.

  12. Effects of Ultrasonic Vibration on Heat Transfer Characteristics of Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution under the Reduced Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashiro, Hikaru; Nakashima, Ryou

    The effects of ultrasonic vibration on heat transfer characteristics of lithium bromide aqueous solution under the reduced pressures are studied experimentally. Pool boiling curves on horizontal smooth tube are obtained using distilled water and 50 % LiBr aqueous solution as test liquids. The system pressure p is varied from 12 to 101 kPa and the liquid subcooling ΔTsub ranges from 0 to 70 K. The frequency of ultrasonic vibration vi s set at 24 and 44 kHz, and the power input to the vibrator P is varied from 0 to 35 W. The wall superheat at the boiling incipience is found to decrease with increasing P, and the nucleate boiling curve shifts toward the lower wall temperature region. However, the effect of P is not found to be very significant in the high heat flux region, especially in the case of small liquid subcooling. Ultrasonic vibration is also found to improve the nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient by up to a maximum of 3.5 times and to prevent crystallization of the solution and precipitation of additives.

  13. Modeling “unilateral” response in the cross-ties of a cable network: Deterministic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaccu, Gian Felice; Caracoglia, Luca; Barbiellini, Bernardo

    2014-09-01

    Cross-ties are employed as passive devices for the mitigation of stay-cable vibrations, exhibited on cable-stayed bridges under wind and wind-rain excitation. Large-amplitude oscillation can result in damage to the cables or perceived discomfort to bridge users. The “cable-cross-ties system” derived by connecting two or more stays by transverse cross-ties is often referred to as an “in-plane cable network”. Linear modeling of network dynamics has been available for some time. This framework, however, cannot be used to detect incipient failure in the restrainers due to slackening or snapping. A new model is proposed in this paper to analyze the effects of a complete loss in the pre-tensioning force imparted to the cross-ties, which leads to the “unilateral” free-vibration response of the network (i.e., a cross-tie with linear-elastic internal force in tension and partially inactive in compression). Deterministic free vibrations of a three-cable network are investigated by using the “equivalent linearization method”. A performance coefficient is introduced to monitor the relative reduction in the average (apparent) stiffness of the connector during free vibration response (“mode by mode”), exhibiting unilateral behavior. A reduction of fifty percent in the apparent stiffness was observed in the cross-tie when the pre-tensioning force is small in comparison with the tension force in the stay. This coefficient may be used as a damage indicator for the selection of the initial pre-tensioning force in the cross-ties needed to avoid slackening.

  14. Analyses of contact forces and vibration response for a defective rolling element bearing using an explicit dynamics finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Köpke, Uwe G.; Howard, Carl Q.; Petersen, Dick

    2014-10-01

    This paper provides insights into the physical mechanism by which defect-related impulsive forces, and consequently, vibrations are generated in defective rolling element bearings. A dynamic nonlinear finite element model of a rolling element bearing with an outer raceway defect was numerically solved using the explicit dynamics finite element software package, LS-DYNA. A hypothesis was developed to explain the numerical noise observed in the predicted vibrations and contact forces, and the noise frequencies were analytically estimated. In-depth analyses of the numerically estimated dynamic contact forces between the rolling elements and the raceways of a bearing, which are not measured in practice, and have not been reported previously, are presented in this paper. Several events associated with the traverse of the rolling elements through the outer raceway defect are elaborated, and the impulsive force generating mechanism is explained. It was found that the re-stressing of the rolling elements that occurs near the end of a raceway defect generates a burst of multiple short-duration force impulses. The modelling results also highlight that much higher contact forces and accelerations are generated on the exit of the rolling elements out of defect compared to when they strike the defective surface. A bearing with a machined outer raceway defect was tested in a controlled experiment; the measured acceleration response compared favourably with the numerically modelled acceleration results, thereby, validating the low- and high-frequency characteristics of the de-stressing and re-stressing of the rolling elements, respectively.

  15. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  16. Action of vibration on the response of cat muscle spindle Ia afferents to low frequency sinusoidal stretching.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P B; Watson, J D

    1981-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the effect of continuous vibration, at 150 Hz, upon the response of muscle spindle afferents to low frequency sinusoidal stretching (1 and 8 Hz). Using the soleus muscle of the anaesthetized cat, with severed ventral roots, recordings were made of single Ia afferents and of the massed Ia afferent discharges in the main bulk of the cut L7 dorsal root. 2. When the amplitude of vibration was large (50 micrometers, short pulses) and that of the sinusoidal stretching was not too great (50-100 micrometers, peak-to-peak) the discharge of the afferents was largely locked 1:1 to the vibration and the response to the sinusoidal stretching was abolished. 3. When the amplitude of the vibration was reduced to below that eliciting continuous afferent driving, then the response to sinusoidal stretching of any amplitude was often markedly increased. This arose through the vibration having a much more powerful excitatory action during the rising phase of the sinusoidal stretch than it did during the falling phase. 4. Averaged over a full cycle, the phase of the response to the sinusoidal stretching tended to be delayed during the vibration in comparison with the normal. This was largely dependent upon the afferents continuing to respond maximally to the vibration around the peak of the sinusoidal stretch, at which stage their unvibrated response is declining, rather than to a phase lag of the whole pattern of response. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of vibration on tremor and the human stretch reflex, and on the determination of the frequency-response of spindle afferents. PMID:6458696

  17. On multiple manifestations of the second response branch in streamwise vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2013-07-01

    The structural motion and velocity field in the wake of a cylinder exhibiting vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in the streamwise direction were measured using Particle-Image Velocimetry. The effect of hysteresis on the amplitude response of the cylinder and the existence of multiple wake modes in the region of the second response branch were examined. As the reduced velocity was decreased, there was a reduction in the lock-in range; outside this range the amplitude response was found to be negligible and the A-II mode (which is similar to the von Kármán vortex street) was observed in the wake. When the reduced velocity was increased the second branch could be manifested in two forms, depending on whether the wake exhibited the SA or the A-IV mode (in which two and four vortices are shed per wake cycle, respectively). The A-IV mode has been observed in studies in which a cylinder was forced to oscillate in the streamwise direction; however, this represents the first time that it has been recorded in the wake of a freely oscillating body, and it was not previously known that the A-IV mode was capable of exciting self-sustaining vibrations. Both the SA and A-IV modes were stable and no intermittent mode-switching was observed; however, it was found to be unpredictable which mode would dominate as the reduced velocity was varied and the cylinder entered the second response branch. Analysis of the cylinder displacement signals measured while each mode was dominant indicated that the SA mode excited larger amplitude vibrations than the A-IV mode. A reduced velocity near the second response branch was identified at which the wake could exhibit either the SA, A-IV, or A-II modes, with the latter occurring as the reduced velocity was decreased. Although bi-modal behaviour is well established in VIV studies, as far as the authors are aware, this represents the first time that a point has been observed in the response regime of a freely oscillating structure in which three stable states have been observed, each corresponding to a different wake mode and vibration amplitude, for the same structural parameters, reduced velocity, and Reynolds number. This suggests that the mechanism determining which wake mode dominates and the fluid-structure interaction in the case of streamwise VIV may be more complex than has previously been thought. Finally, the vortex-formation and shedding processes associated with the A-II, SA, and A-IV modes were described using phase-averaged vorticity fields, and the differences between the SA and A-IV modes were discussed.

  18. Characterization of the tendon vibration reflex response in hemi-spastic stroke individuals.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Nina L; Wang, Inga; Heckman, C J; Rymer, W Zev

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the role of persistent inward currents, or PICs, on the excitability of motoneurons innervating spastic muscle in hemi-spastic stroke individuals. This was accomplished by examining the effects of tonic vibration applied to the tendon of the biceps brachii muscle. The elicited TVR (tonic vibration reflex) provides a useful way to assess the degree of excitability of spinal neurons in spastic syndromes, and it has additional features that may signify the presence of PICs in spastic motoneurons. We applied sinusoidal stretches of varied duration to the biceps tendon of two hemi-spastic stroke individuals and one neurologically intact individual. We recorded the resulting TVR response from electromyographic(EMG) signals obtained from the biceps as well as force recorded at the wrist. The results of our preliminary study show that the initial rise of the TVR force response as well as the force magnitude are generally greater in spastic muscle, perhaps a marker of motoneuron excitability. Additionally, a shorter vibration duration was sufficient to evoke a response on the spastic side of our tested stroke subjects. However, the key marker of PICs--the decay of the force response as well as sustained after-discharge did not exhibit clear differences. Our present data suggests that motoneurons innervating spastic muscle are more readily activated, and thus exhibit increased excitability, which could possibly be a function of greater depolarization, without a change in PIC magnitude. Our data does not rule out the possibility of subthreshold activation of the PIC resulting in enhanced motoneuron depolarization. PMID:22254740

  19. Energy-dependent characteristics of collisinal vibration-energy exchange in vapors of polyatomic molcules

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesskaya, G.A.; Yakovlev, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    CO{sub 2} laser-induced delayed fluorescence was used to study the collisional vibration-energy exchange between the polyatomic molecules in gases. The efficiency of collisional exchange, the mean amount of energy transfer in one collision, as well as their correlation with the vibration energy and with the size of excited molecule were determined for diacetyl, acetophenone, benzophenone, and anthraquinone molecules form the experimentally observed pressure dependences of the decay rates and fluorescence intensities. It was shown that the mean amount of energy transfer per collision decreases with the molecular size and increases as E{sup m}, with m>2, with increasing the vibration energy. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Semi-analytical solution of random response for nonlinear vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoling; Wang, Yong; Xu, Ming; Huang, Zhilong

    2015-03-01

    Due to the prominent broadband performance of nonlinear vibration energy harvester, theoretical evaluations for the mean-square response to random excitations and the associated mean output power are of great interest. By employing the generalized harmonic transformation and equivalent nonlinearization technique, established here is a semi-analytical solution of random response for nonlinear vibration energy harvesters subjected to Gaussian white noise excitation. The semi-analytical solution for stationary probability density of the system response is obtained by two iterative processes. Numerical results for a Duffing-type harvester demonstrate rapid convergence of the iterative processes and high evaluation accuracy for the mean-square response and the mean output power. Furthermore, the influence of harvesting circuit on the mechanical subsystem can be converted to modified quasi-linear damping and stiffness with energy-dependent coefficients, which is different from the traditional viewpoint on the equivalence of constant-coefficient damping and provides more comprehensive explanation on the influence of harvesting circuit.

  1. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

  2. Experimental study on seismic responses of piping systems with friction. Part 1: Large-scale shaking table vibration test

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Watanabe, T.; Mitsumori, T.; Shimizu, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogawa, N.

    1995-08-01

    This report deals with the experimental study of seismic response behavior of piping systems in industrial facilities such as petrochemical, oil refinery, and nuclear plants. Special attention is focused on the nonlinear dynamic response of piping systems due to frictional vibration appearing in piping and supporting devices. A three-dimensional mock-up piping and supporting structure model wherein piping is of 30-m length and 200-mm diameter is excited by a large-scale (15 m x 15 m) shaking table belong to the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention in Tsukuba, Ibaraki. Power spectra of the response vibration and the loading-response relationship in the form of a hysteresis loop under several loading conditions are obtained. The response reduction effect caused by frictional vibration is evaluated and demonstrated in terms of response reduction factor.

  3. Theoretical foundation, methods, and criteria for calibrating human vibration models using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-11-01

    While simulations of the measured biodynamic responses of the whole human body or body segments to vibration are conventionally interpreted as summaries of biodynamic measurements, and the resulting models are considered quantitative, this study looked at these simulations from a different angle: model calibration. The specific aims of this study are to review and clarify the theoretical basis for model calibration, to help formulate the criteria for calibration validation, and to help appropriately select and apply calibration methods. In addition to established vibration theory, a novel theorem of mechanical vibration is also used to enhance the understanding of the mathematical and physical principles of the calibration. Based on this enhanced understanding, a set of criteria was proposed and used to systematically examine the calibration methods. Besides theoretical analyses, a numerical testing method is also used in the examination. This study identified the basic requirements for each calibration method to obtain a unique calibration solution. This study also confirmed that the solution becomes more robust if more than sufficient calibration references are provided. Practically, however, as more references are used, more inconsistencies can arise among the measured data for representing the biodynamic properties. To help account for the relative reliabilities of the references, a baseline weighting scheme is proposed. The analyses suggest that the best choice of calibration method depends on the modeling purpose, the model structure, and the availability and reliability of representative reference data.

  4. Theoretical foundation, methods, and criteria for calibrating human vibration models using frequency response functions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    While simulations of the measured biodynamic responses of the whole human body or body segments to vibration are conventionally interpreted as summaries of biodynamic measurements, and the resulting models are considered quantitative, this study looked at these simulations from a different angle: model calibration. The specific aims of this study are to review and clarify the theoretical basis for model calibration, to help formulate the criteria for calibration validation, and to help appropriately select and apply calibration methods. In addition to established vibration theory, a novel theorem of mechanical vibration is also used to enhance the understanding of the mathematical and physical principles of the calibration. Based on this enhanced understanding, a set of criteria was proposed and used to systematically examine the calibration methods. Besides theoretical analyses, a numerical testing method is also used in the examination. This study identified the basic requirements for each calibration method to obtain a unique calibration solution. This study also confirmed that the solution becomes more robust if more than sufficient calibration references are provided. Practically, however, as more references are used, more inconsistencies can arise among the measured data for representing the biodynamic properties. To help account for the relative reliabilities of the references, a baseline weighting scheme is proposed. The analyses suggest that the best choice of calibration method depends on the modeling purpose, the model structure, and the availability and reliability of representative reference data. PMID:26740726

  5. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for quick replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure field models; for example a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Wind tunnel tests have been proposed to anchor the predictions and provide new insight into modeling approaches for this type of environment. Finally, component vibration environments for design were developed from the measured and predicted responses and compared with those derived from traditional techniques such as Barrett scaling methods for unloaded and component-loaded panels.

  6. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

  7. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  8. A Study of the Temperature Characteristics of Vibration Mode Axes for Vibratory Cylinder Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yulie; Xi, Xiang; Tao, Yi; Wu, Xiaomei; Wu, Xuezhong

    2011-01-01

    The zero bias stability, which is an important performance parameter for vibratory cylinder gyroscopes, is high sensitive to temperature change. It is considered that the varying temperature makes the vibration mode axes unstable, which has significant influence on the zero bias stability. This paper will investigate this problem in detail. First, the relationships between the angular positions of vibration mode axes and the zero bias are analyzed. Secondly, the thermal-modal model of the cylinder resonator with several defects such as mass imbalance, frequency split (FS), and geometry errors are developed by ANSYS. Simulation results show that with the increase of temperature, angular positions of the vibration mode axes obviously change, which leads to a dramatic zero bias drift. Finally, several major influence factors on the angular position stability of vibration mode axes, including frequency split, geometry errors, thermal elastic modulus coefficient (TEMC) and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) are analyzed in detail. Simulation results in this paper will be helpful for deep understanding of the drift principle of zero bias induced by temperature for vibratory cylinder gyroscopes and also be helpful for further temperature compensation or control. PMID:22164038

  9. Hand-arm vibration syndrome: clinical characteristics, conventional electrophysiology and quantitative sensory testing.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Rolke R; Rolke S; Vogt T; Birklein F; Geber C; Treede RD; Letzel S; Voelter-Mahlknecht S

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE: Workers exposed to vibrating tools may develop hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). We assessed the somatosensory phenotype using quantitative sensory testing (QST) in comparison to electrophysiology to characterize (1) the most sensitive QST parameter for detecting sensory loss, (2) the correlation of QST and electrophysiology, and (3) the frequency of a carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in HAVS.METHODS: QST, cold provocation tests, fine motor skills, and median nerve neurography were used. QST included thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds.RESULTS: Thirty-two patients were examined (54 11 years, 91% men) at the more affected hand compared to 16 matched controls. Vibration detection threshold was the most sensitive parameter to detect sensory loss that was more pronounced in the sensitivity range of Pacinian (150 Hz, x12) than Meissner's corpuscles (20 Hz, x3). QST (84% abnormal) was more sensitive to detect neural dysfunction than conventional electrophysiology (37% abnormal). Motor (34%) and sensory neurography (25%) were abnormal in HAVS. CTS frequency was not increased (9.4%).CONCLUSION: Findings are consistent with a mechanically-induced, distally pronounced motor and sensory neuropathy independent of CTS.SIGNIFICANCE: HAVS involves a neuropathy predominantly affecting large fibers with a sensory damage related to resonance frequencies of vibrating tools.

  10. Seated occupant interactions with seat backrest and pan, and biodynamic responses under vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakheja, S.; Stiharu, I.; Zhang, H.; Boileau, P.-É.

    2006-12-01

    The relative interactions of the seated occupants with an inclined backrest were investigated in terms of apparent mass (APMS) responses at the two driving-points formed by the buttock-seat pan and the upper body-backrest under exposure to broad-band and road-measured vertical vibration. The measurements were performed using 24 adult subjects seated with full contact with the back support and two different positions of the hands (in lap and on steering wheel), while exposed to three different levels of broad band (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m/s 2 rms acceleration) vibration in the 0.5-40 Hz frequency range, and a track-measured vibration spectrum (1.07 m/s 2 rms acceleration). The forces developed on the seat pan and the backrest in directions normal to the supporting surfaces were measured to derive the APMS responses at both the driving-points. The results showed significant interactions of the upper body with the back support in a direction normal to the backrest, even though the vibration is applied along the vertical axis. At low frequencies, the backrest APMS magnitude was smaller than that measured at the seat pan, but it either exceeded or approached that of the seat pan APMS in the vicinity of the primary resonant frequencies. The results also suggested considerable effect of the hands position on the APMS magnitudes measured at both the driving-points. The effects of variations in the excitation type and magnitude, considered in this study, were observed to be small compared to those caused by the hands position and individual body masses. Owing to the strong effects of the body mass on the measured APMS responses at both driving-points, a total of 8 target data sets were identified corresponding to four mass groups (<60, 60.6-70, 70.5-80 and >80 kg) and two hands positions for formulating mechanical equivalent models. The model parameters identified for the target functions suggested that the models mass, stiffness and damping parameters increase with increasing body mass. The observed variations in the identified parameters could be applied for predicting the APMS responses reflected on the pan as well as backrest of the human occupants with specific body mass.

  11. Myoelectric Response of Back Muscles to Vertical Random Whole-Body Vibration with Different Magnitudes at Different Postures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BLÜTHNER, R.; SEIDEL, H.; HINZ, B.

    2002-05-01

    Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0·7, 1·0 and 1·4 m/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat and the buttocks were measured. Six EMGs were derived from the right side of the m. trapezius pars descendens, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars lumborum; m. longissimus thoracis pars thoracis, m. longissimus thoracis pars lumborum, and lumbar multifidus muscle. All data were filtered for anti-aliasing and sampled with 1000 Hz. Artefacts caused by the ECG in the EMG were identified and eliminated in the time domain using wavelets. The individually rectified and normalized EMGs were averaged across subjects. The EMGs without WBV exhibited characteristic patterns for the three postures examined. The coherence and transfer functions indicated characteristic myoelectric responses to random WBV with several effects of posture and WBV magnitude. A comprehensive set of transfer functions from the seat acceleration or the mean normalized input force to the mean processed EMG was presented.The results can be used for the development of more sophisticated models with a separate control of various back muscle groups. However, the EMG-force relationship under dynamic conditions needs to be examined in more detail before the results can be implemented. Since different reflex mechanisms depending on the frequency of WBV are linked with different types of active muscle fibres, various time delays between the EMG and muscle force may be necessary.

  12. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  13. Distributed vibration/acoustic sensing with high frequency response and spatial resolution based on time-division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zengguang; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2014-11-01

    A novel time-division multiplexing scheme is proposed and demonstrated for distributed vibration/acoustic sensing with broad frequency response range and high spatial resolution. By setting the time delay between a narrow pulse and a quasi-continuous wave properly, conventional phase optical time-domain reflectometry and polarization diversity scheme can be combined without crosstalk to determine position and frequency of vibration event, respectively. Detections of high vibration frequency of 0.6 MHz and low frequency of 1 Hz are presented with 1 m spatial resolution over 680 m single-mode sensing fiber.

  14. On the vibrational characteristics of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes containing ice nanotube in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Ameri, A.

    2015-10-01

    The properties and behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous environment due to their considerable potential applications in nanobiotechnology and designing nanobiosensors have attracted the attention of researchers. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to investigate the vibrational characteristics of single- and double-walled CNTs containing ice nanotubes (a new phase of ice) in vacuum and aqueous environments. The results demonstrate that formation of ice nanotubes inside the CNTs reduces the natural frequency of pure CNTs. Moreover, it is demonstrated that increasing the number of walls considerably reduces the sensitivity of frequency to the presence of ice nanotube inside CNT. Additionally, it is shown that increasing the length decreases the effect of ice nanotube on reducing the frequency. The calculation of natural frequency of CNTs in aqueous media demonstrates that the interaction of CNTs with water molecules considerably reduces the natural frequency up to 50 %. Finally, it is demonstrated that in the case of CNTs with one free end in aqueous environment, the CNT does not vibrate in its first mode, and its frequency is between the frequencies of first and second modes of vibration.

  15. The Response of Vocal Fold Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Joel; Quinchia Rios, Beatriz; Bartlett, Rebecca; Berchtold, Craig; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Illumination of cellular changes caused by mechanical forces present within the laryngeal microenvironment may well guide strategies for tissue engineering the vocal fold lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFF) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) to vibratory stimulus. In order to study these effects, a bioreactor capable of vibrating two cell seeded substrates was developed. The cell seeded substrates contact each other as a result of the sinusoidal frequency, producing a motion similar to the movement of true vocal folds. Utilizing this bioreactor, hVFF and BM-MSC were subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain for 8 hours. Immunohistochemistry (Ki-67 and TUNEL) was performed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis respectively, while semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess extracellular matrix related gene expression. HVFF significantly proliferated (p = 0.011) when subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain, while BM-MSC did not (p = 1.0). A statistically significant increase in apoptosis of BM-MSC (p = 0.0402) was observed under the experimental conditions; however high cell viability (96%) was maintained. HVFF did not have significantly altered apoptosis (p = 0.7849) when subjected to vibration and strain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR results show no significant differences in expression levels of collagen I (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = v0.3629), fibronectin (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = 0.2513), and TGF-β1 (BM-MSC p = 0.2534, hVFF p = 0.6029) between vibratory and static conditions in either cell type. Finally, smooth muscle actin mRNA was not present in either vibrated or static samples, indicating that no myofibroblast differentiation occurred for either cell type. Together, these results demonstrate that BM-MSC may be a suitable alternative to hVFF for vocal fold tissue engineering. Further investigation into a larger number of gene markers, protein levels, increased number of donors and vibratory conditions are warranted. PMID:22359557

  16. Optical response functions for condensed systems with linear and quadratic electron-vibration coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad; Small, Gerald J.; Mukamel, Shaul

    1998-11-01

    Understanding the similarities and differences between optical coherence loss of electronic transitions of chromophores in glasses and in the glass forming solvent requires, in part, linear response (2-point correlation) functions, J(t;T). An approximate excited state vibrational Hamiltonian (He) which accounts for both linear and quadratic electron-phonon coupling is derived that is acceptable for mode frequency changes smaller than 30%. The associated linear response function for the case of no damping is obtained. A response function that includes damping is proposed for systems whose modes are either linearly or quadratically coupled. It is the product of three response functions, two of which are phononic and associated with linear and quadratic modes. The third response function is electronic with a dephasing frequency γel that is the width of the zero-phonon line. The total response function yields single-site absorption spectra in which folding of the widths of multi-phonon and sequence transitions occurs. Applications of the new response functions are made to the temperature dependence of single-site absorption and hole-burned spectra of the special pair band of the bacterial reaction center and the temperature dependence of the single site absorption spectrum of Al-phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate in glassy ethanol.

  17. Analytical and experimental comparisons of electromechanical vibration response of a piezoelectric bimorph beam for power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumentut, M. F.; Howard, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Power harvesters that extract energy from vibrating systems via piezoelectric transduction show strong potential for powering smart wireless sensor devices in applications of health condition monitoring of rotating machinery and structures. This paper presents an analytical method for modelling an electromechanical piezoelectric bimorph beam with tip mass under two input base transverse and longitudinal excitations. The Euler-Bernoulli beam equations were used to model the piezoelectric bimorph beam. The polarity-electric field of the piezoelectric element is excited by the strain field caused by base input excitation, resulting in electrical charge. The governing electromechanical dynamic equations were derived analytically using the weak form of the Hamiltonian principle to obtain the constitutive equations. Three constitutive electromechanical dynamic equations based on independent coefficients of virtual displacement vectors were formulated and then further modelled using the normalised Ritz eigenfunction series. The electromechanical formulations include both the series and parallel connections of the piezoelectric bimorph. The multi-mode frequency response functions (FRFs) under varying electrical load resistance were formulated using Laplace transformation for the multi-input mechanical vibrations to provide the multi-output dynamic displacement, velocity, voltage, current and power. The experimental and theoretical validations reduced for the single mode system were shown to provide reasonable predictions. The model results from polar base excitation for off-axis input motions were validated with experimental results showing the change to the electrical power frequency response amplitude as a function of excitation angle, with relevance for practical implementation.

  18. Verification test and evaluation of vibration characteristics for the ASTER cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Masakuni; Fujisada, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Minoru; Akao, Hiroshi; Nishihara, Osamu; Nishimoto, Atsushi

    1995-09-01

    The advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) is an instrument which was selected by NASA to fly on the EOS-AM1 platform in 1998. Two cryocoolers are required to cool infrared detectors for the short-wave infrared radiometer (SWIR) and thermal infrared radiometer (TIR). The mission lifetime of the EOS-AM1 platform is expected to be 5 years, and accordingly, an operation lifetime more than 5 years is required for ASTER cryocoolers. The goals in the development of the ASTER cryocoolers are realization of a operation lifetime of over 50,000 hours and mechanical vibration forces below 0.1 N in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 135 Hz in the driection of all three axes. A split- Stirling cycle cryocoolers with clearance seals and linear motors is employed for this purpose. The compressor design adopts a piston driving mechanism which has a twin-opposed piston configuration in one compression space. The mechanical vibration caused by a displacer in the expander unit is reduced by an active balancer. Cryocoolers for SWIR and TIR have cooling capacity of 1.2 W at 70 K with power consumption lower than 55 W without control electronics. Several engineering models (EM) have been fabricated and are presently undergoing performance and life tests. Results of cryocooler verification tests and effects of jitter of mechanical vibration on the ASTER instrument are described.

  19. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses using a TBL model were demonstrated, and wind tunnel tests have been proposed to anchor the predictions and provide new insight into modeling approaches for this environment. Finally, design load factors were developed from the measured and predicted responses and compared with those derived from traditional techniques such as historical Mass Acceleration Curves and Barrett scaling methods for acreage and component-loaded panels.

  20. Real distributed vibration sensing with high frequency response based on pulse pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qian; Zhu, Tao; Xiao, Xianghui; Diao, Dongmei; Huang, Wei; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2014-05-01

    In conventional phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (φ-OTDR), the length of sensing fiber mainly determines the repetition rate of probe light pulses, which limits the extent of detectable frequency range. Moreover, averaging method, which is adopted to enhance the location signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), further decreases the maximum detectable frequency. This paper demonstrates a distributed vibration sensor with satisfied location SNR and extended frequency response range by using a probe pulse pair with a frequency difference. Experimental results show that this method is able to break the trade-off between the given sensing fiber length and the traditional maximum detectable frequency response of φ-OTDR system.

  1. Temperature modulation of the vibrational responses of a flexible fluid-conveying pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelaja, Adekunle O.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the nonlinear transverse vibration of a flexible pipe conveying hot, pressurized fluid is investigated. The pipe which is subjected to a pinned-pinned end condition extends as a result of several operating variables such as internal fluid temperature variation, pre-stress and internal pressurization. The equation of motion is solved analytically by hybrid Fourier-Laplace transforms, and the effects of inlet temperature, temperature gradient, and coefficient of area deformation are investigated on the natural frequencies and transverse dynamic response of the pipeline. While the inlet temperature and temperature gradient are found to be inversely proportional to the natural frequencies and amplitude of the dynamic response, increase in the coefficient of area deformation has little effect on the natural frequencies for the particular case considered.

  2. Frequency Response of the Sample Vibration Mode in Scanning Probe Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Qian; Qian, Meng-Lu

    2010-05-01

    Based on the interaction mechanism between tip and sample in the contact mode of a scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM), an active mass of the sample is introduced in the mass-spring model. The tip motion and frequency response of the sample vibration mode in the SPAM are calculated by the Lagrange equation with dissipation function. For the silicon tip and glass assemblage in the SPAM the frequency response is simulated and it is in agreement with the experimental result. The living myoblast cells on the glass slide are imaged at resonance frequencies of the SPAM system, which are 20kHz, 30kHz and 120kHz. It is shown that good contrast of SPAM images could be obtained when the system is operated at the resonance frequencies of the system in high and low-frequency regions.

  3. Energy Expenditure and Substrate Oxidation in Response to Side-Alternating Whole Body Vibration across Three Commonly-Used Vibration Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Elie-Jacques; Charrière, Nathalie; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Schutz, Yves; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim There is increasing recognition about the importance of enhancing energy expenditure (EE) for weight control through increases in low-intensity physical activities comparable with daily life (1.5–4 METS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) increases EE modestly and could present both a useful adjuvant for obesity management and tool for metabolic phenotyping. However, it is unclear whether a “dose-response” exists between commonly-used vibration frequencies (VF) and EE, nor if WBV influences respiratory quotient (RQ), and hence substrate oxidation. We aimed to investigate the EE-VF and RQ-VF relationships across three different frequencies (30, 40, and 50Hz). Methods EE and RQ were measured in 8 healthy young adults by indirect calorimetry at rest, and subsequently during side-alternating WBV at one of 3 VFs (30, 40, and 50 Hz). Each frequency was assessed over 5 cycles of intermittent WBV (30s vibration/30s rest), separated by 5 min seated rest. During the WBV participants stood on the platform with knees flexed sufficiently to maintain comfort, prevent transmission of vibration to the upper body, and minimise voluntary physical exertion. Repeatability was assessed across 3 separate days in a subset of 4 individuals. In order to assess any sequence/habituation effect, an additional group of 6 men underwent 5 cycles of intermittent WBV (30s vibration/30s rest) at 40 Hz, separated by 5 min seated rest. Results Side-alternating WBV increased EE relative to standing, non-vibration levels (+36%, p<0.001). However, no differences in EE were observed across VFs. Similarly, no effect of VF on RQ was found, nor did WBV alter RQ relative to standing without vibration. Conclusion No relationship could be demonstrated between EE and VF in the range of 30-50Hz, and substrate oxidation did not change in response to WBV. Furthermore, the thermogenic effect of intermittent WBV, whilst robust, was quantitatively small (<2 METS). PMID:26974147

  4. Hand-arm vibration syndrome and dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger among quarry drillers and stonecarvers. Italian Study Group on Physical Hazards in the Stone Industry.

    PubMed Central

    Bovenzi, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the occurrence of disorders associated with the hand arm vibration syndrome in a large population of stone workers in Italy. The dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger (VWF) was also studied. METHODS--The study population consisted of 570 quarry drillers and stonecarvers exposed to vibration and 258 control stone workers who performed only manual activity. Each subject was interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. Sensorineural and VWF disorders were staged according to the Stockholm workshop scales. Vibration was measured on a representative sample of percussive and rotary tools. The 8 h energy equivalent frequency weighted acceleration (A (8)) and lifetime vibration doses were calculated for each of the exposed stone workers. RESULTS--Sensorineural and musculoskeletal symptoms occurred more frequently in the workers exposed to vibration than in the controls, but trend statistics did not show a linear exposure-response relation for these disorders. The prevalence of VWF was found to be 30.2% in the entire group exposed to vibration. Raynaud's phenomenon was discovered in 4.3% of the controls. VWF was strongly associated with exposure to vibration and a monotonic dose-response relation was found. According to the exposure data of this study, the expected percentage of stone workers affected with VWF tends to increase roughly in proportion to the square root of A(8) (for a particular exposure period) or in proportion to the square root of the duration of exposure (for a constant magnitude of vibration). CONCLUSION--Even although limited to a specific work situation, the dose-response relation for VWF estimated in this study suggests a time dependency such that halving the years of exposure allows a doubling of the energy equivalent vibration. According to these findings, the vibration exposure levels currently under discussion within the European Community seem to represent reasonable exposure limits for the protection of workers against the harmful effects of hand transmitted vibration. PMID:7951792

  5. Method for Vibration Response Simulation and Sensor Placement Optimization of a Machine Tool Spindle System with a Bearing Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response. PMID:23012514

  6. Effect of experimentally reduced distal sensation on postural response to hip abductor/ankle evertor muscle vibration.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S; Collings, R; Paton, J; Marsden, J

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether postural responses induced by vibratory perturbations of the hip abductors and ankle evertors, were modified when distal tactile sensation was experimentally reduced through cooling. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated pre and post cooling. Subjects stood with their eyes closed with a stance width of 4 cm. A 2s vibratory stimulus was applied to the left or right hip abductor or ankle evertor muscle. The order of the site and side of the stimulation was randomised. The postural response to hip abductor and ankle evertor vibration was recorded using 3D motion analysis (Codamotion, Leicestershire). Medio-lateral centre of pressure motion was simultaneously recorded during quiet standing via a force plate (Kistler, UK). Pre-cooling people responded to unilateral ankle vibration with an ipsilateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. People responded to unilateral hip vibration with a contralateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. Following an experimental reduction in distal tactile sensation there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to ankle vibration (F(6.2)=P<0.05) and a significant increase in amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to hip vibration (F(5.2)=P<0.05). This suggests that the sensitivity to artificial stimulation of hip proprioception increases with distal cooling, possibly indicating a change in the gain/weighting placed upon sensory information from the hips. PMID:26153881

  7. Psychosocial Characteristics Mediating the Response: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, J. Melvin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the psychosocial characteristics that cognitively mediate between life stressors and the stress response in 235 subjects. Results from the five instruments used showed self-esteem was by far the most important characteristic discriminating between good and poor copers. Other factors were external control, life pace and irrational beliefs.…

  8. Motion characteristics and output voltage analysis of micro-vibration energy harvester based on diamagnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhitong; Duan, Zhiyong; Takahata, Kenichi; Su, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the force analysis and output performance of the micro-vibration energy harvester are elaborated. The force of the floating magnet in the magnetic field of the lifting magnet is firstly analyzed. Using COMSOL™, the change of magnetic force exerted on the floating magnet versus the vertical distance and the horizontal eccentric distance is obtained for different lifting magnets of a cylinder, a ring and an inner cylinder plus an outer ring, respectively. When the distance between the lifting and floating magnets ranges from 7.3 to 8.1 mm, the change rate of the magnetic force versus the vertical distance for the inner cylinder plus outer ring structure is the smallest, whose value is 619 µN/mm. In other words, if the inner cylinder plus outer ring structure is used as the lifting magnet, the vibration space of the floating magnet is the largest, which is 8 and 7.6 % larger than the cylinder and ring lifting magnets, respectively. The horizontal restoring forces of the three structures are substantially equal to each other at the horizontal eccentric distance of 4 mm, which is around 860 µN. Then the equilibrium position change of the floating magnet is discussed when the energy harvester is in an inclined position. Finally, by the analysis of the vibration model, the output performances of the energy harvester are comparatively calculated under the vertical and inclined positions. At the natural frequency of 6.93 Hz, the maximum power of 66.7 µW is generated.

  9. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  10. Analysis of lateral and torsional vibration characteristics of beams and shafts with end located rotational masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Partial differential equations are derived for free lateral and torsional vibration of a uniform free-free beam with a rotational mass attached to each extremity. For appropriate boundary conditions, nonlinear algebraic equations are obtained using a symbolic manipulation computer program, the solutions of which enable the computation of the neutral frequencies and mode-shapes. The mode-shapes are linear combinations of trigonometric and hyperbolic sine and cosine functions. A computer program is written for the numerical solution of the algebraic equations mentioned above, which can compute the natural frequencies, mode-shapes, and node points for any given set of parameters, for any given number of modes.

  11. Flexoelectric effect on the electroelastic responses and vibrational behaviors of a piezoelectric nanoplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengrong; Yan, Zhi; Jiang, Liying

    2014-07-01

    Flexoelectricity, referring to the coupling between electric polarization and strain gradients, is a universal effect in all dielectrics and may become manifest at the nano-scale. The current work aims to investigate the flexoelectric effect on the electroelastic responses and the free vibrational behaviors of a piezoelectric nanoplate (PNP). Based on the conventional Kirchhoff plate theory and the extended linear piezoelectricity theory, the governing equation and the boundary conditions of a clamped PNP with the consideration of the static bulk flexoelectricity are derived. Ritz approximate solutions of the electroelastic fields and the resonant frequencies demonstrate the size-dependency of the flexoelectric effect, which is more prominent for thinner plates with smaller thickness as expected. Simulation results also indicate that the influence of the flexoelectricity upon the electroelastic fields of a bending PNP and the transverse vibration of the PNP is sensitive to the plate in-plane dimensions as well as the applied electric voltage. Moreover, it is suggested that the possible frequency tuning of a PNP resonator by adjusting applied electrical load warrants the consideration of the flexoelectricity. This study is claimed to provide a theoretical predicition on the trend of the flexoelectric effect upon the static and dynamic behaviors of a bending PNP, thus sheding light on understanding the underlying physics of electromechanical coupling at the nano-scale to some extent.

