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Sample records for vibration response characteristics

  1. Response Characteristics of a Linear Rotorcraft Vibration Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.

    1982-01-01

    A fully coupled vibration model, consisting of a rotor with only flapping degrees of freedom plus pylon and fuselage pitching motion, was used in a parametric study undertaken to investigate the response characteristics of a simplified helicopter. Among the parameters studied were uncoupled body frequency, blade stiffness, hinge offset, advance ratio, and mast height. Results from the harmonic balance solution of the equations of motion show how each of these quantities affects the response of the model. The results also indicate that there is a potential for reducing vibration response through the judicious definition of the design parameters.

  2. Significant characteristics of social response to noise and vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishinomiya, G.

    1979-01-01

    Several surveys made since 1971 to investigate annoyance resulting from noise and vibration, from various sources were studied in order to quantify the relation between annoyance response to noise or vibration and properties of the respondent including factors such as noise exposure, etc. Samples collected by the social surveys and physical measurements were analyzed by multi-dimensional analysis.

  3. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  4. Vibration Characteristics of Thermoplastic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Amit Kumar; Singh, Satnam; Prince

    2011-12-01

    Unreinforced, Long fiber and Short fiber polypropylene composites are being used in many antivibration applications, due to their time and temperature dependent specific mechanical properties. Their good damping behavior accounts for many engineering applications. For utilization of these materials in specific engineering applications, there is a need to understand the damping behavior of composites under dynamic load. For this work, unreinforced and 20% long and short reinforced glass fiber polypropylene composite materials were tested for forced transverse vibration damping characteristics under static as well as fatigue loading conditions. The damping characteristics are quantified by forced frequency response of the test material. Presence of reinforced fibers increases the damping capacity. Among reinforcements, short fiber reinforced polypropylene shows increased damping capacity then long glass fiber reinforced. The Publisher is retracting this article from the scientific record due to the verbatim use of content without proper crediting.

  5. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  6. Estimating the ride quality characteristics of vehicles with random decrement analysis of on-the-road vibration response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainalis, Daniel; Rouillard, Vincent; Sek, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the application of a practical analytical technique based on the random decrement method to estimate the rigid sprung mass dynamic characteristics (frequency response function) of road vehicles using only vibration response data during constant-speed operation. A brief history and development of the random decrement technique is presented, along with a summary of work undertaken on optimal parameter selection to establish the random decrement signature. Two approaches to estimate the dynamic characteristics from the random decrement signature are described and evaluated. A custom, single-wheeled vehicle (physical quarter car) was commissioned to undertake a series of on-the-road experiments at various nominally constant operating speeds. The vehicle, also instrumented as an inertial profilometer, simultaneously measured the longitudinal pavement profile to establish the vehicle's actual dynamic characteristics during operation. The main outcome of the paper is that the random decrement technique can be used to provide accurate estimates of the sprung mass mode of the vehicle's dynamic characteristics for both linear and nonlinear suspension systems of an idealised vehicle.

  7. Vibration, performance, flutter and forced response characteristics of a large-scale propfan and its aeroelastic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the vibration, performance, flutter, and forced response of the large-scale propfan, SR7L, and its aeroelastic model, SR7A, has been performed by applying available structural and aeroelastic analytical codes and then correlating measured and calculated results. Finite element models of the blades were used to obtain modal frequencies, displacements, stresses and strains. These values were then used in conjunction with a 3-D, unsteady, lifting surface aerodynamic theory for the subsequent aeroelastic analyses of the blades. The agreement between measured and calculated frequencies and mode shapes for both models is very good. Calculated power coefficients correlate well with those measured for low advance ratios. Flutter results show that both propfans are stable at their respective design points. There is also good agreement between calculated and measured blade vibratory strains due to excitation resulting from yawed flow for the SR7A propfan. The similarity of structural and aeroelastic results show that the SR7A propfan simulates the SR7L characteristics.

  8. Vibration response of misaligned rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tejas H.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2009-08-01

    Misalignment is one of the common faults observed in rotors. Effect of misalignment on vibration response of coupled rotors is investigated in the present study. The coupled rotor system is modelled using Timoshenko beam elements with all six dof. An experimental approach is proposed for the first time for determination of magnitude and harmonic nature of the misalignment excitation. Misalignment effect at coupling location of rotor FE model is simulated using nodal force vector. The force vector is found using misalignment coupling stiffness matrix, derived from experimental data and applied misalignment between the two rotors. Steady-state vibration response is studied for sub-critical speeds. Effect of the types of misalignment (parallel and angular) on the vibration behaviour of the coupled rotor is examined. Along with lateral vibrations, axial and torsional vibrations are also investigated and nature of the vibration response is also examined. It has been found that the misalignment couples vibrations in bending, longitudinal and torsional modes. Some diagnostic features in the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of torsional and longitudinal response related to parallel and angular misalignment have been revealed. Full spectra and orbit plots are effectively used to reveal the unique nature of misalignment fault leading to reliable misalignment diagnostic information, not clearly brought out by earlier studies.

  9. Non-Linear Vibration Characteristics of Clamped Laminated Shallow Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, A.; KOBAYASHI, Y.; YAMADA, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper examines non-linear free vibration characteristics of first and second vibration modes of laminated shallow shells with rigidly clamped edges. Non-linear equations of motion for the shells based on the first order shear deformation and classical shell theories are derived by means of Hamilton's principle. We apply Galerkin's procedure to the equations of motion in which eigenvectors for first and second modes of linear vibration obtained by the Ritz method are employed as trial functions. Then simultaneous non-linear ordinary differential equations are derived in terms of amplitudes of the first and second vibration modes. Backbone curves for the first and second vibration modes are solved numerically by the Gauss-Legendre integration method and the shooting method respectively. The effects of lamination sequences and transverse shear deformation on the behavior are discussed. It is also shown that the motion of the first vibration mode affects the response for the second vibration mode.

  10. Vibrational characteristics of harp soundboards.

    PubMed

    Waltham, Chris; Kotlicki, Andrzej

    2008-09-01

    Harps exist in different forms, from large factory-made concert harps to small hand-made folk harps. This variety presents both a challenge and an opportunity for acousticians. The musical quality of a harp depends on many factors, but key among these is the soundboard. This work sets out to define some general desirable qualities of a harp soundboard. First, in order to understand the relationship between the vibrational behavior of a bare soundboard and that of a completed instrument, a 36-string harp was built from scratch. Measurements were made at each stage of construction, and the results showed how the bare soundboard properties affect those of the finished harp. Second, the soundboards of several harps of different sizes were assessed by measuring the admittances along the string bar. These data showed that one relationship crucial to the quality of the soundboard is that between the modal shapes and modal frequencies of the soundboard, and the position and fundamental frequencies of the strings attached to it. A general statement is made about this relationship, one which should be of use to harp makers. PMID:19045667

  11. Frequency characteristics of electro-hydraulic vibrator.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Noriaki

    2002-12-01

    Frequency characteristics of an electro-hydraulic vibrator were measured using two kinds of test signals. First, sine signals had theoretically 1.0 m/s2 (root-mean-square) in the frequency range from 1 to 16 Hz at single axis. The frequency characteristics were flat from 1 to 12 Hz, but 14, 16 Hz was considerably poor. Second, the vibrator was excited when using a complex signal consisting of 12 components in the frequency range from 1 to 12 Hz at single axis. The overall acceleration was 3 and 1 m/s2. Flat characteristics were seen in the tested frequency range. Acceleration distortion was recognized in a higher frequency than the target frequency. This second method is effective for the efficiency of experimental procedure. PMID:12506857

  12. Impact-absorbing characteristics by applying ultrasonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Ueki, Eiichiro; Tsujino, Jiromaru

    2012-05-01

    An impact-absorbing device that facilitates the application of ultrasonic vibrations was devised. Vibration distributions, springback characteristics, and impact-absorption characteristics were measured. We confirm that the springback amount decreases and the impact is absorbed upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations. When an aluminum alloy plate is crumpled, the maximum output voltage of the attached shock sensor decreases to 65% upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations as compared to when the ultrasonic vibrations are not applied.

  13. Effect of Vibration on Retention Characteristics of Screen Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Park, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of the effect of vibration on the retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems was performed. The functioning of surface tension devices using fine-mesh screens requires that the pressure differential acting on the screen be less than its pressure retention capability. When exceeded, screen breakdown will occur and gas-free expulsion of propellant will no longer be possible. An analytical approach to predicting the effect of vibration was developed. This approach considers the transmission of the vibration to the screens of the device and the coupling of the liquid and the screen in establishing the screen response. A method of evaluating the transient response of the gas/liquid interface within the screen was also developed.

  14. Vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo

    2015-02-01

    High power CO2 laser is widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. Vibration is a common phenomenon during laser working process, it will affect the working performance of high power CO2 laser, vibration must be strictly controlled in the condition where the laser pointing is required. This paper proposed a method to investigate the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser. An experiment device with vibration acceleration sensor was established to measure vibration signal of CO2 laser, the measured vibration signal was mathematically treated using space-frequency conversion, and then the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser can be obtained.

  15. Vibration characteristics of ultrasonic complex vibration for hole machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-05-01

    Complex vibration sources that use diagonal slits as a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter have been applied to ultrasonic motors, ultrasonic rock drilling, and ultrasonic welding. However, there are few examples of the application of these sources to ultrasonic machining in combination with an abrasive. Accordingly, a new method has been developed for machining of holes in brittle materials by using the ultrasonic longitudinal and torsional vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn with a diagonal slit vibration converter. In this paper, we compared vibration of a uniform rod and a hollow-type stepped horn, both with diagonal slits, when the conditions of the diagonal slits are constant.

  16. Human response to vibration in residential environments.

    PubMed

    Waddington, David C; Woodcock, James; Peris, Eulalia; Condie, Jenna; Sica, Gennaro; Moorhouse, Andrew T; Steele, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main findings of a field survey conducted in the United Kingdom into the human response to vibration in residential environments. The main aim of this study was to derive exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to vibration from environmental sources. The sources of vibration considered in this paper are railway and construction activity. Annoyance data were collected using questionnaires conducted face-to-face with residents in their own homes. Questionnaires were completed with residents exposed to railway induced vibration (N = 931) and vibration from the construction of a light rail system (N = 350). Measurements of vibration were conducted at internal and external positions from which estimates of 24-h vibration exposure were derived for 1073 of the case studies. Sixty different vibration exposure descriptors along with 6 different frequency weightings were assessed as potential predictors of annoyance. Of the exposure descriptors considered, none were found to be a better predictor of annoyance than any other. However, use of relevant frequency weightings was found to improve correlation between vibration exposure and annoyance. A unified exposure-response relationship could not be derived due to differences in response to the two sources so separate relationships are presented for each source. PMID:24437758

  17. Vibration characteristics of floating slab track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yi

    2008-11-01

    Coupled equilibrium equations of suspended wheels and floating slab track system were solved with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the deflections, vibration velocities, and wheel-rail contact forces. The program was validated through several aspects. Cases with various vehicle speed, slab mass, and stiffness of slab bearing were analyzed to reveal the effects of slab bearing on track responses. The correlation between wheel-rail resonance and train speed was also discussed. It was found that rail deflections increase significantly as train speed increases. Although large slab mass may lower tuning frequency, it could also result in higher wheel-rail contact force and rail deflections. The floating slab track is effective in isolating loading above 10 Hz, which might present in some railway sections with irregularities. Adopting floating slab track for vibration control for environment along the railway may cause concerns about ride quality and track damages.

  18. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:25622891

  19. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p <0.05) directly with the +G level reaching a maximum (3G) within a seconds compare to controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  20. Natural vibration characteristics of gravity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Ashok K.

    2007-04-01

    A forced vibration procedure is presented to estimate fundamental and higher frequencies of vibrations and associated mode shapes of gravity structures. The gravity structures considered are retaining walls and gravity dams. The validity of the proposed procedure is tested on three test problems of varying complexity for which the natural vibration frequencies and mode shapes either have known analytical solutions or have been determined via numerical means/field tests by others. Also included are the results of natural vibration frequencies and associated mode shapes for a spillway control structure located near the abutment end of an embankment dam obtained using the proposed procedure. For all problems considered, fundamental frequency and mode shape results using the proposed procedure are compared with the results obtained using an alternative procedure in which static deflections due to the structure's own weight are used as the starting point for free vibrations by setting the gravity vector to zero. All results compare well. The merits of the proposed procedure are discussed. Published in 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effects of vibration characteristics on the walking discomfort of floating floors on concrete slabs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Ho; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the vibration characteristics of floating floor systems and the discomfort in walking upon them have been studied in concrete slab structures through mock-up floors experiments. Seven types of floor systems, with panels of various sizes and supporting beams with different joist spacings, were constructed based on actual conditions. For the vibration measurement, an ISO rubber ball dropped from a height of 20 cm was used as an impact source to reproduce human walking. The vibration characteristics were evaluated by calculating the vibration acceleration values and the autocorrelation function parameters for the floor structures. Finally, a human walking experiment was conducted to investigate subjective responses to the vibration characteristics of floating floors. From the results, it was found that the vibration acceleration values and walking discomfort varied with the supporting conditions of the floors and that these were highly correlated with each other. It was also found that more than 75% of subjects accepted the floors when the vibration value of the floor in terms of vibration does value (VDV) is below 4.8 ms(-1.75). In addition, a practical regression of the VDV was obtained and design guidelines for floating floors were suggested. PMID:25324073

  2. Vibration characteristics analysis of rotating shrouded blades with impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Xie, Fangtao; Nai, Haiqiang; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    A dynamic model of rotating shrouded blades with impacts among adjacent shrouded blades is established considering the effects of the centrifugal stiffening, spin softening and Coriolis force, and the model is validated using finite element method. In the proposed model, the shrouded blade is simplified as a cantilever Euler-Bernoulli beam with a mass point at the free end, and the flexural dynamic stiffness of shrouded blade is selected as contact stiffness during collision. Based on the developed model, the effects of symmetric and asymmetric shroud gaps, rotational speeds, and aerodynamic force amplitudes on the dynamic characteristics of shrouded blades are analyzed through Newmark-β numerical method. The results indicate that (1) the vibro-impact responses of shrouded blades under some asymmetric gaps are more complicated than that under symmetric gap. (2) With the increase of rotational speed from 6000 to 10,000 rev/min, the system vibration experiences from period-three motion, through chaotic motion, finally to period-one motion during collision process because the increasing rotational speed changes the flexural dynamic stiffness of rotating blade. (3) The vibration displacements of shrouded blades increase linearly, and impact force increases linearly with the increase of aerodynamic force amplitude.

  3. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. Using a perturbation expansion technique the free vibration solution is obtained in a closed-form, and the effects of system parameters on beam response are explored. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  4. Mechanical characteristics of strained vibrating strings and a vibration-induced electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivin, Yu. K.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanical characteristics of vibrating strings strained between rigid supports and a vibration-induced electric field are studied. Experiments are conducted with nylon, rubber, and metallic strings. Vibrations are excited by a pinch at different sites along the string. The motion of the string is filmed, and the attendant electric field is detected. Experimental data are analyzed under the assumption that the field is induced by unlike charges generated by the moving string. It is found that the field allows one to determine the time characteristics of the motion of the string and discriminate the types of its deformations. Young moduli observed under the static extension of thin nylon strings are compared with those calculated from the natural frequencies of vibration measured for differently strained strings. The mathematical pattern of the motion of the string is compared with the real situation.

  5. Thermal weights for semiclassical vibrational response functions

    SciTech Connect

    Moberg, Daniel R.; Alemi, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2015-08-28

    Semiclassical approximations to response functions can allow the calculation of linear and nonlinear spectroscopic observables from classical dynamics. Evaluating a canonical response function requires the related tasks of determining thermal weights for initial states and computing the dynamics of these states. A class of approximations for vibrational response functions employs classical trajectories at quantized values of action variables and represents the effects of the radiation-matter interaction by discontinuous transitions. Here, we evaluate choices for a thermal weight function which are consistent with this dynamical approximation. Weight functions associated with different semiclassical approximations are compared, and two forms are constructed which yield the correct linear response function for a harmonic potential at any temperature and are also correct for anharmonic potentials in the classical mechanical limit of high temperature. Approximations to the vibrational linear response function with quantized classical trajectories and proposed thermal weight functions are assessed for ensembles of one-dimensional anharmonic oscillators. This approach is shown to perform well for an anharmonic potential that is not locally harmonic over a temperature range encompassing the quantum limit of a two-level system and the limit of classical dynamics.

  6. Mounting method improves electrical and vibrational characteristics of screen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of the mesh or screen electrodes used in electron tubes are improved by decreasing the shunt capacitance of the tube while retaining the close spacing needed for the required resolution. Vibrational characteristics are enhanced by raising the natural resonant frequency.

  7. Peculiarities of Vibration Characteristics of Amorphous Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, Kirill V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic properties of low (LDA), high (HDA) and very high (VHDA) density amorphous ices were investigated within the approach based on Lattice Dynamics simulations. In this approach, we assume that the short-range molecular order mainly determines the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of amorphous ices. Simulation cell of 512 water molecules with periodical boundary conditions and disordering allows us to study dynamical properties and dispersion curves in the Brillouin zone of pseudo-crystal. Existence of collective phenomena in amorphous ices which is usual for crystals but anomalous for disordered phase was confirmed in our simulations. Molecule amplitudes of delocalized (collective) as well as localized vibrations have been considered.

  8. Vertical Vibration Characteristics of a High-Temperature Superconducting Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Ke Cai; Zhao, Li Feng; Ma, Jia Qing; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2013-06-01

    The vertical vibration characteristics of a high-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system are investigated experimentally. The displacement variations of the maglev vehicle system are measured with different external excitation frequency, in the case of a certain levitation gap. When the external vibration frequency is low, the amplitude variations of the response curve are small. With the increase of the vibration frequency, chaos status can be found. The resonance frequencies with difference levitation gap are also investigated, while the external excitation frequency range is 0-100 Hz. Along with the different levitation gap, resonance frequency is also different. There almost is a linear relationship between the levitation gap and the resonance frequency.

  9. Prediction of vibration characteristics in beam structure using sub-scale modeling with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zai, Behzad Ahmed; Sami, Saad; Khan, M. Amir; Ahmad, Furqan; Park, Myung Kyun

    2015-09-01

    Geometric or sub-scale modeling techniques are used for the evaluation of large and complex dynamic structures to ensure accurate reproduction of load path and thus leading to true dynamic characteristics of such structures. The sub-scale modeling technique is very effective in the prediction of vibration characteristics of original large structure when the experimental testing is not feasible due to the absence of a large testing facility. Previous researches were more focused on free and harmonic vibration case with little or no consideration for readily encountered random vibration. A sub-scale modeling technique is proposed for estimating the vibration characteristics of any large scale structure such as Launch vehicles, Mega structures, etc., under various vibration load cases by utilizing precise scaled-down model of that dynamic structure. In order to establish an analytical correlation between the original structure and its scaled models, different scale models of isotropic cantilever beam are selected and analyzed under various vibration conditions( i.e. free, harmonic and random) using finite element package ANSYS. The developed correlations are also validated through experimental testing. The prediction made from the vibratory response of the scaled-down beam through the established sets of correlation are found similar to the response measured from the testing of original beam structure. The established correlations are equally applicable in the prediction of dynamic characteristics of any complex structure through its scaled-down models. This paper presents modified sub-scale modeling technique that enables accurate prediction of vibration characteristics of large and complex structure under not only sinusoidal but also for random vibrations.

  10. Scale-model characterization of flow-induced vibrational response of FFTF reactor internals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J. A.; Mahoney, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Fast Test Reactor core internal and peripheral components were assessed for flow-induced vibrational characteristics under scaled and simulated prototype flow conditions in the Hydraulic Core Mockup as an integral part of the Fast Test Reactor Vibration Program. The Hydraulic Core Mockup was an 0.285 geometric scale model of the Fast Test Reactor internals designed to simulate prototype vibrational and hydraulic characteristics. Using water to simulate sodium coolant, vibrational characteristics were measured and determined for selected model components over the scaled flow range of 36 to 110%. Additionally, in-situ shaker tests were conducted on selected Hydraulic Core Mockup outlet plenum components to establish modal characteristics. Most components exhibited resonant response at all test flow rates; however, the measured dynamic response was neither abnormal nor anomalously flow-rate dependent, and the predicted prototype components' response were deemed acceptable.

  11. Vibration characteristics of a steadily rotating slender ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Partial differential equations are derived to describe the structural vibrations of a uniform homogeneous ring which is very flexible because the radius is very large compared with the cross sectional dimensions. Elementary beam theory is used and small deflections are assumed in the derivation. Four sets of structural modes are examined: bending and compression modes in the plane of the ring; bending modes perpendicular to the plane of the ring; and twisting modes about the centroid of the ring cross section. Spatial and temporal characteristics of these modes, presented in terms of vibration frequencies and ratios between vibration amplitudes, are demonstrated in several figures. Given a sufficiently high rotational rate, the dynamics of the ring approach those of a vibrating string. In this case, the velocity of traveling wave in the material of the ring approaches in velocity of the material relative to inertial space, resulting in structural modes which are almost stationary in space.

  12. Human Response to Aircraft-Noise-Induced Building Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawthorn, J. M.; Dempsey, T. K.; DeLoach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of noise induced building structure vibration and the rattle of objects on human response to aircraft flyover noise were investigated in a series of studies conducted in both the field and the laboratory. The subjective detection thresholds for vibration and rattle were determined as well as the effect of vibration and rattle upon aircraft noise annoyance.

  13. Longitudinal Vibration Characteristics Required to Cut a Circle by Ultrasonic Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takuya Asami,; Hikaru Miura,

    2010-07-01

    Currently, lasers and water jets are used to cut circles in brittle materials such as ceramics. However, a disadvantage of these methods is that the conventional equipment is large and complex. To resolve this issue, a method using the ultrasonic vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn for cutting is developed. We consider that this equipment can be simplified and miniaturized. The shape of the hollow-type stepped horn and the characteristics of the longitudinal vibration required to obtain excellent cutting properties were examined. As a result, the most appropriate depth of the hollow part is one-quarter of the wavelength for a hollow-type stepped horn that vibrates longitudinally. The amplification factor is proportional to the cross-sectional ratio providing the cross-sectional ratio does not exceed 4.6. The characteristics of the longitudinal vibration of the hollow-type stepped horn when the static pressing force at the tip of the horn is varied were also examined. It was clarified that the ultrasonic vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn can be used to cut brittle materials.

  14. Characteristic infrared intensities of carbonyl stretching vibrations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Vidal, Luciano N; Bruns, Roy E

    2016-07-14

    The experimental infrared fundamental intensities of gas phase carbonyl compounds obtained by the integration of spectral bands in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) spectral database are in good agreement with the intensities reported by other laboratories having a root mean square error of 27 km mol(-1) or about 13% of the average intensity value. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules/Charge-Charge Transfer-Counterpolarization (QTAIM/CCTCP) model indicates that the large intensity variation from 61.7 to 415.4 km mol(-1) is largely due to static atomic charge contributions, whereas charge transfer and counterpolarization effects essentially cancel one another leaving only a small net effect. The Characteristic Substituent Shift Model estimates the atomic charge contributions to the carbonyl stretching intensities within 30 km mol(-1) or 10% of the average contribution. However, owing to the size of the 2 × C × CTCP interaction contribution, the total intensities cannot be estimated with this degree of accuracy. The dynamic intensity contributions of the carbon and oxygen atoms account for almost all of the total stretching intensities. These contributions vary over large ranges with the dynamic contributions of carbon being about twice the size of the oxygen ones for a large majority of carbonyls. Although the carbon monoxide molecule has an almost null dipole moment contrary to the very polar bond of the characteristic carbonyl group, its QTAIM/CCTCP model is very similar to those found for the carbonyl compounds. PMID:27306140

  15. Characteristics of Vibration that Alter Cardiovascular Parameters in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Rabey, Karyne N; Schmitt, Daniel; Norton, John N; Reynolds, Randall P

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that short-term exposure of mice to vibration within a frequency range thought to be near the resonant frequency range of mouse tissue and at an acceleration of 0 to 1 m/s2 would alter heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). We used radiotelemetry to evaluate the cardiovascular response to vibration in C57BL/6 and CD1 male mice exposed to vertical vibration of various frequencies and accelerations. MAP was consistently increased above baseline values at an acceleration near 1 m/s2 and a frequency of 90 Hz in both strains, and HR was increased also in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, MAP increased at 80 Hz in individual mice of both strains. When both strains were analyzed together, mean MAP and HR were increased at 90 Hz at 1 m/s2, and HR was increased at 80 Hz at 1 m/s2. No consistent change in MAP or HR occurred when mice were exposed to frequencies below 80 Hz or above 90 Hz. The increase in MAP and HR occurred only when the mice had conscious awareness of the vibration, given that these changes did not occur when anesthetized mice were exposed to vibration. Tested vibration acceleration levels lower than 0.75 m/s2 did not increase MAP or HR at 80 or 90 Hz, suggesting that a relatively high level of vibration is necessary to increase these parameters. These data are important to establish the harmful frequencies and accelerations of environmental vibration that should be minimized or avoided in mouse facilities. PMID:26224436

  16. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  17. Nuclear shell structure and response with quasiparticle-vibration coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Elena; Ring, Peter

    Extensions of the covariant density functional theory by quasiparticle-vibration coupling (QVC) are discussed. The formalism for one-body and two-body propagators in the nuclear medium allows calculations of single-particle energies and spectroscopic factors as well as the response to various types of excitations. In both cases QVC leads to a fragmentation of states, in agreement with experimental observations. Peculiarities of various 2p2h coupling schemes in the nuclear response function are discussed. The theory of the spin-isospin response includes both QVC and pion exchange and provides a framework for calculations of beta-decay, electron capture and charge-exchange reaction characteristics. The presented approaches are illustrated by realistic calculations for medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  18. Sound and structural vibration: Radiation, transmission and response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, F.

    The physical process of vibrational interaction between fluids and solid structures, and models and analyses of the behavior of coupled fluid-structure systems are described. The temporal and spatial distributions of wave field variables, the characteristics of waves in beam, plate, and shell structures, the dispersion relationships between wave speed and frequency forms, the natural frequencies and modes of bounded elastic systems, and the functions of outgoing and returning waves are discussed. The mechanics of sound radiation from vibratory surfaces and the use of far-field evaluation of the Rayleigh integral and traveling wave Fourier component synthesis for analysis of sound radiation for planar surfaces are studied. Fluid loading or vibrating structures, the wave impediance or structures and fluids, and the effects of fluid loading on the radiation of plates are investigated. Sound transmission through various plane partitions, flexural wave propagation in a circular cylindrical shell, and the coupling between shell modes and acoustic duct modes are considered. The analysis of the vibrational response of thin-plate and shell structures to incident sound, acoustic-coupling between structures and enclosed volumes of fluid, and analyses of fluid-structure interaction are examined.

  19. Analysis of Vibrational Harmonic Response for Printing Double-Sheet Detecting System via ANSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Cai, Ji-Fei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang

    In order to explore the influence of the harmonic response of system vibration upon the stability of the double-sheet detector system, the mathematical model of vibrational system is established via the mechanical dynamic theory. Vibrational system of double-sheet detector is studied by theoretical modeling, and the dynamic simulation to obtain the amplitude/phase frequency response curve of the system based on ANSYS is completed to make a comparison with the theoretical results. It is shown that the theoretical value is basically consistent with that calculated through ANSYS. Conclusion vibrational characteristics of double-sheet detection system is obtained quickly and accurately, and propound solving measures by some crucial factors, such as the harmonic load, mass and stiffness, which will affect the vibration of the system, contribute to the finite element method is applied to the complex multiple-degree-of-freedom system.

  20. Torsional vibration transmissibility characteristics of reinforced viscoelastic flexible pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, I.; Tomlinson, G. R.

    1988-04-01

    The dynamic complex shear moduli of fibre and steel reinforced viscoelastic flexible pipes are determined by using a torsional non-resonance method. Material property master curves as a function of frequency and temperature are obtained by using reduced modulus methods. In situations where the loss factor data is difficult to measure directly it is shown that these data can be obtained from the modulus data by using a stepwise Hilbert transform technique. Predictions of the torsional vibration transmissibility of reinforced pipes, by using a simple theory in conjunction with the material properties, results in a close comparison with experimental measurements of the torsional vibration transmissibility characteristics of the pipes over a wide frequency range.

  1. Human discomfort response to noise combined with vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted (1) to determine the effects of combined environmental noise and vertical vibration upon human subjective discomfort response, (2) to develop a model for the prediction of passenger discomfort response to the combined environment, and (3) to develop a set of noise-vibration curves for use as criteria in ride quality design. Subjects were exposed to parametric combinations of noise and vibrations through the use of a realistic laboratory simulator. Results indicated that accurate prediction of passenger ride comfort requires knowledge of both the level and frequency content of the noise and vibration components of a ride environment as well as knowledge of the interactive effects of combined noise and vibration. A design tool in the form of an empirical model of passenger discomfort response to combined noise and vertical vibration was developed and illustrated by several computational examples. Finally, a set of noise-vibration criteria curves were generated to illustrate the fundamental design trade-off possible between passenger discomfort and the noise-vibration levels that produce the discomfort.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. The effects of system parameters on beam response are explored with a perturbation expansion technique. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  3. Vibration and formability characteristics of aluminum-polymer sandwich materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somayajulu, Thamma S. V.

    Metal/polymer/metal sandwich materials are finding increasing use in the automotive industry primarily as lightweight alternatives to steel and aluminum alloys. In addition to low density they also offer other functional benefits e.g. improved vibration damping. In order to exploit such beneficial characteristics it is necessary to examine the manufacturability of these materials. In this work the vibration characteristics and formability were examined in selected materials, chosen from a group of aluminum/polypropylene/aluminum sandwich materials. First, a systematic study was carried out on vibration characteristics of square sandwich plates using 3D finite element models and usefulness of such a 3D displacement field in understanding the damping mechanisms as well as their contributions toward the modal damping were discussed. Second, a study of stretch formability of several sandwich materials was conducted. Since the knowledge of tensile properties is essential for understanding the formability, those properties were determined by performing uniaxial tensile tests on several aluminum/polypropylene/aluminum (HyliteRTM) sandwich materials and their constituent materials. The phenomena of diffused necking and deformation of material up to and beyond the point of necking were systematically investigated. Furthermore, the formability of sandwich materials was assessed by comparing the experimentally determined forming limit diagrams (FLDs) of monolithic 5182 aluminum and several sandwich materials. In addition to the experimental research, theoretical modeling was carried out to predict formability based on the concept of growth of pre-existing defects. One such model, known as M-K analysis, was utilized on the basis of defects existing in (i) the aluminum skins and (ii) the overall thickness of the sandwich. The experimental and theoretical results suggest that the levels of forming limit in sandwich materials are far less than those for monolithic materials of

  4. Vibration transmissibility characteristics of the human hand-arm system under different postures, hand forces and excitation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewusi, S. A.; Rakheja, S.; Marcotte, P.; Boutin, J.

    2010-07-01

    Biodynamic responses of the hand-arm system have been mostly characterized in terms of driving-point force-motion relationships, which have also served as the primary basis for developing the mechanical-equivalent models. The knowledge of localized vibration responses of the hand-arm segments could help derive more effective biodynamic models. In this study, the transmission of z h-axis handle vibration to the wrist, elbow and the shoulder of the human hand and arm are characterized in the laboratory for the bent-arm and extended arm postures. The experiments involved six subjects grasping a handle subject to two different magnitudes of broad-band random vibration, and nine different combinations of hand grip and push forces. The vibration transmissibility data were acquired in the z h- and y h-axis at the wrist and shoulder, and along all the three axes around the elbow joint. The results show that the human hand-arm system in an extended arm posture amplifies the vibration transmitted to the upper-arm and the whole-body at frequencies below 25 Hz, but attenuates the vibration above 25 Hz more effectively than the bent-arm posture, except at the shoulder. The magnitudes of transmitted vibration under an extended arm posture along the y h-axis were observed to be nearly twice those for the bent-arm posture in the low frequency region. The results further showed that variations in the grip force mostly affect vibration transmissibility and characteristic frequencies of the forearm, while changes in the push force influenced the dynamic characteristics of the entire hand-arm system. The magnitudes of transmitted vibration in the vicinity of the characteristic frequencies were influenced by the handle vibration magnitude.

  5. Synthesis of a system with active vibration isolation, considering the vibroacoustical characteristics of the source and of the isolated object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genkin, M. D.; Yelezov, V. G.; Yablonskiy, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    The efficiency and resistance of an active vibration isolation system (AVI) are analyzed for the case of unidirectional vibrations of a mass on a spring, with a damper, resting on a rigid base. The effect of certain vibroacoustical characteristics of real objects on AVI resistance and synthesis of AVI, which are effective over a wide frequency band are considered. A numerical analysis of the response of a mechanical system with AVI features is presented.

  6. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: biodynamic responses to sinusoidal and random vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of biodynamic responses of the seated human body on the frequency, magnitude and waveform of vertical vibration has been studied in 20 males and 20 females. With sinusoidal vibration (13 frequencies from 1 to 16 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.1-1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s.) and with random vibration (1-16 Hz) at the same magnitudes, the apparent mass of the body was similar with random and sinusoidal vibration of the same overall magnitude. With increasing magnitude of vibration, the stiffness and damping of a model fitted to the apparent mass reduced and the resonance frequency decreased (from 6.5 to 4.5 Hz). Male and female subjects had similar apparent mass (after adjusting for subject weight) and a similar principal resonance frequency with both random and sinusoidal vibration. The change in biodynamic response with increasing vibration magnitude depends on the frequency of the vibration excitation, but is similar with sinusoidal and random excitation. PMID:24730687

  7. Thermoregulatory responses to heat and vibration in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaul, W. A.; Spear, R. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vibration on thermoregulatory responses was studied in heat-acclimated men exposed suddenly to simultaneous heat and whole body vibrations (WBVs) at two intensity levels, each at graded frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz. The mean rectal temperature (Tre) became elevated more quickly in the WBV exposures than in the controls (heat exposure alone). Both intensity- and frequency-dependent WBV relationships were recorded in localized blood flows and in sweat rates. Thus, vibration appears to reduce the efficiency of the cooling mechanisms during a heat exposure.

  8. Vibration response mechanism of faulty outer race rolling element bearings for quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lingli; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Feibin; Zhang, Jianyu; Lee, Seungchul

    2016-03-01

    For the quantitative fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings, a nonlinear vibration model for fault severity assessment of rolling element bearings is established in this study. The outer race defect size parameter is introduced into the dynamic model, and vibration response signals of rolling element bearings under different fault sizes are simulated. The signals are analyzed quantitatively to observe the relationship between vibration responses and fault sizes. The impact points when the ball rolls onto and away from the defect are identified from the vibration response signals. Next, the impact characteristic that reflects the fault severity in rolling element bearings is obtained from the time interval between two impact points. When the width of the bearing fault is small, the signals are presented as clear single impact. The signals gradually become double impacts with increasing size of defects. The vibration signals of a rolling element bearings test rig are measured for different outer race fault sizes. The experimental results agree well with the results from simulations. These results are useful for understanding the vibration response mechanism of rolling element bearings under various degrees of fault severity.

  9. The flaminio obelisk in Rome: vibrational characteristics as part of preservation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bongiovanni, G.; Celebi, M.; Clemente, P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to study the vibrational characteristics of the Flaminio Obelisk in Rome as part of general studies being performed for preservation purposes. The state of preservation of the monument is described as well as the sonic method used to evaluate the integrity of the sections. The results of the sonic tests are used to determine reductions in the cross-sectional properties. A stick model including two rotational frequency independent soil springs at the basement level of the obelisk is developed. A response spectrum and stress analysis according to the Italian Seismic Code is performed considering and evaluating the degraded characteristics of sections. -from Authors

  10. Vibration characteristics of rectangular plate in compressible inviscid fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chan-Yi; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a mathematical derivation of the vibration characteristics of an elastic thin plate placed at the bottom of a three dimensional rectangular container filled with compressible inviscid fluid. A set of beam functions is used as the admissible functions of the plate in a fluid-plate system, and the motion of the fluid induced by the deformation of the plate is obtained from a three-dimensional acoustic equation. Pressure from the fluid over the fluid-plate interface is integrated to form a virtual mass matrix. The frequency equation of the fluid-plate system is derived by combining mass, stiffness, and the virtual mass matrix. Solving the frequency equation makes it possible to obtain the dynamic characteristic of the fluid-plate system, such as resonant frequencies, corresponding mode shapes, and velocity of the fluid. Numerical calculations were performed for plates coupled with fluids with various degrees of compressibility to illustrate the difference between compressible and incompressible fluids in a fluid-plate system. The proposed method could be used to predict resonant frequencies and mode shapes with accuracy compared to that of incompressible fluid theory (IFT). The proposed method can be used to analyze cases involving high value of sound velocity, such as incompressible fluids. When the sound velocity approaches infinity, the results obtained for compressible fluids are similar to those of incompressible fluids. We also examined the influence of fluid compressibility on vibration characteristics in which a decrease in sound velocity was shown to correspond to a decrease in resonant frequency. Additional modes, not observed in incompressible fluids, were obtained in cases of low sound velocity, particularly at higher resonant frequencies. Fluid velocity plots clearly reveal that the additional resonant modes can be attributed to the compressible behavior of the fluid.

  11. Characteristics of coated copper wire specimens using high frequency ultrasonic complex vibration welding equipments.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, J; Ihara, S; Harada, Y; Kasahara, K; Sakamaki, N

    2004-04-01

    Welding characteristic of thin coated copper wires were studied using 40, 60, 100 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration welding equipments with elliptical to circular vibration locus. The complex vibration systems consisted of a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter and a driving longitudinal vibration system. Polyurethane coated copper wires of 0.036 mm outer diameter and copper plates of 0.3 mm thickness and the other dimension wires were used as welding specimens. The copper wire part is completely welded on the copper substrate and the insulated coating material is driven from welded area to outsides of the wire specimens by high frequency complex vibration. PMID:15047272

  12. Damage Identification of Piles Based on Vibration Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Yao, Wenjuan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    A method of damage identification of piles was established by using vibration characteristics. The approach focused on the application of the element strain energy and sensitive modals. A damage identification equation of piles was deduced using the structural vibration equation. The equation contained three major factors: change rate of element modal strain energy, damage factor of pile, and sensitivity factor of modal damage. The sensitive modals of damage identification were selected by using sensitivity factor of modal damage firstly. Subsequently, the indexes for early-warning of pile damage were established by applying the change rate of strain energy. Then the technology of computational analysis of wavelet transform was used to damage identification for pile. The identification of small damage of pile was completely achieved, including the location of damage and the extent of damage. In the process of identifying the extent of damage of pile, the equation of damage identification was used in many times. Finally, a stadium project was used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method of damage identification for piles. The correctness and practicability of the proposed method were verified by comparing the results of damage identification with that of low strain test. The research provided a new way for damage identification of piles. PMID:25506062

  13. Characteristics of large capacity ultrasonic complex vibration sources with stepped complex transverse vibration rods.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, J; Ueoka, T

    2004-04-01

    Configurations of large capacity ultrasonic complex vibration sources with multiple longitudinal transducers are proposed and studied. The ultrasonic complex vibration systems are effective and essential for new applications in various industries. The complex vibration source of 27 kHz consists of a complex transverse rod with a welding tip (aluminum alloy, stainless steel and titanium alloy), a complex vibration rod with a flange and stepped part for holding the system, a circular longitudinal vibration disk (aluminum alloy) and six bolt-clamped Langevin type PLT transducers. Three transducer pairs are driven simultaneously using three driving systems at phase difference 120 degrees, and almost circular vibration locus is obtained. PMID:15047267

  14. Investigation of vibrational characteristics in BBO crystals by femtosecond CARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuanqin; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Sheng; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2012-10-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is utilized to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics in BBO crystals at room temperature. Time-resolved two-beam and three-beam CARS are detected. The vibrational dephasing time is analyzed and the changes of vibrational mode intensities with the polarization of pump pulses are observed.

  15. Automated calculation of anharmonic vibrational contributions to first hyperpolarizabilities: Quadratic response functions from vibrational configuration interaction wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Christiansen, Ove; Hättig, Christof

    2009-10-01

    Quadratic response functions are derived and implemented for a vibrational configuration interaction state. Combined electronic and vibrational quadratic response functions are derived using Born-Oppenheimer vibronic product wave functions. Computational tractable expressions are derived for determining the total quadratic response contribution as a sum of contributions involving both electronic and vibrational linear and quadratic response functions. In the general frequency-dependent case this includes a new and more troublesome type of electronic linear response function. Pilot calculations for the FH, H2O, CH2O, and pyrrole molecules demonstrate the importance of vibrational contributions for accurate comparison to experiment and that the vibrational contributions in some cases can be very large. The calculation of transition properties between vibrational states is combined with sum-over-states expressions for analysis purposes. On the basis of this some simple analysis methods are suggested. Also, a preliminary study of the effect of finite lifetimes on quadratic response functions is presented.

  16. An optimized semiclassical approximation for vibrational response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-03-01

    The observables of multidimensional infrared spectroscopy may be calculated from nonlinear vibrational response functions. Fully quantum dynamical calculations of vibrational response functions are generally impractical, while completely classical calculations are qualitatively incorrect at long times. These challenges motivate the development of semiclassical approximations to quantum mechanics, which use classical mechanical information to reconstruct quantum effects. The mean-trajectory (MT) approximation is a semiclassical approach to quantum vibrational response functions employing classical trajectories linked by deterministic transitions representing the effects of the radiation-matter interaction. Previous application of the MT approximation to the third-order response function R(3)(t3, t2, t1) demonstrated that the method quantitatively describes the coherence dynamics of the t3 and t1 evolution times, but is qualitatively incorrect for the waiting-time t2 period. Here we develop an optimized version of the MT approximation by elucidating the connection between this semiclassical approach and the double-sided Feynman diagrams (2FD) that represent the quantum response. Establishing the direct connection between 2FD and semiclassical paths motivates a systematic derivation of an optimized MT approximation (OMT). The OMT uses classical mechanical inputs to accurately reproduce quantum dynamics associated with all three propagation times of the third-order vibrational response function.

  17. An optimized semiclassical approximation for vibrational response functions

    PubMed Central

    Gerace, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    The observables of multidimensional infrared spectroscopy may be calculated from nonlinear vibrational response functions. Fully quantum dynamical calculations of vibrational response functions are generally impractical, while completely classical calculations are qualitatively incorrect at long times. These challenges motivate the development of semiclassical approximations to quantum mechanics, which use classical mechanical information to reconstruct quantum effects. The mean-trajectory (MT) approximation is a semiclassical approach to quantum vibrational response functions employing classical trajectories linked by deterministic transitions representing the effects of the radiation-matter interaction. Previous application of the MT approximation to the third-order response function R(3)(t3, t2, t1) demonstrated that the method quantitatively describes the coherence dynamics of the t3 and t1 evolution times, but is qualitatively incorrect for the waiting-time t2 period. Here we develop an optimized version of the MT approximation by elucidating the connection between this semiclassical approach and the double-sided Feynman diagrams (2FD) that represent the quantum response. Establishing the direct connection between 2FD and semiclassical paths motivates a systematic derivation of an optimized MT approximation (OMT). The OMT uses classical mechanical inputs to accurately reproduce quantum dynamics associated with all three propagation times of the third-order vibrational response function. PMID:23556706

  18. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  19. Influence of alternating loads on nonlinear vibration characteristics of cracked blade in rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang; Chu, Fulei

    2015-09-01

    As important causes of fatigue and crack failure, alternating loads also affect vibration characteristics of cracked blades in rotor system and probably influence formulation of diagnostic rule. This work carried out analysis of nonlinear vibration of cracked blade in rotor system with crack breathing effects and alternating loads taken into account. Firstly, equations of motion are formed with Finite Element Method (FEM), and breathing crack is modeled with cracked hexahedral element (CHE) where the breathing behavior is load-dependent. Secondly, displacement responses of cracked blade are obtained, and the results with CHE and contact element are identical. The stiffness of the cracked blade is obtained with CHE and proved to be time-varying and dependent on the alternating loads. Thirdly, natural frequencies of cracked blade in stationary condition are analyzed including normal model, linear model (open crack) and nonlinear model (breathing crack), and the requirement of the inclusion of breathing effects in blades with fatigue crack is proved. Finally, influence of alternating loads on critical frequency of cracked blade in rotating condition is compared. The results show that the critical frequency is significantly affected due to the co-effects of the rotating speed and alternating loads. The proposed method can estimate nonlinear vibration characteristics of crack blade which is beneficial for the formulation of the diagnostic rule.

  20. Rocket Launch-Induced Vibration and Ignition Overpressure Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E.; Margashayam, Ravi N.; Nayfeh, Jamal F.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rocket-induced vibration and ignition overpressure response environments are predicted in the low-frequency (5 to 200 hertz) range. The predictions are necessary to evaluate their impact on critical components, structures, and facilities in the immediate vicinity of the rocket launch pad.

  1. Vibration analysis of hard-coated composite beam considering the strain dependent characteristic of coating material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Liu, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The strain dependent characteristics of hard coatings make the vibration analysis of hard-coated composite structure become a challenging task. In this study, the modeling and the analysis method of a hard-coated composite beam was developed considering the strain dependent characteristics of coating material. Firstly, based on analyzing the properties of hard-coating material, a high order polynomial was adopted to characterize the strain dependent characteristics of coating materials. Then, the analytical model of a hard-coated composite beam was created by the energy method. Next, using the numerical method to solve the vibration response and the resonance frequencies of the composite beam, a specific calculation flow was also proposed. Finally, a cantilever beam coated with MgO + Al2O3 hard coating was chosen as the study case; under different excitation levels, the resonance region responses and the resonance frequencies of the composite beam were calculated using the proposed method. The calculation results were compared with the experiment and the linear calculation, and the correctness of the created model was verified. The study shows that compared with the general linear calculation, the proposed method can still maintain an acceptable precision when the excitation level is larger.

  2. Vibration analysis of hard-coated composite beam considering the strain dependent characteristic of coating material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Liu, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The strain dependent characteristics of hard coatings make the vibration analysis of hard-coated composite structure become a challenging task. In this study, the modeling and the analysis method of a hard-coated composite beam was developed considering the strain dependent characteristics of coating material. Firstly, based on analyzing the properties of hard-coating material, a high order polynomial was adopted to characterize the strain dependent characteristics of coating materials. Then, the analytical model of a hard-coated composite beam was created by the energy method. Next, using the numerical method to solve the vibration response and the resonance frequencies of the composite beam, a specific calculation flow was also proposed. Finally, a cantilever beam coated with MgO + Al2 O3 hard coating was chosen as the study case; under different excitation levels, the resonance region responses and the resonance frequencies of the composite beam were calculated using the proposed method. The calculation results were compared with the experiment and the linear calculation, and the correctness of the created model was verified. The study shows that compared with the general linear calculation, the proposed method can still maintain an acceptable precision when the excitation level is larger.

  3. Nonlinear characteristics analysis of vortex-induced vibration for a three-dimensional flexible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Jiang, Naibin; Zang, Fenggang; Zhang, Yixiong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Wanjun

    2016-05-01

    Vortex-induced vibration of a three-dimensional flexible tube is one of the key problems to be considered in many engineering situations. This paper aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and response characteristics of a three-dimensional tube under turbulent flow. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model are solved with the finite volume approach, and the dynamic equilibrium equations are discretized by the finite element theory. A three-dimensional fully coupled numerical model for vortex-induced vibration of flexible tube is proposed. The model realized the fluid-structure interaction with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. Based on this model, Response regimes, trajectory, phase difference, fluid force coefficient and vortex shedding frequency are obtained. The nonlinear phenomena of lock-in, phase-switch are captured successfully. Meanwhile, the limit cycle, bifurcation of lift coefficient and displacement are analyzed using phase portrait and Poincare section. The results reveal that, a quasi-upper branch occurs in the present fluid-flexible tube coupling system with high mass-damping and low mass ratio. There is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in the three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow.

  4. Vibrational characteristics of FRP-bonded concrete interfacial defects in a low frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tin Kei; Lau, Denvid

    2014-04-01

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) is a critical load-bearing component of strengthened or retrofitted civil infrastructures, the betterment of structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology for such composites is imperative. Henceforth the vibrational characteristics of near surface interfacial defects involving delamination and trapped air pockets at the FRP-concrete interface are investigated in this study using a finite element approach. Intuitively, due to its lower interfacial stiffness compared with an intact interface, a damaged region is expected to have a set of resonance frequencies different from an intact region when excited by acoustic waves. It has been observed that, when excited acoustically, both the vibrational amplitudes and frequency peaks in the response spectrum of the defects demonstrate a significant deviation from an intact FRP-bonded region. For a thin sheet of FRP bonded to concrete with sizable interfacial defects, the fundamental mode under free vibration is shown to be relatively low, in the order of kHz. Due to the low resonance frequencies of the defects, the use of low-cost equipment for interfacial defect detection via response spectrum analysis is highly feasible.

  5. Vibration characteristics of an APS lab facility in Building 401

    SciTech Connect

    Royston, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The vibratory behavior of a lab facility located in Building 401 of the Advanced Photon Source site at Argonne National Laboratory is summarized. Measurements of ambient vibration indicate that acceptable displacement levels are usually maintained (rms value below 0.1 microns) for the measured frequency range, above 0.2 Hz. An exception occurs when strong wind conditions excite a horizontal building resonance near 1.85 Hz to rms levels as high as 0.3 microns. Measurements of the laboratory floor`s dynamic response to directly applied force excitation agree with theoretical predictions. The primary component of the floor construction is a reinforced concrete slab. The slab has a transverse fundamental resonant frequency of 18.5 Hz and an associated damping level of roughly 8.5% of critical. It is also shown via experimental measurements that the linoleum surface adhered to the concrete slab is far more compliant than the slab itself and can significantly influence the floor`s dynamic response to local excitations.

