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Sample records for vims wavelength scale

  1. Carbon dioxide on the satellites of Saturn: Results from the Cassini VIMS investigation and revisions to the VIMS wavelength scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Meyer, A.W.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Sandford, S.A.; Mastrapa, R.M.E.; Filacchione, G.; Ore, C.M.D.; Nicholson, P.D.; Buratti, B.J.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Dalton, J.B.; Baines, K.H.; Matson, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Several of the icy satellites of Saturn show the spectroscopic signature of the asymmetric stretching mode of C-O in carbon dioxide (CO2) at or near the nominal solid-phase laboratory wavelength of 4.2675 ??m (2343.3 cm-1), discovered with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft. We report here on an analysis of the variation in wavelength and width of the CO2 absorption band in the spectra of Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione. Comparisons are made to laboratory spectra of pure CO2, CO2 clathrates, ternary mixtures of CO2 with other volatiles, implanted and adsorbed CO2 in non-volatile materials, and ab initio theoretical calculations of CO2 * nH2O. At the wavelength resolution of VIMS, the CO2 on Phoebe is indistinguishable from pure CO2 ice (each molecule's nearby neighbors are also CO2) or type II clathrate of CO2 in H2O. In contrast, the CO2 band on Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione is shifted to shorter wavelengths (typically ???4.255 ??m (???2350.2 cm-1)) and broadened. These wavelengths are characteristic of complexes of CO2 with different near-neighbor molecules that are encountered in other volatile mixtures such as with H2O and CH3OH, and non-volatile host materials like silicates, some clays, and zeolites. We suggest that Phoebe's CO2 is native to the body as part of the initial inventory of condensates and now exposed on the surface, while CO2 on the other three satellites results at least in part from particle or UV irradiation of native H2O plus a source of C, implantation or accretion from external sources, or redistribution of native CO2 from the interior. The analysis presented here depends on an accurate VIMS wavelength scale. In preparation for this work, the baseline wavelength calibration for the Cassini VIMS was found to be distorted around 4.3 ??m, apparently as a consequence of telluric CO2 gas absorption in the pre-launch calibration. The effect can be reproduced by convolving a sequence of model detector

  2. Global-scale surface spectral variations on Titan seen from Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present global-scale maps of Titan from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on Cassini. We map at 64 near-infrared wavelengths simultaneously, covering the atmospheric windows at 0.94, 1.08, 1.28, 1.6, 2.0, 2.8, and 5 ??m with a typical resolution of 50 km/pixel or a typical total integration time of 1 s. Our maps have five to ten times the resolution of ground-based maps, better spectral resolution across most windows, coverage in multiple atmospheric windows, and represent the first spatially resolved maps of Titan at 5 ??m. The VIMS maps provide context and surface spectral information in support of other Cassini instruments. We note a strong latitudinal dependence in the spectral character of Titan's surface, and partition the surface into 9 spectral units that we describe in terms of spectral and spatial characteristics. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. COS NUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Observe external radial velocity standard targets {preferably, though not required, in CVZ} in TIME-TAG {FLASH=YES} mode with as many grating and central wavelength combinations as feasible. The purpose is to obtain zero-point offsets for the wavelength scale {internal wavecal lamp scale to external standard wavelength scale} for all central wavelengths. Following this determination, adjustments of the nominal science target spectral range for each grating and central wavelength combination will be made via SMS patchable constant for nominal OSM2 positions corresponding to each central wavelength. Subsequent to this modification of the wavelength scale {and its verification in COS 15 - program 11475}, NUV science-related operations and wavelength-scale dependent EROs can commence.

  4. COS FUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Observe external radial velocity standard targets in TIME-TAG {FLASH=YES} mode with all grating and central wavelength combinations. The purpose is to obtain zero-point offsets for the wavelength scale {internal wavecal lamp scale to external standard wavelength scale} and PSA dispersion relations for all central wavelengths. Following this determination, adjustments of the nominal science target spectral range for each grating and central wavelength combination will be made via SMS patchable constant for nominal OSM1 positions corresponding to each central wavelength. Subsequent to this modification of the wavelength scale {and its verification via analysis of COS30 - program 11488}, FUV science-related operations and wavelength-dependent EROs can commence.

  5. Wavelength Scaling of High Harmonic Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shiner, A. D.; Trallero-Herrero, C.; Kajumba, N.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Bandulet, H.-C.; Comtois, D.; Legare, F.; Giguere, M.; Kieffer, J-C.

    2009-08-14

    Using longer wavelength laser drivers for high harmonic generation is desirable because the highest extreme ultraviolet frequency scales as the square of the wavelength. Recent numerical studies predict that high harmonic efficiency falls dramatically with increasing wavelength, with a very unfavorable lambda{sup -(5-6)} scaling. We performed an experimental study of the high harmonic yield over a wavelength range of 800-1850 nm. A thin gas jet was employed to minimize phase matching effects, and the laser intensity and focal spot size were kept constant as the wavelength was changed. Ion yield was simultaneously measured so that the total number of emitting atoms was known. We found that the scaling at constant laser intensity is lambda{sup -6.3+}-{sup 1.1} in Xe and lambda{sup -6.5+}-{sup 1.1} in Kr over the wavelength range of 800-1850 nm, somewhat worse than the theoretical predictions.

  6. Effective wavelength scaling of rectangular aperture antennas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Yu, Li; Zhang, Jiasen; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-04-20

    We investigate the resonances of aperture antennas from the visible to the terahertz regime, with comparison to comprehensive simulations. Simple piecewise analytic behavior is found for the wavelength scaling over the entire spectrum, with a linear regime through the visible and near-IR. This theory will serve as a useful and simple design tool for applications including biosensors, nonlinear plasmonics and surface enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:25969079

  7. Zero-Points of FOS Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Michael R.; Kerber, Florian

    We have investigated the internal zero-points of the HST's Faint object spectrograph (FOS) on-orbit wavelength calibration between 1990 (launch) and 1997 (de-commissioning). The analysis is based on cross-correlating about 1200 WAVECAL exposures for the high-resolution dispersers, using as templates those exposures which define the dispersion solutions currently in use by the FOS pipeline. FOS has two channels BLUE/RED using two independent Digicon detectors. For BLUE systematic shifts of the zero-points are present, which amount to a maximum offset of 7 pixels (1.75 diodes) over the entire period. The zero-points for RED modes present an apparently random distribution with a peak-to-peak range of 7 pixels. We discu ss the effect of the geomagnetic environment as a possible cause for the observed behaviour and describe the ongoing work to reduce the uncertainty in the wavelength scale.

  8. Scaled Strong Field Interactions at Long Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistrunk, Emily Frances

    The strong field regime describes interactions between light and matter where the electric field of the laser is a significant fraction of the binding field of the atom. Short pulsed lasers are capable of producing local fields on the order of the atomic unit of electric field. Under the influence of such strong fields, the ionization regime and electron dynamics are highly dependent on the wavelength used to drive the interaction. Few studies have been performed in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range. Using MIR wavelengths, the ponderomotive energy, Up, imposed on the electrons can be a factor of 20 greater than in the visible and near-infrared. Experiments on above threshold ionization (ATI) of cesium, nonsequential ionization (NSI) of noble gases, and high harmonic generation (HHG) in condensed phase media highlight the benefits of performing strong field investigations in the MIR. The photoelectron energy spectrum from above threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms provides details about the strong field interaction. Cesium atoms driven by a 3.6 mum laser indicate that excited states can play a large role in ionization from the ground state. Previous experiments on argon in the near-infrared can be compared to cesium at 3.6 im due to their similar Keldysh-scaling. Unlike argon, the measured ionization yield in cesium saturates at a higher intensity than predicted due to the Stark shift of the ground state. Such shifts have not been detected in argon. The low-lying 6P excited states of cesium produce a strong effect on the photoelectron energy spectrum, resulting in a splitting of each ATI peak. Enhancements in the photoelectron energy spectrum similar to those found in argon are observed in cesium. These enhancements are relatively insensitive to ellipticity of the drive laser. To take advantage of the large ponderomotive energy associated with Mid-IR lasers, ionization of argon, krypton and xenon is studied at 3.6 im. The factor of 20 increase in Up between the

  9. Wavelength scaling of laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1983-11-03

    The use of shorter wavelength laser light both enhances collisional absorption and reduces deleterious collective plasma effects. Coupling processes which can be important in reactor-size targets are briefly reviewed. Simple estimates are presented for the intensity-wavelength regime in which collisional absorption is high and collective effects are minimized.

  10. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples. PMID:27472601

  11. Principal components analysis of Jupiter VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2004-01-01

    During Cassini - Jupiter flyby occurred in December 2000, Visual-Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument took several image cubes of Jupiter at different phase angles and distances. We have analysed the spectral images acquired by the VIMS visual channel by means of a principal component analysis technique (PCA). The original data set consists of 96 spectral images in the 0.35-1.05 ??m wavelength range. The product of the analysis are new PC bands, which contain all the spectral variance of the original data. These new components have been used to produce a map of Jupiter made of seven coherent spectral classes. The map confirms previously published work done on the Great Red Spot by using NIMS data. Some other new findings, presently under investigation, are presented. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  12. Mapping and interpretation of Sinlap crater on Titan using Cassini VIMS and RADAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Mouelic S.; Paillou, P.; Janssen, M.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Crapeau, M.; Encrenaz, P.J.; Jaumann, R.; Geudtner, D.; Paganelli, F.; Soderblom, L.; Tobie, G.; Wall, S.

    2008-01-01

    Only a few impact craters have been unambiguously detected on Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission. Among these, Sinlap is the only one that has been observed both by the RADAR and VIMS instruments. This paper describes observations at centimeter and infrared wavelengths which provide complementary information about the composition, topography, and surface roughness. Several units appear in VIMS false color composites of band ratios in the Sinlap area, suggesting compositional heterogeneities. A bright pixel possibly related to a central peak does not show significant spectral variations, indicating either that the impact site was vertically homogeneous, or that this area has been recovered by homogeneous deposits. Both VIMS ratio images and dielectric constant measurements suggest the presence of an area enriched in water ice around the main ejecta blanket. Since the Ku-band SAR may see subsurface structures at the meter scale, the difference between infrared and SAR observations can be explained by the presence of a thin layer transparent to the radar. An analogy with terrestrial craters in Libya supports this interpretation. Finally, a tentative model describes the geological history of this area prior, during, and after the impact. It involves mainly the creation of ballistic ejecta and an expanding plume of vapor triggered by the impact, followed by the redeposition of icy spherules recondensed from this vapor plume blown downwind. Subsequent evolution is then driven by erosional processes and aeolian deposition. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. A close look at Saturn's rings with Cassini VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, P.D.; Hedman, M.M.; Clark, R.N.; Showalter, M.R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Hansen, G.B.; Sicardy, B.; Drossart, P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Coradini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Soon after the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft entered orbit about Saturn on 1 July 2004, its Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer obtained two continuous spectral scans across the rings, covering the wavelength range 0.35-5.1 ??m, at a spatial resolution of 15-25 km. The first scan covers the outer C and inner B rings, while the second covers the Cassini Division and the entire A ring. Comparisons of the VIMS radial reflectance profile at 1.08 ??m with similar profiles at a wavelength of 0.45 ??m assembled from Voyager images show very little change in ring structure over the intervening 24 years, with the exception of a few features already known to be noncircular. A model for single-scattering by a classical, many-particle-thick slab of material with normal optical depths derived from the Voyager photopolarimeter stellar occultation is found to provide an excellent fit to the observed VIMS reflectance profiles for the C ring and Cassini Division, and an acceptable fit for the inner B ring. The A ring deviates significantly from such a model, consistent with previous suggestions that this region may be closer to a monolayer. An additional complication here is the azimuthally-variable average optical depth associated with "self-gravity wakes" in this region and the fact that much of the A ring may be a mixture of almost opaque wakes and relatively transparent interwake zones. Consistently with previous studies, we find that the near-infrared spectra of all main ring regions are dominated by water ice, with a typical regolith grain radius of 5-20 ??m, while the steep decrease in visual reflectance shortward of 0.6 ??m is suggestive of an organic contaminant, perhaps tholin-like. Although no materials other than H2O ice have been identified with any certainty in the VIMS spectra of the rings, significant radial variations are seen in the strength of the water-ice absorption bands. Across the boundary between the C and B rings, over a radial range of ???7000 km, the

  14. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  15. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. IV. Daytime temperature maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Ciarniello, Mauro; Cerroni, Priscilla; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Jaumann, Ralf; McCord, Thomas B.; Sotin, Christophe; Stephan, Katrin; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.

    2016-06-01

    The spectral position of the 3.6 μm continuum peak measured on Cassini-VIMS I/F spectra is used as a marker to infer the temperature of the regolith particles covering the surfaces of Saturn's icy satellites. This feature is characterizing the crystalline water ice spectrum which is the dominant compositional endmember of the satellites' surfaces. Laboratory measurements indicate that the position of the 3.6 μm peak of pure water ice is temperature-dependent, shifting towards shorter wavelengths when the sample is cooled, from about 3.65 μm at T=123 K to about 3.55 μm at T=88 K. A similar method was already applied to VIMS Saturn's rings mosaics to retrieve ring particles temperature (Filacchione, G., Ciarniello, M., Capaccioni, F., et al., 2014. Icarus, 241, 45-65). We report here about the daytime temperature variations observed on the icy satellites as derived from three different VIMS observation types: (a) a sample of 240 disk-integrated I/F observations of Saturn's regular satellites collected by VIMS during years 2004-2011 with solar phase in the 20°-40° range, corresponding to late morning-early afternoon local times. This dataset is suitable to exploit the temperature variations at hemispherical scale, resulting in average temperature T <88 K for Mimas, T ≪88 K for Enceladus, T <88 K for Tethys, T=98-118 K for Dione, T=108-128 K for Rhea, T=118-128 K for Hyperion, T=128-148 and T > 168 K for Iapetus' trailing and leading hemispheres, respectively. A typical ±5 K uncertainty is associated to the temperature retrieval. On Tethys and Dione, for which observations on both leading and trailing hemispheres are available, in average daytime temperatures higher of about 10 K on the trailing than on the leading hemisphere are inferred. (b) Satellites disk-resolved observations taken at 20-40 km pixel-1 resolution are suitable to map daytime temperature variations across surfaces' features, such as Enceladus' tiger stripes and Tethys' equatorial dark lens

  16. Simultaneous Cartography of Aerosol Opacity and Surface Albedo of Titan by the Massive Inversion of the Cassini/VIMS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Sotin, C.; Rannou, P.; Cornet, T.; Hirtzig, M.; Appéré, T.; Solomonidou, A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping Titan's surface albedo is a necessary step to give reliable constraints on its composition. However, surface albedo maps of Titan, especially over large regions, are still very rare, the surface windows being strongly affected by atmospheric effects (absorption, scattering). A full radiative transfer model is an essential tool to remove these effects, but too time-consuming to treat systematically the ~40000 hyperspectral images VIMS acquired since the beginning of the mission. We developed a massive inversion of VIMS data based on lookup tables computed from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (Hirtzig et al. 2013), updated with new aerosol properties coming from our analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation acquired recently by VIMS. Once the physical properties of gases, aerosols and surface are fixed, the lookup tables are built for the remaining free parameters: the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles, given by navigation; and two products (the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo at all wavelengths). The lookup table grid was carefully selected after thorough testing. The data inversion on these pre-computed spectra (opportunely interpolated) is more than 1000 times faster than recalling the full radiative transfer at each minimization step. We present here the results from selected flybys. We invert mosaics composed by couples of flybys observing the same area at two different times. The composite albedo maps do not show significant discontinuities in any of the surface windows, suggesting a robust correction of the effects of the geometry (and thus the aerosols) on the observations. Maps of aerosol and albedo uncertainties are also provided, with the absolute error on the albedo being approximately between 1 and 3% (depending on the surface window considered). We are thus able to provide for the first time ever reliable surface albedo maps at pixel scale for the whole VIMS spectral range.