  12. Tensor decomposition techniques in the solution of vibrational coupled cluster response theory eigenvalue equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Hansen, Mads Bøttger; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    We show how the eigenvalue equations of vibrational coupled cluster response theory can be solved using a subspace projection method with Davidson update, where basis vectors are stacked tensors decomposed into canonical (CP, Candecomp/Parafac) form. In each update step, new vectors are first orthogonalized to old vectors, followed by a tensor decomposition to a prescribed threshold TCP. The algorithm can provide excitation energies and eigenvectors of similar accuracy as a full vector approach and with only a very modest increase in the number of vectors required for convergence. The algorithm is illustrated with sample calculations for formaldehyde, 1,2,5-thiadiazole, and water. Analysis of the formaldehyde and thiadiazole calculations illustrate a number of interesting features of the algorithm. For example, the tensor decomposition threshold is optimally put to rather loose values, such as TCP = 10-2. With such thresholds for the tensor decompositions, the original eigenvalue equations can still be solved accurately. It is thus possible to directly calculate vibrational wave functions in tensor decomposed format.

  13. Dynamic response analysis and vibration control of a cantilever beam with a squeeze-mode electrorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, L.; Rezaeepazhand, J.

    2007-12-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids are a class of smart materials in which their rheological properties can be changed reversibly under the influence of an applied electric field. In recent years, many industrial applications of these smart fluids have been introduced by researchers, especially in the damping control of systems. In the present work, the applicability of squeeze-mode ER dampers in suppressing the vibration of a cantilever beam is investigated. The dynamic response of the beam for an impulse exciting force is obtained using a direct integration method based on a finite-element model for the structure. The nonlinear displacement and velocity-dependent characteristics of the squeeze-mode ER damper are considered in each of the iterations. Although the proposed ER damper has been found to have a significant influence on the dynamic response of the structure, adding a closed-loop control system could improve the damping behavior of the structure considerably. While the strength of the electric field depends on the gap between the electrodes, the control system uses displacement feedback for producing a controlling voltage to prevent the electric field exceeding its allowable bounds.

  14. Effects of whole body vibration on outer hair cells' hearing response to distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Moussavi-Najarkola, Seyyed-Ali; Khavanin, Ali; Mirzaei, Ramazan; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Akbari, Mehdi

    2012-05-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) is one of the most vexing problems in industries. There is a debate about the effect of WBV exposure on hearing system as vibration-induced hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to investigate outer hair cells' (OHCs') hearing response hearing response to distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in rabbits exposed to WBV. It was hypothesized that the DPOAE response amplitudes (A(dp)) in rabbits exposed to WBV would be lower than those in control rabbits not exposed to WBV. New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits as vibration group (n = 6, exposed to WBV in the z-axis at 4-8 Hz and 1.0 ms(-2) root mean square for 8 h per day during five consecutive days) and NZW rabbits as control group (n = 6, not exposed to any WBV) were participated. A(dp) and noise floor levels (L(nf)) were examined on three occasions: day 0 (i.e., baseline), day 8 (i.e., immediately 1 h after exposure), and day 11 (i.e., 72 h following exposure) with f(2) frequencies ranging from 500 to 10,000 Hz and primaries L(1) and L(2) levels of 65 and 55 dB sound pressure level, respectively. Main effects were statistically found to be significant for group, time, and frequency (p < 0.05). DPOAE amplitudes were significantly larger for rabbits exposed to WBV, larger on day 8 and larger for mid to high f(2) frequencies (at and above 5,888.50 Hz). Main effects were not statistically found to be significant for ear (p > 0.05). Also, four statistically significant interactions including time by ear, time by frequency, group by frequency, and group by time were detected (p < 0.05). Contrary to the main hypothesis, DPOAE amplitudes were significantly larger for rabbits exposed to WBV. WBV exposure significantly led to enhanced mean A(dp) at mid to high frequencies rather than at low ones. PMID:22549335

  15. The effect of van der Waals interaction modeling on the vibration characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X. Q.; Eisenberger, M.; Liew, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    An elastic multiple shell model is used for the vibration analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The van der Waals (vdW) interaction between any two layers of the MWCNT is modeled as the radius-dependent function. Based on the simplified Donnell shell equations, explicit formulas are obtained for the radial-dominated natural frequencies and mode shapes of double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes. The natural frequencies are calculated for MWCNT with various radii and number of tubes. The numerical results show that the effect of vdW interaction on the torsionally and longitudinally dominated natural frequencies is very small and can be neglected, and the vdW interaction has only a small influence on the lowest radial-dominated natural frequency, but plays a significant role in the higher radial-dominated natural frequencies for various combinations of m (number of longitudinal) and n (number of circumferential) waves in the mode even for the MWCNTs of small innermost radius. Especially, due to the effect of vdW interaction, there exists a change over in the order of the modes, from radially dominated mode to longitudinally dominated mode, or from longitudinally dominated mode to torsionally dominated mode even when the innermost radius of the MWCNT is very small, indicating that the interlayer vdW interaction plays a significant role in the vibration of MWCNTs with small radius. The effect of the mode order on the natural frequencies of MWCNT is also examined in detail.

  16. Vibration damping characteristics of graphite/epoxy composites for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, R. F.

    1982-03-01

    Limited data on extensional and flexural damping of small specimens of graphite/epoxy and unreinforced epoxy resin were obtained. Flexural damping was measured using a forced vibration technique based on resonant flexural vibration of shaker excited double cantilever specimens. Extensional damping was measured by subjecting similar specimens to low frequency sinusoidal oscillation in a servohydraulic tensile testing machine while plotting load versus extensional strain. Damping was found to vary slowly and continuously over the frequency range 0.01 - 1000 Hz, and no drastic transitions were observed. Composite damping was found to be less than neat resin damping. Comparison of small specimen damping values with assembled column damping values seems to indicate that, for those materials, material damping is more important than joint damping. The data reported was limited not by the test apparatus, but by signal conditioning and data acquisition. It is believed that filtering of the strain gage signals and the use of digital storage with slow playback will make it possible to extend the frequency and amplitude ranges significantly.

  17. G-seat system step input and sinusoidal response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, T. W.; Miller, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The step input and sinusoidal response characteristics of a pneumatically driven computer controlled G set are examined in this study. The response data show that this system can be modeled as a first order system with an 0.08 sec time lag and a 0.53 sec time constant.

  18. Parametric reduced order models for predicting the nonlinear vibration response of cracked structures with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Kwon; Castanier, Matthew P.; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2009-03-01

    Modeling and re-analysis techniques are proposed for predicting the dynamic response of complex structures that have suffered damage in one or more of their components. When such damages are present, the model of the healthy structure may no longer capture the system-level response or the loading from the rest of the structure on the damaged components. Hence, novel models that allow for an accurate re-analysis of the response of damaged structures are needed in important applications, including damage detection. Herein, such models are obtained by using a reduced order modeling approach based on component mode synthesis. Because the resonant response of a complex structure is often sensitive to component uncertainties (in geometric parameters such as thickness, material properties such as Young's modulus, etc.), novel parametric reduced order models (PROMs) are developed. In previous work, PROMs have been applied for handling uncertainties in a single substructure. Herein, PROMs are extended to the general case of multiple substructures with uncertain parameters or damage. Two damage cases are considered: severe structural deformation (dents), and cracks. For the first damage case, an approximate method based on static mode compensation (SMC) is used to perform fast re-analysis of the vibration response of the damaged structure. The re-analysis is performed through a range of locations and severity levels of the damage. For selected damage locations and levels, the SMC approximation is compared to full finite element analysis to demonstrate the accuracy and computational time savings for the new method. For the second damage case (cracks), the vibration problem becomes nonlinear due to the intermittent contact of the crack faces. Therefore, to estimate the resonant frequencies for a cracked structure, the bi-linear frequency approximation (BFA) is used for cracks of various lengths. Since BFA is based on linear analyses, it is fast and particularly well suited for implementation with PROMs for structural re-analysis. In contrast, most other nonlinear techniques for predicting the dynamic response are computationally intensive and cumbersome. For validating the proposed PROMs, resonant frequencies predicted using BFA and PROMs are shown to agree very well with results obtained using a much more expensive commercial finite element tool.

  19. Separating Fluid Shear Stress from Acceleration during Vibrations in Vitro: Identification of Mechanical Signals Modulating the Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Uzer, Gunes; Manske, Sarah L; Chan, M Ete; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Rubin, Clinton T; Frame, Mary D; Judex, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The identification of the physical mechanism(s) by which cells can sense vibrations requires the determination of the cellular mechanical environment. Here, we quantified vibration-induced fluid shear stresses in vitro and tested whether this system allows for the separation of two mechanical parameters previously proposed to drive the cellular response to vibration – fluid shear and peak accelerations. When peak accelerations of the oscillatory horizontal motions were set at 1g and 60Hz, peak fluid shear stresses acting on the cell layer reached 0.5Pa. A 3.5-fold increase in fluid viscosity increased peak fluid shear stresses 2.6-fold while doubling fluid volume in the well caused a 2-fold decrease in fluid shear. Fluid shear was positively related to peak acceleration magnitude and inversely related to vibration frequency. These data demonstrated that peak shear stress can be effectively separated from peak acceleration by controlling specific levels of vibration frequency, acceleration, and/or fluid viscosity. As an example for exploiting these relations, we tested the relevance of shear stress in promoting COX-2 expression in osteoblast like cells. Across different vibration frequencies and fluid viscosities, neither the level of generated fluid shear nor the frequency of the signal were able to consistently account for differences in the relative increase in COX-2 expression between groups, emphasizing that the eventual identification of the physical mechanism(s) requires a detailed quantification of the cellular mechanical environment. PMID:23074384

  20. Gender differences in knee stability in response to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Sañudo, Borja; Feria, Adrian; Carrasco, Luis; de Hoyo, Moisés; Santos, Rui; Gamboa, Hugo

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) differences between men and women in how the knee is controlled during a single-legged drop landing in response to whole-body vibration (WBV). Forty-five healthy volunteers, 30 men (age 22 ± 3 years; weight 76.8 ± 8.8 kg; height 179.0 ± 6.8 cm) and 15 women (age 22 ± 3 years; weight 61.0 ± 7.7 kg; height 161.9 ± 7.2 cm) were recruited for this study. Knee angles, vertical ground reaction forces, and the time to stabilize the knee were assessed after single-legged drop landings from a 30-cm platform. Surface EMG data in rectus femoris (RF) and hamstrings (H) and knee and ankle accelerometry signals were also acquired. The participants performed 3 pretest landings, followed by a 3-minute recovery and then completed 1 minute of WBV (30 Hz to 4 mm). Before vibration, the female subjects had a significantly higher peak vertical force value, knee flexion angles, and greater H preactivity (EMG(RMS) 50 milliseconds before activation) than did the male subjects. In addition, although not significant, the medial-lateral (ML) acceleration in both knee and ankle was also higher in women. After WBV, no significant differences were found for any of the other variables. However, there was a decrease in the RF to H activation ratio during the precontact phase and an increase in the ratio during the postcontact phase just in women, which leads to a decrement in ML acceleration. The gender differences reported in knee stability in response to WBV underline the necessity to perform specific neuromuscular training programs based on WBV together with instruction of the proper technique, which can assist the clinician in the knee injury prevention. PMID:21997457

  1. Free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a 1-g field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free vibration characteristics of a large split blanket solar array in both a 0-g and a 1-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The 0-g configuration corresponds to an in-orbit configuration of the array; the 1-g configuration is a typical ground test configuration. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the mode shapes and frequencies of the array; the second method uses the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. In the Rayleigh-Ritz method the array displacements are represented by string modes and cantilevered beam modes. The results of this investigation are summarized by a series of graphs illustrating the effects of various array parameters on the mode shapes and frequencies of the system. The results of the two methods are also compared in tabular form.

  2. Electromechanical characteristics of piezoelectric ceramic transformers in radial vibration composed of concentric piezoelectric ceramic disk and ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuyu; Hu, Jing; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2013-04-01

    A new type of piezoelectric ceramic transformer in radial vibration is presented. The piezoelectric transformer consists of a pairing of a concentric piezoelectric ceramic circular disk and ring. The inner piezoelectric ceramic disk is axially polarized and the outer piezoelectric ring is radially polarized. Based on the plane stress theory, the exact analytical theory for the piezoelectric transformer is developed and its electromechanical equivalent circuit is introduced. The resonance/anti-resonance frequency equations of the transformer are obtained and the relationship between the resonance/anti-resonance frequency, the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient and the geometrical dimensions of the piezoelectric transformer is analyzed. The dependency of the voltage transformation ratio on the frequency is obtained. To verify the analytical theory, a numerical method is used to simulate the electromechanical characteristics of the piezoelectric transformer. It is shown that the analytical resonance/anti-resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the numerical results.

  3. Optical measurement of the weak non-linearity in the eardrum vibration response to auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Johan

    The mammalian hearing organ consists of the external ear (auricle and ear canal) followed by the middle ear (eardrum and ossicles) and the inner ear (cochlea). Its function is to convert the incoming sound waves and convert them into nerve pulses which are processed in the final stage by the brain. The main task of the external and middle ear is to concentrate the incoming sound waves on a smaller surface to reduce the loss that would normally occur in transmission from air to inner ear fluid. In the past it has been shown that this is a linear process, thus without serious distortions, for sound waves going up to pressures of 130 dB SPL (˜90 Pa). However, at large pressure changes up to several kPa, the middle ear movement clearly shows non-linear behaviour. Thus, it is possible that some small non-linear distortions are also present in the middle ear vibration at lower sound pressures. In this thesis a sensitive measurement set-up is presented to detect this weak non-linear behaviour. Essentially, this set-up consists of a loud-speaker which excites the middle ear, and the resulting vibration is measured with an heterodyne vibrometer. The use of specially designed acoustic excitation signals (odd random phase multisines) enables the separation of the linear and non-linear response. The application of this technique on the middle ear demonstrates that there are already non-linear distortions present in the vibration of the middle ear at a sound pressure of 93 dB SPL. This non-linear component also grows strongly with increasing sound pressure. Knowledge of this non-linear component can contribute to the improvement of modern hearing aids, which operate at higher sound pressures where the non-linearities could distort the signal considerably. It is also important to know the contribution of middle ear non-linearity to otoacoustic emissions. This are non-linearities caused by the active feedback amplifier in the inner ear, and can be detected in the external and middle ear. These signals are used for diagnostic purposes, and therefore it is important to have an estimate the non-linear middle ear contribution to these emissions.

  4. The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the compaction characteristics of paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Levina, M; Rubinstein, M H

    2000-06-01

    An ultrasonic (US) compaction rig has been developed that is capable of providing compaction pressure together with high-power ultrasonic vibrations of 20 kHz to a powder or granular material in a die. The rig has been used to investigate the effect of US on the compaction properties of paracetamol, a drug that produces tablets that are weak and frequently exhibit capping. It was found that coherent paracetamol tablets could be prepared by US-assisted compaction at pressures as low as 20 to 30 MPa. Application of US before and after compaction was not found to be as effective as US applied during compaction. The breaking forces of the tablets produced with US applied during compaction were found to be consistently significantly higher than when compaction was performed conventionally or with US applied before or after compaction. The application of US during compaction made it possible to increase tablet breaking force, typically by a factor of 2 to 5. It was concluded that pressure should be applied together with US to achieve a better acoustical contact, which is required to transmit vibrations from the horn to the material and also to bond the surfaces of the particles. US application during compaction also resulted in an increase in apparent density, in relation to the apparent density of conventionally prepared paracetamol tablets, of up to 12.8%. US appears to improve particle rearrangement and provide energy for partial melting of particle asperities and subsequent fusion of particle surfaces, thus increasing interparticulate bonding. Development of solid bridges between the particles during US-assisted compaction was observed on scanning electron photomicrographs. Solid bridge formation was thought to result in a reduction of void space, which in turn reduced the rate of water penetration into the compacts and consequently increased tablet disintegration and drug dissolution times. It was found that the results of US-assisted compaction are influenced by formulation and US time. An increase in binder (polyvinylpyrrolidone) concentration and/or US time resulted in a significant increase in the breaking forces of paracetamol tablets produced with US. When paracetamol was mixed with a second material, such as dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and microcrystalline cellulose, stronger compacts were prepared by US-assisted compaction compared with the tablets containing no filler. Positive interactions were considered to have occurred as a result of US-induced bonding between the two materials. Overall, the application of US was found to significantly improve the compaction properties of paracetamol. PMID:10824129

  5. A study of a nonlinear vibration isolator with a quasi-zero stiffness characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacic, Ivana; Brennan, Michael J.; Waters, Timothy P.

    2008-08-01

    A vibration isolator consisting of a vertical linear spring and two nonlinear pre-stressed oblique springs is considered in this paper. The system has both geometrical and physical nonlinearity. Firstly, a static analysis is carried out. The softening parameter leading to quasi-zero dynamic stiffness at the equilibrium position is obtained as a function of the initial geometry, pre-stress and the stiffness of the springs. The optimal combination of the system parameters is found that maximises the displacement from the equilibrium position when the prescribed stiffness is equal to that of the vertical spring alone. It also satisfies the condition that the dynamic stiffness only changes slightly in the neighbourhood of the static equilibrium position. For these values, a dynamical analysis of the isolator under asymmetric excitation is performed to quantify the undesirable effects of the nonlinearities. It includes considering the possibilities of the appearance of period-doubling bifurcation and its development into chaotic motion. For this purpose, approximate analytical methods and numerical simulations accompanied with qualitative methods including phase plane plots, Poincaré maps and Lyapunov exponents are used. Finally, the frequency at which the first period-doubling bifurcation appears is found and the effect of damping on this frequency determined.

  6. An on-road shock and vibration response test series utilizing worst case and statistical analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    Defining the maximum expected shock and vibration responses for an on-road truck transportation environment is strongly dependent on the amount of response data that can be obtained. One common test scheme consists of measuring response data over a relatively short prescribed road course and then reviewing that data to obtain the maximum response levels. The more mathematically rigorous alternative is to collect an unbiased ensemble of response data during a long road trip. This paper compares data gathered both ways during a recent on-road certification test for a tractor trailer van being designed by Sandia.

  7. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  8. Elevated Vibration Perception Thresholds in CIDP Patients Indicate More Severe Neuropathy and Lower Treatment Response Rates

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Albulaihe, Hana; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vibration perception threshold (VPT) examination using a neurothesiometer provides objective, sensitive and specific information, and has been utilized mainly in patients with diabetic polyneropathy. Objectives Explore the utility of VPT examination in CIDP patients. Methods CIDP subjects attending the Neuromuscular clinic between 01/2013 and 12/2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, clinical history, physical examination, VPT values, and electrophysiologic data from their charts were extracted. Results 70 charts were reviewed. 55 CIDP patients had elevated VPT, associated with higher frequency of abnormal sensory testing for various modalities (92.7% vs. 46.7%, p<0.0001), lower sensory and motor amplitudes and reduced conduction velocities on nerve conduction studies, and lower treatment response rates (54% vs. 93%, p = 0.01). Conclusion VPT examination is a simple tool, which is a reliable and sensitive measure not only for diabetic neuropathy, but also for CIDP. Moreover, in CIDP, elevated VPT values are also associated with lower treatment response rates. PMID:26545096

  9. The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the compaction characteristics of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Levina, Marina; Rubinstein, Michael H

    2002-05-01

    An ultrasonic (US) compaction rig has been developed, capable of providing compaction pressure together with high-power ultrasonic vibrations of 20 kHz to a powder or granular material in a die. The rig has been used to investigate the effect of ultrasound on the compaction properties of ibuprofen, a drug with poor compaction properties which produces tablets that are weak and frequently exhibit capping. It was found that coherent ibuprofen tablets could be prepared by ultrasound-assisted compaction at pressures as low as 20-30 MPa. Application of ultrasound before and after compaction was found not to be as effective as ultrasound applied during compaction. The breaking forces of the tablets produced with ultrasound applied during compaction were found to be consistently significantly higher than when compaction was performed conventionally, or with ultrasound applied before or after compaction. Application of ultrasound during compaction made it possible to increase tablet mechanical strength, typically by a factor of 2-5. It was concluded that pressure should be applied together with ultrasound in order to achieve a better acoustical contact, which is required to transmit vibrations from the horn to the material, and also to bond the surfaces of the particles. Ultrasound application during ibuprofen compaction also resulted in an increase in the apparent density, in relation to the apparent density of conventionally prepared tablets, of up to 14.4%. Ultrasound appears to improve particle rearrangement and provides energy for partial melting of particle asperities and subsequent fusion of particle surfaces, so as to increase interparticulate bonding. Solid bridge formation was thought to result in a reduction of void space, which in turn reduced the rate of water penetration into the compacts and consequently increased disintegration and dissolution times. It was found that the results of ultrasound-assisted compaction are influenced by formulation and US time. When ibuprofen was mixed with a second material, such as dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP) or microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), stronger tablets were prepared by ultrasound-assisted compaction compared to the compacts containing no filler. Positive interactions were considered to have occurred due to ultrasound-induced bonding between the two materials. With an increase in DCP and MCC concentration in ibuprofen formulations, disintegration and drug dissolution rates of the tablets produced with ultrasound significantly increased. Using temperature-sensitive labels it was found that thermal changes occurred in powdered solids undergoing ultrasound-assisted compaction. Increases in the temperature of tablets were related to US amplitude and US time. With an increase in US amplitude from 5 to 13 microns, the temperature of the DCP tablet surface increased from 40 to 99 degrees C. With an increase in US time from 1 to 5 sec, the temperature of the surface of ibuprofen tablets increased from 43 to 60 degrees C. Increased tablet temperature was thought to be due to ultrasonic energy dissipation turned into heat. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies of ibuprofen tablets prepared by ultrasound-assisted compaction at 32 MPa revealed that no changes in chemical or/and crystalline structure of the material occurred when ultrasound was applied for up to 5 sec (US amplitude 7 microns). An XRD study of DCP tablets produced by ultrasound-assisted compaction at 32 MPa with ultrasound of different amplitudes (5, 7, 13 microns) applied for 2 sec indicated that no material deterioration occurred in all the tested samples. PMID:12098839

  10. Modeling and Analysis of Composite Wing Sections for Improved Aeroelastic and Vibration Characteristics Using Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop analysis procedures to investigate the coupling of composite and smart materials to improve aeroelastic and vibratory response of aerospace structures. The structural modeling must account for arbitrarily thick geometries, embedded and surface bonded sensors and actuators and imperfections, such as delamination. Changes in the dynamic response due to the presence of smart materials and delaminations is investigated. Experiments are to be performed to validate the proposed mathematical model.

  11. Multi-frequency periodic vibration suppressing in active magnetic bearing-rotor systems via response matching in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng

    2011-05-01

    A method for multi-frequency periodic vibration suppressing in active magnetic bearing (AMB)-rotor systems is proposed, which is based on an adaptive finite-duration impulse response (FIR) filter in time domain. Firstly, the theoretic feasibility of the method is proved. However, two problems would be unavoidable, if the conventional adaptive FIR filter is adopted in practical application. One is that the convergence rate of the different frequency components may be highly disparate in multi-frequency vibration control. The other is that the computational complexity is significantly increased because the long memory FIR filter is required to match the transient response time of the AMB-rotor system. To overcome the problems above, the Fast Block Least Mean Square (FBLMS) algorithm is adopted to efficiently implement the computation in frequency domain at a computational cost far less than that of the conventional FIR filter. By the FBLMS algorithm, regardless of the number of the considered frequency components in vibration disturbance, the computational complexity would be invariable. Moreover, filter's weights in the FBLMS algorithm have the intuitional relation with signal's frequency. As a result, the convergence rate of each frequency component can be adjusted by assigning the individual step size parameter for each weight. Experiments with the reciprocating simulating disturbance test and the rotating harmonic vibration test were carried out on an AMB-rigid rotor test rig with a vertical shaft. The experiment results indicate that the proposed method with the FBLMS algorithm can achieve the good effectiveness for suppressing the multi-frequency vibration. The convergence property of each frequency component can be adjusted conveniently. Each harmonic component of the vibration can be addressed, respectively, by reconfiguring the frequency components of the reference input signal.

  12. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key pointsAcute WBV improves knee extensor peak isometric force output and PAP amongst professional and not amateur soccer playersProfessional players perceived acute WBV as more beneficial to performance than amateur playersIsometric strength,vibration intensity and duration appear to influence results amongst players of different playing levels. PMID:26957927

  13. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points Acute WBV improves knee extensor peak isometric force output and PAP amongst professional and not amateur soccer players Professional players perceived acute WBV as more beneficial to performance than amateur players Isometric strength,vibration intensity and duration appear to influence results amongst players of different playing levels PMID:26957927

  14. Poststimulus response characteristics of the human cone flicker electroretinogram.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankaran, Sowjanya; McAnany, J Jason; Alexander, Kenneth R

    2013-07-01

    At certain temporal frequencies, the human cone flicker electroretinogram (ERG) contains multiple additional responses following the termination of a flicker train. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these poststimulus responses are a continuing response to the terminated flicker train or represent the oscillation of a resonant system. ERGs were recorded from 10 visually normal adults in response to full-field sinusoidally modulated flicker trains presented against a short-wavelength rod-saturating adapting field. The amplitude and timing properties of the poststimulus responses were evaluated within the context of a model of a second-order resonant system. At stimulus frequencies between 41.7 and 71.4 Hz, the majority of subjects showed at least three additional ERG responses following the termination of the flicker train. The interval between the poststimulus responses was approximately constant across stimulus frequency, with a mean of 14.4 ms, corresponding to a frequency of 69.4 Hz. The amplitude and timing characteristics of the poststimulus ERG responses were well described by an underdamped second-order system with a resonance frequency of 70.3 Hz. The observed poststimulus ERG responses may represent resonant oscillations of retinal ON bipolar cells, as has been proposed for electrophysiological recordings of poststimulus responses from retinal ganglion cells. However, further investigation is required to determine the types of retinal neurons involved in the generation of the poststimulus responses of the human flicker ERG. PMID:24016531

  15. Preliminary Calibration Report of an Apparatus to Measure Vibration Characteristics of Low Frequency Disturbance Source Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James W.; Marshall, Robert A.; Finley, Tom D.; Lawrence, George F.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a description of the test apparatus and the method of testing the low frequency disturbance source characteristics of small pumps, fans, camera motors, and recorders that are typical of those used in microgravity science facilities. The test apparatus will allow both force and acceleration spectra of these disturbance devices to be obtained from acceleration measurements over the frequency range from 2 to 300 Hz. Some preliminary calibration results are presented.

  16. Stationary levitation and vibration transmission characteristic in a superconducting seismic isolation device with a permanent magnet system and a copper plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Shimada, K.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.; Kawai, N.; Yasui, K.

    2010-11-01

    We have devised a magnetic levitation type superconducting seismic isolation device taking advantage of the specific characteristic of HTS bulk that the HTS bulk returns to its original position by restoring force against a horizontal displacement. The superconducting seismic isolation device is composed of HTS bulks and permanent magnets (PM rails). The PMs are fixed on an iron plate to realize the same polarities in the longitudinal direction and the different polarities in the transverse direction. The superconducting seismic isolation device can theoretically remove any horizontal vibrations completely. Therefore, the vibration transmissibility in the longitudinal direction of the PM rail becomes zero in theory. The zero vibration transmissibility and the stationary levitation, however, cannot be achieved in the real device because a uniform magnetic field distribution in the longitudinal direction of PM rail cannot be realized due to the individual difference of the PMs. Therefore, to achieve stationary levitation in the real device we adopted a PM-PM system that the different polarities are faced each other. The stationary levitation could be achieved by the magnetic interaction between the PMs in the PM-PM system, while the vibration transmitted to the seismic isolation object due to the magnetic interaction. We adopted a copper plate between the PMs to reduce the vibration transmissibility. The PM-PM system with the copper plate is very useful for realizing the stationary levitation and reducing the vibration transmissibility.

  17. Probabilistic analysis of mean-response along-wind induced vibrations on wind turbine towers using wireless network data sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Antonio; Swartz, Raymond A.

    2011-04-01

    Wind turbine systems are attracting considerable attention due to concerns regarding global energy consumption as well as sustainability. Advances in wind turbine technology promote the tendency to improve efficiency in the structure that support and produce this renewable power source, tending toward more slender and larger towers, larger gear boxes, and larger, lighter blades. The structural design optimization process must account for uncertainties and nonlinear effects (such as wind-induced vibrations, unmeasured disturbances, and material and geometric variabilities). In this study, a probabilistic monitoring approach is developed that measures the response of the turbine tower to stochastic loading, estimates peak demand, and structural resistance (in terms of serviceability). The proposed monitoring system can provide a real-time estimate of the probability of exceedance of design serviceability conditions based on data collected in-situ. Special attention is paid to wind and aerodynamic characteristics that are intrinsically present (although sometimes neglected in health monitoring analysis) and derived from observations or experiments. In particular, little attention has been devoted to buffeting, usually non-catastrophic but directly impacting the serviceability of the operating wind turbine. As a result, modal-based analysis methods for the study and derivation of flutter instability, and buffeting response, have been successfully applied to the assessment of the susceptibility of high-rise slender structures, including wind turbine towers. A detailed finite element model has been developed to generate data (calibrated to published experimental and analytical results). Risk assessment is performed for the effects of along wind forces in a framework of quantitative risk analysis. Both structural resistance and wind load demands were considered probabilistic with the latter assessed by dynamic analyses.

  18. Estimation of dynamic characteristics of a medium height office building with passive dampers considering vertical seismic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Misaki; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, dynamic characteristics of a medium-height office building with passive dampers is investigated. The building considered here is equipped with two kinds of passive dampers, viscous vibration control walls and low yield point steel-based buckling resistant braces. Eleven accelerometers are installed on basement, 1st, 5th, 10th and 14th floor. Two displacement meters for measuring the response of dampers are installed. To know the real performance of the building, we consider not only horizontal components but also vertical components. Dynamic characteristics of the building under several earthquakes are analyzed using multi-input and multi-output models for system identification. Using acceleration responses of multiple observation points, dynamic characteristics are estimated more precisely. The estimation errors of modal parameters are obtained simultaneously. Applying the method, it is indicated that vertical input has a significant influence on translational components.

  19. Parametric and autoparametric vibrations of an elevated water tower, part I: Non-linear parametric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, R. A.; Gau, Jin-Shy; Soundararajan, A.

    1988-03-01

    The non-linear dynamic response of an elevated water tower subjected to a prescribed harmonic vertical motion of its base is examined. The mathematical model includes the interaction of one liquid sloshing mode with one structural mode. The Struble method of asymptotic expansion is used to determine the conditions of parametric resonance and the corresponding system responses. Under the condition of principal parametric resonance of the first normal mode the system response is found to possess the characteristics of hard non-linear systems. On the other hand, the response exhibits the characteristics of soft non-linear systems when the second normal mode is parametrically excited. The parametric normal mode interaction is found to take place under the combination parametric resonance of the summed type while it does not exist for the difference type. The absence of the system response at combination resonance of the difference type is mainly attributed to the fact that the linearized system is always parametrically stable at this condition.

  20. Frequency response functions of shape features from full-field vibration measurements using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizhuo; Mottershead, John E.; Siebert, Thorsten; Pipino, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    The availability of high speed digital cameras has enabled three-dimensional (3D) vibration measurement by stereography and digital image correlation (DIC). The 3D DIC technique provides non-contact full-field measurements on complex surfaces whereas conventional modal testing methods employ point-wise frequency response functions. It is proposed to identify the modal properties by utilising the domain-wise responses captured by a DIC system. This idea will be illustrated by a case study in the form a car bonnet of 3D irregular shape typical of many engineering structures. The full-field measured data are highly redundant, but the application of image processing using functional transformation enables the extraction of a small number of shape features without any significant loss of information from the raw DIC data. The complex bonnet surface on which the displacement responses are measured is essentially a 2-manifold. It is possible to apply surface parameterisation to 'flatten' the 3D surface to form a 2D planar domain. Well-developed image processing techniques are defined on planar domains and used to extract features from the displacement patterns on the surface of a specimen. An adaptive geometric moment descriptor (AGMD), defined on surface parametric space, is able to extract shape features from a series of full-field transient responses under random excitation. Results show the effectiveness of the AGMD and the obtained shape features are demonstrated to be succinct and efficient. Approximately 14 thousand data points of raw DIC measurement are represented by 20 shape feature terms at each time step. Shape-descriptor frequency response functions (SD-FRFs) of the response field and the loading field are derived in the shape feature space. It is seen that the SD-FRF has a similar format to the conventional receptance FRF. The usual modal identification procedure is applied to determine the natural frequencies, damping factors and eigen-shape-feature vectors from the SD-FRF. Natural frequencies and mode shapes from a finite element (FE) model are correlated with the experimental data using the cosine distance between the shape feature vectors with 20 terms. There are numerous benefits of using image decomposition to analyse 3D DIC measured data, including (1) representation of the raw measurement data with efficiency and succinctness; (2) determination of the FRF of any point on the specimen by the use of the full-field shape features; and (3) elimination of DIC measurement noise. Also, the SD-FRF is potentially ideal for cases of field excitation of structures.

  1. Effects of eccentricity and order of vibration modes on the inelastic seismic response of 3D steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    P. Sharifi, Naser; Sakulich, Aaron R.

    2014-04-01

    In torsionally coupled buildings, the total response of the structure is the result of the translational displacement of the story's center of stiffness and the displacement due to the roof's rotation. In structures with high eccentricity, the effect of the floor's rotation in the total response is considerable. The order of vibration modes is another important parameter that changes the contribution of the different translational and rotational modes in the total response. To explore the effects of eccentricity and the order of vibration modes on the total response, a number of 3-D steel moment-resistant frames with 4, 8, and 12 stories, with different eccentricities and plans, were considered. The structures were subjected to bidirectional seismic inputs so that their peak ground accelerations were scaled to 0.4g, 0.6g, and 0.8g. Increasing the eccentricity of the structure increases the participation of rotation in the total response. Furthermore, in torsionally flexible structures, where the first or second mode of vibration is a torsional mode, the contribution of the floor's rotation can be even greater. In some cases, the displacement of exterior columns is primarily the result of the floor's rotation. This suggests that to efficiently dampen the seismic displacement of such structures, the rotational mode of the building should be controlled.

  2. Vibration suppression of structures with densely spaced modes using maximally robust minimum delay digital finite impulse response filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glossiotis, G. N.; Antoniadis, I. A.

    2007-03-01

    Due to the inherent flexibility of engineering structures, transient and residual vibrations occur when a motion command is applied, thus raising several practical restrictions concerning their fast, accurate and safe motion. Although various command-preconditioning techniques have been proposed for the effective suppression of the excited vibrations, their application has been limited only to structures with a few distinct and well-separated modes. This paper further considers the applicability of motion preconditioning methods for a large class of lightweight flexible structures, which present multiple densely spaced natural modes, existing even at relatively low frequencies. Properly designed finite impulse response (FIR) filters can lead to an effective motion preconditioning method, suppressing drastically the excited vibrations over the entire excited frequency band. Compared to other alternative preconditioning methods, such as input shapers or infinite impulse response (IIR) filters, FIR filters present the most efficient behavior in terms of vibration suppression efficiency, or in terms of the delay introduced in the motion command, as verified by numerical simulations and experimental results involving multibay trusses, with tenths of densely spaced modes in a range from 0.4 Hz up to 75 Hz.

  3. The response characteristics of avalanche photodiodes to ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufa; Dou, Xianan; Li, Feng; Sun, Xiaoquan

    2015-11-01

    The physical model of avalanche photodiode (APD) response to ultrashort pulsed laser is established. Numerical simulation of APD response characteristics is focused and presented. The simulated results show that the response peak voltage degrades approximately linearly with the laser pulse duration narrowing when the peak power of laser pulse keeps unchanged. Meanwhile, when the energy of input pulse laser is at the same quantity, the response peak voltage keeps invariably in different pulse duration. Moreover, the pulse duration of response voltage is determined by the sensitivity of APD itself, and the input duration of ultrashort pulsed laser could not be recognized by the APD. Experiments are carried out and the experimental results are in good agreement with simulated data.