  6. Analytical design and evaluation of an active control system for helicopter vibration reduction and gust response alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Zwicke, P. E.; Gold, P.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to define the basic configuration of an active control system for helicopter vibration and gust response alleviation. The study culminated in a control system design which has two separate systems: narrow band loop for vibration reduction and wider band loop for gust response alleviation. The narrow band vibration loop utilizes the standard swashplate control configuration to input controller for the vibration loop is based on adaptive optimal control theory and is designed to adapt to any flight condition including maneuvers and transients. The prime characteristics of the vibration control system is its real time capability. The gust alleviation control system studied consists of optimal sampled data feedback gains together with an optimal one-step-ahead prediction. The prediction permits the estimation of the gust disturbance which can then be used to minimize the gust effects on the helicopter.

  7. Semiclassical nonlinear response functions for coupled anharmonic vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbaum, Scott M.; Loring, Roger F.

    2009-11-28

    Observables in linear and nonlinear infrared spectroscopy may be computed from vibrational response functions describing nuclear dynamics on a single electronic surface. We demonstrate that the Herman-Kluk (HK) semiclassical approximation to the quantum propagator yields an accurate representation of quantum coherence effects in linear and nonlinear response functions for coupled anharmonic oscillators. A considerable numerical price is paid for this accuracy; the calculation requires a multidimensional integral over a highly oscillatory integrand that also grows without bound as a function of evolution times. The interference among classical trajectories in the HK approximation produces quantization of good action variables. By treating this interference analytically, we develop a mean-trajectory (MT) approximation that requires only the propagation of classical trajectories linked by transitions in action. The MT approximation accurately reproduces coherence effects in response functions of coupled anharmonic oscillators in a regime in which the observables are strongly influenced by these interactions among vibrations.

  8. The response of rotating machinery to external random vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.; Chiang, T.; Badgley, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    A high-speed turbogenerator employing gas-lubricated hydrodynamic journal and thrust bearings was subjected to external random vibrations for the purpose of assessing bearing performance in a dynamic environment. The pivoted-pad type journal bearings and the step-sector thrust bearing supported a turbine-driven rotor weighing approximately twenty-one pounds at a nominal operating speed of 36,000 rpm. The response amplitudes of both the rigid-supported and flexible-supported bearing pads, the gimballed thrust bearing, and the rotor relative to the machine casing were measured with capacitance type displacement probes. Random vibrations were applied by means of a large electrodynamic shaker at input levels ranging between 0.5 g (rms) and 1.5 g (rms). Vibrations were applied both along and perpendicular to the rotor axis. Response measurements were analyzed for amplitude distribution and power spectral density. Experimental results compare well with calculations of amplitude power spectral density made for the case where the vibrations were applied along the rotor axis. In this case, the rotor-bearing system was treated as a linear, three-mass model.

  9. Vibration characteristics of hexagonal radial rib and hoop platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    Experiment and analysis have been used to characterize the modes of vibration of planar radial rib and hoop hexagonal platforms. Finite element analysis correlated very well with experimental results. The sensitivity of mode shapes and frequencies to cable stiffness and initial tension is presented. Threshold values have been identified, above which changes in cable stiffness do not affect the first few platform vibration modes. Primary vibration modes of the radial rib platform involve beam bending. Vibration modes of the hoop platform exhibit both beam bending and frame bending and torsion. Results indicate for low order polygonal structures, the radial rib concept produced a higher fundamental frequency. For high order polygonal structures, the hoop concept has the potential to achieve a higher fundamental frequency than the radial rib concept.

  10. Vibration characteristics and damage detection in a suspension bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Wasanthi R.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Nguyen, Theanh

    2016-08-01

    Suspension bridges are flexible and vibration sensitive structures that exhibit complex and multi-modal vibration. Due to this, the usual vibration based methods could face a challenge when used for damage detection in these structures. This paper develops and applies a mode shape component specific damage index (DI) to detect and locate damage in a suspension bridge with pre-tensioned cables. This is important as suspension bridges are large structures and damage in them during their long service lives could easily go un-noticed. The capability of the proposed vibration based DI is demonstrated through its application to detect and locate single and multiple damages with varied locations and severity in the cables of the suspension bridge. The outcome of this research will enhance the safety and performance of these bridges which play an important role in the transport network.

  11. Certain characteristics and capture regions of nonlinear vibrating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragulskene, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    Free vibrations of a system and vibrations which are multiples of them in frequency are discussed. The corresponding periodic forced vibrations of the type n/m (n is the number of periods of disturbance between periods of movement and m is the number of periods of movement in one period of disturbance), generated by a harmonic or close to harmonic disturbance, are propagated close to the corresponding curves of the free vibrations and their frequency multiples. It has been proposed that investigation of transitional modes of motion and capture regions be carried out by precise methods in phase space, with the least number of coordinates. Thus, for example, for nonautonomous second order equations (for example, the Duffing equations), in place of three variables (coordinates, velocity, phases), it is proposed to use two: velocity during transition of the coordinate through zero and phase.

  12. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  13. Tissue response to mechanical vibrations for "sonoelasticity imaging".

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Huang, S R; Musulin, R A; Lerner, R M

    1990-01-01

    The goal of "sonoelasticity imaging" is to differentiate between normal soft tissues and hard lesions. This is done by measuring and then displaying the ultrasound Doppler spectrum of regions within tissues which are mechanically forced with low frequency (20-1000 Hz) vibrations. The resolution and sensitivity of the technique ultimately rest on the spatial resolution of ultrasound Doppler detection, the low frequency mechanical properties of tissues, and the vibration response of layered, inhomogeneous regions with hard tumor inclusions and complicated boundary conditions set by the presence of skin, bones and other regions. An initial investigation has measured some tissue stiffness parameters, and applied these in a NASTRAN finite element analysis to simulate a prostate tumor in the pelvic cavity. The measurements show a wide separation between the elastic modulus of tumors and soft tissues such as muscle and prostate. NASTRAN analyses show the ability to delineate regions of different elasticity based on the pattern of vibration amplitudes. The ability to change vibration frequency within the 100-300 Hz band seems particularly helpful in simulations and experiments which visualize small stiff inclusions in tissues. Preliminary results support the postulate that sonoelasticity imaging can provide useful information concerning tissue properties that are not otherwise obtainable. PMID:2194336

  14. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25 Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

  15. Vibration characteristics of composite fan blades and comparison with measured data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    The vibration characteristics of a composite fan blade for high-tip-speed applications were determined theoretically and the results compared with measured data. The theoretical results were obtained using a computerized capability consisting of NASTRAN coupled with composite mechanics by way of pre- and postprocessors. The predicted vibration frequencies and mode shapes were in reasonable agreement with the measured data. Theoretical results showed that different laminate configurations from the same composite system had only small effects on the blade frequency. However, the use of adhesively bonded titanium/beryllium laminar composites may improve considerably the blade vibration characteristics.

  16. Seated Occupant Apparent Mass Characteristics Under Automotive Postures and Vertical Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAKHEJA, S.; HARU, I.; BOILEAU, P.-É.

    2002-05-01

    The biodynamic apparent mass response characteristics of 24 human subjects (12 males and 12 females) seated under representative automotive postures with hands-in-lap (passengers) and hands-on-steering wheel (drivers) are reported. The measurements were carried out under white noise vertical excitations of 0·25, 0·5 and 1·0m/s2r.m.s. acceleration magnitudes in the 0·5-40Hz frequency range and a track measured input (1·07m/s2). The measured data have been analyzed to study the effects of hands position, body mass, magnitude and type of vibration excitation, and feet position, on the biodynamic response expressed in terms of apparent mass. A comparison of the measured response of subjects assuming typical automotive postures involving inclined cushion, inclined backrest and full use of backrest support with data determined under different postural conditions and excitation levels revealed considerable differences. The biodynamic response of automobile occupants seated with hands in lap, peaks in the 6·5-8·6Hz frequency range, which is considerably higher than the reported range of fundamental frequencies (4·5-5Hz) in most other studies involving different experimental conditions. The peak magnitude tends to decrease considerably for the driving posture with hands-on-steering wheel, while a second peak in the 8-12 Hz range becomes more apparent for this posture. The results suggest that biodynamic response of occupants seated in automotive seats and subject to vertical vibration need to be characterized, as a minimum, by two distinct functions for passenger and driving postures. A higher body mass, in general, yields higher peak magnitude response and lower corresponding frequency for both postures. The strong dependence of the response on the body mass is further demonstrated by grouping the measured data into four different mass ranges: less than 60 kg, between 60·5 and 70 kg, between 70·5 and 80 kg, and above 80 kg. From the results, it is concluded that

  17. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness. PMID:23464015

  18. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: discomfort caused by sinusoidal vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Frequency weightings for predicting vibration discomfort assume the same frequency-dependence at all magnitudes of vibration, whereas biodynamic studies show that the frequency-dependence of the human body depends on the magnitude of vibration. This study investigated how the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort depends on the acceleration and the force at the subject-seat interface. Using magnitude estimation, 20 males and 20 females judged their discomfort caused by sinusoidal vertical acceleration at 13 frequencies (1-16 Hz) at magnitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 ms(-2) r.m.s. The frequency-dependence of their equivalent comfort contours depended on the magnitude of vibration, but was less dependent on the magnitude of dynamic force than the magnitude of acceleration, consistent with the biodynamic non-linearity of the body causing some of the magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours. There were significant associations between the biodynamic responses and subjective responses at all frequencies in the range 1-16 Hz. Practitioner Summary: Vertical seat vibration causes discomfort in many forms of transport. This study provides the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort over a range of vibration magnitudes and shows how the frequency weightings in the current standards can be improved. PMID:24730710

  19. Dynamic characteristics analysis and vibration experiment of Upper-time of Flight Counter (U-ToFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Yidu; Song, Sunguang

    2012-09-01

    The dynamic characteristic parameters of Up-time of Flight Counter (U-ToFC) are important for research of structure optimization and reliability. However, the current simulation is performed based on homogenous material and simplified constraint model, the correct and reliability of results are difficult to be guaranteed. The finite element method based on identification of material parameters is proposed for this investigation on dynamic analysis, simulation and vibration experiment of the U-ToFC. The structure of the U-ToFC is complicated. Its' outside is made of aluminum alloy and inside contains electronic components such as capacitors, resistors, inductors, and integrated circuits. The accurate material parameters of model are identified difficultly. Hence, the parameters identification tests are performed to obtain the material parameters of this structure. On the basis of the above parameters, the experiment and FEA are conducted to the U-ToFC. In terms of the flight acceptance test level, and two kinds of joints condition between the U-ToFC and fixture are considered. The natural frequencies, vibration shapes and the response of the power spectral density of the U-ToFC are obtained. The results show simulation which is based on parameters identification is similar with vibration experiment in natural frequencies and responses. The errors are less than 10%. The vibration modes of simulation and experiment are consistent. The paper provides a more reliable computing method for the dynamic characteristic analysis of large complicated structure.

  20. Analysis of proposed criteria for human response to vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janeway, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    The development of criteria for human vibration response is reviewed, including the evolution of the ISO standard 2631. The document is analyzed to show why its application to vehicle ride evaluation is strongly opposed. Alternative vertical horizontal limits for comfort are recommended in the ground vehicle ride frequency range above 1 Hz. These values are derived by correlating the absorbed power findings of Pradko and Lee with other established criteria. Special emphasis is placed on working limits in the frequency range of 1 to 10 Hz since this is the most significant area in ground vehicle ride evaluation.

  1. Modeling vibration response and damping of cables and cabled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, Kaitlin S.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    In an effort to model the vibration response of cabled structures, the distributed transfer function method is developed to model cables and a simple cabled structure. The model includes shear effects, tension, and hysteretic damping for modeling of helical stranded cables, and includes a method for modeling cable attachment points using both linear and rotational damping and stiffness. The damped cable model shows agreement with experimental data for four types of stranded cables, and the damped cabled beam model shows agreement with experimental data for the cables attached to a beam structure, as well as improvement over the distributed mass method for cabled structure modeling.

  2. Non-linear torsional vibration characteristics of an internal combustion engine crankshaft assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Yang, Shouping; Zhang, Fujun; Zhao, Changlu; Ling, Qiang; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-07-01

    Crankshaft assembly failure is one of the main factors that affects the reliability and service life of engines. The linear lumped mass method, which has been universally applied to the dynamic modeling of engine crankshaft assembly, reveals obvious simulation errors. The nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a crankshaft assembly are instructionally significant to the improvement of modeling correctness. In this paper, a general expression for the non-constant inertia of a crankshaft assembly is derived based on the instantaneous kinetic energy equivalence method. The nonlinear dynamic equations of a multi-cylinder crankshaft assembly are established using the Lagrange rule considering nonlinear factors such as the non-constant inertia of reciprocating components and the structural damping of shaft segments. The natural frequency and mode shapes of a crankshaft assembly are investigated employing the eigenvector method. The forced vibration response of a diesel engine crankshaft assembly taking into account the non-constant inertia is studied using the numerical integral method. The simulation results are compared with a lumped mass model and a detailed model using the system matrix method. Results of non-linear torsional vibration analysis indicate that the additional excitation torque created by non-constant inertia activates the 2nd order rolling vibration, and the additional damping torque resulting from the non-constant inertia is the main nonlinear factor. The increased torsional angular displacement evoked by the high order excitation torque relates to the non-constant inertia. This research project is aimed at improving nonlinear dynamics theory, and the confirmed nonlinear parameters can be used for the structure design of a crankshaft assembly.

  3. Experimental measurements on transverse vibration characteristics of piezoceramic rectangular plates by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chien-Ching; Lin, Hsien-Yang

    2005-09-01

    This study provides two non-contact optical techniques to investigate the transverse vibration characteristics of piezoceramic rectangular plates in resonance. These methods, including the amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI) and laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV), are full-field measurement for AF-ESPI and point-wise displacement measurement for LDV, respectively. The edges of these piezoceramic rectangular plates may either be fixed or free. Both resonant frequencies and mode shapes of vibrating piezoceramic plates can be obtained simultaneously by AF-ESPI. Excellent quality of the interferometric fringe patterns for the mode shapes is obtained. In the LDV system, a built-in dynamic signal analyzer (DSA) composed of DSA software and a plug-in waveform generator board can provide the piezoceramic plates with the swept-sine excitation signal, whose gain at corresponding frequencies is analyzed by the DSA software. The peaks appeared in the frequency response curve are resonant frequencies. In addition to these optical methods, the numerical computation based on the finite element analysis is used to verify the experimental results. Good agreements of the mode shapes and resonant frequencies are obtained for experimental and numerical results.

  4. Optimization of Training Sets for Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns from Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been used for a number of years to process holography-generated characteristic patterns of vibrating structures. This technology depends critically on the selection and the conditioning of the training sets. A scaling operation called folding is discussed for conditioning training sets optimally for training feed-forward neural networks to process characteristic fringe patterns. Folding allows feed-forward nets to be trained easily to detect damage-induced vibration-displacement-distribution changes as small as 10 nm. A specific application to aerospace of neural-net processing of characteristic patterns is presented to motivate the conditioning and optimization effort.

  5. Description of the traction characteristics of the neodymium compensators of the automatic vibration isolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.; Panchenko, Y. V.; Gurov, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the method of calculation of neodymium magnets was presented. The calculation of the neodymium magnets characteristics and stiffness correctors of the vibration isolator according to the requirements for vibration isolation devices with stiffness compensators was performed. This research has been performed with the support of the President scholarship for young scientists, order No. 184 of Ministry of education and science of the Russian Federation of the 10th of March 2015.

  6. Training Data Optimized and Conditioned to Learn Characteristic Patterns of Vibrating Blisks and Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we have been training artificial neural networks to interpret the characteristic patterns (see the leftmost image) generated from electronic holograms of vibrating structures. These patterns not only visualize the vibration properties of structures, but small changes in the patterns can indicate structural changes, cracking, or damage. Neural networks detect these small changes well. Our objective has been to adapt the neural-network, electronic-holography combination for inspecting components in Glenn's Spin Rig.

  7. Vibration and Noise Characteristics of Elliptical Gears due to Non-Uniform Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Nagamura, Kazuteru; Ikejo, Kiyotaka

    Elliptical gear is a typical non-circular gear, which transmits a variable-ratio rotation and power simultaneously. Due to the non-uniform rotation, the vibration and noise of elliptical gears demonstrate particular characteristics which should be paid attention to in practical application. In this paper, two elliptical gears, which are a single elliptical gear and a double elliptical gear, have been investigated to analyze the vibration and noise characteristics of elliptical gears. The corresponding circular gears for comparison are also investigated. General factors including the torque, the rotation speed, the gear vibration acceleration and the gear noise of the four test gears are measured by running test. The root mean square of the Circumferential Vibration Acceleration (CVA) and the sound pressure level of the noise of elliptical gears are obtained from the measured results and compared with those of circular gears to clarify the vibration and noise characteristics of elliptical gears. Furthermore, the frequency analysis of the CVA of elliptical gears is conducted by Fast Fourier Transform Algorithm (FFT) and compared with that of circular gears. The main vibration component of elliptical gear is uncovered according to the obtained frequency spectra. In addition, the Critical Rotation Speeds of Tooth Separation (CRSTS) of elliptical gear is obtained and its relation with load torque is unveiled.

  8. Thermal vibration characteristics of armchair boron-nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Anirban; Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-12-21

    A nanomechanical resonator based sensor works by detecting small changes in the natural frequency of the device in presence of external agents. In this study, we address the length and the temperature-dependent sensitivity of precompressed armchair Boron-Nitride nanotubes towards their use as sensors. The vibrational data, obtained using molecular dynamics simulations, are analyzed for frequency content through the fast Fourier transformation. As the temperature of the system rises, the vibrational spectrum becomes noisy, and the modal frequencies show a red-shift irrespective of the length of the nanotube, suggesting that the nanotube based sensors calibrated at a particular temperature may not function desirably at other temperatures. Temperature-induced noise becomes increasingly pronounced with the decrease in the length of the nanotube. For the shorter nanotube at higher temperatures, we observe multiple closely spaced peaks near the natural frequency, that create a masking effect and reduce the sensitivity of detection. However, longer nanotubes do not show these spurious frequencies, and are considerably more sensitive than the shorter ones.

  9. Vibration Characteristics of Partially Covered Double-Sandwich Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qinghua; Levy, Cesar

    1996-01-01

    The differential equations of motion together with the boundary conditions for a partially covered, double-sandwich cantilever beam are derived. Bending and extension, rotational and longitudinal inertia of damping layers, and shear deformation and rotational and longitudinal inertia of the constraining layers and the primary beam are included in the equations. The theory is applicable for long as well as short, soft, or stiff damping layer, double-sandwich beams. Also, the effects of different parameters on the system loss factor and resonance frequency are discussed. Differences are found to exist with the previous beam model (called the Euler beam model) when the damping layers are stiff, when the thickness of the damping layer is large compared to the primary-beam thickness, and in the case of higher modes of vibration.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of torsional vibration characteristics of helicopter rotor blades. Part 1: Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of structural vibration characteristics of rotor blades was carried out. Coupled equations of motion for flapwise bending and torsion were formulated for rotor blades with noncollinear elastic and mass axes. The finite element method was applied for a detailed representation of blade structural properties. Coupled structural mass and stiffness coefficients were evaluated. The range of validity of a set of coupled equations of motion linearized with respect to eccentricity between elastic and mass axes was investigated. The sensitivity of blade vibration characteristics to torsion were evaluated by varying blade geometric properties, boundary conditions, and eccentricities between mass and elastic axes.

  11. Experimental-theoretical investigation of the vibration characteristics of rotating composite box beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the study was to predict the effect of elastic couplings on the free vibration characteristics of thin-walled composite box beams and to correlate the results with experimental data. The free vibration characteristics of coupled thin-walled composite beams under rotation were determined using the Galerkin method. The theoretical results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data obtained for graphite/epoxy, kevlar/epoxy, and glass/epoxy composite beams in an in-vacuo test facility at different rotational speeds.

  12. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron-vibration coupling.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Tomáš; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage) transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V (2k) to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes. PMID:26425436

  13. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron–vibration coupling

    PubMed Central

    Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage) transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V 2k to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes. PMID:26425436

  14. Evaluation of human response to structural vibrations induced by sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Louis C.; Czech, J.

    1992-01-01

    The topic is addressed of building vibration response to sonic boom and the evaluation of the associated human response to this vibration. An attempt is made to reexamine some of the issues addressed previously and to offer fresh insight that may assist in reassessing the potential impact of sonic boom over populated areas. Human response to vibration is reviewed first and a new human vibration response criterion curve is developed as a function of frequency. The difference between response to steady state versus impulsive vibration is addressed and a 'vibration exposure' or 'vibration energy' descriptor is suggested as one possible way to evaluate duration effects on response to transient vibration from sonic booms. New data on the acoustic signature of rattling objects are presented along with a review of existing data on the occurrence of rattle. Structural response to sonic boom is reviewed and a new descriptor, 'Acceleration Exposure Level' is suggested which can be easily determined from the Fourier Spectrum of a sonic boom. A preliminary assessment of potential impact from sonic booms is provided in terms of human response to vibration and detection of rattle based on a synthesis of the preceding material.

  15. A study of vibration characteristics on a luxury wheelchair and a new prototype wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostens, I.; Papaioannou, Y.; Spaepen, A.; Ramon, H.

    2003-09-01

    The transmission of wheelchair vibrations to the body will influence comfort, performance and the long-term health of the user. Improved knowledge of vibration transmissibility and its variability enhances our understanding of various human responses to vibration. In this study, an outdoor experiment and an experiment with vibration simulation using two wheelchairs (high-quality models of a new prototype wheelchair taken from two different stages of the iterative production procedure) were performed. The study confirms that the human body is very sensitive to the frequency range of 0.5- 10 Hz, as found in the literature. Both wheelchairs equipped with passive suspension system did not perform adequately in this frequency range and even amplified the input signal at the resonance frequency (3- 4.5 Hz). As the risk of physical damage is not likely to improve with these wheelchair suspension systems, the future depends on new designs with higher low-frequency comfort and affordable additional costs.

  16. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  17. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ˜ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  18. The responses of human muscle spindle endings to vibration of non-contracting muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D; Hagbarth, K E; Löfstedt, L; Wallin, B G

    1976-01-01

    1. In micro-electrode recordings from the human peroneal and tibial nerves, the responses of thirty-two primary spindle endings, thirteen secondary spindle endings and three Golgi tendon organs were studied during vibration of the tendons of the receptor-bearing muscles in the leg. The amplitude of the applied vibration was 1-5 mm and the frequency was varied from 20 to 220 Hz. As checked with e.m.g. and torque measurements, the muscles of the leg were relaxed during the sequences analysed. 2. Providing that the vibrator was accurately applied, all endings responded with discharges phase-locked to the vibration cycles, the discharge rates being at the vibration frequency or at subharmonics of that frequency. The response to vibration was of abrupt onset and offset, was maintained for the duration of vibration, and was not subject to fluctuation with changes in attention or with remote muscle contraction. 3. The maximal discharge rate that could be achieved varied from one ending to the next, and increased with the length of the receptor-bearing muscle. For endings driven at their maximal rate an increase in vibration frequency produced a decrease in discharge rates as the ending changed to a subharmonic pattern of response. The converse occurred on decreasing vibration frequency. 4. For any given muscle length, primary endings could generally be driven to higher rates than secondary endings but there was a wide range of responsiveness within each group and a significant overlap between the groups. At medium muscle length, the most responsive primary endings could be driven up to 220 Hz but secondary endings did not reach discharge rates higher than 100 Hz. 5. With combined vibration and passive movements, primary endings exhibited maximal vibration responsiveness during the stretching phases, sometimes firing twice per vibration cycle. During the shortening phases, however, they usually ceased responding to the vibratory stimulus. The vibration responsiveness of

  19. Acceleration response spectrum for predicting floor vibration due to occupant walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Ruotian; Zhang, Mengshi

    2014-07-01

    Annoying vibrations caused by occupant walking is an important serviceability problem for long-span floors. At the design stage the floor's structural arrangement may frequently change to cater for the owner's varying requirements. An efficient and accurate approach for predicting a floor's acceleration response is thus of great significance. This paper presents a design-oriented acceleration response spectrum for calculating a floor's response given the floor's modal characteristics and a specified confidence level. 2204 measured footfall traces from 61 test subjects were used to generate 10 s peak root-mean-square acceleration response spectra, on which a piecewise mathematical representation is based. The proposed response spectrum consists of three main parts: the first harmonic plateau ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 Hz, the second harmonic plateau ranging from 3.0 to 5.0 Hz and the descending part going with frequencies from 5.0 to 10.0 Hz. The representative value of each plateau and the mathematical representation for the descending curve were determined statistically for different confidence levels. Furthermore, the effects of factors, such as floor span, occupant stride length, higher modes of vibration, boundary conditions and peak acceleration response, on the proposed spectrum have been investigated and a modification measure for each factor is suggested. A detailed application procedure for the proposed spectrum approach is presented and has been applied to four existing floors to predict their acceleration responses. Comparison between predicted and field measured responses shows that the measured accelerations of the four floors are generally close to or slightly higher than the predicted values for the 75 percent confidence level, but are all lower than the predicted values for the 95 percent confidence level. Therefore the suggested spectrum-based approach can be used for predicting a floor's response subject to a single person walking.

  20. Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Electronic Holograms of Vibrating Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-element-model-trained artificial neural networks can be used to process efficiently the characteristic patterns or mode shapes from electronic holograms of vibrating blades. The models used for routine design may not yet be sufficiently accurate for this application. This document discusses the creation of characteristic patterns; compares model generated and experimental characteristic patterns; and discusses the neural networks that transform the characteristic patterns into strain or damage information. The current potential to adapt electronic holography to spin rigs, wind tunnels and engines provides an incentive to have accurate finite element models lor training neural networks.

  1. Optimization of Training Sets For Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An artificial neural network is disclosed that processes holography generated characteristic pattern of vibrating structures along with finite-element models. The present invention provides for a folding operation for conditioning training sets for optimally training forward-neural networks to process characteristic fringe pattern. The folding pattern increases the sensitivity of the feed-forward network for detecting changes in the characteristic pattern The folding routine manipulates input pixels so as to be scaled according to the location in an intensity range rather than the position in the characteristic pattern.

  2. Free vibration and dynamic response analysis of spinning structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The proposed effort involved development of numerical procedures for efficient solution of free vibration problems of spinning structures. An eigenproblem solution procedure, based on a Lanczos method employing complex arithmetic, was successfully developed. This task involved formulation of the numerical procedure, FORTRAN coding of the algorithm, checking and debugging of software, and implementation of the routine in the STARS program. A graphics package for the E/S PS 300 as well as for the Tektronix terminals was successfully generated and consists of the following special capabilities: (1) a dynamic response plot for the stresses and displacements as functions of time; and (2) a menu driven command module enabling input of data on an interactive basis. Finally, the STARS analysis capability was further improved by implementing the dynamic response analysis package that provides information on nodal deformations and element stresses as a function of time. A number of test cases were run utilizing the currently developed algorithm implemented in the STARS program and such results indicate that the newly generated solution technique is significantly more efficient than other existing similar procedures.

  3. Piezoelectric Instruments of High Natural Frequency Vibration Characteristics and Protection Against Interference by Mass Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohlka, Werner

    1943-01-01

    The exploration of the processes accompanying engine combustion demands quick-responding pressure-recording instruments, among which the piezoelectric type has found widespread use because of its especially propitious properties as vibration-recording instruments for high frequencies. Lacking appropriate test methods, the potential errors of piezoelectric recorders in dynamic measurements could only be estimated up to now. In the present report a test method is described by means of which the resonance curves of the piezoelectric pickup can be determined; hence an instrumental appraisal of the vibration characteristics of piezoelectric recorders is obtainable.

  4. Dynamic characteristics of vibration isolation platforms considering the joints of the struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Zixi; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the dynamic characteristics of the impacts and corresponding frictions generated by the clearances of joints of vibration isolation platforms for control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on spacecraft. A contact force model is applied using a nonlinear contact force model, and the frictions in the joints are considered in the dynamic analysis. First, the dynamic characteristics of a single isolation strut with spherical joints were studied, and joints with different initial clearance sizes were separately analyzed. Then, dynamic models of the vibration isolation platform for a CMG cluster with both perfect joints and joints with clearances were established. During the numeral simulation, joints with different elastic moduli were used to study the nonlinear characteristics. Finally, the distributions of the collision points, which can serve as a reference for the reliability and lifetime of a platform, were given.

  5. Human response to house vibrations caused by sonic booms or air blasts.

    PubMed

    Schomer, P D

    1978-07-01

    Descriptions of the effects of sonic booms of air blasts by observers in buildings have included such statements as "noticeable vibrations" in addition to phrases such as "the house rattles," "the windows rattle," or "bric-à-brac rattles." Analysis of studies of human response to vibrations, vibration complaints in the Toronto area, special tests by Kryter at Edwards Air Force Base, and laboratory studies of human response to sonic booms show that perceived vibration is not normally a factor that contributes significantly to human response to airborne, large-amplitude impulse noise. Rather, human response is solely the result of the impulse noise itself and of audible noise due to induced radiation from vibrating surfaces. PMID:711997

  6. The transmission of vertical vibration through seats: Influence of the characteristics of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    The transmission of vibration through a seat depends on the impedance of the seat and the apparent mass of the seat occupant. This study was designed to determine how factors affecting the apparent mass of the body (age, gender, physical characteristics, backrest contact, and magnitude of vibration) affect seat transmissibility. The transmission of vertical vibration through a car seat was measured with 80 adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with two backrest conditions (no backrest and backrest), and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Linear regression models were used to study the effects of subject physical characteristics (age, gender, and anthropometry) and features of their apparent mass (resonance frequency, apparent mass at resonance and at 12 Hz) on the measured seat transmissibility. The strongest predictor of both the frequency of the principal resonance in seat transmissibility and the seat transmissibility at resonance was subject age, with other factors having only marginal effects. The transmissibility of the seat at 12 Hz depended on subject age, body mass index, and gender. Although subject weight was strongly associated with apparent mass, weight was not strongly associated with seat transmissibility. The resonance frequency of the seat decreased with increases in the magnitude of the vibration excitation and increased when subjects made contact with the backrest. Inter-subject variability in the resonance frequency and transmissibility at resonance was less with greater vibration excitation, but was largely unaffected by backrest contact. A lumped parameter seat-person model showed that changes in seat transmissibility with age can be predicted from changes in apparent mass with age, and that the dynamic stiffness of the seat appeared to increase with increased loading so as to compensate for increases in subject apparent mass associated with increased sitting

  7. Biodynamic characteristics of upper limb reaching movements of the seated human under whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heon-Jeong; Martin, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure. PMID:22814094

  8. Transcriptional Pathways Altered in Response to Vibration in a Model of Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Stacey; Kashon, Michael L.; Li, Shengqiao; Miller, Gerome R.; Johnson, Claud; Krajnak, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to use an established model of vibration-induced injury to assess frequency-dependent changes in transcript expression in skin, artery, and nerve tissues. Methods Transcript expression in tissues from control and vibration-exposed rats (4 h/day for 10 days at 62.5, 125, or 250 Hz; 49 m/s2, rms) was measured. Transcripts affected by vibration were used in bioinformatics analyses to identify molecular- and disease-related pathways associated with exposure to vibration. Results Analyses revealed that cancer-related pathways showed frequency-dependent changes in activation or inhibition. Most notably, the breast-related cancer-1 pathway was affected. Other pathways associated with breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein related signaling, or associated with cancer and cell cycle/cell survivability were also affected. Conclusion Occupational exposure to vibration may result in DNA damage and alterations in cell signaling pathways that have significant effects on cellular division. PMID:27058473

  9. Characteristic of torsional vibration of mill main drive excited by electromechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifang; Yan, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    In the study of electromechanical coupling vibration of mill main drive system, the influence of electrical system on the mechanical transmission is considered generally, however the research for the mechanism of electromechanical interaction is lacked. In order to research the electromechanical coupling resonance of main drive system on the F3 mill in a plant, the cycloconverter and synchronous motor are modeled and simulated by the MTLAB/SIMULINK firstly, simulation result show that the current harmonic of the cycloconverter can lead to the pulsating torque of motor output. Then the natural characteristics of the mechanical drive system are calculated by ANSYS, the result show that the modal frequency contains the component which is close to the coupling vibration frequency of 42Hz. According to the simulation result of the mechanical and electrical system, the closed loop feedback model including the two systems are built, and the mechanism analysis of electromechanical coupling presents that there is the interaction between the current harmonic of electrical system and the speed of the mechanical drive system. At last, by building and computing the equivalent nonlinear dynamics model of the mechanical drive system, the dynamic characteristics of system changing with the stiffness, damping coefficient and the electromagnetic torque are obtained. Such electromechanical interaction process is suggested to consider in research of mill vibration, which can induce strong coupling vibration behavior in the rolling mill drive system.

  10. Insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations in the mining industry. [elastodynamic response of rubber insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeveleanu, C.

    1974-01-01

    The insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations is considered for some ore preparing and sorting implements: rotary crushers, resonance screens, hammer mills, etc. The appearance of subharmonic vibrations is analyzed, and the conditions for their appearance are determined. A method is given for calculating the insulation of these vibrations by means of elastic elements made of rubber. The insulation of the random vibrations produced by Symons crushers is calculated by determining the transmissability and deformation of the insulation system for a narrow band random response.

  11. City Dweller Responses to Multiple Stressors Intruding into Their Homes: Noise, Light, Odour, and Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eja

    2015-01-01

    Urban densification increases exposure to noise, light, odour, and vibration in urban dwellings. Exposure from combined environmental stressors intruding into the home could increase the risk of adverse effects on wellbeing, even when the exposure is at a relatively low level. This study assesses the prevalence of annoyance with a combination of potential environmental stressors common in urban areas and the association with wellbeing. A questionnaire was sent by mail to residents in five areas in Halmstad (Sweden) with similar socioeconomic and housing characteristics but different exposure (response rate 56%; n = 385). Of the respondents, 50% were annoyed to some degree by at least one of the suggested stressors, most commonly by noise and vibration from local traffic. Structural equation modelling showed that annoyance led to lowered quality of life via the mediating construct residential satisfaction, which in turn was influenced by place attachment and perceived restoration possibilities in the dwelling. Stress had a negative impact on quality of life, but was not directly correlated to annoyance. Stress was however correlated with sensitivity. The findings suggest that dose-response relationships for environmental stressors should be studied in a broader context of environmental and individual factors. Also relatively low levels of exposure should be mitigated, especially if several stressors are present. PMID:25794188

  12. The bio-response of osteocytes and its regulation on osteoblasts under vibration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Tong; Sun, Lian-Wen; Qi, Hong-Yu; Shi, Hao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Vibration, especially at low magnitude and high frequency (LMHF), was demonstrated to be anabolic for bone, but how the LMHF vibration signal is perceived by osteocytes is not fully studied. On the other hand, the mechanotransduction of osteocytes under shear stress has been scientists' primary focus for years. Due to the small strain caused by low-magnitude vibration, whether the previous explanation for shear stress will still work for LMHF vibration is unknown. In this study, a finite element method (FEM) model based on the real geometrical shape of an osteocyte was built to compare the mechanical behaviors of osteocytes under LMHF vibration and shear stress. The bio-response of osteocytes to vibration under different frequencies, including the secretion of soluble factors and the concentration of intracellular calcium, were studied. The regulating effect of the conditioned medium (CM) from vibrated osteocytes on osteoblasts was also studied. The FEM analysis result showed the cell membrane deformation under LMHF vibration was very small (with a peak value of 1.09%) as compared to the deformation caused by shear stress (with a peak value of 6.65%). The F-actin stress fibers of osteocytes were reorganized, especially on the nucleus periphery after LMHF vibration. The vibration at 30 Hz has a promoting effect on osteocytes and the osteogenesis of osteoblasts, whereas vibration at 90 Hz was suppressive. These results lead to a conclusion that the bio-response of osteocytes to LMHF vibration is frequency-dependent and is more related to the cytoskeleton on nuclear periphery rather than the membrane deformation. PMID:26715381

  13. Estimations of the smoothing operator response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yatskiv, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    The mean response characteristic of the graphical smoothing method is discussed. The method is illustrated by analysis of latitude observations at Washington from 1915.9 to 1941.0. Spectral density, frequency distribution, and distribution functions are also discussed.

  14. Directionality in the mechanical response to substrate vibration in a treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Umbonia crassicornis).

    PubMed

    Cocroft, R B; Tieu, T D; Hoy, R R; Miles, R N

    2000-01-01

    The use of substrate vibrations in communication and predator-prey interactions is widespread in arthropods. In many contexts, localization of the vibration source plays an important role. For small species on solid substrates, time and amplitude differences between receptors in different legs may be extremely small, and the mechanisms of vibration localization are unclear. Here we ask whether directional information is contained in the mechanical response of an insect's body to substrate vibration. Our study species was a membracid treehopper (Umbonia crassicornis) that communicates using bending waves in plant stems. We used a bending-wave simulator that allows precise control of the frequency, intensity and direction of the vibrational stimulus. With laser-Doppler vibrometry, we measured points on the substrate and on the insect's thorax and middle leg. Transfer functions showing the response of the body relative to the substrate revealed resonance at lower frequencies and attenuation at higher frequencies. There were two modes of vibration along the body's long axis, a translational and a rotational mode. Furthermore, the transfer functions measured on the body differed substantially depending on whether the stimulus originated in front of or behind the insect. Directional information is thus available in the mechanical response of the body of these insects to substrate vibration. These results suggest a vibration localization mechanism that could function at very small spatial scales. PMID:11016785

  15. The interior working mechanism and temperature characteristics of a fluid based micro-vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhao, Shougen; Wu, Dafang; Jing, Xingjian

    2016-01-01

    Micro-vibration isolation is a hot topic in spacecraft vibration control, and fluid based vibration isolators alternatively provide a good and reliable solution to this challenging issue. In this paper, a novel fluid based micro-vibration isolator (FBMVI) is investigated. According to its inherent working principle and deformation pattern, the generation mechanisms of the damping and stiffness characteristics are derived, which are nonlinear functions of the environmental temperature. Then a lumped parameter model which is expressed by the physical design parameters (PDPs) is constructed, and the corresponding performance objective indices (POIs) are also obtained by applying the equivalence of mechanical impedance. Based on the finite element analysis of the internal damping component, a single variable method is further adopted to carry out the parametric study, and the influences of each PDP on the POIs are analyzed in details. Finally, experiments are conducted to identify the variation of fluid bulk modulus with the outside environmental temperature, and to validate the performance of the isolator under different temperature environments. The tested results show great consistence compared with the predicted tendencies of the parametric study. The results of this study can provide a very useful insight into and/or an important guidance for the design and application of this type of FBMVIs in engineering practice.

  16. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  17. Flight and Analytical Methods for Determining the Coupled Vibration Response of Tandem Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeates, John E , Jr; Brooks, George W; Houbolt, John C

    1957-01-01

    Chapter one presents a discussion of flight-test and analysis methods for some selected helicopter vibration studies. The use of a mechanical shaker in flight to determine the structural response is reported. A method for the analytical determination of the natural coupled frequencies and mode shapes of vibrations in the vertical plane of tandem helicopters is presented in Chapter two. The coupled mode shapes and frequencies are then used to calculate the response of the helicopter to applied oscillating forces.

  18. Teacher Characteristics for Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychly, Laura; Graves, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Culturally responsive pedagogy, as defined by one of the most prominent authors in the field, Geneva Gay (2002), is "using the cultural characteristics, experiences, and perspectives of ethnically diverse students as conduits for teaching them more effectively". Culturally responsive pedagogy can be thought of, then, as teaching practices that…

  19. Transfer matrix method for determination of the natural vibration characteristics of elastically coupled launch vehicle boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Laith K.; Zhou, Qinbo; Hendy, Hossam; Rui, Xiaoting

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of natural vibration characteristics has become one of important steps of the manufacture and dynamic design in the aerospace industry. This paper presents a new scenario called virtual cutting in the context of the transfer matrix method of linear multibody systems closed-loop topology for computing the free vibration characteristics of elastically coupled flexible launch vehicle boosters. In this approach, the coupled system is idealized as a triple-beam system-like structure coupled by linear translational springs, where a non-uniform free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam is used. A large thrust-to-weight ratio leads to large axial accelerations that result in an axial inertia load distribution from nose to tail. Consequently, it causes the development of significant compressive forces along the length of the launch vehicle. Therefore, it is important to take into account this effect in the transverse vibration model. This scenario does not need the global dynamics equations of a system, and it has high computational efficiency and low memory requirements. The validity of the presented scenario is achieved through comparison to other approaches published in the literature.

  20. Responses of the frog primary vestibular afferents to direct vibration of the semicircular canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Responses of primary afferents (PA) of lateral semicircular canal to sinusoidal vibration of the canal wall within the range 0.05-200 Hz (mean amplitudes 5-15 microns) in immobilized frogs were studied. Dynamic characteristics (gain, phase) of relative linear velocity of the vibrator (micron X/s) were examined. At 0.2 Hz, the gain was 5.35 + or - 3.19 imp X/s /micron X/s (mean; S.D.; n=14) and linearly decreased if the frequency rose. Phase lag of relative velocity at 0.05 Hz was 49.8 deg + or - 16.5 deg (n=13) and at 1 Hz 97 deg + or - 9.4 deg (n=22). At 100 Hz phase lag was about 240 deg. Three groups of PA are described: wide range PA reacting in the range from 0.05 up to 60-180 Hz; high frequency PA responding in the range from 20-40 up to 100-150 Hz; and low frequency PA responding in the range from 0.05 up to 2-20 Hz.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  2. Vibration and flutter characteristics of the SR7L large-scale propfan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the vibration characteristics and aeroelastic stability of the SR7L Large-Scale Advanced Propfan was performed using a finite element blade model and an improved aeroelasticity code. Analyses were conducted for different blade pitch angles, blade support conditions, number of blades, rotational speeds, and freestream Mach numbers. A finite element model of the blade was used to determine the blade's vibration behavior and sensitivity to support stiffness. The calculated frequencies and mode shape obtained with this model agreed well with the published experimental data. A computer code recently developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and based on three-dimensional, unsteady, lifting surface aerodynamic theory was used for the aeroelastic analysis to examine the blade's stability at a cruise condition of Mach 0.8 at 1700 rpm. The results showed that the blade is stable for that operating point. However, a flutter condition was predicted if the cruise Mach number was increased to 0.9.

  3. Vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2013-12-07

    Based on density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory calculations, we systematically investigate the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strains. It is found that under hole doping, the phonon frequencies of the ZO and TO branches at different wave vector q shift linearly with different slopes. Under electron doping, although the phonon frequencies shift irregularly, the shifting values are different at different phonon wave vectors. Interestingly, we find that external strain can restrain the irregular vibration responses of h-BN sheet to electron doping. The critical factor is revealed to be the relative position of the nearly free electron and boron p{sub z} states of h-BN sheet. Under external strains, the vibration responses of h-BN sheet are also found to be highly dependent on the phonon branches. Different vibration modes at different q points are revealed to be responsible for the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain. Our results point out a new way to detect the doping or strain status of h-BN sheet by measuring the vibration frequencies at different wave vector.

  4. Design and analysis of vibration energy harvesters based on peak response statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Friswell, M. I.; Litak, G.; Haddad Khodaparast, H.

    2016-06-01

    Energy harvesting using cantilever piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters excited by Gaussian broadband random base excitation is considered. The optimal design and analysis of energy harvesters under random excitation is normally performed using the mean and standard deviation of a response quantity of interest, such as the voltage. An alternative approach based on the statistics of the peak voltage is developed in this paper. Three extreme response characteristics, namely (a) level crossing, (b) response peaks above certain level, and (c) fractional time spend above a certain level, have been employed. Two cases, namely the harvesting circuit with and without an inductor, have been considered. Exact closed-form expressions have been derived for number of level crossings, statistics of response peaks and fractional time spend above a certain level for the output voltage. It is shown that these quantities can be related to the standard deviation of the voltage and its derivative with respect to time. Direct numerical simulation has been used to validate the analytical expressions. Based on the analytical results, closed-form expressions for optimal system parameters have been proposed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the applicability of the analytical results.

  5. Vibration Characteristics of a Large-Capacity Complex Vibration Source Using a Titanium Alloy Complex Transverse Vibration Rod with Two Stepped Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Kikuchi, Yuya

    2004-05-01

    The configurations of large-capacity 27 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration sources with multiple longitudinal transducers are proposed and studied. Ultrasonic complex vibration systems are effective for various types of metal welding and essential for new applications in various industries. The large-capacity vibration source consists of a complex transverse rod with a welding tip (titanium alloy), a complex vibration rod with a flange and a stepped part for holding the system (stainless-steel), a one-wavelength longitudinal vibration disk (aluminum alloy) and six bolt-clamped Langevin type piezo-electric ceramic (PZT) transducers (BLTs) installed along the circumference of the disk at an angle difference of 60°. The vibration source is driven using three driving systems with three transformers at a phase difference of 120°, and the disk is driven in a circular locus. The transverse vibration rod installed at the center of the disk is driven transversally and the welding tip of the rod vibrates in a circular locus.

  6. Vibration-Induced Motor Responses of Infants With and Without Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Teulier, Caroline; Smith, Beth A.; Kim, Byungji; Beutler, Benjamin D.; Martin, Bernard J.; Ulrich, Beverly D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The severity of myelomeningocele (MMC) stems both from a loss of neurons due to neural tube defect and a loss of function in viable neurons due to reduced movement experience during the first year after birth. In young infants with MMC, the challenge is to reinforce excitability and voluntary control of all available neurons. Muscle vibration paired with voluntary movement may increase motoneuron excitability and contribute to improvements in neural organization, responsiveness, and control. Objectives This study examined whether infants with or without MMC respond to vibration by altering their step or stance behavior when supported upright on a treadmill. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Twenty-four 2- to 10-month-old infants, 12 with typical development (TD) and 12 with MMC (lumbar and sacral lesions), were tested. Infants were supported upright with their feet in contact with a stationary or moving treadmill during 30-second trials. Rhythmic alternating vibrations were applied to the right and left rectus femoris muscles, the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, or the sole of the foot. Two cameras and behavior coding were used to determine step count, step type, and motor response to vibration onset. Results Step count decreased and swing duration increased in infants with TD during vibration of the sole of the foot on a moving treadmill (FT-M trials). Across all groups the percentage of single steps increased during vibration of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle on a moving treadmill. Infants with MMC and younger infants with TD responded to onset of vibration with leg straightening during rectus femoris muscle stimulation and by stepping during FT-M trials more often than older infants with TD. Conclusions Vibration seems a viable option for increasing motor responsiveness in infants with MMC. Follow-up studies are needed to identify optimal methods of administering vibration to maximize step and stance behavior in infants. PMID:22228610

  7. Influence of tyre-road contact model on vehicle vibration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múčka, Peter; Gagnon, Louis

    2015-09-01

    The influence of the tyre-road contact model on the simulated vertical vibration response was analysed. Three contact models were compared: tyre-road point contact model, moving averaged profile and tyre-enveloping model. In total, 1600 real asphalt concrete and Portland cement concrete longitudinal road profiles were processed. The linear planar model of automobile with 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) was used. Five vibration responses as the measures of ride comfort, ride safety and dynamic load of cargo were investigated. The results were calculated as a function of vibration response, vehicle velocity, road quality and road surface type. The marked differences in the dynamic tyre forces and the negligible differences in the ride comfort quantities were observed among the tyre-road contact models. The seat acceleration response for three contact models and 331 DOF multibody model of the truck semi-trailer was compared with the measured response for a known profile of test section.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Roger H. L.; Kiriakidis, Alejandro C.; Peng, Steve W.

    1997-07-01

    This study aims at the development of an effective nondestructive evaluation technique to predict the remaining useful life of a ceramic candle filter during a power plant's annual maintenance shutdown. The objective of the present on-going study is to establish the vibration signatures of ceramic candle filters at varying degradation levels due to different operating hours, and to study the various factors involving the establishment of the signatures.

  9. Influence of uncertainty and excitation amplitude on the vibration characteristics of rubber isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueqian, Chen; Zhanpeng, Shen; Qinshu, He; Qiang, Du; Xin'en, Liu

    2016-09-01

    Rubber isolators are widely used in engineering structures, which often exhibit some nonlinearity and uncertainty properties subjected to different environment exciting. In order to study the nonlinear characteristic and uncertainty of a rubber isolator system, the sin-sweep vibration tests with different base exciting level are carried out firstly. Then a single freedom degree mass-spring-damper model is introduced to simplify the rubber isolator system. In the theory model, the spring and the damper are represented by polynomial functions of the relative displacement. The coefficients in the functions are identified by the test data, while the uncertainties of the coefficients are quantified by the principal components analysis (PCA) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The major resonant frequencies and the damping ratios of the isolation system are calculated according to the theory model, the amplitude-frequency nonlinear characteristics are simulated by Runge-Kutta numerical method. The simulation results agree well with the experimental results, which indicate that the nonlinear model and the uncertainty quantifying results are feasible to predict the vibration characteristic and uncertainty of the isolation systems.