  17. Performance studies of the parallel VIM code

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Blomquist, R.N.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper, the authors evaluate the performance of the parallel version of the VIM Monte Carlo code on the IBM SPx at the High Performance Computing Research Facility at ANL. Three test problems with contrasting computational characteristics were used to assess effects in performance. A statistical method for estimating the inefficiencies due to load imbalance and communication is also introduced. VIM is a large scale continuous energy Monte Carlo radiation transport program and was parallelized using history partitioning, the master/worker approach, and p4 message passing library. Dynamic load balancing is accomplished when the master processor assigns chunks of histories to workers that have completed a previously assigned task, accommodating variations in the lengths of histories, processor speeds, and worker loads. At the end of each batch (generation), the fission sites and tallies are sent from each worker to the master process, contributing to the parallel inefficiency. All communications are between master and workers, and are serial. The SPx is a scalable 128-node parallel supercomputer with high-performance Omega switches of 63 {micro}sec latency and 35 MBytes/sec bandwidth. For uniform and reproducible performance, they used only the 120 identical regular processors (IBM RS/6000) and excluded the remaining eight planet nodes, which may be loaded by other`s jobs.

  18. Composition of Titan's surface from Cassini VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCord, T.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; D'Aversa, E.; Griffith, C.A.; Baines, E.K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Dalle, Ore C.M.; Filacchione, G.; Formisano, V.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Jaumann, R.; Lunine, J.I.; Nelson, R.M.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    Titan's bulk density along with Solar System formation models indicates considerable water as well as silicates as its major constituents. This satellite's dense atmosphere of nitrogen with methane is unique. Deposits or even oceans of organic compounds have been suggested to exist on Titan's solid surface due to UV-induced photochemistry in the atmosphere. Thus, the composition of the surface is a major piece of evidence needed to determine Titan's history. However, studies of the surface are hindered by the thick, absorbing, hazy and in some places cloudy atmosphere. Ground-based telescope investigations of the integral disk of Titan attempted to observe the surface albedo in spectral windows between methane absorptions by calculating and removing the haze effects. Their results were reported to be consistent with water ice on the surface that is contaminated with a small amount of dark material, perhaps organic material like tholin. We analyze here the recent Cassini Mission's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) observations that resolve regions on Titan. VIMS is able to see surface features and shows that there are spectral and therefore likely compositional units. By several methods, spectral albedo estimates within methane absorption windows between 0.75 and 5 ??m were obtained for different surface units using VIMS image cubes from the Cassini-Huygens Titan Ta encounter. Of the spots studied, there appears to be two compositional classes present that are associated with the lower albedo and the higher albedo materials, with some variety among the brighter regions. These were compared with spectra of several different candidate materials. Our results show that the spectrum of water ice contaminated with a darker material matches the reflectance of the lower albedo Titan regions if the spectral slope from 2.71 to 2.79 ??m in the poorly understood 2.8-??m methane window is ignored. The spectra for brighter regions are not matched by the spectrum of

  19. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  20. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan's Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sicardy, Bruno; Bézard, Bruno; Sotin, Christophe; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matt; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan's atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 μm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution (~10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 10 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 μm, and CO, at 4.7 μm. We can extract methane's abundance between 70 and 750 km and CO's between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 μm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 μm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  1. A Scaling Theory of the MJO Horizontal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Yang and Ingersoll (2013, Triggered Convection, Gravity Waves, and the MJO: A Shallow-Water Model. J. Atmos. Sci., 70, 2476-2486.) use a shallow water model to simulate the MJO. In this model, we parameterize radiation as a large-scale mass sink, and parameterize convection as a small-scale mass source that is only triggered when the layer thickness is lower than a certain threshold. Over a wide parameter range, the model gives a strong MJO-like signal - a large-scale pattern that drifts slowly to the east, together with wind and pressure fields similar to those observed. Based on the simulation results, we propose that the MJO is an interference pattern of the westward and eastward inertia-gravity (WIG and EIG) waves. The MJO propagation speed is determined by the difference in the phase speeds of the EIG and WIG waves. In this study, we try to quantitatively understand what controls the MJO horizontal scale using the same shallow water model. There are four parameters in the model - the Kelvin wave speed (c), the convective timescale (t_c), the size of the convection (r_c), and the number density (s_c) of convection. We perform numerical simulations to examine the sensitivity of the MJO zonal wavenumber (k) to these parameters: k increases when s_c and r_c increase and when c decreases; k does not depend on the convective timescale. The scaling between k and the model parameters obeys a power law within an inertial range. A scaling argument will be presented based on the equatorial beta-plane scaling. This scaling argument helps to understand the climate dynamics of the MJO, e.g., how the MJO responds to global warming. The fidelity of this scaling argument can be examined by performing systematic global warming simulations using super-parameterized 3D climate models that reproduce the MJO signal in the current climate.

  2. S im ulation And Analysis Of VIM Measurements: Feedback On Design Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Vargas, S.; Bonet, J. A.; Martíez Pillet, V.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The Visible-light Imager and Magnetograph (VIM) proposed for the ESA Solar Orbiter mission will observe a photo spheric spectral line at high spatial resolution. Here we simulate and interpret VIM measurements. Realistic MHD models are used to synthesize "observed" Stokes profiles of the photospheric Fe I 617.3 nm line. The profiles are degraded by telescope diffraction and detector pixel size to a spatial resolution of 162 km on the solar surface. We stufy the influence of spectral resolving power, noise, and limited wavelength sampling on the vector magnetic fields and line-of-sight velocities derived from Milne-Eddington inversions of the simulated measurements. VIM will provide reasonably accurate values of the atmospheric parametes even with the filter widths of 120 Å and 3 wavelength positions plus continuum, as long as the noise level is kept below 10-3 Ic.

  3. Novel VIM Metallo-β-Lactamase Variant, VIM-24, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Correa, Adriana; Briceño, David F.; Rosas, Natalia C.; De La Cadena, Elsa; Ruiz, Sory J.; Mojica, Maria F.; Camargo, Ruben Dario; Zuluaga, Ivan; Marin, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2011-01-01

    We report the emergence of a novel VIM variant (VIM-24) in a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate in Colombia. The isolate displays MICs for carbapenems below the resistance breakpoints, posing a real challenge for its detection. The blaVIM-24 gene was located within a class 1 integron carried on a large plasmid. Further studies are needed to clarify its epidemiological and clinical impact. PMID:21282438

  4. [Multi-wavelength spectral aerosol scale height in inshore in contrast with that in inland].

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Rao, Rui-Zhong; Wang, Ying-Jian

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, based on the exponential attenuation of atmospheric aerosol concentration with height, so using continuous spectrum sun-photometer, forward scatter visibility sensor and hygrothermograph, the authors measured the atmosphere column optical characteristic and plane spectral extinction coefficient on earth on the base of two experiments at some edge of ocean at the same time, respectively, set up the calculative method of multi-wavelength spectral aerosol scale height. Firstly, the authors obtained atmospheric horizontal extinction coefficient with forward scattering visibility sensor, which subtracted molecular extinction coefficient, and could get aerosol extinction coefficient near ground; Then, selecting sea salt model, using OPAC software, the authors also could calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient under different humidity (0%, 50%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%, 98% and 99%) and different wavelength (400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 nm), the aerosol extinction coefficient was detected by visibility sensor, using interpolation method, respectively; Finally, using the data of atmospheric columniation optical thickness detected by continuous spectral sun-photometer and subtracted molecular optical thickness corresponding wavelengths were accounted out by Modtran 4. 0. The authors obtained the characteristic of spectral aerosol scale height of visible light (wavelength is 400, 440, 532, 550 and 690 nm): with wavelength increments, and spectral aerosol scale height was found to decline neither in inland nor in inshore in China; Spectral aerosol scale height in winter is higher than in summer in southeast inshore; but spectral aerosol scale height in winter is smaller in summer than in inland. PMID:19385200

  5. About the Portuguese VIM3 version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, O.; Cruz, A.; Oliveira, J. C.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    For the first time, a unique Portuguese version of the International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM) was organized and published by the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) of Portugal and Brazil. This challenge could be met thanks to the experiences of the respective translations of the previous editions of the VIM and to the new Orthographic Agreement (AO) of the Portuguese speaking countries. After a brief historical review of the VIMs and their Portuguese versions, this communication aims to display the main steps that led to the final joint translation. Advantage was taken of this 3rd edition and of the AO to update the Portuguese multiplicative prefix writing "kilo" in coherence with the respective symbol "k". By way of answer to the questions raised by the recent edition of the VIM (VIM3) that stresses on the concepts associated to the terms, some suggestions are proposed and inconsistencies are identified, in order to facilitate the understanding and the dissemination of the document. These few suggestions for the next edition of the VIM also intended to standardize the terminology found in normative texts of different scientific fields which unfortunately does not necessarily tend to be consistent between them.

  6. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs. PMID:26901630

  7. Wavelength scaling of efficient high-order harmonic generation by two-color infrared laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lan Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2010-06-15

    We theoretically investigate and demonstrate a better wavelength scaling of harmonic yield in a two-color infrared field. By mixing a Ti:sapphire assistant field with the infrared driving field, we show that high harmonic generation is enhanced and the harmonic yield scales as {lambda}{sup -3}-{lambda}{sup -4} in the plateau region, which falls more slowly as the increase of the driving laser wavelength {lambda} compared with {lambda}{sup -5}-{lambda}{sup -6} in a one-color infrared field.

  8. Biochemical Characterization of VIM-39, a VIM-1-Like Metallo-β-Lactamase Variant from a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from Greece

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Simona; De Luca, Filomena; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Hrabák, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    VIM-39, a VIM-1-like metallo-β-lactamase variant (VIM-1 Thr33Ala His224Leu) was identified in a clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae belonging to sequence type 147. VIM-39 hydrolyzed ampicillin, cephalothin, and imipenem more efficiently than did VIM-1 and VIM-26 (a VIM-1 variant with the His224Leu substitution) because of higher turnover rates. PMID:26369975

  9. Investigation of Titan's surface and atmosphere photometric functions using the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Thomas; Altobelli, Nicolas; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert; Barnes, Jason; Buratti, Bonnie; Baines, Kevin; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    After 106 flybys spread over 10 years, the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument acquired 33151 hyperspectral cubes pointing at the surface of Titan on the dayside. Despite this huge amount of data available for surface studies, and due to the strong influence of the atmosphere (methane absorption and haze scattering), Titan's surface is only visible with VIMS in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centred at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns. Atmospheric scattering and absorption effects dominate Titan's spectrum at wavelengths shorter than 3 microns, while the 5 micron window, almost insensitive to the haze scattering, only presents a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by VIMS. In all cases, the recorded I/F represents an apparent albedo, which depends on the atmospheric contributions and the surface photometry at each wavelength. We therefore aim to determine real albedo values for Titan's surface by finding photometric functions for the surface and the atmosphere that could be used as a basis for empirical corrections or Radiative Transfer calculations. After updating the navigation of the VIMS archive, we decomposed the entire VIMS data set into a MySQL relational database gathering the viewing geometry, location, time (season) and I/F (for pure atmosphere and surface-atmosphere images) for each pixel of the 33151 individual VIMS cubes. We then isolated all the VIMS pixels where Titan's surface has been repeatedly imaged at low phase angles (< 20 degrees) in order to characterize phase curves for the surface at 5 microns and for the atmosphere. Among these, the T88 flyby appears noteworthy, with a "Emergence-Phase Function (EPF)"-type observation: 25 cubes acquired during the same flyby, over the same area (close to Tortola Facula, in relatively dark terrains), at a constant incidence and with varying emergence and phase (from 0 to 60 degrees) angles. The data clearly exhibit an increase

  10. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan’s Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, S.; Sicardy, B.; Bézard, B.; Sotin, C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan’s atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 µm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution ( 10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 8 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 µm, and CO, at 4.7 µm. We can extract methane’s abundance between 70 and 700 km and CO’s between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 µm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 µm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  11. Hapke modeling of Rhea surface properties through Cassini-VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Stephan, K.

    2011-01-01

    The surface properties of the icy bodies in the saturnian system have been investigated by means of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) hyperspectral imager which operates in the 0.35-5.1. ??m wavelength range. In particular, we have analyzed 111 full disk hyperspectral images of Rhea ranging in solar phase between 0.08?? and 109.8??. These data have been previously analyzed by Filacchione et al. (Filacchione, G. et al. [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290; Filacchione, G. et al. [2010]. Icarus 206, 507-523) to study, adopting various "spectral indicators" (such as spectral slopes, band depth, and continuum level), the relations among various saturnian satellites. As a further step we proceed in this paper to a quantitative evaluation of the physical parameters determining the spectrophotometric properties of Rhea's surface. To do this we have applied Hapke (Hapke, B. [1993]. Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy, Topics in Remote Sensing: 3 Springer, Berlin) IMSA model (Isotropic Multiple Scattering Approximation) which allow us to model the phase function at VIS-IR (visible-infrared) wavelengths as well as the spectra taking into account various types of mixtures of surface materials. Thanks to this method we have been able to constrain the size of water ice particles covering the surface, the amount of organic contaminants, the large scale surface roughness and the opposition effect surge. From our analysis it appears that wavelength dependent parameters, e.g. opposition surge width (h) and single-particle phase function parameters (b,. v), are strongly correlated to the estimated single-scattering albedo of particles. For Rhea the best fit solution is obtained by assuming: (1) an intraparticle mixture of crystalline water ice and a small amount (0.4%) of Triton tholin; (2) a monodisperse grain size distribution having a particle diameter am= 38. ??m; and (3) a surface roughness parameter value of 33??. The study of phase function shows

  12. Reduction of CCD observations made with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. III. Wavelength scale refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the recent modifications to the data reduction technique for observations acquired with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) mounted on the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory that allow the wavelength scale to be correctly computed in the case of large mutual offsets of studied objects in interferograms.We examine the parameters of the scanning FPIs used in the SCORPIO-2 multimode focal reducer.

  13. Stability study of standards used for calibration of the spectrophotometer wavelength scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debossan, L. F.; Carvalho, E. M. S.; Souza, M. A.; Gomes, J. F. S.

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of spectrophotometers is a procedure recommended by international standards to provide quality assurance of results and traceability. Due to its intrinsic properties, holmium oxide filters are indicated as reference standards for calibrating the wavelength scale of such equipment. This paper presents a study aiming to assess the repeatability and drift of holmium oxide standard filters calibrated in the Radiometry and Photometry Laboratory (Laraf) of Inmetro in order to verify their stability.