  4. Longitudinal vibration response of a curved fiber used for laser ultrasound surgical therapy (LUST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desinger, Kai; Pankau, J.; Makarov, S. N.; Ochmann, M.; Stein, Thomas; Helfmann, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1997-04-01

    A theoretical study of the longitudinal vibration response of a bent fiber used as an active element of a medical applicator for laser ultrasound surgical therapy (LUST) is presented. An important problem concerns taking into account fiber bending which may appear due to applications in endoscopy. NIR laser radiation and low frequency ultrasound (20 - 50 kHz) with amplitudes of up to 100 micrometers can be transmitted by silica glass fibers. The fiber cross- section is much smaller than the longitudinal wavelength. Wave propagation in the bent fiber is described by the governing second-order equations of motion which neglect the flexure effect. In contest to numerous works on bent rods, the case of an arbitrary continuous curvative distribution along the fiber is investigated. A simple analytical formula for the transfer function (the ratio of displacements at the working end of the fiber divided by those at the driven end) is obtained. The transfer function depends on frequency, fiber length, output impedance, loss factor, and the mean- square curvative of the fiber. The behavior of this function is investigated applied to some fibers whose lengths are of the order 1 m. If the displacement at the driven end of the fiber is known, the acoustical power output of the applicator can be found from the known values of the tissue impedance and the transfer function.

  5. Study of passenger subjective response to ideal and real-vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, R. H.; Mikulka, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stimulus received by subjects tested on the passenger ride quality apparatus (PRQA) is defined. Additional analyses on the data collected from field tests using buses, were conducted to assess the relation between subjective ratings of ride quality and vibrations measured on the buses, and to better define the vibration stimulus measured in the field. The relation of subjective evaluation of simulations of bus rides produced by the DRQA to subjective evaluations of the actual bus rides is discussed. The relative contribution of the seat and floor vibration to human comfort in a simulated aircraft ride environment is discussed along with the determination of equal comfort curves through magnitude estimation.

  6. The nonlinear forced response characteristics of contained fluids in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanschoor, M. C.; Crawley, E. F.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of the change in the lateral slosh behavior of contained fluids between earth and space is presented. The experimental apparatus used to determine the slosh characteristics is described and a nonlinear analytic model of a coupled fluid/spacecraft system is outlined. The forced response characteristics of silicon oil and distilled water in cylinder tanks with either a flat or spherical bottom are reported and discussed. A comparison of the measured earth and space results identifies and highlights the effects of gravity on the linear and nonlinear slosh behavior of these fluids.

  7. Bonding, vibrational, and electrical characteristics of CdS nanostructures embedded in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, S. P.; Dhar, A.; Ray, S. K.; Chakraborty, A. K.

    2009-04-15

    CdS nanocomposites have been grown in polyvinyl alcohol matrix by a chemical synthesis process. The transmission electron micrographs of nanocomposites synthesized at 70-90 deg. C temperature showed the growth of needlelike and junctionlike nanostructures. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed the growth of stoichiometric CdS without the formation of any intermediate phases at the CdS-polyvinyl alcohol interface. Raman spectra of first order longitudinal optical phonon peak has been analyzed using phonon dispersion model to detect the surface phonon modes in CdS nanoneedles and wires. The origin of negative differential resistance behavior in current-voltage characteristics for junctionlike CdS nanocomposites has been discussed.

  8. Relationship between measured apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses of seated occupants exposed to vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Rakheja, S.; Boileau, P.-.

    2008-07-01

    The "to-the-body" and "through-the-body" biodynamic response functions of the seated human body exposed to vertical vibration are measured and analyzed in an attempt to identify relationships between the apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility measures. The experiments involved 12 male subjects exposed to three magnitudes of whole-body vertical random vibration (0.25,0.5,1.0 m/s 2 rms acceleration) in the 0.5-15 Hz frequency range, and seated with three back support conditions (none, vertical and inclined), and two different hands positions (hands in lap and hands on the steering wheel). The vertical apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses were acquired during the experiments, where the head acceleration was measured using a light and adjustable helmet-strap mounted accelerometer. The results showed that both the measured responses show good agreements in the primary resonances, irrespective of the back support condition, while considerable differences between the normalized apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility could be seen in the secondary resonance range for the two back supported postures. The seat-to-head transmissibility responses are further shown to be relatively sensitive to back supported postures compared with that of apparent mass responses. Relatively stronger effects of hands position were observed on the seat-to-head transmissibility responses compared with the apparent mass responses under back supported conditions. From the results, it is further concluded that seat-to-head transmissibility emphasizes the biodynamic response in the vicinity of the secondary resonance compared to the apparent mass. The seat-to-head transmissibility measure is thus considered to be more appropriate for describing seated body response to higher frequency vibration.

  9. Responses of contralateral SI and SII in cat to same-site cutaneous flutter versus vibration.

    PubMed

    Tommerdahl, M; Whitsel, B L; Favorov, O V; Metz, C B; O'Quinn, B L

    1999-10-01

    The methods of (14)C-2-deoxyglucose ((14)C-2DG) metabolic mapping and optical intrinsic signal (OIS) imaging were used to evaluate the response evoked in the contralateral primary somatosensory receiving areas (SI and SII) of anesthetized cats by either 25 Hz ("flutter") or 200 Hz ("vibration") sinusoidal vertical skin displacement stimulation of the central pad on the distal forepaw. Unilateral 25-Hz stimulation consistently evoked a localized region of elevated (14)C-2DG uptake in both SI and SII in the contralateral hemisphere. In contrast, 200-Hz stimulation did not evoke elevated (14)C-2DG uptake in the contralateral SI but evoked a prominent, localized region of increased (14)C-2DG uptake in the contralateral SII. Experiments in which the OIS was recorded yielded results that complemented and extended the findings obtained with the 2DG method. First, 25-Hz central-pad stimulation evoked an increase in absorbance in a region in the contralateral SI and SII that corresponded closely to the region in which a similar stimulus evoked increased (14)C-2DG uptake. Second, 200-Hz stimulation of the central pad consistently evoked a substantial increase in absorbance in the contralateral SII but very little or no increase in absorbance in the contralateral SI. And third, 200-Hz central-pad stimulation usually evoked a decrease in absorbance in the same contralateral SI region that underwent an increase in absorbance during same-site 25-Hz stimulation. Experiments in which the OIS responses of both SI and SII were recorded simultaneously demonstrated that continuous (>1 s) 25-Hz central-pad stimulation evokes a prominent increase in absorbance in both SI and SII in the contralateral hemisphere, whereas only SII undergoes a sustained prominent increase in absorbance in response to 200-Hz stimulation to the same central-pad site. SI exhibits an initial, transient increase in absorbance in response to 200-Hz stimulation and at durations of stimulation >1 s, undergoes a decrease in absorbance. It was found that the stimulus-evoked absorbance changes in the contralateral SI and SII are correlated significantly during vibrotactile stimulation of the central pad-positively with 25-Hz stimulation and negatively with 200-Hz stimulation. The findings are interpreted to indicate that 25-Hz central-pad stimulation of the central pad evokes spatially localized and vigorous neuronal activation within both SI and SII in the contralateral hemisphere and that although 200-Hz stimulation evokes vigorous and well maintained neuronal activation within the contralateral SII, the principal effect on the contralateral SI of a 200-Hz stimulus lasting >1 s is inhibitory. PMID:10515988

  10. Density response of a trapped Fermi gas: A crossover from the pair vibration mode to the Goldstone mode

    SciTech Connect

    Korolyuk, A.; Kinnunen, J. J.; Toermae, P.

    2011-09-15

    We consider the density response of a trapped two-component Fermi gas. Combining the Bogoliubov-deGennes method with the random phase approximation allows the study of both collective and single-particle excitations. Calculating the density response across a wide range of interactions, we observe a crossover from a weakly interacting pair vibration mode to a strongly interacting Goldstone mode. The crossover is associated with a depressed collective mode frequency and an increased damping rate, in agreement with density response experiments performed in strongly interacting atomic gases.

  11. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  12. A coatable, light-weight, fast-response nanocomposite sensor for the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance: from structural vibration to ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Xu, Hao; Liu, Weijian; Liao, Yaozhong; Jin, Hao; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by an innovative sensing philosophy, a light-weight nanocomposite sensor made of a hybrid of carbon black (CB)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has been developed. The nanoscalar architecture and percolation characteristics of the hybrid were optimized in order to fulfil the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance from low-frequency vibration to high-frequency ultrasonic waves. Dynamic particulate motion induced by elastic disturbance modulates the infrastructure of the CB conductive network in the sensor, with the introduction of the tunneling effect, leading to dynamic alteration in the piezoresistivity measured by the sensor. Electrical analysis, morphological characterization, and static/dynamic electromechanical response interrogation were implemented to advance our insight into the sensing mechanism of the sensor, and meanwhile facilitate understanding of the optimal percolation threshold. At the optimal threshold (∼6.5 wt%), the sensor exhibits high fidelity, a fast response, and high sensitivity to ultrafast elastic disturbance (in an ultrasonic regime up to 400 kHz), yet with an ultralow magnitude (on the order of micrometers). The performance of the sensor was evaluated against a conventional strain gauge and piezoelectric transducer, showing excellent coincidence, yet a much greater gauge factor and frequency-independent piezoresistive behavior. Coatable on a structure and deployable in a large quantity to form a dense sensor network, this nanocomposite sensor has blazed a trail for implementing in situ sensing for vibration- or ultrasonic-wave-based structural health monitoring, by striking a compromise between ‘sensing cost’ and ‘sensing effectiveness’.

  13. Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from changes in their vibration characteristics: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R.; Prime, M.B.; Shevitz, D.W.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains a review of the technical literature concerning the detection, location, and characterization of structural damage via techniques that examine changes in measured structural vibration response. The report first categorizes the methods according to required measured data and analysis technique. The analysis categories include changes in modal frequencies, changes in measured mode shapes (and their derivatives), and changes in measured flexibility coefficients. Methods that use property (stiffness, mass, damping) matrix updating, detection of nonlinear response, and damage detection via neural networks are also summarized. The applications of the various methods to different types of engineering problems are categorized by type of structure and are summarized. The types of structures include beams, trusses, plates, shells, bridges, offshore platforms, other large civil structures, aerospace structures, and composite structures. The report describes the development of the damage-identification methods and applications and summarizes the current state-of-the-art of the technology. The critical issues for future research in the area of damage identification are also discussed.

  14. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.

    2015-10-01

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  15. Characteristics of vocal fold vibrations in vocally healthy subjects: analysis with multi-line kymography.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Akihito; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Yokonishi, Hisayuki; Nito, Takaharu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Tayama, Niro

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the authors aimed to analyze longitudinal data from high-speed digital images in normative subjects using multi-line kymography. METHOD Vocally healthy subjects were divided into young (9 men and 17 women; Mage = 27 years) and older groups (8 men and 12 women; Mage = 73 years). From high-speed digital images of phonation at a conversational frequency kymograms were created at 5 different levels of the vocal fold and were analyzed to determine the opening/closing longitudinal phase difference, open quotient, and speed index. Then age- and gender-related differences of these parameters were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Young women frequently showed a pattern of posterior-to-anterior glottal opening and anterior-to-posterior glottal closure, and older women demonstrated various opening and closing patterns. Both young men and older men were similar to older women. The open quotient was maximal at the most posterior glottal level in young women, but it tended to be maximal at the anterior glottis in the other subgroups. The mean value of the 5 open quotients was largest in young women. The mean speed index had a large negative value in older subjects. CONCLUSION This study provides the first information about age-related differences of longitudinal oscillatory characteristics of the vocal folds obtained with high-speed digital imaging. PMID:24686860

  16. Characteristics of vibrational wave propagation and attenuation in submarine fluid-filled pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Juan

    2015-04-01

    As an important part of lifeline engineering in the development and utilization of marine resources, the submarine fluid-filled pipeline is a complex coupling system which is subjected to both internal and external flow fields. By utilizing Kennard's shell equations and combining with Helmholtz equations of flow field, the coupling equations of submarine fluid-filled pipeline for n=0 axisymmetrical wave motion are set up. Analytical expressions of wave speed are obtained for both s=1 and s=2 waves, which correspond to a fluid-dominated wave and an axial shell wave, respectively. The numerical results for wave speed and wave attenuation are obtained and discussed subsequently. It shows that the frequency depends on phase velocity, and the attenuation of this mode depends strongly on material parameters of the pipe and the internal and the external fluid fields. The characteristics of PVC pipe are studied for a comparison. The effects of shell thickness/radius ratio and density of the contained fluid on the model are also discussed. The study provides a theoretical basis and helps to accurately predict the situation of submarine pipelines, which also has practical application prospect in the field of pipeline leakage detection.

  17. Vibration characteristics of Z-ring-stiffened 60 deg conical shell models of a planetary entry spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.; Mixon, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the vibration characteristics of a 60 deg conical shell model of a planetary entry vehicle is described and the results presented. Model configurations include the shell with or without one or two Z-ring stiffeners and with or without a simulated payload. Tests were conducted with the model clamped at the small diameter and with the model suspended at the simulated payload. Additionally, calculated results obtained from application of several analytical procedures reported in the literature are presented together with comparisons between experimental and calculated frequencies and meridional mode shapes. Generally, very good frequency agreement between experimental and calculated results was obtained for all model configurations. For small values of circumferential mode number, however, the frequency agreement decreased as the number of ring stiffeners increased. Overall agreement between experimental and calculated mode shapes was generally good. The calculated modes usually showed much larger curvatures in the vicinity of the rings than were observed in the experimentally measured mode shapes. Dual resonances associated with modal preference were noted for the shell without Z-ring stiffeners, whereas the addition of stiffeners produced resonances for which the model responded in two or more modes over different sections of the shell length.

  18. Experimental research on the response characteristics of PLZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. J.; Huang, J. H.; Wang, J.

    2015-07-01

    PLZT ceramics have exhibited promising applications as wireless photo-driven micro actuators for their direct conversion from optical energy to mechanical energy. However, the slow response of photodeformation and the residual photovoltage and deformation prevent PLZT ceramics from being employed as micro actuators, especially in the high frequency dynamic field. The primary purposes of this article are to analyze the response characteristics of PLZT ceramics and look for some measures to improve the response performance of the photo-induced deformation. To this end, this study observed the slow response, the residual photovoltage and deformation through photostrictive static experiments. Some measures proposed to accelerate the response speed and eliminate the residual photovoltage and deformation in this paper were experimentally confirmed. From these experiments, the hysteresis phenomenon caused by temperature rising, the residual photovoltage and photo-induced deformation after turning off the ultraviolet light are considered to be the main reasons for the slow response of photo-induced deformation. The experimental results indicate that reducing the effect of temperature elevation, ground connection and using another PLZT ceramic to eliminate the residual photovoltage and deformation are proven ways to improve the response performance of photo-induced deformation. On that basis, two optical driving mechanisms were proposed.

  19. The use of a digital computer for investigation of the dynamic characteristics of a man while pressing vertically downward with the straight arm on the handle of a vibrator (instrument)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zazhivikhina, A. I.; Rosin, G. S.; Ryzhov, Y. I.

    1973-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a man were investigated by the resonance method, by means of recordings of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of a vibrator straight arm human body system on a standard automatic recorder. Experiments were carried out with a specially constructed vibrator, the moving system of which was fastened to a bronze suspension with small losses. Vibrations of the handle, fastened to the moving system, were recorded with an accelerometer. The mass of the moving system m, rigidity of the suspension k and friction coefficient r of the vibrator (calibration) were determined by exact formulas.

  20. Investigation of Dynamic Force/Vibration Transmission Characteristics of Four-Square Type Gear Durability Test Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    In this study, design requirements for a dynamically viable, four-square type gear test machine are investigated. Variations of four-square type gear test machines have been in use for durability and dynamics testing of both parallel- and cross-axis gear set. The basic layout of these machines is illustrated. The test rig is formed by two gear pairs, of the same reduction ratio, a test gear pair and a reaction gear pair, connected to each other through shafts of certain torsional flexibility to form an efficient, closed-loop system. A desired level of constant torque is input to the circuit through mechanical (a split coupling with a torque arm) or hydraulic (a hydraulic actuator) means. The system is then driven at any desired speed by a small DC motor. The main task in hand is the isolation of the test gear pair from the reaction gear pair under dynamic conditions. Any disturbances originated at the reaction gear mesh might potentially travel to the test gearbox, altering the dynamic loading conditions of the test gear mesh, and hence, influencing the outcome of the durability or dynamics test. Therefore, a proper design of connecting structures becomes a major priority. Also, equally important is the issue of how close the operating speed of the machine is to the resonant frequencies of the gear meshes. This study focuses on a detailed analysis of the current NASA Glenn Research Center gear pitting test machine for evaluation of its resonance and vibration isolation characteristics. A number of these machines as the one illustrated has been used over last 30 years to establish an extensive database regarding the influence of the gear materials, processes surface treatments and lubricants on gear durability. This study is intended to guide an optimum design of next generation test machines for the most desirable dynamic characteristics.

  1. Contributions to the study of the characteristics of bearing noise and vibrations. [frequency spectra of ball and roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafitanu, M. D.; Popinceanu, N. G.; Radauceanu, D.; Oancea, I.

    1974-01-01

    Results of experimental research on the noise and vibrations of radial ball and roller bearings are reported. Analysis of the frequency spectra disclosed dependences among vibration and noise, load, rpm and cage material. Some peculiar aspects of the frequency spectrum are also mentioned.

  2. Characteristics of 10 mm Multilayer L1-F2 Mode Vibrator and Application to a Linear Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakubo, Tomoki; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2003-05-01

    In the present paper we discuss a small-sized multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator and its application to an ultrasonic linear motor. In an attempt to reduce both the size and the driving voltage of an L1-F2 mode vibrator, we constructed a multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator whose inner electrodes are simply divided into two. Test results clarified that the multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator exhibits two resonance modes; namely, a first longitudinal mode and a second flexural mode, and that an amplitude of vibration velocity is sufficiently large for application to a linear motor. Specific merits of our multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator are that the driving voltage is low (5 Vrms), owing to multilayer construction, and that the vibrator is small (10 2.5 2 mm: WHD), owing to the simple construction of the inner electrodes. Additionally, the present study revealed that an ultrasonic linear motor using the multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator exhibits superior performance in practical application.

  3. Vibration and buckling characteristics of functionally graded nanoplates subjected to thermal loading based on surface elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ashrafi, M. A.; Pourashraf, T.; Sahmani, S.

    2015-04-01

    The buckling and vibration responses of nanoplates made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to thermal loading are studied in prebuckling domain with considering the effect of surface stress. To accomplish this purpose, Gurtin-Murdoch elasticity theory is incorporated into the classical plate theory to develop a non-classical plate model including the surface effects. The material properties of FGM nanoplate are considered to be graded in the thickness direction on the basis of the power law function. Hamilton's principle is utilized to derive size-dependent governing differential equations of motion and associated boundary conditions. Selected numerical results are presented to indicate the importance of surface stress effect. It is revealed that in the presence of surface stress effect, the influence of material property gradient index on the critical thermal buckling load is more prominent for FGM nanoplates with lower length-to-thickness ratios. Also, by increasing the natural frequency of FGM nanoplate, the role of surface stress effect in the value of critical thermal buckling load is more prominent.

  4. An experimental study for determining human discomfort response to roll vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study using a passenger ride quality apparatus (PRQA) was conducted to determine the subjective reactions of passengers to roll vibrations. The data obtained illustrate the effect upon human comfort of several roll-vibration parameters: namely, roll acceleration level, roll frequency, and seat location (i.e., distance from axis of rotation). Results of an analysis of variance indicated that seat location had no effect on discomfort ratings of roll vibrations. The effect of roll acceleration level was significant, and discomfort ratings increased markedly with increasing roll acceleration level at all roll frequencies investigated. Of particular interest, is the fact that the relationship between discomfort ratings and roll acceleration level was linear in nature. The effect of roll frequency also was significant as was the interaction between roll acceleration level and roll frequency.

  5. Energy conservation in the transient response of nonlinear beam vibration problems subjected to pulse loading - A numerical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of a double cantilevered beam subjected to pulse loading over a central sector is studied. The initial response is generated in detail to ascertain the energetics of the response. The total energy is used as a gauge of the stability and accuracy of the solution. It is shown that to obtain accurate and stable initial solutions an extremely high spatial and time resolution is required. This requirement was only evident through an examination of the energy of the system. It is proposed, therefore, to use the total energy of the system as a necessary stability and accuracy criterion for the nonlinear response of conservative systems. The results also demonstrate that even for moderate nonlinearities, the effects of membrane forces have a significant influence on the system. It is also shown that while the fundamental response is contained in a first mode envelope, the fluctuations caused by the higher order modes must be resolved.

  6. Adaptive nonlinear vibration control of a Cartesian flexible manipulator driven by a ballscrew mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng

    2012-07-01

    A flexible Cartesian manipulator is a coupling system with a moving rigid body and flexible structures. Thus, vibration suppression problem must be solved to guarantee the stability and control accuracy. A characteristic model based nonlinear golden section adaptive control (CMNGSAC) algorithm is implemented to suppress the vibration of a flexible Cartesian smart material manipulator driven by a ballscrew mechanism using an AC servomotor. The system modeling is derived to recognize the dynamical characteristics. The closed loop stability is analyzed based on the model. Also, an experimental setup is constructed to verify the adopted method. Experimental comparison studies are conducted for modal frequencies' identification and active vibration control of the flexible manipulator. The active vibration control experiments include set-point vibration control responses, vibration suppression under resonant excitation and simultaneous translating and vibration suppression using different control methods. The experimental results demonstrate that the controller can suppress both the larger and the lower amplitude vibration near the equilibrium point effectively.

  7. Three-Dimensional Vibration Isolator for Suppressing High-Frequency Responses for Sage III Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Cutright, S.; Dyke, R.; Templeton, J.; Gasbarre, J.; Novak, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III - International Space Station (ISS) instrument will be used to study ozone, providing global, long-term measurements of key components of the Earth's atmosphere for the continued health of Earth and its inhabitants. SAGE III is launched into orbit in an inverted configuration on SpaceX;s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. As one of its four supporting elements, a Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP) mounted to the top panel of the Interface Adapter Module (IAM) box experiences high-frequency response due to structural coupling between the two structures during the SpaceX launch. These vibrations, which were initially observed in the IAM Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test and later verified through finite element analysis (FEA) for the SpaceX launch loads, may damage the internal electronic cards and the Thermoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance (TQCM) sensors mounted on the CMP. Three-dimensional (3D) vibration isolators were required to be inserted between the CMP and IAM interface in order to attenuate the high frequency vibrations without resulting in any major changes to the existing system. Wire rope isolators were proposed as the isolation system between the CMP and IAM due to the low impact to design. Most 3D isolation systems are designed for compression and roll, therefore little dynamic data was available for using wire rope isolators in an inverted or tension configuration. From the isolator FEA and test results, it is shown that by using the 3D wire rope isolators, the CMP high-frequency responses have been suppressed by several orders of magnitude over a wide excitation frequency range. Consequently, the TQCM sensor responses are well below their qualification environments. It is indicated that these high-frequency responses due to the typical instrument structural coupling can be significantly suppressed by a vibration passive control using the 3D vibration isolator. Thermal and contamination issues were also examined during the isolator selection period for meeting the SAGE III-ISS instrument requirements.

  8. Responses of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to conspecific vibrational signals and synthetic mimics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mate-seeking in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, a vector of the economically damaging huanglongbing citrus disease, typically includes male-female duetting behaviors. First, the male calls by beating its wings at ca. 170-250 Hz, producing vibrations that are transmitted along the host tree branches to th...

  9. The Effect of Vibration on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Regiane Luz; Almeida, Gil Lucio

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of proprioception in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effect of vibration on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle, knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group-CG) and eight individuals with Down syndrome (DS) while balancing on

  10. Nonlocal elasticity based magnetic field affected vibration response of double single-walled carbon nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, T.; McCarthy, M. A.; Adhikari, S.

    2012-06-01

    The behaviour of carbon nanotubes in a magnetic field has attracted considerable attention in the scientific community. This paper reports the effects of a longitudinal magnetic field on the vibration of a magnetically sensitive double single-walled carbon nanotube system (DSWNTS). The two nanotubes of the DSWNTS are coupled by an elastic medium. The dynamical equations of the DSWNTS are derived using nonlocal elasticity theory. The two nanotubes are defined as an equivalent nonlocal double-Euler-Bernoulli beam system. Governing equations for nonlocal bending-vibration of the DSWNTS under a longitudinal magnetic field are derived considering the Lorentz magnetic force obtained from Maxwell's relation. An analytical method is proposed to obtain nonlocal natural frequencies of the DSWNTS. The influence of (i) nanoscale effects and (ii) strength of longitudinal magnetic field on the synchronous and asynchronous vibration phase of the DSWNTS is examined. Nonlocal effects with and without the effect of magnetic field are illustrated. Results reveal the difference (quantitatively) by which the longitudinal magnetic field affects the nonlocal frequency in the synchronous and asynchronous vibration modes of a DSWNTS.

  11. The Effect of Vibration on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Regiane Luz; Almeida, Gil Lucio

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of proprioception in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effect of vibration on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle, knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group-CG) and eight individuals with Down syndrome (DS) while balancing on…

  12. The dynamic response characteristics of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Gilchrist, Michael D; Brien, Susan; Cusimano, Michael; Marshall, Shawn

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Research has been undertaken in order to better understand the characteristics of the injury event and measure the risk of injury to develop more effective environmental, technological, and clinical management strategies. This research used methods that have limited applications to predicting human responses. This limits the current understanding of the mechanisms of TBI in humans. As a result, the purpose of this research was to examine the characteristics of impact and dynamic response that leads to a high risk of sustaining a TBI in a human population. Twenty TBI events collected from hospital reports and eyewitness accounts were reconstructed in the laboratory using a combination of computational mechanics models and Hybrid III anthropometric dummy systems. All cases were falls, with an average impact velocity of approximately 4.0m/s onto hard impact surfaces. The results of the methodology were consistent with current TBI research, describing TBI to occur in the range of 335-445g linear accelerations and 23.7-51.2krad/s(2) angular accelerations. More significantly, this research demonstrated that lower responses in the antero-posterior direction can cause TBI, with lateral impact responses requiring larger magnitudes for the same types of brain lesions. This suggests an increased likelihood of sustaining TBI for impacts to the front or back of the head, a result that has implications affecting current understanding of the mechanisms of TBI and associated threshold parameters. PMID:25795923

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation in photoactive yellow protein and green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Leitner, David

    2012-02-01

    The first step in the photocycle of many proteins involves conformational change of a chromophore or a charge transfer reaction following photoexcitation. To explore the response of the protein and solvent environment to photoexcitation of the chromophore in photoactive yellow protein (PYP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation (VER) from the chromophore to the protein and solvent. In PYP the time scale of the protein response, mainly contributed by Tyr42 and Glu46, to photoexcitation appears prominently between 0.1 and 0.3 picoseconds. The frequency-dependent VER rate also reveals dynamic coupling between the chromophore and residues that hydrogen bond to it. Resonances in the VER rate appear at frequencies comparable to the oscillations observed in recent fluorescence decay studies. In GFP, which undergoes excited state proton transfer about 10 ps following photoexcitation that may be assisted by specific chromophore vibrations, both the protein and water molecules inside the β-barrel surrounding the chromophore mediate the dielectric response.

  14. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  15. Sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers for low-mid frequencies vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardonio, P.; Zilletti, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation study concerning the low-mid frequencies control of flexural vibration in a lightly damped thin plate, which is equipped with three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers and is excited by a rain on the roof broad frequency band stationary disturbance. The sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are semi-active mass-spring-dashpot systems whose stiffness and damping properties can be varied uniformly within given ranges. They are operated in such a way as their characteristic natural frequencies are continuously varied to control the response of flexural modes that resonate within given frequency bands. More specifically, in this study the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are operated asynchronously, each within one of three sequential frequency bands comprised between 20 and 120, 120 and 220, 220 and 320 Hz. The flexural vibration control effects produced by the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are compared to those produced by three classical tuneable vibration absorbers, each set to control the response of a specific flexural mode of the plate resonating in one of these three frequency bands. The study shows that the proposed sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers outperform the classical tuneable vibration absorbers and produce about 6, 5, 4 dB reduction of the plate overall flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation. Also, the study indicates that the sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are robust to variations in the plate flexural response. For instance they still produce about 5.1, 5.3, 4.6 dB reductions of the flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation when the plate is tensioned such that the flexural natural frequencies are shifted up from about 40 percent, for the first resonance, to 7 percent, for the tenth resonance.

  16. EMG and Heart Rate Responses Decline within 5 Days of Daily Whole-Body Vibration Training with Squatting

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, André; Liphardt, Anna-Maria; Bargmann, Arne; Müller, Klaus; Beck, Luis; Mester, Joachim; Zange, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the acute effects of a 5-day daily whole-body vibration (WBV) training on electromyography (EMG) responses of the m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius lateralis, heart rate (HR, continuously recorded), and blood lactate levels. The purpose of the study was to investigate the adaptation of muscle activity, heart rate and blood lactate levels during 5 days of daily training. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either squat exercises with vibration at 20 Hz on a side alternating platform (SE+V, n = 20, age  = 31.9±7.5 yrs., height  = 178.8±6.2 cm, body mass  = 79.2±11.4 kg) or squat exercises alone (SE, n = 21, age  = 28.4±7.3 years, height  = 178.9±7.4 cm, body mass  = 77.2±9.7 kg). On training day 1, EMG amplitudes of the m. rectus femoris were significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant on training days 3 and 5. The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days. On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05). On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different. The specific physiological responses to WBV were largest on the initial training day and most of them declined during subsequent training days, showing a rapid neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptation to the vibration stimulus. PMID:24905721

  17. Vibration analysis and transient response of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Ye, Tiangui

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a unified solution for free and transient vibration analyses of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The formulation is derived by means of the variational principle in conjunction with a modified Fourier series which consists of standard Fourier cosine series and supplemented functions. The mechanical and electrical properties of functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPMs) are assumed to vary continuously in the thickness direction and are estimated by Voigt’s rule of mixture. The convergence, accuracy and reliability of the present formulation are demonstrated by comparing the present solutions with those from the literature and finite element analysis. Numerous results for FGPM beams with different boundary conditions, geometrical parameters as well as material distributions are given. Moreover, forced vibration of the FGPM beams subjected to dynamic loads and general boundary conditions are also investigated.

  18. Quasi-Static and Dynamic Response Characteristics of F-4 Bias-Ply and Radial-Belted Main Gear Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics of F-4 military fighter 30x11.5-14.5/26PR bias-ply and radial-belted main gear tires. Tire properties were measured by the application of vertical, lateral, and fore-and-aft loads. Mass moment-of-inertia data were also obtained. The results of the study include quasi-static load-deflection curves, free-vibration time-history plots, energy loss associated with hysteresis, stiffness and damping characteristics, footprint geometry, and inertia properties of each type of tire. The difference between bias-ply and radial-belted tire construction is given, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each tire design. Three simple damping models representing viscous, structural, and Coulomb friction are presented and compared with the experimental data. The conclusions discussed contain a summary of test observations.

  19. Maternal characteristics influence response to DHA during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gould, J F; Anderson, A J; Yelland, L N; Gibson, R A; Makrides, M

    2016-05-01

    We explored the degree to which maternal and offspring outcomes resulting from consuming prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 800mg/day) in a clinical trial were influenced by maternal characteristics. Among non-smokers, women who received DHA had heavier babies (adjusted mean difference (MD)=99g 95% CI 45-153, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01) and fewer low birth weight babies than control women (adjusted relative risk=0.43 95% CI 0.25-0.74, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01). From women who had not completed further education, children in the DHA group had higher cognitive scores at 18 months compared with control children (adjusted MD=3.15 95% CI 0.93-5.37, p=0.01; interaction p<0.01). Conversely, the children of women who completed further education in the DHA group had lower language scores than control children (adjusted MD -2.82 95% CI -4.90 to -0.73, p=0.01; interaction p=0.04). Our results support the notion that responsiveness to prenatal DHA may depend on the characteristics of specific population subgroups. PMID:27154359

  20. Management of the variability of vibration response levels in mistuned bladed discs using robust design concepts. Part 2. Tolerance design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y.-J.; Ewins, D. J.

    2010-11-01

    The mistuning pattern on a bladed disc is controlled in Part 2 of the two-part article either by (i) imposing a small maximum allowable mistune according to the small mistuning approach or (ii) incorporating non-identical blades of specific patterns, known as the intentional mistuning approach. These approaches resemble the tolerance design stage of the Taguchi method of robust design. The first-order maximum amplification factor sensitivity in a single-degree-of-freedom (DOF)-per-sector system is derived to support a new definition of the interblade coupling ratio and to illustrate the dependence of the maximum amplification factor sensitivity on design parameters of a bladed disc. It is found that the variability of the forced vibration response levels in flexible bladed discs can be reduced by controlling the degree of mistune within realistic levels. The potential of a "linear" mistuning pattern to become an effective intentional mistuning pattern is evaluated by observing the amplification factors of bladed discs with combined intentional mistuning and additional random mistuning. A tool based on the importance sampling method is used to reduce the computational effort in determining the magnitude of intentional mistuning. Guidelines of designing bladed discs with a lower variability of forced vibration response levels are given according to the findings in casting the blade mistuning problem as a robust design problem.

  1. Dynamic responses and vibration control of the transmission tower-line system: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  2. Dynamic Responses and Vibration Control of the Transmission Tower-Line System: A State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  3. Analysis of vibration waveforms of electromechanical response to determine piezoelectric and electrostrictive coefficients.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Manabu; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2012-08-01

    We developed a possible method to determine both coefficients of piezoelectricity (d) and electrostriction (M) at the same time by a waveform analysis of current and vibration velocity in the resonance state. The waveforms of the current and vibration velocity were theoretically described using the equations of motion and piezoelectric constitutive equations, considering the dissipation effect. The dissipation factor of the d coefficient and M coefficient is dielectric loss tangent tan δ. The waveforms measured in all of the ceramics, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O(3) (PZT), Pb(Mg,Nb)O(3) (PMN), and 0.8Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb2/3)O(3)-0.2PbTiO(3) (PMN-PT), were well fitted with the calculated waveform. This fitting produced both the d and M coefficients, which agreed with those determined via the conventional methods. Moreover, the respective contributions of both piezoelectricity and electrostriction to the d value determined in the resonance-antiresonance method were clarified. PMID:22899111

  4. Study of start-up vibration response for oil whirl, oil whip and dry whip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chen-Chao; Syu, Jhe-Wei; Pan, Min-Chun; Tsao, Wen-Chang

    2011-11-01

    Oil whip induces self-excited vibration in fluid-handling machines and causes self-excited reverse precessional full annular rub, known as "dry whip", which is a secondary phenomenon resulting from a primary cause, that is, "coexistence of oil whip and dry whip". For predicting these instabilities, the clues are hidden in start-up vibration signals of these kinds of machines. This paper presents a method for predicting these kinds of instabilities. First, a Hilbert spectrum combining a full spectrum, which is named the "full Hilbert spectrum", is developed to reveal the whole process. Next, the transient position of a shaft centerline combining an acceptance region is introduced to predict instability at an early stage. The results presented in this study amply demonstrate the transition from stability to instability and the behavior of fluid-induced instability and rub in rotor systems. By this finding, bearing designers can completely understand these instability phenomena existing in fluid-handling machines. As a result, the control parameter for designing controllable bearings can be obtained and the instability problems can be resolved. Consequently, these findings are worth noting.

  5. Experimental IR and Raman spectra and quantum chemical studies of molecular structures, conformers and vibrational characteristics of L-ascorbic acid and its anion and cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. A.; Rani, P.; Kumar, M.; Singh, R.; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, N. P.

    2011-12-01

    IR and spectra of the L-ascorbic acid ( L-AA) also known as vitamin C have been recorded in the region 4000-50 cm -1. In order to make vibrational assignments of the observed IR and Raman bands computations were carried out by employing the RHF and DFT methods to calculate the molecular geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies along with other related parameters for the neutral L-AA and its singly charged anionic ( L-AA -) and cationic ( L-AA +) species. Significant changes have been found for different characteristics of a number of vibrational modes. The four ν(O-H) modes of the L-AA molecule are found in the order ν(O 9-H 10) > ν(O 19-H 20) > ν(O 7-H 8) > ν(O 14-H 15) which could be due to complexity of hydrogen bonding in the lactone ring and the side chain. The C dbnd O stretching wavenumber ( ν46) decreases by 151 cm -1 in going from the neutral to the anionic species whereas it increases by 151 cm -1 in going from the anionic to the cationic species. The anionic radicals have less kinetic stabilities and high chemical reactivity as compared to the neutral molecule. It is found that the cationic radical of L-AA is kinetically least stable and chemically most reactive as compared to its neutral and anionic species.