  10. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  11. Study on vibration characteristics of the shaft system for a dredging pump based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. M.; Qin, L.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, X.; He, L. Y.; He, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the shaft system for a dredging pump were studied with the Finite Element Method (FEM) by SAMCEF ROTOR. At first, the influence of the fluid-solid coupling interaction of mud water and impeller, water sealing and pump shaft on the lateral critical speeds were analyzed. The results indicated that the mud water must be taken into consideration, while the water sealing need not to. Then the effects of radial and thrust rolling bearings on the lateral critical speeds were discussed, which shows that the radial bearing close to the impeller has greatest impact on the 1st order critical speed. At last, the upper and lower limits of the critical speeds of lateral, axial and torsional vibration were calculated. The rated speed of the dredging pump was far less than the predicted critical speed, which can ensure the safe operation of the unit. Each vibration mode is also shown in this paper. This dynamic analysis method offers some reference value on the research of vibration and stability of the shaft system in dredging pump.

  12. The use of statistical characteristics of reducer vibrations as diagnostic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balitskiy, F. Y.; Genkin, M. D.; Ivanova, M. A.; Sokolova, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a statistical analysis of the vibrations of the experimental RS-1 reducer stand, with a spiral-gear transmission, operating on a closed circuit, are presented. The analysis was carried out on the Minsk-2 and Minsk-32 digital computers, with two-channel analog-digital converter, built in the Institute of the Science of Mechanics. Two-dimensional distribution patterns, conditional dispersions and dispersion ratios were calculated. The octave-band-filtered first harmonics of the tooth frequency f sub z of the vibrations at two different measurement points were considered as the components of the vibration process to be analyzed. The regression lines, corresponding to different values of the loading torque, are presented. Since it was not the gear drive parameters which were determined by diagnostic methods, but the characteristics most sensitive to change in state of the object of the investigation, the loading torque, which is the simplest and most accessible for measurement, was chosen as the condition parameter.

  13. A numerical method for determining the natural vibration characteristics of rotating nonuniform cantilever blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.; Malatino, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the free vibration characteristics of a rotating blade having nonuniform spanwise properties and cantilever boundary conditions. The equations which govern the coupled flapwise, chordwise, and torsional motion of such a blade are solved using an integrating matrix method. By expressing the equations of motion and matrix notation, utilizing the integrating matrix as an operator, and applying the boundary conditions, the equations are formulated into an eigenvalue problem whose solutions may be determined by conventional methods. Computer results are compared with experimental data.

  14. Measurements of an ARS DE204S Cryocooler's Thermal and Vibration Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Haid, B

    2004-08-24

    This document describes measurements that characterize an Advanced Research Systems DE204S cryocooler system. The data is relevant to the thermal performance and vibration characteristics of the cold-head. The thermal measurements include heat load mapping of the 1st and 2nd stage, and temperature fluctuation measurement of the 2nd stage heat station. A comparison of fluctuation measurements by four different sensors is also included to support the 2nd stage fluctuation results. Finally, optical measurement of the cyclic 2nd stage heat station deflection is described.

  15. Characteristics of vibration energy harvesting using giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kotaro; Horibe, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Shigekazu; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2015-12-01

    This work deals with the dynamic bending and energy harvesting characteristics of giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning both numerically and experimentally. The giant magnetostrictive cantilever is fabricated using a thin Terfenol-D layer, SUS layer, movable proof mass, etc, and, is designed to automatically adjust its own resonant frequency to match the external vibration frequency in real time. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, and the resonant frequency, induced voltage and stress in the magnetostrictive cantilevers were predicted. The resonant frequency and induced voltage were also measured, and comparison was made between simulation and experiment. The time-varying behavior and self-tuning ability are discussed in detail.

  16. Vibration characteristics of a large wind turbine tower on non-rigid foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, S. T.; Cang, T. Y. P.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Timmerman, D. H.; Fenton, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of the Mod-OA wind turbine supported by nonrigid foundations were investigated for a range of soil rigidities. The study shows that the influence of foundation rotation on the fundamental frequency of the wind turbine is quite significant for cohesive soils or loose sand. The reduction in natural frequency can be greater than 20 percent. However, for a foundation resting on well graded, dense granular materials or bedrock, such effect is small and the foundation can be treated as a fixed base.

  17. Neurocognitive responses to a single session of static squats with whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Amonette, William E; Boyle, Mandy; Psarakis, Maria B; Barker, Jennifer; Dupler, Terry L; Ott, Summer D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the head accelerations using a common whole body vibration (WBV) exercise protocol acutely reduced neurocognition in healthy subjects. Second, we investigated differential responses to WBV plates with 2 different delivery mechanisms: vertical and rotational vibrations. Twelve healthy subjects (N = 12) volunteered and completed a baseline (BASE) neurocognitive assessment: the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). Subjects then participated in 3 randomized exercise sessions separated by no more than 2 weeks. The exercise sessions consisted of five 2-minute sets of static hip-width stance squats, with the knees positioned at a 45° angle of flexion. The squats were performed with no vibration (control [CON]), with a vertically vibrating plate (vertical vibration [VV]), and with a rotational vibrating plate (rotational vibration [RV]) set to 30 Hz with 4 mm of peak-to-peak displacement. The ImPACT assessments were completed immediately after each exercise session and the composite score for 5 cognitive domains was analyzed: verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, and impulse control. Verbal memory scores were unaffected by exercise with or without vibration (p = 0.40). Likewise, visual memory was not different (p = 0.14) after CON, VV, or RV. Significant differences were detected for visual motor speed (p = 0.006); VV was elevated compared with BASE (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences (p = 0.26) in reaction time or impulse control (p = 0.16) after exercise with or without vibration. In healthy individuals, 10 minutes of 30 Hz, 4-mm peak-to-peak displacement vibration exposure with a 45° angle of knee flexion did not negatively affect neurocognition. PMID:25536489

  18. Assessing the influence of antivibration glove on digital vascular responses to acute hand-arm vibration.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Md H; Yokoyama, Kenjiro; Laskar, Md S; Inoue, Masaiwa; Takahashi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Shinji; Harada, Noriaki

    2007-05-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of an antivibration glove on digital vascular responses in healthy subjects exposed to short-term grasping of a vibrating handle. To measure finger blood flow (FBF) and finger skin temperature (FST) once at the end of every min, a blood flowmeter sensor was attached to the dorsum and a thermistor sensor was attached to the medial surface of the subject's middle phalanx of the third finger of the right hand. After 5 min of baseline measurements without or with an antivibration glove meeting ISO standard 10819, worn on the right hand, subjects gripped a vibrating handle with the same hand for a period of 5 min. Vibration was generated at two frequencies of 31.5 Hz and 250 Hz with a frequency weighted rms acceleration of 5.5 m/s(2). FBF and FST continued to be recorded for a further 5 min after release of the vibrating handle. Statistical analysis showed no significant change after vibration exposure in either FST or FBF at 250 Hz, compared to baseline (control) measurements while using the antivibration glove. At 31.5 Hz, FBF data exhibited a significant difference between before and after grasping of vibrating handle, which was less under the condition of wearing the antivibration glove than under the condition of bare hand. The results provide evidence that the antivibration glove considerably influenced finger vascular changes in healthy subjects induced by vibration exposure, especially against high frequency vibration. Further studies are required to assess finger vascular responses to hand-transmitted vibration with antivibration gloves of different manufacturers. PMID:17575396

  19. Evaluation of human response to structural vibration induced by sonic boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, L. C.; Czech, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the topic of building vibration response to sonic boom and the evaluation of the associated human response to this vibration. The paper reexamines some of the issues addressed in the previous extensive coverage of the topic, primarily by NASA, and attempts to offer a fresh viewpoint for some of the problems that may assist in reassessing the potential impact of sonic boom over populated areas. The topics addressed are: (1) human response to vibration; (2) criteria for, and acoustic signature of rattle; (3) structural response to shaped booms, including definition of two new descriptors for assessing the structural response to sonic boom; and (4) a detailed review of the previous NASA/FAA Sonic Boom Test Program involving structural response measurements at Edwards AFB and an initial estimate of structural response to sonic booms from possible high speed civil transport configurations. Finally, these estimated vibration responses are shown to be substantially greater than the human response and rattle criteria developed earlier.

  20. Response of a flexible filament in a flowing soap film subject to a forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Laibing; Xiao, Qing; Wu, Haijun; Wu, Yanfeng; Yin, Xiezhen

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between flexible plates and fluids are important physical phenomena. A flag in wind is one of the most simplified and classical models for studying the problem. In this paper, we investigated the response of a flag in flow with an externally forced vibration by using flexible filaments and soap film. Experiments show that for a filament that is either in oscillation or stationary, the external forced vibration leads to its oscillation. A synchronization phenomenon occurs in the experiments. A small perturbation leads to a large response of flapping amplitude in response. The insight provided here is helpful to the applications in the flow control, energy harvesting, and bionic propulsion areas.

  1. Vibration characteristics of NiTi-Al MMC beam fabricated with ultrasonic welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Wang, Yiqing; Kuang, Xinbin; Zhang, Teng; Liu, Hongzhong; Lu, Bingheng; Xu, Minglong

    2015-12-01

    A free-vibration differential equation of the compound beam of NiTi-Al MMC (metal matrix composite) is built considering the recovery stress of NiTi foil and based on Timoshenko beam theory to predict the frequency tuning characteristics of the compound beam. The clamped-free (CF) beam is under compressive stress state due to the recovery stress in the NiTi foil, which may cause a reduction in its natural frequency. For an 80 mm CF beam with 8% NiTi (prestrain 3%) embedded in Al matrix, the natural frequency decreases by 52.1% when temperature is up to 70 °C. However the stress state of clamped-clamped (CC) beam depends on the combined effect of recovery stress and thermal expansion of NiTi. At least 20% NiTi should be embedded in Al matrix to increase the natural frequency of CC beam. Finally, the NiTi-Al MMC beam is prepared by ultrasonic welding process. A thermal modal experiment is conducted to study the vibration characteristics of the compound beam. The results show that the natural frequency of the compound beam could be tuned effectively by volume fraction of the NiTi embedded in Al foil, which is consistent with theoretical calculations.

  2. Vibration characteristics of thin rotating cylindrical shells with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shupeng; Chu, Shiming; Cao, Dengqing

    2012-08-01

    An analysis is presented for the vibration characteristics of thin rotating cylindrical shells with various boundary conditions by use of Fourier series expansion method. Based on Sanders' shell equations, the governing equations of motion which take into account the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces as well as the initial hoop tension due to rotating are derived. The displacement field is expressed as a product of Fourier series expressions which represents the axial modal displacements and trigonometric functions which represents the circumferential modal displacements. Stokes' transformation is employed to derive the derivatives of the Fourier series expressions. Then, through the process of formula derivation, an explicit expression of the exact frequency equation can be obtained for a thin rotating cylinder with classical boundary conditions of any type. Once the frequency equation has been determined, the frequencies are calculated numerically. To validate the present analysis, comparisons between the results of the present method and previous studies are performed and very good agreement is achieved. Finally, the method is applied to investigate the vibration characteristics of thin rotating cylindrical shells under various boundaries, and the results are presented.

  3. Vibration characteristics of aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves and their effect on wetting behavior of solder droplets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhiwu; Zheng, Kun; Yan, Jiuchun; Yang, Shiqin

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of an aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves were investigated with a combination of numerical simulation and experimental testing. The wetting behavior of solder droplets on the vibrating aluminum surface was also examined. The results show that the vibration pattern of the aluminum surface is inhomogeneous. The amplitude of the aluminum surface exceeds the excitation amplitude in some zones, while the amplitude decreases nearly to zero in other zones. The distribution of the zero-amplitude zones is much less dependent on the strength of the vibration than on the location of the vibration source. The surface of the liquid solder vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency that is higher than the vibration source, and the amplitude of the liquid solder is almost twice that of the aluminum surface. The vibration of the surface of the base metal (liquid solder) correlates with the oxide film removal effect. Significant removal of the oxide film can be achieved within 2s when the amplitude of the aluminum surface is higher than 5.4 μm or when the amplitude of the liquid solder surface is higher than 10.2 μm. PMID:24295911

  4. Visual Stimulation Facilitates Penile Responses to Vibration in Men with and without Erectile Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Erick; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared reflexogenic and psychogenic penile responses in men with and without erectile disorder. Hypothesized that men with psychogenic dysfunction respond minimally to vibrotactile stimulation. As predicted, responses were different in the vibration condition. Interpretations are provided in terms of attention and appraisal. (BF)

  5. Subjective response to combined noise and vibration during flight of a large twin-jet airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    A NASA twin-jet airplane was used to obtain controlled noise and vibration environments during flight while obtaining subjective responses from 13 passenger-subjects (6 females and 7 males). Subjective ratings of overall comfort, comfort when considering only vibration, and comfort when considering only noise were obtained during times of different vibration and noise environments. Passenger-subjects were able to distinguish and rate noise better than vibration. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in ratings of ride comfort due to both sex type and flight experience. Males rated flying discomfort much more severely than females when rating the overall ride and the ride when considering only the noise environment. Experienced passengers also rated the overall ride to be more uncomfortable than inexperienced passengers.

  6. Mechanical and vibrational responses of gate-tunable graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuqing; Sun, Jiangping; Gong, Xionghui

    2015-03-01

    The vibrational mechanical properties of gate-tunable graphene resonator were investigated in detail using finite element analysis (FEA) and simulation. Treating the graphene resonator as a two-dimensional (2D) thin plate, the relationship between resonance frequency and driving force was explored. The effects of built-in tension, adsorbates and graphene size on the performance of resonator including resonance frequency and tunability were also studied. It was shown that resonance frequency could be tuned by the electrostatically induced average tension due to driving force, and exponentially increased with increasing driving force. When the single-layer graphene resonator without any adsorbates had no or very small built-in tension, the tunability of resonator was greater. However, for a high-frequency-range resonator, the resonator with high built-in tension should be used. The simulation results suggested potential applications of graphene resonators tuned by a driving force, such as widely tunable or ultrahigh frequency nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) devices.

  7. Thermal cycling and vibration response for PREPP concrete waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, R.M.; Welch, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) will process those transuranic wastes which do not satisfy the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria. Since these wastes will contain considerable quantities of combustible materials, incineration will be an integral part of the treatment process. Four basic types of PREPP ash wastes have been identified. The four types are designated high metal box waste, combustible waste, average waste, and inorganic sludge. In this process, the output of the incinerator is a mixture of ash and shredded noncombustible material (principally metals) which is separated into two sizes, -1/4 inch (under-size waste) and reverse arrow 1/4 inch (oversize waste). These wastes are solidified with hydraulic cement in 55-gallon drums. Simulated PREPP waste forms prepared by Colorado School of Mines Research Institute were subjected to thermal cycling and vibration testing to demonstrate compliance with the WIPP immobilization criterion. Although actual storage and transport conditions are expected to vary somewhat from those utilized in the testing protocol, the generation of only very small amounts of particulate suggests that the immobilization criterion should be routinely met for similar waste form formulations and production procedures. However, the behavior of waste forms containing significant quantities of off-gas scrubber sludge or considerably higher waste loadings may differ. Limited thermal cycling and vibration testing of prototype waste forms should be conducted if the final formulations or production methods used for actual waste forms differ appreciably from those tested in this study. If such testing is conducted, consideration should be given to designing the experiment to accommodate a larger number of thermal cycles more representative of the duration of storage expected.

  8. Quantification of the effects of audible rattle and source type on the human response to environmental vibration.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, J; Sica, G; Peris, E; Sharp, C; Moorhouse, A T; Waddington, D C

    2016-03-01

    The present research quantifies the influence of source type and the presence of audible vibration-induced rattle on annoyance caused by vibration in residential environments. The sources of vibration considered are railway and the construction of a light rail system. Data were measured in the United Kingdom using a socio-vibration survey (N = 1281). These data are analyzed using ordinal logit models to produce exposure-response relationships describing community annoyance as a function of vibration exposure. The influence of source type and the presence of audible vibration-induced rattle on annoyance are investigated using dummy variable analysis, and quantified using odds-ratios and community tolerance levels. It is concluded that the sample population is more likely to express higher levels of annoyance if the vibration source is construction compared to railway, and if vibration-induced rattle is audible. PMID:27036258

  9. Deducing Electronic Unit Internal Response During a Vibration Test Using a Lumped Parameter Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    During random vibration testing of electronic boxes there is often a desire to know the dynamic response of certain internal printed wiring boards (PWBs) for the purpose of monitoring the response of sensitive hardware or for post-test forensic analysis in support of anomaly investigation. Due to restrictions on internally mounted accelerometers for most flight hardware there is usually no means to empirically observe the internal dynamics of the unit, so one must resort to crude and highly uncertain approximations. One common practice is to apply Miles Equation, which does not account for the coupled response of the board in the chassis, resulting in significant over- or under-prediction. This paper explores the application of simple multiple-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter modeling to predict the coupled random vibration response of the PWBs in their fundamental modes of vibration. A simple tool using this approach could be used during or following a random vibration test to interpret vibration test data from a single external chassis measurement to deduce internal board dynamics by means of a rapid correlation analysis. Such a tool might also be useful in early design stages as a supplemental analysis to a more detailed finite element analysis to quickly prototype and analyze the dynamics of various design iterations. After developing the theoretical basis, a lumped parameter modeling approach is applied to an electronic unit for which both external and internal test vibration response measurements are available for direct comparison. Reasonable correlation of the results demonstrates the potential viability of such an approach. Further development of the preliminary approach presented in this paper will involve correlation with detailed finite element models and additional relevant test data.

  10. Acute bone response to whole body vibration in healthy pre-pubertal boys.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R; Ward, K; Lee, E; Razaghi, H; Horne, C; Bishop, N J

    2015-06-01

    The skeleton responds to mechanical stimulation. We wished to ascertain the magnitude and speed of the growing skeleton's response to a standardised form of mechanical stimulation, vibration. 36 prepubertal boys stood for 10 minutes in total on one of two vibrating platforms (high (>2 g) or low (<1 g) magnitude vibration) on either 1, 3 or 5 successive days (n=12 for each duration); 15 control subjects stood on an inactive platform. Blood samples were taken at intervals before and after vibration to measure bone formation (P1NP, osteocalcin) and resorption (CTx) markers as well as osteoprotegerin and sclerostin. There were no significant differences between platform and control groups in bone turnover markers immediately after vibration on days 1, 3 and 5. Combining platform groups, at day 8 P1NP increased by 25.1% (CI 12.3 to 38.0; paired t-test p=0.005) and bone resorption increased by 10.9% (CI 3.6 to 18.2; paired t-test p=0.009) compared to baseline. Osteocalcin, osteoprotogerin and sclerostin did not change significantly. The growing skeleton can respond quickly to vibration of either high or low magnitude. Further work is needed to determine the utility of such "stimulation-testing" in clinical practice. PMID:26032203

  11. Whole-body vibration induces pain and lumbar spinal inflammation responses in the rat that vary with the vibration profile.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Martha E; Kartha, Sonia; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-08-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is linked epidemiologically to neck and back pain in humans, and to forepaw mechanical allodynia and cervical neuroinflammation in a rodent model of WBV, but the response of the low back and lumbar spine to WBV is unknown. A rat model of WBV was used to determine the effect of different WBV exposures on hind paw behavioral sensitivity and neuroinflammation in the lumbar spinal cord. Rats were exposed to 30 min of WBV at either 8 or 15 Hz on days 0 and 7, with the lumbar spinal cord assayed using immunohistochemistry at day 14. Behavioral sensitivity was measured using mechanical stimulation of the hind paws to determine the onset, persistence, and/or recovery of allodynia. Both WBV exposures induce mechanical allodynia 1 day following WBV, but only the 8 Hz WBV induces a sustained decrease in the withdrawal threshold through day 14. Similarly, increased activation of microglia, macrophages, and astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord is only evident after the painful 8 Hz WBV. Moreover, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-phosphorylation is most robust in neurons and astrocytes of the dorsal horn, with the most ERK phosphorylation occurring in the 8 Hz group. These findings indicate that a WBV exposure that induces persistent pain also induces a host of neuroimmune cellular activation responses that are also sustained. This work indicates there is an injury-dependent response that is based on the vibration parameters, providing a potentially useful platform for studying mechanisms of painful spinal injuries. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1439-1446, 2016. PMID:27571442

  12. Flow-induced vibration characteristics of the BWR/5-201 jet pump

    SciTech Connect

    LaCroix, L.V.

    1982-09-01

    A General Electric boiling water reactor BWR/5-201 jet pump was tested for flow-induced vibration (FIV) characteristics in the Large Steam Water Test Facility at Moss Landing, CA, during the period June-July 1978. High level periodic FIV were observed at reactor operating conditions (1027 psia, 532/sup 0/F and prototypical flow rates) for the specific single jet pump assembly tested. High level FIV of similar amplitude and character have been shown capable of damaging jet pump components and associated support hardware if allowed to continue unchecked. High level FIV were effectively suppressed in two special cases tested: (1) lateral load (>500 lb) at the mixer to diffuser slip joint; and (2) a labyrinth seal (5 small, circumferential grooves) on the mixer at the slip joint. Stability criteria for the particular jet pump tested were developed from test data. A cause-effect relationship between the dynamic pressure within the slip joint and the jet pump vibration was established.

  13. A spider's biological vibration filter: micromechanical characteristics of a biomaterial surface.

    PubMed

    Young, Seth L; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Erko, Maxim; Barth, Friedrich G; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor; Politi, Yael; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-11-01

    A strain-sensing lyriform organ (HS-10) found on all of the legs of a Central American wandering spider (Cupiennius salei) detects courtship, prey and predator vibrations transmitted by the plant on which it sits. It has been suggested that the viscoelastic properties of a cuticular pad directly adjacent to the sensory organ contribute to the organ's pronounced high-pass characteristics. Here, we investigate the micromechanical properties of the cuticular pad biomaterial in search of a deeper understanding of its impact on the function of the vibration sensor. These properties are considered to be an effective adaptation for the selective detection of signals for frequencies >40 Hz. Using surface force spectroscopy mapping we determine the elastic modulus of the pad surface over a temperature range of 15-40 °C at various loading frequencies. In the glassy state, the elastic modulus was ~100 MPa, while in the rubbery state the elastic modulus decreased to 20 MPa. These data are analyzed according to the principle of time-temperature superposition to construct a master curve that relates mechanical properties, temperature and stimulus frequencies. By estimating the loss and storage moduli vs. temperature and frequency it was possible to make a direct comparison with electrophysiology experiments, and it was found that the dissipation of energy occurs within a frequency window whose position is controlled by environmental temperatures. PMID:25065547

  14. Axial Vibration Characteristics Considering a Moving Pick-Up Unit for the Flexible Optical Disk System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jun Hyeon; Rhim, Yoon Chul

    2011-09-01

    The axial vibration characteristics of the flexible optical disk are investigated experimentally considering the pick-up window and the geometry of a moving pick-up. The axial runout of the disk is measured by using a laser displacement sensor along the four perpendicular radial directions. Measurements are conducted with respect to the shapes of pick-up faces, which have different radius of curvatures, as well as to the positions of the moving pick-up. A flat stabilizer with damping orifices is used in the experiment and the disk is rotated at 8,000, 10,000, and 12,000 rpm. The axial runouts and the displacements of the disk are measured for 6 different shaped pick-ups. The smallest axial runout of 10 µm, which is well manageable for the current optical disk drive technology, is obtained when we use the curved pick-up with curvatures of 400 mm in the direction of disk rotation.

  15. Effects of blood in veins of dragonfly wing on the vibration characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dan; Yin, Yajun; Zhao, Hongxiao; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    How the blood in veins of dragonfly wing affects its vibration characteristics is investigated. Based on the experimental results of the wing's morphology and microstructures, including the veins, the membranes and the pterostigma, accurate three-dimensional finite element models of the dragonfly forewing are developed. Considering the blood in veins, the total mass, mass distribution and the moments of inertia of the wing are studied. The natural frequencies/modal shapes are analyzed when the veins are filled with and without blood, respectively. The based natural frequency of the model with blood (189 Hz) is much closer to the experimental result. Relative to bending modal shapes, the torsional ones are affected more significantly by the blood. The results in this article reveal the multi-functions of the blood in dragonfly wings and have important implications for the bionic design of flapping-wing micro air vehicles. PMID:25577611

  16. Free-vibration characteristics and correlation of a space station split-blanket solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Shaker, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a zero-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The zero-g configuration corrresponds to an on-orbit configuration of the Space Station solar array. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the natural frequencies of the array; the second uses the finite element method program, MSC/NASTRAN. The stiffness matrix from the NASTRAN solution was found to be erroneously grounded. The results from the two methods are compared. It is concluded that the grounding does not seriously compromise the solution to the elastic modes of the solar array. However, the correct rigid body modes need to be included to obtain the correct dynamic model.

  17. Free-vibration characteristics and correlation of a Space Station split-blanket solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Shaker, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a zero-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The zero-g configuration corresponds to an on-orbit configuration of the Space Station solar array. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the natural frequencies of the array; the second uses the finite element method program, MSC/NASTRAN. The stiffness matrix from the NASTRAN solution was found to be erroneously grounded. The results from the two methods are compared. It is concluded that the grounding does not seriously compromise the solution to the elastic modes of the solar array. However, the correct rigid body modes need to be icluded to obtain the correct dynamic model.

  18. Scanning LDV for vibration measurement of filiform hairs in crickets in response to induced airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santulli, C.; Finn, T. J.; Seidel, R.; Jeronimidis, G.

    2006-06-01

    Cercal hairs represent in cricket a wind sensitive escape system, able to detect the airflow generated from predating species. These sensors have been studied as a biomimetic concept to allow the development of MEMS for biomedical use. In particular, the behaviour of the hairs, including airflow response, resonant frequency and damping, has been investigated up to a frequency of 20 kHz. The microscopic nature of the hairs, the complex vibrations of excited hairs and the high damping of the system suggested that the use of Laser Doppler vibrometry could possibly improve the test performance. Two types of tests were performed: in the first case the hairs were indirectly excited using the signal obtained from a vibrating aluminium plate, whilst in the second case the hairs were directly excited using a white noise chirp. The results from the first experiment indicated that the hairs move in-phase with the exciting signal up to frequencies in the order of 10 kHz, responding to the vibration modes of the plate with a signal attenuation of 12 to 20 dB. The chirp experiment revealed the presence of rotational resonant modes at 6850 and 11300 Hz. No clear effect of hair length was perceivable on the vibration response of the filiform sensors. The obtained results proved promising to support the mechanical and vibration characterisation of the hairs and suggest that scanning Laser vibrometry can be used extensively on highly dampened biological materials.

  19. On the dimension of complex responses in nonlinear structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The ability to accurately model engineering systems under extreme dynamic loads would prove a major breakthrough in many aspects of aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering. Extreme loads frequently induce both nonlinearities and coupling which increase the complexity of the response and the computational cost of finite element models. Dimension reduction has recently gained traction and promises the ability to distill dynamic responses down to a minimal dimension without sacrificing accuracy. In this context, the dimensionality of a response is related to the number of modes needed in a reduced order model to accurately simulate the response. Thus, an important step is characterizing the dimensionality of complex nonlinear responses of structures. In this work, the dimensionality of the nonlinear response of a post-buckled beam is investigated. Significant detail is dedicated to carefully introducing the experiment, the verification of a finite element model, and the dimensionality estimation algorithm as it is hoped that this system may help serve as a benchmark test case. It is shown that with minor modifications, the method of false nearest neighbors can quantitatively distinguish between the response dimension of various snap-through, non-snap-through, random, and deterministic loads. The state-space dimension of the nonlinear system in question increased from 2-to-10 as the system response moved from simple, low-level harmonic to chaotic snap-through. Beyond the problem studied herein, the techniques developed will serve as a prescriptive guide in developing fast and accurate dimensionally reduced models of nonlinear systems, and eventually as a tool for adaptive dimension-reduction in numerical modeling. The results are especially relevant in the aerospace industry for the design of thin structures such as beams, panels, and shells, which are all capable of spatio-temporally complex dynamic responses that are difficult and computationally expensive to

  20. Lumped Parameter Modeling for Rapid Vibration Response Prototyping and Test Correlation for Electronic Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Present preliminary work using lumped parameter models to approximate dynamic response of electronic units to random vibration; Derive a general N-DOF model for application to electronic units; Illustrate parametric influence of model parameters; Implication of coupled dynamics for unit/board design; Demonstrate use of model to infer printed wiring board (PWB) dynamics from external chassis test measurement.

  1. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  2. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  3. Acute Cardiovascular Response during Resistance Exercise with Whole-body Vibration in Sedentary Subjects: A Randomized Cross-over Trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, Thaisa; Polito, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the acute cardiovascular responses during and after resistance exercise with and without whole-body vibration. Nineteen sedentary adults randomly performed one session of isometric squats without vibration and the same exercise with vibration. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were measured. SBP, DBP and HR were also measured for 20 min after the sessions. The exercise with vibration demonstrated significant values ​​(P < 0.05) for SBP (second to sixth sets), DBP (third to sixth sets) and SVR (second to sixth sets) compared with the exercise without vibration. After the sessions, the values ​​of SBP for both exercises were significantly lower than the respective resting values; with no difference between the sessions. In conclusion, exercise with vibration caused increases in SBP, DBP and SVR compared with exercise with no vibration in sedentary adults. PMID:26031551

  4. Analysis of vibrational response in graphite oxide nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prias Barragan, Jhon Jairo; Gross, Katherine; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Ariza Calderon, Hernando; Prieto, Pedro

    In this work, we present a new low-cost fabrication process to obtain graphite oxide nanoplatelets from bamboo pyroligneous acid (GO-BPA) by thermal decomposition method using a pyrolysis system for different carbonization temperatures from 673 to 973 K. The GO-BPA samples were characterized by using Raman, FTIR, XRD, SEM and TEM techniques, whose results suggest that increased carbonization temperature increases graphite conversion, boundary defects, desorption of some organic compounds and phonon response, respectively. We discuss potential applications of the GO-BPA samples involving phonon response that would benefit from a fully scaled technology, advanced electronic sensors and devices.

  5. Study of T53 engine vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Vibration characteristics for overhauled T53 engines, including rejection rate, principal sources of vibration, and normal procedures taken by the overhaul center to reduce engine vibration are summarized. Analytical and experimental data were compared to determine the engine's dynamic response to unbalance forces with results showing that the engine operates through bending critical speeds. Present rigid rotor balancing techniques are incapable of compensating for the flexible rotor unbalance. A comparison of typical test cell and aircraft vibration levels disclosed significant differences in the engine's dynamic response. A probable spline shift phenomenon was uncovered and investigated. Action items to control costs and reduce vibration levels were identified from analytical and experimental studies.

  6. Effects of gear crack propagation paths on vibration responses of the perforated gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Qibin; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behaviors of a perforated gear system considering effects of the gear crack propagation paths and this study focuses on the effects of a crack propagating through the rim on the time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) and vibration responses. Considering the effects of the extended tooth contact, a finite element (FE) model of a gear pair is established based on ANSYS software. TVMS of the perforated gear with crack propagating through tooth and rim are calculated by using the FE model. Furthermore, a lumped mass model is adopted to investigate the vibration responses of the perforated gear system. The results show that there exist three periods related to slots of the gear body in a rotating period of the perforated gear. Gear cracks propagating through tooth and rim both reduce the gear body stiffness and lead to reduction of TVMS besides the crack tooth contact moment, and the TVMS weakening for the former is less than that for the latter. Moreover, the results also show that the gear crack propagating through the rim (CPR) has a greater effect on vibration responses than the gear crack propagating through the tooth (CPT) under the same crack level. Vibration level increases with the increasing crack depth, especially for the gear with CPR.

  7. Experimental studies for determining human discomfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate several problems related to methodology and design of experiments to obtain human comfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration. Specifically, the studies were directed to the determination of (1) the adequacy of frequency averaging of vibration data to obtain discomfort predictors, (2) the effect of practice on subject ratings, (3) the effect of the demographic factors of age, sex, and weight, and (4) the relative importance of seat and floor vibrations in the determination of measurement and criteria specification location. Results indicate that accurate prediction of discomfort requires knowledge of both the acceleration level and frequency content of the vibration stimuli. More importantly, the prediction of discomfort was shown to be equally good based upon either floor accelerations or seat accelerations. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the discomfort levels in different seats resulting from similar vibratory imputs were equal. Therefore, it was recommended that criteria specifications and acceleration measurements be made at the floor location. The results also indicated that practice did not systematically influence discomfort responses nor did the demographic factors of age, weight, and sex contribute to the discomfort response variation.

  8. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field /sup 252/Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables.

  9. Short term response of insulin, glucose, growth hormone and corticosterone to acute vibration in rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Leon, H. A.; Chackerian, M.

    1971-01-01

    Study carried out to obtain some notion of the initial phasing and interactive effects among some hormones known to be responsive to vibration stress. Sprague-Dawley derived rats were exposed to the acute effects of confinement and confinement with lateral (plus or minus G sub y) vibration. The coincident monitoring of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and corticosterone plasma levels, during and immediately subsequent to exposure to brief low level vibration, exhibits the effects of inhibition of insulin release by epinephrine. The ability of insulin (IRI) to return rapidly to basal levels, from appreciably depressed levels during vibration, in the face of elevated levels of glucose is also shown. Corticosterone responds with almost equal rapidity, but in opposite phase to the IRI. The immuno-assayable growth hormone (IGH) dropped from a basal level of 32 ng/ml to 7.3 ng/ml immediately subsequent to vibration and remained at essentially that level throughout the experiment (60 min). Whether these levels represent a real fall in the rat or whether they merely follow the immuno-logically deficient form is still in question.

  10. Optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps for helicopter vibration reduction using response surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswamurthy, S. R.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2007-03-01

    This study aims to determine optimal locations of dual trailing-edge flaps to achieve minimum hub vibration levels in a helicopter, while incurring low penalty in terms of required trailing-edge flap control power. An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used in conjunction with an optimal control algorithm to determine the flap time history for vibration minimization. The reduced hub vibration levels and required flap control power (due to flap motion) are the two objectives considered in this study and the flap locations along the blade are the design variables. It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces based on the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments describe both objectives adequately. Numerical studies for a four-bladed hingeless rotor show that both objectives are more sensitive to outboard flap location compared to the inboard flap location by an order of magnitude. Optimization results show a disjoint Pareto surface between the two objectives. Two interesting design points are obtained. The first design gives 77 percent vibration reduction from baseline conditions (no flap motion) with a 7 percent increase in flap power compared to the initial design. The second design yields 70 percent reduction in hub vibration with a 27 percent reduction in flap power from the initial design.

  11. Free vibration characteristics of multiple load path blades by the transfer matrix method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Joshi, Arun M.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of free vibrational characteristics is basic to any dynamic design, and these characteristics can form the basis for aeroelastic stability analyses. Conventional helicopter blades are typically idealized as single-load-path blades, and the transfer matrix method is well suited to analyze such blades. Several current helicopter dynamic programs employ transfer matrices to analyze the rotor blades. In this paper, however, the transfer matrix method is extended to treat multiple-load-path blades, without resorting to an equivalent single-load-path approximation. With such an extension, these current rotor dynamic programs which employ the transfer matrix method can be modified with relative ease to account for the multiple load paths. Unlike the conventional blades, the multiple-load-path blades require the introduction of the axial degree-of-freedom into the solution process to account for the differential axial displacements of the different load paths. The transfer matrix formulation is validated through comparison with the finite-element solutions.

  12. Vibration characteristics of walls and a plate glass window representative of those of a wood-frame house

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    Mechanical excitation was used, and measurements of acceleration response, natural frequencies, and nodal patterns were performed. Results indicate that the wall sections and the complete wall did not act as a unit in responding to sinusoidal vibration inputs. Calculated frequencies of the components that account for this independent behavior of the studs and face sheets agreed resonably well with experimental frequencies. Experimental vibrations of the plate glass window agreed with the calculated behavior, and responses of the window exposed to airplane flyover noise were readily correlated with the test results.

  13. Torsional optokinetic nystagmus: normal response characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, S J; Proudlock, F A; Gottlob, I

    2004-01-01

    Background/aims: Few studies have investigated normal response characteristics of torsional optokinetic nystagmus (tOKN). The authors have investigated the effect of stimulus velocity and central/peripheral stimulation on tOKN. Methods: Torsional OKN was elicited using a sinusoidal grating rotating at velocities of 3°/s to 1000°/s in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. To investigate the effect of central stimulation, stimulus size was varied from 2.86° to 50.8°. An artificial scotoma placed over a 50.8° stimulus was varied from 2.86° to 43.2° to investigate peripheral stimulation. Eight subjects participated in each experiment and torsional eye movements were recorded using video-oculography. The mean slow phase velocity (MSPV) and gain were calculated. Results: The maximum gain occurred in response to 8°/s stimulation. The MSPV increased up to a stimulus velocity of 200°/s achieving a maximum of 3°/s in both directions. MSPV was linearly correlated with the log of stimulus velocity. The smallest field size, rotating at 40°/s, evoked 10% of the gain elicited by the largest display. When the most peripheral stimulus was used, the gain was maintained at 50% of the gain evoked when the full display was used. Conclusions: A wide range of stimulus velocities can elicit tOKN and peripheral field stimulation contributes significantly to its response. PMID:15148215

  14. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  15. Nonlinear response of vibrational excitons: Simulating the two-dimensional infrared spectrum of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Paarmann, A.; Hayashi, T.; Mukamel, S.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2009-01-01

    A simulation formalism for the nonlinear response of vibrational excitons is presented and applied to the OH stretching vibrations of neat liquid H2O. The method employs numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation and allows explicit treatment of fluctuating transition frequencies, vibrational couplings, dipole moments, and the anharmonicities of all these quantities, as well as nonadiabatic effects. The split operator technique greatly increases computational feasibility and performance. The electrostatic map for the OH stretching vibrations in liquid water employed in our previous study [A. Paarmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 191103 (2008)] is presented. The two-dimensional spectra are in close agreement with experiment. The fast 100 fs dynamics are primarily attributed to intramolecular mixing between states in the two-dimensional OH stretching potential. Small intermolecular couplings are sufficient to reproduce the experimental energy transfer time scales. Interference effects between Liouville pathways in excitonic systems and their impact on the analysis of the nonlinear response are discussed. PMID:19485440

  16. The Application of Disturbance Response Decoupling to the Vibration Control of an Electron Beam Lithography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Cheng; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2009-06-01

    This paper demonstrates a method to control an electron beam lithography (EBL) system's vibrations with a newly developed technique called disturbance response decoupling (DRD). Resolution requirements make the vibration control of EBL systems increasingly important. Satisfying performance criteria requires considering two kinds of disturbances, load disturbances from the machine and ground disturbances from the environment, in EBL systems. Controlling lithography tools' vibrations has been studied for many years; however, designing controllers by traditional approaches can be very complicated because of these two types of disturbances' conflicting requirements. Therefore, DRD techniques were applied for this paper to deal independently with these performance requirements. The DRD control method was initially proposed in 2001 to address vehicle suspension control problems. This paper proposes a generalized and experimentally realized DRD control structure to suppress an EBL system's vibrations. The work was carried out in three parts. First, passive isolators were used to isolate ground disturbances. Second, active components were applied to improve the system's responses to load disturbances. Finally, the system was integrated to verify its overall performance. Simulations and experiments verify the proposed control strategies' effectiveness.

  17. Analytical and experimental vibration and buckling characteristics of a pretensioned stayed column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    Modal vibration tests to determine lateral modes of vibration of a stayed column and static axial compression tests to determine the column's buckling and postbuckling behavior have been performed. Effects of stay tension levels and vibration-load interaction are presented. Two finite element models are used to analyze the column, a three-dimensional frame using NASTRAN and an equivalent two-dimensional frame using an exact dynamic stiffness matrix. Both analyses correlated well with the linear vibration and buckling experimental data. Results indicate premature buckling of the column due to vibration-load interaction and nonlinear oscillations due to stay slackening. Postbuckling behavior of the column is unusual because of stay slackening and results in a postbuckling restoring force of less than the bifurcation buckling load. Guidelines for design of pretensioned structures are presented which consider buckling, postbuckling and vibration behavior.

  18. Synchronous and non-synchronous responses of systems with multiple identical nonlinear vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Jimmy S.; Shaw, Steven W.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we investigate the nonlinear dynamic response of systems composed of a primary inertia to which multiple identical vibration absorbers are attached. This problem is motivated by observations of systems of centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers that are designed to reduce engine order torsional vibrations in rotating systems, but the results are relevant to translational systems as well. In these systems the total absorber mass is split into multiple equal masses for purposes of distribution and/or balance, and it is generally expected that the absorbers will act in unison, corresponding to a synchronous response. In order to capture nonlinear effects of the responses of the absorbers, specifically, their amplitude-dependent frequency, we consider them to possess nonlinear stiffness. The equations of motion for the system are derived and it is shown how one can uncouple the equations for the absorbers from that for the primary inertia, resulting in a system of identical resonators that are globally coupled. These symmetric equations are scaled for weak nonlinear effects, near resonant forcing, and small damping. The method of averaging is applied, from which steady-state responses and their stability are investigated. The response of systems with two, three, and four absorbers are considered in detail, demonstrating a rich variety of bifurcations of the synchronous response, resulting in responses with various levels of symmetry in which sub-groups of absorbers are mutually synchronous. It is also shown that undamped models with more than two absorbers possess a degenerate response, which is made robust by the addition of damping to the model. Design guidelines are proposed based on the nature of the system response, with the aim of minimizing the acceleration of the primary system. It is shown that the desired absorber parameters are selected so that the system achieves a stable synchronous response which does not undergo jumps via saddle

  19. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  20. Electrorheological vibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobko, Evguenia V.; Shulman, Zinovy P.; Korobko, Yulia O.

    2001-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to de3velopment and testing of an active vibration system. The system is intended for providing efficient motion of a piston in a hydraulic channel for creation of shocks and periodic vibrations in a low frequency range by means of the ER-valves based on an electrosensitive working me dium, i.e. electrorheological fluids. The latter manifests the electrorheological (ER) effect, i.e. a reversible change in the rheological characteristics of weak-conducting disperse compositions in the presence of constant and alternating electric fields. As a result of the experimental study of the dependence of viscoelastic properties of the ER-fluid on the magnitude and type of an electric field, the optimum dimensions of the vibrator and the its valves characteristics of the optimal electrical signal are determined. For control of an ER- vibrator having several valves we have designed a special type of a high-voltage two-channel impulse generator. Experiments were conducted at the frequencies ranged from 1- 10 Hz. It has been shown, that a peak force made 70% of the static force exercised by the vibrator rod. A phase shift between the input voltage and the load acceleration was less than 45 degree(s)C which allowed servocontrol and use of the vibrator for attendant operations. It was noted that a response of the vibrator to a stepwise signal has a delay only of several milliseconds.

  1. Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G. Kirk; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Powers, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of a cable-stayed bridge measured from traffic-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Chen, Chern-Hwa

    2012-09-01

    This paper studies the dynamic characteristics of the Kao-Ping-Hsi cable-stayed bridge under daily traffic conditions. Experimental data were measured from a structural monitoring system, and system-identification techniques, such as the random decrement (RD) technique and Ibrahim time-domain (ITD) method, were adopted. The first five modes of the bridge were identified for their natural frequencies and damping ratios under different traffic loading conditions, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) deck velocities. The magnitude of the torsion mode of the Kao-Ping-Hsi cable-stayed bridge is found to be one order-of-magnitude less than the transfer mode, and two orders-of-magnitude less than the vertical modes. Out results indicated that vibrations induced by traffic flow can be used as an indicator to monitor the health of the bridge due to their insensitivity to the natural frequencies of the cable-stayed bridge. Furthermore, the damping ratios may be used as a more sensitive indicator to describe the condition of the bridge.

  3. Evaluating Attenuation of Vibration Response using Particle Impact Damping for a Range of Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert; Craigmyle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from a series of acoustically excited tests to determine the effectiveness of these dampers for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid panel for a launch vehicle application. Vibration attenuation trends are examined for variations in particle damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level was achieved, suggesting that comparatively small, strategically placed, particle damper devices might be advantageously used in launch vehicle design. These test results were compared to baseline acoustic response tests without particle damping devices, over a range of isolation and damping parameters. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  4. Psychophysical relationships characterizing human response to whole-body sinusoidal vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation determined that the psychophysical relationships between subjective discomfort evaluations to vibratory stimuli and subjective evaluations of the intensity of vibratory stimuli can be expressed in a linear fashion. Furthermore, significant differences were found to exist between discomfort and intensity subjective response for several but not all discrete frequencies investigated. The implication of these results is that ride quality criteria based upon subjective evaluation of vibration intensity should be applied cautiously in the development of criteria for human comfort.

  5. Vibration and Operational Characteristics of a Composite-Steel (Hybrid) Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; DeLuca, Samuel; Pelagalli, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid gears have been tested consisting of metallic gear teeth and shafting connected by composite web. Both free vibration and dynamic operation tests were completed at the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Test Facility, comparing these hybrid gears to their steel counterparts. The free vibration tests indicated that the natural frequency of the hybrid gear was approximately 800 Hz lower than the steel test gear. The dynamic vibration tests were conducted at five different rotational speeds and three levels of torque in a four square test configuration. The hybrid gears were tested both as fabricated (machined, composite layup, then composite cure) and after regrinding the gear teeth to the required aerospace tolerance. The dynamic vibration tests indicated that the level of vibration for either type of gearing was sensitive to the level of load and rotational speed.

  6. Analytical and experimental evaluations of Space Shuttle TPS tile vibration response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical studies and laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the vibration response of the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) tiles due to the intense rocket generated acoustic noise during lift-off. The TPS tiles are mounted over the exterior of the Space Shuttle Orbiter structure through Strain Isolation Pads (SIP) which protect the tiles from thermal induced shear loads at their interface. The analytical predictions indicate that the response of a typical tile is governed by the structural vibration inputs through the SIP under the tile at frequencies below 250 Hz, and by the direct acoustic excitation over the exterior surface of the tile at frequencies above 250 Hz. An evaluation of the laboratory test data for this same tile, in which conditioned (partial) coherent output spectral analysis procedures were used, leads to exactly the same conclusion. The results demonstrate the power of conditioned spectral analysis procedures in identifying vibration response mechanisms when two or more of the inputs are highly correlated.

  7. Experimental analysis of dynamic characteristics for vibration-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Lu-ping; Lu, Xu-xiang; Rao, Hong-de; Liu, Yu-jing

    2008-11-01

    Integral shroud is an advanced technique used to improve reliability of steam turbine blades. In this paper, dynamic characteristics of vibration-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud are studied. To test and verify the reliability of calculation result, a series of experiments are well performed on the platform of contracting and impacting of blades tips. The dynamic strain data under different gaps, different loads and different rotating speeds are surveyed through which the log decrement at each condition is obtained, and the effects of vibration damping are obtained by comparing the log decrement. The results of experimental study show that larger log decrement means larger system damping and better effectives of vibration reduction. Besides, the effects of vibro-impact reduction of different parameters are got and the experimental study results show that the vibro-impact structure is a good vibration damper. The dynamic stress of the blade with integral shroud is insensitive to loads when the gap between adjacent integral shrouds is small. In short, the achievements gained in the paper have revealed dynamic characteristics for vibro-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud, which will bring important engineering application to development and modification design of the integrally shrouded blades.

  8. Universal response spectrum procedure for predicting walking-induced floor vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James; Racic, Vitomir; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Floor vibrations caused by people walking are an important serviceability problem both for human occupants and vibration-sensitive equipment. Present design methodologies available for prediction of vibration response due to footfall loading are complex and suffer from division between low and high frequency floors. In order to simplify the design process and to avoid the problem of floor classification, this paper presents a methodology for predicting vibration response metrics due to pedestrian footfalls for any floor type having natural frequency in the range 1-20 Hz. Using a response spectrum approach, a database of 852 weight-normalised vertical ground reaction force (GRF) time histories recorded for more than 60 individuals walking on an instrumented treadmill was used to calculate response metrics. Chosen metrics were peak values of 1 s peak root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration and peak envelope one-third octave velocities. These were evaluated by weight-normalising the GRFs and applying to unit-mass single degree of freedom oscillators having natural frequencies in the range 1-20 Hz and damping ratios in the range 0.5-5%. Moreover, to account for effect of mode shape and duration of crossing (i.e. duration of dynamic loading), the recorded GRFs were applied for three most typical mode shapes and floor spans from 5 m to 40 m. The resulting peak values as functions of frequency i.e. spectra are condensed to statistical representations for chosen probability of being exceeded over a wide range of applications. RMS (acceleration) spectra show strong peaks corresponding to the first harmonic of pacing rate followed by clear minima at approximately 3.5 Hz, a second much smaller peak corresponding to the second harmonic and a steady decline with increasing frequency beginning around 5 Hz. One-third octave spectra show asymptotic trends with frequency, span and damping. A comprehensive validation exercise focusing on the acceleration RMS spectra was based on a

  9. A scaling approach for the prediction of high-frequency mean responses of vibrating systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianhui

    2010-05-01

    This analysis presents a scaling approach to predict high-frequency mean responses of vibrating systems. The basis of the approach lies in the dynamic similitude between the original systems and the scaled models. A general scaling law is formulated using Skudrzyk's mean-value theorem and its specific form is derived for the case of a flexural plate. Modal density is scaled down to reduce the computational cost in the high-frequency mean response prediction. Different scaling procedures are numerically experimented and some insights are given about the accuracy of the scaling approach as compared with a dense finite element analysis. PMID:21117716

  10. Modeling “unilateral” response in the cross-ties of a cable network: Deterministic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaccu, Gian Felice; Caracoglia, Luca; Barbiellini, Bernardo

    2014-09-01

    Cross-ties are employed as passive devices for the mitigation of stay-cable vibrations, exhibited on cable-stayed bridges under wind and wind-rain excitation. Large-amplitude oscillation can result in damage to the cables or perceived discomfort to bridge users. The “cable-cross-ties system” derived by connecting two or more stays by transverse cross-ties is often referred to as an “in-plane cable network”. Linear modeling of network dynamics has been available for some time. This framework, however, cannot be used to detect incipient failure in the restrainers due to slackening or snapping. A new model is proposed in this paper to analyze the effects of a complete loss in the pre-tensioning force imparted to the cross-ties, which leads to the “unilateral” free-vibration response of the network (i.e., a cross-tie with linear-elastic internal force in tension and partially inactive in compression). Deterministic free vibrations of a three-cable network are investigated by using the “equivalent linearization method”. A performance coefficient is introduced to monitor the relative reduction in the average (apparent) stiffness of the connector during free vibration response (“mode by mode”), exhibiting unilateral behavior. A reduction of fifty percent in the apparent stiffness was observed in the cross-tie when the pre-tensioning force is small in comparison with the tension force in the stay. This coefficient may be used as a damage indicator for the selection of the initial pre-tensioning force in the cross-ties needed to avoid slackening.