  14. Cassini VIMS Measurements of Thermal Emission from the Tiger Stripes on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2014-11-01

    The 3 to 5μm sensitivity of the Cassini VIMS instrument detects the rising, short-wavelength edge Planck thermal radiation from the highest temperature ( 200 K) component of the active fissures at the south pole of Enceladus. The tiger stripe fissures are heated by the escaping warm water vapor that forms the plumes. During an extremely low 7 km altitude pass through the plumes in 2012, Goguen et al. (2013) used VIMS in the high-speed occultation mode to measure the temperature and width of an active site along the Baghdad fissure. In this presentation, we will give an overview of the some of the other VIMS measurements of thermal emission from the tiger stripes and compare the emission from different active locations at different times for data that is already archived in the Planetary Data System.Goguen, J.D., et al. (2013). The Temperature and Width of an Active Fissure on Enceladus Measured with Cassini VIMS during the 14 April 2012 South Pole Flyover. Icarus 226,1128-1137.

  15. Cassini VIMS observations of the Galilean satellites including the VIMS calibration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Capaccioni, F.; Hansen, G.B.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Bussoletti, E.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed the Galilean satellites during the Cassini spacecraft's 2000/2001 flyby of Jupiter, providing compositional and thermal information about their surfaces. The Cassini spacecraft approached the jovian system no closer than about 126 Jupiter radii, about 9 million kilometers, at a phase angle of < 90 ??, resulting in only sub-pixel observations by VIMS of the Galilean satellites. Nevertheless, most of the spectral features discovered by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) aboard the Galileo spacecraft during more than four years of observations have been identified in the VIMS data analyzed so far, including a possible 13C absorption. In addition, VIMS made observations in the visible part of the spectrum and at several new phase angles for all the Galilean satellites and the calculated phase functions are presented. In the process of analyzing these data, the VIMS radiometric and spectral calibrations were better determined in preparation for entry into the Saturn system. Treatment of these data is presented as an example of the VIMS data reduction, calibration and analysis process and a detailed explanation is given of the calibration process applied to the Jupiter data. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cassini-VIMS temperature maps of Saturn's satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, M. C.; Scipioni, F.; Cerroni, P.

    The spectral position of the 3.6 mu m continuum peak measured on Cassini-VIMS reflectance spectra is used to infer the temperature of the regolith particles covering the surfaces of Saturn's icy satellites. Laboratory measurements by \\cite{Clark2012} have shown that 3.6 mu m peak for pure crystalline water ice particles shifts towards shorter wavelengths when the sample is cooled, moving from about 3.65 mu m at T=123 K to about 3.55 mu m at T=88 K. A similar trend is observed also in the imaginary part (k) of the refractive index of water ice when the sample is cooled from T=140 K to 20 K \\citep{Mastrapa2009}. Since water ice is the dominant endmember on Saturn's satellites surfaces \\citep{Filacchione2012}, the measurement of the wavelength at which the 3.6 mu m reflectance peak occurs can be considered as a temperature indicator. We report about temperature maps of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea derived by applying this method to Cassini-VIMS data taken at spatial resolution of 20-40 km/pixel. These maps allow us to correlate the temperature distribution with solar illumination conditions and with geological features. On average Enceladus' midlatitudes regions appear at T<100 K while the south pole tiger-stripes active area shows a thermal emission at T>115 K. Tethys' and Mimas' equatorial lenses show significant thermal anomalies: despite these features have low visible albedo they appear more cold than the surrounding mid-latitude regions as a consequence of a much higher thermal inertia. On Mimas, Hershel crater's floor appears warmer (T>115 K) than the adjacent equatorial lens area (T<110 K). Finally, Dione's analysis evidences lower temperature across the bright wispy terrains than the nearby low albedo areas.

  17. Large-scale characterization of silicon nitride-based evanescent couplers at 532nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claes, Tom; Jansen, Roelof; Neutens, Pieter; Du Bois, Bert; Helin, Philippe; Severi, Simone; Van Dorpe, Pol; Deshpande, Paru; Rottenberg, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the photonics community has a renewed attention for silicon nitride.1-3 When deposited at temperatures below 650K with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD),4 it enables photonic circuits fabricated on-top of standard complementary metaloxidesemiconductor (CMOS) electronics. Silicon nitride is moreover transparent to wavelengths that are visible to the human eye and detectable with available silicon detectors, thus offering a photonics platform for a range of applications that is not accessible with the popular silicon-on-insulator platform. However, first-time-right design of large-scale circuits for demanding specifications requires reliable models of the basic photonic building blocks, like evanescent couplers (Figure 1), components that couple power between multiple waveguides. While these models typically exist for the silicon-on-insulator platform, they still lack maturity for the emerging silicon nitride platform. Therefore, we meticulously studied silicon nitride-based evanescent couplers fabricated in our 200mm-wafer facility. We produced the structures in a silicon nitride film deposited with low-temperature PECVD, and patterned it using optical lithography at a wavelength of 193nm and reactive ion etching. We measured the performance of as much as 250 different designs at 532nm wavelength, a central wavelength in the visible range for which laser sources are widespread. For each design, we measured the progressive transmission of up-to 10 cascaded identical couplers (Figure 2(a)), yielding very accurate figures for the coupling factor (Figure 2(b)). This paper presents the trends extracted from this vast data set (Figure 3), and elaborates on the impact of the couplers bend radius and gap on its coupling factors (Figure 4 and Figure 5). We think that the large- scale characterization of evanescent couplers presented in this paper, in excellent agreement with the simulated performance of the devices, forms the basis for a component

  18. Computing Global Mosaics of Titan With the VIMS Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouelic, S.; Cornet, T.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini observes the surface of Titan in seven narrow atmospheric windows in the infrared at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.68-2.78, and 4.9-5.1 microns. We have produced a global hyperspectral mosaic of the complete VIMS data set of Titan between T0 (July 2004) and T112 flyby (July 2015), by merging all the data cubes sorted by increasing spatial resolution, with the high resolution images on top of the mosaic and the low resolution images used as background. We filtered out the observing geometry in order to remove the pixels acquired in too extreme illuminating and viewing conditions, which systematically produce atmospheric artifacts. We used thresholds of 80° both on the incidence and emission angles, 100° on the phase angle, and 7 on the airmass. These thresholds corresponds to a trade-off between surface coverage and data quality. The viewing geometry is normalized at first order using a surface photometric function derived from the observation at 5 μm, where the atmospheric scattering is almost negligible. We also use the wings of the atmospheric windows as a proxy to correct for the amount of additive scattering present in the center of these windows, where the surface is seen by VIMS. Various color composites can then be produced using combinations of different wavelengths to emphasize surface heterogeneities. Among these, a RGB composite with red controlled by the 5 μm image, the green by the 2 μm image and the blue by the 1.27 μm, reveals the extent of equatorial dune fields appearing in brownish tones. Bluish areas corresponds to regions possibly enriched in water ice or other organic compounds. Composite of band ratios such as 1.59/1.27 μm, 2.03/1.27 μm and 1.27/1.08 also prove to be more useful to better emphasize surface variations, even if they are also more sensitive to residual artefacts due to atmospheric and geometric effects or calibration residuals.

  19. Probing Saturn's tropospheric cloud with Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, J. K.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Giles, R. S.; Merlet, C.

    2016-06-01

    In its decade of operation the Cassini mission has allowed us to look deep into Saturn's atmosphere and investigate the processes occurring below its enshrouding haze. We use Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) 4.6-5.2 μm data from early in the mission to investigate the location and properties of Saturn's cloud structure between 0.6 and 5 bar. We average nightside spectra from 2006 over latitude circles and model the spectral limb darkening using the NEMESIS radiative transfer and retrieval tool. We present our best-fit deep cloud model for latitudes -40∘ < λ <50∘ , along with retrieved abundances for NH3, PH3 and AsH3. We find an increase in NH3 abundance at the equator, a cloud base at ˜2.3 bar and no evidence for cloud particles with strong absorption features in the 4.6-5.2 μm wavelength range, all of which are consistent with previous work. Non-scattering cloud models assuming a composition of either NH3 or NH4SH, with a scattering haze overlying, fit limb darkening curves and spectra at all latitudes well; the retrieved optical depth for the tropospheric haze is decreased in the northern (winter) hemisphere, implying that the haze has a photochemical origin. Our ability to test this hypothesis by examining spectra at different seasons is restricted by the varying geometry of VIMS observations over the life of the mission, and the appearance of the Saturn storm towards the end of 2010.

  20. Mimas: Preliminary Evidence For Amorphous Water Ice from VIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Marzo, G. A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Roush, T. L.; Mastrapa, R. M.; DalleOre, C. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a statistical clustering analysis (1,2) on a mosaic of VIMS data cubes obtained on February 13, 2010, for Saturn s satellite Mimas. Seven VIMS cubes were geometrically projected and re-sampled to a common spatial resolution. The clustering technique consists of a partitioning algorithm coupled to a criterion that prevents sub-optimal solutions and tests for the influence of random noise in the measurements. The clustering technique is agnostic about the meaning of the clusters, and scientific interpretation requires their a posteriori evaluation. The preliminary results yielded five clusters, demonstrating that spectral variability across Mimas surface is statistically significant. The ratios of the means calculated for each of the clusters show structure within the 1.6- micron water ice band, as well as the shape and the central wavelength of the strong ice band at 2 micron, that map spatially in patterns apparently related to the topography of Mimas, in particular certain regions in and around Herschel crater. The mean spectra of the five clusters, show similarities with laboratory spectra of amorphous and crystalline H2O ice (3) that are suggestive of the presence of an amorphous ice component in certain regions of Mimas, notably on the central peak of Herschel, on the crater floor, and in faults surrounding the crater. This may represent a mixture of both ice phases, or perhaps a layer of amorphous ice on a base of crystalline ice. Another possible occurrence of amorphous ice appears southwest of Herschel, close to the south pole.

  1. Hunting Down Horizon-scale Effects with Multi-wavelength Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, José; Camera, Stefano; Santos, Mário G.; Maartens, Roy

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation cosmological surveys will probe ever larger volumes of the universe, including the largest scales, near and beyond the horizon. On these scales, the galaxy power spectrum carries signatures of local primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) and horizon-scale general relativistic (GR) effects. However, cosmic variance limits the detection of horizon-scale effects. Combining different surveys via the multi-tracer method allows us to reduce the effect of cosmic variance. This method benefits from large bias differences between two tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution, which suggests a multi-wavelength combination of large volume surveys that are planned on a similar timescale. We show that the combination of two contemporaneous surveys, a large neutral hydrogen intensity mapping survey in SKA Phase 1 and a Euclid-like photometric survey, will provide unprecedented constraints on PNG as well as detection of the GR effects. We forecast that the error on local PNG will break through the cosmic variance limit on cosmic microwave background surveys and achieve σ ({f}{{NL}})≃ 1.4-0.5, depending on assumed priors, bias, and sky coverage. GR effects are more robust to changes in the assumed fiducial model, and we forecast that they can be detected with a signal-to-noise of about 14.

  2. Comparison of Cassini/VIMS and Huygens/DISR observations: Implications for Titan's geology and atmospheric haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Karkoschka, Eric; Lawrence, Ken; LeMouelic, Stephane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Solomonidou, Anezina; Barnes, Jason; Brown, Robert; Buratti, Bonnie; Kirk, Randy; Soderblom, Jason; Soderblom, Larry; Baines, Kevin; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil

    2015-04-01

    The Huygens probe made in situ observations of Titan's atmosphere and surface in an area of Titan now known as a high equatorial plateau named Adiri surrounded by dune fields. These observations, made in January 2005, provide ground truth for remote sensing observations. This study focuses on the comparison between observations made by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on Cassini spacecraft and the Descent Imager / Spectral Radiometer (DISR) on the Huygens probe. Two of the DISR instrument suite are relevant to the comparison with VIMS: the high resolution imager (HRI) and the Downward-Looking Infrared Spectrometer (DLIS) whose spectral range overlaps with the VIMS instrument between 0.9- and 1.6-μm. The comparison provides key information that can be applied to the VIMS data set which globally covers Titan's surface. The VIMS instrument can observe Titan's surface in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centred at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns [1]. Determining the spectral properties of the surface, and therefore the composition, requires the removal of the atmospheric contribution which includes absorption and scattering by atmospheric molecules and haze particles. Radiative transfer models have been using the DISR derived opacities to retrieve the surface albedo of Titan's surface. Light curves derived from VIMS solar occultation observations show that the atmospheric opacities above 80 km are in very good agreement with the DISR observations. However, the extrapolation of the DISR-derived opacities below 80 km at wavelengths above 1.6-μm predicts opacities much larger than those derived from the VIMS solar occultation observations. At 5-μm, the DISR extrapolation predicts a value of the optical depth three times larger than the value derived from the VIMS observations. The radiative transfer model used to retrieve the surface albedo [2] must be corrected accordingly. The VIMS instrument acquired one high resolution image of

  3. Impact of long-range wavelength-scale distortion on fine-structure constant measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Vincent; Webb, John Kelvin

    2015-08-01

    New ideas in unification theories suggest space-time variations of dimensionless physical constants may exist and that they might be within reach of current instrumental precision available from the world's best observatories. State-of-the-art observations already hint at such an effect. If confirmed, fundamental revisions in standard physics would be required.Accurate calibrations are of course crucial in searches for space-time variations of dimensionless physical constants using spectroscopic observations from the world's best observatories. Several recent studies reveal wavelength distortions in optical echelle spectrographs. These are not yet understood and they have not yet been measured using the actual science data used to derive constraints on space-time variation of alpha (critical since they appear to vary with time). In this work we study the impact of such distortions on measurements of the fine structure constant, alpha, observed at high redshift using high-resolution quasar spectroscopy.We have carried out extensive high-performance computing calculations that quantify the effect accurately for the first time, using the same quasar spectra used to measure alpha at high redshift. The spectra we use were obtained using the Keck telescope in Hawaii and the European Southern Observatory's VLT.We explain the detailed methodologies required, using instrumental configuration information from each wavelength setting used in forming a final summed spectrum. Our results show that whilst long-range wavelength-scale distortions do exist, and hence contribute an additional systematic error, these systematics (measured directly from the science exposures themselves) are small and unlikely to explain the spatial variations alpha of reported recently.

  4. Organized chromophoric assemblies for nonlinear optical materials: towards (sub)wavelength scale architectures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialiang; Semin, Sergey; Rasing, Theo; Rowan, Alan E

    2015-03-01

    Photonic circuits are expected to greatly contribute to the next generation of integrated chips, as electronic integrated circuits become confronted with bottlenecks such as heat generation and bandwidth limitations. One of the main challenges for the state-of-the-art photonic circuits lies in the development of optical materials with high nonlinear optical (NLO) susceptibilities, in particular in the wavelength and subwavelength dimensions which are compatible with on-chip technologies. In this review, the varied approaches to micro-/nanosized NLO materials based on building blocks of bio- and biomimetic molecules, as well as synthetic D-π-A chromophores, have been categorized as supramolecular self-assemblies, molecular scaffolds, and external force directed assemblies. Such molecular and supramolecular NLO materials have intrinsic advantages, such as structural diversities, high NLO susceptibilities, and clear structure-property relationships. These "bottom-up" fabrication approaches are proposed to be combined with the "top-down" techniques such as lithography, etc., to generate multifunctionality by coupling light and matter on the (sub)wavelength scale. PMID:25358754

  5. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  6. Probing the parsec-scale accretion flow of 3C 84 with millimeter wavelength polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Plambeck, R. L.; Bower, G. C.; Rao, Ramprasad; Marrone, D. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Johnson, M. D.