  6. Nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolator with cam-roller-spring mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiaxi; Wang, Xinlong; Xu, Daolin; Bishop, Steve

    2015-06-01

    The property of quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) of vibration isolation system (VIS) could be realized by using the conceptual design of cam-roller-spring mechanisms (CRSMs). We develop this idea into a physical prototype and study its vibration isolation performance. A piecewise nonlinear dynamic model is formulated in the consideration of possible disengagement between the cam and roller. The analytical solution of the amplitude-frequency relationship is derived by using the averaging method and further verified by numerical simulations. The effects of excitation force and system damping on the force transmissibility are investigated. A particular behavior of this type of QZS isolator, very differ from existing ones, is that the peak transmissibility and starting frequency of isolation never overshoots those of the linear counterpart no matter how large the excitation amplitude is. The prototype is tested and the experimental results show that the QZS isolator outperforms the linear counterpart.

  7. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  8. Review and Evaluation of Hand-Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Sinsel, Erik W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-09-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  9. Spectral response of crystalline acetanilide and N -methylacetamide: Vibrational self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, Julian; Hamm, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to compare the spectral response of the amide I band and the NH-stretching band of acetanilide (ACN) and N -methylacetamide (NMA), as well as their deuterated derivatives. Both molecules form hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals that are regarded to be model systems for polypeptides and proteins. The amide I bands of both ACN and NMA show a temperature-dependent sideband, while the NH bands are accompanied by a sequence of equidistantly spaced satellite peaks. These spectral anomalies are interpreted as a signature of vibrational self-trapping. Two different types of states can be identified in both crystals in the pump-probe signal: a delocalized free-exciton state and a set of localized self-trapped states. The phonons that mediate self-trapping in ACN and deuterated ACN are identified by their temperature dependence, confirming our previous results. The study shows that the substructure of the NH band in NMA (amide A and amide B bands) originates, at least partly, from vibrational self-trapping and not, as often assumed, from a Fermi resonance.

  10. Experimental damage detection of cracked beams by using nonlinear characteristics of forced response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreaus, U.; Baragatti, P.

    2012-08-01

    Experimental evaluation of the flexural forced vibrations of a steel cantilever beam having a transverse surface crack extending uniformly along the width of the beam was performed, where an actual fatigue crack was introduced instead - as usual - of a narrow slot. The nonlinear aspects of the dynamic response of the beam under harmonic excitation were considered and the relevant quantitative parameters were evaluated, in order to relate the nonlinear resonances to the presence and size of the crack. To this end, the existence of sub- and super-harmonic components in the Fourier spectra of the acceleration signals was evidenced, and their amplitudes were quantified. In particular, the acceleration signals were measured in different positions along the beam axis and under different forcing levels at the beam tip. The remarkable relevance of the above mentioned nonlinear characteristics, and their substantial independence on force magnitude and measurement point were worthily noted in comparison with the behavior of the intact beam. Thus, a reliable method of damage detection was proposed which was based on simple tests requiring only harmonically forcing and acceleration measuring in any point non-necessarily near the crack. Then, the time-history of the acceleration recorded at the beam tip was numerically processed in order to obtain the time-histories of velocity and displacement. The nonlinear features of the forced response were described and given a physical interpretation in order to define parameters suitable for damage detection. The efficiency of such parameters was discussed with respect to the their capability of detecting damage and a procedure for damage detection was proposed which was able to detect even small cracks by using simple instruments. A finite element model of the cantilever beam was finally assembled and tuned in order to numerically simulate the results of the experimental tests.

  11. Nonlinear forced vibration response of smart two-phase nano-composite beams to external harmonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareishi, Soraya; Kalhori, Hamed; Rafiee, Mohammad; Hosseini, Seyedeh Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for nonlinear free and forced vibration response of smart laminated nano-composite beams resting on nonlinear elastic foundation and under external harmonic excitation. The structure is under a temperature change and an electric excitation through the piezoelectric layers. Different distribution patterns of the single walled aligned and straight carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the thickness of the beam are considered. The beam complies with Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and von Kármán geometric nonlinearity. The nonlinearity is due to the mid-plane stretching of the beam and the nonlinear stiffness of the elastic foundation. The Multiple Time Scales perturbation scheme is used to perform the nonlinear dynamical analysis of functionally graded carbon nanotube-reinforced beams. Analytical expressions of the nonlinear natural frequencies, nonlinear dynamic response and frequency response of the system in the case of primary resonance have been presented. The effects of different parameters including applied voltage, temperature change, beam geometry, the volume fraction and distribution pattern of the carbon nanotubes on the nonlinear natural frequencies and frequency-response curves are presented. It is found that the volume fractions of SWCNTs as well as their distribution pattern significantly change the behavior of the system.

  12. Re-evaluation of the absolute threshold and response mode of the most sensitive known "vibration" detector, the cockroach's subgenual organ: a cochlea-like displacement threshold and a direct response to sound.

    PubMed

    Shaw, S R

    1994-09-01

    Earlier accounts claim from indirect measurements that the subgenual organ (SGO) in the proximal tibia of the cockroach leg can detect vibrational displacements down to 0.002 nm, two orders of magnitude below the threshold for vertebrate hair cells in the cochlea. The SGO vibration threshold is redetermined here more directly by a new method on a cantilever beam, while controlling for particular acoustic and vibrational artifacts that might have compromised earlier efforts. The threshold is revised upwards to about 0.2 nm in the most sensitive preparation, about the same as the cochlea. Recently, it has been determined that the cockroach SGO also has an auditory response, and the data here on subthreshold summation and response-intensity relationships provide further evidence that sound and contact vibration are both sensed by the same receptor neurons. Direct measurements rule out the prevailing hypothesis that sound is detected indirectly as induced vibration of the ground, and also weigh strongly against any significant involvement of generalized leg resonance in acoustic pick-up. The results fit with a recent proposal that the auditory response is direct, and that acoustic fluctuations inside the tracheae may be the primary response mode in the transduction of both vibration and sound. PMID:7815071

  13. Experimental investigation of the vibrational and thermal response of a laser spark plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Gregory S.

    A study was conducted in order to evaluate the external thermal and vibrational effects on the operation of a laser ignition system for internal combustion (IC) engine applications. West Virginia University (WVU) in conjunction with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have constructed a prototype laser spark plug which has been designed to mount directly onto the head of a natural gas engine for the purpose of igniting an air/fuel (A/F) mixture in the engine's combustion chamber. To be considered as a viable replacement for the conventional electrode-based ignition system, integrity, durability and reliability must be justified. Thermal and oscillatory perturbations induced upon the ignition system are major influences that affect laser spark plug (LSP) operation and, therefore, quantifying these effects is necessary to further the advancement and development of this technology. The passively q-switched Nd:YAG laser was mounted on Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) Vibration Exciter Type 4808 Shaker in conjunction with at B&K Power Amplifier Type 2719, which was oscillated in 10 Hz intervals from 0 to 60 Hz using a sine wave to mimic natural gas engine operation. The input signal simulated the rotational velocity of the engine operating from 0 to 3600 RPM with the laser mounted in three different axial orientations. The laser assembly was wrapped with medium-temperature heat tape, outfitted with thermocouples and heated from room temperature to 140 ºF to simulate the temperatures that the LSP may experience when installed on an engine. The acceleration of the payload was varied between 50% and 100% of the oscillator's maximum allowable acceleration in each mounting orientation resulting in a total of 294 total setpoints. For each setpoint, pulse width, pulse width variation, q-switch delay, jitter and output energy were measured and recorded. Each of these dependent variables plays a critical role in multi photon ionization and precise control is necessary to limit the variability of these key parameters. Under the influence of thermal and oscillatory perturbations, the q-switch delay of the laser was found to vary significantly. For application on an IC engine, such variation in qswitch delay would result in an ignition timing variation by as much as +/-4.6 crank angle (CA) degrees in the most extreme setpoint on a cycle-to-cycle basis. Every setpoint tested was calculated to be capable of generating a plasma spark in air (>100 GW/cm2), however the resulting focal intensity was found to vary by as much as +/-13 GW/cm2.

  14. Estimates of site response based on spectral ratio between horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibrations in the source zone of 2001 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Thulasiraman; Rajendran, Kusala

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the site response characteristics of Kachchh rift basin over the meizoseismal area of the 2001, Mw 7.6, Bhuj (NW India) earthquake using the spectral ratio of the horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibrations. Using the available knowledge on the regional geology of Kachchh and well documented ground responses from the earthquake, we evaluated the H/V curves pattern across sediment filled valleys and uplifted areas generally characterized by weathered sandstones. Although our H/V curves showed a largely fuzzy nature, we found that the hierarchical clustering method was useful for comparing large numbers of response curves and identifying the areas with similar responses. Broad and plateau shaped peaks of a cluster of curves within the valley region suggests the possibility of basin effects within valley. Fundamental resonance frequencies (f0) are found in the narrow range of 0.1-2.3 Hz and their spatial distribution demarcated the uplifted regions from the valleys. In contrary, low H/V peak amplitudes (A0 = 2-4) were observed on the uplifted areas and varying values (2-9) were found within valleys. Compared to the amplification factors, the liquefaction indices (kg) were able to effectively indicate the areas which experienced severe liquefaction. The amplification ranges obtained in the current study were found to be comparable to those obtained from earthquake data for a limited number of seismic stations located on uplifted areas; however the values on the valley region may not reflect their true amplification potential due to basin effects. Our study highlights the practical usefulness as well as limitations of the H/V method to study complex geological settings as Kachchh.

  15. NIST torsion oscillator viscometer response: Performance on the LeRC active vibration isolation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1992-01-01

    Critical point viscosity measurements are limited to their reduced temperature approach to T(sub c) in an Earth bound system, because of density gradients imposed by gravity. Therefore, these classes of experiments have been proposed as good candidates for 'microgravity' science experiments where this limitation is not present. The nature of these viscosity measurements dictate hardware that is sensitive to low frequency excitations. Because of the vibratory acceleration sensitivity of a torsion oscillator viscometer, used to acquire such measurements, a vibration isolation sensitivity test was performed on candidate 'microgravity' hardware to study the possibility of meeting the stringent oscillatory sensitivity requirements of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) torsion oscillator viscometer. A prototype six degree of freedom active magnetic isolation system, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used as the isolation system. The ambient acceleration levels of the platform were reduced to the noise floor levels of its control sensors, about one microgravity in the 0.1 to 10 Hz bandwidth.

  16. Research on relation between bending stress and characteristic frequency of H-shaped beam by free vibration deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2014-05-27

    In order to investigate a relation between a bending stress and a characteristic frequency of a beam, 4-point loading which had constant moment region was conducted to a beam with H shape configuration experimentally and numerically. H-shaped beam has many characteristic deformation modes. Axial tensile stress in the beam made its characteristic frequency higher, and compressive stress lower. In the experiment, some characteristic frequencies got higher by a bending stress, and the others stayed in a small frequency fluctuation. The distinction is anticipated as a capability to measure a bending stress of a beam by its characteristic frequencies.

  17. Psycho-vibratory evaluation of timber floors - Towards the determination of design indicators of vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreira, J.; Trollé, A.; Jarnerö, K.; Sjökvist, L.-G.; Bard, D.

    2015-03-01

    In timber housing constructions, vibrations can be a nuisance for inhabitants. Notably, the vibrational response of wooden floor systems is an issue in need of being dealt with more adequately in the designing of such buildings. Studies addressing human response to vibrations are needed in order to be able to better estimate what level of vibrations in dwellings can be seen as acceptable. In the present study, measurements on five different wooden floors were performed in a laboratory environment at two locations in Sweden (SP in Växjö and LU in Lund). Acceleration measurements were carried out while a person either was walking on a particular floor or was seated in a chair placed there as the test leader was walking on the floor. These participants filled out a questionnaire regarding their perception and experiencing of the vibrations in question. Independently of the subjective tests, several static and dynamic characteristics of the floors were determined through measurements. The ultimate aim was to develop indicators of human response to floor vibrations, specifically those regarding vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance, their being drawn based on relationships between the questionnaire responses obtained and the parameter values determined on the basis of the measurements carried out. To that end, use was made of multilevel regression. Although the sample of floors tested was small, certain clear trends could be noted. The first eigenfrequency (calculated in accordance with Eurocode 5) and Hu and Chui's criterion (calculated from measured quantities) proved to be the best indicators of vibration annoyance, and the Maximum Transient Vibration Value (computed on the basis of the accelerations experienced by the test subjects) to be the best indicator of vibration acceptability.

  18. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  19. Lateral vibration of hydro turbine-generator rotor with varying stiffness of guide bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. D.; Liao, G. L.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, X.; Gou, Q. Q.; Zhang, W. B.

    2012-11-01

    The rotor consisted of rotating components and origin of energy transfer is the source of all vibrations in a hydro turbine generator unit. Among all vibration modes, the lateral mode is of the greatest concern. A lateral vibration response calculation model for rotor-bearing system with the nonlinear characteristics of the guide bearing's stiffness is presented in this paper. The model for hydro-generator rotor combines finite element model with the varying guide bearing's stiffness, the gyroscopic effect, unbalanced magnetic pull, hydraulic force and mechanical forces to calculate natural frequencies and steady state response. Take Francis turbine unit with three guide bearings for an example, the unit's lateral vibration characteristics and response of rotating components had been simulated by using FEM. The lateral vibration characteristics and response amplitude at rotating parts had been analyzed by varying stiffness simultaneously or one of the three guide bearings based on the assumption of elastic supporting models, and the influence of rotating speed, phase difference between the unbalanced forces on the vibration response had also been analyzed by the simplified analysis at the designed guide bearing stiffness. It shows that accounting for bearing stiffness and support structure flexibility, and then understanding the resulting in vibration behavior is an important factor in enhancing the stability of a hydro turbine generator rotor. The simulation results show that, for a vertical-mounted hydro turbine generator unit, there exists a common characteristic in the first three vibration mode, that is, the maximum amplitude is at the exciter in the first vibration mode and at the runner in the second vibration mode respectively, and the maximum amplitude is near the exciter or rotor in the third vibration mode. These results have great significance for the optimization design of the supporting structure of a hydro turbine generator unit.

  20. Investigation of residual stress and its effects on the vibrational characteristics of piezoelectric-based multilayered microdiaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olfatnia, M.; Xu, T.; Ong, L. S.; Miao, J. M.; Wang, Z. H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, residual stress influences on the vibrational behavior of piezoelectric circular microdiaphragm-based biosensors are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The piezoelectric microdiaphragm was first fabricated by combining sol-gel PZT thin film and MEMS technology. The stress measurements by the wafer curvature method and the micro-Raman technique demonstrate that high tensile stresses are generated in the upper films (Pt/PZT/Pt), while the silicon oxide layer experiences a compressive stress. After backside etching of the microdiaphragm, the suspended membrane method was used to measure the average stress and equivalent Young's modulus of the diaphragm, which were 96 MPa and 106.4 GPa, respectively. The dynamic behavior of the fabricated sensor under this stress was then investigated. A comprehensive mechanics model based on vibration modes is presented and the natural frequencies of the diaphragm are obtained. A nondimensional tension parameter is defined, and effects of this parameter on the resonant frequency of the diaphragm are presented. It was concluded that both flexural rigidity and tension contribute to the resonant frequency of the diaphragm sensor. Finally, the resonant frequencies of the fabricated sensor were measured by impedance analysis and laser vibrometry techniques. These frequencies were compared with their theoretical counterparts and a good agreement was observed.

  1. Comparative vibration environments of transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Measured vibration data are presented for a number of air and surface vehicles. Consideration is given to the importance of direction effects; of vehicle operating modes such as takeoff, cruise, and landing; and of measurement location on the level and frequency of the measurements. Various physical measurement units or descriptors are used to quantify and compare the data. Results suggest the range of vibration associated with a particular mode of transportation and illustrate the comparative levels in terms of each of the descriptors. Collectively, the results form a data base which may be useful in assessing the ride of existing or future systems relative to vehicles in current operation. In addition, subjective response data obtained from vibration simulator studies are presented to illustrate human response characteristics as well as to indicate a laboratory approach for the development of ride-quality criteria.

  2. Unsteady pressure response of a liquid in a cylindrical container subject to vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    1988-05-01

    Experimental results on the pressure response, surface wave motion, and container wall response of liquid in a cylindrical container subject to high-frequency vertical oscillations are presented. The amplitude of pressure was found to increase exponentially with time when the excitation acceleration exceeded a threshold value. The pressure amplitude maximum decreased with increasing excitation acceleration. The present results can be explained by the wave velocity of the liquid-bubble-shell system approaching the resonant velocity as the void fraction increases.

  3. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  4. Power-Generation Characteristics After Vibration and Thermal Stresses of Thermoelectric Unicouples with CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kwang Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok; Kim, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Lee, Soonil; Hwang, Hae Jin

    2015-06-01

    Reliability tests for thermoelectric unicouples were carried out to investigate the adhesion properties of CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces. The n-type In0.25 Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 and p-type In0.25Co3FeSb12 bulks were prepared for fabricating a thermoelectric unicouple (one p- n couple) by an induction melting and a spark plasma sintering process. Mo-Cu alloy was selected as an electrode for the unicouples due to its high melting temperature and proper work function value. Many thermoelectric unicouples with the CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces were fabricated with the proper brazing materials by means of a repeated firing process. Reliability of the unicouples with the interfaces was evaluated by a vibration test and a thermal cycling test. After the thermal cycling and vibration tests, the power-generation characteristics of the unicouples were compared with the unicouples before the tests. Even after the vibration test, electrical power with a power density of 0.5 W/cm2 was generated. The Ti-interlayer is considered as a possible candidate for making a reliable unicouple with high adhesion strength. With the thermal cycling test, the resistance of the unicouple increased and the electrical power from the unicouple decreased. A failure mode by the thermal cycling test was ascribed to a complex effect of micro-cracks originated from the thermal stress and oxidation problem of the thermoelectric materials; that is, a thick oxide layer more than 300 μm was detected after a high-temperature durability test of n-type In0.25Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 material at 773 K in air for 7 days.

  5. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  6. Road condition evaluation using the vibration response of ordinary vehicles and synchronously recorded movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tomonori; Miyajima, Akira; Kimura, Shunya; Shimada, Yuuki; Fujino, Yozo

    2013-04-01

    Frequent and quantitative assessment of road condition is important as the maintenance of the road infrastructure needs to be performed with a limited budget. Vehicle Intelligent Monitoring System (VIMS) has been developed to estimate an index of road ride comfort (International Roughness Index; IRI) by obtaining the acceleration responses of ordinary vehicles together with GPS position data. VIMS converts the vertical acceleration of the measurement vehicle to acceleration RMS of the sprung mass of the standard Quarter Car model, and then to IRI using an approximate expression. By driving over a hump of a known profile and comparing the responses with Quarter Car simulation responses, a variety of vehicles can be calibrated; a non-linear quarter car model equivalent to the vehicle is identified. By performing numerical simulation using the nonlinear vehicle model, the difference in driving speed can also be calibrated. The measurement results can be exported to maps to comprehend road condition in a geographical view and to other data base systems. In addition, smartphones which can record motions, GPS data, and movies synchronously are utilized to improve VIMS. Because practical installation locations of smartphones are limited and because angular velocity responses are less subjective to difference in installation locations, VIMS is extended to utilize the pitching angular velocity. Furthermore, high frequency components of acceleration responses are analyzed to distinguish local pavement damages or joints from rough road sections. The examination of synchronously recorded movies confirmed the capability to distinguish the local conditions.

  7. Exploring Modeling Options and Conversion of Average Response to Appropriate Vibration Envelopes for a Typical Cylindrical Vehicle Panel with Rib-stiffened Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Phil; LaVerde, Bruce; Teague, David

    2009-01-01

    Although applications for Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) techniques are more widely used in the aerospace industry today, opportunities to anchor the response predictions using measured data from a flight-like launch vehicle structure are still quite valuable. Response and excitation data from a ground acoustic test at the Marshall Space Flight Center permitted the authors to compare and evaluate several modeling techniques available in the SEA module of the commercial code VA One. This paper provides an example of vibration response estimates developed using different modeling approaches to both approximate and bound the response of a flight-like vehicle panel. Since both vibration response and acoustic levels near the panel were available from the ground test, the evaluation provided an opportunity to learn how well the different modeling options can match band-averaged spectra developed from the test data. Additional work was performed to understand the spatial averaging of the measurements across the panel from measured data. Finally an evaluation/comparison of two conversion approaches from the statistical average response results that are output from an SEA analysis to a more useful envelope of response spectra appropriate to specify design and test vibration levels for a new vehicle.

  8. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  9. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at NASA Lewis. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. Transient and steady-state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single-mesh-gear noise test rig are modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  10. Secondary Periodicity in the Structural and Vibrational Characteristics of 3,3-DIMETHYLCYCLOPROPENES - and Monosubstituted by -X{(CH_3)}_3 (x = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Abramenkov, A. V.; de Maré, G. R.

    2009-06-01

    The regularities of changes in the structural parameters and vibrational wavenumbers have been traced for certain moieties of the title compounds. The optimized geometrical parameters and the force fields of disubstituted 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenes and monosubstituted 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenes were determined at the HF/3-21G* and DDAll levels, respectively. The choice of these theoretical levels was brought about by peculiarities of GAUSSIAN 03 suite of programs for Sn and Pb atoms. The theoretical vibrational wavenumbers were calculated from the corresponding scaled force fields. The regularities obtained in the form of the zigzag lines are analogous to regularities that are characteristic to the atoms of the 14 (IVA) group of the Mendeleyev Periodic Table. This is known as the secondary periodicity phenomenon. Yu. N. Panchenko, G. R. De Maré, A. V. Abramenkov, and A. de Meijere, Spectrochim. Acta 65A, 575 (2006). G. R. De Maré, Yu. N. Panchenko, and A. V. Abramenkov, Spectrochim. Acta 67A, 1094 (2007).

  11. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  12. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  13. Semiclassical description of the nonlinear response of self-trapped vibrational excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woutersen, Sander

    2007-06-01

    A simple description of the nonlinear response of self-trapped NH-stretch excitations is obtained by treating the NH-stretch modes as quantized, but the hydrogen bonds as classical modes. This approach provides both an intuitive picture of the self-trapping dynamics and a semiquantitative description of the experimentally observed transient-absorption spectrum.

  14. LINKING WITHIN-FIELD CROP RESPONSE WITH SOIL CHARACTERISTICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management zones for precision farming can be determined by identifying areas where soil, water, and management factors result in similar crop responses. Given the spatial distribution of LAI of a field, factors determining response patterns may be obtained via inversion of a model linking environme...

  15. Earthquake Response Analysis of Buildings at The Union Territory of Chandigarh, India, by using Building Vibration Observations due to Weak Earthquake Ground Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, K.; Ito, T.; Masuda, T.; Koketsu, K.; Ramancharla, P. K.; Sangam, R.; Bodige, N.; Dasari, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vulnerability of built environment in highly seismic areas is an important component of earthquake risk mitigation. As part of Indo-Japan collaborative research project (DISANET) sponsored by JST and JICA, six sets of building vibration sensors have been installed in the Union Territory of Chandigarh, India. The Union Territory of Chandigarh, India is located at South of the Himalayan Frontal Belt (HFT) is in zone IV of the seismic zone map of India (BIS, 2007). In past few decades, this area has experienced several minor earthquakes and a few moderate earthquakes. In spite of being in high seismic zone, most of the buildings in Chandigarh are designed and constructed for gravity loads only disregarding seismic forces. Such kind of buildings may deteriorate in strength even when they are subjected to minor earthquakes. To understand the response of buildings to micro-tremors, vibration sensors were installed in the building of Department of Geology of Panjab University in July 2012. Subsequently 5 more buildings were instrumented by January 2014. For each building, in order to capture the overall vibration of building during earthquake, vibration sensors of 8 or 10 units are installed to the ground floor, top floor and middle floor of the building. These sensors are continuously monitoring the building vibration and recording all data which include the weak ground motion occurring from near to far earthquakes. Through these sensors, over 20 minor ground motions have been recorded during last two years. Even in these weak ground motions, it was possible to confirm the state of the building response caused by earthquakes. In this presentation, we will introduce some building vibration records caused by the weak ground motion of the earthquakes and discuss the important insights drawn from analysis of recorded data.

  16. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  17. Transient response characteristics in a biomolecular integral controller.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaunak

    2016-04-01

    The cellular behaviour of perfect adaptation is achieved through the use of an integral control element in the underlying biomolecular circuit. It is generally unclear how integral action affects the important aspect of transient response in these biomolecular systems, especially in light of the fact that it typically deteriorates the transient response in engineering contexts. To address this issue, the authors investigated the transient response in a computational model of a simple biomolecular integral control system involved in bacterial signalling. They find that the transient response can actually speed up as the integral gain parameter increases. On further analysis, they find that the underlying dynamics are composed of slow and fast modes and the speed-up of the transient response is because of the speed-up of the slow-mode dynamics. Finally, they note how an increase in the integral gain parameter also leads to a decrease in the amplitude of the transient response, consistent with the overall improvement in the transient response. These results should be useful in understanding the overall effect of integral action on system dynamics, particularly for biomolecular systems. PMID:26997660

  18. Vibration response of spalled rolling element bearings: Observations, simulations and signal processing techniques to track the spall size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawalhi, N.; Randall, R. B.

    2011-04-01

    Fatigue in rolling element bearings, resulting in spalling of the races and/or rolling elements, is the most common cause of bearing failure. The useful life of the bearing may extend considerably beyond the appearance of the first spall and a premature removal of the bearing from service can be very expensive, but on the other hand chances cannot be taken with safety of machines or personnel. Previous studies indicated that there might be two parts to the defect vibration signal of a spalled bearing, the first part being originating from the entry of the rolling element into the fault (de-stress) and the second part being due to the departure of the rolling element from the fault (re-stress). This is investigated in this paper using vibration signatures of seeded faults at different speeds. The acceleration signals resulting from the entry of the rolling element into the spall and exit from it were found to be of different natures. The entry into the fault can be described as a step response, with mainly low frequency content, while the impact excites a much broader frequency impulse response. The latter is the most noticeable and prominent event, especially when examining the high pass filtered response or the enveloped signal. In order to enable a clear separation of the two events, and produce an averaged estimate of the size of the fault, two approaches are proposed to enhance the entry event while keeping the impulse response. The first approach (joint treatment) utilizes pre-whitening to balance the low and high frequency energy, then octave band wavelet analysis to allow selection of the best band (or scale) to balance the two pulses with similar frequency content. In the second approach, a separate treatment is applied to the step and the impulse responses, so that they can be equally represented in the signal. Cepstrum analysis can be used to give an average estimate of the spacing between the entry and impact events, but the latter can also be assessed by an arithmetic estimation of the mean and standard deviation of the event separation for a number of realizations, in particular for the second approach. In order to determine the effects of various simulations and signal processing parameters on the estimated delay times, the entry and exit events were simulated as modified step and impulse responses with precisely known starting times. The simulation was also found useful in pointing to artefacts associated with the cepstrum calculation, which affect even the simulated signals, and have thus prompted modifications of the processing of real signals. The results presented for the two approaches give a reasonable approximation of the measured fault widths (double the spacing between the entry and impact events) under different speed conditions, but the method of separate treatment is somewhat better and is thus recommended.

  19. Characteristics of response factors of coaxial gaseous rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation undertaken to determine the frequency dependence of the response factors of various gaseous propellant rocket injectors subject to axial instabilities are presented. The injector response factors were determined, using the modified impedance-tube technique, under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in unstable rocket motors. The tested injectors included a gaseous-fuel injector element, a gaseous-oxidizer injector element and a coaxial injector with both fuel and oxidizer elements. Emphasis was given to the determination of the dependence of the injector response factor upon the open-area ratio of the injector, the length of the injector orifice, and the pressure drop across the injector orifices. The measured data are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the corresponding injector response factor data predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  20. Characteristics of oscillating magnetic field-actuated microvalve response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Jonathan; Ghosh, Santaneel; Peng, Jian; Schenk, Clayton

    2010-03-01

    Magnetically responsive thermo-active hydrogels offer several potential advantages over other bio-material systems for the controlled release applications for micro- and nanofluidic devices. Volume phase transition of the thermo-sensitive gels is controlled by the change in entropy of the system induced by the hysteresis loss of embedded ferromagnetic nanoparticles modulated by an ac magnetic field. It has been shown in [1], a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) based thermo-responsive system provides controlled heating and volumetric changes with a significantly faster response time through magnetic actuation owing to its smaller dimension. Moreover, it is extremely easy to modulate the field and frequency. Varying the flow rate, channel diameter, and valve width, we characterize the response time of the microvalve for drug delivery applications. [1] S. Ghosh, C. Yang, T. Cai, Z. Hu, and A. Neogi, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 (2009) 135501

  1. Whole-body vibration decreases the proliferative response of TCD4+ cells in elderly individuals with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tossige-Gomes, R.; Avelar, N.C.P.; Simão, A.P.; Neves, C.D.C.; Brito-Melo, G.E.A.; Coimbra, C.C.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Lacerda, A.C.R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding whole-body vibration (WBV; frequency = 35 to 40 Hz; amplitude = 4 mm) to squat training on the T-cell proliferative response of elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study was a randomized controlled trial in which the selected variables were assessed before and after 12 weeks of training. Twenty-six subjects (72 ± 5 years of age) were divided into three groups: 1) squat training with WBV (WBV, N = 8); 2) squat training without WBV (N = 10), and 3) a control group (N = 8). Women who were ≥60 years of age and had been diagnosed with OA in at least one knee were eligible. The intervention consisted of 12 uninterrupted weeks of squatting exercise training performed 3 times/week. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from peripheral blood collected before and after training. The proliferation of TCD4+ and TCD8+ cells was evaluated by flow cytometry measuring the carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester fluorescence decay before and after the intervention (Δ). The proliferative response of TCD4+ cells (P = 0.02, effect size = 1.0) showed a significant decrease (23%) in the WBV group compared to the control group, while there was no difference between groups regarding the proliferative response of TCD8+ cells (P = 0.12, effect size = 2.23). The data suggest that the addition of WBV to squat exercise training might modulate T-cell-mediated immunity, minimizing or slowing disease progression in elderly patients with OA of the knee. PMID:22948377

  2. Nonlinear vibration characteristics of graphene/piezoelectric sandwich films under electric loading based on nonlocal elastic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. B.; Li, Y. D.; Wang, X.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the result of an investigation into the nonlinear vibration frequencies of graphene/piezoelectric sandwich films under electrical loading based on nonlocal elastic theory by utilizing a global residual harmonic balance method. Based on the Galerkin method and global residual harmonic balance method, the nonlinear resonant frequencies of graphene/piezoelectric sandwich films under electric exciting loads are obtained with a set of factors: the ratio of the oscillating amplitude to the thickness of sandwich films, small scale effect, electric loading exerted on piezoelectric layer, mode number and size length. Results indicate that the electric exciting load enhances the nonlinear resonant frequency of graphene/piezoelectric sandwich films, the nonlinear resonant frequency decreases as the scale effect increases, the scale effect has a more significant effect on higher mode resonant frequency and linear resonant frequency, and the effect of scale on the nonlinear resonant frequency is independent on the electric exciting load and the boundary conditions exerted on the sandwich films.

  3. Measuring Fluctuating Pressure Levels and Vibration Response in a Jet Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterholt, Douglas J.; Knox, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of loads due to solid rocket motor plume impingement allows for moreaccurate analyses of components subjected to such an environment. Typically, test verification of predicted loads due to these conditions is widely overlooked or unsuccessful. ATA Engineering, Inc., performed testing during a solid rocket motor firing to obtain acceleration and pressure responses in the hydrodynamic field surrounding the jet plume. The test environment necessitated a robust design to facilitate measurements being made in close proximity to the jet plume. This paper presents the process of designing a test fixture and an instrumentation package that could withstand the solid rocket plume environment and protect the required instrumentation.

  4. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  5. Vibration Response Models of a Stiffened Aluminum Plate Excited by a Shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical models of structural-acoustic interactions are of interest to aircraft designers and the space program. This paper describes a comparison between two energy finite element codes, a statistical energy analysis code, a structural finite element code, and the experimentally measured response of a stiffened aluminum plate excited by a shaker. Different methods for modeling the stiffeners and the power input from the shaker are discussed. The results show that the energy codes (energy finite element and statistical energy analysis) accurately predicted the measured mean square velocity of the plate. In addition, predictions from an energy finite element code had the best spatial correlation with measured velocities. However, predictions from a considerably simpler, single subsystem, statistical energy analysis model also correlated well with the spatial velocity distribution. The results highlight a need for further work to understand the relationship between modeling assumptions and the prediction results.

  6. An experimental study of changes in the impulse response of a wood plate that is subject to vibrational stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, Jared; Braunstein, Michael; Piacsek, Andrew

    2003-04-01

    It is a well-known dictum among players of stringed instruments that the tone of a new instrument improves with playing and that a fine instrument needs to be played if it is to maintain its optimum sound quality. This process is sometimes referred to as ``playing in'' an instrument. There is scant mention in the scientific literature, however, of a quantitative analysis of this phenomenon. As a first step in rigorously testing this hypothesis, measurements were made of tap tones of rectangular pieces of thin spruce before and after they were subjected to vibrational stimulus. Four spruce rectangles (20x28 cm) were cut from a single sheet obtained from a luthier supplier; three of these were stimulated at different amplitudes, while the fourth was a control plate. The stimulus (provided by a harmonically driven guitar string connected to the plate via a bridge) lasted approximately 10 weeks, during which time tap tones of all four plates were periodically recorded. Spectrograms of the tap tones are compared among the plates and over time. A preliminary analysis of the data does not reveal any significant changes in the acoustic response of the plates.

  7. Frequency response characteristics of the fuzzy polar power system stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Ortmeyer, T.H.; Hiyama, Takashi

    1995-06-01

    The fuzzy polar power system stabilizer (FPPSS) which has been recently developed is analyzed using frequency domain methods. the frequency domain approach allows the PSS designer to compare the new FPPSS with more conventional controllers. The significance of the three FPPSS design parameters are readily seen from the frequency response data, and their relationship to the conventional lead-lag design approach can be evaluated. Furthermore, the frequency response data for the FPPSS allows an alternate design approach for this stabilizer, and can be used to develop information concerning the small signal stability of the resulting system.

  8. Ab initio determination of geometries and vibrational characteristics of building blocks of organic super-conductors: TTF and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rani, P; Yadav, R A

    2012-12-01

    Molecular behavior of the building block {[2-(1,3-dithiole-2-ylidene)-1,3-dithiole] ≡ tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)} of organic superconductors have been investigated along with its three derivatives, namely, {[2-(1,3-dioxole-2-ylidene)-1,3-dioxole] ≡ tetraoxafulvalene (TOF)}; [2,2]-bi -[[1,3] oxathiolylidene] ≡ Der I and 2-(3H-Furan-2-ylidene)-[1,3] oxathiole ≡ Der II. The properties of the molecules such as molecular geometries, frontier MOs and vibrational spectra have been investigated by using DFT method at the B3LYP level employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The geometrical parameters and atomic charges on various atomic sites of the TTF, TOF, Ders I and II suggest extended conjugation in these systems. The present calculations lead to the reassignments for of some of the fundamentals and new interpretations for some of the observed IR and Raman frequencies. One of the two modes involved in the Fermi resonance giving rise to the doublet 1555 and 1564 cm(-1) needed to be revised and another doublet 3083 and 3108 cm(-1) could be interpreted as a Fermi resonance doublet. Out of the two ν(C = C) modes under the a(1) species, the lower frequency mode is assigned to the ν(C = C) of the ring and the higher one to the ν(C = C) of the central C = C bond contrary to the assignment reported in literature. The conducting properties of these molecules depend mainly on this mode. PMID:23040970

  9. Structural characteristic responses for finite element model updating of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linren; Wang, Lei; Ou, Jinping

    2014-04-01

    The field measurements of structures are very important to the structural finite element (FE) model updating because the errors and uncertainties of a FE model are corrected directly through closing the discrepancies between the analytical responses from FE model and the measurements from field testing of a structure. Usually, the accurate and reliable field measurements are very limited. Therefore, it is very important to make full use of the limited and valuable field measurements in structural model updating to achieve a best result with the lowest cost. In this paper, structural FE model updating is investigated in the point of view of solving a mathematical problem, and different amount and category of structural dynamic responses and static responses are considered as constraints to explore their effects on the updated results of different degree and types of structural damages. The numerical studies are carried out on a space truss. Accounting for the numerical results, some inherent phenomena and connections taking account of the updating parameters, output responses and the updated results are revealed and discussed. Some useful and practicable suggestions about using the field measurements for FE model updating are provided to achieve efficient and reliable results.

  10. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASEA Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 906% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=08 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=06 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 155 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=124/195). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=137 (CI95%=086/217) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=06 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  11. Estimating residual stress, curvature and boundary compliance of doubly clamped MEMS from their vibration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Garg, Anurag; Kovacs, Andrew; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    Structural parameters of doubly clamped microfabricated beams such as initial curvature, boundary compliance, thickness and mean residual stress are often critical to the performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and need to be estimated as a part of quality control of the microfabrication process. However, these parameters couple and influence many metrics of device response and thus are very difficult to disentangle and estimate using conventional methods such as the M-test, static mechanical tests, pull-in measurements or dynamic mechanical tests. Here we present a simple, non-destructive experimental method to extract these parameters based on the non-contact measurement of the natural frequencies of the lowest few eigenmodes of the microfabricated beam, and knowledge of Young's modulus and plan dimensions of the beam alone. The method exploits the fact that certain eigenmodes are insensitive to some of these structural parameters which enable a convenient decoupling and estimation of the parameters. As a result, the method does not require complicated finite element analysis, is insensitive to the gap height and introduces no contact wear or dielectric charging effects. Experiments are performed using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure the natural frequencies of doubly clamped, nickel, RF-MEMS capacitive switches and the method is applied to extract the residual stress, beam thickness, boundary compliance and post-release curvature.