  11. Analyses of biodynamic responses of seated occupants to uncorrelated fore-aft and vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandapuram, Santosh; Rakheja, Subhash; Marcotte, Pierre; Boileau, Paul-Émile

    2011-08-01

    The apparent mass and seat-to-head-transmissibility response functions of the seated human body were investigated under exposures to fore-aft ( x), vertical ( z), and combined fore-aft and vertical ( x and z) axis whole-body vibration. The coupling effects of dual-axis vibration were investigated using two different frequency response function estimators based upon the cross- and auto-spectral densities of the response and excitation signals, denoted as H1 and Hv estimators, respectively. The experiments were performed to measure the biodynamic responses to single and uncorrelated dual-axis vibration, and to study the effects of hands support, back support and vibration magnitude on the body interactions with the seatpan and the backrest, characterized in terms of apparent masses and the vibration transmitted to the head. The data were acquired with 9 subjects exposed to two different magnitudes of vibration applied along the individual x- and z-axis (0.25 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms), and along both the axis (0.28 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms along each axis) in the 0.5-20 Hz frequency range. The two methods resulted in identical single-axis responses but considerably different dual-axis responses. The dual-axis responses derived from the Hv estimator revealed notable effects of dual-axis vibration, as they comprised both the direct and cross-axis responses observed under single axis vibration. Such effect, termed as the coupling effect, was not evident in the dual-axis responses derived using the commonly used H1 estimator. The results also revealed significant effects of hands and back support conditions on the coupling effects and the measured responses. The back support constrained the upper body movements and thus showed relatively weaker coupling compared to that observed in the responses without the back support. The effect of hand support was also pronounced under the fore-aft vibration. The results suggest that a better understanding of the seated human body responses to

  12. On multiple manifestations of the second response branch in streamwise vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2013-07-01

    The structural motion and velocity field in the wake of a cylinder exhibiting vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in the streamwise direction were measured using Particle-Image Velocimetry. The effect of hysteresis on the amplitude response of the cylinder and the existence of multiple wake modes in the region of the second response branch were examined. As the reduced velocity was decreased, there was a reduction in the lock-in range; outside this range the amplitude response was found to be negligible and the A-II mode (which is similar to the von Kármán vortex street) was observed in the wake. When the reduced velocity was increased the second branch could be manifested in two forms, depending on whether the wake exhibited the SA or the A-IV mode (in which two and four vortices are shed per wake cycle, respectively). The A-IV mode has been observed in studies in which a cylinder was forced to oscillate in the streamwise direction; however, this represents the first time that it has been recorded in the wake of a freely oscillating body, and it was not previously known that the A-IV mode was capable of exciting self-sustaining vibrations. Both the SA and A-IV modes were stable and no intermittent mode-switching was observed; however, it was found to be unpredictable which mode would dominate as the reduced velocity was varied and the cylinder entered the second response branch. Analysis of the cylinder displacement signals measured while each mode was dominant indicated that the SA mode excited larger amplitude vibrations than the A-IV mode. A reduced velocity near the second response branch was identified at which the wake could exhibit either the SA, A-IV, or A-II modes, with the latter occurring as the reduced velocity was decreased. Although bi-modal behaviour is well established in VIV studies, as far as the authors are aware, this represents the first time that a point has been observed in the response regime of a freely oscillating structure in which three

  13. Characterization of the tendon vibration reflex response in hemi-spastic stroke individuals.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Nina L; Wang, Inga; Heckman, C J; Rymer, W Zev

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the role of persistent inward currents, or PICs, on the excitability of motoneurons innervating spastic muscle in hemi-spastic stroke individuals. This was accomplished by examining the effects of tonic vibration applied to the tendon of the biceps brachii muscle. The elicited TVR (tonic vibration reflex) provides a useful way to assess the degree of excitability of spinal neurons in spastic syndromes, and it has additional features that may signify the presence of PICs in spastic motoneurons. We applied sinusoidal stretches of varied duration to the biceps tendon of two hemi-spastic stroke individuals and one neurologically intact individual. We recorded the resulting TVR response from electromyographic(EMG) signals obtained from the biceps as well as force recorded at the wrist. The results of our preliminary study show that the initial rise of the TVR force response as well as the force magnitude are generally greater in spastic muscle, perhaps a marker of motoneuron excitability. Additionally, a shorter vibration duration was sufficient to evoke a response on the spastic side of our tested stroke subjects. However, the key marker of PICs--the decay of the force response as well as sustained after-discharge did not exhibit clear differences. Our present data suggests that motoneurons innervating spastic muscle are more readily activated, and thus exhibit increased excitability, which could possibly be a function of greater depolarization, without a change in PIC magnitude. Our data does not rule out the possibility of subthreshold activation of the PIC resulting in enhanced motoneuron depolarization. PMID:22254740

  14. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

  15. Experimental study on seismic responses of piping systems with friction. Part 1: Large-scale shaking table vibration test

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Watanabe, T.; Mitsumori, T.; Shimizu, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogawa, N.

    1995-08-01

    This report deals with the experimental study of seismic response behavior of piping systems in industrial facilities such as petrochemical, oil refinery, and nuclear plants. Special attention is focused on the nonlinear dynamic response of piping systems due to frictional vibration appearing in piping and supporting devices. A three-dimensional mock-up piping and supporting structure model wherein piping is of 30-m length and 200-mm diameter is excited by a large-scale (15 m x 15 m) shaking table belong to the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention in Tsukuba, Ibaraki. Power spectra of the response vibration and the loading-response relationship in the form of a hysteresis loop under several loading conditions are obtained. The response reduction effect caused by frictional vibration is evaluated and demonstrated in terms of response reduction factor.

  16. Theoretical foundation, methods, and criteria for calibrating human vibration models using frequency response functions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    While simulations of the measured biodynamic responses of the whole human body or body segments to vibration are conventionally interpreted as summaries of biodynamic measurements, and the resulting models are considered quantitative, this study looked at these simulations from a different angle: model calibration. The specific aims of this study are to review and clarify the theoretical basis for model calibration, to help formulate the criteria for calibration validation, and to help appropriately select and apply calibration methods. In addition to established vibration theory, a novel theorem of mechanical vibration is also used to enhance the understanding of the mathematical and physical principles of the calibration. Based on this enhanced understanding, a set of criteria was proposed and used to systematically examine the calibration methods. Besides theoretical analyses, a numerical testing method is also used in the examination. This study identified the basic requirements for each calibration method to obtain a unique calibration solution. This study also confirmed that the solution becomes more robust if more than sufficient calibration references are provided. Practically, however, as more references are used, more inconsistencies can arise among the measured data for representing the biodynamic properties. To help account for the relative reliabilities of the references, a baseline weighting scheme is proposed. The analyses suggest that the best choice of calibration method depends on the modeling purpose, the model structure, and the availability and reliability of representative reference data. PMID:26740726

  17. Theoretical foundation, methods, and criteria for calibrating human vibration models using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-11-01

    While simulations of the measured biodynamic responses of the whole human body or body segments to vibration are conventionally interpreted as summaries of biodynamic measurements, and the resulting models are considered quantitative, this study looked at these simulations from a different angle: model calibration. The specific aims of this study are to review and clarify the theoretical basis for model calibration, to help formulate the criteria for calibration validation, and to help appropriately select and apply calibration methods. In addition to established vibration theory, a novel theorem of mechanical vibration is also used to enhance the understanding of the mathematical and physical principles of the calibration. Based on this enhanced understanding, a set of criteria was proposed and used to systematically examine the calibration methods. Besides theoretical analyses, a numerical testing method is also used in the examination. This study identified the basic requirements for each calibration method to obtain a unique calibration solution. This study also confirmed that the solution becomes more robust if more than sufficient calibration references are provided. Practically, however, as more references are used, more inconsistencies can arise among the measured data for representing the biodynamic properties. To help account for the relative reliabilities of the references, a baseline weighting scheme is proposed. The analyses suggest that the best choice of calibration method depends on the modeling purpose, the model structure, and the availability and reliability of representative reference data.

  18. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  19. Nonlinear subjective and biodynamic responses to continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the magnitude of continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction on both subjective and biodynamic responses of human subjects has been investigated experimentally. Additionally, the relation between the subjective responses and the dynamic responses has also been studied. Twelve subjects were exposed to sinusoidal continuous vibrations at five frequencies (3.15-8.0 Hz) and at three magnitudes (0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms). They were also exposed to transient vibrations that were modulated one-and-half cycle sinusoidal waveforms at the same frequencies as the continuous vibrations and at three magnitudes corresponding to the magnitudes used for the continuous vibrations. Discomfort was measured by the method of magnitude estimation with reference stimuli having frequency components in the middle of the frequency range used in this study. The driving-point dynamic responses (the ratio between the force and the motion, i.e., acceleration and velocity, at the driving point) were also measured and divided by the responses to the reference stimuli used in the measurement of discomfort so as to allow the comparison of the dynamic responses with the discomfort responses. Both the discomfort estimates and the normalised driving-point dynamic responses were influenced by the stimuli magnitudes, especially with the continuous vibration. At 3.15 and 4.0 Hz, the discomfort estimates and the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass increased significantly with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms. Magnitude estimates for discomfort were correlated with the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass in the frequency range investigated. For the transient vibrations, the discomfort estimates and the driving-point dynamic responses were interpreted as responses in frequency bands around the fundamental frequency of the input motion. The results indicate similar nonlinearities in discomfort and driving-point dynamic

  20. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

  1. Constrained tibial vibration does not produce an anabolic bone response in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Blaine A; Kotiya, Akhilesh A; Silva, Matthew J

    2009-10-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and increased fracture risk. High frequency, low-amplitude whole-body vibration (WBV) has been proposed as a treatment for osteoporosis because it can stimulate new bone formation and prevent trabecular bone loss. We developed constrained tibial vibration (CTV) as a method for controlled vibrational loading of the lower leg of a mouse. We first subjected mice to five weeks of daily CTV loading (0.5 G maximum acceleration) with loading parameters chosen to independently investigate the effects of strain magnitude, loading frequency, and cyclic acceleration on the adaptive response to vibration. We hypothesized that mice subjected to the highest magnitude of dynamic strain would have the largest bone formation response. We observed a slight, local benefit of CTV loading on trabecular bone, as BV/TV was 5.2% higher in the loaded vs. non-loaded tibia of mice loaded with the highest bone strain magnitude. However, despite these positive differences, we observed significantly lower measures of trabecular structure in both loaded and non-loaded tibias from CTV loaded mice compared to Sham and Baseline Control animals, indicating a negative systemic effect of CTV on trabecular bone. Based on this evidence, we conducted a follow-up study wherein mice were subjected to CTV or sham loading, and tibias were scanned at the beginning and end of the study period using in vivo microCT. Consistent with the findings of the first study, trabecular BV/TV in both tibias of CTV loaded and Sham mice was, on average, 36% and 31% lower on day 36 than day 0, respectively, compared to 20% lower in Age-Matched Controls over the same time period. Contrary to the first study, there were no differences between loaded and non-loaded tibias in CTV loaded mice, providing no evidence for a local benefit of CTV. In summary, 5 weeks of daily CTV loading of mice was, at best, weakly anabolic for trabecular bone in the proximal tibia, while daily handling

  2. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  3. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  4. An investigation of the vibration characteristics of shrouded-bladed-disk rotor stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L.-T.; Dugundji, J.

    1979-01-01

    Coupled differential equations of motion are given for application to a rotating, pretwisted and heated beam under the effects of thermal stresses and gas bending loads. The circumferential modes of the multi-blade vibration of a bladed-disk rotor stage were studied. A finite element method was developed for the dynamic and static deformation analysis of the blade. The deformations of a bladed disk and a shrouded-bladed disk were studied by introducing a special bladed-disk element and a special shrouded-blade element. Some features of the vibration of part-span-shrouded, bladed-disk rotor stages are discussed. The static deformation, thermal stress and gas bending effects on the blade vibration were presented previously.

  5. Energy-dependent characteristics of collisinal vibration-energy exchange in vapors of polyatomic molcules

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesskaya, G.A.; Yakovlev, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    CO{sub 2} laser-induced delayed fluorescence was used to study the collisional vibration-energy exchange between the polyatomic molecules in gases. The efficiency of collisional exchange, the mean amount of energy transfer in one collision, as well as their correlation with the vibration energy and with the size of excited molecule were determined for diacetyl, acetophenone, benzophenone, and anthraquinone molecules form the experimentally observed pressure dependences of the decay rates and fluorescence intensities. It was shown that the mean amount of energy transfer per collision decreases with the molecular size and increases as E{sup m}, with m>2, with increasing the vibration energy. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Seated occupant interactions with seat backrest and pan, and biodynamic responses under vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakheja, S.; Stiharu, I.; Zhang, H.; Boileau, P.-É.

    2006-12-01

    The relative interactions of the seated occupants with an inclined backrest were investigated in terms of apparent mass (APMS) responses at the two driving-points formed by the buttock-seat pan and the upper body-backrest under exposure to broad-band and road-measured vertical vibration. The measurements were performed using 24 adult subjects seated with full contact with the back support and two different positions of the hands (in lap and on steering wheel), while exposed to three different levels of broad band (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m/s 2 rms acceleration) vibration in the 0.5-40 Hz frequency range, and a track-measured vibration spectrum (1.07 m/s 2 rms acceleration). The forces developed on the seat pan and the backrest in directions normal to the supporting surfaces were measured to derive the APMS responses at both the driving-points. The results showed significant interactions of the upper body with the back support in a direction normal to the backrest, even though the vibration is applied along the vertical axis. At low frequencies, the backrest APMS magnitude was smaller than that measured at the seat pan, but it either exceeded or approached that of the seat pan APMS in the vicinity of the primary resonant frequencies. The results also suggested considerable effect of the hands position on the APMS magnitudes measured at both the driving-points. The effects of variations in the excitation type and magnitude, considered in this study, were observed to be small compared to those caused by the hands position and individual body masses. Owing to the strong effects of the body mass on the measured APMS responses at both driving-points, a total of 8 target data sets were identified corresponding to four mass groups (<60, 60.6-70, 70.5-80 and >80 kg) and two hands positions for formulating mechanical equivalent models. The model parameters identified for the target functions suggested that the models mass, stiffness and damping parameters increase with increasing

  7. Physiological response to whole-body vibration in athletes and sedentary subjects.

    PubMed

    Gojanovic, B; Feihl, F; Gremion, G; Waeber, B

    2014-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a new exercise method, with good acceptance among sedentary subjects. The metabolic response to WBV has not been well documented. Three groups of male subjects, inactive (SED), endurance (END) and strength trained (SPRINT) underwent a session of side-alternating WBV composed of three 3-min exercises (isometric half-squat, dynamic squat, dynamic squat with added load), and repeated at three frequencies (20, 26 and 32 Hz). VO(2), heart rate and Borg scale were monitored. Twenty-seven healthy young subjects (10 SED, 8 SPRINT and 9 END) were included. When expressed in % of their maximal value recorded in a treadmill test, both the peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and heart rate (HR) attained during WBV were greatest in the SED, compared to the other two groups (VO(2): 59.3 % in SED vs 50.8 % in SPRINT and 48.0 % in END, p<0.01; HR 82.7 % in SED vs 80.4 % in SPRINT and 72.4 % in END, p<0.05). In conclusions, the heart rate and metabolic response to WBV differs according to fitness level and type, exercise type and vibration frequency. In SED, WBV can elicit sufficient cardiovascular response to benefit overall fitness and thus be a potentially useful modality for the reduction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25157652

  8. Vibration Characteristics of Acoustically Levitated Object with Rigid and Elastic Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Wen-Jun; Wei, Bing-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Levitation stability is a crucial factor that influences acoustic levitation capability. We present two sample-including models for a single-axis acoustic levitator with either a rigid or elastic reflector. Numerical analysis shows that, with the rigid reflector, both the decay time from initial disturbance and the vibration amplitude increase with sample density, which is unfavorable for levitation stability. However, with the elastic reflector, the decay time and the vibration amplitude are greatly reduced by choosing appropriate parameters of the reflector. Experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions, indicating that levitation stability can be remarkably enhanced by replacing the rigid reflector with an elastic reflector.

  9. EUV/FUV response characteristics of photographic films for the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Deforest, Craig E.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.

    1991-01-01

    The photographic film employed by NASA's Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array must have high-to-ultrahigh resolution; since the spacecraft bearing the telescope must be evacuated to prevent the failure of delicate EUV and soft X-ray filters due to acoustic vibration during launch, the films must also have very low outgassing rates. An account is presently given of the properties of important new emulsions selected for flight, together with response-characteristics data for the experimental XUV 100 film and an uncoated Spectroscopic 649 emulsion.

  10. Myoelectric Response of Back Muscles to Vertical Random Whole-Body Vibration with Different Magnitudes at Different Postures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BLÜTHNER, R.; SEIDEL, H.; HINZ, B.

    2002-05-01

    Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0·7, 1·0 and 1·4 m/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat and the buttocks were measured. Six EMGs were derived from the right side of the m. trapezius pars descendens, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars lumborum; m. longissimus thoracis pars thoracis, m. longissimus thoracis pars lumborum, and lumbar multifidus muscle. All data were filtered for anti-aliasing and sampled with 1000 Hz. Artefacts caused by the ECG in the EMG were identified and eliminated in the time domain using wavelets. The individually rectified and normalized EMGs were averaged across subjects. The EMGs without WBV exhibited characteristic patterns for the three postures examined. The coherence and transfer functions indicated characteristic myoelectric responses to random WBV with several effects of posture and WBV magnitude. A comprehensive set of transfer functions from the seat acceleration or the mean normalized input force to the mean processed EMG was presented.The results can be used for the development of more sophisticated models with a separate control of various back muscle groups. However, the EMG-force relationship under dynamic conditions needs to be examined in more detail before the results can be implemented. Since different reflex mechanisms depending on the frequency of WBV are linked with different types of active muscle fibres, various time delays between the EMG and muscle force may be necessary.

  11. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  12. A Study of the Temperature Characteristics of Vibration Mode Axes for Vibratory Cylinder Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yulie; Xi, Xiang; Tao, Yi; Wu, Xiaomei; Wu, Xuezhong

    2011-01-01

    The zero bias stability, which is an important performance parameter for vibratory cylinder gyroscopes, is high sensitive to temperature change. It is considered that the varying temperature makes the vibration mode axes unstable, which has significant influence on the zero bias stability. This paper will investigate this problem in detail. First, the relationships between the angular positions of vibration mode axes and the zero bias are analyzed. Secondly, the thermal-modal model of the cylinder resonator with several defects such as mass imbalance, frequency split (FS), and geometry errors are developed by ANSYS. Simulation results show that with the increase of temperature, angular positions of the vibration mode axes obviously change, which leads to a dramatic zero bias drift. Finally, several major influence factors on the angular position stability of vibration mode axes, including frequency split, geometry errors, thermal elastic modulus coefficient (TEMC) and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) are analyzed in detail. Simulation results in this paper will be helpful for deep understanding of the drift principle of zero bias induced by temperature for vibratory cylinder gyroscopes and also be helpful for further temperature compensation or control. PMID:22164038

  13. The Response of Vocal Fold Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Joel; Quinchia Rios, Beatriz; Bartlett, Rebecca; Berchtold, Craig; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Illumination of cellular changes caused by mechanical forces present within the laryngeal microenvironment may well guide strategies for tissue engineering the vocal fold lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFF) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) to vibratory stimulus. In order to study these effects, a bioreactor capable of vibrating two cell seeded substrates was developed. The cell seeded substrates contact each other as a result of the sinusoidal frequency, producing a motion similar to the movement of true vocal folds. Utilizing this bioreactor, hVFF and BM-MSC were subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain for 8 hours. Immunohistochemistry (Ki-67 and TUNEL) was performed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis respectively, while semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess extracellular matrix related gene expression. HVFF significantly proliferated (p = 0.011) when subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain, while BM-MSC did not (p = 1.0). A statistically significant increase in apoptosis of BM-MSC (p = 0.0402) was observed under the experimental conditions; however high cell viability (96%) was maintained. HVFF did not have significantly altered apoptosis (p = 0.7849) when subjected to vibration and strain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR results show no significant differences in expression levels of collagen I (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = v0.3629), fibronectin (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = 0.2513), and TGF-β1 (BM-MSC p = 0.2534, hVFF p = 0.6029) between vibratory and static conditions in either cell type. Finally, smooth muscle actin mRNA was not present in either vibrated or static samples, indicating that no myofibroblast differentiation occurred for either cell type. Together, these results demonstrate that BM-MSC may be a suitable alternative to hVFF for vocal fold tissue engineering. Further investigation into a larger number of

  14. Vibration characteristics of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Moyer, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of various rotordynamic problems which have been encountered and eliminated in developing the current flight engines, and continuing subsynchronous problems which are being encountered in developing a 109% power level engine. The basic model for the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) of the SSME including the structural dynamic model for the rotor and housing and component models for the liquid and gas seals, turbine-clearance excitation forces, and impeller-diffuser forces are discussed. Results from a linear model are used to examine the synchronous response and stability characteristics of the HPOTP, examining bearing load and stability problems associated with the second critical speed. Various seal modifications are examined and shown to have favorable consequences with respect to bearing reactions and stability.

  15. Vibration Response Predictions for Heavy Panel Mounted Components from Panel Acreage Environment Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Phillip; Frady, Greg; Duvall, Lowery; Fulcher, Clay; LaVerde, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The development of new launch vehicles in the Aerospace industry often relies on response measurements taken from previously developed vehicles during various stages of liftoff and ascent, and from wind tunnel models. These measurements include sound pressure levels, dynamic pressures in turbulent boundary layers and accelerations. Rigorous statistical scaling methods are applied to the data to derive new environments and estimate the performance of new skin panel structures. Scaling methods have proven to be reliable, particularly for designs similar to the vehicles used as the basis for scaling, and especially in regions of smooth acreage without exterior protuberances or heavy components mounted to the panel. To account for response attenuation of a panel-mounted component due to its apparent mass at higher frequencies, the vibroacoustics engineer often reduces the acreage vibration according to a weight ratio first suggested by Barrett. The accuracy of the reduction is reduced with increased weight of the panel-mounted component, and does not account for low-frequency amplification of the component/panel response as a system. A method is proposed that combines acreage vibration from scaling methods with finite element analysis to account for the frequency-dependent dynamics of heavy panel-mounted components. Since the acreage and mass-loaded skins respond to the same dynamic input pressure, such pressure may be eliminated in favor of a frequency-dependent scaling function applied to the acreage vibration to predict the mass-loaded panel response. The scaling function replaces the Barrett weight ratio, and contains all of the dynamic character of the loaded and unloaded skin panels. The solution simplifies for spatially uncorrelated and fully correlated input pressures. Since the prediction uses finite element models of the loaded and unloaded skins, a rich suite of response data are available to the design engineer, including interface forces, stress and strain

  16. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  17. A study of ribbing effect on the vibration response and transmission of an L-shaped plate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tian Ran; Tan, Jiwen; Zhou, Yifan; Jiang, Jingliang; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for the vibration response of a ribbed L-shaped plate using a modal expansion solution approach. The analytical model is then employed to study the ribbing effect on vibration reduction and transmission between the two plate components of the L-shaped plate. It is found that for the system considered in the study, a rib inserted between the excitation force and the source plate can lead to a large vibration reduction for both source and receiving plates except at a frequency band near the fundamental resonant frequency of the rib where the rib's flexural stiffness is negligible. A reduced vibration transmission to the receiving plate can also be achieved by placing a rib near the plate/plate junction, attributed to the increased moment impedance at the coupling after the rib insertion. Increasing the rib's flexural stiffness under this condition can further reduce vibration transmission in the low frequency bands while increasing the rib's mass can lead to a reduced vibration transmission in the higher frequency bands. The insights obtained from this study are relevant to vibration control of structures such as transformer tanks and machine covers. PMID:27369128

  18. Frequency Response of the Sample Vibration Mode in Scanning Probe Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Qian; Qian, Meng-Lu

    2010-05-01

    Based on the interaction mechanism between tip and sample in the contact mode of a scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM), an active mass of the sample is introduced in the mass-spring model. The tip motion and frequency response of the sample vibration mode in the SPAM are calculated by the Lagrange equation with dissipation function. For the silicon tip and glass assemblage in the SPAM the frequency response is simulated and it is in agreement with the experimental result. The living myoblast cells on the glass slide are imaged at resonance frequencies of the SPAM system, which are 20kHz, 30kHz and 120kHz. It is shown that good contrast of SPAM images could be obtained when the system is operated at the resonance frequencies of the system in high and low-frequency regions.

  19. Temperature modulation of the vibrational responses of a flexible fluid-conveying pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelaja, Adekunle

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the nonlinear transverse vibration of a flexible pipe conveying hot, pressurized fluid is investigated. The pipe which is subjected to a pinned-pinned end condition extends as a result of several operating variables such as internal fluid temperature variation, pre-stress and internal pressurization. The equation of motion is solved analytically by hybrid Fourier-Laplace transforms, and the effects of inlet temperature, temperature gradient, and coefficient of area deformation are investigated on the natural frequencies and transverse dynamic response of the pipeline. While the inlet temperature and temperature gradient are found to be inversely proportional to the natural frequencies and amplitude of the dynamic response, increase in the coefficient of area deformation has little effect on the natural frequencies for the particular case considered.

  20. Energy Expenditure and Substrate Oxidation in Response to Side-Alternating Whole Body Vibration across Three Commonly-Used Vibration Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Elie-Jacques; Charrière, Nathalie; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Schutz, Yves; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim There is increasing recognition about the importance of enhancing energy expenditure (EE) for weight control through increases in low-intensity physical activities comparable with daily life (1.5–4 METS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) increases EE modestly and could present both a useful adjuvant for obesity management and tool for metabolic phenotyping. However, it is unclear whether a “dose-response” exists between commonly-used vibration frequencies (VF) and EE, nor if WBV influences respiratory quotient (RQ), and hence substrate oxidation. We aimed to investigate the EE-VF and RQ-VF relationships across three different frequencies (30, 40, and 50Hz). Methods EE and RQ were measured in 8 healthy young adults by indirect calorimetry at rest, and subsequently during side-alternating WBV at one of 3 VFs (30, 40, and 50 Hz). Each frequency was assessed over 5 cycles of intermittent WBV (30s vibration/30s rest), separated by 5 min seated rest. During the WBV participants stood on the platform with knees flexed sufficiently to maintain comfort, prevent transmission of vibration to the upper body, and minimise voluntary physical exertion. Repeatability was assessed across 3 separate days in a subset of 4 individuals. In order to assess any sequence/habituation effect, an additional group of 6 men underwent 5 cycles of intermittent WBV (30s vibration/30s rest) at 40 Hz, separated by 5 min seated rest. Results Side-alternating WBV increased EE relative to standing, non-vibration levels (+36%, p<0.001). However, no differences in EE were observed across VFs. Similarly, no effect of VF on RQ was found, nor did WBV alter RQ relative to standing without vibration. Conclusion No relationship could be demonstrated between EE and VF in the range of 30-50Hz, and substrate oxidation did not change in response to WBV. Furthermore, the thermogenic effect of intermittent WBV, whilst robust, was quantitatively small (<2 METS). PMID:26974147

  1. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contract all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimental quantities.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contact all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimetnal quantities.

  3. Effect of radial stretch on vibration characteristics of single-layered circular graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlani, Gunjan; Verma, Deepti; Gupta, Shakti

    Vibrations of single-layered circular graphene sheets are studied using molecular mechanics (MM) simulations. Interactions between bonded and non-bonded atoms are prescribed using MM3 potential. Frequencies of different modes of vibration are computed from the eigenvalues and eigen vectors of mass weighted Hessian of the system. This study is performed on graphene sheets of various diameters. A linear continuum membrane model for predicting vibrational frequencies is studied using finite element (FE) method. Frequencies for several modes computed from continuum and molecular model matched well for moderate values of radial stretch, however, with increased stretch those deviated from each other significantly. In particular for higher values of stretch the MM simulations predict considerably lower values of frequencies compared to that found from FE simulations. Also, at higher values of stretch the frequency vs. stretch curve obtained from MM simulations showed a hardening behavior which could not be captured by the linear continuum model. We have also found a similar behavior in two-layered graphene sheets using MM simulations.

  4. Method for Vibration Response Simulation and Sensor Placement Optimization of a Machine Tool Spindle System with a Bearing Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response. PMID:23012514

  5. Effect of experimentally reduced distal sensation on postural response to hip abductor/ankle evertor muscle vibration.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S; Collings, R; Paton, J; Marsden, J

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether postural responses induced by vibratory perturbations of the hip abductors and ankle evertors, were modified when distal tactile sensation was experimentally reduced through cooling. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated pre and post cooling. Subjects stood with their eyes closed with a stance width of 4 cm. A 2s vibratory stimulus was applied to the left or right hip abductor or ankle evertor muscle. The order of the site and side of the stimulation was randomised. The postural response to hip abductor and ankle evertor vibration was recorded using 3D motion analysis (Codamotion, Leicestershire). Medio-lateral centre of pressure motion was simultaneously recorded during quiet standing via a force plate (Kistler, UK). Pre-cooling people responded to unilateral ankle vibration with an ipsilateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. People responded to unilateral hip vibration with a contralateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. Following an experimental reduction in distal tactile sensation there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to ankle vibration (F(6.2)=P<0.05) and a significant increase in amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to hip vibration (F(5.2)=P<0.05). This suggests that the sensitivity to artificial stimulation of hip proprioception increases with distal cooling, possibly indicating a change in the gain/weighting placed upon sensory information from the hips. PMID:26153881

  6. Tensor decomposition techniques in the solution of vibrational coupled cluster response theory eigenvalue equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Hansen, Mads Bøttger; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    We show how the eigenvalue equations of vibrational coupled cluster response theory can be solved using a subspace projection method with Davidson update, where basis vectors are stacked tensors decomposed into canonical (CP, Candecomp/Parafac) form. In each update step, new vectors are first orthogonalized to old vectors, followed by a tensor decomposition to a prescribed threshold TCP. The algorithm can provide excitation energies and eigenvectors of similar accuracy as a full vector approach and with only a very modest increase in the number of vectors required for convergence. The algorithm is illustrated with sample calculations for formaldehyde, 1,2,5-thiadiazole, and water. Analysis of the formaldehyde and thiadiazole calculations illustrate a number of interesting features of the algorithm. For example, the tensor decomposition threshold is optimally put to rather loose values, such as TCP = 10-2. With such thresholds for the tensor decompositions, the original eigenvalue equations can still be solved accurately. It is thus possible to directly calculate vibrational wave functions in tensor decomposed format.

  7. Frequency weighting for vibration-induced white finger compatible with exposure-response models.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Anthony J; Pitts, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    An analysis has been performed to derive a frequency weighting for the development of vibration-induced white finger (VWF). It employs a model to compare health risks for pairs of population groups that are selected to have similar health outcomes from operating power tools or machines with markedly different acceleration spectra (rock drills, chain saws, pavement breakers and motorcycles). The model defines the Relative Risk, RR(f(trial)), which is constructed from the ratio of daily exposures and includes a trial frequency weighting that is applied to the acceleration spectra. The trial frequency weighting consists of a frequency-independent primary frequency range, and subordinate frequency ranges in which the response to vibration diminishes, with cut-off frequencies that are changed to influence the magnitude of RR(f(trial)). The frequency weighting so derived when RR(f(trial)) = 1 is similar to those obtained by other methods (W(hf), W(hT)). It consists of a frequency independent range from about 25 Hz to 500 Hz (-3 dB frequencies), with an amplitude cut-off rate of 12 dB/octave below 25 Hz and above 500 Hz. The range is compatible with studies of vasoconstriction in persons with VWF. The results provide further evidence that the ISO frequency weighting may be inappropriate for assessing the risk of developing VWF. PMID:23060253

  8. Acute Bone Marker Responses to Whole-Body Vibration and Resistance Exercise in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Sherk, Vanessa D.; Chrisman, Carmen; Smith, Jessica; Young, Kaelin C.; Singh, Harshvardhan; Bemben, Michael G.; Bemben, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) augments the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise (RE). However, its acute effects on bone turnover markers (BTM) have not been determined. This study examined BTM responses to acute high intensity RE and high intensity RE with WBV (WBV+RE) in young women (n=10) taking oral contraceptives in a randomized, cross-over repeated measures design. WBV+RE exposed subjects to 5 one-minute bouts of vibration (20 Hz, 3.38 peak–peak displacement, separated by 1 minute of rest) prior to RE. Fasting blood samples were obtained before (Pre), immediately post WBV (PostVib), immediately post RE (IP), and 30 minutes post RE (P30). Bone ALP did not change at any time point. TRAP5b significantly (p<0.05) increased from the Pre to PostVib, then decreased from IP to P30 for both conditions. CTX significantly decreased (p<0.05) from Pre to PostVib and from Pre to P30 only for WBV+RE. WBV+RE showed a greater decrease in CTX than RE (-12.6 ± 4.7% vs. -1.13 ± 3.5%). In conclusion, WBV was associated with acute decreases in CTX levels not elicited with resistance exercise alone in young women. PMID:22902255

  9. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  10. Calibration characteristics of IRAD GAGE vibrating wire stressmeter at normal and high temperature. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P. K.; Hatfield, R. W.; Runstadler, Jr., P. W.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes calibration studies of the IRAD GAGE Vibrating Wire Stressmeter. The work has been performed for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, to understand and interpret the behavior and performance of the stressmeter in Climax granite. To help interpret the results obtained in Climax granite, the study also included calibration tests of the gage in other materials: Barre granite, aluminum, and Lucite. Stressmeter calibrations were carried out in thin rock slabs by determining the relation between the stressmeter readings and uniaxial plane stresses. Calibrations were also conducted under biaxial and triaxial stress fields.

  11. The impact of unilateral vibrations on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V.; Kalinina, A.

    2016-06-01

    The work is devoted to the mathematical modeling of the influence of forced vibrations of a surface element on one side of the airfoil on the shock-wave structure of transonic flow around. The influence of parameters of oscillations on the airfoil wave drag and the lift force were qualitatively and quantitatively investigated for constant maximum velocity amplitude, which is close in magnitude to the sound velocity in the incoming flow, and for a wide range of frequencies. The arising of additional lift force is shown.

  12. Analysis of lateral and torsional vibration characteristics of beams and shafts with end located rotational masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Partial differential equations are derived for free lateral and torsional vibration of a uniform free-free beam with a rotational mass attached to each extremity. For appropriate boundary conditions, nonlinear algebraic equations are obtained using a symbolic manipulation computer program, the solutions of which enable the computation of the neutral frequencies and mode-shapes. The mode-shapes are linear combinations of trigonometric and hyperbolic sine and cosine functions. A computer program is written for the numerical solution of the algebraic equations mentioned above, which can compute the natural frequencies, mode-shapes, and node points for any given set of parameters, for any given number of modes.

  13. Parametric reduced order models for predicting the nonlinear vibration response of cracked structures with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Kwon; Castanier, Matthew P.; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2009-03-01

    Modeling and re-analysis techniques are proposed for predicting the dynamic response of complex structures that have suffered damage in one or more of their components. When such damages are present, the model of the healthy structure may no longer capture the system-level response or the loading from the rest of the structure on the damaged components. Hence, novel models that allow for an accurate re-analysis of the response of damaged structures are needed in important applications, including damage detection. Herein, such models are obtained by using a reduced order modeling approach based on component mode synthesis. Because the resonant response of a complex structure is often sensitive to component uncertainties (in geometric parameters such as thickness, material properties such as Young's modulus, etc.), novel parametric reduced order models (PROMs) are developed. In previous work, PROMs have been applied for handling uncertainties in a single substructure. Herein, PROMs are extended to the general case of multiple substructures with uncertain parameters or damage. Two damage cases are considered: severe structural deformation (dents), and cracks. For the first damage case, an approximate method based on static mode compensation (SMC) is used to perform fast re-analysis of the vibration response of the damaged structure. The re-analysis is performed through a range of locations and severity levels of the damage. For selected damage locations and levels, the SMC approximation is compared to full finite element analysis to demonstrate the accuracy and computational time savings for the new method. For the second damage case (cracks), the vibration problem becomes nonlinear due to the intermittent contact of the crack faces. Therefore, to estimate the resonant frequencies for a cracked structure, the bi-linear frequency approximation (BFA) is used for cracks of various lengths. Since BFA is based on linear analyses, it is fast and particularly well suited for

  14. Vibrational response of free standing single copper nanowire through transient reflectivity microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, Laurent; Cornelius, Thomas W.; Perrin, Bernard; Kacemi, Nazim; Becerra, Loïc; Thomas, Olivier; Eugenia Toimil-Molares, Maria; Cassinelli, Marco

    2013-11-01

    We report on the ultrafast vibrational response of single copper nanowires investigated by femtosecond transient reflectivity measurements. The oscillations of the sample reflectivity are correlated with individual modes of resonance for wires with a diameter ranging from 100 to 500 nm and are compared with 2D finite element simulation. Fluctuation of the sample-substrate coupling is illustrated through its effect on the damping rate. We demonstrate elastic confinement in free standing wires which allowed the detection of up to the third harmonic of the breathing mode. By removing the energy relaxation channel towards the substrate, we obtained nano-oscillators with quality factors up to 130. Finally, taking advantage of the very high spectral resolution achieved on free standing wires, we could observe the elastic coupling between two close wires via their polymer cladding.

  15. Design optimization for dynamic response of vibration mechanical system with uncertain parameters using convex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Ding, Han

    2008-11-01

    The concept of uncertainty plays an important role in the design of practical mechanical system. The most common methods for solving uncertainty problems are to model the parameters as a random vector. A natural way to handle the randomness is to admit that a given probability density function represents the uncertainty distribution. However, the drawback of this approach is that the probability distribution is difficult to obtain. In this paper, we use the non-probabilistic convex model to deal with the uncertain parameters in which there is no need for probability density functions. Using the convex model theory, a new method to optimize the dynamic response of mechanical system with uncertain parameters is derived. Because the uncertain parameters can be selected as the optimization parameters, the present method can provide more information about the optimization results than those obtained by the deterministic optimization. The present method is implemented for a torsional vibration system. The numerical results show that the method is effective.

  16. The response of a plate bonded to a randomly vibrating viscoelastic half-space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The response of an infinite Bernoulli-Euler plate placed on the surface of a randomly vibrating viscoelastic half-space is calculated, allowing for the presence of shear stresses between the plate and the half-space. The shear stresses arise from the condition that the relative motion between the plate and the half-space vanishes at the interface. The three components of displacement of the free surface of the half-space before the plate is added are assumed to be stationary homogeneous random functions of position and time. From the wavenumber-frequency spectra of these displacements the frequency spectra of the three components of displacement of the plate half-space interface are calculated. As an example, the frequency spectrum of the vertical interface displacement is calculated for two assumed forms of the wavenumber spectra of the free-surface displacements.

  17. Psychosocial Characteristics Mediating the Response: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, J. Melvin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the psychosocial characteristics that cognitively mediate between life stressors and the stress response in 235 subjects. Results from the five instruments used showed self-esteem was by far the most important characteristic discriminating between good and poor copers. Other factors were external control, life pace and irrational beliefs.…

  18. Vibration damping characteristics of graphite/epoxy composites for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Limited data on extensional and flexural damping of small specimens of graphite/epoxy and unreinforced epoxy resin were obtained. Flexural damping was measured using a forced vibration technique based on resonant flexural vibration of shaker excited double cantilever specimens. Extensional damping was measured by subjecting similar specimens to low frequency sinusoidal oscillation in a servohydraulic tensile testing machine while plotting load versus extensional strain. Damping was found to vary slowly and continuously over the frequency range 0.01 - 1000 Hz, and no drastic transitions were observed. Composite damping was found to be less than neat resin damping. Comparison of small specimen damping values with assembled column damping values seems to indicate that, for those materials, material damping is more important than joint damping. The data reported was limited not by the test apparatus, but by signal conditioning and data acquisition. It is believed that filtering of the strain gage signals and the use of digital storage with slow playback will make it possible to extend the frequency and amplitude ranges significantly.

  19. Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration. PMID:22146145

  20. Dynamic response characteristics of two transport models tested in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents recent experiences with measuring the dynamic response characteristics of a commercial transport and a military transport model during full scale Reynolds number tests in the National Transonic Facility. Both models were limited in angle of attack while testing at full scale Reynolds number and cruise Mach number due to pitch or stall buffet response. Roll buffet (wing buzz) was observed for both models at certain Mach numbers while testing at high Reynolds number. Roll buffet was more severe and more repeatable for the military transport model at cruise Mach number. Miniature strain-gage type accelerometers were used for the first time for obtaining dynamic data as a part of the continuing development of miniature dynamic measurements instrumentation for cryogenic applications. This paper presents the results of vibration measurements obtained for both the commercial and military transport models and documents the experience gained in the use of miniature strain gage type accelerometers.

  1. Optimum Design of a Helicopter Rotor for Low Vibration Using Aeroelastic Analysis and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, R.

    2002-11-01

    An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used to model the helicopter rotor in forward flight. The rotor blade is represented as an elastic cantilever beam undergoing flap and lag bending, elastic torsion and axial deformations. The objective of the improved design is to reduce vibratory loads at the rotor hub that are the main source of helicopter vibration. Constraints are imposed on aeroelastic stability, and move limits are imposed on the blade elastic stiffness design variables. Using the aeroelastic analysis, response surface approximations are constructed for the objective function (vibratory hub loads). It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces constructed using the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments adequately represents the aeroelastic model in the vicinity of the baseline design. Optimization results show a reduction in the objective function of about 30 per cent. A key accomplishment of this paper is the decoupling of the analysis problem and the optimization problems using response surface methods, which should encourage the use of optimization methods by the helicopter industry.

  2. G-seat system step input and sinusoidal response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, T. W.; Miller, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The step input and sinusoidal response characteristics of a pneumatically driven computer controlled G set are examined in this study. The response data show that this system can be modeled as a first order system with an 0.08 sec time lag and a 0.53 sec time constant.

  3. Effect of Phase on Human Responses to Vertical Whole-Body Vibration and SHOCK—ANALYTICAL Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MATSUMOTO, Y.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

    2002-03-01

    The effect of the “phase” on human responses to vertical whole-body vibration and shock has been investigated analytically using alternative methods of predicting subjective responses (using r.m.s., VDV and various frequency weightings). Two types of phase have been investigated: the effect of the relative phase between two frequency components in the input stimulus, and the phase response of the human body. Continuous vibrations and shocks, based on half-sine and one-and-a-half-sine accelerations, each of which had two frequency components, were used as input stimuli. For the continuous vibrations, an effect of relative phase was found for the vibration dose value (VDV) when the ratio between two frequency components was three: about 12% variation in the VDV of the unweighted acceleration was possible by changing the relative phase. The effect of the phase response of the body represented by frequency weightings was most significant when the frequencies of two sinusoidal components were about 3 and 9 Hz. With shocks, the effect of relative phase was observed for all stimuli used. The variation in the r.m.s. acceleration and in the VDV caused by variations in the relative phase varied between 3 and 100%, depending on the nature of stimulus and the frequency weighting. The phase of the frequency weightings had a different effect on the r.m.s. and the VDV.

  4. Optical measurement of the weak non-linearity in the eardrum vibration response to auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Johan

    The mammalian hearing organ consists of the external ear (auricle and ear canal) followed by the middle ear (eardrum and ossicles) and the inner ear (cochlea). Its function is to convert the incoming sound waves and convert them into nerve pulses which are processed in the final stage by the brain. The main task of the external and middle ear is to concentrate the incoming sound waves on a smaller surface to reduce the loss that would normally occur in transmission from air to inner ear fluid. In the past it has been shown that this is a linear process, thus without serious distortions, for sound waves going up to pressures of 130 dB SPL (˜90 Pa). However, at large pressure changes up to several kPa, the middle ear movement clearly shows non-linear behaviour. Thus, it is possible that some small non-linear distortions are also present in the middle ear vibration at lower sound pressures. In this thesis a sensitive measurement set-up is presented to detect this weak non-linear behaviour. Essentially, this set-up consists of a loud-speaker which excites the middle ear, and the resulting vibration is measured with an heterodyne vibrometer. The use of specially designed acoustic excitation signals (odd random phase multisines) enables the separation of the linear and non-linear response. The application of this technique on the middle ear demonstrates that there are already non-linear distortions present in the vibration of the middle ear at a sound pressure of 93 dB SPL. This non-linear component also grows strongly with increasing sound pressure. Knowledge of this non-linear component can contribute to the improvement of modern hearing aids, which operate at higher sound pressures where the non-linearities could distort the signal considerably. It is also important to know the contribution of middle ear non-linearity to otoacoustic emissions. This are non-linearities caused by the active feedback amplifier in the inner ear, and can be detected in the external and

  5. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI) obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. Methods The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects of VRI images related to the quality of data aquisition, synchronization of the progression of breath sound distribution and agreement between the maximal energy frame (MEF) of VRI (which is the maximal geographical area of lung vibrations produced at maximal inspiration) and chest radiography. For qualitative assessment of VRI images, the raters' evaluations were analyzed by degree of consistency and agreement. Results The average value for overall identical evaluations of twelve features of the VRI image evaluation, ranged from 87% to 95% per rater (94% to 97% in control cases and from 79% to 93% per rater in pneumonia cases). Inter-rater median (IQR) agreement was 91% (82-96). The level of agreement according to VRI feature evaluated was in most cases over 80%; intra-class correlation (ICC) obtained by using a model of subject/rater for the averaged features was overall 0.86 (0.92 in normal and 0.73 in pneumonia cases). Conclusions Our findings suggest good agreement in the interpretation of VRI data between different raters. In this respect, VRI might be helpful as a radiation free diagnostic tool for the management of pneumonia. PMID:20222975

  6. An on-road shock and vibration response test series utilizing worst case and statistical analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    Defining the maximum expected shock and vibration responses for an on-road truck transportation environment is strongly dependent on the amount of response data that can be obtained. One common test scheme consists of measuring response data over a relatively short prescribed road course and then reviewing that data to obtain the maximum response levels. The more mathematically rigorous alternative is to collect an unbiased ensemble of response data during a long road trip. This paper compares data gathered both ways during a recent on-road certification test for a tractor trailer van being designed by Sandia.

  7. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  8. Free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a 1-g field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free vibration characteristics of a large split blanket solar array in both a 0-g and a 1-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The 0-g configuration corresponds to an in-orbit configuration of the array; the 1-g configuration is a typical ground test configuration. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the mode shapes and frequencies of the array; the second method uses the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. In the Rayleigh-Ritz method the array displacements are represented by string modes and cantilevered beam modes. The results of this investigation are summarized by a series of graphs illustrating the effects of various array parameters on the mode shapes and frequencies of the system. The results of the two methods are also compared in tabular form.