    2014-12-10

    We report the discovery of Faraday rotation toward radio source 3C 84, the active galactic nucleus in NGC 1275 at the core of the Perseus Cluster. The rotation measure (RM), determined from polarization observations at wavelengths of 1.3 and 0.9 mm, is (8.7 ± 2.3)× 10{sup 5} rad m{sup –2}, among the largest ever measured. The RM remained relatively constant over a 2 yr period even as the intrinsic polarization position angle wrapped through a span of 300°. The Faraday rotation is likely to originate either in the boundary layer of the radio jet from the nucleus or in the accretion flow onto the central black hole. The accretion flow probably is disk-like rather than spherical on scales of less than a parsec, otherwise the RM would be even larger.

  7. Near-infrared spectra of liquid/solid acetylene under Titan relevant conditions and implications for Cassini/VIMS detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Cornet, T.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-Ph.; McCord, T. B.; Roe, L. A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Le Menn, E.; Wasiak, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Acetylene is thought to be abundant on Titan according to most photochemical models. While detected in the atmosphere, its likely presence at the surface still lacks physical evidence. It is thought that solid acetylene could be a major component of Titan's lakes shorelines and dry lakebed, detected as the 5 μm-bright deposits with the Cassini/VIMS instrument. Acetylene could also be present under its liquid form as dissolved solids in Titan's methane-ethane lakes, as emphasized by thermodynamics studies. This paper is devoted to the near-infrared spectroscopy study of acetylene under solid and liquid phases between 1 and 2.2 μm, synthesized in a Titan simulation chamber that is able to reproduce extreme temperature conditions. From experiments, we observed a ∼10% albedo increase between liquid acetylene at 193-188 K and solid acetylene at 93 K. Using the NIR spectroscopy technique we successfully calculated the reflectivity ratio of solid/liquid acetylene as 1.13. The second difference we observed between liquid and solid acetylene is a shift in the major absorption band detected at 1.54 μm, the shift of ∼0.01 μm occurring toward higher wavelength. In order to assess the detectability of acetylene on Titan using the Cassini/VIMS instrument, we adapted our spectra to the VIMS spectral resolution. The spectral band at 1.55 μm and a negative slope at 2.0 μm falls in the Cassini/VIMS atmospheric windows over several VIMS infrared spectels, thus Cassini/VIMS should be able to detect acetylene.

  8. The ‘Excess’ Emission from the Warm Surface Adjacent to Active Fissures on Enceladus from Combined VIMS and CIRS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Howell, Robert R.

    2015-11-01

    The exciting discovery of thermal emission from the tiger stripe fissures at the S. pole of Enceladus is a major highlight of the Cassini mission. Both VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) detect the thermal ‘blackbody’ spectrum emitted from the warm fissure areas. The VIMS instrument is uniquely suited to measuring the hottest active locations because VIMS covers the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range where the rising edge of the Planck function for these T~200 K areas dominates the emission spectrum. At longer wavelengths, the spectrum is more complicated because contributions from small hot areas and larger cooler areas combine to form the broad emission spectrum that is detected by the CIRS instrument at wavelengths >6.7 microns. It is the combination of VIMS and CIRS spectra that paint a more complete portrait of the fissure heat transfer processes. Using spectra that span both the VIMS and CIRS wavelengths places a stronger constraint on the T distribution near the fissures than consideration of the spectra from either instrument alone.We show that when the best (= highest spatial resolution, 800 m/pixel and smaller) VIMS and CIRS spectra of the fissure thermal emission are considered together, there is a large (up to 400%) component of ‘excess’ emission spanning 7 to 17 microns that requires explanation. New analysis of ~2 km spatial resolution VIMS spectra of the Damascus hot spot on 8/13/2010 are similar to the highest resolution 4/14/2012 VIMS Baghdad spectra, confirming that differences in location or time between the best VIMS and CIRS spectra do not explain away the excess. The obvious interpretation is that there are processes that transfer heat from the fissure eruption to the surface within 400 m of the fissure center in addition to heat conduction through the fissure walls. Candidate heat transfer processes include fallback of large warm low velocity ice particles from the edges of the

  9. Titan's surface composition and atmospheric transmission with solar occultation measurements by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; McCord, Thomas B.; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Solar occultation measurements by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reveal the near-infrared transmission of Titan's atmosphere down to an altitude of ∼40 km. By combining these observations with VIMS reflectance measurements of Titan's surface and knowledge of haze and gas opacity profiles from the Huygens probe, we constrain a simple model for the transfer of radiation in Titan's atmosphere in order to derive surface reflectance in the methane windows used for compositional analysis. The advantages of this model are twofold: (1) it is accurate enough to yield useful results, yet simple enough to be implemented in just a few lines of code, and (2) the model parameters are directly constrained by the VIMS occultation and on-planet measurements. We focus on the 2.0, 2.7, 2.8 and 5.0 μm windows, where haze opacity is minimized, and diagnostic vibrational bands exist for water ice and other candidate surface species. A particularly important result is the strong atmospheric attenuation at 2.7 μm compared to 2.8 μm, resulting in a reversal of apparent spectral slope in a compositionally diagnostic wavelength range. These results show that Titan's surface reflectance is much "bluer" and more closely matched by water ice than the uncorrected spectra would indicate, although the majority of Titan's surface has a spectrum consistent with mixtures (either intimate or areal) of water ice and haze particles precipitated from the atmosphere. Compositions of geologic units can be accurately modeled as mixtures ranging from predominantly water ice (Sinlap crater ejecta and margins of dark equatorial terrain) to predominantly organic-rich (Tui Regio and Hotei Regio), with particles in the size range ∼10-20 μm. In distinguishing between hypothesized formation mechanisms for Tui and Hotei Regio, their organic-rich composition favors a process that concentrates precipitated haze particles, such as playa lake evaporite deposition (Barnes, J.W., Bow

  10. Cassini/VIMS observations of the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belluci, G.; Brown, R.H.; Formisano, V.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Miller, E.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary scientific results obtained from the analysis of VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) lunar images and spectra. These data were obtained during the Cassini Earth flyby in August 1999. Spectral ratios have been produced in order to derive lunar mineralogical maps. Some spectra observed at the north-east lunar limb, show few unusual absorption features located at 0.357, 0.430 and 0.452 ??m, the origin of which is presently unknown. ?? 2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of the Titan's VIMS - units: Using Spectral Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Jérémy F.; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Brown, Robert H.

    2016-04-01

    Since the equatorial regions of Titan have been fully observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [1], the analysis of false-color composites enables distinguishing four main spectral units: the equatorial bright, brown, blue, and 5 μm-bright spectral units [2-4]. More precisely, the equatorial bright plateaus and inselbergs correspond to water-ice substrate coated by a layer of organic sediments. Moreover, the blue materials are more likely enriched in water-ice, which consist of icy particles exposition derived from the high standing plateaus and deposited into the lowlands after fluvial/pluvial processes [5] and/or impact cratering [6]. These blue materials are mainly located at the frontier of the large bright plateaus, and hence considered as transition zones to the brown areas corresponding to the radar dunes [7]. Whereas these brown dunes consist on atmospheric aerosols (i.e. tholins) [4] contaminated with particles of water-ice. Here we try to better characterize these spectral units, through VIMS observations at high resolution from TA (Oct. 2004) to T114 (Nov. 2015). Regions of interest show local transition zones between the equatorial bright areas, the blue materials, and the brown dunes, suggesting weathering and erosional processes (e.g. the Huygens landing site; areas at the east of Xanadu province; and Bohai Sinus at the south of Quivira plateau) [5,8], and impact cratering (e.g. Sinlap, Selk, Menrva, and Paxsi craters) [6,9]. Areas exposing large (i.e. Tui and Hotei Regiones) and small (e.g. Yalaing Terra, NW Belet, and NW Fensal) 5 μm-bright units - presumed evaporitic deposits - are also included in this study [9-11]. Subtle differences in the spectral behavior of these four units can be enhanced by using ratios of VIMS channels. At short wavelengths (i.e. below 2 μm), brown and blue materials seem to correspond to a granular mixture of organic sediments - similar to the atmospheric aerosols - and water-ice particles [7

  12. Development of vehicle intelligent monitoring system (VIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Yozo; Kitagawa, Keisuke; Furukawa, Takashi; Ishii, Hironori

    2005-05-01

    In an urban highway network system such as Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway, to detect conditions of road pavement and expansion joints is a very important issue. Although accurate surface condition can be captured by using a road profiler system, the operating cost is expensive and development of a simpler and more inexpensive system is really needed to reduce monitoring cost. "Vehicle Intelligent Monitoring System (VIMS)" developed for this purpose is described in this paper. An accelerometer and GPS are installed to an ordinary road patrol car. GPS together with a PC computer are used to measure the road surface condition and to identify the location of the vehicle, respectively. Dynamic response of the vehicle is used as a measure of the road pavements surface condition as well as the expansion joints. A prototype of VIMS is installed to a motor car and measurement is made at the actual roads. Accuracy of measuring result and effectiveness of this system are demonstrated; the outline of the system and some of the measurement results are reported herein.

  13. Detection and Characterization of VIM-31, a New Variant of VIM-2 with Tyr224His and His252Arg Mutations, in a Clinical Isolate of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Bebrone, Carine; Huang, Te-Din; Bouchahrouf, Warda; DeGheldre, Yves; Deplano, Ariane; Hoffmann, Kurt; Glupczynski, Youri

    2012-01-01

    We report the first description of the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-31, a new variant of VIM-2 with Tyr224His and His252Arg mutations, in Enterobacter cloacae 11236, which was isolated from blood specimens of a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma in Belgium. blaVIM-31 was found on a class 1 integron located on a self-transferable but not typeable 42-kb plasmid. Compared to values published elsewhere for VIM-2, the purified VIM-31 enzyme showed weaker catalytic efficiency against all the tested beta-lactam agents (except for ertapenem), resulting from lower kcat (except for ertapenem) and higher Km values for VIM-31. PMID:22391550

  14. Multigroup calculations using VIM: A user's guide to ISOVIM

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1992-09-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have long been used to benchmark more a mate approximate solution methods for reactor physics problems. The power of VIM (ref 1) lies partly in the detailed geometrical representations incorporating the (generally) curved surfaces of combinatorial geometry, and partly in the fine energy detail of pointwise cross sections which are independent of the neutron spectrum. When differences arise between Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations, the question arises, is the error in the multigroup cross sections, in the treatment of transport effects, or in the mesh-based treatment of space in the deterministic calculation The answers may not be obvious, but may be identified by combining the exact geometry capability of VIM with the multigroup formalism. We can now run VIM in a multigroup mode by producing special VIM Material files which contain point-wise data describing multigroup data with histograms. This forces VIM to solve the multigroup problem with only three small code modifications. P[sub N] scattering is simulated with the usual tabulated angular distributions with 20 equally-sized scattering angle cosine meshes. This document describes the VIM multigroup capability, the procedures for generating multigroup cross sections for VIM, and their use. The multigroup cross section generating code, ISOVIM, is described, and benchmark testing is documented.

  15. Titan's Surface Composition Investigated by Spectral Mixture Analysis of VIMS/Cassini Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, T. B.; Hayne, P.; Hansen, G. B.

    2007-10-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini and ground-based telescopic observations revealed the diversity of Titan's surface composition. The atmosphere is transparent only in seven narrow ranges of wavelength between 1 and 5 µm, and mixtures of materials certainly occur and distort their absorption bands, even in high spectral resolution measurements. As a consequence, some investigations for specific materials are not fully certain or even failed. In addition, aerosol scattering dominates the signal, especially towards short wavelengths. H2O ice has been reported first by Griffith et al. (2003). Other components are only suggested: CH4 (Coustenis et al. (2005), bitumens and tholins (Lellouch et al., 2004) and CO2 ice (Barnes et al., 2006; Rodriguez et al., 2006) but detection attempt failed for CO2 ice (Hartung et al., 2006). The global spectral shape also contains useful information to derive the surface composition. Thus, we focused on the analysis of VIMS spectra after averaging the signal within each atmospheric window. Data are selected between 70 degrees emergence angle and incidence angles less than 45 degrees for more homogeneity. We apply a linear spectral unmixing model to fit VIMS data with similarly windowed laboratory spectra of known materials and a model of aerosol scattering. Image fraction maps suggest a major role of CO2 in bright regions like the 5-µm bright spot at Tui Regio (Barnes et al., 2005). Results are consistent with the 5-µm window analysis reported in the companion abstracts (Hayne et al., 2007 and in McCord et al., 2007, this meeting). This analysis is also in agreement with H2O ice at locations previously reported by Soderblom et al. (2007) . Atmospheric scattering is ubiquitous and quite homogenous. This analysis revealed a spectral component bright at 2 µm that may be used to identify other surface components.

  16. Power scaling of a wavelength-narrowed diode laser system for pumping alkali vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersman, F. W.; Distelbrink, J. H.; Ketel, J.; Wilson, J.; Watt, D. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report a method for locking the output wavelength and reducing the spectral linewidth of diode lasers by feeding back light to the emitters from a wavelength selective external optical cavity. Ten years ago our team developed a stepped-mirror that allowed a single external cavity to lock the wavelength of a stack of diode array bars by equalizing path lengths between each emitter and the grating. Here we report combining one such step-mirror external cavity with an array of power dividers, each sending a portion of this feedback power to a separate diode array bar stack.

  17. VIMS Observations of Titan During the First Two Close Flybys by the Cassini-Huygens Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, S.; LeMouelic, S.; Sotin, C.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.

    2005-01-01

    The joint NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini-Huygens mission reached the saturnian system on July 1st 2004. It started the observations of Saturn s environment including its atmosphere, rings, and satellites (Phoebe, Iapetus and Titan). Titan, one of the primary scientific interests of the mission, is veiled by an ubiquitous thick haze. Its surface cannot be seen in the visible but as the haze effects decrease with increasing wavelength, there is signal in the infrared atmospheric windows if no clouds are present. Onboard the Cassini spacecraft, the VIMS instrument (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) is expected to pierce the veil of the hazy moon and successfully image its surface in the infrared wavelengths, taking hyperspectral images in the range 0.4 to 5.2 micron. On 26 October (TA) and 13 December 2004 (TB), the Cassini-Huygens mission flew over Titan at an altitude lower than 1200 km at closest approach. VIMS acquired several tens of image cubes with spatial resolution ranging from a few tens of kilometers down to 1.5 kilometer per pixel, demonstrating its capability for studying Titan s geology.