  12. Demonstrating the Effect of Particle Impact Dampers on the Random Vibration Response and Fatigue Life of Printed Wiring Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Montgomery, Randall; Geist, David; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In a recent experimental study, small Particle Impact Dampers (PID) were bonded directly to the surface of printed circuit board (PCB) or printed wiring assemblies (PWA), reducing the random vibration response and increasing the fatigue life. This study provides data verifying practicality of this approach. The measured peak strain and acceleration response of the fundamental out of plane bending mode was significantly attenuated by adding a PID device. Attenuation of this mode is most relevant to the fatigue life of a PWA because the local relative displacements between the board and the supported components, which ultimately cause fatigue failures of the electrical leads of the board-mounted components are dominated by this mode. Applying PID damping at the board-level of assembly provides mitigation with a very small mass impact, especially as compared to isolation at an avionics box or shelf level of assembly. When compared with other mitigation techniques at the PWA level (board thickness, stiffeners, constrained layer damping), a compact PID device has the additional advantage of not needing to be an integral part of the design. A PID can simply be bonded to heritage or commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware to facilitate its use in environments beyond which it was originally qualified. Finite element analysis and test results show that the beneficial effect is not localized and that the attenuation is not due to the simple addition of mass. No significant, detrimental reduction in frequency was observed. Side-by-side life testing of damped and un-damped boards at two different thicknesses (0.070" and 0.090") has shown that the addition of a PID was much more significant to the fatigue life than increasing the thickness. High speed video, accelerometer, and strain measurements have been collected to correlate with analytical results.

  13. Vibration isolation of automotive vehicle engine using periodic mounting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, S.

    2005-05-01

    Customer awareness and sensitivity to noise and vibration levels have been raised through increasing television advertisement, in which the vehicle noise and vibration performance is used as the main market differentiation. This awareness has caused the transportation industry to regard noise and vibration as important criteria for improving market shares. One industry that tends to be in the forefront of the technology to reduce the levels of noise and vibration is the automobile industry. Hence, it is of practical interest to reduce the vibrations induced structural responses. The automotive vehicle engine is the main source of mechanical vibrations of automobiles. The engine is vulnerable to the dynamic action caused by engine disturbance force in various speed ranges. The vibrations of the automotive vehicle engines may cause structural failure, malfunction of other parts, or discomfort to passengers because of high level noise and vibrations. The mounts of the engines act as the transmission paths of the vibrations transmitted from the excitation sources to the body of the vehicle and passengers. Therefore, proper design and control of these mounts are essential to the attenuation of the vibration of platform structures. To improve vibration resistant capacities of engine mounting systems, vibration control techniques may be used. For instance, some passive and semi-active dissipation devices may be installed at mounts to enhance vibration energy absorbing capacity. In the proposed study, a radically different concept is presented whereby periodic mounts are considered because these mounts exhibit unique dynamic characteristics that make them act as mechanical filters for wave propagation. As a result, waves can propagate along the periodic mounts only within specific frequency bands called the "Pass Bands" and wave propagation is completely blocked within other frequency bands called the "Stop Bands". The experimental arrangements, including the design of mounting systems with plain and periodic mounts will be studied first. The dynamic characteristics of such systems will be obtained experimentally in both cases. The tests will be then carried out to study the performance characteristics of periodic mounts with geometrical and/or material periodicity. The effectiveness of the periodicity on the vibration levels of mounting systems will be demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Finally, the experimental results will be compared with the theoretical predictions.

  14. Vibration analysis methods for piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, R. J.

    1981-09-01

    Attention is given to flow vibrations in pipe flow induced by singularity points in the piping system. The types of pressure fluctuations induced by flow singularities are examined, including the intense wideband fluctuations immediately downstream of the singularity and the acoustic fluctuations encountered in the remainder of the circuit, and a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics is developed. The response of the piping systems to the pressure fluctuations thus generated is considered, and the calculation of the modal characteristics of piping containing a dense fluid in order to obtain the system transfer function is discussed. The TEDEL program, which calculates the vibratory response of a structure composed of straight and curved pipes with variable mechanical characteristics forming a three-dimensional network by a finite element method, is then presented, and calculations of fluid-structural coupling in tubular networks are illustrated.

  15. Wind response characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Holley, W. E.; Jafarey, N.

    1981-01-01

    It was the objective of the work reported here, and in the companion paper 1 . A broader examination of wind turbine dynamic response to turbulence, and attempts to ascertain the features of turbulence that wind turbines are most sensitive to were made. A statistical description of the wind input including all three wind components and allowing linear wind gradients across the rotor disk, was used together with quasi-static aerodynamic theory and an elementary structural model involving only a few degrees of freedom. The idea was to keep the turbine model simple and show the benefits of this type of statistical wind representation before attempting to use a more complex turbine model. As far as possible, the analysis was kept in the simplest form, while still preserving key physical responses.

  16. Noninvasive Determination of Bone Mechanical Properties Using Vibration Response: A Refined Model and Validation in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, S. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Kiratli, B. J; Steele, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate non-invasive mechanical measurement of long bones is made difficult by the masking effect of surrounding soft tissues. Mechanical response tissue analysis (MRTA) offers a method for separating the effects of the soft tissue and bone; however, a direct validation has been lacking. A theoretical analysis of wave propagation through the compressed tissue revealed a strong mass effect dependent on the relative accelerations of the probe and bone. The previous mathematical model of the bone and overlying tissue system was reconfigured to incorporate the theoretical finding. This newer model (six-parameter) was used to interpret results using MRTA to determine bone cross-sectional bending stiffness, EI(sub MRTA). The relationship between EI(sub MRTA) and theoretical EI values for padded aluminum rods was R(sup 2) = 0.999. A biological validation followed using monkey tibias. Each bone was tested in vivo with the MRTA instrument. Postmortem, the same tibias were excised and tested to failure in three-point bending to determine EI(sub 3-PT) and maximum load. Diaphyseal bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were also made. The relationship between EI(sub 3-PT) and in vivo EI(sub MRTA) using the six-parameter model is strong (R(sup 2) = 0.947) and better than that using the older model (R(sup 2) = 0.645). EI(sub MRTA) and BMD are also highly correlated (R(sup 2) = 0.853). MRTA measurements in vivo and BMD ex vivo are both good predictors of scaled maximum strength (R(sup 2) = 0.915 and R(sup 2) = 0.894, respectively). This is the first biological validation of a non- invasive mechanical measurement of bone by comparison to actual values. The MRTA technique has potential clinical value for assessing long-bone mechanical properties.

  17. Noninvasive Determination of Bone Mechanical Properties using Vibration Response: A Refined Model and Validation in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, S. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Steele, C. R.; Kiratli, B. J.; Martin, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate non-invasive mechanical measurement of long bones is made difficult by the masking effect of surrounding soft tissues. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) offers a method for separating the effects of the soft tissue and bone; however, a direct validation has been lacking. A theoretical analysis of wave propagation through the compressed tissue revealed a strong mass effect dependent on the relative accelerations of the probe and bone. The previous mathematical model of the bone and overlying tissue system was reconfigured to incorporate the theoretical finding. This newer model (six-parameter) was used to interpret results using MRTA to determine bone cross-sectional bending stiffness, EI(sub MRTA). The relationship between EI(MRTA) and theoretical EI values for padded aluminum rods was R(exp 2) = 0.999. A biological validation followed using monkey tibias. Each bone was tested in vivo with the MRTA instrument. Postmortem, the same tibias were excised and tested to failure in three-point bending to determine EI(sub 3-PT) and maximum load. Diaphyseal Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measurements were also made. The relationship between E(sub 3-PT) and in vivo EI(sub MRTA) using the six-parameter model is strong (R(exp 2) = 0.947) and better than that using the older model (R(exp 2) = 0.645). EI(MRTA) and BMD are also highly correlated (R(exp 2) = 0.853). MRTA measurements in vivo and BMD ex vivo are both good predictors of scaled maximum strength (R(exp 2) = 0.915 and R(exp 2) = 0.894, respectively). This is the first biological validation of a non-invasive mechanical measurement of bone by comparison to actual values. The MRTA technique has potential clinical value for assessing long-bone mechanical properties.

  18. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing requirements by increasing harvested power, shifting optimal conditioning impedance, inducing significant voltage supply fluctuations and ultimately rendering idealized sinusoidal and random analyses insufficient.

  19. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful operating range. Operating a blade at or near the resonance frequencies leads to high-cycle fatigue, which ultimately limits the blade's durability and life. So the aim of this study is to determine the variation of the resonance frequencies for an idealized sandwich blade as a function of its face-sheet thickness, core thickness, and foam density. The finite element method is used to determine the natural frequencies for an idealized rectangular sandwich blade. The proven Lanczos method (ref. 7) is used in the study to extract the natural frequency.

  20. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  1. Analytical Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies for the Green Fluorescent Protein Computed with ONIOM: Chromophore Mode Character and Its Response to Environment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lee M; Lasoroski, Aurélie; Champion, Paul M; Sage, J Timothy; Frisch, Michael J; van Thor, Jasper J; Bearpark, Michael J

    2014-02-11

    A systematic comparison of different environmental effects on the vibrational modes of the 4-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI) chromophore using the ONIOM method allows us to model how the molecule's spectroscopic transitions are modified in the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). ONIOM(QM:MM) reduces the expense of normal mode calculations when computing the majority of second derivatives only at the MM level. New developments described here for the efficient solution of the CPHF equations, including contributions from electrostatic interactions with environment charges, mean that QM model systems of ∼100 atoms can be embedded within a much larger MM environment of ∼5000 atoms. The resulting vibrational normal modes, their associated frequencies, and dipole derivative vectors have been used to interpret experimental difference spectra (GFPI2-GFPA), chromophore vibrational Stark shifts, and changes in the difference between electronic and vibrational transition dipoles (mode angles) in the protein environment. PMID:26580050

  2. Dynamics of a vibrational energy harvester with a bistable beam: voltage response identification by multiscale entropy and "0-1" test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, P.; Bowen, C. R.; Kim, H. A.; Litak, G.

    2016-04-01

    The use of bistable laminates is a potential approach to realize broadband piezoelectric-based energy harvesting by introducing elastic non-linearities to the system. In this paper the dynamic response of a piezoelectric material attached to a bistable laminate beam is examined based on the experimental measurement of the generated voltage-time series. The system was subjected to harmonic excitations and exhibited single-well and snap-through vibrations of both periodic and chaotic character. The ability to identify the vibration modes of the energy harvester is important since different levels of power are expected in each dynamic mode. We identify the dynamics of the selected system response using return maps, multiscale entropy, and "0-1" test. The potential of the approaches to identify periodic and chaotic modes and snap-through events in the non-linear bistable harvester is described.

  3. Experiments and numerical simulations of nonlinear vibration responses of an assembly with friction joints - Application on a test structure named "Harmony"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-03-01

    In presence of friction, the frequency response function of a metallic assembly is strongly dependent on the excitation level. The local stick-slip behavior at the friction interfaces induces energy dissipation and local stiffness softening. These phenomena are studied both experimentally and numerically on a test structure named "Harmony". Concerning the numerical part, a classical complete methodology from the finite element and friction modeling to the prediction of the nonlinear vibrational response is implemented. The well-known Harmonic Balance Method with a specific condensation process on the nonlinear frictional elements is achieved. Also, vibration experiments are performed to validate not only the finite element model of the test structure named "Harmony" at low excitation levels but also to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the system on several excitation levels. A scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the nonlinear behavior and the local stick-slip movement near the contacts.

  4. The influence of the great Hanshin earthquake on human response to environmental vibration due to the Shinkansen.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, S; Tsujimoto, S; Maeda, S; Kitamura, Y

    1998-07-01

    A severe earthquake of magnitude 7.2 hit the west part of Japan on January 17, 1995. A part of the Shinkansen railway, which is one of the most popular high-speed mass transportation systems in Japan, was seriously damaged by the earthquake. About 80 days later, the Shinkansen service was resumed but complaints about vibration due to the passing Shinkansen increased rapidly among residents near the tracks. This paper reports the results of two investigations that were carried out in both stricken and non-stricken areas to determine the cause of complaint. In the first investigation, the ground vibration propagation induced by passing trains was measured. In the second investigation, questionnaires were distributed to the people living near the Shinkansen tracks. As a result, it was found out that the vibration levels before and after the earthquake were almost the same at most measured points in the stricken area. It was also found that the vibration levels in the stricken area and a non-stricken area were almost the same within 50 m from the Shinkansen tracks. However the results of the questionnaire survey showed that people's nuisance due to the vibration in the stricken area was clearly greater than that in the non-stricken area. This inconsistency was explained using the "category judgment method", which is generally used to determine the relationship between a physical stimulus and psychological reaction. According to the results of this analysis, the vibration level, at which 50% of the inhabitants complained about Shinkansen vibration, was approximately 54 dB in the non-stricken area and 50 dB in the stricken area. This result suggests that the people who experienced the severe earthquake became 4 dB more sensitive to the Shinkansen vibration than the people living in a non-stricken area despite the fact that this investigation was carried out 10 months after the earthquake struck. PMID:9701909

  5. Repeatability and oblique flow response characteristics of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory investigation into the precision and accuracy of various mechanical-current meters are presented. Horizontal-axis and vertical-axis meters that are used for the measurement of point velocities in streams and rivers were tested. Meters were tested for repeatability and response to oblique flows. Both horizontal- and vertical-axis meters were found to under- and over-register oblique flows with errors generally increasing as the velocity and angle of flow increased. For the oblique flow tests, magnitude of errors were smallest for horizontal-axis meters. Repeatability of all meters tested was good, with the horizontal- and vertical-axis meters performing similarly.

  6. Vibration analysis by time-average holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprahamian, R.; Evensen, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Method photographs vibration modes as high as 100 kHz. Technique also measures vibration decay and damping characteristics. Compensation techniques for structural size limitations and for background noise excitations are discussed.

  7. Roman Catholic beliefs produce characteristic neural responses to moral dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Flexas, Albert; de Miguel, Pedro; Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Munar, Enric

    2014-02-01

    This study provides exploratory evidence about how behavioral and neural responses to standard moral dilemmas are influenced by religious belief. Eleven Catholics and 13 Atheists (all female) judged 48 moral dilemmas. Differential neural activity between the two groups was found in precuneus and in prefrontal, frontal and temporal regions. Furthermore, a double dissociation showed that Catholics recruited different areas for deontological (precuneus; temporoparietal junction) and utilitarian moral judgments [dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC); temporal poles], whereas Atheists did not (superior parietal gyrus for both types of judgment). Finally, we tested how both groups responded to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas: Catholics showed enhanced activity in DLPFC and posterior cingulate cortex during utilitarian moral judgments to impersonal moral dilemmas and enhanced responses in anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus during deontological moral judgments to personal moral dilemmas. Our results indicate that moral judgment can be influenced by an acquired set of norms and conventions transmitted through religious indoctrination and practice. Catholic individuals may hold enhanced awareness of the incommensurability between two unequivocal doctrines of the Catholic belief set, triggered explicitly in a moral dilemma: help and care in all circumstances-but thou shalt not kill. PMID:23160812

  8. Characteristics of wind forces and responses of rectangular tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, J. A.; Ahuja, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the results of wind tunnel tests on rectangular building models having the same plan area and height but different side ratios of 1, 1.56, 2.25, 3.06 and 4. The models were made from perspex sheet at a geometrical scale of 1:300. The wind pressure coefficients on all the models were evaluated from pressure records measured in a closed circuit wind tunnel under boundary layer flow for wind directions of 0° to 90° at an interval of 15°. The mean responses of rectangular tall buildings having different side ratios were also evaluated from the experimentally obtained wind loads. Effectiveness of side ratio of buildings in changing the surface pressure distribution and mean responses of prototype buildings is assessed for wind directions of 0° to 90° at an interval of 15°. It is observed that the side ratio of buildings significantly affects the wind pressures on leeward and sidewalls, whereas wind pressure on windward wall is almost independent of side ratio. Further, the wind incidence angles and side ratio of the buildings significantly affect its mean displacements as well as torque.

  9. Roman Catholic beliefs produce characteristic neural responses to moral dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Flexas, Albert; de Miguel, Pedro; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; Munar, Enric

    2014-01-01

    This study provides exploratory evidence about how behavioral and neural responses to standard moral dilemmas are influenced by religious belief. Eleven Catholics and 13 Atheists (all female) judged 48 moral dilemmas. Differential neural activity between the two groups was found in precuneus and in prefrontal, frontal and temporal regions. Furthermore, a double dissociation showed that Catholics recruited different areas for deontological (precuneus; temporoparietal junction) and utilitarian moral judgments [dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC); temporal poles], whereas Atheists did not (superior parietal gyrus for both types of judgment). Finally, we tested how both groups responded to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas: Catholics showed enhanced activity in DLPFC and posterior cingulate cortex during utilitarian moral judgments to impersonal moral dilemmas and enhanced responses in anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus during deontological moral judgments to personal moral dilemmas. Our results indicate that moral judgment can be influenced by an acquired set of norms and conventions transmitted through religious indoctrination and practice. Catholic individuals may hold enhanced awareness of the incommensurability between two unequivocal doctrines of the Catholic belief set, triggered explicitly in a moral dilemma: help and care in all circumstances—but thou shalt not kill. PMID:23160812

  10. Characteristic responses of a phospholipid molecular layer to polyols.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Satoshi; Deguchi, Ayano; Seki, Yota; Furuta, Miyuki; Fukuhara, Koichi; Nishihara, Sadafumi; Inoue, Katsuya; Kumazawa, Noriyuki; Mashiko, Shun; Fujihira, Shota; Goto, Makiko; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Polyols (sugar alcohols) are widely used in foods, pharmaceutical formulations and cosmetics, and therefore it is important to understand their effects on cell membranes and skin. To address this issue, we examined the effect of polyols (1,2-ethanediol (ethylene glycol), 1,3-butanediol, 1,2,3-propanetriol (glycerol), and 1,2,3,4-butanetetraol) on artificial membrane systems (liposomes, monolayers, or dry films) prepared from phospholipid (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)). 1,2-Ethanediol and 1,3-butanediol had little effect on the size of the DMPC liposomes or the surface pressure (π)-surface area (A) isotherm of DMPC monolayers at an air-water interface, whereas 1,2,3-propanetriol or 1,2,3,4-butanetetraol increased both liposome size and surface pressure. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate the interaction between DMPC and polyols. These experimental results suggest that the chemical structure of polyol plays an important role in the characteristic interaction between polyol and DMPC. PMID:26454550

  11. 'Nordic' hamstrings exercise - engagement characteristics and training responses.

    PubMed

    Iga, J; Fruer, C S; Deighan, M; Croix, M D S; James, D V B

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined the neuromuscular activation characteristics of the hamstrings during the 'Nordic' hamstrings exercise (NHE) and changes in the eccentric strength of the knee flexors with NHE training. Initially, the normalised root mean square electromyographic (EMG) activity of the hamstrings of both limbs during various phases (90-61°, 60-31° and 30-0° of knee extension) of the NHE were determined in 18 soccer players. Subsequently participants were randomly allocated to either a training (n=10) or control group. The isokinetic eccentric peak torques of the dominant and non-dominant limbs were recorded at 60, 120 and 240°/s pre- and post-training. The EMG values of both limbs were comparable (P=0.184) and greater EMG activity was recorded at more extended knee positions of the NHE (P=0.001). 4 weeks of NHE training significantly improved peak torque by up to 21% in all assessment conditions. Data indicate the hamstrings of both limbs are engaged identically during the NHE and training results in gains in the eccentric peak torque of the hamstrings of both limbs; these gains may augment the force that the hamstrings can withstand when forcefully stretched, attenuating injury risk. PMID:22895870

  12. Characteristics and drivers of baseflow response in 183 Australian catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.

    2009-09-01

    Daily streamflow data for 183 Australian catchments were used to assess the characteristics and main drivers of baseflow and quick flow behaviour, and to find an appropriate balance between simplicity and explanatory performance in modelling. Baseflow separation was performed following the Wittenberg algorithm. A linear reservoir model (one parameter) produced baseflow estimates as good as those obtained using a non-linear reservoir (two parameters) and was therefore considered the more appropriate. The transition from storm flow dominated to baseflow dominated streamflow generally occurred 7 to 10 d after the storm event. The catchments investigated had baseflow half-times of about 12 d, with 80% of stations having half-times between 7 and 34 d. The shortest half-times occurred in the driest catchments and were attributed to intermittent occurrence of fast-draining (possibly perched) groundwater. Median baseflow index (BFI) was 0.45 with considerable variation between stations. Catchment humidity explained 27% of the variation in derived baseflow recession coefficients. Another 53% of variance in recession coefficients as well as in BFI showed spatial correlation lengths of 200 to 300 km, corresponding to terrain factors rather than climate or land use. The remaining 16 to 20% of variance remained unexplained. Most (84%) of the variation between stations in average baseflow could be explained by monthly precipitation in excess of potential evapotranspiration. Most (70%) of the variation in average quick flow could be explained by average rainfall. Another 20% of variation was spatially correlated over spatial scales of 400 km, possibly reflecting a combination of terrain and climate factors; the remaining 10 to 16% remained unexplained.

  13. Plant characteristic estimation using sonar, multispectral reflectance, and electromagnetic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Carol L.

    Scope and method of study. The goal of this study was to design, test and validate three methods of remotely estimating plant physical and physiological characteristics. A free-space parallel plate electrostatic sensing system operating at medium radio frequency range was used to estimate water content and plant dry biomass. An ultrasound distance sensing system and a multispectral imaging system was used to directly estimate plant height and top view surface area and indirectly estimate plant biomass. NDVI was calculated from the multispectral imaging system data. Combining NDVI with the plant height and top view surface area estimates, a correlation was observed between plant biomass, chlorophyll content and chlorophyll concentration. Findings and conclusions. Plant water content and dry biomass of greenhouse grown spinach were estimated using a free-space electrostatic sensing system (r2 = 0.95). Ultrasonic sensor-based height estimates and top view surface area multispectral image data provided plant biomass estimates in corn and spinach (r 2 = 0.85 and 0.88). Estimates for snap beans were not as convincing (r2 = 0.52). Combining biomass estimates from the height and surface area data obtained by the ultrasonic distance sensor and the multispectral imaging system with NDVI670 calculated from reflectance data from the imaging system provided strong correlations with chlorophyll content in spinach (r 2 = 0.91). This was an improvement from the chlorophyll content estimates using only NDVI670. Correlations with chlorophyll concentration were weak. The strongest correlation was found using the reflectance ratio, NIR/Green (r2 = 0.30).

  14. Vibration isolation via a scissor-like structured platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuting; Jing, Xingjian; Xu, Jian; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    More and more attentions are attracted to the analysis and design of nonlinear vibration control/isolation systems for better isolation performance. In this study, an isolation platform with n-layer scissor-like truss structure is investigated to explore novel design of passive/semi-active/active vibration control/isolation systems and to exploit potential nonlinear benefits in vibration suppression. Due to the special scissor-like structure, the dynamic response of the platform has inherent nonlinearities both in equivalent damping and stiffness characteristics (although only linear components are applied), and demonstrates good loading capacity and excellent equilibrium stability. With the mathematical modeling and analysis of the equivalent stiffness and damping of the system, it is shown that: (a) the structural nonlinearity in the system is very helpful in vibration isolation, (b) both equivalent stiffness and damping characteristics are nonlinear and could be designed/adjusted to a desired nonlinearity by tuning structural parameters, and (c) superior vibration isolation performances (e.g., quasi-zero stiffness characteristics etc.) can be achieved with different structural parameters. This scissor-like truss structure can potentially be employed in different engineering practices for much better vibration isolation or control.

  15. Vibration control in piping system by dual dynamic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeyama, H.; Ikahata, N.; Sunakoda, K.; Seto, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the applicability of a seismic response reduction method with a dual dynamic absorber for equipment, piping system, etc. in a nuclear power plant. The dual dynamic absorber which utilizes a magnetic damping effect was developed and the investigation was done to the characteristics of vibration controllability through excitation tests. As the primary stage of this study, a simple vertical straight pipe with a diameter of 60.8 mm and a length of 2,000 mm was excited by random vibration input, and amplitude of vibration level was reduced by the dual dynamic absorber mounted on the pipe. The mass ratio of the dual dynamic absorber to the straight pipe was 0.05. The result of this test was that the response reduction effect of the dual dynamic absorber for random excitations was verified. Also, the damping characteristic with fine linearity for the input level was obtained.

  16. Investigation of a new vortex-induced vibration suppression device in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbo; Guo, Haiyan; Liu, Xiaochun; Li, Xiaomin

    2012-06-01

    In order to mitigate vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of marine risers, especially to eliminate the phenomenon of frequency slock-in', a new suppression device of crescent-shaped flow spoiler was designed with seven different layout schemes. VIV model tests with six flow levels were conducted in a large wind-wave-current flume. In all cases, vibration responses in both in-line and cross-flow cases were measured. With the installation of suppression devices vibration frequency evolution of a riser was analyzed by Morlet wavelet transform. The principle of VIV suppression was interpreted through vibration characteristics. Fatigue life of the riser was calculated by the Palmgren-Miner rule. Compared with a bare riser, vibration of an outfitted riser with suppression devices disturbed the steady flow, the vibration amplitudes in the two flow directions were reduced, and the riser fatigue life was improved.

  17. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  18. The Director of Student Teaching: Characteristics and Responsibilities. Research Bulletin 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leon, Ed.

    This survey investigates the characteristics and responsibilities of the director of student teaching in United States colleges and universities. Consisting of explanatory sections with graphs revealing data gathered (through a questionnaire) from student teaching directors, the report covers their educational and personal characteristics (age,…

  19. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  20. Human response to vibration stress in Japanese workers: lessons from our 35-year studies A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    MATOBA, Tsunetaka

    2015-01-01

    The occupational uses with vibratory tools or vehicles provoked health disorders of users. We reviewed narratively our articles of 35 yr studies and their related literatures, and considered the pathophysiology of the hand-arm vibration disorders. Concerning the risk factors of health impairments in workers with vibratory tools, there are two conflicting schools of the researchers: The peripheral school emphasizes that vibration only makes predominant impairments on hands and arms, showing typically Raynaud’s phenomenon in the fingers. In the systemic school, the health disorders are produced by combination with vibration, noise and working environment, namely vibratory work itself, leading to diversified symptoms and signs in relation to systemic impairments. Our 35 yr studies have evidently supported the systemic school, including disorders of the central and autonomic nervous systems. The genesis is vibratory work itself, including vibration, noise, cold working environment, ergonomic and biodynamic conditions, and emotional stress in work. Because the health disorders yield in the whole body, the following measures would contribute to the prevention of health impairments: the attenuation of vibration and noise generated form vibratory machines and the regulations on operating tool hours. In conclusion, this occupational disease results from systemic impairments due to long-term occupational work with vibratory tools. PMID:26460379

  1. Vibration analysis of the Second Saikai Bridge—a concrete filled tubular (CFT) arch bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Mistuhiro; Wu, Qingxiong; Takahashi, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shozo; Furukawa, Kazuyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Concrete-filled steel tubular (CFT) arch bridges have been rapidly developing in China since 1990. Research has focused on the static behavior, thermal stress and erection technique, however, and there has been very little research of natural vibrations and dynamic responses of these bridges. Japan's first CFT arch bridge in highway bridges, the Second Saikai Bridge, is now under construction in Nagasaki Prefecture. Furthermore, this bridge has a pedestrian bridge that is suspended under the girder, which is rare. Therefore, the natural vibration properties are examined, and the influence of pedestrian bridge structure on the natural vibration of main bridge is discussed first. Response analysis under a moving vehicle and pedestrian is carried out, and the response characteristics and response level are clarified. The natural vibrations and responses are compared to those of CFT arch bridges that have been constructed in China. Results show the fine performance of both main bridge and pedestrian bridge of the Second Saikai Bridge.

  2. Intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds, conformation and vibrational characteristics of hydrazo-group in 5-nitro-2-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)pyridine and its 3-, 4- or 6-methyl isomers.

    PubMed

    Michalski, J; Kucharska, E; Sąsiadek, W; Lorenc, J; Hanuza, J

    2013-08-01

    Syntheses of 5-nitro-2-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)pyridine (5-nitro-2-phenylhydrazopyridine), 3-methyl-5-nitro-2-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)pyridine (3-methyl-5-nitro-2-phenylhydrazopyridine), 4-methyl-5-nitro-2-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)pyridine (4-methyl-5-nitro-2-phenylhydrazopyridine) and 6-methyl-5-nitro-2-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)pyridine (6-methyl-5-nitro-2-phenylhydrazopyridine) have been described. Their IR and Raman spectra have been measured and analyzed in terms of DFT quantum chemical calculations. The 6-311G(2d,2p) basis set with the B3LYP functional has been used to discuss the optimized structure and vibrational spectra. The vibrational characteristics of the hydrazo-bond have been reported with their relation to the inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds formed in the studied systems. The role and influence of substitution position of the methyl chromophore on the structure and vibrational data have been discussed. PMID:23680510

  3. Effects of a Dynamic Warm-Up, Static Stretching or Static Stretching with Tendon Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance and EMG Responses.

    PubMed

    Yapicioglu, Bulent; Colakoglu, Muzaffer; Colakoglu, Zafer; Gulluoglu, Halil; Bademkiran, Fikret; Ozkaya, Ozgur

    2013-12-18

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of static stretching, with vibration given directly over Achilles tendon, on electro-myographic (EMG) responses and vertical jump (VJ) performances. Fifteen male, college athletes voluntarily participated in this study (n=15; age: 22±4 years old; body height: 181±10 cm; body mass: 74±11 kg). All stages were completed within 90 minutes for each participant. Tendon vibration bouts lasted 30 seconds at 50 Hz for each volunteer. EMG analysis for peripheral silent period, H-reflex, H-reflex threshold, T-reflex and H/M ratio were completed for each experimental phases. EMG data were obtained from the soleus muscle in response to electro stimulation on the popliteal post tibial nerve. As expected, the dynamic warm-up (DW) increased VJ performances (p=0.004). Increased VJ performances after the DW were not statistically substantiated by the EMG findings. In addition, EMG results did not indicate that either static stretching (SS) or tendon vibration combined with static stretching (TVSS) had any detrimental or facilitation effect on vertical jump performances. In conclusion, using TVSS does not seem to facilitate warm-up effects before explosive performance. PMID:24511340

  4. Temperature-dependent dynamic response to flash heating of molecular monolayers on metal surfaces: vibrational energy exchange.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christopher M; Sun, Yuxiao; Dlott, Dana D

    2014-07-17

    An ultrafast nonlinear coherent laser spectroscopy termed vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) was used to monitor vibrational transitions of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-nitrobenzenethiolate (NBT) on Au after Au flash heating. Ultrafast thermoreflectance measurements showed the surface temperature jumps ?T were in the 35-250 K range. The NBT symmetric and antisymmetric nitro stretches ?sNO2 and ?asNO2 and a phenyl ring stretch ?CC were probed. Flash heating caused these transitions to lose intensity, shift, and broaden. The time dependences all had overshoot-decay-plateau structures. In the long-lived plateau, the SAM was in thermal equilibrium with the hot Au surface. The SFG plateau intensity losses of ?sNO2 and ?CC, two vibrations with parallel transition moments, were identical, indicating that the SFG intensity loss was caused by thermally induced SAM orientational disorder. The T-jump-induced frequency shifts of ?sNO2 and ?asNO2 were identical and opposite in sign. The rise times of the shifts were identical and equal to the ?3.5 ps time constant for the rise of Au surface temperature, which indicates that both shifts were caused by anharmonic coupling to the same lower-energy vibration. The temperature dependence of the ?sNO2 shift and width indicated that this vibration was the ?480 cm(-1) nitro bend. The ?sNO2 temperature dependence was interpreted using a vibrational energy exchange mechanism between the nitro stretch and bend. PMID:25031101

  5. Free in-plane vibration of circular arches.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veletsos, A. S.; Austin, W. J.; Lopes Pereira, C. A.; Wung, S.-J.

    1972-01-01

    Numerical data are presented for the natural frequencies and modes of vibration of hinged and fixed, uniform, circular arches vibrating in their own plane, and the effects of the various parameters affecting the response are analyzed. It is shown that the vibrational modes may be almost purely flexural, or almost purely extensional, or the extensional and flexural actions may be strongly coupled. The conditions of occurrence of each type of behavior are defined, and simple approximate formulas are derived; using these formulas, the free vibrational characteristics of arches may be estimated to a satisfactory degree of accuracy for most practical applications. The approach used to derive the approximate formulas may also be applied to arches having other boundary conditions, shapes, or distributions of stiffness and mass.

  6. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  7. Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions is discussed. Descriptions of experimental results concerning root acclimation to temperature, root and shoot acclimation to nitrogen stress, and growth response to NH4(+) and NO3(-) nutrition are included. A preliminary model validation to changing temperatures is presented.

  8. Documented Characteristics of Labor Market-Responsive Community Colleges and a Review of Supporting Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Robert; MacAllum, Keith

    This paper discusses the mission of the market-responsive community college. These colleges include mid- and high-level workforce training in their curriculum. Some of the characteristics of a market-responsive community college detailed here include: (1) allocating resources to develop training programs; (2) reaching out to businesses and other…

  9. A Branched Beam-Based Vibration Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangcheng; Hu, Junhui

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a strategy to utilize a branched beam system to improve the frequency response characteristic of vibration energy harvesting is demonstrated. A basic unit of the device consists of several branch beams with proof mass at their ends and one main cantilever beam with a piezoelectric component at its root and proof mass at its end. The device can utilize the resonance of the branch beams and main beam to generate multiple output voltage peaks, providing a better frequency response characteristic than that of the conventional piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. Multiple branch structure and multiple basic units with similar structures can be connected to generate more output voltage peaks in the frequency response characteristic. Only one piezoelectric component is needed in the device, which makes it competitive in the management of harvested electric energy.

  10. Influence of immobilization strategies on biosensing response characteristics: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Saha, Shibu; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization technique plays an important role in fabrication of a biosensor. NiO based cholesterol biosensor has been used to study the effect of various immobilization techniques on the biosensing response characteristics. The biosensors were fabricated by immobilizing cholesterol oxidase on NiO thin films by three different immobilization techniques viz. physisorption, cross-linking and covalent binding. The study reveals a strong dependence of biosensing response on corresponding immobilization technique. The biosensor based on immobilization by covalent bonding shows superior response characteristics as compared to others owing to its zero length. The results highlight the significance of immobilization technique for biosensor fabrication. PMID:26672461

  11. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  12. Vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on vibration isolation are presented. Techniques to control and isolate centrifuge disturbances were identified. Topics covered include: disturbance sources in the microgravity environment; microgravity assessment criteria; life sciences centrifuge; flight support equipment for launch; active vibration isolation system; active balancing system; and fuzzy logic control.

  13. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  14. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  15. Vibrating superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquinazi, Pablo

    1991-11-01

    This review is concerned with effects in the energy dissipation and elastic modulus of superconductors vibrating in a magnetic field. The physics of superconducting vibrating reeds and reeds made of superconducting suspensions is thoroughly described as well as the main features observed in other oscillators applied to flux pinning studies. It is argued that among the diversity of methods to study superconducting and pinning properties as a function of magnetic field and temperature, the vibrating reed technique is one of the most sensitive due to the accurate measurement of frequency and dissipation with feasible magnetometry applications. Results of the elastic coupling between the flux line lattice and the atomic lattice in high- and low- T c superconductors obtained with the vibrating reed are summarized as well as the behavior of vibrating type II superconductors near their lower critical field. Results from mechanical measurements in high-temperature superconductors are reviewed, which support the model of thermally activated depinning and vortex diffusion.