  9. Elevated Vibration Perception Thresholds in CIDP Patients Indicate More Severe Neuropathy and Lower Treatment Response Rates

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Albulaihe, Hana; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vibration perception threshold (VPT) examination using a neurothesiometer provides objective, sensitive and specific information, and has been utilized mainly in patients with diabetic polyneropathy. Objectives Explore the utility of VPT examination in CIDP patients. Methods CIDP subjects attending the Neuromuscular clinic between 01/2013 and 12/2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, clinical history, physical examination, VPT values, and electrophysiologic data from their charts were extracted. Results 70 charts were reviewed. 55 CIDP patients had elevated VPT, associated with higher frequency of abnormal sensory testing for various modalities (92.7% vs. 46.7%, p<0.0001), lower sensory and motor amplitudes and reduced conduction velocities on nerve conduction studies, and lower treatment response rates (54% vs. 93%, p = 0.01). Conclusion VPT examination is a simple tool, which is a reliable and sensitive measure not only for diabetic neuropathy, but also for CIDP. Moreover, in CIDP, elevated VPT values are also associated with lower treatment response rates. PMID:26545096

  10. Dynamics of the head-neck complex in response to the trunk horizontal vibration: modeling and identification.

    PubMed

    Fard, Mohammad A; Ishihara, Tadashi; Inooka, Hikaru

    2003-08-01

    Although many studies exist concerning the influence of seat vibration on the head in the seated human body, the dynamic response of the head-neck complex (HNC) to the trunk vibration has not been well investigated. Little quantitative knowledge exists about viscoelastic parameters of the neck. In this study, the dynamics of the HNC is identified when it is exposed to the trunk horizontal (fore-and-aft) vibration. The frequency response functions between the HNC angular velocity and the trunk horizontal acceleration, corresponding to four volunteers, are obtained in the frequency range of 0.5 Hz to 10 Hz. A fourth-order mathematical model, derived by considering a double-inverted-pendulum model for the HNC, is designed to simulate the dynamic response of the HNC to the trunk horizontal vibration. The frequency domain identification method is used to determine the coefficients of the mathematical model of the HNC. Good agreement has been obtained between experimental and simulation results. This indicates that the system, similar to the designed fourth-order model, has mainly two resonance frequencies. The viscoelastic parameters of the neck, including the spring and damping coefficients, are then obtained by use of the optimization method. PMID:12968578

  11. Multi-frequency periodic vibration suppressing in active magnetic bearing-rotor systems via response matching in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng

    2011-05-01

    A method for multi-frequency periodic vibration suppressing in active magnetic bearing (AMB)-rotor systems is proposed, which is based on an adaptive finite-duration impulse response (FIR) filter in time domain. Firstly, the theoretic feasibility of the method is proved. However, two problems would be unavoidable, if the conventional adaptive FIR filter is adopted in practical application. One is that the convergence rate of the different frequency components may be highly disparate in multi-frequency vibration control. The other is that the computational complexity is significantly increased because the long memory FIR filter is required to match the transient response time of the AMB-rotor system. To overcome the problems above, the Fast Block Least Mean Square (FBLMS) algorithm is adopted to efficiently implement the computation in frequency domain at a computational cost far less than that of the conventional FIR filter. By the FBLMS algorithm, regardless of the number of the considered frequency components in vibration disturbance, the computational complexity would be invariable. Moreover, filter's weights in the FBLMS algorithm have the intuitional relation with signal's frequency. As a result, the convergence rate of each frequency component can be adjusted by assigning the individual step size parameter for each weight. Experiments with the reciprocating simulating disturbance test and the rotating harmonic vibration test were carried out on an AMB-rigid rotor test rig with a vertical shaft. The experiment results indicate that the proposed method with the FBLMS algorithm can achieve the good effectiveness for suppressing the multi-frequency vibration. The convergence property of each frequency component can be adjusted conveniently. Each harmonic component of the vibration can be addressed, respectively, by reconfiguring the frequency components of the reference input signal.

  12. Compositional, microstructural, and vibrational characteristics of synthesized V2O5 microspheres with nanorod formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayal Raj, A.; Suresh Kumar, P.; Yang, Q.; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.; Albert Irudayaraj, A.

    2013-07-01

    Microspheres composed of vanadium pentoxide nanorods have been successfully synthesized using a single step solvothermal method. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis were used to characterize the morphology of the nanorod-like structures. The results show that the microspheres have an average diameter of 3.5 μm and that the diameter of the nanorods, of which these microspheres consist, ranges from 150 to 200 nm. Chemical and phase composition of the microspheres was analyzed using X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Selective Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). XRD patterns show that the nanorods are composed of V2O5 phase. The SAED patterns confirm the polycrystalline nature of V2O5 phase in the samples. The XPS spectra indicate that the surface of the microsphere samples consist predominantly of vanadium in its V5+ oxidation state. Vibrational analysis was done using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy and the results further confirm the formation of V2O5 phase.

  13. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points

  14. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key

  15. Probabilistic analysis of mean-response along-wind induced vibrations on wind turbine towers using wireless network data sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Antonio; Swartz, Raymond A.

    2011-04-01

    Wind turbine systems are attracting considerable attention due to concerns regarding global energy consumption as well as sustainability. Advances in wind turbine technology promote the tendency to improve efficiency in the structure that support and produce this renewable power source, tending toward more slender and larger towers, larger gear boxes, and larger, lighter blades. The structural design optimization process must account for uncertainties and nonlinear effects (such as wind-induced vibrations, unmeasured disturbances, and material and geometric variabilities). In this study, a probabilistic monitoring approach is developed that measures the response of the turbine tower to stochastic loading, estimates peak demand, and structural resistance (in terms of serviceability). The proposed monitoring system can provide a real-time estimate of the probability of exceedance of design serviceability conditions based on data collected in-situ. Special attention is paid to wind and aerodynamic characteristics that are intrinsically present (although sometimes neglected in health monitoring analysis) and derived from observations or experiments. In particular, little attention has been devoted to buffeting, usually non-catastrophic but directly impacting the serviceability of the operating wind turbine. As a result, modal-based analysis methods for the study and derivation of flutter instability, and buffeting response, have been successfully applied to the assessment of the susceptibility of high-rise slender structures, including wind turbine towers. A detailed finite element model has been developed to generate data (calibrated to published experimental and analytical results). Risk assessment is performed for the effects of along wind forces in a framework of quantitative risk analysis. Both structural resistance and wind load demands were considered probabilistic with the latter assessed by dynamic analyses.

  16. Musculoskeletal Response to Whole-Body Vibration During Fracture Healing in Intact and Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stuermer, Ewa K.; Werner, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Kolios, Leila; Sehmisch, Stephan; Tezval, Mohammad; Utesch, Clara; Mangal, Orzala; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dullin, Christian; Stuermer, Klaus M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of vibration on bone healing and muscle in intact and ovariectomized rats. Thirty ovariectomized (at 3 months of age) and 30 intact 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral metaphyseal osteotomy of tibia. Five days later, half of the ovariectomized and of the intact rats were exposed to whole-body vertical vibration (90 Hz, 0.5 mm, 4 × g acceleration) for 15 min twice a day during 30 days. The other animals did not undergo vibration. After decapitation of rats, one tibia was used for computed tomographic, biomechanical, and histological analyses; the other was used for gene expression analyses of alkaline phosphatase (Alp), osteocalcin (Oc), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 1, and insulinlike growth factor 1. Serum Alp and Oc were measured. Mitochondrial activity, fiber area and distribution, and capillary densities were analyzed in M. gastrocnemius and M. longissimus. We found that vibration had no effect on body weight and food intake, but it improved cortical and callus densities (97 vs. 99%, 72 vs. 81%), trabecular structure (9 vs. 14 trabecular nodes), blood supply (1.7 vs. 2.1 capillaries/fiber), and oxidative metabolism (17 vs. 23 pmol O2/s/mg) in ovariectomized rats. Vibration generally increased muscle fiber size. Tibia biomechanical properties were diminished after vibration. Oc gene expression was higher in vibrated rats. Serum Alp was increased in ovariectomized rats. In ovariectomized rats, vibration resulted in an earlier bridging; in intact rats, callus bridging occurred later after vibration. The chosen vibration regimen (90 Hz, 0.5 mm, 4 × g acceleration, 15 min twice a day) was effective in improving musculoskeletal tissues in ovariectomized rats but was not optimal for fracture healing. PMID:20532877

  17. Frequency response functions of shape features from full-field vibration measurements using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizhuo; Mottershead, John E.; Siebert, Thorsten; Pipino, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    The availability of high speed digital cameras has enabled three-dimensional (3D) vibration measurement by stereography and digital image correlation (DIC). The 3D DIC technique provides non-contact full-field measurements on complex surfaces whereas conventional modal testing methods employ point-wise frequency response functions. It is proposed to identify the modal properties by utilising the domain-wise responses captured by a DIC system. This idea will be illustrated by a case study in the form a car bonnet of 3D irregular shape typical of many engineering structures. The full-field measured data are highly redundant, but the application of image processing using functional transformation enables the extraction of a small number of shape features without any significant loss of information from the raw DIC data. The complex bonnet surface on which the displacement responses are measured is essentially a 2-manifold. It is possible to apply surface parameterisation to 'flatten' the 3D surface to form a 2D planar domain. Well-developed image processing techniques are defined on planar domains and used to extract features from the displacement patterns on the surface of a specimen. An adaptive geometric moment descriptor (AGMD), defined on surface parametric space, is able to extract shape features from a series of full-field transient responses under random excitation. Results show the effectiveness of the AGMD and the obtained shape features are demonstrated to be succinct and efficient. Approximately 14 thousand data points of raw DIC measurement are represented by 20 shape feature terms at each time step. Shape-descriptor frequency response functions (SD-FRFs) of the response field and the loading field are derived in the shape feature space. It is seen that the SD-FRF has a similar format to the conventional receptance FRF. The usual modal identification procedure is applied to determine the natural frequencies, damping factors and eigen-shape-feature vectors

  18. Modeling and Analysis of Composite Wing Sections for Improved Aeroelastic and Vibration Characteristics Using Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop analysis procedures to investigate the coupling of composite and smart materials to improve aeroelastic and vibratory response of aerospace structures. The structural modeling must account for arbitrarily thick geometries, embedded and surface bonded sensors and actuators and imperfections, such as delamination. Changes in the dynamic response due to the presence of smart materials and delaminations is investigated. Experiments are to be performed to validate the proposed mathematical model.

  19. Study of passenger subjective response to ideal and real-vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, R. H.; Mikulka, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stimulus received by subjects tested on the passenger ride quality apparatus (PRQA) is defined. Additional analyses on the data collected from field tests using buses, were conducted to assess the relation between subjective ratings of ride quality and vibrations measured on the buses, and to better define the vibration stimulus measured in the field. The relation of subjective evaluation of simulations of bus rides produced by the DRQA to subjective evaluations of the actual bus rides is discussed. The relative contribution of the seat and floor vibration to human comfort in a simulated aircraft ride environment is discussed along with the determination of equal comfort curves through magnitude estimation.

  20. The Tendency to Omit Items: Another Deviant Response Characteristic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    1983-01-01

    It is argued that the tendency to omit items is a deviant response characteristic. Three studies using a self-actualization measure are outlined. Persons who omitted items did so because of fatigue, confusion with some items, unpreparedness to disclose information, and/or because they may not trust the researcher with certain information.…

  1. Relationship between measured apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses of seated occupants exposed to vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Rakheja, S.; Boileau, P.-É.

    2008-07-01

    The "to-the-body" and "through-the-body" biodynamic response functions of the seated human body exposed to vertical vibration are measured and analyzed in an attempt to identify relationships between the apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility measures. The experiments involved 12 male subjects exposed to three magnitudes of whole-body vertical random vibration (0.25,0.5,1.0 m/s 2 rms acceleration) in the 0.5-15 Hz frequency range, and seated with three back support conditions (none, vertical and inclined), and two different hands positions (hands in lap and hands on the steering wheel). The vertical apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses were acquired during the experiments, where the head acceleration was measured using a light and adjustable helmet-strap mounted accelerometer. The results showed that both the measured responses show good agreements in the primary resonances, irrespective of the back support condition, while considerable differences between the normalized apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility could be seen in the secondary resonance range for the two back supported postures. The seat-to-head transmissibility responses are further shown to be relatively sensitive to back supported postures compared with that of apparent mass responses. Relatively stronger effects of hands position were observed on the seat-to-head transmissibility responses compared with the apparent mass responses under back supported conditions. From the results, it is further concluded that seat-to-head transmissibility emphasizes the biodynamic response in the vicinity of the secondary resonance compared to the apparent mass. The seat-to-head transmissibility measure is thus considered to be more appropriate for describing seated body response to higher frequency vibration.

  2. Dynamic response characteristics of the high-temperature superconducting maglev system under lateral eccentric distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zheng, Jun; Si, Shuaishuai; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    Off-centre operation of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev systems caused by inevitable conditions such as the misregistration of vehicle, crosswind and curve negotiation, may change the distribution of the trapped flux in the HTS bulks and the magnetic interaction between HTS bulks and the PMG. It impacts on the performance of HTS maglev, and more seriously makes the maglev vehicle overturned. Therefore, understanding the performance of the HTS maglev in off-center operation is very important. In this paper, the dynamic response characteristics of a cryostat with twenty-four onboard YBaCuO superconductor bulks were experimentally investigated at different eccentric distances under loads before the initial FC process. Parameters such as vibration accelerations, displacement, natural frequency and dynamic stiffness were acquired and analyzed via the B&K vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. Results suggest that the natural frequency and dynamic stiffness of the maglev vehicle would be obviously reduced with the eccentric distance, posing negative effects on the stability of HTS maglev.

  3. The experimental investigation of bounce characteristics of ACV responsive skirt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. L.; Ma, T.

    This paper presents some experimental results on the bounce characteristics of the bag-finger responsive skirt and on skirt frequency response under cushion pressure excitation obtained in a large-scale box facility. The influence of some parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the skirt bounce motion and the amplitude of the cushion pressure oscillation were explored, and the corresponding bounce boundary curves are given. Some interesting nonlinear phenomena related to the skirt instability in the time domain response are presented. The mechanism for skirt bounce and the important parameters affecting skirt dynamic stability are examined, and some means for eliminating skirt bounce are introduced.

  4. Density response of a trapped Fermi gas: A crossover from the pair vibration mode to the Goldstone mode

    SciTech Connect

    Korolyuk, A.; Kinnunen, J. J.; Toermae, P.

    2011-09-15

    We consider the density response of a trapped two-component Fermi gas. Combining the Bogoliubov-deGennes method with the random phase approximation allows the study of both collective and single-particle excitations. Calculating the density response across a wide range of interactions, we observe a crossover from a weakly interacting pair vibration mode to a strongly interacting Goldstone mode. The crossover is associated with a depressed collective mode frequency and an increased damping rate, in agreement with density response experiments performed in strongly interacting atomic gases.

  5. Frequency response characteristics and response spectra of base-isolated and un-isolated structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Namba, H.

    1995-07-06

    The transmissibility of seismic loads through a linear base-isolation system is analyzed using an impedance method. The results show that the system acts like a {open_quotes}low-pass{close_quotes} filter. It attenuates high-frequency loads but passes through low-frequency ones. The filtering effect depends on the vibration frequencies and damping of the isolated structure and the isolation system. This paper demonstrates the benefits and design principles of base isolation by comparing the transmissibilities and response spectra of isolated and un-isolated structures. Parameters of typical isolated buildings and ground motions of the 1994 Northridge earthquake are used for the demonstration.

  6. A coatable, light-weight, fast-response nanocomposite sensor for the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance: from structural vibration to ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Xu, Hao; Liu, Weijian; Liao, Yaozhong; Jin, Hao; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by an innovative sensing philosophy, a light-weight nanocomposite sensor made of a hybrid of carbon black (CB)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has been developed. The nanoscalar architecture and percolation characteristics of the hybrid were optimized in order to fulfil the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance from low-frequency vibration to high-frequency ultrasonic waves. Dynamic particulate motion induced by elastic disturbance modulates the infrastructure of the CB conductive network in the sensor, with the introduction of the tunneling effect, leading to dynamic alteration in the piezoresistivity measured by the sensor. Electrical analysis, morphological characterization, and static/dynamic electromechanical response interrogation were implemented to advance our insight into the sensing mechanism of the sensor, and meanwhile facilitate understanding of the optimal percolation threshold. At the optimal threshold (∼6.5 wt%), the sensor exhibits high fidelity, a fast response, and high sensitivity to ultrafast elastic disturbance (in an ultrasonic regime up to 400 kHz), yet with an ultralow magnitude (on the order of micrometers). The performance of the sensor was evaluated against a conventional strain gauge and piezoelectric transducer, showing excellent coincidence, yet a much greater gauge factor and frequency-independent piezoresistive behavior. Coatable on a structure and deployable in a large quantity to form a dense sensor network, this nanocomposite sensor has blazed a trail for implementing in situ sensing for vibration- or ultrasonic-wave-based structural health monitoring, by striking a compromise between ‘sensing cost’ and ‘sensing effectiveness’.

  7. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  8. Natural vibration response based damage detection for an operating wind turbine via Random Coefficient Linear Parameter Varying AR modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño-Valencia, L. D.; Fassois, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    The problem of damage detection in an operating wind turbine under normal operating conditions is addressed. This is characterized by difficulties associated with the lack of measurable excitation(s), the vibration response non-stationary nature, and its dependence on various types of uncertainties. To overcome these difficulties a stochastic approach based on Random Coefficient (RC) Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) AutoRegressive (AR) models is postulated. These models may effectively represent the non-stationary random vibration response under healthy conditions and subsequently used for damage detection through hypothesis testing. The performance of the method for damage and fault detection in an operating wind turbine is subsequently assessed via Monte Carlo simulations using the FAST simulation package.

  9. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  10. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.

    2015-10-01

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  11. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S. Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  12. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on neuromuscular responses in older individuals: implications for prescription of vibratory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Herrero, Azael J; García-López, David; Rhea, Matthew R; López-Chicharro, José; González-Gallego, Javier; Garatachea, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze surface electromyography activity (sEMG) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) responses in different muscles while standing on a vibrating platform producing oscillations of different frequencies and amplitudes. Twenty community-dwelling older adults (79.6 ± 3.2 years) took part in the research. Subjects were exposed to 12 different vibration treatments of 15 seconds separated by 1 minute of rest in random order to check the influence of frequency (25, 35, and 45 Hz) and amplitude (1 mm [low] and 3.1 mm [high]) vibration on sEMG signal and RPE. Additionally, the use of a soft pad was also examined for its influence on these measures. Three-factor analysis of variance for RPE and both lower and whole-body sEMGs revealed a significant amplitude main effect (p < 0.01), and soft mat effect (p < 0.01), and a significant frequency main effect (p < 0.01). The major findings were that sEMG and RPE increased with the acceleration of the vibration; moreover, the increments of sEMG were highly correlated with RPE. The results of this study suggest that using the RPE method after each exercise would allow exercise and health professionals to assess the intensity levels that correspond to the level of the vibratory program in older adults. PMID:22158143

  13. Bonding, vibrational, and electrical characteristics of CdS nanostructures embedded in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, S. P.; Dhar, A.; Ray, S. K.; Chakraborty, A. K.

    2009-04-15

    CdS nanocomposites have been grown in polyvinyl alcohol matrix by a chemical synthesis process. The transmission electron micrographs of nanocomposites synthesized at 70-90 deg. C temperature showed the growth of needlelike and junctionlike nanostructures. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed the growth of stoichiometric CdS without the formation of any intermediate phases at the CdS-polyvinyl alcohol interface. Raman spectra of first order longitudinal optical phonon peak has been analyzed using phonon dispersion model to detect the surface phonon modes in CdS nanoneedles and wires. The origin of negative differential resistance behavior in current-voltage characteristics for junctionlike CdS nanocomposites has been discussed.

  14. Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from changes in their vibration characteristics: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R.; Prime, M.B.; Shevitz, D.W.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains a review of the technical literature concerning the detection, location, and characterization of structural damage via techniques that examine changes in measured structural vibration response. The report first categorizes the methods according to required measured data and analysis technique. The analysis categories include changes in modal frequencies, changes in measured mode shapes (and their derivatives), and changes in measured flexibility coefficients. Methods that use property (stiffness, mass, damping) matrix updating, detection of nonlinear response, and damage detection via neural networks are also summarized. The applications of the various methods to different types of engineering problems are categorized by type of structure and are summarized. The types of structures include beams, trusses, plates, shells, bridges, offshore platforms, other large civil structures, aerospace structures, and composite structures. The report describes the development of the damage-identification methods and applications and summarizes the current state-of-the-art of the technology. The critical issues for future research in the area of damage identification are also discussed.

  15. The nonlinear forced response characteristics of contained fluids in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanschoor, M. C.; Crawley, E. F.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of the change in the lateral slosh behavior of contained fluids between earth and space is presented. The experimental apparatus used to determine the slosh characteristics is described and a nonlinear analytic model of a coupled fluid/spacecraft system is outlined. The forced response characteristics of silicon oil and distilled water in cylinder tanks with either a flat or spherical bottom are reported and discussed. A comparison of the measured earth and space results identifies and highlights the effects of gravity on the linear and nonlinear slosh behavior of these fluids.

  16. Chemotherapeutic response to cisplatin-like drugs in human breast cancer cells probed by vibrational microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Batista de Carvalho, A L M; Pilling, M; Gardner, P; Doherty, J; Cinque, G; Wehbe, K; Kelley, C; Batista de Carvalho, L A E; Marques, M P M

    2016-06-23

    Studies of drug-cell interactions in cancer model systems are essential in the preclinical stage of rational drug design, which relies on a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying cytotoxic activity and biological effects, at a molecular level. This study aimed at applying complementary vibrational spectroscopy methods to evaluate the cellular impact of two Pt(ii) and Pd(ii) dinuclear chelates with spermine (Pt2Spm and Pd2Spm), using cisplatin (cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2) as a reference compound. Their effects on cellular metabolism were monitored in a human triple-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) by Raman and synchrotron-radiation infrared microspectroscopies, for different drug concentrations (2-8 μM) at 48 h exposure. Multivariate data analysis was applied (unsupervised PCA), unveiling drug- and concentration-dependent effects: apart from discrimination between control and drug-treated cells, a clear separation was obtained for the different agents studied - mononuclear vs. polynuclear, and Pt(ii) vs. Pd(ii). Spectral biomarkers of drug action were identified, as well as the cellular response to the chemotherapeutic insult. The main effect of the tested compounds was found to be on DNA, lipids and proteins, the Pd(ii) agent having a more significant impact on proteins while its Pt(ii) homologue affected the cellular lipid content at lower concentrations, which suggests the occurrence of distinct and unconventional pathways of cytotoxicity for these dinuclear polyamine complexes. Raman and FTIR microspectroscopies were confirmed as powerful non-invasive techniques to obtain unique spectral signatures of the biochemical impact and physiological reaction of cells to anticancer agents. PMID:27063935

  17. Characteristics of vibrational wave propagation and attenuation in submarine fluid-filled pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Juan

    2015-04-01

    As an important part of lifeline engineering in the development and utilization of marine resources, the submarine fluid-filled pipeline is a complex coupling system which is subjected to both internal and external flow fields. By utilizing Kennard's shell equations and combining with Helmholtz equations of flow field, the coupling equations of submarine fluid-filled pipeline for n=0 axisymmetrical wave motion are set up. Analytical expressions of wave speed are obtained for both s=1 and s=2 waves, which correspond to a fluid-dominated wave and an axial shell wave, respectively. The numerical results for wave speed and wave attenuation are obtained and discussed subsequently. It shows that the frequency depends on phase velocity, and the attenuation of this mode depends strongly on material parameters of the pipe and the internal and the external fluid fields. The characteristics of PVC pipe are studied for a comparison. The effects of shell thickness/radius ratio and density of the contained fluid on the model are also discussed. The study provides a theoretical basis and helps to accurately predict the situation of submarine pipelines, which also has practical application prospect in the field of pipeline leakage detection.

  18. The use of a digital computer for investigation of the dynamic characteristics of a man while pressing vertically downward with the straight arm on the handle of a vibrator (instrument)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zazhivikhina, A. I.; Rosin, G. S.; Ryzhov, Y. I.

    1973-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a man were investigated by the resonance method, by means of recordings of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of a vibrator straight arm human body system on a standard automatic recorder. Experiments were carried out with a specially constructed vibrator, the moving system of which was fastened to a bronze suspension with small losses. Vibrations of the handle, fastened to the moving system, were recorded with an accelerometer. The mass of the moving system m, rigidity of the suspension k and friction coefficient r of the vibrator (calibration) were determined by exact formulas.

  19. Vibration characteristics of Z-ring-stiffened 60 deg conical shell models of a planetary entry spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.; Mixon, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the vibration characteristics of a 60 deg conical shell model of a planetary entry vehicle is described and the results presented. Model configurations include the shell with or without one or two Z-ring stiffeners and with or without a simulated payload. Tests were conducted with the model clamped at the small diameter and with the model suspended at the simulated payload. Additionally, calculated results obtained from application of several analytical procedures reported in the literature are presented together with comparisons between experimental and calculated frequencies and meridional mode shapes. Generally, very good frequency agreement between experimental and calculated results was obtained for all model configurations. For small values of circumferential mode number, however, the frequency agreement decreased as the number of ring stiffeners increased. Overall agreement between experimental and calculated mode shapes was generally good. The calculated modes usually showed much larger curvatures in the vicinity of the rings than were observed in the experimentally measured mode shapes. Dual resonances associated with modal preference were noted for the shell without Z-ring stiffeners, whereas the addition of stiffeners produced resonances for which the model responded in two or more modes over different sections of the shell length.

  20. Investigation of Dynamic Force/Vibration Transmission Characteristics of Four-Square Type Gear Durability Test Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    In this study, design requirements for a dynamically viable, four-square type gear test machine are investigated. Variations of four-square type gear test machines have been in use for durability and dynamics testing of both parallel- and cross-axis gear set. The basic layout of these machines is illustrated. The test rig is formed by two gear pairs, of the same reduction ratio, a test gear pair and a reaction gear pair, connected to each other through shafts of certain torsional flexibility to form an efficient, closed-loop system. A desired level of constant torque is input to the circuit through mechanical (a split coupling with a torque arm) or hydraulic (a hydraulic actuator) means. The system is then driven at any desired speed by a small DC motor. The main task in hand is the isolation of the test gear pair from the reaction gear pair under dynamic conditions. Any disturbances originated at the reaction gear mesh might potentially travel to the test gearbox, altering the dynamic loading conditions of the test gear mesh, and hence, influencing the outcome of the durability or dynamics test. Therefore, a proper design of connecting structures becomes a major priority. Also, equally important is the issue of how close the operating speed of the machine is to the resonant frequencies of the gear meshes. This study focuses on a detailed analysis of the current NASA Glenn Research Center gear pitting test machine for evaluation of its resonance and vibration isolation characteristics. A number of these machines as the one illustrated has been used over last 30 years to establish an extensive database regarding the influence of the gear materials, processes surface treatments and lubricants on gear durability. This study is intended to guide an optimum design of next generation test machines for the most desirable dynamic characteristics.

  1. Vibration characteristics of 1/8-scale dynamic models of the space-shuttle solid-rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leadbetter, S. A.; Stephens, W.; Sewall, J. L.; Majka, J. W.; Barret, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Vibration tests and analyses of six 1/8 scale models of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters are reported. Natural vibration frequencies and mode shapes were obtained for these aluminum shell models having internal solid fuel configurations corresponding to launch, midburn (maximum dynamic pressure), and near endburn (burnout) flight conditions. Test results for longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies are compared with analytical predictions derived from thin shell theory and from finite element plate and beam theory. The lowest analytical longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies were within + or - 10 percent of experimental values. The effects of damping and asymmetric end skirts on natural vibration frequency were also considered. The analytical frequencies of an idealized full scale space shuttle solid rocket boosted structure are computed with and without internal pressure and are compared with the 1/8 scale model results.

  2. An experimental study for determining human discomfort response to roll vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study using a passenger ride quality apparatus (PRQA) was conducted to determine the subjective reactions of passengers to roll vibrations. The data obtained illustrate the effect upon human comfort of several roll-vibration parameters: namely, roll acceleration level, roll frequency, and seat location (i.e., distance from axis of rotation). Results of an analysis of variance indicated that seat location had no effect on discomfort ratings of roll vibrations. The effect of roll acceleration level was significant, and discomfort ratings increased markedly with increasing roll acceleration level at all roll frequencies investigated. Of particular interest, is the fact that the relationship between discomfort ratings and roll acceleration level was linear in nature. The effect of roll frequency also was significant as was the interaction between roll acceleration level and roll frequency.

  3. Three-Dimensional Vibration Isolator for Suppressing High-Frequency Responses for Sage III Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Cutright, S.; Dyke, R.; Templeton, J.; Gasbarre, J.; Novak, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III - International Space Station (ISS) instrument will be used to study ozone, providing global, long-term measurements of key components of the Earth's atmosphere for the continued health of Earth and its inhabitants. SAGE III is launched into orbit in an inverted configuration on SpaceX;s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. As one of its four supporting elements, a Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP) mounted to the top panel of the Interface Adapter Module (IAM) box experiences high-frequency response due to structural coupling between the two structures during the SpaceX launch. These vibrations, which were initially observed in the IAM Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test and later verified through finite element analysis (FEA) for the SpaceX launch loads, may damage the internal electronic cards and the Thermoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance (TQCM) sensors mounted on the CMP. Three-dimensional (3D) vibration isolators were required to be inserted between the CMP and IAM interface in order to attenuate the high frequency vibrations without resulting in any major changes to the existing system. Wire rope isolators were proposed as the isolation system between the CMP and IAM due to the low impact to design. Most 3D isolation systems are designed for compression and roll, therefore little dynamic data was available for using wire rope isolators in an inverted or tension configuration. From the isolator FEA and test results, it is shown that by using the 3D wire rope isolators, the CMP high-frequency responses have been suppressed by several orders of magnitude over a wide excitation frequency range. Consequently, the TQCM sensor responses are well below their qualification environments. It is indicated that these high-frequency responses due to the typical instrument structural coupling can be significantly suppressed by a vibration passive control using the 3D vibration isolator. Thermal and contamination

  4. A numerical study of the flow-induced vibration characteristics of a voice-producing element for laryngectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Thomson, S L; Tack, J W; Verkerke, G J

    2007-01-01

    A computational model for exploring the design of a voice-producing voice prosthesis, or voice-producing element (VPE), is presented. The VPE is intended for use by laryngectomized patients who cannot benefit from current speech rehabilitation techniques. Previous experiments have focused on the design of a double-membrane voice generator as a VPE. For optimization studies, a numerical model has been developed. The numerical model introduced incorporates the finite element (FE) method to solve for the flow-induced vibrations of the VPE system, including airflow coupled with a mass-loaded membrane. The FE model includes distinct but coupled fluid and solid domains. The flow solver is governed by the incompressible, laminar, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The solid solver allows for large deformation, large strain, and collision. It is first shown that the model satisfactorily represents previously published experimental results in terms of frequency and flow rate, enabling the model for use as a design tool. The model is then used to study the influence of geometric scaling, membrane thickness, membrane stiffness, and slightly convergent or divergent channel geometry on the model response. It is shown that physiological allowable changes in the latter three device parameters alone will not be sufficient to generate the desired reduction in fundamental frequency. However, their effects are quantified and it is shown that membrane stiffness and included angle should be considered in future designs. PMID:17662296

  5. Vibration and buckling characteristics of functionally graded nanoplates subjected to thermal loading based on surface elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ashrafi, M. A.; Pourashraf, T.; Sahmani, S.

    2015-04-01

    The buckling and vibration responses of nanoplates made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to thermal loading are studied in prebuckling domain with considering the effect of surface stress. To accomplish this purpose, Gurtin-Murdoch elasticity theory is incorporated into the classical plate theory to develop a non-classical plate model including the surface effects. The material properties of FGM nanoplate are considered to be graded in the thickness direction on the basis of the power law function. Hamilton's principle is utilized to derive size-dependent governing differential equations of motion and associated boundary conditions. Selected numerical results are presented to indicate the importance of surface stress effect. It is revealed that in the presence of surface stress effect, the influence of material property gradient index on the critical thermal buckling load is more prominent for FGM nanoplates with lower length-to-thickness ratios. Also, by increasing the natural frequency of FGM nanoplate, the role of surface stress effect in the value of critical thermal buckling load is more prominent.

  6. The Effect of Vibration on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Regiane Luz; Almeida, Gil Lucio

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of proprioception in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effect of vibration on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle, knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group-CG) and eight individuals with Down syndrome (DS) while balancing on…

  7. Responses of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to conspecific vibrational signals and synthetic mimics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mate-seeking in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, a vector of the economically damaging huanglongbing citrus disease, typically includes male-female duetting behaviors. First, the male calls by beating its wings at ca. 170-250 Hz, producing vibrations that are transmitted along the host tree branches to th...

  8. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  9. Sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers for low-mid frequencies vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardonio, P.; Zilletti, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation study concerning the low-mid frequencies control of flexural vibration in a lightly damped thin plate, which is equipped with three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers and is excited by a rain on the roof broad frequency band stationary disturbance. The sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are semi-active mass-spring-dashpot systems whose stiffness and damping properties can be varied uniformly within given ranges. They are operated in such a way as their characteristic natural frequencies are continuously varied to control the response of flexural modes that resonate within given frequency bands. More specifically, in this study the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are operated asynchronously, each within one of three sequential frequency bands comprised between 20 and 120, 120 and 220, 220 and 320 Hz. The flexural vibration control effects produced by the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are compared to those produced by three classical tuneable vibration absorbers, each set to control the response of a specific flexural mode of the plate resonating in one of these three frequency bands. The study shows that the proposed sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers outperform the classical tuneable vibration absorbers and produce about 6, 5, 4 dB reduction of the plate overall flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation. Also, the study indicates that the sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are robust to variations in the plate flexural response. For instance they still produce about 5.1, 5.3, 4.6 dB reductions of the flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation when the plate is tensioned such that the flexural natural frequencies are shifted up from about 40 percent, for the first resonance, to 7 percent, for the tenth resonance.

  10. Corticosteroid responsiveness and clinical characteristics in childhood difficult asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bossley, C.J.; Saglani, S.; Kavanagh, C.; Payne, D.N.R.; Wilson, N.; Tsartsali, L.; Rosenthal, M.; Balfour-Lynn, I.M.; Nicholson, A.G.; Bush, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the clinical characteristics and corticosteroid responsiveness of children with difficult asthma (DA). We hypothesised that complete corticosteroid responsiveness (defined as improved symptoms, normal spirometry, normal exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO) and no bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR <12%)) is uncommon in paediatric DA. We report on 102 children, mean±SD age 11.6±2.8 yrs, with DA in a cross-sectional study. 89 children underwent spirometry, BDR and FeNO before and after 2 weeks of systemic corticosteroids (corticosteroid response study). Bronchoscopy was performed after the corticosteroid trial. Of the 102 patients in the cross-sectional study, 88 (86%) were atopic, 60 (59%) were male and 52 (51%) had additional or alternative diagnoses. Out of the 81 patients in the corticosteroid response study, nine (11%) were complete responders. Of the 75 patients with symptom data available, 37 (49%) responded symptomatically, which was less likely if there were smokers in the home (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.02–0.82). Of the 75 patients with available spirometry data, 35 (46%) had normal spirometry, with associations being BAL eosinophilia (OR 5.43, 95% CI 1.13–26.07) and high baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.12). Of these 75 patients, BDR data were available in 64, of whom 36 (56%) had <12% BDR. FeNO data was available in 70 patients, of whom 53 (75%) had normal FeNO. Airflow limitation data was available in 75 patients, of whom 17 (26%) had persistent airflow limitation, which was associated with low baseline FEV1 (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.90–0.97). Only 11% of DA children exhibited complete corticosteroid responsiveness. The rarity of complete corticosteroid responsiveness suggests alternative therapies are needed for children with DA. PMID:19541710

  11. Validation of Intra-Subject Variation in Biodynamic Responses of Seated Human Exposed to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Soo; Yoshimura, Takuya; Tamaoki, Gen

    Many studies have been conducted to investigate the change in human response under various experimental conditions. Usually, these experiments were conducted using many subjects and the inter-subject variation was evaluated. However, the intra-subject variation in human response is also necessary for understanding the change in an individual's physical response to whole-body vibration (WBV). The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses (both apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility) of a seated human exposed to vertical whole-body vibration over time. In the experiments, nine male subjects were exposed to vertical random vibration (0.2-0.3 m/s2 in r.m.s.) in the 0-30Hz frequency range. The measurement variation was also evaluated, wherein the measurements were repeated five times without any change to form the “baseline” for each subject, and the intra-subject variations were evaluated by comparing their responses with these “baseline.” The intra-subject variation was examined from two different viewpoints: variation “within a day” and that “over several days.” To determine the intra-subject variation “within a day”, the five measurements were obtained at two-hour intervals on the same day. In the intra-subject variation “over several days”, the five measurements were obtained again, but at the same time of the day on five consecutive days. The results show that the intra-subject variations (both “within a day” and “over several days”) in biodynamic responses are larger than the “baseline.” However, when the variation “within a day” in biodynamic responses is compared to that “over several days,” no common trend is observed among subjects. Although the magnitude of intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses depends on each subject, both variations “within a day” and that “over several days” have a similar range of variation.

  12. A technical feasibility study of dornase alfa delivery with eFlow® vibrating membrane nebulizers: aerosol characteristics and physicochemical stability.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Thomas; Geller, David E; Owyang, Laura; Tservistas, Marcus; Keller, Manfred; Boden, Norbert; Kesser, Kenneth C; Shire, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Dornase alfa (Pulmozyme®) is an inhaled mucus-active drug that decreases viscoelasticity of sputum in vitro, improves lung function and reduces respiratory exacerbations in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients of 5 years age and older. The regulatory approval of dornase alfa 15 years ago stipulated that only certain jet nebulizer-compressor combinations should be used to deliver the drug. Since that time there have been significant advances in aerosol delivery technology, including development of electronic perforated vibrating membrane devices. Three independent laboratories studied aerosol characteristics, nebulization time, dose delivery, and stability of dornase alfa after nebulization to determine the feasibility of using perforated vibrating membrane devices to deliver the drug. These studies determined that the eFlow® vibrating membrane technology delivers dornase alfa more rapidly and efficiently than jet nebulizers, and does not affect the physicochemical properties of the drug. These in vitro results demonstrate only the technical feasibility of using vibrating membrane devices to deliver dornase alfa. Clinical studies will be required before any conclusions can be made regarding clinical safety and efficacy of these drug-device combinations for cystic fibrosis. PMID:20533437

  13. Modelling the response of a vibrating-element density meter in a two-phase mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingham, John

    1997-06-01

    A vibrating-element density meter is a mechanical oscillator with known properties, for example a tuning fork or a simple rod, driven to vibrate at a known frequency. The oscillator is immersed in a fluid and the resonant frequency measured. The density of the fluid can then be inferred. We consider an idealized meter immersed in two-phase flows of various types, and investigate whether a simple single-phase interpretation allows us to deduce the density of the mixture. We find that, when the density contrast between the two fluids is not great, the simple interpretation gives good results, for example in oil/water flows. However, when the density contrast is significant, for example in gas/liquid flows, the simple interpretation is highly inaccurate.

  14. Vibration analysis and transient response of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Ye, Tiangui

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a unified solution for free and transient vibration analyses of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The formulation is derived by means of the variational principle in conjunction with a modified Fourier series which consists of standard Fourier cosine series and supplemented functions. The mechanical and electrical properties of functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPMs) are assumed to vary continuously in the thickness direction and are estimated by Voigt’s rule of mixture. The convergence, accuracy and reliability of the present formulation are demonstrated by comparing the present solutions with those from the literature and finite element analysis. Numerous results for FGPM beams with different boundary conditions, geometrical parameters as well as material distributions are given. Moreover, forced vibration of the FGPM beams subjected to dynamic loads and general boundary conditions are also investigated.

  15. Characterization of the frequency and muscle responses of the lumbar and thoracic spines of seated volunteers during sinusoidal whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Baig, Hassam A; Dorman, Daniel B; Bulka, Ben A; Shivers, Bethany L; Chancey, Valeta C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2014-10-01

    Whole body vibration has been postulated to contribute to the onset of back pain. However, little is known about the relationship between vibration exposure, the biomechanical response, and the physiological responses of the seated human. The aim of this study was to measure the frequency and corresponding muscle responses of seated male volunteers during whole body vibration exposures along the vertical and anteroposterior directions to define the transmissibility and associated muscle activation responses for relevant whole body vibration exposures. Seated human male volunteers underwent separate whole body vibration exposures in the vertical (Z-direction) and anteroposterior (X-direction) directions using sinusoidal sweeps ranging from 2 to 18 Hz, with a constant amplitude of 0.4 g. For each vibration exposure, the accelerations and displacements of the seat and lumbar and thoracic spines were recorded. In addition, muscle activity in the lumbar and thoracic spines was recorded using electromyography (EMG) and surface electrodes in the lumbar and thoracic region. Transmissibility was determined, and peak transmissibility, displacement, and muscle activity were compared in each of the lumbar and thoracic regions. The peak transmissibility for vertical vibrations occurred at 4 Hz for both the lumbar (1.55 ± 0.34) and thoracic (1.49 ± 0.21) regions. For X-directed seat vibrations, the transmissibility ratio in both spinal regions was highest at 2 Hz but never exceeded a value of 1. The peak muscle response in both spinal regions occurred at frequencies corresponding to the peak transmissibility, regardless of the direction of imposed seat vibration: 4 Hz for the Z-direction and 2-3 Hz for the X-direction. In both vibration directions, spinal displacements occurred primarily in the direction of seat vibration, with little off-axis motion. The occurrence of peak muscle responses at frequencies of peak transmissibility suggests that such

  16. Exaggerated haemodynamic and neural responses to involuntary contractions induced by whole-body vibration in normotensive obese versus lean women.

    PubMed

    Dipla, Konstantina; Kousoula, Dimitra; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Kyparos, Antonios; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? In obesity, the exaggerated blood pressure response to voluntary exercise is linked to hypertension, yet the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. We examined whether involuntary contractions elicit greater haemodynamic responses and altered neural control of blood pressure in normotensive obese versus lean women. What is the main finding and its importance? During involuntary contractions induced by whole-body vibration, there were augmented blood pressure and spontaneous baroreflex responses in obese compared with lean women. This finding is suggestive of an overactive mechanoreflex in the exercise-induced hypertensive response in obesity. Passive contractions did not elicit differential heart rate responses in obese compared with lean women, implying other mechanisms for the blunted heart rate response reported during voluntary exercise in obesity. In obesity, the exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is linked to hypertension, yet the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether involuntary mechanical oscillations, induced by whole-body vibration (WBV), elicit greater haemodynamic responses and altered neural control of BP in obese versus lean women. Twenty-two normotensive, premenopausal women (12 lean and 10 obese) randomly underwent a passive WBV (25 Hz) and a control protocol (similar posture without WVB). Beat-by-beat BP, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, cardiac output, parasympathetic output (evaluated by heart rate variability) and spontaneous baroreceptor sensitivity (sBRS) were assessed. We found that during WBV, obese women exhibited an augmented systolic BP response compared with lean women that was correlated with body fat percentage (r = 0.77; P < 0.05). The exaggerated BP rise was driven mainly by the greater increase in cardiac output index in obese versus lean women, associated with a greater stroke volume index in obese women

  17. Characteristics of seismoelectric interface responses at dipping boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, B.; Kemna, A.

    2012-04-01

    When crossing an interface between two layers with different petrophysical properties, a seismic wave generates a time-varying charge separation which acts as a dipole radiating electromagnetic energy independently of the seismic wave. If we consider a monochromatic seismic source located above a horizontal interface between such media, the seismic wave traverses the interface and causes relative displacement of ions at the matrix-fluid interface in the pore space. The resulting electric field is due to the streaming current imbalance at the interface. This is equivalent to the case of an electrical dipole oscillating in phase with the seismic wave along such boundary. As a consequence, electromagnetic disturbances are radiated away from the dipole source and can be recorded at various receiver lines. This seismic-to-electromagnetic field conversion at petrophysical boundaries in the 1st Fresnel zone is the so-called seismoelectric interface response. Conceptual field models and theoretical modelling indicate that the interface response should be a multipole electrical source. Higher-order terms will diminish more rapidly with distance and therefore will leave the dipole term to dominate. Thus, a seismoelectric interface response emanating from a horizontal boundary in a homogeneous half-space is expected to exhibit symmetry and amplitude characteristics similar to those of a vertical electric dipole (VED) centred on the interface directly below the shot point. However, no general theoretical predictions concerning the characteristics, the shape and the morphology of the VED induced by seismic waves at dipping interfaces can be found in the literature. To gain insight into the spatio-temporal occurrence and evolution of the seismoelectric interface response for dipping interfaces we run several numerical simulations using different petrophysical parameter set-ups. For the modelling, we make use of a simplified time-domain formulation of the coupled physical problem

  18. Vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to monitoring circuitry for the real time detection of vibrations of a predetermined frequency and which are greater than a predetermined magnitude. The circuitry produces an instability signal in response to such detection. The circuitry is particularly adapted for detecting instabilities in rocket thrusters, but may find application with other machines such as expensive rotating machinery, or turbines. The monitoring circuitry identifies when vibration signals are present having a predetermined frequency of a multi-frequency vibration signal which has an RMS energy level greater than a predetermined magnitude. It generates an instability signal only if such a vibration signal is identified. The circuitry includes a delay circuit which responds with an alarm signal only if the instability signal continues for a predetermined time period. When used with a rocket thruster, the alarm signal may be used to cut off the thruster if such thruster is being used in flight. If the circuitry is monitoring tests of the thruster, it generates signals to change the thruster operation, for example, from pulse mode to continuous firing to determine if the instability of the thruster is sustained once it is detected.

  19. Acceptance and control of aircraft interior noise and vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Ride quality criteria for noise, vibration, and their combination in the helicopter cabin environment are discussed. Results are presented of laboratory and field studies of passenger responses to interior noise and vibration during the performance of a listening task and during reverie, as well as to the interaction of noise with multi-frequency and multi-axis vibration. A study of means for reducing helicopter interior noise based on analytical, experimental and flight studies of the near-field noise source characteristics of the aircraft, the transmission of noise through aircraft structures and the attenuation of noise by various noise control treatments is then presented which has resulted in a reduction of 3 dB in helicopter cabin noise. Finally, a model under development to evaluate passenger acceptance of a helicopter noise and vibration environment is indicated which incorporates the observed noise and vibration effects on comfort and is expected to provide insights for more effective noise and vibration control.

  20. Quasi-Static and Dynamic Response Characteristics of F-4 Bias-Ply and Radial-Belted Main Gear Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics of F-4 military fighter 30x11.5-14.5/26PR bias-ply and radial-belted main gear tires. Tire properties were measured by the application of vertical, lateral, and fore-and-aft loads. Mass moment-of-inertia data were also obtained. The results of the study include quasi-static load-deflection curves, free-vibration time-history plots, energy loss associated with hysteresis, stiffness and damping characteristics, footprint geometry, and inertia properties of each type of tire. The difference between bias-ply and radial-belted tire construction is given, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each tire design. Three simple damping models representing viscous, structural, and Coulomb friction are presented and compared with the experimental data. The conclusions discussed contain a summary of test observations.

  1. Good Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) sponsorship from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, assisted MetroLaser, of Irvine, California, in the development of a self-aligned laser vibrometer system. VibroMet, capable of measuring surface vibrations in a variety of industries, provides information on the structural integrity and acoustical characteristics of manufactured products. This low-cost, easy-to-use sensor performs vibration measurement from distances of up to three meters without the need for adjustment. The laser beam is simply pointed at the target and the system then uses a compact laser diode to illuminate the surface and to subsequently analyze the reflected light. The motion of the surface results in a Doppler shift that is measured with very high precision. VibroMet is considered one of the many behind-the-scenes tools that can be relied on to assure the quality, reliability and safety of everything from airplane panels to disk brakes

  2. Energy characteristics of photothermal vibrational instability at stimulated Raman and Mandelstam-Brillouin scattering in aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, M. V.

    2009-04-01

    The threshold intensity and the combination frequencies for photothermal vibrational instability in high- Q aqueous aerosol droplets in the two-mode regime have been calculated. The selection rules for coupling electromagnetic and temperature modes in a droplet are obtained. A comparative analysis of the threshold excitation intensities of photothermal vibrational instability, stimulated Mandelstam-Brillouin scattering, and stimulated Raman scattering in droplets is performed. It is shown that photothermal vibrational instability in the two-mode regime can be developed at a pump intensity of about 104 W/cm2 for droplets with radii of 2-20 μm for a pump wavelength of 0.532 μm. A method of remote measurement of the microphysical droplet parameters from the additional periodic temperature shift of droplet eigenfrequencies in the spectrum of stimulated Raman scattering and lasing is proposed.

  3. A chambered porous damper for rotor vibration control: Part 2. Imbalance response and blade loss simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.; Martin, M. )

    1993-04-01

    In this paper, results of experimental rotordynamic evaluations of a novel, high load chambered porous damper design are presented. The chambered porous damper concept was evaluated for gas turbine engine application since this concept avoids the nonlinearities associated with high-eccentricity operation of conventional squeeze film dampers. The rotordynamic testing was conducted under large steady-state imbalance and simulated transient blade-loss conditions for up to 0.254 mm (0.01 in.) mass c.g offset or 180 g-cm (2.5 oz-in.) imbalance. The chambered porous damper demonstrated that the steady-state imbalance and simulated blade-loss transient response of a flexible rotor operating above its first bending critical speed could be readily controlled. Rotor system imbalance sensitivity and logarithmic decrement are presented showing the characteristics of the system with the damper installed. The ability to accommodate high steady-state and transient imbalance conditions makes this damper well suited to a wide range of rotating machinery, including aircraft gas turbine engines.

  4. Response of the rf-extraction-wing balcony and floor, and the storage ring to forced and ambient vibration excitation and coupling to tunnel/basemat

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.; Rosas-Velez, P.

    1993-08-01

    To ensure successful operation of the APS, vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets must be limited to very low levels for frequencies >10 Hz. There will be many sources of vibration, such as pumps, fans, compressors, generators, and other rotating and reciprocating machinery when the APS is operational. In general, such vibration sources are isolated from the structural components and base foundations by vibration dampers and isolators. Pumps are typically mounted on seismic isolators, which are massive bases with response frequencies of <10 Hz, and fans are mounted with elastic-type isolators to minimize vibration coupling. The attenuation of expansion/isolation joints is a very important factor in predicting the response of the storage ring basemat to the various excitation sources. Several 75-hp pumps are located on the balcony of the rf extraction wing, which is close to the storage ring basemat. The pumps per se may prove to be a vibration excitation source of concern. Additional pumps will be placed in the RF extraction building and could add to the vibration levels. If the dynamic unbalance force of the pump motor, and the efficiency of the associated expansion joints were known, one could predict the response of the storage ring basemat. This information would also be useful in determining the placement of additional pumps. This report discusses vibration tests and measurements that were performed on July 28, 1993, in the rf extraction building. The purpose of the investigation was to study the efficiency of two specific expansion joints: (1) the joint that separates a structural column pad from the extraction wing floor, and (2) the joint that separates the extraction wing floor from the roof of the storage ring tunnel. A small electrodynamic exciter, with a maximum RMS force output of {approx}0.5 lb at the frequencies of interest, was used.