  18. Cassini/VIMS observation of an Io post-eclipse brightening event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellucci, G.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Cruikshank, D.; Nelson, R.M.; Clark, R.N.; Baines, K.H.; Matson, D.; Brown, R.H.; McCord, T.B.; Buratti, B.J.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    During the Cassini-Jupiter flyby, VIMS observed Io at different phase angles, both in full sunlight and in eclipse. By using the sunlight measurements, we were able to produce phase curves in the visual through all the near infrared wavelengths covered by the VIMS instrument (0.85-5.1 ??m). The phase angle spanned from ???2?? to ???120??. The measurements, done just after Io emerged from Jupiter's shadow, show an increase of about 15% in Io's reflectance with respect to what would be predicted by the phase curve. This behavior is observed at wavelengths >1.2 ??m. Moreover, just after emergence from eclipse an increase of about 25% is observed in the depth of SO2 frost bands at 4.07 and 4.35 ??m. At 0.879

  19. Wavelength dependence of scattering properties in the VIS-NIR and links with grain-scale physical and compositional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Fernando, J.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Schmidt, F.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface scattered sunlight carries important information about the composition and microtexture of surface materials, thus enabling tracing back the geological and climatic processes that occurred on the planetary body. Here we perform laboratory spectro-goniometric measurements of granular samples (45-75 μ m fraction) with different composition and physical properties over the VIS-NIR spectral range (0.4-2.5 μ m). To quantify the evolution of the scattering properties over the VIS-NIR, we use an inversion procedure based on a Bayesian approach to estimate photometric parameters from the Hapke radiative transfer model. The granular samples are also carefully characterized by optical and SEM techniques in order to link these scattering variations with the grains' physical properties. Results show that the scattering properties are wavelength-dependent and can vary significantly over the VIS-NIR spectral range. In particular, the phase function of a granular material is affected by both the absorptivity and the external and internal structure of the grains, from the millimeter scale down to the wavelength scale. Our results also confirm that the macroscopic roughness parameter, as defined by Hapke, is to first order correlated with the absorptivity of the particles, through multiple scattering effects, and thus mostly corresponds to a measurement of the particles shadowing. Photometric datasets, typically obtained at a given wavelength that can vary from one study to another, should therefore be compared and interpreted with caution when extrapolating across wavelengths. Our results also suggest that multi-wavelength photometry could potentially provide a much richer signature than with single-wavelength photometry, opening new perspectives into the characterization of surface materials.

  20. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of VIM-1-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae EC_38VIM1

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    The VIM-1-producing multidrug-resistant strain Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from blood culture. The strain showed multiple resistances to clinically used antibiotics, including all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides. Sequence analysis showed the presence of 14 genes associated with resistance to antibiotics, including the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-1 gene, which was located in a class 1 integron. PMID:24009122

  1. Power scaling and wavelength tuning of diode-pumped Nd:LSO laser at 1.35 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Cui, Shengwei; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    We report a power scaled laser operation of diode-pumped Nd:LSO lasers at 1.35 μm. With single-end-pumping scheme, maximum output power reaches 0.77 W at 1358.99 nm in free-running mode. By inserting an etalon, wavelength tuning can be realized with tuning range of at least 6.5 nm from 1356.95 nm to 1363.39 nm. Simultaneous dual-wavelength laser at 1331.63 and 1357.43 nm can also be generated with total output power of 0.19 W, for the first time to our knowledge. Further power scaling to 1.03 W of the 1358.99 nm laser is finally achieved by recycling the remaining pump power, which represents the highest output power so far for 1.3 μm silicate lasers.

  2. Multi-wavelength Monitoring of Lensed Quasars: Deciphering Quasar Structure at Micro-arcseconds Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Ana; Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dai, Xinyu; Chen, Bin; MacLeod, Chelsea Louise; Chartas, George

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing in multiply imaged gravitationally lensed quasars provides us with a unique tool to zoom in on the structure of AGN and explore their physics in more detail. Microlensing magnification, caused primarily by stars and white dwarfs close to the line of sight towards the lensed quasar images, is seen as uncorrelated flux variations due to the relative motions of the quasar, the lens, its stars, and the observer, and it depends on the structural and dynamical properties of the source and the lens. Since the magnification depends upon the size of the source, we can use microlensing to measure the size of quasar emission regions. In essence, the amplitude of the microlensing variability encodes the source size, with smaller sources showing larger variability amplitudes. Using state of the art microlensing techniques, our team has performed pioneering research in the field based on multi-wavelength space and ground-based observations. Among the most remarkable results, using Chandra observations we have set the first quantitative constraints on the sizes of the X-ray emission regions of quasars. In this work l briefly describe the methodology, the results from our previous multi-wavelength monitoring programs, and the next frontier of exploring the dependence of the structure of the X-ray emission regions on black hole mass and X-ray energy.

  3. Metallo-beta-lactamases in clinical Pseudomonas isolates in Taiwan and identification of VIM-3, a novel variant of the VIM-2 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yan, J J; Hsueh, P R; Ko, W C; Luh, K T; Tsai, S H; Wu, H M; Wu, J J

    2001-08-01

    A total of 209 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas (193 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 P. putida, 4 P. stutzeri, and 2 P. fluorescens isolates) with reduced susceptibilities to imipenem and/or ceftazidime were subjected to PCR assays with primers specific for bla(IMP-1), bla(IMP-2), bla(VIM-1), and bla(VIM-2) and sequence analysis to identify the metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) prevalent among these organisms in Taiwan; and 21 isolates gave positive results. Five isolates including two P. putida and three P. stutzeri isolates were found to carry bla(IMP-1), and six isolates including five P. putida and one P. stutzeri isolates harbored bla(VIM-2). The remaining 10 isolates were P. aeruginosa, and all were found to carry a novel variant of bla(VIM-2), designated bla(VIM-3). There are only two nucleotide differences between bla(VIM-2) and bla(VIM-3), leading to two amino acid alterations. Our findings indicate that VIM-2 and its variant have become the most prevalent metalloenzymes in Pseudomonas in Taiwan. Southern hybridization with the bla(VIM-2)-, bla(VIM-3)-, and bla(IMP-1 )-specific probes revealed that only two VIM-2-producing P. putida isolates appeared to carry the MBL gene on plasmids. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that six VIM-3-producing P. aeruginosa isolates and two IMP-1-producing P. stutzeri isolates were genetically related, suggesting that the spread of these MBL genes in Taiwan could be due to clonal dissemination as well as genetic exchange between different clones. PMID:11451678

  4. Wavelength scaling of spiral patterns formed by granular media underneath a rotating fluid

    PubMed

    Zoueshtiagh; Thomas

    2000-05-01

    A spiral pattern formed by granular media underneath a rotating fluid is discussed. Results from a cellular-automaton model are compared to experimental data, and are found to reproduce experimentally observed scalings. A theoretical argument predicting these scalings on the basis of the existence of a critical threshold condition is advanced. It is suggested that the pattern is probably not associated with a hitherto unknown flow instability, as has been speculated previously. It appears that the pattern constitutes some rotating analog to sand ripples in nonrotating systems. PMID:11031612

  5. 1.3 mm WAVELENGTH VLBI OF SAGITTARIUS A*: DETECTION OF TIME-VARIABLE EMISSION ON EVENT HORIZON SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bolin, David E.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Blundell, Ray; Gurwell, Mark A.; Moran, James M.; Primiani, Rurik; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Plambeck, Richard; Chamberlin, Richard; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Honma, Mareki; Oyama, Tomoaki; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Lamb, James; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2011-02-01

    Sagittarius A*, the {approx}4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} black hole candidate at the Galactic center, can be studied on Schwarzschild radius scales with (sub)millimeter wavelength very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). We report on 1.3 mm wavelength observations of Sgr A* using a VLBI array consisting of the JCMT on Mauna Kea, the Arizona Radio Observatory's Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham in Arizona, and two telescopes of the CARMA array at Cedar Flat in California. Both Sgr A* and the quasar calibrator 1924-292 were observed over three consecutive nights, and both sources were clearly detected on all baselines. For the first time, we are able to extract 1.3 mm VLBI interferometer phase information on Sgr A* through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of baselines. On the third night of observing, the correlated flux density of Sgr A* on all VLBI baselines increased relative to the first two nights, providing strong evidence for time-variable change on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii. These results suggest that future VLBI observations with greater sensitivity and additional baselines will play a valuable role in determining the structure of emission near the event horizon of Sgr A*.

  6. Novel variant (bla(VIM-4)) of the metallo-beta-lactamase gene bla(VIM-1) in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pournaras, Spyros; Tsakris, Athanassios; Maniati, Maria; Tzouvelekis, Leonidas S; Maniatis, Antonios N

    2002-12-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate highly resistant to carbapenems was collected from a patient with postsurgical cerebrospinal infection in Greece. The isolate carried a class 1 integron that contained as a sole cassette the gene bla(VIM-4), a novel variant of bla(VIM-1), with one nucleotide difference resulting in a Ser-to-Arg change at amino acid position 175 of the VIM-1 enzyme. This is the first detection of a VIM-1 variant after its appearance in Italy. PMID:12435718

  7. Temporal variations of Titan's surface with Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Stephan, K.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Drossart, P.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lawrence, K.; Bratsolis, E.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze Cassini VIMS data of several areas on Titan's surface looking for variations with time. Three of these locations are near the equator (10-30°S), namely Hotei Regio, Tui Regio and Sotra Patera; in some cases changes in brightness and/or in appearance were reported therein. We also investigate a portion of the undifferentiated plains, areas relatively homogeneous and dark in radar observations, located near 20-25°N. This is a follow-up on a previous paper in which we had inferred surface albedos for some distinct regions of interest (RoIs) identified within the Hotei, Tui and Sotra areas through a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and radiative transfer (RT) modeling (Solomonidou [2014]. J. Geophys. Res. 119, 1729-1747). We apply the same methods here to a larger dataset looking for variations of the surface albedo with time and using the Huygens landing site as the 'ground truth' for calibration purposes. As expected, the undifferentiated plains remain unchanged from January 2010 to June 2012. Our analysis of Hotei Regio data from March 2005 to March 2009 also does not show any significant surface albedo variations within uncertainties. We note however that our RT retrievals are not optimal in this case because of the use of a plane-parallel code and the unfavorable geometry of the associated datasets. Conversely, Tui Regio and Sotra Patera show surface albedo fluctuations with time with pronounced trends for darkening and for brightening respectively. The Tui Regio spectrum exhibits a surface albedo decrease from March 2005 to February 2009, at 0.94, 1.08, 2.03, and 5 μm wavelengths, while the spectrum shape remains the same over that time. On the contrary, the Sotra Patera area became at least two times brighter within a year (April 2005-February 2006), at 1.58 μm, 2.03 μm, and 5 μm. We also retrieved surface albedo spectra for three reference regions surrounding Hotei, Tui and Sotra and for three additional regions we use as 'test cases' that

  8. Temperature maps of Saturn's satellites retrieved from Cassini-VIMS observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Clark, Roger N.; Brown, Robert N.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Scipioni, Francesca; Cerroni, Priscilla

    2014-11-01

    The spectral position of the 3.6 µm continuum peak measured on Cassini-VIMS reflectance spectra is used to infer the temperature of the regolith particles covering the surfaces of Saturn’s icy satellites. Laboratory measurements by Clark et al. (2012) have shown that 3.6 µm peak for pure crystalline water ice particles shifts towards shorter wavelengths when the sample is cooled, moving from about 3.65 µm at T=123 K to about 3.55 µm at T=88 K. A similar trend is observed also in the imaginary part (k) of the refractive index of water ice when the sample is cooled from T=140 K to 20 K (Mastrapa et al., 2009). Since water ice is the dominant endmember on Saturn’s satellites surfaces (Clark and Owensby, 1981; Clark et al., 1984; Filacchione et al., 2012), the measurement of the wavelength at which the 3.6 µm reflectance peak occurs can be considered as a temperature indicator. We report on our temperature maps of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea derived by applying this method to Cassini-VIMS data taken at spatial resolution of 20-40 km/pixel. These maps allow us to correlate the temperature distribution with solar illumination conditions and with geological features. On average Enceladus’ mid-latitudes regions appear at T<100 K while the south pole tiger-stripes active area shows a thermal emission at T>115 K. Tethys’ and Mimas’ equatorial lenses show significant thermal anomalies: despite the fact that these features have low visible albedo they appear colder than the surrounding mid-latitude regions as a consequence of a much higher thermal inertia. On Mimas, the floor of Herschel crater appears warmer (T>115 K) than the adjacent equatorial lens area (T<110 K). Finally, the analysis of Dione shows that the temperature across the bright wispy terrains is lower than the nearby low albedo areas.

  9. Spectral challenges of individual wavelength-scale particles: strong phonons and their distorted lineshapes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Aruna; Malone, Marvin A; Luthra, Antriksh; Lioi, David; Coe, James V

    2013-07-01

    Beyond our own interest in airborne particulate matter, the prediction of extinction and absorption spectra of single particles of mixed composition has wide use in astronomy, geology, atmospheric sciences, and nanotechnology. Single particle spectra present different challenges than traditional spectroscopic approaches. To quantify the amount of a material in a bulk sample (molecules in solution or the gas phase), one might employ the Beer-Lambert law assuming a simple slab-type assay geometry and averaging over orientation, whereas with single particles one might have a specific orientation and require a nonlinear, Mie-like particle theory. The complicating single particle issues include: strong and broad scattering at wavelengths similar to the particle size, phonon lineshape phase shifting, particle shape effects, distortion of transition lineshapes by strong vibrational bands, bi- and trirefringence, crystal orientation effects including dispersion, and composition mixtures. This work uses a combination of three-dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) calculations and experimental infrared spectra on single, crystalline quartz particles to illustrate some of the challenges--in particular the distortion of lineshapes by strong phonons that lie within a range of strong scattering. It turns out that many mineral dust components in the inhalable size range have strong phonons. A Mie-Bruggeman model for single particle spectra is presented to isolate the effects of strong phonons on lineshapes which has utility for analysing the spectra of single, mixed-composition particles. This model will ultimately enable the determination of volume fractions of components in single particles that are mixtures of many materials with strong phonons, as are the dust particles breathed into people's lungs. PMID:23703537

  10. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Federico; Orosei, Roberto; Seu, Roberto; Coradini, Angioletta; Lunine, Jonathan; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Cerroni, Priscilla; Brown, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  11. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R. H.; Cassini Vims; Radar Teams

    2010-04-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  12. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Flamini, E.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lopes, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR medium resolution data on Titan’s surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. Such units in fact reveal compositional trends in the surface, that are likely related to different abundances of simple ices and/or hydrocarbons. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This classification can be expanded and refined as new

  13. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  14. Performance evaluation of a large-scale optical switch based on an arrayed waveguide grating router and wavelength converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Luying; Xu, Zhaowen

    2016-02-01

    A scheduling scheme for a large-scale optical switch is presented and its performance is evaluated. The optical switch is built on an arrayed waveguide grating router (AWGR) and space switching enabled tunable wavelength converter (SS-TWC) and in a Clos switch structure. The SS-TWC has more than one output and in the switch structure enables a multiple fold expansion of the switch port count while using the same dimension AWGR. The switch reconfiguration is triggered by an event, e.g., packet arriving or input port transmitter available for its waiting packets, and the scheduling scheme operates asynchronously. Simulation results demonstrate that the traffic scheduling scheme enables the delivery of high-transmission bandwidth and low packet delay performance, and verify the nonblocking property of the switch.