  16. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Fluid structural interaction problems that estimate panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. Even when the analyst elects to use a fitted function for the spatial correlation an error may be introduced if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Both qualitative and quantitative illustrations evaluating the adequacy of different patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are provided. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system is then evaluated in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same finite element model. The convergence study results are presented illustrating the impact resulting from a poor choice of patch density. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a Diffuse Acoustic Field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  17. Growth and physiological characteristics of E. coli in response to the exposure of sound field.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Bin; Wu, Ying; Li, Shi-Chang; Liu, Wen; Duan, Xiao-Fei; Li, Meng-Wei

    2013-09-15

    It is undeniable that environmental sonic vibration can affect our emotions and mood, but so far the study of physical stimuli provoked by audible wave on single cells has been rarely concerned. To investigate the response of E. coli to audible wave exposure, the growth status and alterations in antioxidant enzyme activity were studied in liquid culture. The data showed that the growth of E. coli was promoted in the treatments of different frequencies sound wave. The most significant effect on growth promotion appeared when sound wave was maintained at 100 dB and 5000 Hz. Simultaneously, sonic vibration evoked significantly increases the level of total protein content contents. And the changes of activities of Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were observed obviously. The results suggested that the growth promotion effect of audible sound may be non-linear and shows obvious frequency and intensity peculiarities. Moreover, the increase in activity of antioxidant enzymes implied that a number of active oxygen species generated in bacterial cell under the exposure of audible sound. We speculate that the audible sound may cause a secondary oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of active oxygen species generation induced by audible sound. PMID:24502157

  18. Influence of structural parameters on dynamic characteristics and wind-induced buffeting responses of a super-long-span cable-stayed bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Chunchao; Xing, Chenxi; Li, Aiqun

    2014-09-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) model for the Sutong cable-stayed bridge (SCB) is established based on ANSYS. The dynamic characteristics of the bridge are analyzed using a subspace iteration method. Based on recorded wind data, the measured spectra expression is presented using the nonlinear least-squares regression method. Turbulent winds at the bridge site are simulated based on the spectral representation method and the FFT technique. The influence of some key structural parameters and measures on the dynamic characteristics of the bridge are investigated. These parameters include dead load intensity, as well as vertical, lateral and torsional stiffness of the steel box girder. In addition, the influence of elastic stiffness of the connection device employed between the towers and the girder on the vibration mode of the steel box girder is investigated. The analysis shows that all of the vertical, lateral and torsional buffeting displacement responses reduce gradually as the dead load intensity increases. The dynamic characteristics and the structural buffeting displacement response of the SCB are only slightly affected by the vertical and torsional stiffness of the steel box girder, and the lateral and torsional buffeting displacement responses reduce gradually as the lateral stiffness increases. These results provide a reference for dynamic analysis and design of super-long-span cable-stayed bridges.

  19. Vibrational drives for precision instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilo, R.E.; Syanyunas, G.I.

    1994-12-01

    The principles underlying the construction of vibrational drives for precision systems are described. The main characteristics of the drives in the asynchronous and synchronous regimes of motion are presented along with their technical specifications.

  20. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  1. A numerical analysis of the influence of tram characteristics and rail profile on railway traffic ground-borne noise and vibration in the Brussels Region.

    PubMed

    Kouroussis, G; Pauwels, N; Brux, P; Conti, C; Verlinden, O

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, damage potentially caused by passing train in dense cities is of increasing concern and restricts improvement to the interconnection of various public transport offers. Although experimental studies are common to quantify the effects of noise and vibration on buildings and on people, their reach is limited since the causes of vibrations can rarely be deduced from data records. This paper presents the numerical calculations that allow evaluating the main contributions of railway-induced ground vibrations in the vicinity of buildings. The reference case is the Brussels Region and, more particularly, the T2000 tram circulating in Brussels city. Based on a pertinent selection of the vibration assessment indicators and a numerical prediction approach, various results are presented and show that the free-field analysis is often improperly used in this kind of analysis as the interaction of soil and structure is required. Calculated high ground vibrations stem from singular rail surface defects. The use of resilient wheels is recommended in order to reduce the ground-borne noise and vibration to permissible values. PMID:23786851

  2. Toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences: how task characteristics influence responses

    PubMed Central

    Hafenbrädl, Sebastian; Hoffrage, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In research on Bayesian inferences, the specific tasks, with their narratives and characteristics, are typically seen as exchangeable vehicles that merely transport the structure of the problem to research participants. In the present paper, we explore whether, and possibly how, task characteristics that are usually ignored influence participants’ responses in these tasks. We focus on both quantitative dimensions of the tasks, such as their base rates, hit rates, and false-alarm rates, as well as qualitative characteristics, such as whether the task involves a norm violation or not, whether the stakes are high or low, and whether the focus is on the individual case or on the numbers. Using a data set of 19 different tasks presented to 500 different participants who provided a total of 1,773 responses, we analyze these responses in two ways: first, on the level of the numerical estimates themselves, and second, on the level of various response strategies, Bayesian and non-Bayesian, that might have produced the estimates. We identified various contingencies, and most of the task characteristics had an influence on participants’ responses. Typically, this influence has been stronger when the numerical information in the tasks was presented in terms of probabilities or percentages, compared to natural frequencies – and this effect cannot be fully explained by a higher proportion of Bayesian responses when natural frequencies were used. One characteristic that did not seem to influence participants’ response strategy was the numerical value of the Bayesian solution itself. Our exploratory study is a first step toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences, and highlights new avenues for future research. PMID:26300791

  3. Time-domain parameter identification of aeroelastic loads by forced-vibration method for response of flexible structures subject to transient wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bochao

    Slender structures representing civil, mechanical and aerospace systems such as long-span bridges, high-rise buildings, stay cables, power-line cables, high light mast poles, crane-booms and aircraft wings could experience vortex-induced and buffeting excitations below their design wind speeds and divergent self-excited oscillations (flutter) beyond a critical wind speed because these are flexible. Traditional linear aerodynamic theories that are routinely applied for their response prediction are not valid in the galloping, or near-flutter regime, where large-amplitude vibrations could occur and during non-stationary and transient wind excitations that occur, for example, during hurricanes, thunderstorms and gust fronts. The linear aerodynamic load formulation for lift, drag and moment are expressed in terms of aerodynamic functions in frequency domain that are valid for straight-line winds which are stationary or weakly-stationary. Application of the frequency domain formulation is restricted from use in the nonlinear and transient domain because these are valid for linear models and stationary wind. The time-domain aerodynamic force formulations are suitable for finite element modeling, feedback-dependent structural control mechanism, fatigue-life prediction, and above all modeling of transient structural behavior during non-stationary wind phenomena. This has motivated the developing of time-domain models of aerodynamic loads that are in parallel to the existing frequency-dependent models. Parameters defining these time-domain models can be now extracted from wind tunnel tests, for example, the Rational Function Coefficients defining the self-excited wind loads can be extracted using section model tests using the free vibration technique. However, the free vibration method has some limitations because it is difficult to apply at high wind speeds, in turbulent wind environment, or on unstable cross sections with negative aerodynamic damping. In the current research, new algorithms were developed based on forced vibration technique for direct extraction of the Rational Functions. The first of the two algorithms developed uses the two angular phase lag values between the measured vertical or torsional displacement and the measured aerodynamic lift and moment produced on the section model subject to forced vibration to identify the Rational Functions. This algorithm uses two separate one-degree-of-freedom tests (vertical or torsional) to identify all the four Rational Functions or corresponding Rational Function Coefficients for a two degrees-of-freedom (DOF) vertical-torsional vibration model. It was applied to a streamlined section model and the results compared well with those obtained from earlier free vibration experiment. The second algorithm that was developed is based on direct least squares method. It uses all the data points of displacements and aerodynamic lift and moment instead of phase lag values for more accurate estimates. This algorithm can be used for one-, two- and three-degree-of-freedom motions. A two-degree-of-freedom forced vibration system was developed and the algorithm was shown to work well for both streamlined and bluff section models. The uniqueness of the second algorithms lies in the fact that it requires testing the model at only two wind speeds for extraction of all four Rational Functions. The Rational Function Coefficients that were extracted for a streamlined section model using the two-DOF Least Squares algorithm were validated in a separate wind tunnel by testing a larger scaled model subject to straight-line, gusty and boundary-layer wind.

  4. Numerical modeling of the dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to ambient vibrations: comparison with measurements and potential application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, Alexandre; Valentin, Johann; Jongmans, Denis; Baillet, Laurent; Larose, Eric; Bottelin, Pierre; Donze, Frédéric; Mangeney, Anne

    2015-04-01

    During the last two decades, seismic noise measurements have been increasingly used in gravitational hazard assessment for both investigation and monitoring purposes. The wide frequency range allows ambient vibrations to be applied for investigating geological and civil engineering structures in a great variety of sizes, from the lithospheric or crust scale to a few m-thick landslide and rock column or buildings. On unstable slopes, ambient vibrations have been applied in very different ways for reconnaissance, depending on the investigation purpose and the landslide type. The simplest way to extract information from ambient vibrations on a given site is to perform single-station measurements with a 3-C sensor and to process the records computing Fourier spectra of the three components or the spectral ratio between the horizontal and vertical components (the so-called H/V method). On landslide sites, several studies revealed significant spectral amplification at given frequency and polarization of the wave-field in the direction of maximum slope displacement. They show that different characteristics of the seismic noise (resonant frequencies, polarization, and spectral amplification) could be used from the spectral analysis of the motion or of spectral ratios for characterizing the landslides. For cliff-like sites, this study aims to identify the pertinent and applicable parameters that could be extracted from ambient vibrations and used to gain information on the prone-to-fall column geometry. We first use 2D numerical modeling for better understanding the influence of the rear fracture characteristics (wideness w and depth L) on the horizontal motion H(f), as well as on the spectral ratios H(f)/V(f) and H(f)/Hr(f), where Hr(f) is the horizontal motion measured at a reference site. We then identify the seismic parameters able to characterize the column decoupling and we compare numerical results to data acquired at two rocky sites exhibiting cliff-like geometry. During this study, the influence of other internal factors like presence of additional fractures and of an interbedded soft layer (Figure 1) is also tested.

  5. Pathway Switching Explains the Sharp Response Characteristic of Hypoxia Response Network

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yihai; Wang, Guanyu; Simha, Rahul; Peng, Weiqun; Turano, Frank; Zeng, Chen

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia induces the expression of genes that alter metabolism through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). A theoretical model based on differential equations of the hypoxia response network has been previously proposed in which a sharp response to changes in oxygen concentration was observed but not quantitatively explained. That model consisted of reactions involving 23 molecular species among which the concentrations of HIF and oxygen were linked through a complex set of reactions. In this paper, we analyze this previous model using a combination of mathematical tools to draw out the key components of the network and explain quantitatively how they contribute to the sharp oxygen response. We find that the switch-like behavior is due to pathway-switching wherein HIF degrades rapidly under normoxia in one pathway, while the other pathway accumulates HIF to trigger downstream genes under hypoxia. The analytic technique is potentially useful in studying larger biomedical networks. PMID:17784783

  6. Modeling active vibration control of a geared rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C.; Shepard, W. Steve, Jr.

    2004-06-01

    This paper analyzes the practicality of active internal shaft transverse vibration control using a piezoelectric stack actuator for reducing external gearbox housing structure response due to transmission error excitation from a gear pair. The proposed adaptive controller that is designed specifically for tackling mesh frequency vibrations is based on an enhanced filtered-x least mean square algorithm with frequency estimation to synthesize the required reference signal. The vital system secondary path characteristic that relates the actuation force to the housing response of interest is identified in offline or online mode using the additive random noise technique. Numerical studies employing practical design parameters in order to provide a realistic assessment of the proposed approach are performed for a geared rotor system (dynamic plant) that is represented as finite and lumped elements. The simulations reveal very promising vibration control results, which will be utilized to guide future experimental studies.

  7. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  8. Vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, Ranvir; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Mahesh

    2003-10-01

    Today, vibration sensors with low and medium sensitivities are in great demand. Their applications include robotics, navigation, machine vibration monitoring, isolation of precision equipment & activation of safety systems e.g. airbags in automobiles. Vibration sensors have been developed at SSPL, using silicon micromachining to sense vibrations in a system in the 30 - 200 Hz frequency band. The sensing element in the silicon vibration sensor is a seismic mass suspended by thin silicon hinges mounted on a metallized glass plate forming a parallel plate capacitor. The movement of the seismic mass along the vertical axis is monitored to sense vibrations. This is obtained by measuring the change in capacitance. The movable plate of the parallel plate capacitor is formed by a block connected to a surrounding frame by four cantilever beams located on sides or corners of the seismic mass. This element is fabricated by silicon micromachining. Several sensors in the chip sizes 1.6 cm x 1.6 cm, 1 cm x 1 cm and 0.7 cm x 0.7 cm have been fabricated. Work done on these sensors, techniques used in processing and silicon to glass bonding are presented in the paper. Performance evaluation of these sensors is also discussed.

  9. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  10. Vibration analysis of a trimorph plate as a precursor model for smart automotive bodywork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Big-Alabo, A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2012-08-01

    This study investigates the vibration characteristics of a proposed candidate structure for smarter car bodies. The material is conceived as a three-layer laminated structure in the form of a trimorph plate. The vibration response of the plate is investigated for large deflections by considering the effects of geometric nonlinearity. First, the governing equation for the mid-point deflection of the plate is developed based on classical laminate plate theory (CLPT). The governing equation is solved, and a simulation is run for different possible layer-stacking sequences. Comparisons are made between the nonlinear vibration response of this trimorph plate both with and without the effects of the von Krmn geometric nonlinearity. The results show that for the same material properties the different layer-stacking sequences produce different vibration responses, and from there it is concluded that layer-stacking sequencing is a basis for the definition of a suitable material configuration for high performance automotive applications.

  11. EFFECTS OF 6‐WEEK WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON THE REFLEX RESPONSE OF THE ANKLE MUSCLES: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Jacobo A.; Ramos, Domingo J.; Esteban, Paula; Mendizábal, Susana; Jiménez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ligament sprain of the lateral ankle is the most frequent injury that occurs when participating in sports. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a training method that has been recently introduced as a rehabilitative tool for treatment of athletes. It has been hypothesized that the transmission of mechanical oscillations from the vibrating platform may lead to physiological changes in muscle spindles, joint mechanoreceptors, as well as improve balance. Propose: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 6‐week WBV training program on the reflex response mechanism of the peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles in ankle inversion at 30º from horizontal, in a static position. Methods: This study was a single‐blinded and randomized controlled trial. Forty‐four healthy, physically active participants were randomly split into two groups: the experimental group (n = 26) (the WBV training) and control group (n = 18). Reaction time (RT), maximum electromyographic (EMG) peak (peak EMG), time to the maximum peak EMG (peak EMG time) and reflex electrical activity of all the muscles were assessed before and after the WBV training through surface EMG. Results: After 6‐weeks WBV training, there were no significant changes in the variables analysed for all the muscles involved. Conclusion: A 6‐week WBV training does not improve the reflex response mechanism of the lateral stabilizing muscles of the ankle. Level of evidence: 1b PMID:23439725

  12. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  13. Utility of MMPI-2 Indicators of Response Distortion: Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Mouton, Glenn J.; Bagby, R. Michael; Buis, Tom; Peterson, Stephanie A.; Buigas, Rudy A.

    1997-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate 11 Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) indicators of response distortion using 343 college students, some of whom simulated malingering or defensive responding, 181 forensic psychiatric patients, and 95 other psychiatric patients. Results show the usefulness…

  14. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuebing, Karla K.; Barth, Amy E.; Trahan, Lisa H.; Reddy, Radhika R.; Miciak, Jeremy; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, "What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?" Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from…

  15. Relationships of Examinee Pair Characteristics and Item Response Similarity. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Detecting unusual similarity in the item responses of a pair of examinees usually conditions on the pair's overall test performance (e.g., raw scores). Doing this, however, often requires assumptions about the invariance of other examinee pair characteristics. In this study, we examined the appropriateness of such assumptions about selected…

  16. Preference for Anonymous Classroom Participation: Linking Student Characteristics and Reactions to Electronic Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Alyson; Hill, N. Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Electronic response systems (ERS) are a means to foster class participation by students who are reluctant to participate in class. In this study, we identify individual characteristics that relate to students' preference for anonymous classroom participation, and we also examine the extent to which preference for anonymity is related to their…

  17. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    STUEBING, KARLA K.; BARTH, AMY E.; TRAHAN, LISA H.; REDDY, RADHIKA R.; MICIAK, JEREMY; FLETCHER, JACK M.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, “What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?” Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from the National Reading Panel Report. Eligible participant populations included at-risk elementary school children enrolled in the third grade or below. Effects were analyzed using a shifting unit of analysis approach within three statistical models: cognitive characteristics predicting growth curve slope (Model 1, mean r = .31), gain (Model 2, mean r = .21), or postintervention reading controlling for preintervention reading (Model 3, mean r = .15). Effects were homogeneous within each model when effects were aggregated within study. The small size of the effects calls into question the practical significance and utility of using cognitive characteristics for prediction of response when baseline reading is available. PMID:26535015

  18. Seismic vibration analysis of fluid-structure interaction in LMFBR piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, F.

    1988-05-01

    This paper is a basic study on the vibrational characteristics of an LMFBR piping system containing liquid sodium under one-dimensional seismic excitation. Using Z-shaped piping, the authors formulate coupled equations for the pipe's bending vibration and pressure wave, and transform them into two-degree-of-freedom vibration equations for the first modes of the piping vibration and pressure wave. A numerical study using the vibration model shows that: 1) the coupling effect appears between piping acceleration and liquid pressure for a piping configuration having a natural frequency ratio ..nu.. = about 0.5 to 2.0; 2) the magnitude of seismically induced pressure reaches 0.7 kPa to 1 kPa per gal; and 3) the dead-mass model of liquid gives a nonconservative response depending on the pipe's geometrical configuration, compared to that from the pressure-wave-piping-interaction model.

  19. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  20. Frequency-response method for determination of dynamic stability characteristics of airplanes with automatic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Harry

    1947-01-01

    A frequency-response method for determining the critical control-gearing and hunting oscillations of airplanes with automatic pilots is presented. The method is graphical and has several advantages over the standard numerical procedure based on Routh's discriminant. The chief advantage of the method is that direct use can be made of the measured response characteristics of the automatic pilot. This feature is especially useful in determining the existence, amplitude, and frequency of the hunting oscillations that may be present when the automatic pilot has nonlinear dynamic characteristics. Several examples are worked out to illustrate the application of the frequency-response method in determining the effect of automatic-pilot lag or lead on critical control gearing and in determining the amplitude and frequency hunting. It is shown that the method may be applied to the case of a control geared to airplane motions about two axes.

  1. Energy harvesting from an autoparametric vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhimiao; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-11-01

    The combined control and energy harvesting characteristics of an autoparametric vibration absorber consisting of a base structure subjected to the external force and a cantilever beam with a tip mass are investigated. The piezoelectric sheets are attached to the cantilever beam to convert the vibrations of the base structure into electrical energy. The coupled nonlinear representative model is developed by using the extended Hamiton’s principle. The effects of the electrical load resistance on the frequency and damping ratio of the cantilever beam are analyzed. The impacts of the external force and load resistance on the structural displacements of the base structure and the beam and on the level of harvested energy are determined. The results show that the initial conditions have a significant impact on the system’s response. The relatively high level of energy harvesting is not necessarily accompanied with the minimum displacements of the base structure.

  2. A Method for Determination of Damping for Edgewise Blade Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, K.; Petersen, J. T.; Nim, E.; Øye, S.; Petersen, B.

    2000-10-01

    Violent edgewise blade vibrations have in recent years been a large problem for some stall-regulated wind turbines. Owing to the complexity of the phenomenon, it has been difficult to predict the risk of these vibrations with aeroelastic load prediction tools. One problem is the choice of parameters in the aeroelastic model, e.g. structural damping and aerodynamic aerofoil characteristics. In many cases a high degree of uncertainty in the predicted response exists and the need for experimental verification methods is obvious. In this work a new method to identify the effective damping for the edgewise blade mode shape for wind turbines has been developed. The method consists of an exciter mechanism which makes it possible to excite the edgewise blade mode shapes from the wind turbine nacelle. Furthermore, the method consists of an analysis method which enables a straightforward determination of the damping. The analysis method is based on a local blade whirl description of the edgewise blade vibrations. The method is verified on a Bonus wind turbine, and for this specific turbine the effective damping for edgewise blade vibrations has been determined. The results support the further development of aeroelastic models and show potential for fine-tuning of parameters of importance for the edgewise blade vibration problem. Furthermore, the method can be used for experimental investigation of the risk of edgewise blade vibrations for a specific turbine. Copyright

  3. Vibration modal analysis using all-optical photorefractive processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, T.; Telschow, K.

    1996-12-31

    A new experimental method for vibration modal analysis based on all- optical photorefractive processing is presented. The method utilizes an optical lock-in approach to measure phase variations in light scattered from optically rough, continuously vibrating surfaces. In this four-wave mixing technique, all-optical processing refers to mixing the object beam containing the frequency modulation due to vibration with a single frequency modulated pump beam in the photorefractive medium that processes the modulated signals. This allows for simple detection of the conjugate wavefront image at a CCD. The conjugate intensity is shown to be a function of the first-order ordinary Bessel function and linearly dependent on the vibration displacement induced phase. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the unique capabilities of the optical lock-in vibration detection technique to measure vibration signals with very narrow bandwidth (< 1 Hz) and high displacement sensitivity (sub-Angstrom). This narrow bandwidth detection can be achieved over a wide frequency range from the photorefractive response limit to the reciprocal of the photoinduced carrier recombination time. The technique is applied to determine the modal characteristics of a rigidly clamped circular disc from 10 kHz to 100 kHz.

  4. Six-Degree-of-Freedom Vibration Suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halwes, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    New system, total-rotor-isolation system (TRIS) employs liquid-inertia vibration-eliminator (LIVE) units, designed to isolate all six degrees of freedom of aircraft-fuselage dynamic response from continuously changing airloads developed by rotor. Vibration suppressor uses liquid mercury to damp vibrations. Results of flight tests indicated at least 95-percent reduction in vibration levels from rotor hub to pilot's seat.

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  6. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  7. Discomfort criteria for single-axis vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the fundamental relationships governing human subjective discomfort response to single-axis vibrations. The axes investigated were vertical, lateral, longitudinal, roll, and pitch, and the vibrations used were both sinusoidal and random in nature. Results of these investigations provided the basis for: (1) development of a scale of passenger discomfort that is common to all axes of vibration; and (2) generation of discomfort criteria for each axis of each axis and for both types of vibration. Furthermore, empirical equations describing discomfort responses within each axis of vibration are included.

  8. Postprandial glycaemic response: how is it influenced by characteristics of cereal products?

    PubMed

    Meynier, Alexandra; Goux, Aurélie; Atkinson, Fiona; Brack, Olivier; Vinoy, Sophie

    2015-06-28

    Cereal products exhibit a wide range of glycaemic indexes (GI), but the interaction of their different nutrients and starch digestibility on blood glucose response is not well known. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate how cereal product characteristics can contribute to GI and insulinaemic index and to the parameters describing glycaemic or insulinaemic responses (incremental AUC, maximum concentration and Δpeak). Moreover, interactions between the different cereal products characteristics and glycaemic response parameters were assessed for the first time. Relationships between the cereal products characteristics and the glycaemic response were analysed by partial least square regressions, followed by modelling. A database including 190 cereal products tested by the usual GI methodology was used. The model on glycaemic responses showed that slowly digestible starch (SDS), rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and fat and fibres, and several interactions involving them, significantly explain GI by 53 % and Δpeak of glycaemia by 60 %. Fat and fibres had important contributions to glycaemic response at low and medium SDS contents in cereal products, but this effect disappears at high SDS levels. We showed also for the first time that glycaemic response parameters are dependent on interactions between starch digestibility (interaction between SDS and RDS) and nutritional composition (interaction between fat and fibres) of the cereal products. We also demonstrated the non-linear effect of fat and fibres (significant effect of their quadratic terms). Hence, optimising both the formula and the manufacturing process of cereal products can improve glucose metabolism, which is recognised as strongly influential on human health. PMID:25998901

  9. Localised Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Dynamic Exercise With Whole Body Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Daniel; Elwell, Clare; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV) exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration). Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001) depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings. Key pointsWhole body vibration affects tissue oxygenation of the lateral gastrocnemius.The underlying mechanism could be either increased blood flow or a vasospastic response in the feet.The local metabolic cost of heel raise activity on the lateral gastrocnemius does not appear to be increased by whole body vibration. PMID:24149209

  10. Thermoelastic vibration test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Michael W.; Snyder, H. Todd

    1991-01-01

    The structural integrity of proposed high speed aircraft can be seriously affected by the extremely high surface temperatures and large temperature gradients throughout the vehicle's structure. Variations in the structure's elastic characteristics as a result of thermal effects can be observed by changes in vibration frequency, damping, and mode shape. Analysis codes that predict these changes must be correlated and verified with experimental data. The experimental modal test techniques and procedures used to conduct uniform, nonuniform, and transient thermoelastic vibration tests are presented. Experimental setup and elevated temperature instrumentation considerations are also discussed. Modal data for a 12 by 50 inch aluminum plate heated to a temperature of 475 F are presented. These data show the effect of heat on the plate's modal characteristics. The results indicated that frequency decreased, damping increased, and mode shape remained unchanged as the temperature of the plate was increased.

  11. Experimental verificatio of load resistance switching for global stabilization of high-energy response of a nonlinear wideband electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Masuda, A.; Sanada, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental verification of a self-excitation control of a resonance- type vibration energy harvester with a Duffing-type nonlinearity which is designed to perform effectively in a wide frequency range. For the conventional linear vibration energy harvester, the performance of the power generation at the resonance frequency and the bandwidth of the resonance peak are trade-off. The resonance frequency band can be expanded by introducing a Duffing-type nonlinear oscillator in order to enable the harvester to generate larger electric power in a wider frequency range. However, since such nonlinear oscillator can have multiple stable steady-state solutions in the resonance band, it is difficult for the nonlinear harvester to maintain the high performance of the power generation constantly. The principle of self-excitation and entrainment has been utilized to provide the global stability to the highest-energy solution by destabilizing other unexpected lower-energy solutions by introducing a switching circuit of the load resistance between positive and the negative values depending on the response amplitude of the oscillator. It has been experimentally validated that this control law imparts the self-excitation capability to the oscillator to show an entrainment into the highest-energy solution.

  12. High-pressure vibrational and polymorphic response of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene single crystals: Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Zbigniew A; Tao, Yuchuan; Gupta, Yogendra M

    2014-07-10

    Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the vibrational and polymorphic behavior of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7) to elucidate its structural and chemical stability under high pressure. Measurements were performed on single crystals compressed in a diamond anvil cell, and data were obtained over the entire frequency range of FOX-7 Raman activity. Several new features were observed with increase of pressure: (i) new vibrational peaks and discontinuity in the shifts of the peaks at 2 and 4.5 GPa, (ii) apparent coupling or mixing of several modes, and (iii) changes in the NH2 stretching spectral shape and modes shift. The spectral changes at 2 GPa, in contrast to previous reports, involved only a few peaks and likely resulted from a small molecular transformation. In contrast, changes at 4.5 GPa involved most of the modes, and the pressure for the onset and completion of the changes depended on the pressure medium. A large pressure hysteresis regarding the changes at 4.5 GPa implies a reconstructive transformation. We suggest that this transformation reflects a change in the balance between interlayer (van der Waals) and in-layer (H-bonding) interactions. Despite these transformations, further compression to 40 GPa and subsequent release of pressure did not cause any irreversible changes. This finding implies that FOX-7 has remarkable chemical stability under high pressures. The observed coupling between the various modes with increasing pressure was analyzed within the Fermi resonance model. The potential implication of the coupling of modes for shock insensitivity of FOX-7 is briefly discussed. PMID:24941445

  13. Vibration in The Ultrasonic Machining System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Chen, Zhigang; Zhong, Xinrong

    The rotary ultrasonic machining system is the vibration system, using the characteristics of the ultrasonic resonance. Based on the ultrasonic vibration model, the dynamic characteristics of the ultrasonic machining system are analyzed, and using the wave equations, the dynamic characteristics of the horn with the exponential transition are analyzed. Based on FEM, the dynamic characteristics of the horn with the exponential transition in the rotary ultrasonic machining system are analyzed.

  14. Neural Heterogeneities Determine Response Characteristics to Second-, but Not First-Order Stimulus Features

    PubMed Central

    Metzen, Michael G.; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2015-01-01

    Neural heterogeneities are seen ubiquitously, but how they determine neural response properties remains unclear. Here we show that heterogeneities can either strongly, or not at all, influence neural responses to a given stimulus feature. Specifically, we recorded from peripheral electroreceptor neurons, which display strong heterogeneities in their resting discharge activity, in response to naturalistic stimuli consisting of a fast time-varying waveform (i.e., first-order) whose amplitude (i.e., second-order or envelope) varied slowly in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Although electroreceptors displayed relatively homogeneous responses to first-order stimulus features, further analysis revealed two subpopulations with similar sensitivities that were excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope, respectively, for stimuli whose frequency content spanned the natural range. We further found that a linear–nonlinear cascade model incorporating the known linear response characteristics to first-order features and a static nonlinearity accurately reproduced experimentally observed responses to both first- and second-order features for all stimuli tested. Importantly, this model correctly predicted that the response magnitude is independent of either the stimulus waveform’s or the envelope’s frequency content. Further analysis of our model led to the surprising prediction that the mean discharge activity can be used to determine whether a given neuron is excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope. This prediction was validated by our experimental data. Thus, our results provide key insight as to how neural heterogeneities can determine response characteristics to some, but not other, behaviorally relevant stimulus features. PMID:25698748

  15. Neural heterogeneities determine response characteristics to second-, but not first-order stimulus features.

    PubMed

    Metzen, Michael G; Chacron, Maurice J

    2015-02-18

    Neural heterogeneities are seen ubiquitously, but how they determine neural response properties remains unclear. Here we show that heterogeneities can either strongly, or not at all, influence neural responses to a given stimulus feature. Specifically, we recorded from peripheral electroreceptor neurons, which display strong heterogeneities in their resting discharge activity, in response to naturalistic stimuli consisting of a fast time-varying waveform (i.e., first-order) whose amplitude (i.e., second-order or envelope) varied slowly in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Although electroreceptors displayed relatively homogeneous responses to first-order stimulus features, further analysis revealed two subpopulations with similar sensitivities that were excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope, respectively, for stimuli whose frequency content spanned the natural range. We further found that a linear-nonlinear cascade model incorporating the known linear response characteristics to first-order features and a static nonlinearity accurately reproduced experimentally observed responses to both first- and second-order features for all stimuli tested. Importantly, this model correctly predicted that the response magnitude is independent of either the stimulus waveform's or the envelope's frequency content. Further analysis of our model led to the surprising prediction that the mean discharge activity can be used to determine whether a given neuron is excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope. This prediction was validated by our experimental data. Thus, our results provide key insight as to how neural heterogeneities can determine response characteristics to some, but not other, behaviorally relevant stimulus features. PMID:25698748

  16. Nonlinear response and failure characteristics of clamped internally pressurized graphite-epoxy cylindrical panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boitnott, R. L.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Johnson, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized 4- to 16-ply cylindrical panels of graphite/epoxy are experimentally and analytically studied. Tests simulated the skin of a typical transport aircraft fuselage under loading to eventual failure. Aluminum test specimens were similarly tested and compared. All graphite/epoxy panels are found to withstand the internal pressures applied, which are well above the proof pressure loading expected for transport fuselage structures.

  17. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  18. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  19. Meta-analysis of digital game and study characteristics eliciting physiological stress responses.

    PubMed

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert-Jan; Van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Digital games have been used as stressors in a range of disciplines for decades. Nonetheless, the underlying characteristics of these stressors and the study in which the stressor was applied are generally not recognized for their moderating effect on the measured physiological stress responses. We have therefore conducted a meta-analysis that analyzes the effects of characteristics of digital game stressors and study design on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in studies carried out from 1976 to 2012. In order to assess the differing quality between study designs, a new scale is developed and presented, coined reliability of effect size. The results show specific and consistent moderating functions of both game and study characteristics, on average accounting for around 43%, and in certain cases up to 57% of the variance found in physiological stress responses. Possible cognitive and physiological processes underlying these moderating functions are discussed, and a new model integrating these processes with the moderating functions is presented. These findings indicate that a digital game stressor does not act as a stressor by virtue of being a game, but rather derives its stressor function from its characteristics and the methodology in which it is used. This finding, together with the size of the associated moderations, indicates the need for a standardization of digital game stressors. PMID:25950613

  20. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, in March 2010. Several speakers at this meeting were invited to contribute to the special section in this issue. As is clear from the articles in this special section, the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces continues to be a dynamic field of investigation. In fact, there is a resurgence of effort because the insights provided by surface dynamics are still fundamental to the development of an understanding of the microscopic factors that control surface structure formation, diffusion, reaction and structural stability. Examination of dynamics at surfaces thus complements and supplements the wealth of information that is obtained from real-space techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy. Vibrational dynamics is, of course, not limited to surfaces. Surfaces are important since they provide immediate deviation from the bulk. They display how lack of symmetry can lead to new structures, new local atomic environments and new types of dynamical modes. Nanoparticles, large molecules and nanostructures of all types, in all kinds of local environments, provide further examples of regions of reduced symmetry and coordination, and hence display characteristic vibrational modes. Given the tremendous advance in the synthesis of a variety of nanostructures whose functionalization would pave the way for nanotechnology, there is even greater need to engage in experimental and theoretical techniques that help extract their vibrational dynamics. Such knowledge would enable a more complete understanding and characterization of these nanoscale systems than would otherwise be the case. The papers presented here provide excellent examples of the kind of information that is revealed by vibrations at surfaces. Vibrations at surface contents Poisoning and non-poisoning oxygen on Cu(410)L Vattuone, V Venugopal, T Kravchuk, M Smerieri, L Savio and M Rocca Modifying protein adsorption by layers of glutathione pre-adsorbed on Au(111)Anne Vallée, Vincent Humblot, Christophe Méthivier, Paul Dumas and Claire-Marie Pradier Relating temperature dependence of atom scattering spectra to surface corrugationW W Hayes and J R Manson Effects of the commensurability and disorder on friction for the system Xe/CuA Franchini, V Bortolani, G Santoro and K Xheka Switching ability of nitro-spiropyran on Au(111): electronic structure changes as a sensitive probe during a ring-opening reactionChristopher Bronner, Gunnar Schulze, Katharina J Franke, José Ignacio Pascual and Petra Tegeder High-resolution phonon study of the Ag(100) surfaceK L Kostov, S Polzin and W Widdra On the interpretation of IETS spectra of a small organic molecule Karina Morgenstern

  1. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part I: Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    An ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be applied to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings by using both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting severaladditional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimization process. This paper, Part I, concerns derivation of a mathematical model of the plate with attached elements in the function of their shape and placement. The model is validated by means of simulations and laboratory experiments, and compared with models known from the literature. This paper is followed by a companion paper, Part II, where the optimization process is described. It includes arrangement of passive elements as well as actuators and sensors to improve controllability and observability measures, if active control is concerned.

  2. On the separation of internal and boundary damage in slender bars using longitudinal vibration frequencies and equivalent linearization of damaged bolted joint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argatov, Ivan; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-06-01

    The problem of detecting localized large-scale internal damage in structures with imperfect bolted joints is considered. The proposed damage detection strategy utilizes the structural damping and an equivalent linearization of the bolted lap joint response to separate the combined boundary damage from localized large-scale internal damage. The frequencies are found approximately using asymptotic analysis and a perturbation technique. The proposed approach is illustrated on an example of longitudinal vibrations in a slender elastic bar with both ends clamped by bolted lap joints with different levels of damage. It is found that while the proposed method allows for the estimation of internal damage severity once the crack location is known, it gives multiple possible crack locations so that other methods (e.g., mode shapes) are required to obtain a unique crack location.