  5. Dynamic responses and vibration control of the transmission tower-line system: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  6. Ultrasonic vibration-assisted pelleting of wheat straw: a predictive model for energy consumption using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2014-01-01

    Cellulosic biomass can be used as a feedstock for biofuel manufacturing. Pelleting of cellulosic biomass can increase its bulk density and thus improve its storability and reduce the feedstock transportation costs. Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting can produce biomass pellets whose density is comparable to that processed by traditional pelleting methods (e.g. extruding, briquetting, and rolling). This study applied response surface methodology to the development of a predictive model for the energy consumption in UV-A pelleting of wheat straw. Effects of pelleting pressure, ultrasonic power, sieve size, and pellet weight were investigated. This study also optimized the process parameters to minimize the energy consumption in UV-A pelleting using response surface methodology. Optimal conditions to minimize the energy consumption were the following: ultrasonic power at 20%, sieve size at 4 mm, and pellet weight at 1g, and the minimum energy consumption was 2.54 Wh. PMID:23859359

  7. Dynamic Responses and Vibration Control of the Transmission Tower-Line System: A State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  8. Vibration ride comfort criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study directed to derive equal vibration discomfort curves, to determine the influence of vibration masking in order to account for the total discomfort of any random vibration, and to develop a scale of total vibration discomfort in the case of human response to whole-body vertical vibration. Discomfort is referred to as a subjective discomfort associated with the acceleration level of a particular frequency band. It is shown that passenger discomfort to whole-body vibration increases linearly with acceleration level for each frequency. Empirical data provide a mechanism for determining the degree of masking (or summation) of the discomfort of multiple frequency vibration. A scale for the prediction of passenger discomfort is developed.

  9. Analysis of vibration waveforms of electromechanical response to determine piezoelectric and electrostrictive coefficients.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Manabu; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2012-08-01

    We developed a possible method to determine both coefficients of piezoelectricity (d) and electrostriction (M) at the same time by a waveform analysis of current and vibration velocity in the resonance state. The waveforms of the current and vibration velocity were theoretically described using the equations of motion and piezoelectric constitutive equations, considering the dissipation effect. The dissipation factor of the d coefficient and M coefficient is dielectric loss tangent tan δ. The waveforms measured in all of the ceramics, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O(3) (PZT), Pb(Mg,Nb)O(3) (PMN), and 0.8Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb2/3)O(3)-0.2PbTiO(3) (PMN-PT), were well fitted with the calculated waveform. This fitting produced both the d and M coefficients, which agreed with those determined via the conventional methods. Moreover, the respective contributions of both piezoelectricity and electrostriction to the d value determined in the resonance-antiresonance method were clarified. PMID:22899111

  10. Seasonal variations in vibrational spectra of the sea surface nanolayer and their relation to characteristic parameters for phytoplankton activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laß, Kristian; Bange, Hermann W.; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    The sea surface nanolayer is a very thin organic substance layer, down to monomolecular thickness. It is found on top of the sea surface microlayer, which in turn comprises roughly the uppermost millimeter of the water column. The nanolayer constitutes the actual interface between ocean and atmosphere and plays an important role in all exchange processes of matter and energy between ocean and atmosphere. Nevertheless, knowledge about formation and development of the sea surface nanolayer in the course of the year is very limited. In this study we present surface-specific observations of the sea surface nanolayer development over a period of three and a half years. Samples of the sea surface have been taken monthly at Boknis Eck Time Series Station (Eckernförde Bay, southwestern Baltic Sea) by screen sampling. From surface-sensitive vibrational spectra obtained by nonlinear sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), information on amount, structure and composition of the organic nanolayer material was extracted. SFG has been introduced by us as a new method to study the ocean nanolayer quite recently [1,2]. The abundance of nanolayer material was found to follow a pronounced yearly periodicity, with larger amounts of material present from mid to end of summer. A substantial time lag of about 2.5 months between spring algal bloom maxima and abundance maxima of nanolayer material has been observed. In contrast to common perception, this shows that high phytoplankton abundance and pronounced nanolayers are not directly related to each other. Variations in the appearance of the spectra serve as indicators for changes in structure and chemical composition of the nanolayer. The accumulation of carbohydrate-rich material in late summer provides a possible explanation for the observed spectral changes. We propose that sloppy feeding of zooplankton as well as photochemical and/or microbial processing of organic material present in the microlayer is responsible for the

  11. Spectral characteristics of ventricular response to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hayano, J; Yamasaki, F; Sakata, S; Okada, A; Mukai, S; Fujinami, T

    1997-12-01

    To investigate the spectral characteristics of the fluctuation in ventricular response during atrial fibrillation (AF), R-R interval time series obtained from ambulatory electrocardiograms were analyzed in 45 patients with chronic AF and in 30 age-matched healthy subjects with normal sinus rhythm (SR). Although the 24-h R-R interval spectrum during SR showed a 1/f noise-like downsloping linear pattern when plotted as log power against log frequency, the spectrum during AF showed an angular shape with a breakpoint at a frequency of 0.005 +/- 0.002 Hz, by which the spectrum was separated into long-term and short-term components with different spectral characteristics. The short-term component showed a white noise-like flat spectrum with a spectral exponent (absolute value of the regression slope) of 0.05 +/- 0.08 and an intercept at 10(-2) Hz of 4.9 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz). The long-term component had a 1/f noise-like spectrum with a spectral exponent of 1.26 +/- 0.40 and an intercept at 10(-4) Hz of 7.0 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz), which did not differ significantly from those for the spectrum during SR in the same frequency range [spectral exponent, 1.36 +/- 0.06; intercept at 10(-4) Hz, 7.1 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz)]. The R-R intervals during AF may be a sequence of uncorrelated values over the short term (within several minutes). Over the longer term, however, the R-R interval fluctuation shows the long-range negative correlation suggestive of underlying regulatory processes, and spectral characteristics indistinguishable from those for SR suggest that the long-term fluctuations during AF and SR may originate from similar dynamics of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. PMID:9435618

  12. Maternal characteristics influence response to DHA during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gould, J F; Anderson, A J; Yelland, L N; Gibson, R A; Makrides, M

    2016-05-01

    We explored the degree to which maternal and offspring outcomes resulting from consuming prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 800mg/day) in a clinical trial were influenced by maternal characteristics. Among non-smokers, women who received DHA had heavier babies (adjusted mean difference (MD)=99g 95% CI 45-153, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01) and fewer low birth weight babies than control women (adjusted relative risk=0.43 95% CI 0.25-0.74, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01). From women who had not completed further education, children in the DHA group had higher cognitive scores at 18 months compared with control children (adjusted MD=3.15 95% CI 0.93-5.37, p=0.01; interaction p<0.01). Conversely, the children of women who completed further education in the DHA group had lower language scores than control children (adjusted MD -2.82 95% CI -4.90 to -0.73, p=0.01; interaction p=0.04). Our results support the notion that responsiveness to prenatal DHA may depend on the characteristics of specific population subgroups. PMID:27154359

  13. Vibration characteristics of the HPOTP (High-Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Moyer, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to rotor dynamic problems that have been encountered and eliminated in the course of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) development, as well as continuing, subsynchronous problems which are being encountered in the development of a 109-percent power level engine. The basic model for the SSME's High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) encompasses a structural dynamic model for the rotor and housing, and component models for the liquid and gas seals, turbine clearance excitation forces, and impeller diffuser forces. Linear model results are used to examine the synchronous response and stability characteristics of the HPOTP, with attention to bearing load and stability problems associated with the second critical speed. Differences between linear and nonlinear model results are discussed and explained in terms of simple models. Simulation results indicate that while synchronous bearing loads can be reduced, subsynchronous motion is not eliminated by seal modifications.

  14. Spectral response of crystalline acetanilide and N -methylacetamide: Vibrational self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, Julian; Hamm, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to compare the spectral response of the amide I band and the NH-stretching band of acetanilide (ACN) and N -methylacetamide (NMA), as well as their deuterated derivatives. Both molecules form hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals that are regarded to be model systems for polypeptides and proteins. The amide I bands of both ACN and NMA show a temperature-dependent sideband, while the NH bands are accompanied by a sequence of equidistantly spaced satellite peaks. These spectral anomalies are interpreted as a signature of vibrational self-trapping. Two different types of states can be identified in both crystals in the pump-probe signal: a delocalized free-exciton state and a set of localized self-trapped states. The phonons that mediate self-trapping in ACN and deuterated ACN are identified by their temperature dependence, confirming our previous results. The study shows that the substructure of the NH band in NMA (amide A and amide B bands) originates, at least partly, from vibrational self-trapping and not, as often assumed, from a Fermi resonance.

  15. Review and Evaluation of Hand-Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Sinsel, Erik W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-09-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  16. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  17. Experimental IR and Raman spectra and quantum chemical studies of molecular structures, conformers and vibrational characteristics of L-ascorbic acid and its anion and cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. A.; Rani, P.; Kumar, M.; Singh, R.; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, N. P.

    2011-12-01

    IR and spectra of the L-ascorbic acid ( L-AA) also known as vitamin C have been recorded in the region 4000-50 cm -1. In order to make vibrational assignments of the observed IR and Raman bands computations were carried out by employing the RHF and DFT methods to calculate the molecular geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies along with other related parameters for the neutral L-AA and its singly charged anionic ( L-AA -) and cationic ( L-AA +) species. Significant changes have been found for different characteristics of a number of vibrational modes. The four ν(O-H) modes of the L-AA molecule are found in the order ν(O 9-H 10) > ν(O 19-H 20) > ν(O 7-H 8) > ν(O 14-H 15) which could be due to complexity of hydrogen bonding in the lactone ring and the side chain. The C dbnd O stretching wavenumber ( ν46) decreases by 151 cm -1 in going from the neutral to the anionic species whereas it increases by 151 cm -1 in going from the anionic to the cationic species. The anionic radicals have less kinetic stabilities and high chemical reactivity as compared to the neutral molecule. It is found that the cationic radical of L-AA is kinetically least stable and chemically most reactive as compared to its neutral and anionic species.

  18. Vibration study of the APS storage ring 0. 8 meter quadrupole magnet/magnet support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this study are as follows: Determine the vibration characteristics (frequency, damping, and mode shapes) of the magnet on prototypic supports (the actual mounting system used to mount the magnet on the girder). Measure system response to ambient floor motion. Measure the effect of various modifications to determine if the magnet response can be modified to minimize unwanted response characteristics. Modifications investigated include support schemes, increasing system damping, and increasing mechanical rigidity. Measure system response to coolant flow. Determine vibrational characteristics of a large concrete block placed on a concrete floor, including response to ambient floor motions.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolator with cam-roller-spring mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiaxi; Wang, Xinlong; Xu, Daolin; Bishop, Steve

    2015-06-01

    The property of quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) of vibration isolation system (VIS) could be realized by using the conceptual design of cam-roller-spring mechanisms (CRSMs). We develop this idea into a physical prototype and study its vibration isolation performance. A piecewise nonlinear dynamic model is formulated in the consideration of possible disengagement between the cam and roller. The analytical solution of the amplitude-frequency relationship is derived by using the averaging method and further verified by numerical simulations. The effects of excitation force and system damping on the force transmissibility are investigated. A particular behavior of this type of QZS isolator, very differ from existing ones, is that the peak transmissibility and starting frequency of isolation never overshoots those of the linear counterpart no matter how large the excitation amplitude is. The prototype is tested and the experimental results show that the QZS isolator outperforms the linear counterpart.

  20. Nonlinear forced vibration response of smart two-phase nano-composite beams to external harmonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareishi, Soraya; Kalhori, Hamed; Rafiee, Mohammad; Hosseini, Seyedeh Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for nonlinear free and forced vibration response of smart laminated nano-composite beams resting on nonlinear elastic foundation and under external harmonic excitation. The structure is under a temperature change and an electric excitation through the piezoelectric layers. Different distribution patterns of the single walled aligned and straight carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the thickness of the beam are considered. The beam complies with Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and von Kármán geometric nonlinearity. The nonlinearity is due to the mid-plane stretching of the beam and the nonlinear stiffness of the elastic foundation. The Multiple Time Scales perturbation scheme is used to perform the nonlinear dynamical analysis of functionally graded carbon nanotube-reinforced beams. Analytical expressions of the nonlinear natural frequencies, nonlinear dynamic response and frequency response of the system in the case of primary resonance have been presented. The effects of different parameters including applied voltage, temperature change, beam geometry, the volume fraction and distribution pattern of the carbon nanotubes on the nonlinear natural frequencies and frequency-response curves are presented. It is found that the volume fractions of SWCNTs as well as their distribution pattern significantly change the behavior of the system.

  1. Modal interactions due to friction in the nonlinear vibration response of the "Harmony" test structure: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of an assembly with friction joints - named "Harmony" - is studied both experimentally and numerically. The experimental results exhibit a softening effect and an increase of dissipation with excitation level. Modal interactions due to friction are also evidenced. The numerical methodology proposed groups together well-known structural dynamic methods, including finite elements, substructuring, Harmonic Balance and continuation methods. On the one hand, the application of this methodology proves its capacity to treat a complex system where several friction movements occur at the same time. On the other hand, the main contribution of this paper is the experimental and numerical study of evidence of modal interactions due to friction. The simulation methodology succeeds in reproducing complex form of dynamic behavior such as these modal interactions.

  2. Psycho-vibratory evaluation of timber floors - Towards the determination of design indicators of vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreira, J.; Trollé, A.; Jarnerö, K.; Sjökvist, L.-G.; Bard, D.

    2015-03-01

    In timber housing constructions, vibrations can be a nuisance for inhabitants. Notably, the vibrational response of wooden floor systems is an issue in need of being dealt with more adequately in the designing of such buildings. Studies addressing human response to vibrations are needed in order to be able to better estimate what level of vibrations in dwellings can be seen as acceptable. In the present study, measurements on five different wooden floors were performed in a laboratory environment at two locations in Sweden (SP in Växjö and LU in Lund). Acceleration measurements were carried out while a person either was walking on a particular floor or was seated in a chair placed there as the test leader was walking on the floor. These participants filled out a questionnaire regarding their perception and experiencing of the vibrations in question. Independently of the subjective tests, several static and dynamic characteristics of the floors were determined through measurements. The ultimate aim was to develop indicators of human response to floor vibrations, specifically those regarding vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance, their being drawn based on relationships between the questionnaire responses obtained and the parameter values determined on the basis of the measurements carried out. To that end, use was made of multilevel regression. Although the sample of floors tested was small, certain clear trends could be noted. The first eigenfrequency (calculated in accordance with Eurocode 5) and Hu and Chui's criterion (calculated from measured quantities) proved to be the best indicators of vibration annoyance, and the Maximum Transient Vibration Value (computed on the basis of the accelerations experienced by the test subjects) to be the best indicator of vibration acceptability.

  3. Estimates of site response based on spectral ratio between horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibrations in the source zone of 2001 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Thulasiraman; Rajendran, Kusala

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the site response characteristics of Kachchh rift basin over the meizoseismal area of the 2001, Mw 7.6, Bhuj (NW India) earthquake using the spectral ratio of the horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibrations. Using the available knowledge on the regional geology of Kachchh and well documented ground responses from the earthquake, we evaluated the H/V curves pattern across sediment filled valleys and uplifted areas generally characterized by weathered sandstones. Although our H/V curves showed a largely fuzzy nature, we found that the hierarchical clustering method was useful for comparing large numbers of response curves and identifying the areas with similar responses. Broad and plateau shaped peaks of a cluster of curves within the valley region suggests the possibility of basin effects within valley. Fundamental resonance frequencies (f0) are found in the narrow range of 0.1-2.3 Hz and their spatial distribution demarcated the uplifted regions from the valleys. In contrary, low H/V peak amplitudes (A0 = 2-4) were observed on the uplifted areas and varying values (2-9) were found within valleys. Compared to the amplification factors, the liquefaction indices (kg) were able to effectively indicate the areas which experienced severe liquefaction. The amplification ranges obtained in the current study were found to be comparable to those obtained from earthquake data for a limited number of seismic stations located on uplifted areas; however the values on the valley region may not reflect their true amplification potential due to basin effects. Our study highlights the practical usefulness as well as limitations of the H/V method to study complex geological settings as Kachchh.

  4. Experimental investigation of the vibrational and thermal response of a laser spark plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Gregory S.

    A study was conducted in order to evaluate the external thermal and vibrational effects on the operation of a laser ignition system for internal combustion (IC) engine applications. West Virginia University (WVU) in conjunction with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have constructed a prototype laser spark plug which has been designed to mount directly onto the head of a natural gas engine for the purpose of igniting an air/fuel (A/F) mixture in the engine's combustion chamber. To be considered as a viable replacement for the conventional electrode-based ignition system, integrity, durability and reliability must be justified. Thermal and oscillatory perturbations induced upon the ignition system are major influences that affect laser spark plug (LSP) operation and, therefore, quantifying these effects is necessary to further the advancement and development of this technology. The passively q-switched Nd:YAG laser was mounted on Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) Vibration Exciter Type 4808 Shaker in conjunction with at B&K Power Amplifier Type 2719, which was oscillated in 10 Hz intervals from 0 to 60 Hz using a sine wave to mimic natural gas engine operation. The input signal simulated the rotational velocity of the engine operating from 0 to 3600 RPM with the laser mounted in three different axial orientations. The laser assembly was wrapped with medium-temperature heat tape, outfitted with thermocouples and heated from room temperature to 140 ºF to simulate the temperatures that the LSP may experience when installed on an engine. The acceleration of the payload was varied between 50% and 100% of the oscillator's maximum allowable acceleration in each mounting orientation resulting in a total of 294 total setpoints. For each setpoint, pulse width, pulse width variation, q-switch delay, jitter and output energy were measured and recorded. Each of these dependent variables plays a critical role in multi photon ionization and precise control is necessary to limit

  5. Dose response characteristics of special opti-chromic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humprerys, K. C.; Kantz, A. D.

    In 1981 Kronenberg, McLaughlin, and Siebentritt proposed measurement of radiation dosage using optical waveguides with leuco dye solutions. Based on this work, an opti-chromic system was proposed at the Fourth International Meeting on Radiation Processing. This opti-chromic system has been evaluated by McLaughlin and Radak. The opti-chromic waveguide system may be even more valuable for other applications which involve measurements with special requirements and configurations. The linearity of the radiation response can be enhanced by proper selection of leuco dye concentration, waveguide materials, organic activator solvents, and trace chemical additives. This paper presents experimental data resulting from an examination of the organic solvents TEP, DMSO, and n-propyl alcohol in relationship to stability, temperature characteristics, and radiation chemistry. The experimental data indicates that by varying the types and combinations of organic solvents, special opti-chromic waveguides can be fabricated to measure various radiation ranges under a variety of temperature ranges which have stability over time.

  6. Lateral vibration of hydro turbine-generator rotor with varying stiffness of guide bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. D.; Liao, G. L.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, X.; Gou, Q. Q.; Zhang, W. B.

    2012-11-01

    The rotor consisted of rotating components and origin of energy transfer is the source of all vibrations in a hydro turbine generator unit. Among all vibration modes, the lateral mode is of the greatest concern. A lateral vibration response calculation model for rotor-bearing system with the nonlinear characteristics of the guide bearing's stiffness is presented in this paper. The model for hydro-generator rotor combines finite element model with the varying guide bearing's stiffness, the gyroscopic effect, unbalanced magnetic pull, hydraulic force and mechanical forces to calculate natural frequencies and steady state response. Take Francis turbine unit with three guide bearings for an example, the unit's lateral vibration characteristics and response of rotating components had been simulated by using FEM. The lateral vibration characteristics and response amplitude at rotating parts had been analyzed by varying stiffness simultaneously or one of the three guide bearings based on the assumption of elastic supporting models, and the influence of rotating speed, phase difference between the unbalanced forces on the vibration response had also been analyzed by the simplified analysis at the designed guide bearing stiffness. It shows that accounting for bearing stiffness and support structure flexibility, and then understanding the resulting in vibration behavior is an important factor in enhancing the stability of a hydro turbine generator rotor. The simulation results show that, for a vertical-mounted hydro turbine generator unit, there exists a common characteristic in the first three vibration mode, that is, the maximum amplitude is at the exciter in the first vibration mode and at the runner in the second vibration mode respectively, and the maximum amplitude is near the exciter or rotor in the third vibration mode. These results have great significance for the optimization design of the supporting structure of a hydro turbine generator unit.

  7. Structural-dynamic-response characteristics of Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Operational experience at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) has indicated that a variety of dynamic issues can affect structural performance of the system. The observation and analysis of structural dynamic responses in the VAWT have been divided among three major aspects of the system; namely rotor vibrations, torsional response of the drive train, and transverse vibrations of the cables. This division is not arbitrary, but is rather because the response of these subsystems can be accurately decoupled from each other in most circumstances. This paper will present only a brief summary of the efforts now underway at SNL in the area of structural dynamics. The emphasis will be on discussing the status of our analytical tools, the quantity and quality of existing experimental confirmation data, and the implications structural dynamic issues have on rotor design.

  8. NIST torsion oscillator viscometer response: Performance on the LeRC active vibration isolation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1992-01-01

    Critical point viscosity measurements are limited to their reduced temperature approach to T(sub c) in an Earth bound system, because of density gradients imposed by gravity. Therefore, these classes of experiments have been proposed as good candidates for 'microgravity' science experiments where this limitation is not present. The nature of these viscosity measurements dictate hardware that is sensitive to low frequency excitations. Because of the vibratory acceleration sensitivity of a torsion oscillator viscometer, used to acquire such measurements, a vibration isolation sensitivity test was performed on candidate 'microgravity' hardware to study the possibility of meeting the stringent oscillatory sensitivity requirements of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) torsion oscillator viscometer. A prototype six degree of freedom active magnetic isolation system, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used as the isolation system. The ambient acceleration levels of the platform were reduced to the noise floor levels of its control sensors, about one microgravity in the 0.1 to 10 Hz bandwidth.

  9. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  10. Vibration of perforated cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousseau, Peter L.

    For a credible design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target chamber, the vibration characteristics of the chamber must be completely understood. Target chambers are usually cylindrical or spherical in shape and contain hundreds of perforations (called ports) to allow access to the inside of the chamber. The fusion reaction within the chamber creates a uniform impulsive loading, which the chamber walls must be designed to contain. Also prior to an implosion, a delicate alignment process of the drivers and diagnostics takes place. The vibration of the chamber from rotating machinery, e.g., vacuum pumps, and ambient sources must be completely understood and accounted for during these alignment procedures. This dissertation examines the vibration characteristics of perforated cylindrical shells. Because the target chambers' thickness-to-radius ratio is small, such chambers can be modeled as thin shells. Included in the text is a literature review of perforated plates and shells and examples of the use of perforated structures in constructed and proposed ICF target chambers. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of perforated and unperforated cylindrical shells are studied analytically, numerically (via finite elements) and experimentally. Conclusions and comparisons between the different solution methods are made for both the perforated and unperforated cases. In addition, the dynamic response of perforated cylindrical shells to an axisymmetric impulsive loading has been identified. A demonstration showing how the convolution integral can be used to determine the response of a cylinder to a non-impulsive loading is presented.

  11. Comparative vibration environments of transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Measured vibration data are presented for a number of air and surface vehicles. Consideration is given to the importance of direction effects; of vehicle operating modes such as takeoff, cruise, and landing; and of measurement location on the level and frequency of the measurements. Various physical measurement units or descriptors are used to quantify and compare the data. Results suggest the range of vibration associated with a particular mode of transportation and illustrate the comparative levels in terms of each of the descriptors. Collectively, the results form a data base which may be useful in assessing the ride of existing or future systems relative to vehicles in current operation. In addition, subjective response data obtained from vibration simulator studies are presented to illustrate human response characteristics as well as to indicate a laboratory approach for the development of ride-quality criteria.

  12. Thickness-Shear Vibration Mode Characteristics of SrBi4Ti4O15-Based Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hitoshi; Hirose, Masakazu; Tsukada, Takeo; Watanabe, Yasuo; Nomura, Takeshi

    2000-09-01

    Dielectric and piezoelectric properties have been investigated in bismuth layer-structure compounds SrBi4Ti4O15 (SBT) and BaBi4Ti4O15 (BBT)-based solid solutions. Lanthanum-substituted and manganese-added SBT and BBT form solid solutions for all levels of Ba substitution. The Curie temperature and coercive field strength decrease monotonously with the amount of Ba substitution. The mechanical quality factor, Qm, of the thickness-shear vibration mode also decreases. The value of elastic compliance increases with the amount of Ba substitution, but conversely its temperature dependency decreases.

  13. Research on relation between bending stress and characteristic frequency of H-shaped beam by free vibration deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2014-05-27

    In order to investigate a relation between a bending stress and a characteristic frequency of a beam, 4-point loading which had constant moment region was conducted to a beam with H shape configuration experimentally and numerically. H-shaped beam has many characteristic deformation modes. Axial tensile stress in the beam made its characteristic frequency higher, and compressive stress lower. In the experiment, some characteristic frequencies got higher by a bending stress, and the others stayed in a small frequency fluctuation. The distinction is anticipated as a capability to measure a bending stress of a beam by its characteristic frequencies.

  14. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  15. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  16. Electrical, optical and vibrational characteristics of nano structured yttrium barium stannous oxide synthesized through a modified combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Vidya, S.; Rejith, P.P.; John, Annamma; Solomon, Sam; Deepa, A.S.; Thomas, J.K.

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Synthesis of YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} nano particles through a novel single step auto igniting combustion process. {yields} Phase purity, thermal stability, vibrational analysis, UV-vis absorption and photo luminescent studies were carried out. {yields} Chemical non-reactivity of YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} with high T{sub c} superconductor YBCO was studied. -- Abstract: A single step combustion process for the preparation of nanoparticles of yttrium barium stannous oxide is reported in this paper. The structure, phase purity and particulate properties of the as prepared nano YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} powder were examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as prepared powder obtained itself is phase pure and possess cubic structure with lattice constant 8.240 A. The particle size of the as prepared sample from Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis is in the range of {approx}15 nm. Vibrational studies carried out on the as prepared powder also confirm the cubic structure of the as prepared sample. The thermal stability of the nano particle is analyzed by thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The material is a semiconductor with excellent luminescent properties. Chemical compatibility of the sample with YBCO is analyzed. The YBCO-YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} composite showed T{sub c}(0) at 92 K.

  17. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  18. Selective effects of vibration on monosynaptic and late EMG responses in human soleus muscle after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve or a tendon tap.

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, A

    1979-01-01

    In normal subjects it was possible to evoke tendon and Hoffman reflexes which were followed by late EMG responses with a latency of 150-250 ms after the reflex stimuli. Analysis of the covariations of reflexes and late responses revealed that muscle spindle sensitivity and strength of the preceding twitch are not essential factors in determining the occurrence of the late responses as opposed to excitability changes within the spinal cord. Inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes and facilitation of late EMG responses to vibration indicate a difference in central pathways. A polysynaptic pathway may be involved in the late responses. PMID:159346

  19. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at NASA Lewis. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. Transient and steady-state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single-mesh-gear noise test rig are modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  20. Application of a photonic crystal fiber LPG for vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, I. M.; Chesini, G.; Sousa, Marco; Osório, Jonas H.; Baptista, J. M.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.; Jorge, Pedro A. S.

    2013-05-01

    A fiber optic sensor based on a long-period grating (LPG) inscribed in a photonic crystal fiber is investigated for vibration sensing for structural monitoring applications. In this paper, preliminary results are shown demonstrating the sensor ability to detect vibration induced in a test structure. The sensor frequency response when attached to a loudspeaker-acrylic plate stimulation system (tested in the range from 40 Hz to 2.5 kHz) is analyzed using an intensity based scheme with a tunable laser. An alternative interrogation scheme, where the vibration signal is retrieved from a spectral scan, is also demonstrated and analyzed showing promising characteristics for structural health monitoring.

  1. Exploring Modeling Options and Conversion of Average Response to Appropriate Vibration Envelopes for a Typical Cylindrical Vehicle Panel with Rib-stiffened Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Phil; LaVerde, Bruce; Teague, David

    2009-01-01

    Although applications for Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) techniques are more widely used in the aerospace industry today, opportunities to anchor the response predictions using measured data from a flight-like launch vehicle structure are still quite valuable. Response and excitation data from a ground acoustic test at the Marshall Space Flight Center permitted the authors to compare and evaluate several modeling techniques available in the SEA module of the commercial code VA One. This paper provides an example of vibration response estimates developed using different modeling approaches to both approximate and bound the response of a flight-like vehicle panel. Since both vibration response and acoustic levels near the panel were available from the ground test, the evaluation provided an opportunity to learn how well the different modeling options can match band-averaged spectra developed from the test data. Additional work was performed to understand the spatial averaging of the measurements across the panel from measured data. Finally an evaluation/comparison of two conversion approaches from the statistical average response results that are output from an SEA analysis to a more useful envelope of response spectra appropriate to specify design and test vibration levels for a new vehicle.

  2. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  3. Road condition evaluation using the vibration response of ordinary vehicles and synchronously recorded movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tomonori; Miyajima, Akira; Kimura, Shunya; Shimada, Yuuki; Fujino, Yozo

    2013-04-01

    Frequent and quantitative assessment of road condition is important as the maintenance of the road infrastructure needs to be performed with a limited budget. Vehicle Intelligent Monitoring System (VIMS) has been developed to estimate an index of road ride comfort (International Roughness Index; IRI) by obtaining the acceleration responses of ordinary vehicles together with GPS position data. VIMS converts the vertical acceleration of the measurement vehicle to acceleration RMS of the sprung mass of the standard Quarter Car model, and then to IRI using an approximate expression. By driving over a hump of a known profile and comparing the responses with Quarter Car simulation responses, a variety of vehicles can be calibrated; a non-linear quarter car model equivalent to the vehicle is identified. By performing numerical simulation using the nonlinear vehicle model, the difference in driving speed can also be calibrated. The measurement results can be exported to maps to comprehend road condition in a geographical view and to other data base systems. In addition, smartphones which can record motions, GPS data, and movies synchronously are utilized to improve VIMS. Because practical installation locations of smartphones are limited and because angular velocity responses are less subjective to difference in installation locations, VIMS is extended to utilize the pitching angular velocity. Furthermore, high frequency components of acceleration responses are analyzed to distinguish local pavement damages or joints from rough road sections. The examination of synchronously recorded movies confirmed the capability to distinguish the local conditions.

  4. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  5. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  6. Crack modelling and detection in Timoshenko FGM beam under transverse vibration using frequency contour and response surface model with GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Panigrahi, Brajesh; Pohit, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, dynamic response of cracked Timoshenko beam with functionally graded material properties are obtained by a numerical technique using Ritz approximation. In order to verify the applicability and performance of the formulation, comparisons of the present numerical method with three-dimensional FEM models are made. Crack is assumed to be transverse and open throughout the vibration cycle. Two different crack detection techniques have been proposed. Results obtained by the numerical technique are used in both of the crack detection techniques. In the first technique, the frequency contours with respect to crack location and size are plotted and the intersection of contours of different modes helps in the prediction of crack location and size. In the second technique, crack is modelled using response surface methodology (RSM). The sum of the squared errors between the numerical and RSM regression model natural frequencies is used as the objective function. This objective function is minimised using genetic algorithm optimisation technique. Both the crack detection techniques and the numerical analysis have shown good agreement with each other.

  7. Power-Generation Characteristics After Vibration and Thermal Stresses of Thermoelectric Unicouples with CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kwang Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok; Kim, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Lee, Soonil; Hwang, Hae Jin

    2015-06-01

    Reliability tests for thermoelectric unicouples were carried out to investigate the adhesion properties of CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces. The n-type In0.25 Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 and p-type In0.25Co3FeSb12 bulks were prepared for fabricating a thermoelectric unicouple (one p- n couple) by an induction melting and a spark plasma sintering process. Mo-Cu alloy was selected as an electrode for the unicouples due to its high melting temperature and proper work function value. Many thermoelectric unicouples with the CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces were fabricated with the proper brazing materials by means of a repeated firing process. Reliability of the unicouples with the interfaces was evaluated by a vibration test and a thermal cycling test. After the thermal cycling and vibration tests, the power-generation characteristics of the unicouples were compared with the unicouples before the tests. Even after the vibration test, electrical power with a power density of 0.5 W/cm2 was generated. The Ti-interlayer is considered as a possible candidate for making a reliable unicouple with high adhesion strength. With the thermal cycling test, the resistance of the unicouple increased and the electrical power from the unicouple decreased. A failure mode by the thermal cycling test was ascribed to a complex effect of micro-cracks originated from the thermal stress and oxidation problem of the thermoelectric materials; that is, a thick oxide layer more than 300 μm was detected after a high-temperature durability test of n-type In0.25Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 material at 773 K in air for 7 days.

  8. Whole-body vibration decreases the proliferative response of TCD4+ cells in elderly individuals with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tossige-Gomes, R.; Avelar, N.C.P.; Simão, A.P.; Neves, C.D.C.; Brito-Melo, G.E.A.; Coimbra, C.C.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Lacerda, A.C.R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding whole-body vibration (WBV; frequency = 35 to 40 Hz; amplitude = 4 mm) to squat training on the T-cell proliferative response of elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study was a randomized controlled trial in which the selected variables were assessed before and after 12 weeks of training. Twenty-six subjects (72 ± 5 years of age) were divided into three groups: 1) squat training with WBV (WBV, N = 8); 2) squat training without WBV (N = 10), and 3) a control group (N = 8). Women who were ≥60 years of age and had been diagnosed with OA in at least one knee were eligible. The intervention consisted of 12 uninterrupted weeks of squatting exercise training performed 3 times/week. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from peripheral blood collected before and after training. The proliferation of TCD4+ and TCD8+ cells was evaluated by flow cytometry measuring the carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester fluorescence decay before and after the intervention (Δ). The proliferative response of TCD4+ cells (P = 0.02, effect size = 1.0) showed a significant decrease (23%) in the WBV group compared to the control group, while there was no difference between groups regarding the proliferative response of TCD8+ cells (P = 0.12, effect size = 2.23). The data suggest that the addition of WBV to squat exercise training might modulate T-cell-mediated immunity, minimizing or slowing disease progression in elderly patients with OA of the knee. PMID:22948377

  9. The influence of higher harmonic flow forces on the response of a curved circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Budz, Collin; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a curved circular cylinder (a quarter of a ring, with no extension added to either end) free to oscillate in the crossflow direction was studied experimentally. Both the concave and the convex orientations (with respect to the oncoming flow direction) were considered. As expected, the amplitude of oscillations in both configurations was decreased compared to a vertical cylinder with the same mass ratio. Flow visualizations showed that the vortices were shed in parallel to the curved cylinder, when the cylinder was free to oscillate. The sudden jump in the phase difference between the flow forces and the cylinder displacement observed in the VIV of vertical cylinders was not observed in the curved cylinders. Higher harmonic force components at frequencies twice and three times the frequency of oscillations were observed in flow forces acting on the vertical cylinder, as well as the curved cylinder. Asymmetry in the wake was responsible for the 2nd harmonic force component and the relative velocity of the structure with respect to the oncoming flow was responsible for the 3rd harmonic force component. The lock-in occurred over the same range of reduced velocities for the curved cylinder in the convex orientation as for a vertical cylinder, but it was extended to higher reduced velocities for a curved cylinder in the concave orientation. Higher harmonic force components were found to be responsible for the extended lock-in range in the concave orientation. Within this range, the higher harmonic forces were even larger than the first harmonic force and the structure was being excited mainly by these higher harmonic forces.

  10. Analogy between the stimulus-response characteristics of neuronal and electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoki; Naito, Masayoshi

    1995-05-01

    One of the simplest catalytically rhythmic reactions, an electrochemical oxidation of formic acid, is found to show a stimulus-response behavior analogous to that of a nerve. The response of a nerve cell has three important characteristics: a threshold, a refractory period and a response that depends on the slope of ramp stimulation. Formic acid oxidation has these characteristics and also shows a digital response to analogue stimulus. Such behavior is discussed in terms of a chemical reaction mechanisms.

  11. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  12. Measuring Fluctuating Pressure Levels and Vibration Response in a Jet Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterholt, Douglas J.; Knox, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of loads due to solid rocket motor plume impingement allows for moreaccurate analyses of components subjected to such an environment. Typically, test verification of predicted loads due to these conditions is widely overlooked or unsuccessful. ATA Engineering, Inc., performed testing during a solid rocket motor firing to obtain acceleration and pressure responses in the hydrodynamic field surrounding the jet plume. The test environment necessitated a robust design to facilitate measurements being made in close proximity to the jet plume. This paper presents the process of designing a test fixture and an instrumentation package that could withstand the solid rocket plume environment and protect the required instrumentation.

  13. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  14. Effect of granular media on the vibrational response of a resonant structure: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Valenza, John J; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Johnson, David Linton

    2010-11-01

    The acoustic response of a structure that contains a cavity filled with a loose granular material is analyzed. The inputs to the theory are the effective masses of each subsystem: that of the empty-cavity resonating structure and that of the granular medium within the cavity. This theory accurately predicts the frequencies, widths, and relative amplitudes of the various flexural mode resonances observed with rectangular bars, each having a cavity filled with loose tungsten granules. Inasmuch as the dominant mechanism for damping is due to adsorbed water at the grain-grain contacts, the significant effects of humidity on both the effective mass of the granular medium as well as on the response of the grain-loaded bars are monitored. Here, depending upon the humidity and the preparation protocol, it is possible to observe one, two, or three distinct resonances in a wide frequency range (1-5 kHz) over which the empty bar has but one resonance. These effects are understood in terms of the theoretical framework, which may simplify in terms of perturbation theories. PMID:21110572

  15. Autonomic nervous system response to vibrating and electrical stimuli on the forearm and wrist.

    PubMed

    Barralon, P; Dumont, G; Schwarz, S K W; Ansermino, J M

    2008-01-01

    In today's operating rooms, anesthesiologists use physiological data monitoring systems with visual and auditory cues to receive patient information. The efficacy of these visual-audio systems is limited by the human limitations of these modalities. Previous studies have shown the potential use of a complementary, or alternate, patient data monitoring technology utilizing another psychophysically relevant modality: the sense of touch via vibro-tactile or electro-tactile stimulation. In this paper, we describe an experiment designed to determine whether the specific type and/or location of such a tactile stimulation device on the arm affects the autonomic nervous system response. In our study, each of 10 participants tested a vibro-tactile display on the forearm (VF), a vibro-tactile display on the wrist (VW), and an electro-tactile display on the forearm (EF) in random order. Using the LifeShirt, system, electrocardiogram (ECG), respiratory rate (Br), tidal volume (Vt) data were collected. Results showed a higher value of the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) when using the VF compared to the VW and EF. We also found that the HRV response for the three tactile prototypes was correlated with the accuracy of tactile pattern identification. PMID:19162810

  16. Vibration study of the APS storage ring 0.8 meter quadrupole magnet/magnet support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this study are as follows: Determine the vibration characteristics (frequency, damping, and mode shapes) of the magnet on prototypic supports (the actual mounting system used to mount the magnet on the girder). Measure system response to ambient floor motion. Measure the effect of various modifications to determine if the magnet response can be modified to minimize unwanted response characteristics. Modifications investigated include support schemes, increasing system damping, and increasing mechanical rigidity. Measure system response to coolant flow. Determine vibrational characteristics of a large concrete block placed on a concrete floor, including response to ambient floor motions.

  17. Vibration Response Models of a Stiffened Aluminum Plate Excited by a Shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical models of structural-acoustic interactions are of interest to aircraft designers and the space program. This paper describes a comparison between two energy finite element codes, a statistical energy analysis code, a structural finite element code, and the experimentally measured response of a stiffened aluminum plate excited by a shaker. Different methods for modeling the stiffeners and the power input from the shaker are discussed. The results show that the energy codes (energy finite element and statistical energy analysis) accurately predicted the measured mean square velocity of the plate. In addition, predictions from an energy finite element code had the best spatial correlation with measured velocities. However, predictions from a considerably simpler, single subsystem, statistical energy analysis model also correlated well with the spatial velocity distribution. The results highlight a need for further work to understand the relationship between modeling assumptions and the prediction results.

  18. Characteristics of near response cells projecting to the oculomotor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Mays, L E; Gamlin, P D

    1992-04-01

    1. Previous work has shown neurons just dorsal and lateral to the oculomotor nucleus that increase their firing rate with increases in the angle of ocular convergence. It has been suggested that the output of these midbrain near response cells might provide the vergence command needed by the medial rectus motoneurons. However, lens accommodation ordinarily accompanies convergence, and a subsequent study showed that only about one-half of these midbrain near response cells carried a signal related exclusively to vergence. One hypothesis suggested by this finding is that this subgroup of neurons might have a unique role in providing a "pure" vergence signal to the medial rectus motoneurons. 2. In the present study extracellular recordings were made from midbrain near response cells in monkeys while eye position and lens accommodation were measured. The monkeys viewed targets through an optical system that allowed the accommodative and ocular vergence demands to be manipulated independently. This approach was used to produce a partial dissociation of accommodative and vergence responses, so that an accommodative and vergence coefficient could be determined for each cell, by the use of the following equation FR = R0 + kda x AR + kdv x CR where FR is the firing rate of the near response cell, R0 is the predicted firing rate for a distant target, kda is the (dissociated) accommodation coefficient, AR is the accommodative response, kdv is the (dissociated) vergence coefficient, and CR is the convergence response. 3. The vergence and accommodation coefficients were determined for a large number of midbrain near response cells, including a subset that could be antidromically activated from the medial rectus subdivisions of the oculomotor nucleus. Some near response neurons were found with signals related exclusively to convergence (i.e., kdv greater than 0 and kda = 0), whereas several others had signals related exclusively to lens accommodation (i.e., kda greater than 0

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  20. Vibration isolation of automotive vehicle engine using periodic mounting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, S.

    2005-05-01

    Customer awareness and sensitivity to noise and vibration levels have been raised through increasing television advertisement, in which the vehicle noise and vibration performance is used as the main market differentiation. This awareness has caused the transportation industry to regard noise and vibration as important criteria for improving market shares. One industry that tends to be in the forefront of the technology to reduce the levels of noise and vibration is the automobile industry. Hence, it is of practical interest to reduce the vibrations induced structural responses. The automotive vehicle engine is the main source of mechanical vibrations of automobiles. The engine is vulnerable to the dynamic action caused by engine disturbance force in various speed ranges. The vibrations of the automotive vehicle engines may cause structural failure, malfunction of other parts, or discomfort to passengers because of high level noise and vibrations. The mounts of the engines act as the transmission paths of the vibrations transmitted from the excitation sources to the body of the vehicle and passengers. Therefore, proper design and control of these mounts are essential to the attenuation of the vibration of platform structures. To improve vibration resistant capacities of engine mounting systems, vibration control techniques may be used. For instance, some passive and semi-active dissipation devices may be installed at mounts to enhance vibration energy absorbing capacity. In the proposed study, a radically different concept is presented whereby periodic mounts are considered because these mounts exhibit unique dynamic characteristics that make them act as mechanical filters for wave propagation. As a result, waves can propagate along the periodic mounts only within specific frequency bands called the "Pass Bands" and wave propagation is completely blocked within other frequency bands called the "Stop Bands". The experimental arrangements, including the design of

  1. Transient response characteristics in a biomolecular integral controller.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaunak

    2016-04-01

    The cellular behaviour of perfect adaptation is achieved through the use of an integral control element in the underlying biomolecular circuit. It is generally unclear how integral action affects the important aspect of transient response in these biomolecular systems, especially in light of the fact that it typically deteriorates the transient response in engineering contexts. To address this issue, the authors investigated the transient response in a computational model of a simple biomolecular integral control system involved in bacterial signalling. They find that the transient response can actually speed up as the integral gain parameter increases. On further analysis, they find that the underlying dynamics are composed of slow and fast modes and the speed-up of the transient response is because of the speed-up of the slow-mode dynamics. Finally, they note how an increase in the integral gain parameter also leads to a decrease in the amplitude of the transient response, consistent with the overall improvement in the transient response. These results should be useful in understanding the overall effect of integral action on system dynamics, particularly for biomolecular systems. PMID:26997660

  2. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  3. Demonstrating the Effect of Particle Impact Dampers on the Random Vibration Response and Fatigue Life of Printed Wiring Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Montgomery, Randall; Geist, David; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In a recent experimental study, small Particle Impact Dampers (PID) were bonded directly to the surface of printed circuit board (PCB) or printed wiring assemblies (PWA), reducing the random vibration response and increasing the fatigue life. This study provides data verifying practicality of this approach. The measured peak strain and acceleration response of the fundamental out of plane bending mode was significantly attenuated by adding a PID device. Attenuation of this mode is most relevant to the fatigue life of a PWA because the local relative displacements between the board and the supported components, which ultimately cause fatigue failures of the electrical leads of the board-mounted components are dominated by this mode. Applying PID damping at the board-level of assembly provides mitigation with a very small mass impact, especially as compared to isolation at an avionics box or shelf level of assembly. When compared with other mitigation techniques at the PWA level (board thickness, stiffeners, constrained layer damping), a compact PID device has the additional advantage of not needing to be an integral part of the design. A PID can simply be bonded to heritage or commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware to facilitate its use in environments beyond which it was originally qualified. Finite element analysis and test results show that the beneficial effect is not localized and that the attenuation is not due to the simple addition of mass. No significant, detrimental reduction in frequency was observed. Side-by-side life testing of damped and un-damped boards at two different thicknesses (0.070" and 0.090") has shown that the addition of a PID was much more significant to the fatigue life than increasing the thickness. High speed video, accelerometer, and strain measurements have been collected to correlate with analytical results.

  4. Vibration analysis methods for piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, R. J.

    1981-09-01

    Attention is given to flow vibrations in pipe flow induced by singularity points in the piping system. The types of pressure fluctuations induced by flow singularities are examined, including the intense wideband fluctuations immediately downstream of the singularity and the acoustic fluctuations encountered in the remainder of the circuit, and a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics is developed. The response of the piping systems to the pressure fluctuations thus generated is considered, and the calculation of the modal characteristics of piping containing a dense fluid in order to obtain the system transfer function is discussed. The TEDEL program, which calculates the vibratory response of a structure composed of straight and curved pipes with variable mechanical characteristics forming a three-dimensional network by a finite element method, is then presented, and calculations of fluid-structural coupling in tubular networks are illustrated.

  5. Estimating residual stress, curvature and boundary compliance of doubly clamped MEMS from their vibration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Garg, Anurag; Kovacs, Andrew; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    Structural parameters of doubly clamped microfabricated beams such as initial curvature, boundary compliance, thickness and mean residual stress are often critical to the performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and need to be estimated as a part of quality control of the microfabrication process. However, these parameters couple and influence many metrics of device response and thus are very difficult to disentangle and estimate using conventional methods such as the M-test, static mechanical tests, pull-in measurements or dynamic mechanical tests. Here we present a simple, non-destructive experimental method to extract these parameters based on the non-contact measurement of the natural frequencies of the lowest few eigenmodes of the microfabricated beam, and knowledge of Young's modulus and plan dimensions of the beam alone. The method exploits the fact that certain eigenmodes are insensitive to some of these structural parameters which enable a convenient decoupling and estimation of the parameters. As a result, the method does not require complicated finite element analysis, is insensitive to the gap height and introduces no contact wear or dielectric charging effects. Experiments are performed using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure the natural frequencies of doubly clamped, nickel, RF-MEMS capacitive switches and the method is applied to extract the residual stress, beam thickness, boundary compliance and post-release curvature.

  6. Genetically engineered protein in hydrogels tailors stimuli-responsive characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrick, Jason D.; Deo, Sapna K.; Browning, Tyler W.; Bachas, Leonidas G.; Madou, Marc J.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2005-04-01

    Certain proteins undergo a substantial conformational change in response to a given stimulus. This conformational change can manifest in different manners and result in an actuation, that is, catalytic or signalling event, movement, interaction with other proteins, and so on. In all cases, the sensing-actuation process of proteins is initiated by a recognition event that translates into a mechanical action. Thus, proteins are ideal components for designing new nanomaterials that are intelligent and can perform desired mechanical actions in response to target stimuli. A number of approaches have been undertaken to mimic nature's sensing-actuating process. We now report a new hybrid material that integrates genetically engineered proteins within hydrogels capable of producing a stimulus-responsive action mechanism. The mechanical effect is a result of an induced conformational change and binding affinities of the protein in response to a stimulus. The stimuli-responsive hydrogel exhibits three specific swelling stages in response to various ligands offering additional fine-tuned control over a conventional two-stage swelling hydrogel. The newly prepared material was used in the sensing, and subsequent gating and transport of biomolecules across a polymer network, demonstrating its potential application in microfluidics and miniaturized drug-delivery systems.