  15. Large-scale features of the sun at 20 centimeter wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from an experimental study of the characteristics of large-scale coronal structures such as active regions, plages, filaments, and coronal holes using data obtained with the VLA at 1.5 GHz during the period September 11-17, 1988. The radio data were supplemented with He 10830- A, H-alpha, and Calcium-K spectroheliograms. A statistical analysis of some of the characteristics of the active regions is performed. Most of the active region sources were found to be about 100 arcsec in size, with bridges between regions common; lower brightness temperature regions showed a higher degree of polarization in general. The maximum polarization was found at the edge of active regions but well within the associated plages. The degree of polarization from bright active regions was small (not more than 20 percent), in agreement with previous results. Evidence was found for compression of preexisting flux by the emerging flux from a new region, which took place in the apparent absence of magnetic reconnection.

  16. The VIsible and InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph (VIM-IRIM) at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W.; Tritschler, A.; Denker, C.; Wang, H.; Shumko, S.; Ma, J.; Wang, J.; Marquette, B.

    2004-05-01

    The Visible-light and the InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph (VIM-IRIM) are Fabry-Perot based filtergraphs working in a telecentric configuration, planned to upgrade the capability for measuring solar magnetic fields at BBSO. Both filtergraph instruments are designed to work with the combination of a narrow-band prefilter and a single Fabry-Perot etalon. VIM and IRIM will provide high temporal resolution, high spatial resolution (< 0.2 "/pixel image scale), high spectral resolution (< 0.1 Å) simultaneous observation at 600-700 nm and 1.0-1.6 μ m with a substantial field of view 170", respectively. Modifications in the setup allow also for scanning different spectral lines that cover the height range from the solar photosphere up to the solar chromopshere. Here we describe the optical setup and present first observations to demonstrate the feasibility of the instrument. After the instrument has proven to work as a 2D-spectrometer, the upgrade to a 2D spectropolarimeter is planned.

  17. The bcp gene in the bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF operon is important in oxidative stress resistance in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N A; McKenzie, R M E; Fletcher, H M

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis to overcome oxidative stress in the inflammatory environment of the periodontal pocket is critical for its survival. We have previously demonstrated that the recA locus, which carries the bacterioferritin co-migratory protein (bcp) gene and has a unique genetic architecture, plays a role in virulence regulation and oxidative stress resistance in P. gingivalis. To further characterize the bcp gene, which was confirmed to be part of the bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF operon, we created a P. gingivalis bcp-defective isogenic mutant (FLL302) by allelic exchange. Compared with the wild-type, FLL302 had a similar growth rate, black pigmentation, β-hemolysis and UV sensitivity. Although there was no change in the distribution of gingipain activity, there was a 30% reduction in both Arg-X and Lys-X activities in the mutant strain compared with the wild-type. When exposed to 0.25 mm hydrogen peroxide, P. gingivalis FLL302 was more sensitive than the wild-type. In addition, the cloned P. gingivalis bcp gene increased resistance to 0.25 mm hydrogen peroxide in a bcp-defective Escherichia coli mutant. The mutant also demonstrated decreased aerotolerance when compared with the wild-type. Porphyromonas gingivalis FLL302 and the wild-type strain had similar virulence profiles in a mouse model of virulence. These observations suggest that the bcp gene may play a role in oxidative stress resistance but has a decreased functional significance in the pathogenic potential of P. gingivalis. PMID:21214873

  18. Characterizing the Effects of Washing by Different Detergents on the Wavelength-Scale Microstructures of Silk Samples Using Mueller Matrix Polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yang; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Zhou, Jialing; Zeng, Nan; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Silk fibers suffer from microstructural changes due to various external environmental conditions including daily washings. In this paper, we take the backscattering Mueller matrix images of silk samples for non-destructive and real-time quantitative characterization of the wavelength-scale microstructure and examination of the effects of washing by different detergents. The 2D images of the 16 Mueller matrix elements are reduced to the frequency distribution histograms (FDHs) whose central moments reveal the dominant structural features of the silk fibers. A group of new parameters are also proposed to characterize the wavelength-scale microstructural changes of the silk samples during the washing processes. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are carried out to better understand how the Mueller matrix parameters are related to the wavelength-scale microstructure of silk fibers. The good agreement between experiments and simulations indicates that the Mueller matrix polarimetry and FDH based parameters can be used to quantitatively detect the wavelength-scale microstructural features of silk fibers. Mueller matrix polarimetry may be used as a powerful tool for non-destructive and in situ characterization of the wavelength-scale microstructures of silk based materials. PMID:27517919

  19. Characterizing the Effects of Washing by Different Detergents on the Wavelength-Scale Microstructures of Silk Samples Using Mueller Matrix Polarimetry

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yang; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Zhou, Jialing; Zeng, Nan; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Silk fibers suffer from microstructural changes due to various external environmental conditions including daily washings. In this paper, we take the backscattering Mueller matrix images of silk samples for non-destructive and real-time quantitative characterization of the wavelength-scale microstructure and examination of the effects of washing by different detergents. The 2D images of the 16 Mueller matrix elements are reduced to the frequency distribution histograms (FDHs) whose central moments reveal the dominant structural features of the silk fibers. A group of new parameters are also proposed to characterize the wavelength-scale microstructural changes of the silk samples during the washing processes. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are carried out to better understand how the Mueller matrix parameters are related to the wavelength-scale microstructure of silk fibers. The good agreement between experiments and simulations indicates that the Mueller matrix polarimetry and FDH based parameters can be used to quantitatively detect the wavelength-scale microstructural features of silk fibers. Mueller matrix polarimetry may be used as a powerful tool for non-destructive and in situ characterization of the wavelength-scale microstructures of silk based materials. PMID:27517919

  20. Cassini VIMS Preliminary Exploration of Titan's Surface Hemispheric Albedo Dichotomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Brown, R. H.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary evidence that suggests a hemispheric albedo dichotomy on Titan, the largest planetary satellite in the Solar System. We have also studied the photometric properties of several dark circular features on Titan's surface to test if they might be of impact origin. The evidence is derived from photometric analysis of selected surface regions taken at different Titanian longitudes and solar phase angles using images from the Cassini Saturn Orbiter Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The VIMS instrument is able to image Titan's surface at spectral windows (e.g. 2.02 microns) in its atmosphere where methane, the principal atmospheric absorber is transparent. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Simultaneous Mapping of Titan's Atmospheric and Surface Properties Through the Massive Inversion of Cassini/VIMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Appéré, T.; Vincendon, M.; Douté, S.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer solver (i.e. SHDOM) is the most powerful tool to extract simultaneous information of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan from the hyperspectral data of the VIMS imaging spectrometer onboard Cassini. However, the sheer amount of data (~40000 VIMS cubes containing several millions of spectra since the beginning of the mission) makes this approach too demanding in computational time. In our analysis we use a radiative transfer model to create look-up tables for different values of the model's parameters (geometry of the observation, surface albedo, aerosols opacity). We employ up-to-date information on gaseous spectral coefficients, aerosols' optical properties and Titan's climatology. These look-up tables, appropriately interpolated, are then used to minimize the observations and create simultaneous maps of surface albedo at the wavelengths of Titan's spectral windows and of aerosols opacity. This approach allows the gain of a factor of several thousands in computational time and thus, for the first time, a truly massive treatment of VIMS data. This capacity of processing full mapping quickly will consent to monitor closely the global and local seasonal evolution of the atmosphere and the surface. We will present the results of our method applied to some cases of interest. We will analyze several hyperspectral images of the Huygens landing site and show the comparison of our results with observations of other Cassini instruments. We will also investigate regions that have been observed multiple times at different Cassini flybys with different observational conditions, as the T13/T17 mosaic of the Atzlan area. The perspectives for atmospheric and surface seasonal monitoring will be highlighted.

  2. Saturn B and C ring studies at multiple wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-04-01

    We can learn a great deal about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize higher optical depth regions in faint rings such as the outer C ring, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as

  3. The Saturnian satellite Rhea as seen by Cassini VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Wagner, R.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Giese, B.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Brown, R.H.; Filacchione, G.; Cappacioni, F.; Scholten, F.; Buratti, B.J.; Hansen, G.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.; Nelson, R.M.; Matson, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Since the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in June 2004, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer has obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn in the spectral range from 0.35 to 5.2 ??m. Numerous flybys were performed at Saturn's second largest satellite Rhea, providing a nearly complete coverage with pixel-ground resolutions sufficient to analyze variations of spectral properties across Rhea's surface in detail. We present an overview of the VIMS observations obtained so far, as well as the analysis of the spectral properties identified in the VIMS spectra and their variations across its surface compared with spatially highly resolved Cassini ISS images and digital elevation models. Spectral variations measured across Rhea's surface are similar to the variations observed in the VIMS observations of its neighbor Dione, implying similar processes causing or at least inducing their occurrence. Thus, magnetospheric particles and dust impacting onto the trailing hemisphere appear to be responsible for the concentration of dark rocky/organic material and minor amounts of CO 2 in the cratered terrain on the trailing hemisphere. Despite the prominent spectral signatures of Rhea's fresh impact crater Inktomi, radiation effects were identified that also affect the H 2O ice-rich cratered terrain of the leading hemisphere. The concentration of H 2O ice in the vicinity of steep tectonic scarps near 270??W and geologically fresh impact craters implies that Rhea exhibits an icy crust at least in the upper few kilometers. Despite the evidence for past tectonic events, no indications of recent endogenically powered processes could be identified in the Cassini data. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Remote sensing applications in marine science programs at VIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, H. H.; Penney, M. E.; Byrne, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Scientists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) utilized remote sensing in three programs: (1) tonal variations in imagery of wetlands; (2) use of the thermal infrared to delineate the discharge cooling water at the Virginia Electric and Power Company (VEPCO) nuclear power station on the James River; and (3) the use of aerial photography to determine the volume storage function for water in the marsh-bay complex fed by Wachapreague Inlet on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Details of the investigations are given, along with significant results.

  5. Titan's Surface Properties: Correlations Among DISR, RADAR And VIMS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Laurence A.; DISR, Cassini-Huygens; RADAR; VIMS Teams

    2006-09-01

    Titan's vast equatorial fields of longitudinal dunes seen in radar images (Lorenz et al. 2006) correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated as “ brown” and "blue” in color composites (RGB as 2.0, 1.6, 1.3 μm) of near-IR spectral cubes. Earth-based spectroscopy (Griffith et al. 2003) shows a surface consistent with dirty H2O ice; VIMS data show more evidence of H2O ice in darker than brighter units (McCord et al. 2006). Our work shows that relative to the VIMS dark blue unit, the albedo of the dark brown unit is lower at 1.3 μm, higher at 2.0 μm, shows less evidence of water ice, and correlates with the radar-dark dunes. This suggests that the dunes are dryer, higher in hydrocarbon or nitrile composition. VIMS bright units show even less evidence of H2O, inferred to consist of very fine tholin dust. If the rate of deposition of hydrocarbons is 0.1 μm/yr (Yung et al. 1984), the surface would be coated (optically) in a few years unless cleansing processes are active. The dunes must be mobile on this timescale to prevent accumulation of bright coatings. Likewise fluvial/pluvial processes every few decades must be cleaning the dark floors of the incised channels and dark scoured plains at the Huygens landing site. In this model Xanadu is a large inactive region where eolian, fluvial, pluvial activity is currently at a low ebb. Huygens landing in a region of the dark blue materials a few kilometers south of bright highlands and about 30 km south of the nearest occurrence of the VIMS-dark-brown Radar-dunes unit. References: Lorenz, R. D., et al., Science, 312, 2006; Griffith, C. A., et al., Science 300, 2003; McCord, T. B., et al., Pl. Sp. Sci. in press, 2006; Yung, Y. L., et al., Ap. J. Supp, 55, 1984.

  6. Comparison of Verona Integron-Borne Metallo-β-Lactamase (VIM) Variants Reveals Differences in Stability and Inhibition Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Makena, Anne; Düzgün, Azer Ö.; Brem, Jürgen; McDonough, Michael A.; Rydzik, Anna M.; Abboud, Martine I.; Saral, Ayşegül; Çiçek, Ayşegül Ç.

    2015-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) are of increasing clinical significance; the development of clinically useful MBL inhibitors is challenged by the rapid evolution of variant MBLs. The Verona integron-borne metallo-β-lactamase (VIM) enzymes are among the most widely distributed MBLs, with >40 VIM variants having been reported. We report on the crystallographic analysis of VIM-5 and comparison of biochemical and biophysical properties of VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-5, and VIM-38. Recombinant VIM variants were produced and purified, and their secondary structure and thermal stabilities were investigated by circular dichroism analyses. Steady-state kinetic analyses with a representative panel of β-lactam substrates were carried out to compare the catalytic efficiencies of the VIM variants. Furthermore, a set of metalloenzyme inhibitors were screened to compare their effects on the different VIM variants. The results reveal only small variations in the kinetic parameters of the VIM variants but substantial differences in their thermal stabilities and inhibition profiles. Overall, these results support the proposal that protein stability may be a factor in MBL evolution and highlight the importance of screening MBL variants during inhibitor development programs. PMID:26666919

  7. Saturn's north polar cyclone and hexagon at depth revealed by Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Fletcher, L.N.; Showman, A.P.; Roos-Serote, M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    A high-speed cyclonic vortex centered on the north pole of Saturn has been revealed by the visual-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter, thus showing that the tropospheres of both poles of Saturn are occupied by cyclonic vortices with winds exceeding 135 m/s. High-spatial-resolution (~200 km per pixel) images acquired predominantly under night-time conditions during Saturn's polar winter-using a thermal wavelength of 5.1 ??m to obtain time-lapsed imagery of discrete, deep-seated (>2.1-bar) cloud features viewed in silhouette against Saturn's internally generated thermal glow-show a classic cyclonic structure, with prograde winds exceeding 135 m/s at its maximum near 88.3?? (planetocentric) latitude, and decreasing to <30 m/s at 89.7?? near the vortex center and<20 m/s at 80.5??. High-speed winds, exceeding 125 m/s, were also measured for cloud features at depth near 76?? (planetocentric) latitude within the polar hexagon consistent with the idea that the hexagon itself, which remains nearly stationary, is a westward (retrograde) propagating Rossby wave - as proposed by Allison (1990, Science 247, 1061-1063) - with a maximum wave speed near 2-bars pressure of ~125 m/s. Winds are ~25 m/s stronger than observed by Voyager, suggesting temporal variability. Images acquired of one side of the hexagon in dawn conditions as the polar winter wanes shows the hexagon is still visible in reflected sunlight nearly 28 years since its discovery, that a similar 3-lane structure is observed in reflected and thermal light, and that the cloudtops may be typically lower in the hexagon than in nearby discrete cloud features outside of it. Clouds are well-correlated in visible and 5.1 ??m images, indicating little windshear above the ~2-bar level. The polar cyclone is similar in size and shape to its counterpart at the south pole; a primary difference is the presence of a small (<600 km in diameter) nearly pole-centered cloud, perhaps indicative of

  8. Saturn's north polar cyclone and hexagon at depth revealed by Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Momary, Thomas W.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Showman, Adam P.; Roos-Serote, Maarten; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2009-12-01

    A high-speed cyclonic vortex centered on the north pole of Saturn has been revealed by the visual-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter, thus showing that the tropospheres of both poles of Saturn are occupied by cyclonic vortices with winds exceeding 135 m/s. High-spatial-resolution (~200 km per pixel) images acquired predominantly under night-time conditions during Saturn's polar winter - using a thermal wavelength of 5.1 μm to obtain time-lapsed imagery of discrete, deep-seated (>2.1-bar) cloud features viewed in silhouette against Saturn's internally generated thermal glow - show a classic cyclonic structure, with prograde winds exceeding 135 m/s at its maximum near 88.3° (planetocentric) latitude, and decreasing to <30 m/s at 89.7° near the vortex center and<20 m/s at 80.5°. High-speed winds, exceeding 125 m/s, were also measured for cloud features at depth near 76° (planetocentric) latitude within the polar hexagon consistent with the idea that the hexagon itself, which remains nearly stationary, is a westward (retrograde) propagating Rossby wave - as proposed by Allison (1990, Science 247, 1061-1063) - with a maximum wave speed near 2-bars pressure of ~125 m/s. Winds are ~25 m/s stronger than observed by Voyager, suggesting temporal variability. Images acquired of one side of the hexagon in dawn conditions as the polar winter wanes shows the hexagon is still visible in reflected sunlight nearly 28 years since its discovery, that a similar 3-lane structure is observed in reflected and thermal light, and that the cloudtops may be typically lower in the hexagon than in nearby discrete cloud features outside of it. Clouds are well-correlated in visible and 5.1 μm images, indicating little windshear above the ~2-bar level. The polar cyclone is similar in size and shape to its counterpart at the south pole; a primary difference is the presence of a small (<600 km in diameter) nearly pole-centered cloud, perhaps indicative of

  9. High resolution CASSINI VIMS mosaics of Titan and the icy satellites of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Matz, K.; Brown, R. H.