  3. Glycemic responses and sensory characteristics of whole yellow pea flour added to novel functional foods.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Kassis, Amira N; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding regarding postprandial glycemic responses to foods containing whole yellow-pea flour (WYPF) remains unknown. This, alongside concerns that WYPF possesses unfavorable sensory characteristics has limited the incorporation of WYPF into new functional food products as a healthy novel ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate how WYPF modulates postprandial glycemic responses as well as sensory characteristics in novel foods. In a single-blind crossover trial, the present study assessed postprandial glycemic responses of banana bread, biscotti, and spaghetti containing either WYPF or whole wheat flour (WWF). Boiled yellow peas (BYP) and white bread (WB) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. On day 1, subjects evaluated appearance, taste, texture, smell as well as overall acceptance of each WYPF and WWF food on a 5-point hedonic scale. WYPF banana bread (97.9 +/- 17.8 mmol x min/L) and biscotti (83 +/- 13 mmol x min/L), as well as BYP (112.3 +/- 19.9 mmol x min/L), reduced (P < 0.05) glycemic responses compared to WB (218.1 +/- 29.5 mmol x min/L). The glycemic response of WYPF pasta (160.7 +/- 19.4 mmol x min/L) was comparable to WB. WYPF biscotti produced a lower (P = 0.019) postprandial glycemic response compared to WWF biscotti (117.2 +/- 13.1 mmol x min/L). Hedonic responses between corresponding foods were similar except for the WYPF pasta (2.9 +/- 0.9) which possessed a lower sensory score (P = 0.02) for smell compared to WWF pasta (3.6 +/- 1). WYPF can be used to produce low-glycemic functional foods possessing sensory attributes that are comparable to identical food products containing WWF. PMID:20492127

  4. Evaluation of the possibility and response characteristics of laser-induced tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Ji-Sun; Jung, Gu-In; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Choi, Seungmoon; Park, Sung-Jun; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-08-18

    In this study, we examined the possibility and perceptual response characteristics of tactile sense induced by laser stimulation to the finger with different laser energy densities through human response experiments. 15 healthy adult males and 4 healthy adult females with an age of 22.62.2 years were tested. A frequency-doubled Q-switched laser was used with a wavelength of 532 nm and a 5 ns pulse width. The experimental trial spanned a total of 30 s and included a rest phase (19 s), a stimulation phase (7 s), and a response phase (4 s). During the rest phase, subjects kept their fingers comfortable. During the stimulation phase, one of three types of laser energy density (13.5, 16.6, 19.8 mJ/cm(2)) or a sham stimulation was used to irradiate the distal phalanx on the right index finger. During the response phase, the cognitive response to the laser stimulation was recorded by a PC by pressing the response button. The confusion matrix was configured to evaluate the possibility that the tactile sense was caused by the laser. In addition, changes in the response characteristics were observed according to three types of laser energy densities. From the analysis of the confusion matrix, the accuracy and sensitivity were not high. In contrast, precision and specificity were found to be high. Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation between the laser irradiation and tactile perception, indicating that tactile sense can be induced using a laser in a mid-air manner. In addition, it was found that as the laser energy density increased, the tactile perception possibility also increased. PMID:26145316

  5. The vibrations of texture

    PubMed Central

    Bensmaïa, Sliman J.; Hollins, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Pacinian channel has been implicated in the perception of fine textures (Hollins et al., Somatosens Mot Res 18: 253–262, 2001a). In the present study, we investigate candidate codes for Pacinian-mediated roughness perception. We use a Hall effect transducer to record the vibrations elicited in the skin when a set of textured surfaces is passively presented to the index finger. The peak frequency of the vibrations is found to decrease systematically as spatial period increases. The power of the vibrations—weighted according to the spectral sensitivity of the Pacinian system—increases with spatial period for all but the coarsest surfaces. By varying the scanning velocity, we manipulate the temporal and intensive characteristics of the texture-induced vibrations and assess the effect of the manipulation on perceived roughness. We find that doubling the scanning velocity does not result in the substantial decrease in roughness predicted by a frequency theory of vibrotactile roughness perception. On the other hand, the effects of speed on roughness match those of speed on power. We propose that the roughness of a fine surface (spatial period<200 μm) is a function of the Pacinian-weighted power of the vibrations it elicits. PMID:12745443

  6. Teacher Characteristics Influence Responsiveness to a Course and a Consultancy Focused on Effective Teacher-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Bridget; Hamre, Bridget; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Pianta, Robert; Downer, Jason; Burchinal, Margaret; Howes, Carollee

    2012-01-01

    In the current study characteristics of the teacher and classroom that influence teacher responsiveness to the course or consultancy are explored. If classroom quality or characteristics of teachers, such as anxiety levels or efficacy in teaching prior to intervention participation are predictive of responsiveness, then future programs will be…

  7. Fear responses and postmortem muscle characteristics of turkeys of two genetic lines.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M A; Lee, H C; Kang, I; Swanson, J C

    2015-09-01

    Commercial turkey production has increased greatly in recent decades. Along with increased production, problems with turkey meat quality have also increased. Research with other species has demonstrated that differences in meat quality exist among pigs and cattle differing in characteristics such as fearfulness. However, associations between fear responses and postmortem (PM) muscle characteristics related to the meat quality of turkeys have not been examined. This study evaluated the test-retest repeatability of responses of male commercial (COMM) and randombred (RB) turkeys in an open field (OF) test, which is used to assess fear and activity levels of poultry. Another objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between behavioral OF responses and PM breast muscle characteristics (pH and R-value) that are related to meat quality. Thirdly, this study evaluated differences in pH and R-value between the turkey lines. Male COMM and RB turkeys were each housed in groups in 4 pens. Turkeys were individually tested in an OF (2.74×2.74 m, divided into 81 squares) at 1, 4, and 11 wk (COMM N=27; RB N=33). Turkeys were then grouped into clusters based on a cluster analysis of OF behavior. Turkeys were processed and meat quality characteristics were evaluated at 15-17 wk for COMM and 20-21 wk for RB turkeys. Results were analyzed using a mixed model (SAS 9.4). Breast muscle pH and R-value did not differ between genetic lines, and there were no differences in pH and R-value among clusters within genetic lines. These findings suggest that OF responses measured during rearing are not related to PM breast muscle pH and R-value, which ultimately affect meat quality. Further research is needed to assess whether other types of fear responses are associated with meat quality and whether differences in R-value between genetic lines are associated with differences in other meat quality characteristics. PMID:26195807

  8. Application of the Method of Stein and Sanders to the Calculation of Vibration Characteristics of a 45 deg Delta-Wing Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Warner, Paul G., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Generalized influence coefficients are calculated by the method of NACA TN 3640 for a large-scale, built-up, 450 delta-wing specimen. These are used together with appropriate generalized masses to obtain the natural modes and frequencies in symmetric and antisymmetric free-free vibration. The resulting frequencies are compared with those obtained experimentally and are found to be consistently high. Possible sources of the disparities are discussed.

  9. Response characteristics of laser diffraction particle size analyzers - Optical sample volume extent and lens effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The response characteristics of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments were studied theoretically and experimentally. In particular, the extent of optical sample volume and the effects of receiving lens properties were investigated in detail. The experimental work was performed with a particle size analyzer using a calibration reticle containing a two-dimensional array of opaque circular disks on a glass substrate. The calibration slide simulated the forward-scattering characteristics of a Rosin-Rammler droplet size distribution. The reticle was analyzed with collection lenses of 63 mm, 100 mm, and 300 mm focal lengths using scattering inversion software that determined best-fit Rosin-Rammler size distribution parameters. The data differed from the predicted response for the reticle by about 10 percent. A set of calibration factor for the detector elements was determined that corrected for the nonideal response of the instrument. The response of the instrument was also measured as a function of reticle position, and the results confirmed a theoretical optical sample volume model presented here.

  10. Acoustic vibration induced high electromagnetic responses of Fe3O4 nano-hollow spheres in the THz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Rupali; Sarkar, Debasish; Pal, Monalisa; Serite, Kazunori; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Mandal, Kalyan

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we investigate the origin of enhanced absorption and complex conductivity of magnetite (Fe3O4) nano-hollow spheres (NHSs) in contrast to its nanoparticles (NPs) configuration in the frequency range 0.4-2.0?THz. The maximum absorption for NHSs and NPs of the same average diameter (~100?nm) are found to be 246.27 and 48.35?cm-1 at 1.8?THz, respectively. A detailed study suggests that the multiple resonance peaks in the absorption spectra are due to low frequency acoustic vibrational phonon modes of Fe3O4 nanostructures. Moreover, we demonstrate that the magnitude of total absorption can be tailored by varying the shell thickness of NHSs. It is found to increase with increasing shell thickness, and attain a maximum value of 498.5?cm-1 for the NHSs of average diameter 350?nm at 1.8?THz. The invariance of frequency dependent magnetic permeability points out that the absorption is basically due to dielectric loss instead of magnetic loss. The enhanced THz conductivity of Fe3O4 NHSs, as compared to NPs is described in light of thermally activated polaronic hopping which is found to increase with increasing THz absorption. Finally, the size dependent THz conductivity of NHSs confirms its sole dependence on the magnitude of THz absorptivity.

  11. Using Surface Electromyography To Assess Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Response Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandra J.; Perrin, David H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the continuum of muscular responses that typically occur with joint perturbation. The applications and limitations of surface electromyography (sEMG) in evaluating these responses are also addressed. Research applications assessing sex differences in these neuromuscular response characteristics are discussed along with suggestions for future research. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched from 1969 through 1998. Sport DISCUS was searched from 1975 through 1998. Terms searched included “anterior cruciate ligament,” “epidemiology,” “neuromuscular control,” “neuromuscular performance,” “electromyography,” “latency,” “reflex,” “electromechanical delay,” “dynamic stability,” “intrinsic stiffness,” “short-range stiffness,” “muscle,” “mechanoreceptors,” and “reaction time.” Data Synthesis: It is widely accepted that efficient neuromuscular control is essential to dynamic joint stability and protection. Many studies have established the significant role of the muscles, and particularly the hamstrings, in providing knee stability. By observing the timing, phasing, and recruitment of reflexive muscular activation after a loading stress to the knee, we can better understand the coordinative mechanisms necessary to protect the joint and prevent ligament injury. A number of research models have employed the use of sEMG to evaluate neuromuscular responses at the knee after joint loading or perturbation. However, very few studies have specifically addressed potential sex differences in these response characteristics. Conclusions/Recommendations: From the limited research available, it appears that a sex difference may exist in some aspects of neuromuscular responses. However, further research is needed to explore these differences at the knee and their potential role as predisposing factors to the higher incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Future studies should examine sex differences in neuromuscular response characteristics at the knee under functional, weight-bearing conditions while controlling for training and other confounding variables. The limitations of sEMG should be considered when interpreting neuromuscular response studies. PMID:16558560

  12. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  13. Clinical Characteristics and Patterns and Predictors of Response to Therapy in Collagenous and Lymphocytic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Dora; Salari, Behzad; Stewart, Kathleen O; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Richter, James R; Chan, Andrew T; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Khalili, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC) are chronic inflammatory disorders of the colon. There is a paucity of data on differences in etiology, natural history, and treatment response between CC and LC. METHODS Between 2002 to 2013, we identified new diagnoses of CC and LC using the Research Patient Data Registry in a tertiary referral center. We used Chi Square or Fischer exact test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to compare the differences in clinical characteristics, treatment types, and response rates between LC and CC. RESULTS Through 2013, we confirmed 131 patients with a new diagnosis of MC (55 LC, 76 CC). Compared to cases of LC, patients with a diagnosis of CC were more likely to be women (86% vs. 69%, P = 0.03), have elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 28 vs. 13 mm/hr, P = 0.04), and less likely to be diabetic (5% vs. 18%, P = 0.02). Budesonide was the most effective treatment for both CC and LC (94% and 80%, respectively). However, there were no statistically significant differences in response to various treatments according to the type of microscopic colitis (All P > 0.10). Older age at the time of diagnosis was associated with better response to bismuth subsalicylate (OR 1.76; 95% CI, 1.21–2.56 for every 5-year increase) for both CC and LC. CONCLUSION Despite differences in the clinical characteristics, response rates to available treatments appeared to be similar in both LC and CC. Older patients may have a better response to bismuth subsalicylate therapy. PMID:25997458

  14. Characteristics of human B cells responsive to the T-independent mitogen Branhamella catarrhalis.

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, J E; Calogeras, A

    1986-01-01

    Non-T cells from tonsil or blood were fractionated according to buoyant density, isotype of surface immunoglobulin, or the ability to form rosettes with mouse erythrocytes. Each fraction was tested for the ability to proliferate in response to B. catarrhalis (Bc) and, for comparison, Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 (SAC) or an MLR supernatant (TF). Cells in all density fractions responded to Bc, the greatest response occurring in the high-density cell fraction. SAC could similarly induce proliferation in high-density cells, in contrast to TF which preferentially activated cells in the low-density fraction. When cells were fractionated by rosetting with mouse erythrocytes, both fractions (MRBC-R+ and MRBC-R-) responded to Bc and to SAC, whereas the greatest response to TF occurred in the MRBC-R- cell fraction. Depletion of sIgD+ sIgM+ cells almost completely abolished the response to Bc, suggesting that responsive cells express both these classes of immunoglobulin on their membrane. Furthermore inclusion of anti-delta antibodies in cultures resulted in failure to proliferate in response to Bc. These data strongly suggest that Bc, like SAC but in contrast to TF, is able to stimulate proliferation in cells with the characteristics of resting B cells, i.e., high-density, sIgD+ cells which form rosettes with MRBC. This may be related to the fact that Bc, like SAC, is able to bind to human immunoglobulins. PMID:3486820

  15. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  16. Ride quality criteria. [transportation system interior and passenger response to environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ride quality refers to the interior or passenger environment of a transportation system as well as the passenger response to the environment. Ride quality factors are illustrated with the aid of a diagram presenting inputs to vehicle, the vehicle transfer function, the ride environment, the passenger response function, and the passenger ride response. The reported investigation considers the ride environment as measured on a variety of air and surface vehicles, the passenger response to the environment as determined from laboratory and field surveys, and criteria/standards for vibration, noise, and combined stimuli. Attention is given to the vertical vibration characteristics in cruise for aircraft and automobile, the aircraft vibration levels for various operating regimes, comparative noise levels during cruise, the discomfort level for a 9 Hz sinusoidal vibration, equal discomfort contours for vertical vibration, subjective response to noise in a speech situation, and noise and vibration levels for constant discomfort contours.

  17. Association of alexithymic characteristics and posttraumatic stress responses following medical treatment for children with refractory hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, I; Tsuruta, T; Hirabayashi, N; Asukai, N

    2001-12-01

    Recent research has examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following medical treatment for children with refractory hematological diseases such as leukemia. However, much remains unknown. This study examined the association of alexithymic characteristics on the manifestation of posttraumatic stress responses in 33 children with refractory hematological diseases. Of 33 children, 27 (81.8%) exhibited posttraumatic stress responses following medical treatment for refractory hematological diseases. The frequency of posttraumatic stress responses was significantly higher than with children who experienced severe flood disaster. Also, the severity of posttraumatic stress responses was significantly stronger than for children who experienced severe flood disaster. Moreover, children with refractory hematological diseases were more likely to exhibit alexithymic characteristics. The alexithymic characteristics were significantly and positively correlated with avoidance and emotional numbing among posttraumatic stress responses. The results suggest the possibility that alexithymic characteristics may be predictive of the manifestation of avoidance and emotional numbing among posttraumatic stress responses following medical treatment for refractory hematological diseases. PMID:11824712

  18. Differential Responses to Food Price Changes by Personal Characteristic: A Systematic Review of Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mizdrak, Anja; Scarborough, Peter; Waterlander, Wilma E.; Rayner, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Fiscal interventions to improve population diet have been recommended for consideration by many organisations including the World Health Organisation and the United Nations and policies such as sugar-sweetened beverage taxes have been implemented at national and sub-national levels. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the differential impact of fiscal interventions on population sub-groups and this remains a barrier to implementation. Objective To examine how personal characteristics (such as socioeconomic status, sex, impulsivity, and income) moderate changes in purchases of targeted foods in response to food and beverage price changes in experimental settings. Design Systematic review Data Sources Online databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, EconLit and PsycInfo), reference lists of previous reviews, and additional data from study authors. Study Selection We included randomised controlled trials where food and beverage prices were manipulated and reported differential effects of the intervention on participant sub-groups defined according to personal characteristics. Data Analysis Where possible, we extracted data to enable the calculation of price elasticities for the target foods by personal characteristic. Results 8 studies were included in the review. Across studies, the difference in price elasticity varied from 0.02 to 2.43 between groups within the same study. 11 out of the total of 18 comparisons of own-price elasticity estimates by personal characteristic differed by more than 0.2 between groups. Income related factors were the most commonly considered and there was an indication that own-price elasticity estimates do vary by income but the direction of this effect was not clear. Conclusion Experimental studies provide an opportunity to examine the differential effects of fiscal measures to improve population diets. Patterns in price sensitivity by personal characteristics are complex. General conclusions pertaining to the effects of personal characteristics on price sensitivity are not supported by the evidence, which shows heterogeneity between studies and populations. Trial Registration PROSPERO CRD42014009705 PMID:26151133

  19. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  20. Ab initio determination of geometries and vibrational characteristics of building blocks of organic superconductors: 4,5-Ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-thione, and 4,5-ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-one.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, S; Singh, Deepshikha; Prasad, R L; Yadav, R A

    2010-08-01

    RHF and DFT calculations were carried out to study the optimized molecular geometries and vibrational characteristics of the 4,5-ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-thione (EDT-DTT) and 4,5-ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-one (EDT-DTO) molecules and their radical cations and anions. It is found that the anionic radical of the EDT-DTO molecule is unstable. Both the neutral molecules and their radical cations have non-planar structures with C(2) symmetry while the radical anion of the EDT-DTT molecule has non-planar structure with C(1) symmetry. It is found that the most of the vibrational characteristics of the radicals are similar to their corresponding neutral molecules, however, for some of the modes significant changes are noticed. As a result of anionic radicalization of EDT-DTT, the IR intensity and Raman activity increase and Raman band becomes polarized for both the CH(2) twisting modes. Drastic enhancements in the Raman activity and reduced IR intensity are noticed for the C=S/O stretching mode in going from neutral molecules to their radical ions consistent with charge separation along this bond. The C=S and C=C stretching wavenumber changes are consistent with corresponding bond length changes in going from neutral to their radical ions. PMID:20430691

  1. Ab initio determination of geometries and vibrational characteristics of building blocks of organic superconductors: 4,5-Ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-thione, and 4,5-ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Singh, Deepshikha; Prasad, R. L.; Yadav, R. A.

    2010-08-01

    RHF and DFT calculations were carried out to study the optimized molecular geometries and vibrational characteristics of the 4,5-ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-thione (EDT-DTT) and 4,5-ethylenedithio-1,3-dithiole-2-one (EDT-DTO) molecules and their radical cations and anions. It is found that the anionic radical of the EDT-DTO molecule is unstable. Both the neutral molecules and their radical cations have non-planar structures with C 2 symmetry while the radical anion of the EDT-DTT molecule has non-planar structure with C 1 symmetry. It is found that the most of the vibrational characteristics of the radicals are similar to their corresponding neutral molecules, however, for some of the modes significant changes are noticed. As a result of anionic radicalization of EDT-DTT, the IR intensity and Raman activity increase and Raman band becomes polarized for both the CH 2 twisting modes. Drastic enhancements in the Raman activity and reduced IR intensity are noticed for the C dbnd S/O stretching mode in going from neutral molecules to their radical ions consistent with charge separation along this bond. The C dbnd S and C dbnd C stretching wavenumber changes are consistent with corresponding bond length changes in going from neutral to their radical ions.

  2. Dynamic response characteristics of dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Joseph A.; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Scott-Emuakpor, Onome E.; Cross, Charles J.; Slater, Joseph C.

    2015-02-01

    New turbine engine designs requiring secondary flow compression often look to dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors (DFIBRs) since these stages have the ability to perform work on the secondary, or bypassed, flow-field. While analogous to traditional integrally bladed rotor stages, DFIBR designs have many differences that result in unique dynamic response characteristics that must be understood to avoid fatigue. This work investigates these characteristics using reduced-order models (ROMs) that incorporate mistuning through perturbations to blade frequencies. This work provides an alternative to computationally intensive geometric-mistuning approaches for DFIBRs by utilizing tuned blade mode reductions and substructure coupling in cyclic coordinates. Free and forced response results are compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions to determine if any errors are related to the reduced-order model formulation reduction methods. It is shown that DFIBRs have many more frequency veering regions than their single flow-path integrally blade rotor (IBR) counterparts. Modal families are shown to transition between system, inner-blade, and outer-blade motion. Furthermore, findings illustrate that while mode localization of traditional IBRs is limited to a single or small subset of blades, DFIBRs can have modal energy localized to either an inner- or outer-blade set resulting in many blades responding above tuned levels. Lastly, ROM forced response predictions compare well to full FEM predictions for the two test cases shown.

  3. Evaluation of Vibration Response Imaging (VRI) Technique and Difference in VRI Indices Among Non-Smokers, Active Smokers, and Passive Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongying; Chen, Jichao; Cao, Jinying; Mu, Lan; Hu, Zhenyu; He, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Vibration response imaging (VRI) is a new technology for lung imaging. Active smokers and non-smokers show differences in VRI findings, but no data are available for passive smokers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of VRI and to assess the differences in VRI findings among non-smokers, active smokers, and passive smokers. Material/Methods Healthy subjects (n=165: 63 non-smokers, 56 active smokers, and 46 passive smokers) with normal lung function were enrolled. Medical history, physical examination, lung function test, and VRI were performed for all subjects. Correlation between smoking index and VRI scores (VRIS) were performed. Results VRI images showed progressive and regressive stages representing the inspiratory and expiratory phases bilaterally in a vertical and synchronized manner in non-smokers. Vibration energy curves with low expiratory phase and plateau were present in 6.35% and 3.17%, respectively, of healthy non-smokers, 41.07% and 28.60% of smokers, and 39.13% and 30.43% of passive smokers, respectively. The massive energy peak in the non-smokers, smokers, and passive-smokers was 1.77±0.27, 1.57±0.29, and 1.66±0.33, respectively (all P<0.001). A weak but positive correlation was observed between VRIS and smoking index. Conclusions VRI can intuitively show the differences between non-smokers and smokers. VRI revealed that passive smoking can also harm the lungs. VRI could be used to visually persuade smokers to give up smoking. PMID:26212715

  4. Role of growth temperature on the frequency response characteristics of pentacene-based organic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yayun; Zhang, Yang; He, Wenqiang; Liu, Chuan; Minari, Takeo; Wu, Sujuan; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-03-01

    The ac frequency response characteristics (FRC) of organic thin film transistors and metal-insulator semiconductor diodes were highly improved by controlling the morphology and electrical characteristics of semiconducting pentacene films. The devices with films grown at 50 °C show much higher cutoff frequency and better frequency stability of flat-band voltage, as compared to those with films grown at other temperatures below or above. The improvement mainly originates from the maximum field effect carrier mobility of 0.78 cm2 V-1 s-1 and a small metal/organic contact resistance (Rc) obtained in the optimum thin film transistors. Our results indicate growth temperature precisely tunes the film microstructure and metal/semiconductor interface, which together determine the FRC of pentacene-based organic devices.

  5. Point Response Characteristics for the CERES/EOS-PM, FM3 & FM4 instruments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paden, Jack; Smith, G. Louis; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the point source functions (PSF s) of the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES,) Earth Observing System (EOS,) afternoon platform (PM,) Flight Model 3 (FM3,) and Flight Model 4 (FM4) scanning instruments. The PSF (also known as the Point Response Function, or PRF) is vital to the accurate geo-location of the remotely sensed radiance measurements acquired by the instrument. This paper compares the characteristics of the FM3 and FM4 instruments with the earlier Proto Flight Model (PFM) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) platform, and the FM1 and FM2 Models on the EOS morning orbiting (AM) platform, which has recently been renamed "Terra". All of the PSF s were found to be quite comparable, and the previously noted "spreading" characteristic of the window (water vapor) channel PSF is analyzed Keywords: PSF, PRF, CERES, TRMM, EOS, Earth Radiation Budget

  6. [Response of morphological characteristics of Populus euphratica nebkhas to groundwater in Birkum Desert, west of Taklimakan].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan-he; Lai, Feng-bing; Chen, Shu-jiang

    2015-09-01

    By regarding the east of Birkum desert of the west of Taklimakan as research areas, the paper measured the basic morphological characteristics of Populus euphratica nebkhas through real-time kinematics, got the relevant data of groundwater by manual drilling, and analyzed the response of emorphological characteristics of P. euphratica nebkhas to groundwater. The results showed that the change range of morphological parameters of P. euphratica nebkhas was large. Groundwater infil- trated the research areas from west, south and southwest to northwest and the depth of groundwater ranged from 0.15 m to 83.2 m. Except for the maximums of the length and circumference, the other morphological parameters of P. euphratica nebkhas had a negative relation with the depth of groundwater. The volume of P. euphratica nebkhas was mainly in the range of 63.54-91.24 m3. PMID:26785540

  7. Acute effects of Dry Immersion on kinematic characteristics of postural corrective responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayenko, D. G.; Miller, T. F.; Melnik, K. A.; Netreba, A. I.; Khusnutdinova, D. R.; Kitov, V. V.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Gerasimenko, Y. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-04-01

    Impairments in balance control are inevitable following exposure to microgravity. However, the role of particular sensory system in postural disorders at different stages of the exposure to microgravity still remains unknown. We used a method called Dry Immersion (DI), as a ground-based model of microgravity, to elucidate the effects of 6-h of load-related afferent inputs on kinematic characteristics of postural corrective responses evoked by pushes to the chest of different intensities during upright standing. The structure of postural corrective responses was altered following exposure to DI, which was manifested by: (1) an increase of the ankle and knee flexion during perturbations of medium intensity, (2) the lack of the compensatory hip extension, as well as diminished knee and ankle flexion with a further increase of the perturbation intensity to submaximal level. We suggest that the lack of weight-bearing increases the reactivity of the balance control system, whereas the ability to scale the responses proportionally to the perturbation intensity decreases. Disrupted neuromuscular coordination of postural corrective responses following DI can be attributed to adaptive neural modifications on the spinal and cortical levels. The present study provides evidence that even a short-term lack of load-related afferent inputs alters kinematic patterns of postural corrective responses, and can result in decreased balance control. Because vestibular input is not primarily affected during the DI exposure, our results indicate that activity and the state of the load-related afferents play critical roles in balance control following real or simulated microgravity.

  8. Research on the response characteristics of solenoid valve of the air-jet loom by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuzhen; Deng, Ruoyu; Jin, Yingzi; Hu, Xudong

    2013-12-01

    Solenoid valve is one of the executive parts of weft insertion control system. According to the response characteristics of the solenoid valve, an improved design becomes a necessity. Firstly, the numerical model was established after analyzing the solenoid valve during its start-up and shut-down. Comparing the simulation data with the practical data, it is verified that the numerical simulation model has a high feasibility. Secondly, excitation voltage and spring pre-compression were adjusted respectively, and the response rules after adjusting were investigated. The research of the study shows: the response time tends to be inverse proportional to the excitation voltage during start-up, and it becomes a constant value with the increase of the excitation voltage; the response time is proportional to the spring pre-compression when the solenoid valve starts up, it is inverse proportional to spring pre-compression when the solenoid valve shuts down. And the total response time is a constant value with the increase of the spring pre-compression. Therefore, the value of the excitation voltage and the spring pre-compression should be selected when the curve is becoming flatten. The results of the research can provide the reference to the further development of the solenoid valve.

  9. Approximating SIR-B response characteristics and estimating wave height and wavelength for ocean imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, David G.

    1987-01-01

    NASA Space Shuttle Challenger SIR-B ocean scenes are used to derive directional wave spectra for which speckle noise is modeled as a function of Rayleigh random phase coherence downrange and Poisson random amplitude errors inherent in the Doppler measurement of along-track position. A Fourier filter that preserves SIR-B image phase relations is used to correct the stationary and dynamic response characteristics of the remote sensor and scene correlator, as well as to subtract an estimate of the speckle noise component. A two-dimensional map of sea surface elevation is obtained after the filtered image is corrected for both random and deterministic motions.

  10. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  11. A torsion quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Daolin; Bishop, Steven

    2015-03-01

    A torsion vibration isolator with quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) is proposed to attenuate the transmission of torsional vibration along a shaft system, which also plays a role of coupling between shafts. A pre-compressed cam-roller mechanism is designed to provide torsional negative stiffness that counteracts with the positive torsion stiffness of the vulcanized rubber between shafts. With the design parameters are set to satisfy a unique condition, the stiffness of the isolator delivers a QZS property about the equilibrium position. A nonlinear mathematical model is developed and its dynamic characteristics are further analyzed by using the Harmonic Balance method. A typical folded resonance curve occurs when the vibration amplitude is plotted as the excitation frequency is varied, illustrating a jump phenomenon in the response. The efficiency of vibration attenuation is estimated under a designed torque load, showing that the torsion QZS vibration isolator outperforms the corresponding linear counterpart, especial in low frequency ranges. Furthermore, the torque transmissibility of the QZS isolator is also studied to demonstrate the performance of the QZS isolator when the actual torque deviates from the design load.

  12. Food vibrations: Asian spice sets lips trembling

    PubMed Central

    Hagura, Nobuhiro; Barber, Harry; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Szechuan pepper, a widely used ingredient in the cuisine of many Asian countries, is known for the tingling sensation it induces on the tongue and lips. While the molecular mechanism by which Szechuan pepper activates tactile afferent fibres has been clarified, the tingling sensation itself has been less studied, and it remains unclear which fibres are responsible. We investigated the somatosensory perception of tingling in humans to identify the characteristic temporal frequency and compare this to the established selectivity of tactile afferents. Szechuan pepper was applied to the lower lip of participants. Participants judged the frequency of the tingling sensation on the lips by comparing this with the frequencies of mechanical vibrations applied to their right index finger. The perceived frequency of the tingling was consistently at around 50 Hz, corresponding to the range of tactile RA1 afferent fibres. Furthermore, adaptation of the RA1 channel by prolonged mechanical vibration reliably reduced the tingling frequency induced by Szechuan pepper, confirming that the frequency-specific tactile channel is shared between Szechuan pepper and mechanical vibration. Combining information about molecular reactions at peripheral receptors with quantitative psychophysical measurement may provide a unique method for characterizing unusual experiences by decomposing them into identifiable minimal units of sensation. PMID:24026819

  13. Dose response characteristics of polymethacrylic acid gel (PMAAG) for a polymerization-based dosimeter using NMR.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, S M; Elias, S; Jumiah, H; Asri, M T M; Masrianis, A; Ab Rahman, M Z; Taiman, K; Abdul Rashid, M Y

    2004-05-01

    The radiation-response characteristics of polymetharylic acid gel dosimeter prepared with different concentrations of monomer and cross-linker is described in these studies. The dosimeters were prepared under the hypoxic condition in a glove box and were then irradiated with gamma-rays produced by Co-60 radionuclide that was generated at 1.25MeV energy. The irradiation took place at different doses ranged from 0Gy to 19Gy. Due to the radiation activities, chain-reaction polymerisation processes had taken place in the formation of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) gel, which cause the dose response mechanism increased in the NMR relaxation rates of protons. It has been observed that for higher concentration of monomer and cross-linker, the polymerization rate was increased. PMID:15468893

  14. Frequency-Response Characteristics of a Single-Link Flexible Joint Manipulator and Possible Trajectory Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DIKEN, H.

    2000-06-01

    A single-link manipulator consisting of servomotor, elastic shaft and rigid link is chosen to represent an elastic control system. Equations of the torsional elastic system are derived including the servomotor control system parameters. The transfer function of the elastic control system is obtained including not only control system parameters but also the natural frequency and the damping ratio of the torsional vibratory system. Non-dimensional parameters such as the ratio of the structural natural frequency to the substructural natural frequency and the ratio of the substructural natural frequency to the control system frequency are defined. The effects of these parameters on the frequency response of the system are investigated. A simple and effective method using the frequency-response characteristics is proposed to track a cycloidal trajectory precisely.

  15. Using cross correlations of turbulent flow-induced ambient vibrations to estimate the structural impulse response. Application to structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Winkel, Eric S; Bourgoyne, Dwayne A; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steve L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2007-04-01

    It has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an estimate of the impulse response (or Green's function) between two receivers can be obtained from the cross correlation of diffuse wave fields at these two receivers in various environments and frequency ranges: ultrasonics, civil engineering, underwater acoustics, and seismology. This result provides a means for structural monitoring using ambient structure-borne noise only, without the use of active sources. This paper presents experimental results obtained from flow-induced random vibration data recorded by pairs of accelerometers mounted within a flat plate or hydrofoil in the test section of the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The experiments were conducted at high Reynolds number (Re > 50 million) with the primary excitation source being turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the upper and lower surfaces of the plate or foil. Identical deterministic time signatures emerge from the noise cross-correlation function computed via robust and simple processing of noise measured on different days by a pair of passive sensors. These time signatures are used to determine and/or monitor the structural response of the test models from a few hundred to a few thousand Hertz. PMID:17471715

  16. Real modes of vibration and hybrid modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovstam, K.

    Based on continuous Hilbert space basis functions and mean square convergence properties of spatial generalised Fourier series a new technique for hybrid modal analysis (HMA) is proposed. The technique utilises a mix of experimental, measured vibration responses and good numerical approximations of well defined, three-dimensional, real, normal modes. The modes are assumed to be solutions to an elastic, eigenvalue problem corresponding to the true geometry of the analysed body or structure. Starting from a known geometry and a suitable set of modes, it is shown that the measured data may be supplemented with spatial information about the whole vibrational displacement field which is correctly represented by the chosen set of complete (Hilbert space), modal basis vector fields. The spatial information is extracted from the measured vibration responses by curve fitting a truncated modal response model to the data. As a result of the curve fit a number of generalised Fourier coefficient spectra are obtained which together with the corresponding modes may be used to predict or simulate responses which were not measured or used in the curve fit. Given also the true mass density field of the body, the time average of the kinetic energy of the whole body may be approximated using only a restricted set of measured vibration responses. The method is completely general and applicable in all cases where the vibrational displacements are small enough compared to the characteristic dimensions of the analysed body. The effect of modal truncation and means to approximate corresponding dynamic displacement residuals are discussed for linear, anisotropic solid bodies and structures with general damping. Modal coupling due to damping and unknown elastic properties are also discussed. The method has been tested, with very good results, on experimental data measured with a laser doppler vibrometer on a plexiglas plate excited with a shaker in the frequency range 25-500 Hz.

  17. Comprehensive studies of response characteristics of organic photodetectors based on rubrene and C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dezhi; Xu, Kai; Zhou, Xiaokang; Wang, Yanping; Ma, Dongge

    2014-06-01

    We studied the transient response characteristics of organic photodetectors composing of high mobility materials of rubrene and C60, respectively, as donor and acceptor. It was found that the response speed was limited by the delay time of both exciton diffusion and transit, and an anomalous phenomenon that the bandwidth decreases as the reverse bias increases was found for the first time. The investigation of frequency dependence at different device structures and light excitations demonstrated that the light absorption of rubrene prevents the photodetector from obtaining a fast response. With the help of magnetic field effect study, it was clearly elucidated that the slow diffusion time of the long lifetime triplet excitons generated from singlet fission in rubrene limited the bandwidth of the device. Moreover, the simulation of the response of photodetector under transient and steady state by exciton transport-diffusion equation showed that the exciton dissociation efficiency in rubrene increases more quickly than that in C60, which should account for the negative dependence of bandwidth on the reverse bias in rubrene-based device.

  18. Comprehensive studies of response characteristics of organic photodetectors based on rubrene and C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dezhi; Xu, Kai; Zhou, Xiaokang; Wang, Yanping; Ma, Dongge

    2014-06-28

    We studied the transient response characteristics of organic photodetectors composing of high mobility materials of rubrene and C{sub 60}, respectively, as donor and acceptor. It was found that the response speed was limited by the delay time of both exciton diffusion and transit, and an anomalous phenomenon that the bandwidth decreases as the reverse bias increases was found for the first time. The investigation of frequency dependence at different device structures and light excitations demonstrated that the light absorption of rubrene prevents the photodetector from obtaining a fast response. With the help of magnetic field effect study, it was clearly elucidated that the slow diffusion time of the long lifetime triplet excitons generated from singlet fission in rubrene limited the bandwidth of the device. Moreover, the simulation of the response of photodetector under transient and steady state by exciton transport-diffusion equation showed that the exciton dissociation efficiency in rubrene increases more quickly than that in C{sub 60}, which should account for the negative dependence of bandwidth on the reverse bias in rubrene-based device.

  19. Nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized composite cylindrical panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boitnott, R. L.; Johnson, E. R.; Starnes, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical study of the nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized 4- to 16-ply-thick graphite-epoxy cylindrical panels are presented. Specimens with clamped boundaries simulating the skin between two frames and two stringers of a typical transport fuselage were tested to failure. Failure results of aluminum specimens are compared with the graphite-epoxy test results. The specimens failed at their edges where the local bending gradients and interlaminar stresses are maximum. STAGS nonlinear two-dimensional shell analysis computer code results are used to identify regions of the panels where the response is independent of the axial coordinate. A geometrically nonlinear one-dimensional cylindrical panel analysis was derived and used to determine panel response and interlaminar stresses. Inclusion of the geometric nonlinearity was essential for accurate prediction of panel response. The maximum stress failure criterion applied to the predicted tensile stress in the fiber direction agreed best with the experimentally determined first damage pressures.