  7. Noninvasive Determination of Bone Mechanical Properties Using Vibration Response: A Refined Model and Validation in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, S. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Kiratli, B. J; Steele, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate non-invasive mechanical measurement of long bones is made difficult by the masking effect of surrounding soft tissues. Mechanical response tissue analysis (MRTA) offers a method for separating the effects of the soft tissue and bone; however, a direct validation has been lacking. A theoretical analysis of wave propagation through the compressed tissue revealed a strong mass effect dependent on the relative accelerations of the probe and bone. The previous mathematical model of the bone and overlying tissue system was reconfigured to incorporate the theoretical finding. This newer model (six-parameter) was used to interpret results using MRTA to determine bone cross-sectional bending stiffness, EI(sub MRTA). The relationship between EI(sub MRTA) and theoretical EI values for padded aluminum rods was R(sup 2) = 0.999. A biological validation followed using monkey tibias. Each bone was tested in vivo with the MRTA instrument. Postmortem, the same tibias were excised and tested to failure in three-point bending to determine EI(sub 3-PT) and maximum load. Diaphyseal bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were also made. The relationship between EI(sub 3-PT) and in vivo EI(sub MRTA) using the six-parameter model is strong (R(sup 2) = 0.947) and better than that using the older model (R(sup 2) = 0.645). EI(sub MRTA) and BMD are also highly correlated (R(sup 2) = 0.853). MRTA measurements in vivo and BMD ex vivo are both good predictors of scaled maximum strength (R(sup 2) = 0.915 and R(sup 2) = 0.894, respectively). This is the first biological validation of a non- invasive mechanical measurement of bone by comparison to actual values. The MRTA technique has potential clinical value for assessing long-bone mechanical properties.

  8. Noninvasive Determination of Bone Mechanical Properties using Vibration Response: A Refined Model and Validation in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, S. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Steele, C. R.; Kiratli, B. J.; Martin, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate non-invasive mechanical measurement of long bones is made difficult by the masking effect of surrounding soft tissues. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) offers a method for separating the effects of the soft tissue and bone; however, a direct validation has been lacking. A theoretical analysis of wave propagation through the compressed tissue revealed a strong mass effect dependent on the relative accelerations of the probe and bone. The previous mathematical model of the bone and overlying tissue system was reconfigured to incorporate the theoretical finding. This newer model (six-parameter) was used to interpret results using MRTA to determine bone cross-sectional bending stiffness, EI(sub MRTA). The relationship between EI(MRTA) and theoretical EI values for padded aluminum rods was R(exp 2) = 0.999. A biological validation followed using monkey tibias. Each bone was tested in vivo with the MRTA instrument. Postmortem, the same tibias were excised and tested to failure in three-point bending to determine EI(sub 3-PT) and maximum load. Diaphyseal Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measurements were also made. The relationship between E(sub 3-PT) and in vivo EI(sub MRTA) using the six-parameter model is strong (R(exp 2) = 0.947) and better than that using the older model (R(exp 2) = 0.645). EI(MRTA) and BMD are also highly correlated (R(exp 2) = 0.853). MRTA measurements in vivo and BMD ex vivo are both good predictors of scaled maximum strength (R(exp 2) = 0.915 and R(exp 2) = 0.894, respectively). This is the first biological validation of a non-invasive mechanical measurement of bone by comparison to actual values. The MRTA technique has potential clinical value for assessing long-bone mechanical properties.

  9. Ab initio determination of geometries and vibrational characteristics of building blocks of organic super-conductors: TTF and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rani, P; Yadav, R A

    2012-12-01

    Molecular behavior of the building block {[2-(1,3-dithiole-2-ylidene)-1,3-dithiole] ≡ tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)} of organic superconductors have been investigated along with its three derivatives, namely, {[2-(1,3-dioxole-2-ylidene)-1,3-dioxole] ≡ tetraoxafulvalene (TOF)}; [2,2]-bi -[[1,3] oxathiolylidene] ≡ Der I and 2-(3H-Furan-2-ylidene)-[1,3] oxathiole ≡ Der II. The properties of the molecules such as molecular geometries, frontier MOs and vibrational spectra have been investigated by using DFT method at the B3LYP level employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The geometrical parameters and atomic charges on various atomic sites of the TTF, TOF, Ders I and II suggest extended conjugation in these systems. The present calculations lead to the reassignments for of some of the fundamentals and new interpretations for some of the observed IR and Raman frequencies. One of the two modes involved in the Fermi resonance giving rise to the doublet 1555 and 1564 cm(-1) needed to be revised and another doublet 3083 and 3108 cm(-1) could be interpreted as a Fermi resonance doublet. Out of the two ν(C = C) modes under the a(1) species, the lower frequency mode is assigned to the ν(C = C) of the ring and the higher one to the ν(C = C) of the central C = C bond contrary to the assignment reported in literature. The conducting properties of these molecules depend mainly on this mode. PMID:23040970

  10. Analytical Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies for the Green Fluorescent Protein Computed with ONIOM: Chromophore Mode Character and Its Response to Environment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lee M; Lasoroski, Aurélie; Champion, Paul M; Sage, J Timothy; Frisch, Michael J; van Thor, Jasper J; Bearpark, Michael J

    2014-02-11

    A systematic comparison of different environmental effects on the vibrational modes of the 4-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI) chromophore using the ONIOM method allows us to model how the molecule's spectroscopic transitions are modified in the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). ONIOM(QM:MM) reduces the expense of normal mode calculations when computing the majority of second derivatives only at the MM level. New developments described here for the efficient solution of the CPHF equations, including contributions from electrostatic interactions with environment charges, mean that QM model systems of ∼100 atoms can be embedded within a much larger MM environment of ∼5000 atoms. The resulting vibrational normal modes, their associated frequencies, and dipole derivative vectors have been used to interpret experimental difference spectra (GFPI2-GFPA), chromophore vibrational Stark shifts, and changes in the difference between electronic and vibrational transition dipoles (mode angles) in the protein environment. PMID:26580050

  11. Dynamics of a vibrational energy harvester with a bistable beam: voltage response identification by multiscale entropy and "0-1" test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, P.; Bowen, C. R.; Kim, H. A.; Litak, G.

    2016-04-01

    The use of bistable laminates is a potential approach to realize broadband piezoelectric-based energy harvesting by introducing elastic non-linearities to the system. In this paper the dynamic response of a piezoelectric material attached to a bistable laminate beam is examined based on the experimental measurement of the generated voltage-time series. The system was subjected to harmonic excitations and exhibited single-well and snap-through vibrations of both periodic and chaotic character. The ability to identify the vibration modes of the energy harvester is important since different levels of power are expected in each dynamic mode. We identify the dynamics of the selected system response using return maps, multiscale entropy, and "0-1" test. The potential of the approaches to identify periodic and chaotic modes and snap-through events in the non-linear bistable harvester is described.

  12. Vibration analysis by time-average holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprahamian, R.; Evensen, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Method photographs vibration modes as high as 100 kHz. Technique also measures vibration decay and damping characteristics. Compensation techniques for structural size limitations and for background noise excitations are discussed.

  13. Frequency response characteristics of the fuzzy polar power system stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Ortmeyer, T.H.; Hiyama, Takashi

    1995-06-01

    The fuzzy polar power system stabilizer (FPPSS) which has been recently developed is analyzed using frequency domain methods. the frequency domain approach allows the PSS designer to compare the new FPPSS with more conventional controllers. The significance of the three FPPSS design parameters are readily seen from the frequency response data, and their relationship to the conventional lead-lag design approach can be evaluated. Furthermore, the frequency response data for the FPPSS allows an alternate design approach for this stabilizer, and can be used to develop information concerning the small signal stability of the resulting system.

  14. Response characteristics of a low-dimensional model neuron.

    PubMed

    Cartling, B

    1996-11-15

    It is shown that a low-dimensional model neuron with a response time constant smaller than the membrane time constant closely reproduces the activity and excitability behavior of a detailed conductance-based model of Hodgkin-Huxley type. The fast response of the activity variable also makes it possible to reduce the model to a one-dimensional model, in particular for typical conditions. As an example, the reduction to a single-variable model from a multivariable conductance-based model of a neocortical pyramidal cell with somatic input is demonstrated. The conditions for avoiding a spurious damped oscillatory response to a constant input are derived, and it is shown that a limit-cycle response cannot occur. The capability of the low-dimensional model to approximate higher-dimensional models accurately makes it useful for describing complex dynamics of nets of interconnected neurons. The simplicity of the model facilitates analytic studies, elucidations of neurocomputational mechanisms, and applications to large-scale systems. PMID:8888611

  15. Structural characteristic responses for finite element model updating of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linren; Wang, Lei; Ou, Jinping

    2014-04-01

    The field measurements of structures are very important to the structural finite element (FE) model updating because the errors and uncertainties of a FE model are corrected directly through closing the discrepancies between the analytical responses from FE model and the measurements from field testing of a structure. Usually, the accurate and reliable field measurements are very limited. Therefore, it is very important to make full use of the limited and valuable field measurements in structural model updating to achieve a best result with the lowest cost. In this paper, structural FE model updating is investigated in the point of view of solving a mathematical problem, and different amount and category of structural dynamic responses and static responses are considered as constraints to explore their effects on the updated results of different degree and types of structural damages. The numerical studies are carried out on a space truss. Accounting for the numerical results, some inherent phenomena and connections taking account of the updating parameters, output responses and the updated results are revealed and discussed. Some useful and practicable suggestions about using the field measurements for FE model updating are provided to achieve efficient and reliable results.

  16. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful

  17. Vibration isolation via a scissor-like structured platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuting; Jing, Xingjian; Xu, Jian; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    More and more attentions are attracted to the analysis and design of nonlinear vibration control/isolation systems for better isolation performance. In this study, an isolation platform with n-layer scissor-like truss structure is investigated to explore novel design of passive/semi-active/active vibration control/isolation systems and to exploit potential nonlinear benefits in vibration suppression. Due to the special scissor-like structure, the dynamic response of the platform has inherent nonlinearities both in equivalent damping and stiffness characteristics (although only linear components are applied), and demonstrates good loading capacity and excellent equilibrium stability. With the mathematical modeling and analysis of the equivalent stiffness and damping of the system, it is shown that: (a) the structural nonlinearity in the system is very helpful in vibration isolation, (b) both equivalent stiffness and damping characteristics are nonlinear and could be designed/adjusted to a desired nonlinearity by tuning structural parameters, and (c) superior vibration isolation performances (e.g., quasi-zero stiffness characteristics etc.) can be achieved with different structural parameters. This scissor-like truss structure can potentially be employed in different engineering practices for much better vibration isolation or control.

  18. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  19. Vibrational ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borromeo, M.; Marchesoni, F.

    2006-01-01

    Transport in one-dimensional symmetric devices can be activated by the combination of thermal noise and a biharmonic drive. For the study case of an overdamped Brownian particle diffusing on a periodic one-dimensional substrate, we distinguish two apparently different biharmonic regimes: (i) Harmonic mixing, where the two drive frequencies are commensurate and of the order of some intrinsic relaxation rate. Earlier predictions based on perturbation expansions seem inadequate to interpret our simulation results; (ii) Vibrational mixing, where one harmonic drive component is characterized by high frequency but finite amplitude-to-frequency ratio. Its effect on the device response to either a static or a low-frequency additional input signal is accurately reproduced by rescaling each spatial Fourier component of the substrate potential, separately. Contrary to common wisdom, based on the linear response theory, we show that extremely high-frequency modulations can indeed influence the response of slowly (or dc) operated devices, with potential applications in sensor technology and cellular physiology. Finally, the mixing of two high-frequency beating signal is also investigated both numerically and analytically.

  20. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  1. Wind response characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Holley, W. E.; Jafarey, N.

    1981-01-01

    It was the objective of the work reported here, and in the companion paper 1 . A broader examination of wind turbine dynamic response to turbulence, and attempts to ascertain the features of turbulence that wind turbines are most sensitive to were made. A statistical description of the wind input including all three wind components and allowing linear wind gradients across the rotor disk, was used together with quasi-static aerodynamic theory and an elementary structural model involving only a few degrees of freedom. The idea was to keep the turbine model simple and show the benefits of this type of statistical wind representation before attempting to use a more complex turbine model. As far as possible, the analysis was kept in the simplest form, while still preserving key physical responses.

  2. Electro-response characteristic of starch hydrogel crosslinked with Glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling-xiang; Chen, Jian-li; Han, Xue-wu; Yan, Shu-xian; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wei-qiang; Gao, Zi-wei

    2015-01-01

    The facile synthesis of the starch hydrogel with anisotropic microstructure and dynamic behaviors was developed in the presence (A-gel) and absence of DC electric field (B-gel). The microstructures of hydrogels were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscope. Their electro-responsive property of hydrogels was investigated with their storage modulus (G'). The result demonstrates that the G' of A-gel is greater than that of B-gel, and the modulus of A-gel increases along with the external field, which signifies positive electroresponse. In addition, the G' of A-gel and B-gel ((G'(A) and G'(B)) also continuously increases with increasing starch concentration, whereas both the maximum of modulus increment (ΔG' = G'(A)−G'(B) ) and that of modulus increment sensitivity (ΔG'/G'(B)) occur with the starch weight fraction at around 36.5%. To enhance the electro-responsive effects of the hydrogels, dielectric particles were dispersed in the hydrogel. It is found that BaTiO3/chitosan core-shell composite particles significantly enhance the electroresponse of the hydrogel. The mechanism of the electro-response mode is proposed. PMID:25849098

  3. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  4. Vibrational rainbows

    SciTech Connect

    Drolshagen, G.; Mayne, H.R.; Toennies, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    We extend the theory of inelastic rainbows to include vibrationally inelastic scattering, showing how the existence of vibrational rainbows can be deduced from collinear classical scattering theory. Exact close-coupling calculations are carried out for a breathing sphere potential, and rainbow structures are, in fact, observed. The location of the rainbows generally agrees well with the classical prediction. In addition, the sensitivity of the location of the rainbow to changes in the vibrational coupling has been investigated. It is shown that vibrational rainbows persist in the presence of anisotropy. Experimental results (R. David, M. Faubel, and J. P. Toennies, Chem. Phys. Lett. 18, 87 (1973)) are examined for evidence of vibrational rainbow structure, and it is shown that vibrational rainbow theory is not inconsistent with these results.

  5. Tactile Responses to Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrillo, Ronald T.; Bolanowski, Stanley J.

    The skin is by far the largest organ of the human body having an area of approximately 1.85 m2 in the adult male and 1.65 m2 in the adult female with an average weight of about 9 lb., comprising about 6% of the total body weight. In thickness it ranges from an average of 4.4 mm in non-hairy skin to 2.1 mm in hairy skin. It is thin over the eyelids and thick at the soles of the feet. The human body contains four types of skin.

  6. Human response to vibration stress in Japanese workers: lessons from our 35-year studies A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    MATOBA, Tsunetaka

    2015-01-01

    The occupational uses with vibratory tools or vehicles provoked health disorders of users. We reviewed narratively our articles of 35 yr studies and their related literatures, and considered the pathophysiology of the hand-arm vibration disorders. Concerning the risk factors of health impairments in workers with vibratory tools, there are two conflicting schools of the researchers: The peripheral school emphasizes that vibration only makes predominant impairments on hands and arms, showing typically Raynaud’s phenomenon in the fingers. In the systemic school, the health disorders are produced by combination with vibration, noise and working environment, namely vibratory work itself, leading to diversified symptoms and signs in relation to systemic impairments. Our 35 yr studies have evidently supported the systemic school, including disorders of the central and autonomic nervous systems. The genesis is vibratory work itself, including vibration, noise, cold working environment, ergonomic and biodynamic conditions, and emotional stress in work. Because the health disorders yield in the whole body, the following measures would contribute to the prevention of health impairments: the attenuation of vibration and noise generated form vibratory machines and the regulations on operating tool hours. In conclusion, this occupational disease results from systemic impairments due to long-term occupational work with vibratory tools. PMID:26460379

  7. Human response to vibration stress in Japanese workers: lessons from our 35-year studies A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Tsunetaka

    2015-01-01

    The occupational uses with vibratory tools or vehicles provoked health disorders of users. We reviewed narratively our articles of 35 yr studies and their related literatures, and considered the pathophysiology of the hand-arm vibration disorders. Concerning the risk factors of health impairments in workers with vibratory tools, there are two conflicting schools of the researchers: The peripheral school emphasizes that vibration only makes predominant impairments on hands and arms, showing typically Raynaud's phenomenon in the fingers. In the systemic school, the health disorders are produced by combination with vibration, noise and working environment, namely vibratory work itself, leading to diversified symptoms and signs in relation to systemic impairments. Our 35 yr studies have evidently supported the systemic school, including disorders of the central and autonomic nervous systems. The genesis is vibratory work itself, including vibration, noise, cold working environment, ergonomic and biodynamic conditions, and emotional stress in work. Because the health disorders yield in the whole body, the following measures would contribute to the prevention of health impairments: the attenuation of vibration and noise generated form vibratory machines and the regulations on operating tool hours. In conclusion, this occupational disease results from systemic impairments due to long-term occupational work with vibratory tools. PMID:26460379

  8. Repeatability and oblique flow response characteristics of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory investigation into the precision and accuracy of various mechanical-current meters are presented. Horizontal-axis and vertical-axis meters that are used for the measurement of point velocities in streams and rivers were tested. Meters were tested for repeatability and response to oblique flows. Both horizontal- and vertical-axis meters were found to under- and over-register oblique flows with errors generally increasing as the velocity and angle of flow increased. For the oblique flow tests, magnitude of errors were smallest for horizontal-axis meters. Repeatability of all meters tested was good, with the horizontal- and vertical-axis meters performing similarly.

  9. Pediatric high speed digital imaging of vocal fold vibration: A normative pilot study of glottal closure and phase closure characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rita R.; Dixon, Angela; Richmond, AnnaMary; Donohue, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to characterize normal vibratory patterns of both glottal closure and phase closure in the pediatric population with the use of high speed digital imaging. Methods For this prospective study a total of 56 pre-pubertal children, 5–11 years (boys = 28, girls = 28) and 56 adults, 21–45 years (males = 28, females = 28) without known voice problems were examined with the use of a new technology of high speed digital imaging. Recordings were captured at 4000 frames per second for duration of 4.094 seconds at participants’ typical phonation. With semi-automated software, montage analysis of glottal cycles was performed. Three trained experienced raters, rated features of glottal configuration and phase closure from glottal cycle montages. Results Posterior glottal gap was the predominant glottal closure configuration in children (girls = 85%, boys = 68%) with normal voice. Other glottal configurations observed were: anterior gap (girls = 3.6%, boys = 0%), complete closure (girls = 7%, boys = 10%), hour glass (girls = 0%, boys = 11%). Adults with normal voice also demonstrated predominantly higher percentage of posterior glottal gap configuration (females = 75% male = 54%) compared to the configurations of anterior gap (females = 0% male = 7%), complete closure (females = 2% male = 39%), hour glass (females = 3.6% male = 3.6%). A predominantly open phase (51–70% of the glottal cycle) was observed in 86% girls and 71% boys. Compared to children, adult females showed a predominantly balance phased closure 46%, followed by open phase (39%) and predominantly closed phase (14%). Adult males showed a predominantly closed phase (43%), followed by predominantly open phase (39%), followed by a balanced phase (18%). Conclusions This is a first study investigating characteristics of normal vibratory motion in children with high speed digital imaging. Glottal configuration and phase closure for children with normal voices are distinctly

  10. Effects of a Dynamic Warm-Up, Static Stretching or Static Stretching with Tendon Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance and EMG Responses.

    PubMed

    Yapicioglu, Bulent; Colakoglu, Muzaffer; Colakoglu, Zafer; Gulluoglu, Halil; Bademkiran, Fikret; Ozkaya, Ozgur

    2013-12-18

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of static stretching, with vibration given directly over Achilles tendon, on electro-myographic (EMG) responses and vertical jump (VJ) performances. Fifteen male, college athletes voluntarily participated in this study (n=15; age: 22±4 years old; body height: 181±10 cm; body mass: 74±11 kg). All stages were completed within 90 minutes for each participant. Tendon vibration bouts lasted 30 seconds at 50 Hz for each volunteer. EMG analysis for peripheral silent period, H-reflex, H-reflex threshold, T-reflex and H/M ratio were completed for each experimental phases. EMG data were obtained from the soleus muscle in response to electro stimulation on the popliteal post tibial nerve. As expected, the dynamic warm-up (DW) increased VJ performances (p=0.004). Increased VJ performances after the DW were not statistically substantiated by the EMG findings. In addition, EMG results did not indicate that either static stretching (SS) or tendon vibration combined with static stretching (TVSS) had any detrimental or facilitation effect on vertical jump performances. In conclusion, using TVSS does not seem to facilitate warm-up effects before explosive performance. PMID:24511340

  11. Effects of a Dynamic Warm-Up, Static Stretching or Static Stretching with Tendon Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance and EMG Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yapicioglu, Bulent; Colakoglu, Muzaffer; Colakoglu, Zafer; Gulluoglu, Halil; Bademkiran, Fikret; Ozkaya, Ozgur

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of static stretching, with vibration given directly over Achilles tendon, on electro-myographic (EMG) responses and vertical jump (VJ) performances. Fifteen male, college athletes voluntarily participated in this study (n=15; age: 22±4 years old; body height: 181±10 cm; body mass: 74±11 kg). All stages were completed within 90 minutes for each participant. Tendon vibration bouts lasted 30 seconds at 50 Hz for each volunteer. EMG analysis for peripheral silent period, H-reflex, H-reflex threshold, T-reflex and H/M ratio were completed for each experimental phases. EMG data were obtained from the soleus muscle in response to electro stimulation on the popliteal post tibial nerve. As expected, the dynamic warm-up (DW) increased VJ performances (p=0.004). Increased VJ performances after the DW were not statistically substantiated by the EMG findings. In addition, EMG results did not indicate that either static stretching (SS) or tendon vibration combined with static stretching (TVSS) had any detrimental or facilitation effect on vertical jump performances. In conclusion, using TVSS does not seem to facilitate warm-up effects before explosive performance. PMID:24511340

  12. Characteristic responses of a phospholipid molecular layer to polyols.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Satoshi; Deguchi, Ayano; Seki, Yota; Furuta, Miyuki; Fukuhara, Koichi; Nishihara, Sadafumi; Inoue, Katsuya; Kumazawa, Noriyuki; Mashiko, Shun; Fujihira, Shota; Goto, Makiko; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Polyols (sugar alcohols) are widely used in foods, pharmaceutical formulations and cosmetics, and therefore it is important to understand their effects on cell membranes and skin. To address this issue, we examined the effect of polyols (1,2-ethanediol (ethylene glycol), 1,3-butanediol, 1,2,3-propanetriol (glycerol), and 1,2,3,4-butanetetraol) on artificial membrane systems (liposomes, monolayers, or dry films) prepared from phospholipid (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)). 1,2-Ethanediol and 1,3-butanediol had little effect on the size of the DMPC liposomes or the surface pressure (π)-surface area (A) isotherm of DMPC monolayers at an air-water interface, whereas 1,2,3-propanetriol or 1,2,3,4-butanetetraol increased both liposome size and surface pressure. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate the interaction between DMPC and polyols. These experimental results suggest that the chemical structure of polyol plays an important role in the characteristic interaction between polyol and DMPC. PMID:26454550

  13. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  14. Characteristics and drivers of baseflow response in 183 Australian catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.

    2009-09-01

    Daily streamflow data for 183 Australian catchments were used to assess the characteristics and main drivers of baseflow and quick flow behaviour, and to find an appropriate balance between simplicity and explanatory performance in modelling. Baseflow separation was performed following the Wittenberg algorithm. A linear reservoir model (one parameter) produced baseflow estimates as good as those obtained using a non-linear reservoir (two parameters) and was therefore considered the more appropriate. The transition from storm flow dominated to baseflow dominated streamflow generally occurred 7 to 10 d after the storm event. The catchments investigated had baseflow half-times of about 12 d, with 80% of stations having half-times between 7 and 34 d. The shortest half-times occurred in the driest catchments and were attributed to intermittent occurrence of fast-draining (possibly perched) groundwater. Median baseflow index (BFI) was 0.45 with considerable variation between stations. Catchment humidity explained 27% of the variation in derived baseflow recession coefficients. Another 53% of variance in recession coefficients as well as in BFI showed spatial correlation lengths of 200 to 300 km, corresponding to terrain factors rather than climate or land use. The remaining 16 to 20% of variance remained unexplained. Most (84%) of the variation between stations in average baseflow could be explained by monthly precipitation in excess of potential evapotranspiration. Most (70%) of the variation in average quick flow could be explained by average rainfall. Another 20% of variation was spatially correlated over spatial scales of 400 km, possibly reflecting a combination of terrain and climate factors; the remaining 10 to 16% remained unexplained.

  15. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of lightweight ceramic ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.K.; Rasky, D.J.; Esfahani, L.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the newly developed lightweight ceramic ablators (LCAs) in a supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environment. Lightweight ceramic ablators were recently conceived and developed at NASA Ames using low-density ceramic or carbon fibrous matrices as substrates for main structural support and organic resins as fillers. These LCAs were successfully produced with densities ranging from approximately 0.224 to 1.282 g/cu cm. Several infiltrants with different char yields were used to study the effect on surface recession. Tests were conducted in the NASA Ames arc-jet facilities. Material thermal performance was evaluated at cold-wall heat fluxes from 113.5 to 1634 W/sq cm, and stagnation pressures of 0.018 to 0.331 atm. Conventional ablators such as SLA-561, Avcoat 5026-39HC, MA-25S, and balsa wood were tested at the same heat fluxes for direct comparison. Surface temperature was measured using optical pyrometers, and the recession rates were obtained from the high-speed films. In-depth temperature data were obtained to determine the thermal penetration depths and conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that most LCAs performed comparably to or better than conventional ablators. At low flux levels (less than 454 W/sq cm), the addition of silicon carbide and polymethyl methacrylate significantly improved the ablation performance of silica substrates. The carbon-based LCAs were the most mass-efficient at high flux levels (greater than 454 W/sq cm). 16 refs.

  16. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  17. The Director of Student Teaching: Characteristics and Responsibilities. Research Bulletin 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leon, Ed.

    This survey investigates the characteristics and responsibilities of the director of student teaching in United States colleges and universities. Consisting of explanatory sections with graphs revealing data gathered (through a questionnaire) from student teaching directors, the report covers their educational and personal characteristics (age,…

  18. Vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on vibration isolation are presented. Techniques to control and isolate centrifuge disturbances were identified. Topics covered include: disturbance sources in the microgravity environment; microgravity assessment criteria; life sciences centrifuge; flight support equipment for launch; active vibration isolation system; active balancing system; and fuzzy logic control.

  19. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  20. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  1. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Fluid structural interaction problems that estimate panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. Even when the analyst elects to use a fitted function for the spatial correlation an error may be introduced if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Both qualitative and quantitative illustrations evaluating the adequacy of different patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are provided. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system is then evaluated in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same finite element model. The convergence study results are presented illustrating the impact resulting from a poor choice of patch density. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a Diffuse Acoustic Field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  2. The Influence of Learning Characteristics on Evaluation of Audience Response Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGeorge, Erina L.; Homan, Scott R.; Dunning, John B.; Elmore, David; Bodie, Graham D.; Evans, Ed; Khichadia, Sangeetha; Lichti, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Audience Response Technology (ART) has been widely adopted on college campuses, and prior research indicates that, on average, it receives positive evaluations from students. However, research has not yet examined how characteristics of students as learners influence their responses to ART. The current study examined aptitude for learning,…

  3. Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions is discussed. Descriptions of experimental results concerning root acclimation to temperature, root and shoot acclimation to nitrogen stress, and growth response to NH4(+) and NO3(-) nutrition are included. A preliminary model validation to changing temperatures is presented.

  4. Who is responsible for food risks? The influence of risk type and risk characteristics.

    PubMed

    Leikas, Sointu; Lindeman, Marjaana; Roininen, Katariina; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2009-08-01

    The influence of food risk type and risk characteristics on food risk responsibility judgments was studied. A total of 1270 Finnish consumers judged their personal responsibility and the responsibility of three non-personal targets, industry, retail, and society, in relation to six food-related risks. They also evaluated the risks on several psychometric dimensions. The ratings were gathered via internet questionnaire. Industry and society were considered to be most responsible for all risks but the risk of cardiovascular disease, for which personal responsibility was considered to be highest. Judgments of personal controllability predicted personal responsibility judgments, and unnaturalness judgments predicted non-personal targets' judged responsibility. Personal responsibility judgments were related to different risk dimensions than judgments of non-personal targets' responsibility. PMID:19433122

  5. Experiences with nonsynchronous forced vibration in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. R.; Wachel, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The high subsynchronous vibrations which are often forced vibrations caused by flow instabilities, such as stage stall were examined. Modifications to improve the rotor stability by changing the bearings or seals have little effects on the subsynchronous vibrations. Understanding of the differences between forced vibrations and self excited vibrations to properly diagnose the problem and to correct it, is recommended. A list of characteristics of the two types of subsynchronous vibration is presented.

  6. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  7. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  8. Influence of structural parameters on dynamic characteristics and wind-induced buffeting responses of a super-long-span cable-stayed bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Chunchao; Xing, Chenxi; Li, Aiqun

    2014-09-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) model for the Sutong cable-stayed bridge (SCB) is established based on ANSYS. The dynamic characteristics of the bridge are analyzed using a subspace iteration method. Based on recorded wind data, the measured spectra expression is presented using the nonlinear least-squares regression method. Turbulent winds at the bridge site are simulated based on the spectral representation method and the FFT technique. The influence of some key structural parameters and measures on the dynamic characteristics of the bridge are investigated. These parameters include dead load intensity, as well as vertical, lateral and torsional stiffness of the steel box girder. In addition, the influence of elastic stiffness of the connection device employed between the towers and the girder on the vibration mode of the steel box girder is investigated. The analysis shows that all of the vertical, lateral and torsional buffeting displacement responses reduce gradually as the dead load intensity increases. The dynamic characteristics and the structural buffeting displacement response of the SCB are only slightly affected by the vertical and torsional stiffness of the steel box girder, and the lateral and torsional buffeting displacement responses reduce gradually as the lateral stiffness increases. These results provide a reference for dynamic analysis and design of super-long-span cable-stayed bridges.

  9. Variational study on the vibrational level structure and IVR behavior of highly vibrationally excited S0 formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C

    2012-02-15

    We perform large scale converged variational vibrational calculations on S(0) formaldehyde up to very high excess vibrational energies (E(v)), E(v)∼17,000cm(-1), using our vibrational method, consisting of a specific search/selection/Lanczos iteration procedure. Using the same method we investigate the vibrational level structure and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) characteristics for various vibrational levels in this energy range in order to assess the onset of IVR. PMID:22185953

  10. A subsystem approach for analysis of dynamic vibration absorbers suppressing broadband vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Y. L.; Wong, W. O.; Cheng, L.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic vibration absorbers are commonly designed and tuned to suppress vibrations of one vibration mode of a vibrating structure even it is a multi degree-of-freedom (MDOF) or continuous structure. Resonance at other vibration modes of the structure may still occur if the exciting force has a wide frequency band. A subsystem approach is proposed for analysis of the added stiffness and damping of vibration absorbers to the primary structure to which they are attached. The transfer function between the counteracting force from the vibration absorber and the vibration amplitude can then be derived for the comparison of their counteracting forces to the primary system. The major advantage of using the proposed method is that different designs of vibration absorber can be analysed separately from the primary system and therefore the dynamics characteristics of different designs of vibration absorber can be compared efficiently.

  11. Time-domain parameter identification of aeroelastic loads by forced-vibration method for response of flexible structures subject to transient wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bochao

    Slender structures representing civil, mechanical and aerospace systems such as long-span bridges, high-rise buildings, stay cables, power-line cables, high light mast poles, crane-booms and aircraft wings could experience vortex-induced and buffeting excitations below their design wind speeds and divergent self-excited oscillations (flutter) beyond a critical wind speed because these are flexible. Traditional linear aerodynamic theories that are routinely applied for their response prediction are not valid in the galloping, or near-flutter regime, where large-amplitude vibrations could occur and during non-stationary and transient wind excitations that occur, for example, during hurricanes, thunderstorms and gust fronts. The linear aerodynamic load formulation for lift, drag and moment are expressed in terms of aerodynamic functions in frequency domain that are valid for straight-line winds which are stationary or weakly-stationary. Application of the frequency domain formulation is restricted from use in the nonlinear and transient domain because these are valid for linear models and stationary wind. The time-domain aerodynamic force formulations are suitable for finite element modeling, feedback-dependent structural control mechanism, fatigue-life prediction, and above all modeling of transient structural behavior during non-stationary wind phenomena. This has motivated the developing of time-domain models of aerodynamic loads that are in parallel to the existing frequency-dependent models. Parameters defining these time-domain models can be now extracted from wind tunnel tests, for example, the Rational Function Coefficients defining the self-excited wind loads can be extracted using section model tests using the free vibration technique. However, the free vibration method has some limitations because it is difficult to apply at high wind speeds, in turbulent wind environment, or on unstable cross sections with negative aerodynamic damping. In the current

  12. Numerical modeling of the dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to ambient vibrations: comparison with measurements and potential application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, Alexandre; Valentin, Johann; Jongmans, Denis; Baillet, Laurent; Larose, Eric; Bottelin, Pierre; Donze, Frédéric; Mangeney, Anne

    2015-04-01

    During the last two decades, seismic noise measurements have been increasingly used in gravitational hazard assessment for both investigation and monitoring purposes. The wide frequency range allows ambient vibrations to be applied for investigating geological and civil engineering structures in a great variety of sizes, from the lithospheric or crust scale to a few m-thick landslide and rock column or buildings. On unstable slopes, ambient vibrations have been applied in very different ways for reconnaissance, depending on the investigation purpose and the landslide type. The simplest way to extract information from ambient vibrations on a given site is to perform single-station measurements with a 3-C sensor and to process the records computing Fourier spectra of the three components or the spectral ratio between the horizontal and vertical components (the so-called H/V method). On landslide sites, several studies revealed significant spectral amplification at given frequency and polarization of the wave-field in the direction of maximum slope displacement. They show that different characteristics of the seismic noise (resonant frequencies, polarization, and spectral amplification) could be used from the spectral analysis of the motion or of spectral ratios for characterizing the landslides. For cliff-like sites, this study aims to identify the pertinent and applicable parameters that could be extracted from ambient vibrations and used to gain information on the prone-to-fall column geometry. We first use 2D numerical modeling for better understanding the influence of the rear fracture characteristics (wideness w and depth L) on the horizontal motion H(f), as well as on the spectral ratios H(f)/V(f) and H(f)/Hr(f), where Hr(f) is the horizontal motion measured at a reference site. We then identify the seismic parameters able to characterize the column decoupling and we compare numerical results to data acquired at two rocky sites exhibiting cliff-like geometry

  13. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  14. Vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, Ranvir; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Mahesh

    2003-10-01

    Today, vibration sensors with low and medium sensitivities are in great demand. Their applications include robotics, navigation, machine vibration monitoring, isolation of precision equipment & activation of safety systems e.g. airbags in automobiles. Vibration sensors have been developed at SSPL, using silicon micromachining to sense vibrations in a system in the 30 - 200 Hz frequency band. The sensing element in the silicon vibration sensor is a seismic mass suspended by thin silicon hinges mounted on a metallized glass plate forming a parallel plate capacitor. The movement of the seismic mass along the vertical axis is monitored to sense vibrations. This is obtained by measuring the change in capacitance. The movable plate of the parallel plate capacitor is formed by a block connected to a surrounding frame by four cantilever beams located on sides or corners of the seismic mass. This element is fabricated by silicon micromachining. Several sensors in the chip sizes 1.6 cm x 1.6 cm, 1 cm x 1 cm and 0.7 cm x 0.7 cm have been fabricated. Work done on these sensors, techniques used in processing and silicon to glass bonding are presented in the paper. Performance evaluation of these sensors is also discussed.

  15. A brief history of free-response receiver operating characteristic paradigm data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Dev P

    2013-07-01

    In the receiver operating characteristic paradigm the observer assigns a single rating to each image and the location of the perceived abnormality, if any, is ignored. In the free-response receiver operating characteristic paradigm the observer is free to mark and rate as many suspicious regions as are considered clinically reportable. Credit for a correct localization is given only if a mark is sufficiently close to an actual lesion; otherwise, the observer's mark is scored as a location-level false positive. Until fairly recently there existed no accepted method for analyzing the resulting relatively unstructured data containing random numbers of mark-rating pairs per image. This report reviews the history of work in this field, which has now spanned more than five decades. It introduces terminology used to describe the paradigm, proposed measures of performance (figures of merit), ways of visualizing the data (operating characteristics), and software for analyzing free-response receiver operating characteristic studies. PMID:23583665

  16. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng

    The vibrational response of circular cylinder (CC) structures subjected to flow is characterized analytically, summarizing the results of recent theoretical and experimental investigations. Topics addressed include a single CC in quiescent fluid, multiple CCs in quiescent fluid, CC shells containing fluid, pipes conveying fluid, and CCs in axial flow. Consideration is given to cross-flow configurations involving a single CC, an array of CCs, and two CCs; the fluid-elastic instability of a group of CCs in cross flow; and design techniques. Diagrams and graphs are provided, and the vibration of damped linear systems, the general fluid equations, and characteristic equations and adjoint eigenfunctions are treated in appendices.

  17. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  18. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  19. Silicon Vibrating Wires at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Eddy; Filleau, Laure; Fournier, Thierry; Bunkov, Yuriy M.; Godfrin, Henri

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays microfabrication techniques originating from micro-electro nics enable to create mechanical objects of micron-size. The field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical devices (MEMs) is continuously expanding, with an amazingly broad range of applications at room temperature. Vibrating objects (torsional oscillators, vibrating wires) widely used at low temperatures to study quantum fluids, can be replaced advantageously by Silicon MEMs. In this letter we report on the study of Silicon vibrating wire devices. A goal-post structure covered with a metal layer is driven at resonance by the Laplace force acting on a current in a magnetic field, while the induced voltage arising from the cut magnetic flux allows to detect the motion. The characteristics of the resonance have been studied from 10 mK to 30 K, in vacuum and in 4He gas. In this article, we focus on the results obtained above 1.5 K, in vacuum and gas, and introduce some features observed at lower temperatures. The resonant properties can be quantitatively understood by means of simple models, from the linear regime to a highly non-linear response at strong drives. We demonstrate that the non-linearity is mostly due to the geometry of the vibrators. We also show that in our device the friction mechanisms originate in the metallic layers, and can be fully characterized. The interaction with 4He gas is fit to theory without adjustable parameters.

  20. Vibration study of the APS storage ring vacuum-chamber/girder assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1991-02-01

    The overall objective of this study is to obtain insights into the dynamic coupling between the storage ring vacuum chamber and girder, and an assessment of the potential for unacceptable vibration amplitudes that would require redesign of the vacuum chamber supports. Specific objectives include determination of the vibrational characteristics (natural frequencies and modes) of the coupled vacuum-chamber/girder system, measurement of response amplitudes to forced excitation and ambient floor motion, and calculation of magnification factors associated with the various coupled vibration modes. 1 ref.

  1. Toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences: how task characteristics influence responses

    PubMed Central

    Hafenbrädl, Sebastian; Hoffrage, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In research on Bayesian inferences, the specific tasks, with their narratives and characteristics, are typically seen as exchangeable vehicles that merely transport the structure of the problem to research participants. In the present paper, we explore whether, and possibly how, task characteristics that are usually ignored influence participants’ responses in these tasks. We focus on both quantitative dimensions of the tasks, such as their base rates, hit rates, and false-alarm rates, as well as qualitative characteristics, such as whether the task involves a norm violation or not, whether the stakes are high or low, and whether the focus is on the individual case or on the numbers. Using a data set of 19 different tasks presented to 500 different participants who provided a total of 1,773 responses, we analyze these responses in two ways: first, on the level of the numerical estimates themselves, and second, on the level of various response strategies, Bayesian and non-Bayesian, that might have produced the estimates. We identified various contingencies, and most of the task characteristics had an influence on participants’ responses. Typically, this influence has been stronger when the numerical information in the tasks was presented in terms of probabilities or percentages, compared to natural frequencies – and this effect cannot be fully explained by a higher proportion of Bayesian responses when natural frequencies were used. One characteristic that did not seem to influence participants’ response strategy was the numerical value of the Bayesian solution itself. Our exploratory study is a first step toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences, and highlights new avenues for future research. PMID:26300791

  2. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  3. Energy harvesting from an autoparametric vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhimiao; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-11-01

    The combined control and energy harvesting characteristics of an autoparametric vibration absorber consisting of a base structure subjected to the external force and a cantilever beam with a tip mass are investigated. The piezoelectric sheets are attached to the cantilever beam to convert the vibrations of the base structure into electrical energy. The coupled nonlinear representative model is developed by using the extended Hamiton’s principle. The effects of the electrical load resistance on the frequency and damping ratio of the cantilever beam are analyzed. The impacts of the external force and load resistance on the structural displacements of the base structure and the beam and on the level of harvested energy are determined. The results show that the initial conditions have a significant impact on the system’s response. The relatively high level of energy harvesting is not necessarily accompanied with the minimum displacements of the base structure.

  4. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  5. A Method for Determination of Damping for Edgewise Blade Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, K.; Petersen, J. T.; Nim, E.; Øye, S.; Petersen, B.

    2000-10-01

    Violent edgewise blade vibrations have in recent years been a large problem for some stall-regulated wind turbines. Owing to the complexity of the phenomenon, it has been difficult to predict the risk of these vibrations with aeroelastic load prediction tools. One problem is the choice of parameters in the aeroelastic model, e.g. structural damping and aerodynamic aerofoil characteristics. In many cases a high degree of uncertainty in the predicted response exists and the need for experimental verification methods is obvious. In this work a new method to identify the effective damping for the edgewise blade mode shape for wind turbines has been developed. The method consists of an exciter mechanism which makes it possible to excite the edgewise blade mode shapes from the wind turbine nacelle. Furthermore, the method consists of an analysis method which enables a straightforward determination of the damping. The analysis method is based on a local blade whirl description of the edgewise blade vibrations. The method is verified on a Bonus wind turbine, and for this specific turbine the effective damping for edgewise blade vibrations has been determined. The results support the further development of aeroelastic models and show potential for fine-tuning of parameters of importance for the edgewise blade vibration problem. Furthermore, the method can be used for experimental investigation of the risk of edgewise blade vibrations for a specific turbine.

  6. Vibration modal analysis using all-optical photorefractive processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, T.; Telschow, K.

    1996-12-31

    A new experimental method for vibration modal analysis based on all- optical photorefractive processing is presented. The method utilizes an optical lock-in approach to measure phase variations in light scattered from optically rough, continuously vibrating surfaces. In this four-wave mixing technique, all-optical processing refers to mixing the object beam containing the frequency modulation due to vibration with a single frequency modulated pump beam in the photorefractive medium that processes the modulated signals. This allows for simple detection of the conjugate wavefront image at a CCD. The conjugate intensity is shown to be a function of the first-order ordinary Bessel function and linearly dependent on the vibration displacement induced phase. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the unique capabilities of the optical lock-in vibration detection technique to measure vibration signals with very narrow bandwidth (< 1 Hz) and high displacement sensitivity (sub-Angstrom). This narrow bandwidth detection can be achieved over a wide frequency range from the photorefractive response limit to the reciprocal of the photoinduced carrier recombination time. The technique is applied to determine the modal characteristics of a rigidly clamped circular disc from 10 kHz to 100 kHz.

  7. Female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, are responsive to visual stimuli but unselective of stimulus characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Galante, Holland; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2014-09-15

    The visual ecology of nocturnal anurans is poorly understood, but there is growing evidence that vision plays a role in important behaviors such as mate choice. While several recent studies have demonstrated that females are responsive to visual cues when selecting mates, the forces responsible for these preferences are unknown. We investigated the responsiveness of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to video playbacks of calling conspecific males in which we varied attributes of the vocal sac, a conspicuous visual characteristic of calling males and a target of female choice in other species. Females responded surprisingly strongly to the video playbacks, but did so indiscriminately with respect to variation in vocal sac characteristics. We followed up on these results with a series of additional tests that examined female responses to abstract stimuli. Females continued to respond to such stimuli, leading us to conclude that their behavior was related to a generalized phototactic response. Because of this, we were unable to make conclusions regarding female preferences for vocal sac characteristics. Nonetheless, our results are significant in two respects. First, we illustrate that despite much effort into improving video playback methodologies, challenges remain, and we offer our experimental design as a method to ensure that appropriate conclusions can be drawn from such studies. Second, we argue that the female phototactic response has potentially significant behavioral implications and in general the consequences of anuran visual preferences deserve further investigation. PMID:25013111

  8. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  9. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O₂ in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  11. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  12. Granular metamaterials for vibration mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantzounis, G.; Serra-Garcia, M.; Homma, K.; Mendoza, J. M.; Daraio, C.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic metamaterials that allow low-frequency band gaps are interesting for many practical engineering applications, where vibration control and sound insulation are necessary. In most prior studies, the mechanical response of these structures has been described using linear continuum approximations. In this work, we experimentally and theoretically address the formation of low-frequency band gaps in locally resonant granular crystals, where the dynamics of the system is governed by discrete equations. We investigate the quasi-linear behavior of such structures. The analysis shows that a stopband can be introduced at about one octave lower frequency than in materials without local resonances. Broadband and multi-frequency stopband characteristics can also be achieved by strategically tailoring the non-uniform local resonance parameters.

  13. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuebing, Karla K.; Barth, Amy E.; Trahan, Lisa H.; Reddy, Radhika R.; Miciak, Jeremy; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, "What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?" Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from…

  14. Relationships of Examinee Pair Characteristics and Item Response Similarity. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Detecting unusual similarity in the item responses of a pair of examinees usually conditions on the pair's overall test performance (e.g., raw scores). Doing this, however, often requires assumptions about the invariance of other examinee pair characteristics. In this study, we examined the appropriateness of such assumptions about selected…

  15. The Association between SAT Prompt Characteristics, Response Features, and Essay Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Deng, Hui; Shaw, Emily J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of prompt characteristics and response features with essay scores on the SAT Reasoning Test. A sample of essays was coded on a variety of features regarding their length and content. Analyses included descriptive statistics and computation of effect sizes, correlations between essay features and scores, and…

  16. Preference for Anonymous Classroom Participation: Linking Student Characteristics and Reactions to Electronic Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Alyson; Hill, N. Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Electronic response systems (ERS) are a means to foster class participation by students who are reluctant to participate in class. In this study, we identify individual characteristics that relate to students' preference for anonymous classroom participation, and we also examine the extent to which preference for anonymity is related to their…

  17. Ultrasonic Rotary Motors Using Complex Transverse and Torsional Vibration Rods and Multiple Longitudinal Vibration Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Kihara, Masaki; Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Keisuke; Tsujino, Jiromaru

    2005-06-01

    The vibration and load characteristics of ultrasonic motors having (a) a torsional vibration cylinder with three bolt-clamped Langevin piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) longitudinal vibration transducers (BLTs) installed in the tangential direction and (b) a longitudinal vibration disk with three BLT transducers installed around a circular disk were studied. The center rod vibrates longitudinally and affects the load characteristics of the ultrasonic motor. Vibration distributions along a center rod were measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. Revolution, electric input power, mechanical output power and efficiency were measured under various rotating torques. Maximum torque, revolution and efficiency of the ultrasonic motor with (a) a torsional vibration cylinder (a) were 0.75 Nm, 205 rpm and 1.68%, respectively, and (b) 0.32 Nm, 84 rpm and 1.68%, respectively, with a circular longitudinal vibration disk.

  18. Thermoelastic vibration test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Michael W.; Snyder, H. Todd

    1991-01-01

    The structural integrity of proposed high speed aircraft can be seriously affected by the extremely high surface temperatures and large temperature gradients throughout the vehicle's structure. Variations in the structure's elastic characteristics as a result of thermal effects can be observed by changes in vibration frequency, damping, and mode shape. Analysis codes that predict these changes must be correlated and verified with experimental data. The experimental modal test techniques and procedures used to conduct uniform, nonuniform, and transient thermoelastic vibration tests are presented. Experimental setup and elevated temperature instrumentation considerations are also discussed. Modal data for a 12 by 50 inch aluminum plate heated to a temperature of 475 F are presented. These data show the effect of heat on the plate's modal characteristics. The results indicated that frequency decreased, damping increased, and mode shape remained unchanged as the temperature of the plate was increased.

  19. An experimental investigation of dual-resonant and non-resonant responses for vortex-induced vibration of a long slender cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XiaoDong; Ge, Fei; Hong, YouShi

    2014-01-01

    Experimental results of the dual-resonant and non-resonant responses are presented for vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a long slender cylinder. The cylinder has a diameter of 10mm and a length of 3.31 m, giving an aspect ratio of 331. The cylinder was towed by a carriage with the velocity up to 1.5 m/s, with the Reynolds number varying from 2500 to 38000. Three different weights were used to provide the initial tension. Dual resonance means that resonance occurs simultaneously in both the cross-flow (CF) and in-line (IL) directions. The experiments were conducted in two stages. At the first stage, dual-resonant dynamic features of the cylinder subjected to vortex-induced excitation were investigated. The features of CF and IL vibration amplitude, motion orbits, phase angle differences, dominant frequencies and mode order numbers are presented. At the second stage of the experiments, particular emphasis was placed on non-resonant dynamic features. The variation of multi-mode modal displacement amplitudes was investigated in detail.