    2005-12-01

    The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer VIMS onboard the CASSINI spacecraft obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn after its arrival at Saturn in June 2004. VIMS operates in a spectral range of 0.3 and 5.1 microns, generating image cubes in which each pixel represents a spectrum consisting of 352 contiguous wavebands. VIMS consists of two separate optical systems, the visible channel VIMS-V and the infrared channel VIMS-IR. VIMS-V acquires its data in push-broom-mode and views one row of a square scene at a time. VIMS-IR uses a linear array detector in order to acquire its data in whiskbroom mode, where it views only one single spatial pixel per exposure. Each of these channels can operated in different modi which cause differences in size and spatial resolution of the image cubes. Therefore, image cubes which combine the spectral data of both optical systems may result in a different location of the target in the VIS-channels and the IR-channels within the image cubes. To analyse the spectral data in a spatial way it is necessary that all 352 spectral elements of each pixel show the same area of the specific surface. We developed an algorithm to reproject each pixel geometrically and to convert the spectral data into a map projection. The algorithm includes the mosaicking of different VIMS observations. Based on these mosaics spatial maps of the spectral properties for each satellite can be derived and can be attributed to location, geological and geomorphologic features. VIMS mosaics of the available VIMS data of the Saturnian satellites, including Titan will be presented.

  10. Spectral changes associated with rain on Titan: observations by VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Dalba, P. A.; Barnes, J.; Baines, K. H.; Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.

    2012-04-01

    Titan has an erosional cycle similar to that on the Earth, with solid, liquid, and gaseous methane taking the place of the Earth’s water. Lakes and ponds, drainage and fluvial features, and clouds all suggest that rain is falling on Titan. A darkening event near clouds covering the Huygens landing site, followed by a return to the previous state, strongly suggested rainfall followed by evaporation (Turtle et al., 2011). The Cassini Visual infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) obtains medium resolution spectra in the 0.35-5.1 μm spectral region, which includes several atmospheric “windows” that offer glimpses of Titan’s surface. The albedo of the surface can be measured in these windows, and some compositional information, including changes through time, can be derived. VIMS observed an area near 15º south latitude and 330º longitude at two separate times: in August 2009 during T61 and in May 2011 during T76. A spectral analysis of this region, including compensation for varying atmospheric path lengths, shows substantial spectral changes in the two and five micron atmospheric windows. A comparison of the changes with that expected from the deposition and later evaporation of liquid methane or another hydrocarbon shows them to be consistent with rain on Titan. Ackowledgements: This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012 all rights reserved. References: Turtle, E. P. et al. (2011) Science 331, 1414.

  11. Multigroup calculations using VIM: A user`s guide to ISOVIM

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1992-09-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have long been used to benchmark more a mate approximate solution methods for reactor physics problems. The power of VIM (ref 1) lies partly in the detailed geometrical representations incorporating the (generally) curved surfaces of combinatorial geometry, and partly in the fine energy detail of pointwise cross sections which are independent of the neutron spectrum. When differences arise between Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations, the question arises, is the error in the multigroup cross sections, in the treatment of transport effects, or in the mesh-based treatment of space in the deterministic calculation? The answers may not be obvious, but may be identified by combining the exact geometry capability of VIM with the multigroup formalism. We can now run VIM in a multigroup mode by producing special VIM Material files which contain point-wise data describing multigroup data with histograms. This forces VIM to solve the multigroup problem with only three small code modifications. P{sub N} scattering is simulated with the usual tabulated angular distributions with 20 equally-sized scattering angle cosine meshes. This document describes the VIM multigroup capability, the procedures for generating multigroup cross sections for VIM, and their use. The multigroup cross section generating code, ISOVIM, is described, and benchmark testing is documented.

  12. VimA mediates multiple functions that control virulence in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Aruni, A W; Robles, A; Fletcher, H M

    2013-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a black-pigmented, gram-negative anaerobe, is an important etiological agent of periodontal disease. Its ability to survive in the periodontal pocket and orchestrate the microbial/host activities that can lead to disease suggest that P. gingivalis possesses a complex regulatory network involving transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The vimA (virulence modulating) gene is part of the 6.15-kb bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF-aroG locus and plays a role in oxidative stress resistance. In addition to the glycosylation and anchorage of several surface proteins including the gingipains, VimA can also modulate sialylation, acetyl coenzyme A transfer, lipid A and its associated proteins and may be involved in protein sorting and transport. In this review, we examine the multifunctional role of VimA and discuss its possible involvement in a major regulatory network important for survival and virulence regulation in P. gingivalis. It is postulated that the multifunction of VimA is modulated via a post-translational mechanism involving acetylation. PMID:23279905

  13. VIS-IR spectrograms of Saturn's rings retrieved from Cassini-VIMS radial mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P.; Hedmann, M. M.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Cerroni, P.

    2011-10-01

    Context: Cassini-VIMS has harvested a large number of Saturn's rings radial mosaics at very different observation geometries. Aims: This work is focused on the retrieval of rings average composition (water ice and red cromophores), regolith grain sizes and photometric parameters. Method: We have implemented a procedure to build ring spectrograms, e.g., 2D arrays that contain the full spectral (0.35 - 5.0 μm) and spatial (from 73.500 to 141.375 km) information sampled at 400 km/bin spatial resolution. This processing is applied to several mosaics acquired at different illumination phases (12° to 136°) and opening angles (-21° to +5°). Results: Ring spectra show reddening at VIS wavelengths while maintaining a strong similarity to water ice in the IR. Differences both in VIS reddening, water ice abundance and grain sizes are retrieved across different rings regions. Conclusions: Two important findings are that 1) both VIS reddening and water ice band depths increase at high phases, thus indicating that the red contaminant is intimately mixed in water ice grains; 2) typical regolith grain sizes are between 10-40 μm in the C ring, 40-60 μm in the Cassini Division (CD) and >100 μm in the A and B rings.

  14. Latitudinal variations in Titan's methane and haze from Cassini VIMS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penteado, P.F.; Griffith, C.A.; Tomasko, M.G.; Engel, S.; See, C.; Doose, L.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.; Sotin, C.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze observations taken with Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), to determine the current methane and haze latitudinal distribution between 60??S and 40??N. The methane variation was measured primarily from its absorption band at 0.61 ??m, which is optically thin enough to be sensitive to the methane abundance at 20-50 km altitude. Haze characteristics were determined from Titan's 0.4-1.6 ??m spectra, which sample Titan's atmosphere from the surface to 200 km altitude. Radiative transfer models based on the haze properties and methane absorption profiles at the Huygens site reproduced the observed VIMS spectra and allowed us to retrieve latitude variations in the methane abundance and haze. We find the haze variations can be reproduced by varying only the density and single scattering albedo above 80 km altitude. There is an ambiguity between methane abundance and haze optical depth, because higher haze optical depth causes shallower methane bands; thus a family of solutions is allowed by the data. We find that haze variations alone, with a constant methane abundance, can reproduce the spatial variation in the methane bands if the haze density increases by 60% between 20??S and 10??S (roughly the sub-solar latitude) and single scattering absorption increases by 20% between 60??S and 40??N. On the other hand, a higher abundance of methane between 20 and 50 km in the summer hemisphere, as much as two times that of the winter hemisphere, is also possible, if the haze variations are minimized. The range of possible methane variations between 27??S and 19??N is consistent with condensation as a result of temperature variations of 0-1.5 K at 20-30 km. Our analysis indicates that the latitudinal variations in Titan's visible to near-IR albedo, the north/south asymmetry (NSA), result primarily from variations in the thickness of the darker haze layer, detected by Huygens DISR, above 80 km altitude. If we assume little to no latitudinal methane

  15. VIMS spectral mapping observations of Titan during the Cassini prime mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Griffith, C.; Penteado, P.; Tosi, F.; Pitman, K.M.; Soderblom, L.; Stephan, K.; Hayne, P.; Vixie, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Bellucci, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    This is a data paper designed to facilitate the use of and comparisons to Cassini/visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) spectral mapping data of Saturn's moon Titan. We present thumbnail orthographic projections of flyby mosaics from each Titan encounter during the Cassini prime mission, 2004 July 1 through 2008 June 30. For each flyby we also describe the encounter geometry, and we discuss the studies that have previously been published using the VIMS dataset. The resulting compliation of metadata provides a complementary big-picture overview of the VIMS data in the public archive, and should be a useful reference for future Titan studies. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Cassini-VIMS Observations of Stellar Occultations by Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, M. M.; Wallis, B. D.; Cassini-VIMS Team

    2007-07-01

    Since entering orbit around Saturn in July 2004, the VIMS instrument on the Cassini spacecraft has observed 15 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings, at incidence angles ranging from 3.5 to 51 degrees. The radial resolution of the resulting optical depth profiles varies from 200 meters to 4 km. We will present selected results from these observations, concentrating on the narrow, kinky, multistranded and eccentric F ring. An initial series of grazing occultations of the long-period variable star, o Ceti yielded eight high S/N profiles of the F ring, revealing a dense central strand of FWHM 25-45 km flanked by inner and outer strands which are variable both in normal optical depth (0.005-0.035) and radial separation from the core (250-465 km). All three strands are embedded in a broad `skirt' of diffuse material which is at least 1200 km wide. These results are qualitatively consistent with Cassini imaging observations (Porco etal. 2005). Despite local radial distortions of up to 50 km, the measured radii of the F ring's core are found to be remarkably consistent with the model developed by Bosh etal. (2002) - based on Voyager and Earth-based occultation data - of an eccentric, inclined keplerian orbit precessing under the influence of Saturn's oblate figure. Our measured radii of the fainter flanking strands, on the other hand, do not appear to support the one-armed trailing spiral model developed by Charnoz etal. (2005). One VIMS profile across the F ring shows evidence for a dense embedded clump, approximately 1 km in diameter, which may correspond to one of the bright pointlike features seen in several Cassini images. This clump was also seen in simultaneous observations by the UVIS instrument (Esposito etal. 2007), where it is clearly seen to be partially transparent (ie., it is not an embedded moonlet).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The KepVIM catalog (Makarov+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Goldin, A.

    2016-07-01

    The algorithm described in section 4 was applied to the entire collection of "long-cadence" files archived in the MAST for the principal Kepler mission. A single variability-induced motion (VIM) detection corresponds to a complete data set for a given target collected during one quarter. Therefore, a single target can generate up to 17 VIM detections in the catalog. (2 data files).

  18. Outbreak of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing VIM-1 carbapenemase in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsakris, A; Pournaras, S; Woodford, N; Palepou, M F; Babini, G S; Douboyas, J; Livermore, D M

    2000-03-01

    Resistance to imipenem and meropenem was observed in 211 (16.5%) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered in a Greek university hospital during 1996 to 1998. In six isolates selected from throughout this period, high-level resistance to both carbapenems (MICs >/= 128 microg/ml) was associated with production of the class B beta-lactamase VIM-1. bla(VIM)-bearing isolates belonged to serotype O:12 and were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. PMID:10699045

  19. Room-temperature continuous-wave operation of lateral current injection wavelength-scale embedded active-region photonic-crystal laser.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shinji; Takeda, Koji; Sato, Tomonari; Notomi, Masaya; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Taniyama, Hideaki; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2012-02-13

    We have developed a wavelength-scale embedded active-region photonic-crystal laser using lateral p-i-n structure. Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation are used for p- and n-type doping. Room-temperature continuous-wave lasing behavior is clearly observed from the injection current dependence of the output power, 3dB-bandwidth of the peak, and lasing wavelength. The threshold current is 390 μA and the estimated effective threshold current is 9.4 μA. The output power in output waveguide is 1.82 μW for a 2.0-mA current injection. These results indicate that the embedded active-region structure effectively reduce the thermal resistance. Ultrasmall electrically driven lasers are an important step towards on-chip photonic network applications. PMID:22418134

  20. Titan's aerosol optical properties with VIMS observations at the limb of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannou, Pascal; Seignovert, Benoit; Lavvas, Panayotis; Lemouelic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The study of Titan properties with remote sensing relies on a good knowledge of the atmosphere properties. The in-situ observations made by Huygens combined with recent advances in the definition of methane properties enable to model and interpret observations with a very good accuracy. Thanks to these progresses, we can analyze in this work the observations made at the limb of Titan in order to retrieve information on the haze properties as its vertical profiles but also the spectral behaviour between 0.88 and 5.2 μm.To study the haze layer and more generally the source of opacities in the stratosphere, we use som observation made at the limbe of Titan by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. We used a model in spherical geometry and in single scattering, and we accounted for the multiple scattering with a parallel plane model that evaluate the multiple scattering source function at the plane of the limb.Our scope is to retrieve informations about the vertical distribution of the haze, its spectral properties, but also to obtain details about the shape of the methane windows to disantangle the role of the methane and of the aerosols.We started our study at the latitude of 55°N, with a image taken in 2006 with a relatively high spatial resolution (for VIMS). Our preliminary results shows the spectral properties of the aerosols are the same whatever the altitude. This is a consequence of the large scale mixing. From limb profile between 0.9 and 5.2 μm, we can probe the haze layer from about 500 km (at 0.9 μm) to the ground (at 5.2 μm). We find that the vertical profile of the haze layer shows three distinct scale heights with transitions around 250 km and 350 km. We also clearly a transition around 70-90 km that may be due to the top of a condensation layer.