  20. Numerical Simulation on the Response Characteristics of a Pneumatic Microactuator for Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuling; Li, Songjing; Bao, Gang

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a multiphysical system modeling and simulation of a pneumatic microactuator, which significantly influences the performance of a particular pneumatic microfluidic device. First, the multiphysical system modeling is performed by developing a physical model for each of its three integrated components: microchannel with a microvalve, a gas chamber, and an elastomer membrane. This is done for each step of operation for the whole system. The whole system is then considered a throttle blind capacitor model, and it is used to predict the response time of the pneumatic microactuator by correlating its characteristics such as gas pressurizing, hydraulic resistance, and membrane deformation. For this microactuator, when the maximum membrane deformation is 100 µm, the required actuated air pressure is 80 kPa, and the response time is 1.67 ms when the valve-opening degree is 0.8. The response time is 1.61 ms under fully open conditions. These simulated results are validated by the experimental results of the current and previous work. A correlation between the simulated and experimental results confirms that the multiphysical modeling presented in this work is applicable in developing a proper design of a pneumatic microactuator. Finally, the influencing factors of the response time are discussed and analyzed. PMID:25944840

  1. Comparison of aortic and carotid baroreflex stimulus-response characteristics in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Querry, R. G.; Fadel, P. J.; Weiss, M. W.; Olivencia-Yurvati, A.; Shi, X.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    In order to characterize the stimulus-response relationships of the arterial, aortic, and carotid baroreflexes in mediating cardiac chronotropic function, we measured heart rate (HR) responses elicited by acute changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and carotid sinus pressure (CSP) in 11 healthy individuals. Arterial (aortic + carotid) baroreflex control of HR was quantified using ramped changes in MAP induced by bolus injection of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SN). To assess aortic-cardiac responses, neck pressure (NP) and suction (NS) were applied during PE and SN administration, respectively, to counter alterations in CSP thereby isolating the aortic baroreflex. Graded levels of NP and NS were delivered to the carotid sinus using a customized neck collar device to assess the carotid-cardiac baroreflex, independent of drug infusion. The operating characteristics of each reflex were determined from the logistic function of the elicited HR response to the induced change in MAP. The arterial pressures at which the threshold was located on the stimulus-response curves determined for the arterial, aortic and carotid baroreflexes were not significantly different (72+/-4, 67+/-3, and 72+/-4 mm Hg, respectively, P > 0.05). Similarly, the MAP at which the saturation of the reflex responses were elicited did not differ among the baroreflex arcs examined (98+/-3, 99+/-2, and 102+/-3 mm Hg, respectively). These data suggest that the baroreceptor populations studied operate over the same range of arterial pressures. This finding indicates each baroreflex functions as both an important anti-hypotensive and anti-hypertensive mechanism. In addition, this investigation describes a model of aortic baroreflex function in normal healthy humans, which may prove useful in identifying the origin of baroreflex dysfunction in disease- and training-induced conditions.

  2. Blast vibrations and other potential causes of damage in homes near a large surface coal mine in Indiana. Report. of investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.; Crum, S.V.; Plis, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines studied seven homes near Evansville, IN, that had various degrees of damage that the owners attributed to vibrations from surface coal mine blasting. Researchers monitored vibration and airblast impacts, crack behavior before and after blasts, and dynamic structural responses to blasting and other sources. Level-loop surveys were performed to quantify possible settlement and subsidence. These results were combined with State and coal company measurements to determine if recent vibration characteristics, airblast propagations, or structural responses were typical of results found in historical studies that produced criteria for safe blasting and regulatory limits.

  3. A canonical response of precipitation characteristics to global warming from CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, William K.-M.; Wu, H.-T.; Kim, K.-M.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we find from analyses of projections of 14 CMIP5 models a robust, canonical global response in rainfall characteristics to a warming climate. Under a scenario of 1% increase per year of CO2 emission, the model ensemble projects globally more heavy precipitation (+7 ± 2.4%K-1), less moderate precipitation (-2.5 ± 0.6%K-1), more light precipitation (+1.8 ± 1.3%K-1), and increased length of dry (no-rain) periods (+4.7 ± 2.1%K-1). Regionally, a majority of the models project a consistent response with more heavy precipitation over climatologically wet regions of the deep tropics, especially the equatorial Pacific Ocean and the Asian monsoon regions, and more dry periods over the land areas of the subtropics and the tropical marginal convective zones. Our results suggest that increased CO2 emissions induce a global adjustment in circulation and moisture availability manifested in basic changes in global precipitation characteristics, including increasing risks of severe floods and droughts in preferred geographic locations worldwide.

  4. Evaluation of space shuttle main engine fluid dynamic frequency response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to determine the POGO stability characteristics of the space shuttle main engine liquid oxygen (LOX) system, the fluid dynamic frequency response functions between elements in the SSME LOX system was evaluated, both analytically and experimentally. For the experimental data evaluation, a software package was written for the Hewlett-Packard 5451C Fourier analyzer. The POGO analysis software is documented and consists of five separate segments. Each segment is stored on the 5451C disc as an individual program and performs its own unique function. Two separate data reduction methods, a signal calibration, coherence or pulser signal based frequency response function blanking, and automatic plotting features are included in the program. The 5451C allows variable parameter transfer from program to program. This feature is used to advantage and requires only minimal user interface during the data reduction process. Experimental results are included and compared with the analytical predictions in order to adjust the general model and arrive at a realistic simulation of the POGO characteristics.

  5. Influence of activated carbon characteristics on toluene and hexane adsorption: Application of surface response methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, Mª Teresa; de Yuso, Alicia Martínez; Valenciano, Raquel; Rubio, Begoña; Pino, Mª Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity of toluene and hexane over activated carbons prepared according an experimental design, considering as variables the activation temperature, the impregnation ratio and the activation time. The response surface methodology was applied to optimize the adsorption capacity of the carbons regarding the preparation conditions that determine the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons. The methodology of preparation produced activated carbons with surface areas and micropore volumes as high as 1128 m2/g and 0.52 cm3/g, respectively. Moreover, the activated carbons exhibit mesoporosity, ranging from 64.6% to 89.1% the percentage of microporosity. The surface chemistry was characterized by TPD, FTIR and acid-base titration obtaining different values of surface groups from the different techniques because the limitation of each technique, but obtaining similar trends for the activated carbons studied. The exhaustive characterization of the activated carbons allows to state that the measured surface area does not explain the adsorption capacity for either toluene or n-hexane. On the other hand, the surface chemistry does not explain the adsorption results either. A compromise between physical and chemical characteristics can be obtained from the appropriate activation conditions, and the response surface methodology gives the optimal activated carbon to maximize adsorption capacity. Low activation temperature, intermediate impregnation ratio lead to high toluene and n-hexane adsorption capacities depending on the activation time, which a determining factor to maximize toluene adsorption.

  6. Response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade using latex and nonlatex materials

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J; Lalande, Sophie; Hyatt, Robert E; Johnson, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of esophageal pressure allows for the calculation of several important and clinically useful parameters of respiratory mechanics. Esophageal pressure is often measured with balloon-tipped catheters. These catheters may be handmade from natural latex condoms and polyethylene tubing. Given the potential of natural latex to cause allergic reaction, it is important to determine whether esophageal catheter balloons can be fabricated, by hand, using nonlatex condoms as construction materials. To determine the static and dynamic response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade from latex and nonlatex materials, six esophageal catheter balloons were constructed from each of the following condom materials: natural latex, synthetic polyisoprene, and polyurethane (18 total). Static compliance and working volume range of each balloon catheter was obtained from their pressure-volume characteristics in water. The dynamic response of balloon catheters were measured via a pressure “step” test, from which a third-order underdamped transfer function was modeled. The dynamic ranges of balloon catheters were characterized by the frequencies corresponding to ±5% amplitude- and phase-distortion (fA5% and fφ5%). Balloon catheters handmade from polyurethane condoms displayed the smallest working volume range and lowest static balloon compliance. Despite this lower compliance, fA5% and fφ5% were remarkably similar between all balloon materials. Our findings suggest that polyisoprene condoms are an ideal nonlatex construction material to use when fabricating esophageal catheter balloons by hand. PMID:26077619

  7. Vibration and noise from blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Adverse environmental effects from blasting continue to be a major problem for the mining industry, the public living near mining operations, and the governmental agencies responsible for setting environmental standards. The Bureau of Mines has established a comprehensive blasting research program dealing with the many technical aspects of generation and propagation of ground vibrations and airblast, structure response and damage, and proper instrumentation.

  8. Prototype fiber Bragg Grattings (FBG) sensor based on intensity modulation of the laser diode low frequency vibrations measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiono, Andi; Ula, Rini Khamimatul; Hanto, Dwi; Widiyatmoko, Bambang; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2016-02-01

    In general, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor works based on observation of spectral response characteristic to detect the desired parameter. In this research, we studied intensity response characteristic of FBG to detect the dynamic strain. Experiment result show that the reflected intensity had linier relationships with dynamic strain. Based on these characteristics, we developed the FBG sensor to detect low frequency vibration. This sensor is designed by attaching the FBG on the bronze cantilever with dimensions of 85×3×0.5 mm. Measurement results showed that the sensor was able to detect vibrations in the frequency range of 7-10 Hz at temperature range of 25-45 ˚C. The measured frequency range is still within the frequency range of digging activity, therefore this vibration sensor can be applied for oil pipelines vandalisation detection system.

  9. Characteristics of SIP Response for Rock Specimens in the Gagok Skarn Deposit, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Mi Kyung, P.; Park, S.; Shin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) method was conducted to develop mineral exploration technique in the Gagok skarn deposit, Korea. The Gagok mine was once abandoned and recently reopened. The Gagok stratabound skarn deposit is originated from the Cretaceous granite intrusion into the Paleozoic limestone and slate formations. The ore minerals of the Gagok deposit include sulfide minerals such as sphalerite, pyrrhotite, galena, chalcopyrite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, etc. The characteristics of SIP response for the rock specimens were examined to re-evaluate mineral resources. Total 104 rock specimens were obtained from the mine shafts at the various elevations, and were modified in cylindrical shape for the measurement of SIP response, along with other physical properties such as porosity, density, DC electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and seismic velocity. The SIP measurement system consists of electrical current transmitter and receiver (model GDP-32 system, Zonge Co. USA), and measures amplitude for resistivity, and phase at 14 steps of frequencies ranging from 0.125 to 1,024 Hz. The results of the SIP measurement shows that the rock specimens from ore bodies accompanied with sulfide minerals such as sphalerite and pyrite produce large phase differences with frequencies applied. The results also show that the rock specimens at the lower elevation of the mine shaft have stronger SIP response and mineralization. The rock specimens with large phase differences of strong SIP response were classified into three phase curve types, based on the range of critical frequency from the SIP measurement. (1) Curve type 1: critical frequency of less than 1 Hz with decreasing phase curve (2) Curve type 2: critical frequency of 1 to 10 Hz with bell shape, (3) Curve type 3: critical frequency of larger than 10 Hz with mixture of curve type 1 and 2. It is believed that the graphitic components and sulfide minerals such as sphalerite and pyrite are dominant in the rock specimens with curve type 1 and 2, respectively, and that the mixed components of graphitic and sulfide minerals mainly consist of rock specimens with curve type 3. The analysis of mineral components for the rock specimens is currently being conducted in the laboratory. The results of the mineral analysis will provide more clear information regarding the relationship between SIP response and mineral composition, particularly, sulfide minerals for the rock specimens. In the future study, the analysis of the characteristics of the SIP response, integrated with lithological study for the ore bodies would improve mineral exploration development techniques in the skarn ore deposits.

  10. Physiological responses and characteristics of table tennis matches determined in official tournaments.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro M; Morel, Erika A; Gobatto, Claudio A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the physiological responses and the match characteristics of table tennis and also to compare these responses in 2 different performance-level athletes from official tournaments. Twenty male table tennis players (12 regional experience-RP and 8 national and international experience-NP) were participants in the study. Blood lactate concentration ([LAC]) and heart rate (HR) were measured as physiological parameters in 21 official table tennis matches, and other 12 matches had recorded the duration of rally (DR), rest time, effort and rest ratio (E:R), total playing time (TPT), effective playing time (EPT), and frequency of shots by video analyses. The [LAC] verified in all matches was 1.8 mmol.L (+/-0.8), whereas the [LAC] peak was 2.2 mmol.L (+/-0.8). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups (p > 0.05) in both parameters. The HR was 164 b.min (+/-14), corresponding to 81.2% (+/-7.4) of the predicted maximum HR. As characteristics of the matches, the DR corresponded to 3.4 seconds (+/-1.7), rest time to 8.1 seconds (+/-5.1), E:R to 0.4 (+/-0.2), TPT to 970.5 seconds (+/-336.1), EPT to 44.3% (+/-23.7), and frequency of shots to 35.3 balls.min (+/-7.7). Among groups, the rest time was lower in RP than in NP. Consistently, the E:R and EPT were higher in RP than in NP (p < 0.05). The results suggest that table tennis matches present the aerobic system as a principal output energy, the phosphagenic system being the most important during efforts. The information pertaining to the physiological profile and the characteristics of table tennis should be used by coaches planning physical training and specific exercise prescriptions aiming at achieving maximal sport performance. PMID:20300034

  11. Leaf gas exchange characteristics of three neotropical mangrove species in response to varying hydroperiod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Twilley, Robert R.; Doyle, Thomas W.; Gardiner, Emile S.

    2006-01-01

    We determined how different hydroperiods affected leaf gas exchange characteristics of greenhouse-grown seedlings (2002) and saplings (2003) of the mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f., and Rhizophora mangle L. Hydroperiod treatments included no flooding (unflooded), intermittent flooding (intermittent), and permanent flooding (flooded). Plants in the intermittent treatment were measured under both flooded and drained states and compared separately. In the greenhouse study, plants of all species maintained different leaf areas in the contrasting hydroperiods during both years. Assimilation–light response curves indicated that the different hydroperiods had little effect on leaf gas exchange characteristics in either seedlings or saplings. However, short-term intermittent flooding for between 6 and 22 days caused a 20% reduction in maximum leaf-level carbon assimilation rate, a 51% lower light requirement to attain 50% of maximum assimilation, and a 38% higher demand from dark respiration. Although interspecific differences were evident for nearly all measured parameters in both years, there was little consistency in ranking of the interspecific responses. Species by hydroperiod interactions were significant only for sapling leaf area. In a field study, R. mangle saplings along the Shark River in the Everglades National Park either demonstrated no significant effect or slight enhancement of carbon assimilation and water-use efficiency while flooded. We obtained little evidence that contrasting hydroperiods affect leaf gas exchange characteristics of mangrove seedlings or saplings over long time intervals; however, intermittent flooding may cause short-term depressions in leaf gas exchange. The resilience of mangrove systems to flooding, as demonstrated in the permanently flooded treatments, will likely promote photosynthetic and morphological adjustment to slight hydroperiod shifts in many settings..

  12. Leaf gas exchange characteristics of three neotropical mangrove species in response to varying hydroperiod.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ken W; Twilley, Robert R; Doyle, Thomas W; Gardiner, Emile S

    2006-07-01

    We determined how different hydroperiods affected leaf gas exchange characteristics of greenhouse-grown seedlings (2002) and saplings (2003) of the mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f., and Rhizophora mangle L. Hydroperiod treatments included no flooding (unflooded), intermittent flooding (intermittent), and permanent flooding (flooded). Plants in the intermittent treatment were measured under both flooded and drained states and compared separately. In the greenhouse study, plants of all species maintained different leaf areas in the contrasting hydroperiods during both years. Assimilation-light response curves indicated that the different hydroperiods had little effect on leaf gas exchange characteristics in either seedlings or saplings. However, short-term intermittent flooding for between 6 and 22 days caused a 20% reduction in maximum leaf-level carbon assimilation rate, a 51% lower light requirement to attain 50% of maximum assimilation, and a 38% higher demand from dark respiration. Although interspecific differences were evident for nearly all measured parameters in both years, there was little consistency in ranking of the interspecific responses. Species by hydroperiod interactions were significant only for sapling leaf area. In a field study, R. mangle saplings along the Shark River in the Everglades National Park either demonstrated no significant effect or slight enhancement of carbon assimilation and water-use efficiency while flooded. We obtained little evidence that contrasting hydroperiods affect leaf gas exchange characteristics of mangrove seedlings or saplings over long time intervals; however, intermittent flooding may cause short-term depressions in leaf gas exchange. The resilience of mangrove systems to flooding, as demonstrated in the permanently flooded treatments, will likely promote photosynthetic and morphological adjustment to slight hydroperiod shifts in many settings. PMID:16585041

  13. Prediction of Linear Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Characteristics Responsible for Their Interaction with the Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most available antimicrobial peptides (AMP) prediction methods use common approach for different classes of AMP. Contrary to available approaches, we suggest that a strategy of prediction should be based on the fact that there are several kinds of AMP that vary in mechanisms of action, structure, mode of interaction with membrane, etc. According to our suggestion for each kind of AMP, a particular approach has to be developed in order to get high efficacy. Consequently, in this paper, a particular but the biggest class of AMP, linear cationic antimicrobial peptides (LCAP), has been considered and a newly developed simple method of LCAP prediction described. The aim of this study is the development of a simple method of discrimination of AMP from non-AMP, the efficiency of which will be determined by efficiencies of selected descriptors only and comparison the results of the discrimination procedure with the results obtained by more complicated discriminative methods. As descriptors the physicochemical characteristics responsible for capability of the peptide to interact with an anionic membrane were considered. The following characteristics such as hydrophobicity, amphiphaticity, location of the peptide in relation to membrane, charge density, propensities to disordered structure and aggregation were studied. On the basis of these characteristics, a new simple algorithm of prediction is developed and evaluation of efficacies of the characteristics as descriptors performed. The results show that three descriptors, hydrophobic moment, charge density and location of the peptide along the membranes, can be used as discriminators of LCAPs. For the training set, our method gives the same level of accuracy as more complicated machine learning approaches offered as CAMP database service tools. For the test set accuracy obtained by our method gives even higher value than the one obtained by CAMP prediction tools. The AMP prediction tool based on the considered method is available at http://www.biomedicine.org.ge/dbaasp/. PMID:24730612

  14. [Response characteristics of neurons to tone in dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the mouse].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Yan-Ling; Yang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal nucleus of lateral lemniscus (DNLL) is a nucleus in the auditory ascending pathway, and casts inhibitory efferent projections to the inferiorcolliculus. Studies on the DNLL are less than studies on the auditory brain stem and inferior colliculus. To date, there is no information about response characteristics of neurons in DNLL of albino mouse. Under free field conditions, we used extracellular single unit recording to study the acoustic signal characteristics of DNLL neurons in Kunming mice (Mus musculus). Transient (36%) and ongoing (64%) firing patterns were found in 96 DNLL neurons. Neurons with different firing patterns have significant differences in characteristic frequency and minimal threshold. We recorded frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of 87 DNLL neurons. All of the FTCs exhibit an open "V" shape. There is no significant difference in FTCs between transient and ongoing neurons, but among the ongoing neurons, the FTCs of sustained neurons are sharper than those of onset plus sustained neurons and pauser neurons. Our results showed that the characteristic frequency of DNLL neurons of mice was not correlated with depth, supporting the view that the DNLL of mouse has no frequencytopological organization throughdorsal-ventral plane, which is different from cats and some other animals. Furthermore, by using rate-intensityfunction (RIF) analysis the mouse DNLL neurons can be classified as monotonic (60%), saturated (31%) and non-monotonic (8%) types. Each RIF type includes transient and ongoing firing patterns. Dynamic range of the transient firing pattern is smaller than that of ongoing firing ones (P < 0.01), suggesting that the inhibitory inputs may underlie the formation of transient firing pattern. Multiple firing patterns and intensity coding of DNLL neurons may derive from the projections from multiple auditory nuclei, and play different roles in auditory information processing. PMID:26915316

  15. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2011-10-20

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper.A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.

  16. A Canonical Response in Rainfall Characteristics to Global Warming: Projections by IPCC CMIP5 Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.; Kim, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in rainfall characteristics induced by global warming are examined based on probability distribution function (PDF) analysis, from outputs of 14 IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), CMIP (5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) models under various scenarios of increased CO2 emissions. Results show that collectively CMIP5 models project a robust and consistent global and regional rainfall response to CO2 warming. Globally, the models show a 1-3% increase in rainfall per degree rise in temperature, with a canonical response featuring large increase (100-250 %) in frequency of occurrence of very heavy rain, a reduction (5-10%) of moderate rain, and an increase (10-15%) of light rain events. Regionally, even though details vary among models, a majority of the models (>10 out of 14) project a consistent large scale response with more heavy rain events in climatologically wet regions, most pronounced in the Pacific ITCZ and the Asian monsoon. Moderate rain events are found to decrease over extensive regions of the subtropical and extratropical oceans, but increases over the extratropical land regions, and the Southern Oceans. The spatial distribution of light rain resembles that of moderate rain, but mostly with opposite polarity. The majority of the models also show increase in the number of dry events (absence or only trace amount of rain) over subtropical and tropical land regions in both hemispheres. These results suggest that rainfall characteristics are changing and that increased extreme rainfall events and droughts occurrences are connected, as a consequent of a global adjustment of the large scale circulation to global warming.

  17. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part II: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    It was shown in Part I that an ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be used to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings. It can be used for both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting several additional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimisation process. In Part I a relevant model of such structure, as a function of arrangement of the additional elements was derived and validated. The model allows calculating natural frequencies and mode-shapes of the whole structure. The aim of this companion paper, Part II, is to present the second stage of the method. This is an optimization process that results in arrangement of the elements guaranteeing desired plate frequency response, and enhancement of controllability and observability measures. For that purpose appropriate cost functions, and constraints followed from technological feasibility are defined. Then, a memetic algorithm is employed to obtain a numerical solution with parameters of the arrangement. The optimization results are initially presented for simple cases to validate the method. Then, more complex scenarios are analysed with very special demands concerning the frequency response to present the full potential of the method. Subsequently, a laboratory experiment is presented and discussed. Finally, other areas of applications of the proposed method are shown and conclusions for future research are drawn.

  18. The hydrazo-bond in 4,4'-dimethyl-3,3'-dinitro-2,2'-hydrazobipyridine - crystal structure, conformation and vibrational characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, E; Bryndal, I; Hanuza, J; Lis, T

    2014-06-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 4,4'-dimethyl-3,3'-dinitro-2,2'-hydrazobipyridine have been determined by X-ray diffraction and quantum chemical DFT analysis. The title compound crystallizes in P1¯ space group, with one-half molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecular structure is stabilized by intramolecular NH···O hydrogen bonds. The molecules are linked by a combination of weak intermolecular CH⋯O interactions and also aromatic π-π stacking. The molecular structure of the studied compound has been determined using the DFT B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) approach and compared to that derived from X-ray studies. The IR and Raman wavenumbers have been calculated for the optimized geometry of a possible monomer structural model. The structural and vibrational properties of the intramolecular NH···O interaction are described. PMID:24632239

  19. Flow Analysis around the Suction Valve and the Vibration Characteristics of the Valve in a Compressor for Automotive Air-Conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taizo; Tsukiji, Tetsuhiro

    The displacement of the suction valve in a compressor for automotive air-conditioning and the flow around the valve are investigated using a flow visualization technique. The visualization is conducted using the real compressor, which is improved to observe inside under the actual condition. Turbulent flow around the suction valve is solved using a computational fluid dynamics simulation. The flow is assumed to be an incompressible three-dimensional and viscous. The standard k-ε turbulent model is used Furthermore the pressure pulsations, the flow velocity and the displacements of the suction valves are analyzed numerically using the system simulation program we developed. The calculated results using a computational fluid dynamics are compared with the flow visualization results and the vibrations of the valve are discussed.

  20. Identification of root cause and abatement of vibration of monochromator.

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J. A.

    1998-01-13

    Silicon crystal mirrors are used to reflect high-intensity X-ray beams. A large amount of heat is generated in each mirror. To minimize the effect of thermal expansion on the crystal mirrors, heat is removed by pumping liquid gallium (with a boiling point of 29.8 C) through passages in the crystal mirrors. During system operation, mirror motion should be kept to an acceptable level to avoid performance degradation. There are many potential sources of excitation to the crystal assembly; one such source is the flowing gallium. Two series of tests were performed earlier for a near-prototypical gallium cooling system (1-2). This paper describes a series of tests to measure the general vibration response characteristics of critical components in the monochromator system that contains the mirrors. The main objective of this work is to identify the root cause of vibration and to recommend general guidelines for abatement of vibration. This is achieved by performing many tests to understand the response characteristics under various conditions, by analysis of the response data, and by use of some theoretical considerations.

  1. Potentiometric Response Characteristics of Membrane-Based Cs + -Selective Electrodes Containing Ionophore-Functionalized Polymeric Microspheres

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peper, Shane; Gonczy, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Csmore » + -selective solvent polymeric membrane-based ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) were developed by doping ethylene glycol-functionalized cross-linked polystyrene microspheres (P-EG) into a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrix containing sodium tetrakis-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl) borate (TFPB) as the ion exchanger. A systematic study examining the effects of the membrane plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (DOS), 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE), and 2-fluorophenyl nitrophenyl ether (FPNPE) on the potentiometric response and selectivity of the corresponding electrodes was performed. Under certain conditions, P-EG-based ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) containing TFPB and plasticized with NPOE exhibited a super-Nernstian response between 1 × 10 − 3 and 1 × 10 − 4  M+ , a response characteristic not observed in analogous membranes plasticized with either DOS or FPNPE. Additionally, the performance of P-EG-based ISEs was compared to electrodes based on two mobile ionophores, a neutral lipophilic ethylene glycol derivative (ethylene glycol monooctadecyl ether (U-EG)) and a charged metallacarborane ionophore, sodium bis(dicarbollyl)cobaltate(III) (CC). In general, P-EG-based electrodes plasticized with FPNPE yielded the best performance, with a linear range from 10 -1 –10 -5  M+ , a conventional lower detection limit of 8.1 × 10 − 6  M+ , and a response slope of 57.7 mV/decade. The pH response of P-EG ISEs containing TFPB was evaluated for membranes plasticized with either NPOE or FPNPE. In both cases, the electrodes remained stable throughout the pH range 3–12, with only slight proton interference observed below pH 3.« less

  2. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  3. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  4. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  5. Hysteretic memory and end plate effects on the response of a flexible cylinder undergoing Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedikli, Ersegun Deniz; Dahl, Jason M.

    2015-11-01

    The response of rigid cylinders undergoing VIV has been observed to be hysteretic with respect to the nominal reduced velocity, as transition of the wake is delayed dependent on whether the flow has been slowed down or sped up. In the present study, a similar behavior is observed for a flexible, tension-dominated cylinder, however the hysteretic behavior is shown to affect the transition between excited modes. The test cylinder has diameter of 6.35 mm, aspect ratio of 40 and mass ratio of 3.76. The dynamic response of the cylinder is measured visually, by tracking 26 dots along the span of the cylinder using two high-speed cameras between the Reynolds number of 1080 and 4660. It is observed that a clear memory effect exists, where the speed at which transition between the first mode and second mode excitation in the cross-flow direction changes dependent on whether the flow is increasing or decreasing in speed. A second series of experiments is conducted to investigate end plate effects on the flexible cylinder. Experiments are conducted with and without an end plate located at the end pivot point on the cylinder. Clear differences are observed between each condition illustrating the strong three-dimensional behavior of vortex shedding behind the flexible cylinder.

  6. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z., Vibrating liquids in Space, Europhysics News, 2010, 41, 14.

  7. Study on DFIG wind turbines control strategy for improving frequency response characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongmei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yanhua; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2012-01-01

    The active and reactive power decoupling control for the double-fed induction generator wind turbines(DFIG) does not play a positive role to the frequency response ability of power grid because it performs as the hidden inertia for the power grid. If we want to improve the transient frequency stability of the wind turbine when it is integrated with the system, we must ameliorate its frequency response characteristics. The inability of frequency control due to DFIG decoupling control could be overcome through releasing (or absorbing) a part of the kinetic energy stored in the rotor, so as to increase (or decrease) active power injected to the power system when the deviation of power system frequency appears. This paper discusses the mathematical model of the variable speed DFIG, including the aerodynamic model, pitch control system model, shaft model, generator model and inverter control model, and other key components, focusing on the mathematical model of the converters in rotor side and grid side. Based on the existing model of wind generator, the paper attaches the frequency control model on the platform of the simulation software DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. The simulation results show that the proposed control strategy can response quickly to transient frequency deviation and prove that wind farms can participate in the system frequency regulation to a certain extent. Finally, the result verifies the accuracy and plausibility of the inverter control model which attaches the frequency control module.

  8. Study on DFIG wind turbines control strategy for improving frequency response characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongmei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yanhua; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2011-12-01

    The active and reactive power decoupling control for the double-fed induction generator wind turbines(DFIG) does not play a positive role to the frequency response ability of power grid because it performs as the hidden inertia for the power grid. If we want to improve the transient frequency stability of the wind turbine when it is integrated with the system, we must ameliorate its frequency response characteristics. The inability of frequency control due to DFIG decoupling control could be overcome through releasing (or absorbing) a part of the kinetic energy stored in the rotor, so as to increase (or decrease) active power injected to the power system when the deviation of power system frequency appears. This paper discusses the mathematical model of the variable speed DFIG, including the aerodynamic model, pitch control system model, shaft model, generator model and inverter control model, and other key components, focusing on the mathematical model of the converters in rotor side and grid side. Based on the existing model of wind generator, the paper attaches the frequency control model on the platform of the simulation software DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. The simulation results show that the proposed control strategy can response quickly to transient frequency deviation and prove that wind farms can participate in the system frequency regulation to a certain extent. Finally, the result verifies the accuracy and plausibility of the inverter control model which attaches the frequency control module.

  9. Sensitivity threshold and response characteristics of infrared detection in the beetle Melanophila acuminata (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    PubMed

    Hammer, D X; Schmitz, H; Schmitz, A; Grady Rylander, H; Welch, A J

    2001-04-01

    The minimum detection threshold of the infrared sensitive beetle, Melanophila acuminata, was measured with a helium-neon laser that emitted light at a wavelength of 3.39 microm. Extracellular recordings were taken both at the pit organ responsible for detection and at the interganglionic connectives in the thorax of the beetle. At the pit organ, generator and action potentials from single neurons were measured with a sharpened tungsten electrode. At the connectives that linked the fused second meso-/metathoracic and prothoracic ganglia, compound action potentials were measured with a tungsten hook electrode that encircled the connective. The latter recordings confirmed conveyance of infrared information through specific pathways to rostrally-situated sites in the nervous system of the beetle. The 50% probability irradiance threshold at which action potentials were elicited from the receptor and connectives occurred at 17.3 and 14.6 mW/cm(2), respectively. In addition to sensitivity threshold, several other characteristics of the response were quantified including dependence of generator potential latency, generator potential duration, spike frequency, and spike latency on irradiance, dependence of response strength (spike count) on exposure time, and flicker fusion frequency. The ability to detect infrared radiation is rare in nature, and these results provide valuable information necessary to understand this unique sensitivity. PMID:11282323

  10. The characteristics of expansins in wheat coleoptiles and their responses to water stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Guo, Qi-Fang; Xing, Shi-Chao; Zhao, Mei-Rong; Li, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2007-10-01

    As the key regulators of cell wall extension during plant growth, expansins play an important role in regulating the development and response of plants to adverse environment. The characteristics of expansins in wheat coleoptiles and their responses to water stress were studied. Expansin proteins were extracted from wheat coleoptiles by the methods of Hepes or SDS. The activities of expansins were measured with an improved extensometer and the amount of expansins was measured by immunoblot analysis with the expansin antibody. The results showed that in coleoptiles, the extension of native cell walls depended on acidic pH, and the expansins were found to be located at cell walls by location analysis. Expansins from wheat coleoptiles could induce cell wall extension both of cucumber hypocotyls and coleoptiles, and vice versa, albeit with differences noted in extension activity. The changes in activity and abundance of expansins in wheat coleoptiles in response to water stress suggest that expansins may play a significant role in the tolerance of wheat plants to water stress. PMID:17960043

  11. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Vibration dampers for cryogenic turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Olan, Emmanuel; Ibrahim, Azman Syed; Kascak, Albert F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of effective and reliable minimum-weight and minimum-envelope vibration dampers for cryogenic turbines. To meet this objective, a high speed test rig was designed and fabricated, which is currently used to test a curved beam type damper. The operation, capacity, structural characteristics, measurement system, and safety features of the cryogenic damper test rig are discussed.

  13. Vibration Responses of Test Structure No. 2 During the Edward Air Force Base Phase of the National Sonic Boom Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findley, D. S.; Huckel, V.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    In order to evaluate reaction of people to sonic booms of varying overpressures and time durations, a series of closely controlled and systematic flight tests/studies were conducted from June 3 to June 23, 1966. The dynamic responses of several building structures were measured, with emphasis on a two-story residence structure. Sample acceleration and strain recordings from F-104, B-58, and XB-70 sonic boom exposures are included, along with tabulations of the maximum acceleration and strain values measured for each one of about 140 flight tests. These data are compared with similar measurements for engine noise exposures of the building during simulated landing approaches and takeoffs of KC-135 aircraft.

  14. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 2: Single-mode large deflection vibrations of beams and plates using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1987-01-01

    A finite element method is presented for the large amplitude vibrations of complex structures that can be modelled with beam and rectangular plate elements subjected to harmonic excitation. Both inplane deformation and inertia are considered in the formulation. Derivation of the harmonic force and nonlinear stiffness matrices for a beam and a rectangular plate element are presented. Solution procedures and convergence characteristics of the finite element method are described. Nonlinear response to uniform and concentrated harmonic loadings and improved nonlinear free vibration results are presented for beams and rectangular plates of various boundary conditions.

  15. Coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopher, R.; Studwell, R. E.; Cassarino, S.; Kottapalli, S. B. R.

    1982-01-01

    A coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis developed as a design tool for predicting helicopter vibrations and a research tool to quantify the effects of structural properties, aerodynamic interactions, and vibration reduction devices on vehicle vibration levels is described. The analysis consists of a base program utilizing an impedance matching technique to represent the coupled rotor/airframe dynamics of the system supported by inputs from several external programs supplying sophisticated rotor and airframe aerodynamic and structural dynamic representation. The theoretical background, computer program capabilities and limited correlation results are presented in this report. Correlation results using scale model wind tunnel results show that the analysis can adequately predict trends of vibration variations with airspeed and higher harmonic control effects. Predictions of absolute values of vibration levels were found to be very sensitive to modal characteristics and results were not representative of measured values.

  16. Temporal Characteristics of Gustatory Responses in Rat Parabrachial Neurons Vary by Stimulus and Chemosensitive Neuron Type

    PubMed Central

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of “sweet” (sucrose), “salty” (NaCl), “sour” (citric acid), and “bitter” (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs. PMID:24124597

  17. Estimates of auditory filter phase response at and below characteristic frequency (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Ewert, Stephan D.

    2005-04-01

    Animal studies in basal cochlear regions have shown that basilar-membrane phase curvature (or rate of change of group delay with frequency) is negative around characteristic frequency (CF), but near zero well below CF. This study examined whether psychophysical masking experiments in humans show the same difference between on- and off-CF phase curvature. Masked thresholds were measured for a 2-kHz signal in the presence of harmonic tone complex maskers with a fundamental frequency of 100 Hz, band-limited between 200 and 1400 Hz (off-frequency masker) or between 1400 and 2600 Hz (on-frequency masker). The results from four normal-hearing listeners are consistent with predictions from animal physiological data: negative phase curvature is found for the on-frequency masker, whereas the phase curvature for the off-frequency masker is near zero. The method and results provide a strong test for the temporal response of computational models of human cochlear filtering. .

  18. Clinical characteristics and treatment response to SSRI in a female pedophile.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eva W C; Choy, Alberto L

    2002-04-01

    Although much investigation has been done with male sex offenders, there have been few studies on female sex offenders. Female sex offenders have been reported as having a high incidence of psychiatric disorders, but female paraphilics were rarely described. The literature on the treatment of female sex offenders is also limited and treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) has not been reported. This paper presents the case of a woman with DSM-IV pedophilia. Her clinical characteristics, her offense history, and her positive response to treatment with sertraline (a SSRI) are described. This case adds to the limited literature on female pedophiles and suggests that SSRIs may be an effective treatment for paraphilic disorders in female sex offenders. PMID:11974646

  19. CHARADE: A characteristic code for calculating rate-dependent shock-wave response

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Tonks, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this report we apply spatially one-dimensional methods and simple shock-tracking techniques to the solution of rate-dependent material response under flat-plate-impact conditions. This method of solution eliminates potential confusion of material dissipation with artificial dissipative effects inherent in finite-difference codes, and thus lends itself to accurate calculation of elastic-plastic deformation, shock-to-detonation transition in solid explosives, and shock-induced structural phase transformation. Equations are presented for rate-dependent thermoelastic-plastic deformation for (100) planar shock-wave propagation in materials of cubic symmetry (or higher). Specific numerical calculations are presented for polycrystalline copper using the mechanical threshold stress model of Follansbee and Kocks with transition to dislocation drag. A listing of the CHARADE (for characteristic rate dependence) code and sample input deck are given. 26 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Analysis of the frequency response of a fluid amplifier using unsteady flow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caen, R.; Fonade, C.

    1983-06-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the theoretical and experimental study of the frequency response of an analog fluid amplifier. The channels are considered as distributed parameter systems and the frequency effects on the characteristics of nozzles, vents, and jet interaction are taken into account. The paper considers the dynamic behavior of the flow in vortex vents and the interaction of two jets: a discontinuous profile is used to approximately describe the average velocity distribution in the jet in order that a recursive solution for the eigenvalues resulting from a small perturbation be obtained. The amplifiier was tested by means of an electropneumatic signal generator at frequencies up to 3000 Hz. A comparison with experiments performed in the potential core region shows that the linear theory correctly predicts the passband of the jet which is constant provided a local Strouhal number is used.