  20. Experimental verificatio of load resistance switching for global stabilization of high-energy response of a nonlinear wideband electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Masuda, A.; Sanada, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental verification of a self-excitation control of a resonance- type vibration energy harvester with a Duffing-type nonlinearity which is designed to perform effectively in a wide frequency range. For the conventional linear vibration energy harvester, the performance of the power generation at the resonance frequency and the bandwidth of the resonance peak are trade-off. The resonance frequency band can be expanded by introducing a Duffing-type nonlinear oscillator in order to enable the harvester to generate larger electric power in a wider frequency range. However, since such nonlinear oscillator can have multiple stable steady-state solutions in the resonance band, it is difficult for the nonlinear harvester to maintain the high performance of the power generation constantly. The principle of self-excitation and entrainment has been utilized to provide the global stability to the highest-energy solution by destabilizing other unexpected lower-energy solutions by introducing a switching circuit of the load resistance between positive and the negative values depending on the response amplitude of the oscillator. It has been experimentally validated that this control law imparts the self-excitation capability to the oscillator to show an entrainment into the highest-energy solution.

  1. Frequency-response method for determination of dynamic stability characteristics of airplanes with automatic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Harry

    1947-01-01

    A frequency-response method for determining the critical control-gearing and hunting oscillations of airplanes with automatic pilots is presented. The method is graphical and has several advantages over the standard numerical procedure based on Routh's discriminant. The chief advantage of the method is that direct use can be made of the measured response characteristics of the automatic pilot. This feature is especially useful in determining the existence, amplitude, and frequency of the hunting oscillations that may be present when the automatic pilot has nonlinear dynamic characteristics. Several examples are worked out to illustrate the application of the frequency-response method in determining the effect of automatic-pilot lag or lead on critical control gearing and in determining the amplitude and frequency hunting. It is shown that the method may be applied to the case of a control geared to airplane motions about two axes.

  2. Vibrational energy prediction of the response of the vulcain rocket engine using a mixed FET/SEA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, G.

    The VULCAIN engine of the central core of Ariane 5, the Europe's launch vehicle of the next generation, is submitted to a high external acoustic pressure field, produced by the two solid propellant boosters during the lift-off phase. To investigate the distribution of the resulting vibrational energy throughout the different components, a predictive Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model was carried out, due to the high frequency signature of the lift-off noise. The first phase of the work was an experimental analysis of the VULCAIN's dynamical behavior under external sound field excitation, using energy techniques (reverse SEA). The main conclusion was an effective weak coupling between components which was encouraging for going on through the next phase the development of the theoretical SEA model.

  3. Vibration in The Ultrasonic Machining System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Chen, Zhigang; Zhong, Xinrong

    The rotary ultrasonic machining system is the vibration system, using the characteristics of the ultrasonic resonance. Based on the ultrasonic vibration model, the dynamic characteristics of the ultrasonic machining system are analyzed, and using the wave equations, the dynamic characteristics of the horn with the exponential transition are analyzed. Based on FEM, the dynamic characteristics of the horn with the exponential transition in the rotary ultrasonic machining system are analyzed.

  4. Psychological and physiological responses during an exam and their relation to personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Spangler, G

    1997-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare emotional and physiological responses to real and control examinations and to assess their relation to personality characteristics. Emotional responses were assessed by state anxiety and perceived stress. The assessment of physiological responses included the activity of the cardiac system (heart periods, vagal tone), the adrenocortical system (cortisol) and the immune system (immune globulin A, sIgA). Emotional and physiological responses of 23 students (12 males, 11 females) were assessed during an oral exam at the end of a basic course in psychology which was a prerequisite for the students' final exams. For the control condition physiological responses were assessed one week before the examination during a memory test. The findings of the study demonstrate different emotional and physiological response patterns to examinations as compared to the control condition. Heightened anxiety was observed only before the exam. Whereas within-situation physiological responses (higher heart periods, cortisol, and sIgA; lower vagal tone) were observed both under the exam and control condition, responses to exam condition indicated pre-exam anticipatory activation and post-exam restricted recovery responses. With regard to personality characteristics subjects with high ego-resiliency showed more flexible adaptation than subjects with low ego-resiliency both on the emotional level (anxiety down-regulation after exam) and on the physiological level (situation-specific responses, quick recovery). Subjects with high ego-control exhibited a lower physiological reactivity under both conditions, i.e. they seemed to maintain longer their control also on a physiological level independent of the type of situation. PMID:9364621

  5. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  6. Vibration-based damage detection algorithm for WTT structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Choi, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Joo-Young; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the integrity of a wind turbine tower (WTT) structure is nondestructively estimated using its vibration responses. Firstly, a damage detection algorithm using changes in modal characteristics to predict damage locations and severities in structures is outlined. Secondly, a finite element (FE) model based on a real WTT structure is established by using a commercial software, Midas FEA. Thirdly, forced vibration tests are performed on the FE model of the WTT structure under various damage scenarios. The changes in modal parameters such as natural frequencies and mode shapes are examined for damage monitoring in the structure. Finally, the feasibility of the vibration-based damage detection method is numerically verified by predicting locations and severities of the damage in the FE model of the WTT structure.

  7. Health Systems' Responsiveness and Its Characteristics: A Cross-Country Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robone, Silvana; Rice, Nigel; Smith, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Responsiveness has been identified as one of the intrinsic goals of health care systems. Little is known, however, about its determinants. Our objective is to investigate the potential country-level drivers of health system responsiveness. Data Source Data on responsiveness are taken from the World Health Survey. Information on country-level characteristics is obtained from a variety of sources including the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). Study Design A two-step procedure. First, using survey data we derive a country-level measure of system responsiveness purged of differences in individual reporting behavior. Secondly, we run cross-sectional country-level regressions of responsiveness on potential drivers. Principal Findings Health care expenditures per capita are positively associated with responsiveness, after controlling for the influence of potential confounding factors. Aspects of responsiveness are also associated with public sector spending (negatively) and educational development (positively). Conclusions From a policy perspective, improvements in responsiveness may require higher spending levels. The expansion of nonpublic sector provision, perhaps in the form of increased patient choice, may also serve to improve responsiveness. However, these inferences are tentative and require further study. PMID:21762144

  8. Fuel assembly self-excited vibration and test methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, R.Y.; Broach, K. D.; McEvoy, J. J.

    2004-07-01

    PWR fuel assemblies normally experience low amplitude, random vibration under normal reactor flow conditions. This normal fuel assembly vibration has almost no impact on grid-rod fretting wear. However, some fuel assembly designs experience a high resonant fuel assembly vibration under normal axial flow conditions. This anomalous fuel assembly vibration is defined as fuel assembly self-excitation vibration (FASE), because the assembly vibrates resonantly without any external periodic excitation force. Fuel assembly self-excitation vibration can cause severe grid-rod fretting if the assembly operates at the flow rate, which causes high fuel assembly vibration. This paper will describe the characteristics of fuel assembly self-excitation vibration and the test methodology to identify the fuel assembly vibration. Several fuel assembly designs are compared under standard test conditions. The causes for the fuel assembly self-excitation vibration are analyzed and discussed. The test acceptance criteria are defined for newly developed PWR fuel assemblies. (authors)

  9. On the separation of internal and boundary damage in slender bars using longitudinal vibration frequencies and equivalent linearization of damaged bolted joint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argatov, Ivan; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-06-01

    The problem of detecting localized large-scale internal damage in structures with imperfect bolted joints is considered. The proposed damage detection strategy utilizes the structural damping and an equivalent linearization of the bolted lap joint response to separate the combined boundary damage from localized large-scale internal damage. The frequencies are found approximately using asymptotic analysis and a perturbation technique. The proposed approach is illustrated on an example of longitudinal vibrations in a slender elastic bar with both ends clamped by bolted lap joints with different levels of damage. It is found that while the proposed method allows for the estimation of internal damage severity once the crack location is known, it gives multiple possible crack locations so that other methods (e.g., mode shapes) are required to obtain a unique crack location.

  10. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part I: Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    An ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be applied to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings by using both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting severaladditional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimization process. This paper, Part I, concerns derivation of a mathematical model of the plate with attached elements in the function of their shape and placement. The model is validated by means of simulations and laboratory experiments, and compared with models known from the literature. This paper is followed by a companion paper, Part II, where the optimization process is described. It includes arrangement of passive elements as well as actuators and sensors to improve controllability and observability measures, if active control is concerned.

  11. Standard infralow-frequency vibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Chistyakov, V.A.; Korytko, E.P.; Pevzner, B.N.; Prosikov, A.A.

    1985-06-01

    Precision test systems working in the range 0.01-20 Hz are required to determine the metrological characteristics of seismic equipment used in seismic observations and in research on the earth's physical properties. An experimental seismometric test system (STS) has been built to produce sinusoidal oscillations in the horizontal plane in the range 0.01-20 Hz with amplitudes of 0.1-20 mm for instruments of mass up to 25 kg. The apparatus contains a computer and the programmable GZ-110 oscillator, which provide good scope for automating the processing and specifying the working modes in checking equipment with high accuracy and throughput. The STS enables one to record the frequency response, the phase response, and the amplitude characteristics for means of measuring the parameters of infralow-frequency vibrations, as well as to determine the conversion factors for seismic detectors and the metrological parameters of instruments.

  12. Drillstring vibrations create crooked holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dareing, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Boreholes in hard formations sometimes deviate when the drillstring runs rough or the kelly bounces severely. This article explains how drillstring vibrations produce crooked holes in hard formations. It shows how to reduce dog-leg severity through vibration control. Dog-legs are known to produce cyclic bending-type fatigue loads in drill pipe and collars. Longitudinal and torsional vibrational stresses are additive to rotational bending and further reduce the life of drillstring tubulars. Vibration-induced dog-legs are therefore more damaging to drillstrings than other dog-leg producing mechanisms because total cyclic fatigue loading is the combined effect of bending stress reversal due to rotation plus vibrational stress variations. The vibration-induced dog-leg concept is based on overall vibration response of drillstrings, resultant dynamic displacements of roller cone drill bits, and corresponding dynamic forces between bit and formation. The concept explains how dynamic forces generated by roller cone rock bits might produce helical bore holes in hard homogeneous formations. Dog-legs in hard formations may be due in part to drillstring vibrations. The wellbore deviation concept relates only to roller cone rock bits and is based on dynamically reorienting three-lobed formation pattern hammered out by bottomhole assembly resonance. Analytical studies are needed to determine the effect of bit force impact point location on chip formation and rock removal. Field studies of various bottom hole assemblies operating at critical rotary speeds coupled with directional surveys are needed to test the validity of this theory.

  13. Variational study on the vibrational level structure and vibrational level mixing of highly vibrationally excited S₀ D₂CO.

    PubMed

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C; Rashev, Vladimir

    2012-11-01

    We perform converged high precision variational calculations to determine the frequencies of a large number of vibrational levels in S(0) D(2)CO, extending from low to very high excess vibrational energies. For the calculations we use our specific vibrational method (recently employed for studies on H(2)CO), consisting of a combination of a search/selection algorithm and a Lanczos iteration procedure. Using the same method we perform large scale converged calculations on the vibrational level spectral structure and fragmentation at selected highly excited overtone states, up to excess vibrational energies of ∼17,000 cm(-1), in order to study the characteristics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR), vibrational level density and mode selectivity. PMID:22750345

  14. Specified Step Settling Control Based Initial Value Compensation for Slow Settling Response Considering Rolling Friction Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Makoto

    This paper presents a novel initial value compensation (IVC) method based on rolling friction characteristics for the precise positioning of linear motor-driven table systems. Rolling friction in mechanism behaves as a nonlinear elastic element in the micro displacement region, and deteriorates the positioning performance with a slow settling response. In order to improve the positioning performance, the overshoot response, which results in the slow settling response, should be suppressed during the positioning. In this study, therefore, IVC based on the specified step settling control framework is employed to achieve the required settling performance without the slow settling response. The effectiveness of the proposed IVC has been verified by experiments performed using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  15. Response Characteristics of Bisphenols on a Metal-Organic Framework-Based Tyrosinase Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianbo; Wang, Xue; Wu, Lidong; Wu, Lingxia; Dhanjai; Fu, Lei; Gao, Yuan; Chen, Jiping

    2016-06-29

    Bisphenols (BPs), which have more than ten kinds of structural analogues, are emerging as the most important endocrine disrupting chemicals that adversely affect human health and aquatic life. A tyrosinase nanosensor based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and chitosan was developed to investigate the electrochemical response characteristics and mechanisms of nine kinds of BPs for the first time. The developed tyrosinase nanosensor showed a sensitive response to bisphenol A, bisphenol F, bisphenol E, bisphenol B, and bisphenol Z, and the responsive sensitivities were highly dependent on their respective log Kow values. However, the nanosensor showed no response to bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol AP (BPAP), bisphenol AF (BPAF), or tetrabromobisphenol A, although BPS, BPAP, and BPAF have structures similar to those of the responsive BPs. The obtained results reveal that the electrochemical response of different BPs is affected not only by the molecular structure, especially the available ortho positions of phenolic hydroxyl groups, but also by the substituent group properties (electron acceptor or electron donor) on the bisphenol framework. The electronic cloud distribution of the phenolic hydroxyl groups, which is affected by the substituent group, determines whether the available ortho positions of phenolic hydroxyl groups can be oxidized by the tyrosinase biosensor. These response mechanisms are very significant as they can be used for predicting the response characteristics of many BPs and their various derivatives and metabolites on biosensors. The unexpected anti-interference ability of the biosensor to nine heavy metal ions was also discovered and discussed. The MOF-chitosan nanocomposite proves to be a promising sensing platform for the construction of diverse biosensors for selective detection of targets even in the presence of a high concentration of heavy metal ions. PMID:27281291

  16. Neural heterogeneities determine response characteristics to second-, but not first-order stimulus features.

    PubMed

    Metzen, Michael G; Chacron, Maurice J

    2015-02-18

    Neural heterogeneities are seen ubiquitously, but how they determine neural response properties remains unclear. Here we show that heterogeneities can either strongly, or not at all, influence neural responses to a given stimulus feature. Specifically, we recorded from peripheral electroreceptor neurons, which display strong heterogeneities in their resting discharge activity, in response to naturalistic stimuli consisting of a fast time-varying waveform (i.e., first-order) whose amplitude (i.e., second-order or envelope) varied slowly in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Although electroreceptors displayed relatively homogeneous responses to first-order stimulus features, further analysis revealed two subpopulations with similar sensitivities that were excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope, respectively, for stimuli whose frequency content spanned the natural range. We further found that a linear-nonlinear cascade model incorporating the known linear response characteristics to first-order features and a static nonlinearity accurately reproduced experimentally observed responses to both first- and second-order features for all stimuli tested. Importantly, this model correctly predicted that the response magnitude is independent of either the stimulus waveform's or the envelope's frequency content. Further analysis of our model led to the surprising prediction that the mean discharge activity can be used to determine whether a given neuron is excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope. This prediction was validated by our experimental data. Thus, our results provide key insight as to how neural heterogeneities can determine response characteristics to some, but not other, behaviorally relevant stimulus features. PMID:25698748

  17. Ride quality criteria. [transportation system interior and passenger response to environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ride quality refers to the interior or passenger environment of a transportation system as well as the passenger response to the environment. Ride quality factors are illustrated with the aid of a diagram presenting inputs to vehicle, the vehicle transfer function, the ride environment, the passenger response function, and the passenger ride response. The reported investigation considers the ride environment as measured on a variety of air and surface vehicles, the passenger response to the environment as determined from laboratory and field surveys, and criteria/standards for vibration, noise, and combined stimuli. Attention is given to the vertical vibration characteristics in cruise for aircraft and automobile, the aircraft vibration levels for various operating regimes, comparative noise levels during cruise, the discomfort level for a 9 Hz sinusoidal vibration, equal discomfort contours for vertical vibration, subjective response to noise in a speech situation, and noise and vibration levels for constant discomfort contours.

  18. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  19. Acoustic vibration induced high electromagnetic responses of Fe3O4 nano-hollow spheres in the THz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Rupali; Sarkar, Debasish; Pal, Monalisa; Serite, Kazunori; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Mandal, Kalyan

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we investigate the origin of enhanced absorption and complex conductivity of magnetite (Fe3O4) nano-hollow spheres (NHSs) in contrast to its nanoparticles (NPs) configuration in the frequency range 0.4-2.0 THz. The maximum absorption for NHSs and NPs of the same average diameter (~100 nm) are found to be 246.27 and 48.35 cm-1 at 1.8 THz, respectively. A detailed study suggests that the multiple resonance peaks in the absorption spectra are due to low frequency acoustic vibrational phonon modes of Fe3O4 nanostructures. Moreover, we demonstrate that the magnitude of total absorption can be tailored by varying the shell thickness of NHSs. It is found to increase with increasing shell thickness, and attain a maximum value of 498.5 cm-1 for the NHSs of average diameter 350 nm at 1.8 THz. The invariance of frequency dependent magnetic permeability points out that the absorption is basically due to dielectric loss instead of magnetic loss. The enhanced THz conductivity of Fe3O4 NHSs, as compared to NPs is described in light of thermally activated polaronic hopping which is found to increase with increasing THz absorption. Finally, the size dependent THz conductivity of NHSs confirms its sole dependence on the magnitude of THz absorptivity.

  20. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  1. Meta-analysis of digital game and study characteristics eliciting physiological stress responses.

    PubMed

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert-Jan; Van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Digital games have been used as stressors in a range of disciplines for decades. Nonetheless, the underlying characteristics of these stressors and the study in which the stressor was applied are generally not recognized for their moderating effect on the measured physiological stress responses. We have therefore conducted a meta-analysis that analyzes the effects of characteristics of digital game stressors and study design on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in studies carried out from 1976 to 2012. In order to assess the differing quality between study designs, a new scale is developed and presented, coined reliability of effect size. The results show specific and consistent moderating functions of both game and study characteristics, on average accounting for around 43%, and in certain cases up to 57% of the variance found in physiological stress responses. Possible cognitive and physiological processes underlying these moderating functions are discussed, and a new model integrating these processes with the moderating functions is presented. These findings indicate that a digital game stressor does not act as a stressor by virtue of being a game, but rather derives its stressor function from its characteristics and the methodology in which it is used. This finding, together with the size of the associated moderations, indicates the need for a standardization of digital game stressors. PMID:25950613

  2. Application of the Method of Stein and Sanders to the Calculation of Vibration Characteristics of a 45 deg Delta-Wing Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Warner, Paul G., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Generalized influence coefficients are calculated by the method of NACA TN 3640 for a large-scale, built-up, 450 delta-wing specimen. These are used together with appropriate generalized masses to obtain the natural modes and frequencies in symmetric and antisymmetric free-free vibration. The resulting frequencies are compared with those obtained experimentally and are found to be consistently high. Possible sources of the disparities are discussed.

  3. Investigation of torsional potentials, molecular structure, vibrational properties, molecular characteristics and NBO analysis of some bipyridines using experimental and theoretical tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashanth, J.; Reddy, B. Venkatram; Rao, G. Ramana

    2016-08-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of 2,2‧-bipyridine (2BPE); 4,4‧-bipyridine (4BPE); and 2,4‧-bipyridine (24BPE) were measured in the range 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. Torsional potentials were evaluated at various angles of rotation around the C-C inter-ring bond for the three molecules in order to arrive at the molecular conformation of lowest energy. This conformation was further optimized to get ground state geometry. Vibrational frequencies along with infrared and Raman intensities were computed. In the above calculations, DFT employing B3LYP functional with 6311++G(d,p) basis set was used. The rms error between observed and calculated frequencies was 10.0, 10.9 and 10.2 cm-1 for 2BPE, 4BPE and 24BPE, respectively. A 54-parameter modified valence force field was derived by solving inverse vibrational problem using Wilson's GF matrix method. The force constants were refined using 117 experimental frequencies of the three molecules in overlay least-squares technique. The average error between observed and computed frequencies was 12.44 cm-1. PED and eigen vectors calculated in the process were used to make unambiguous vibrational assignments of all the fundamental vibrations. The values of dipole moment, polarizability and hyperpolarizability were computed to determine the NLO behaviour of these molecules. The HOMO and LUMO energies, thermodynamic parameters and molecular electrostatic surface potentials (MESP) were also evaluated. Stability of the molecules arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  4. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  5. Glycemic responses and sensory characteristics of whole yellow pea flour added to novel functional foods.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Kassis, Amira N; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding regarding postprandial glycemic responses to foods containing whole yellow-pea flour (WYPF) remains unknown. This, alongside concerns that WYPF possesses unfavorable sensory characteristics has limited the incorporation of WYPF into new functional food products as a healthy novel ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate how WYPF modulates postprandial glycemic responses as well as sensory characteristics in novel foods. In a single-blind crossover trial, the present study assessed postprandial glycemic responses of banana bread, biscotti, and spaghetti containing either WYPF or whole wheat flour (WWF). Boiled yellow peas (BYP) and white bread (WB) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. On day 1, subjects evaluated appearance, taste, texture, smell as well as overall acceptance of each WYPF and WWF food on a 5-point hedonic scale. WYPF banana bread (97.9 +/- 17.8 mmol x min/L) and biscotti (83 +/- 13 mmol x min/L), as well as BYP (112.3 +/- 19.9 mmol x min/L), reduced (P < 0.05) glycemic responses compared to WB (218.1 +/- 29.5 mmol x min/L). The glycemic response of WYPF pasta (160.7 +/- 19.4 mmol x min/L) was comparable to WB. WYPF biscotti produced a lower (P = 0.019) postprandial glycemic response compared to WWF biscotti (117.2 +/- 13.1 mmol x min/L). Hedonic responses between corresponding foods were similar except for the WYPF pasta (2.9 +/- 0.9) which possessed a lower sensory score (P = 0.02) for smell compared to WWF pasta (3.6 +/- 1). WYPF can be used to produce low-glycemic functional foods possessing sensory attributes that are comparable to identical food products containing WWF. PMID:20492127

  6. Teacher Characteristics Influence Responsiveness to a Course and a Consultancy Focused on Effective Teacher-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Bridget; Hamre, Bridget; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Pianta, Robert; Downer, Jason; Burchinal, Margaret; Howes, Carollee

    2012-01-01

    In the current study characteristics of the teacher and classroom that influence teacher responsiveness to the course or consultancy are explored. If classroom quality or characteristics of teachers, such as anxiety levels or efficacy in teaching prior to intervention participation are predictive of responsiveness, then future programs will be…

  7. Vibration analysis to improve reliability and reduce failure; Proceedings of the Design Automation Conference, Cincinnati, OH, September 10-13, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Niskode, P.M.; Doepker, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are: turbomachinery tip rubs and interactive casting resonances; the transverse vibrational characteristics of an externally damaged pipe and performance of vibration monitoring for the prevention of gas turbine airfoil failures. Consideration is also given to: velocity response analysis of a spherical roller bearing; vibration monitoring of large pumps via a remote satellite stations; dynamic edge strain prediction in stiffened honeycomb panels; and fault-diagnosis for turbo-machines by means of vibration monitoring. Additional topics discussed include: early detection and diagnosis of faults rolling element bearings; spectral analysis of damped vibration by means of a modified version of the Prony method and guidelines for forced vibration in machine tools for use in protective maintenance and analysis.

  8. Fear responses and postmortem muscle characteristics of turkeys of two genetic lines.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M A; Lee, H C; Kang, I; Swanson, J C

    2015-09-01

    Commercial turkey production has increased greatly in recent decades. Along with increased production, problems with turkey meat quality have also increased. Research with other species has demonstrated that differences in meat quality exist among pigs and cattle differing in characteristics such as fearfulness. However, associations between fear responses and postmortem (PM) muscle characteristics related to the meat quality of turkeys have not been examined. This study evaluated the test-retest repeatability of responses of male commercial (COMM) and randombred (RB) turkeys in an open field (OF) test, which is used to assess fear and activity levels of poultry. Another objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between behavioral OF responses and PM breast muscle characteristics (pH and R-value) that are related to meat quality. Thirdly, this study evaluated differences in pH and R-value between the turkey lines. Male COMM and RB turkeys were each housed in groups in 4 pens. Turkeys were individually tested in an OF (2.74×2.74 m, divided into 81 squares) at 1, 4, and 11 wk (COMM N=27; RB N=33). Turkeys were then grouped into clusters based on a cluster analysis of OF behavior. Turkeys were processed and meat quality characteristics were evaluated at 15-17 wk for COMM and 20-21 wk for RB turkeys. Results were analyzed using a mixed model (SAS 9.4). Breast muscle pH and R-value did not differ between genetic lines, and there were no differences in pH and R-value among clusters within genetic lines. These findings suggest that OF responses measured during rearing are not related to PM breast muscle pH and R-value, which ultimately affect meat quality. Further research is needed to assess whether other types of fear responses are associated with meat quality and whether differences in R-value between genetic lines are associated with differences in other meat quality characteristics. PMID:26195807

  9. Helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and the design of a minimum vibration blade based upon this understanding are examined. Various design approaches are examined for a 4 bladed articulated rotor operating at a high speed flight condition. Blade modal shaping, frequency placement, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and intermodal cancellation are investigated to systematically identify and evaluate blade design parameters that influence blade airloads, blade modal response, hub loads, and fuselage vibration. The relative contributions of the various components of blade force excitation and response to the vibratory hub loads transmitted to the fuselage are determined in order to isolate primary candidates for vibration alleviation. A blade design is achieved which reduces the predicted fuselage vibration from the baseline blade by approximately one half. Blade designs are developed that offer significant reductions in vibration (and fatigue stresses) without resorting to special vibration alleviation devices, radical blade geometries, or weight penalties.

  10. Response characteristics of laser diffraction particle size analyzers - Optical sample volume extent and lens effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The response characteristics of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments were studied theoretically and experimentally. In particular, the extent of optical sample volume and the effects of receiving lens properties were investigated in detail. The experimental work was performed with a particle size analyzer using a calibration reticle containing a two-dimensional array of opaque circular disks on a glass substrate. The calibration slide simulated the forward-scattering characteristics of a Rosin-Rammler droplet size distribution. The reticle was analyzed with collection lenses of 63 mm, 100 mm, and 300 mm focal lengths using scattering inversion software that determined best-fit Rosin-Rammler size distribution parameters. The data differed from the predicted response for the reticle by about 10 percent. A set of calibration factor for the detector elements was determined that corrected for the nonideal response of the instrument. The response of the instrument was also measured as a function of reticle position, and the results confirmed a theoretical optical sample volume model presented here.

  11. Pharmacotherapy response and regional cerebral blood flow characteristics in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the correlation between the pharmacotherapy response and the characteristics of the pre-treatment regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods Single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) was used to determine the pre-treatment rCBF in 30 OCD patients and 30 normal controls. Based on their clinical remission response, the subjects were divided into two groups: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and SSRIs plus quetiapine. The subjects with clinical remission response were identified after treatment for a period of 24 weeks, and the rCBF imaging data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software with two-sample Z-tests. Results Nineteen OCD patients who achieved clinical remission were included in the study. Increased rCBF in forebrain regions, including the frontal lobe, cingulate gyrus, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia, was found in 11 responders to SSRIs compared to normal control patients. The eight SSRI plus quetiapine responders exhibited a decrease in rCBF within posterior brain regions, including the parietal lobe, cerebellar vermis, and occipital lobe, and an increase in rCBF in the frontal lobe, thalamus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum tonsil compared to normal control patients. Conclusions The characteristics of increased rCBF in forebrain regions and decreased rCBF in posterior brain regions before treatment of OCD patients was a potentially predictor of treatment response to guide treatment options. PMID:23898909

  12. Evaluation of Vibration Response Imaging (VRI) Technique and Difference in VRI Indices Among Non-Smokers, Active Smokers, and Passive Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongying; Chen, Jichao; Cao, Jinying; Mu, Lan; Hu, Zhenyu; He, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Vibration response imaging (VRI) is a new technology for lung imaging. Active smokers and non-smokers show differences in VRI findings, but no data are available for passive smokers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of VRI and to assess the differences in VRI findings among non-smokers, active smokers, and passive smokers. Material/Methods Healthy subjects (n=165: 63 non-smokers, 56 active smokers, and 46 passive smokers) with normal lung function were enrolled. Medical history, physical examination, lung function test, and VRI were performed for all subjects. Correlation between smoking index and VRI scores (VRIS) were performed. Results VRI images showed progressive and regressive stages representing the inspiratory and expiratory phases bilaterally in a vertical and synchronized manner in non-smokers. Vibration energy curves with low expiratory phase and plateau were present in 6.35% and 3.17%, respectively, of healthy non-smokers, 41.07% and 28.60% of smokers, and 39.13% and 30.43% of passive smokers, respectively. The massive energy peak in the non-smokers, smokers, and passive-smokers was 1.77±0.27, 1.57±0.29, and 1.66±0.33, respectively (all P<0.001). A weak but positive correlation was observed between VRIS and smoking index. Conclusions VRI can intuitively show the differences between non-smokers and smokers. VRI revealed that passive smoking can also harm the lungs. VRI could be used to visually persuade smokers to give up smoking. PMID:26212715

  13. Free Vibration of Size-Dependent Functionally Graded Microbeams Based on the Strain Gradient Reddy Beam Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Gholami, R.; Sahmani, S.

    2014-09-01

    The microscale vibration characteristics of microbeams made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) are investigated based on the strain gradient Reddy beam theory capable of capturing the size effect. The non-classical governing differential equations, together with the corresponding boundary conditions, are obtained using Hamilton's principle. Then, the free vibration problem of simply supported FGM microbeams is solved using the Navier solution. The natural frequencies of FGM microbeams are calculated corresponding to a wide range of dimensionless length scale parameters, material property gradient indices, and aspect ratios to illustrate the influences of size effect on the vibrational response of FGM microbeams.

  14. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  15. Ag85A DNA Vaccine Delivery by Nanoparticles: Influence of the Formulation Characteristics on Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Poecheim, Johanna; Barnier-Quer, Christophe; Collin, Nicolas; Borchard, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    The influence of DNA vaccine formulations on immune responses in combination with adjuvants was investigated with the aim to increase cell-mediated immunity against plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85A. Different ratios of pDNA with cationic trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles were characterized for their morphology and physicochemical characteristics (size, zeta potential, loading efficiency and pDNA release profile) applied in vitro for cellular uptake studies and in vivo, to determine the dose-dependent effects of pDNA on immune responses. A selected pDNA/TMC nanoparticle formulation was optimized by the incorporation of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) as an immunostimulatory agent. Cellular uptake investigations in vitro showed saturation to a maximum level upon the increase in the pDNA/TMC nanoparticle ratio, correlating with increasing Th1-related antibody responses up to a definite pDNA dose applied. Moreover, TMC nanoparticles induced clear polarization towards a Th1 response, indicated by IgG2c/IgG1 ratios above unity and enhanced numbers of antigen-specific IFN-γ producing T-cells in the spleen. Remarkably, the incorporation of MDP in TMC nanoparticles provoked a significant additional increase in T-cell-mediated responses induced by pDNA. In conclusion, pDNA-loaded TMC nanoparticles are capable of provoking strong Th1-type cellular and humoral immune responses, with the potential to be further optimized by the incorporation of MDP. PMID:27626449

  16. Response characteristics of a dual transcutaneous oxygen/carbon dioxide monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kesten, S; Chapman, K R; Rebuck, A S

    1991-05-01

    We tested the response characteristics of a dual transcutaneous (tc) PO2/PCO2 monitoring system in healthy subjects who breathed various gas mixtures, and we compared steady-state tc readings to simultaneous arterial blood gas analysis in 20 stable respiratory outpatients. The electrodes were simple to apply, required very little skin preparation, and had trivial signal drift. In healthy subjects, tcPCO2 lag time during CO2 rebreathing was 16.8 seconds, with a 90 percent response time of 77.9 seconds after CO2 breathing was discontinued. The 90 percent response times of the O2 electrode when subjects breathed a hypoxic mixture was 257 seconds after a lag of 31 seconds. When inhaled gas mixtures were changed from hypoxia to room air, the lag time was shorter (12.5 seconds), but 90 percent response time exceeded 5 minutes. In stable patients with respiratory disease, tcPCO2 and tcPO2 were linearly related to PaCO2 (range, 19 to 53 mm Hg) and PaO2 (range, 45 to 99 mm Hg), respectively (tcPCO2 = 1.4 PaCO2-9.44, with r = 0.90 and SEE = 5.35 mm Hg; tcPO2 = 0.56 PaO2 + 20.4, with r = 0.53 and SEE = 11.7 mm Hg). We conclude that the response of the dual transcutaneous monitoring system is more rapid for the CO2 than the O2 electrode and may be rapid enough to be useful in some clinical settings; however, the O2 system fails to offer the response characteristics and accuracy that would allow it to be substituted for arterial gas tensions in unstable clinical situations. PMID:2019180

  17. Food vibrations: Asian spice sets lips trembling

    PubMed Central

    Hagura, Nobuhiro; Barber, Harry; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Szechuan pepper, a widely used ingredient in the cuisine of many Asian countries, is known for the tingling sensation it induces on the tongue and lips. While the molecular mechanism by which Szechuan pepper activates tactile afferent fibres has been clarified, the tingling sensation itself has been less studied, and it remains unclear which fibres are responsible. We investigated the somatosensory perception of tingling in humans to identify the characteristic temporal frequency and compare this to the established selectivity of tactile afferents. Szechuan pepper was applied to the lower lip of participants. Participants judged the frequency of the tingling sensation on the lips by comparing this with the frequencies of mechanical vibrations applied to their right index finger. The perceived frequency of the tingling was consistently at around 50 Hz, corresponding to the range of tactile RA1 afferent fibres. Furthermore, adaptation of the RA1 channel by prolonged mechanical vibration reliably reduced the tingling frequency induced by Szechuan pepper, confirming that the frequency-specific tactile channel is shared between Szechuan pepper and mechanical vibration. Combining information about molecular reactions at peripheral receptors with quantitative psychophysical measurement may provide a unique method for characterizing unusual experiences by decomposing them into identifiable minimal units of sensation. PMID:24026819

  18. A method of investigating the phase response characteristic of the ionospheric scattering communications channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakovets, A. F.

    1972-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the phase difference fluctuations between vibrations at different frequencies that result from scattering properties of the medium. The measurement equipment is described, along with an ideal communication channel.

  19. Inaudible temporomandibular joint vibrations.

    PubMed

    Widmalm, Sven E; Bae, Hanna E K; Djurdjanovic, Dragan; McKay, Duane C

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to test the hypothesis that inaudible vibrations with significant amounts of energy increasing during jaw movements can be recorded in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) area. Twenty one subjects, who could perform wide opening movements without feeling discomfort, 12 with and 9 without TMJ sounds audible at conventional auscultation with a stethoscope, were included. Recordings were made during opening-closing, 2/s without tooth contact, and during mandibular rest, using accelerometers with a flat frequency response between the filter cutoff frequencies 0.1 Hz and 1000 Hz. The signals were digitized using a 24 bits card and sampled with the rate 96000 Hz. Power spectral analyses, and independent and paired samples t-tests were used in the analysis of the vibration power observed in frequency bands corresponding to audible and inaudible frequencies. An alpha-level of 5% was chosen for accepting a difference as being significant. In the group with audible sounds, about 47% of the total vibration energy was in the inaudible area below 20 Hz during opening-closing and about 76% during mandibular rest. In the group without audible sounds, the corresponding proportions were significantly different, 85% vs. 69%. The energy content of the vibrations, both those below and those above 20 Hz, increased significantly during jaw movement in both groups. Furthermore, percentage of signal energy above 20 Hz showed a noticeable increase in the group of subjects with audible sounds. This can physically be explained by decreased damping properties of damaged tissues surrounding the TMJ. Vibrations in the TMJ area can be observed with significant portions in the inaudible area below 20 Hz both during mandibular rest and during jaw movements whether or not the subjects have audible joint sounds. Further studies are needed to identify sources and evaluate possible diagnostic value. PMID:16933462

  20. Using cross correlations of turbulent flow-induced ambient vibrations to estimate the structural impulse response. Application to structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Winkel, Eric S; Bourgoyne, Dwayne A; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steve L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2007-04-01

    It has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an estimate of the impulse response (or Green's function) between two receivers can be obtained from the cross correlation of diffuse wave fields at these two receivers in various environments and frequency ranges: ultrasonics, civil engineering, underwater acoustics, and seismology. This result provides a means for structural monitoring using ambient structure-borne noise only, without the use of active sources. This paper presents experimental results obtained from flow-induced random vibration data recorded by pairs of accelerometers mounted within a flat plate or hydrofoil in the test section of the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The experiments were conducted at high Reynolds number (Re > 50 million) with the primary excitation source being turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the upper and lower surfaces of the plate or foil. Identical deterministic time signatures emerge from the noise cross-correlation function computed via robust and simple processing of noise measured on different days by a pair of passive sensors. These time signatures are used to determine and/or monitor the structural response of the test models from a few hundred to a few thousand Hertz. PMID:17471715

  1. Differential Responses to Food Price Changes by Personal Characteristic: A Systematic Review of Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mizdrak, Anja; Scarborough, Peter; Waterlander, Wilma E.; Rayner, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Fiscal interventions to improve population diet have been recommended for consideration by many organisations including the World Health Organisation and the United Nations and policies such as sugar-sweetened beverage taxes have been implemented at national and sub-national levels. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the differential impact of fiscal interventions on population sub-groups and this remains a barrier to implementation. Objective To examine how personal characteristics (such as socioeconomic status, sex, impulsivity, and income) moderate changes in purchases of targeted foods in response to food and beverage price changes in experimental settings. Design Systematic review Data Sources Online databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, EconLit and PsycInfo), reference lists of previous reviews, and additional data from study authors. Study Selection We included randomised controlled trials where food and beverage prices were manipulated and reported differential effects of the intervention on participant sub-groups defined according to personal characteristics. Data Analysis Where possible, we extracted data to enable the calculation of price elasticities for the target foods by personal characteristic. Results 8 studies were included in the review. Across studies, the difference in price elasticity varied from 0.02 to 2.43 between groups within the same study. 11 out of the total of 18 comparisons of own-price elasticity estimates by personal characteristic differed by more than 0.2 between groups. Income related factors were the most commonly considered and there was an indication that own-price elasticity estimates do vary by income but the direction of this effect was not clear. Conclusion Experimental studies provide an opportunity to examine the differential effects of fiscal measures to improve population diets. Patterns in price sensitivity by personal characteristics are complex. General conclusions pertaining to the

  2. Theoretical study of the distal-side steric and electrostatic effects on the vibrational characteristics of the FeCO unit of the carbonylheme proteins and their models.

    PubMed Central

    Kushkuley, B; Stavrov, S S

    1996-01-01

    The vibronic theory of activation and quantum chemical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) calculations are used to study the activation of carbon monoxide (change of the C-O bond index and force field constant) by the imidazole complex with heme in dependence on the distortion of the porphyrin ring, geometry of the CO coordination, iron-carbon and iron-imidazole distances, iron displacement out of the porphyrin plane, and presence of the charged groups in the heme environment. It is shown that the main contribution to the CO activation stems from the change in the sigma donation from the 5 sigma CO orbital to iron, and back-bonding from the iron to the 2 pi orbital of CO. It follows from the results that none of the studied distortions can explain, by itself, the wide variation of the C-O vibrational frequency in the experimentally studied model compounds and heme proteins. To study the dependence of the properties of the FeCO unit on the presence of charged groups in the heme environment, the latter are simulated by the homogeneous electric field and point charges of different magnitude and location. The results show that charged groups can strongly affect the strength of the C-O bond and its vibrational frequency. It is found that the charges located on the distal side of the heme plane can affect the Fe-C and C-O bond indexes (and, consequently, the Fe-C and C-O vibrational frequencies), both in the same and in opposite directions, depending on their position. The theoretical results allow us to understand the peculiarities of the effect of charged groups on the properties of the FeCO unit both in heme proteins and in their model compounds. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8785279

  3. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Neuronal Response Characteristics in Deep Layers of Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Narjes; Mohammadi, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a chemical often used as a solvent for water-insoluble drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DMSO on neural response characteristics (in 1200–1500 μm depth) of the rat barrel cortex. Methods: DMSO solution was prepared in 10% v/v concentration and injected into the lateral ventricle of rats. Neuronal spontaneous activity and neuronal responses to deflection of the principal whisker (PW) and adjacent whisker (AW) were recorded in barrel cortex. A condition test ratio (CTR) was used to measure inhibitory receptive fields in barrel cortex. Results: The results showed that both PW and AW evoked ON and OFF responses, neuronal spontaneous activity and inhibitory receptive fields did not change following ICV administration of DMSO. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that acute ICV administration of 10% DMSO did not modulate the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons in the l deep ayers of rat barrel cortex. PMID:27563414

  4. Dynamic response characteristics of dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Joseph A.; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Scott-Emuakpor, Onome E.; Cross, Charles J.; Slater, Joseph C.

    2015-02-01

    New turbine engine designs requiring secondary flow compression often look to dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors (DFIBRs) since these stages have the ability to perform work on the secondary, or bypassed, flow-field. While analogous to traditional integrally bladed rotor stages, DFIBR designs have many differences that result in unique dynamic response characteristics that must be understood to avoid fatigue. This work investigates these characteristics using reduced-order models (ROMs) that incorporate mistuning through perturbations to blade frequencies. This work provides an alternative to computationally intensive geometric-mistuning approaches for DFIBRs by utilizing tuned blade mode reductions and substructure coupling in cyclic coordinates. Free and forced response results are compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions to determine if any errors are related to the reduced-order model formulation reduction methods. It is shown that DFIBRs have many more frequency veering regions than their single flow-path integrally blade rotor (IBR) counterparts. Modal families are shown to transition between system, inner-blade, and outer-blade motion. Furthermore, findings illustrate that while mode localization of traditional IBRs is limited to a single or small subset of blades, DFIBRs can have modal energy localized to either an inner- or outer-blade set resulting in many blades responding above tuned levels. Lastly, ROM forced response predictions compare well to full FEM predictions for the two test cases shown.

  5. Acute effects of Dry Immersion on kinematic characteristics of postural corrective responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayenko, D. G.; Miller, T. F.; Melnik, K. A.; Netreba, A. I.; Khusnutdinova, D. R.; Kitov, V. V.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Gerasimenko, Y. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-04-01

    Impairments in balance control are inevitable following exposure to microgravity. However, the role of particular sensory system in postural disorders at different stages of the exposure to microgravity still remains unknown. We used a method called Dry Immersion (DI), as a ground-based model of microgravity, to elucidate the effects of 6-h of load-related afferent inputs on kinematic characteristics of postural corrective responses evoked by pushes to the chest of different intensities during upright standing. The structure of postural corrective responses was altered following exposure to DI, which was manifested by: (1) an increase of the ankle and knee flexion during perturbations of medium intensity, (2) the lack of the compensatory hip extension, as well as diminished knee and ankle flexion with a further increase of the perturbation intensity to submaximal level. We suggest that the lack of weight-bearing increases the reactivity of the balance control system, whereas the ability to scale the responses proportionally to the perturbation intensity decreases. Disrupted neuromuscular coordination of postural corrective responses following DI can be attributed to adaptive neural modifications on the spinal and cortical levels. The present study provides evidence that even a short-term lack of load-related afferent inputs alters kinematic patterns of postural corrective responses, and can result in decreased balance control. Because vestibular input is not primarily affected during the DI exposure, our results indicate that activity and the state of the load-related afferents play critical roles in balance control following real or simulated microgravity.

  6. Point Response Characteristics for the CERES/EOS-PM, FM3 & FM4 instruments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paden, Jack; Smith, G. Louis; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the point source functions (PSF s) of the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES,) Earth Observing System (EOS,) afternoon platform (PM,) Flight Model 3 (FM3,) and Flight Model 4 (FM4) scanning instruments. The PSF (also known as the Point Response Function, or PRF) is vital to the accurate geo-location of the remotely sensed radiance measurements acquired by the instrument. This paper compares the characteristics of the FM3 and FM4 instruments with the earlier Proto Flight Model (PFM) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) platform, and the FM1 and FM2 Models on the EOS morning orbiting (AM) platform, which has recently been renamed "Terra". All of the PSF s were found to be quite comparable, and the previously noted "spreading" characteristic of the window (water vapor) channel PSF is analyzed Keywords: PSF, PRF, CERES, TRMM, EOS, Earth Radiation Budget

  7. Parametric Optimization of Ares I Propellant Slosh Characteristics Using Frequency Response Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Hall, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique for developing propellant slosh damping requirements with respect to the stability characteristics of large flexible launch vehicles is presented. A numerical algorithm is devised which allows an automated software program to rapidly converge to pseudo-optimal solutions that minimize required propellant slosh damping for multiple tanks while maintaining constraints on the frequency response characteristics of a particular open-loop plant transfer function. An implementation of the algorithm using a high-order linear model of the Ares I plant dynamics considers all relevant dynamic interactions of flexible body modes, propellant slosh, and nozzle inertia effects. A high-resolution propellant damping requirements table is produced that can be used for baffle design. The method is demonstrated to provide exceptional speed and accuracy when compared with the alternative human-in-the-loop approach.

  8. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  9. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2011-10-20

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper.A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.

  10. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  11. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  12. Identification of root cause and abatement of vibration of monochromator.

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J. A.

    1998-01-13

    Silicon crystal mirrors are used to reflect high-intensity X-ray beams. A large amount of heat is generated in each mirror. To minimize the effect of thermal expansion on the crystal mirrors, heat is removed by pumping liquid gallium (with a boiling point of 29.8 C) through passages in the crystal mirrors. During system operation, mirror motion should be kept to an acceptable level to avoid performance degradation. There are many potential sources of excitation to the crystal assembly; one such source is the flowing gallium. Two series of tests were performed earlier for a near-prototypical gallium cooling system (1-2). This paper describes a series of tests to measure the general vibration response characteristics of critical components in the monochromator system that contains the mirrors. The main objective of this work is to identify the root cause of vibration and to recommend general guidelines for abatement of vibration. This is achieved by performing many tests to understand the response characteristics under various conditions, by analysis of the response data, and by use of some theoretical considerations.

  13. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  14. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part II: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    It was shown in Part I that an ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be used to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings. It can be used for both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting several additional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimisation process. In Part I a relevant model of such structure, as a function of arrangement of the additional elements was derived and validated. The model allows calculating natural frequencies and mode-shapes of the whole structure. The aim of this companion paper, Part II, is to present the second stage of the method. This is an optimization process that results in arrangement of the elements guaranteeing desired plate frequency response, and enhancement of controllability and observability measures. For that purpose appropriate cost functions, and constraints followed from technological feasibility are defined. Then, a memetic algorithm is employed to obtain a numerical solution with parameters of the arrangement. The optimization results are initially presented for simple cases to validate the method. Then, more complex scenarios are analysed with very special demands concerning the frequency response to present the full potential of the method. Subsequently, a laboratory experiment is presented and discussed. Finally, other areas of applications of the proposed method are shown and conclusions for future research are drawn.

  15. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  16. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  17. Dynamic response and transfer characteristics of joint neurons in somatosensory thalamus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Yin, T C; Williams, W J

    1976-05-01

    1. The dynamic response of neurons sensitive to knee joint rotation in the cat somatosensory thalamus was studied during sinusoidal variation of joint angle. The input sine waves were applied with a precise voltage-controlled, electromechanical actuator. The average rate of discharge of a single cell was considered as the output parameter. Describing functions of the sensory system were extracted by correlation and spectral analysis techniques. The effects of anesthetic, bias angle, and excursion angle were investigated. Discrete and swept sinusoidal waveforms between 0.1 and 7.0 Hz were used as inputs.2. The majority of joint cells in the thalamus were rapidly adapting and had frequency-response curves that were characterized as highpass filters. Although the major features of the response curves for individual cells were very similar, they could not all be fit with a single transfer function. The describing function of all the rapidly adapting cells averaged together was well fit by a transfer function that could be termed velocity sensitive in the bandwidth between 0.1 and 6.5 Hz. Most of these phasic cells showed a phase-locking tendency, particularly at high frequencies.3. The dynamics of the response for the rapidly adapting cells was relatively independent of anesthetic, bias angle, and excursion angle. Threshold and saturation effects were exhibited by some cells for very small (less than 1 degree) and large (greater than 10 degrees) input amplitudes, respectively. In addition a few (17%) showed a bidirectional response, i.e., responded at both flexion and extension of the limb. The anesthetic had a strong effect in depressing the spontaneous discharge of the cells and seemed to change the character of the tonic response by introducing a bursting component.4. The transfer characteristic of the thalamic cells was found to be a single-pole low-pass filter plus a time delay. The optimized value for the filter was found to have a corner frequency of 6.0 Hz with

  18. Characteristic-Wave Approach Complements Modal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of estimation of unmodeled dynamics discussed. Report discusses solution of nonhomogeneous governing matrix equation for dynamics of short vibrational pulses propagating as characteristic waves in large structure. Applied to analyze response, to repeated pulses, of beam clamped at one end and free at other. Shows all qualitative characteristics occuring under arbitrary periodic excitations of beam and those of quasi-periodic excitations, in as much as such excitations obtained by linear superpositions of periodic excitations.

  19. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 2: Single-mode large deflection vibrations of beams and plates using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1987-01-01

    A finite element method is presented for the large amplitude vibrations of complex structures that can be modelled with beam and rectangular plate elements subjected to harmonic excitation. Both inplane deformation and inertia are considered in the formulation. Derivation of the harmonic force and nonlinear stiffness matrices for a beam and a rectangular plate element are presented. Solution procedures and convergence characteristics of the finite element method are described. Nonlinear response to uniform and concentrated harmonic loadings and improved nonlinear free vibration results are presented for beams and rectangular plates of various boundary conditions.