  1. Emitted Power of Jupiter Based on Cassini CIRS and VIMS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Mark A.; West, Robert A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Trammel, Harold J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Nixon, Conor A.; Filachionne, Gianrico; Fry, Patrick M.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The emitted power of Jupiter and its meridional distribution are determined from observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during its flyby en route to Saturn in late 2000 and early 2001. Jupiter's global- average emitted power and effective temperature are measured to be 14.10+/-0.03 W/sq m and 125.57+/-0.07 K, respectively. On a global scale, Jupiter's 5-micron thermal emission contributes approx. 0.7+/-0.1 % to the total emitted power at the global scale, but it can reach approx. 1.9+/-0.6% at 15degN. The meridional distribution of emitted power shows a significant asymmetry between the two hemispheres with the emitted power in the northern hemisphere 3.0+/-0.3% larger than that in the southern hemisphere. Such an asymmetry shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-01) is not present during the Voyager epoch (1979). In addition, the global-average emitted power increased approx. 3.8+/-1.0% between the two epochs. The temporal variation of Jupiter's total emitted power is mainly due to the warming of atmospheric layers around the pressure level of 200 mbar. The temporal variation of emitted power was also discovered on Saturn (Li et al., 2010). Therefore, we suggest that the varying emitted power is a common phenomenon on the giant planets.

  2. Emitted Power Of Jupiter Based On Cassini CIRS And VIMS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Mark A.; West, Robert A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Trammel, Harold J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Nixon, Conor A.; Filacchione, Gianrico; Fry, Patrick M.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The emitted power of Jupiter and its meridional distribution are determined from observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during its flyby en route to Saturn in late 2000 and early 2001. Jupiter's global- average emitted power and effective temperature are measured to be 14.10+/-0.03 W/sq m and 125.57+/-0.07 K, respectively. On a global scale, Jupiter's 5-micron thermal emission contributes approx. 0.7+/-0.1 % to the total emitted power at the global scale, but it can reach approx. 1.9+/-0.6% at 15degN. The meridional distribution of emitted power shows a significant asymmetry between the two hemispheres with the emitted power in the northern hemisphere 3.0+/-0.3% larger than that in the southern hemisphere. Such an asymmetry shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-01) is not present during the Voyager epoch (1979). In addition, the global-average emitted power increased approx. 3.8+/-1.0% between the two epochs. The temporal variation of Jupiter's total emitted power is mainly due to the warming of atmospheric layers around the pressure level of 200 mbar. The temporal variation of emitted power was also discovered on Saturn (Li et al., 2010). Therefore, we suggest that the varying emitted power is a common phenomenon on the giant planets.

  3. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. I. UNIVERSAL SCALING LAWS OF SPACE AND TIME PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2013-09-20

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D{sub 2}), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient κ, spreading exponent β, and maximum expansion velocities v{sub max}) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)∝L {sup –3}, N(A)∝A {sup –2}, N(V)∝V {sup –5/3}, N(T)∝T {sup –2}, and D{sub 2} = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation κ∝L {sup 0.94±0.01} and the three-parameter scaling law L∝κ T {sup 0.1}, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients κ than confined flares (without CMEs)

  4. Characterization of the new metallo-beta-lactamase VIM-13 and its integron-borne gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate in Spain.

    PubMed

    Juan, Carlos; Beceiro, Alejandro; Gutiérrez, Olivia; Albertí, Sebastián; Garau, Margalida; Pérez, José L; Bou, Germán; Oliver, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    During a survey conducted to evaluate the incidence of class B carbapenemase (metallo-beta-lactamase [MBL])-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from hospitals in Majorca, Spain, five clinical isolates showed a positive Etest MBL screening test result. In one of them, strain PA-SL2, the presence of a new bla(VIM) derivative (bla(VIM-13)) was detected by PCR amplification with bla(VIM-1)-specific primers followed by sequencing. The bla(VIM-13)-producing isolate showed resistance to all beta-lactams (except aztreonam), gentamicin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin. VIM-13 exhibited 93% and 88% amino acid sequence identities with VIM-1 and VIM-2, respectively. bla(VIM-13) was cloned in parallel with bla(VIM-1), and the resistance profile conferred was analyzed both in Escherichia coli and in P. aeruginosa backgrounds. Compared to VIM-1, VIM-13 conferred slightly higher levels of resistance to piperacillin and lower levels of resistance to ceftazidime and cefepime. VIM-13 and VIM-1 were purified in parallel as well, and their kinetic parameters were compared. The k(cat)/K(m) ratios for the antibiotics mentioned above were in good agreement with the MIC data. Furthermore, EDTA inhibited the activity of VIM-13 approximately 25 times less than it inhibited the activity of VIM-1. VIM-13 was harbored in a class 1 integron, along with a new variant (Ala108Thr) of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme encoding gene aacA4, which confers resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin. Finally, the VIM-13 integron was apparently located in the chromosome, since transformation and conjugation experiments consistently yielded negative results and the bla(VIM-13) probe hybridized only with the genomic DNA. PMID:18644957

  5. Identification of VIM-2-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Tanzania Is Associated with Sequence Types 244 and 640 and the Location of blaVIM-2 in a TniC Integron

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Sabrina; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Aboud, Said; Blomberg, Bjørn; Maselle, Samuel Y.; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Langeland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data on carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria on the African continent are limited. Here, we report the identification of VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Tanzania. Eight out of 90 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary care hospital in Dar es Salaam were shown to harbor blaVIM-2. The blaVIM-2-positive isolates belonged to two different sequence types (ST), ST244 and ST640, with blaVIM-2 located in an unusual integron structure lacking the 3′ conserved region of qacΔE1-sul1. PMID:25331700

  6. Cloud structure of Jupiter’s troposphere from Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Rohini S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G.

    2014-11-01

    Cassini VIMS 4.5-5.1μm thermal emission spectra were used to study the composition and cloud structure of Jupiter’s middle troposphere during the 2000/2001 flyby. The radiance observed varies considerably across the planet (a factor of 50 between the warm North Equatorial Belt and the cool Equatorial Zone) but the spectral shape remains constant, suggesting the presence of a spectrally flat, spatially inhomogeneous cloud deck. Spectra were analysed using the NEMESIS radiative transfer code and retrieval algorithm. Both night- and day-side nadir spectra could be well reproduced using a model with a single, compact, grey cloud deck. For hotter spectra, this grey cloud could be located as deep as 3.0 bar, but the cooler spectra required the cloud deck to be at pressures of 1.2 bar or less. At these pressures, the clouds are expected to be NH4SH or NH3, but the single-scattering albedos of pure ices of NH3 or NH4SH produce spectral features that are incompatible with the VIMS data. These spectral signatures may be masked by complex rimming/coating processes, and/or by the presence of multiple cloud decks. Retrievals show that the cloud optical thickness varies significantly with latitude and longitude. The North Equatorial Belt contains discrete cloud-free “hot-spots” whose radiance is twice as bright as the coolest parts of the belt. The turbulent region in the wake of the Great Red Spot (GRS) has the thickest clouds of the South Equatorial Belt; these begin to thin out on the opposite hemisphere, 180° away from the GRS. The relatively low spectral resolution and model degeneracies mean that no variability could be detected (or ruled out) in the gaseous species (NH3, PH3 and other disequilibrium species). A limb darkening analysis was carried out using the nightside observations. Extreme inhomogeneity within latitude circles meant that simultaneous retrievals at different emission angles were not possible. However, forward modelling was used to show that

  7. Multiemission wavelength picosecond time-resolved fluorescence decay data obtained on the millisecond time scale: application to protein:DNA interactions and protein-folding reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechem, Joseph M.

    1992-04-01

    One of the major aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy which differentiates this technique from many other spectroscopic approaches is the inherent multidimensional nature of the data. For instance, the basic pulsed-laser fluorescence data set is characterized by fluorescence versus: emission wavelength, polarization state (parallel and perpendicular intensities), time of emission (picoseconds to nanoseconds), and time of biological reaction (milliseconds to minutes). Usually, this six-dimensional data set is obtained piecemeal, single dimension at a time; often complete data sets are not even collected. This is especially true of the biological time scale axis. Data acquisition times for picosecond decay data are typically seconds to minutes, and, therefore, it has not been generally possible to perform this experiment in a kinetic mode. What is described in this report is the construction of a parallel multichannel time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorometer which is capable of simultaneous collection of: fluorescence vs. picosecond to nanosecond time vs. emission wavelength vs. polarization state vs. millisecond to second time. Use is made of two multi-anode microchannel plate detectors, each obtaining data at two different polarization states, six different emission wavelengths, along 12 independent TCSPC channels. This instrument is interfaced to a three-syringe stepper motor controlled stop-flow apparatus, and picosecond decay data along all of these channels is stored and collected by two 33 MHz 80486 computers at rates approaching 1200 - 12000 data sets per second.

  8. Scaling single-wavelength optical interconnects to 180 Gb/s with PAM-M and pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Stefanos; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Argyris, Nikolaos; Spatharakis, Christos; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2016-03-01

    Faced with surging datacenter traffic demand, system designers are turning to multi-level optical modulation with direct detection as the means of reaching 100 Gb/s in a single optical lane; a further upgrade to 400 Gb/s is envisaged through wavelength-multiplexing of multiple 100 Gb/s strands. In terms of modulation formats, PAM-4 and PAM-8 are considered the front-runners, striking a good balance between bandwidth-efficiency and implementation complexity. In addition, the emergence of energy-efficient, high-speed CMOS digital-to-analog converters (DACs) opens up new possibilities: Spectral shaping through digital filtering will allow squeezing even more data through low-cost, low-bandwidth electro-optic components. In this work we demonstrate an optical interconnect based on an EAM that is driven directly with sub-volt electrical swing by a 65 GSa/s arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). Low-voltage drive is particularly attractive since it allows direct interfacing with the switch/server ASIC, eliminating the need for dedicated, power-hungry and expensive electrical drivers. Single-wavelength throughputs of 180 and 120 Gb/s are experimentally demonstrated with 60 Gbaud optical PAM-8 and PAM-4 respectively. Successful transmission over 1250 m SMF is achieved with direct-detection, using linear equalization via offline digital signal processing in order to overcome the strong bandwidth limitation of the overall link (~20 GHz). The suitability of Nyquist pulse shaping for optical interconnects is also investigated experimentally with PAM-4 and PAM-8, at a lower symbol rate of 40 Gbaud (limited by the sampling rate of the AWG). To the best of our knowledge, the rates achieved are the highest ever using optical PAM-M formats.

  9. VIMS Near-Infrared Imaging and Spectra of Precipitation-Associated Surface Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Bow, Jacob; Dalba, Paul A.; Perry, Jason; Brown, Robert H.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; LeMouelic, Stephane; Baines, Kevin H.; Sotin, Christophe; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Malaska, Michael J.; McCord, Thomas B.; Clark, Roger N.; Jaumann, Ralf; Hayne, Paul; Nicholson, Philip D.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini ISS saw large-scale surface darkenings in the wake of a tropical cloudburst event in 2010 September. In concert with the abstract by Turtle et al., in this presentation we show that weeks to months after darkening the surfaces did not revert to their pre-cloudburst brightness, but rather became brighter. VIMS observations of four distinct areas show these brightenings: Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio, Concordia Regio, and Adiri. Each study area brightened within each near-infrared atmospheric window, though not equally. In each case the brightened areas fade to their original spectra over a timescale of about a year. This rapid reversion time is inconsistent with chemical alteration of the surface - haze fallout would take hundreds to tens of thousands of years to recover an altered surface. Instead the deposition and removal of a volatile layer is more consistent with the observed evolution. Different scenarios for the production and removal of such a layer are possible. We will discuss these scenarios, which include evaporative cooled frost that later sublimates, and dissolution and reprecipitation of surface organics that may later be eroded by wind.

  10. Purification and biochemical characterization of the VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, N; Caravelli, B; Docquier, J D; Galleni, M; Frère, J M; Amicosante, G; Rossolini, G M

    2000-11-01

    VIM-1 is a new group 3 metallo-beta-lactamase recently detected in carbapenem-resistant nosocomial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Mediterranean area. In this work, VIM-1 was purified from an Escherichia coli strain carrying the cloned bla(VIM-1) gene by means of an anion-exchange chromatography step followed by a gel permeation chromatography step. The purified enzyme exhibited a molecular mass of 26 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and an acidic pI of 5.1 in analytical isoelectric focusing. Amino-terminal sequencing showed that mature VIM-1 results from the removal of a 26-amino-acid signal peptide from the precursor. VIM-1 hydrolyzes a broad array of beta-lactam compounds, including penicillins, narrow- to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems, and mechanism-based serine-beta-lactamase inactivators. Only monobactams escape hydrolysis. The highest catalytic constant/K(m) ratios (>10(6) M(-1). s(-1)) were observed with carbenicillin, azlocillin, some cephalosporins (cephaloridine, cephalothin, cefuroxime, cefepime, and cefpirome), imipenem, and biapenem. Kinetic parameters showed remarkable variability with different beta-lactams and also within the various penam, cephem, and carbapenem compounds, resulting in no clear preference of the enzyme for any of these beta-lactam subfamilies. Significant differences were observed with some substrates between the kinetic parameters of VIM-1 and those of other metallo-beta-lactamases. Inactivation assays carried out with various chelating agents (EDTA, 1,10-o-phenanthroline, and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) indicated that formation of a ternary enzyme-metal-chelator complex precedes metal removal from the zinc center of the protein and revealed notable differences in the inactivation parameters of VIM-1 with different agents. PMID:11036013

  11. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Titan's atmospheric and surface properties of the Ontario Lacus region from Cassini/VIMS remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrão, A.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M.; Coradini, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Filacchione, G.; Lunine, J.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of oceans or lakes of liquid hydrocarbons on Titan's surface was predicted more than 20 years ago. These would serve as a source of atmospheric methane and would also contain the end products of the photochemical reactions occurring high in the atmosphere. Although no oceans were ever found, lake-like features poleward of 70°N were first detected by the radar instrument onboard Cassini on July 2006. Before that, Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images of the south pole from June 2005 revealed an intriguing lake-like dark feature named Ontario Lacus. Recently an interesting and important result has been published about the identification of liquid ethane contained within Ontario Lacus (Brown et al. 2008). The authors analysed a near-infrared Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observation of the Ontario Lacus performed the 2007 December 4, during the T38 flyby. Their result needs nevertheless to be confirmed and improved using a more detailed methodology. Here we report on the analysis of this observation using a radiative transfer model (the libRadtran package) to simulate the atmospheric contribution. LibRadtran is a library of tools developed for radiative transfer calculations in the Earth's atmosphere, but adapted here to Titan's atmospheric conditions. Extinction sources were calculated for atmospheric methane and aerosols as a function of altitude and wavelength. Using the DISORT solver we were able to invert the surface spectrum of the lake interior and of an adjacent, non-lake region, in the near-infrared methane windows. The surface spectra were then compared with spectra of different ices and liquid hydrocarbons, yielding constraints on the possible constituents of Titan's lakes and their adjacent areas. Reference: Brown, R. et al. 2008. The identification of liquid ethane in Titan's Ontario Lacus, Nature 454, 607-610.

  13. VIMS Observations of Saturn’s Rings Investigated by means of Montecarlo Ray Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, Mauro; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.

    2012-10-01

    The VIMS instrument onboard Cassini has extensively observed the Saturn’s rings producing a number of mosaics that allow the study of the radial variability of the rings spectral properties at visible and infrared wavelengths. Along with compositional variations some systematic effects induced by observation geometry are observed in the rings spectra, such as phase angle dependence of water ice band depths and spectral reddening. In this paper we investigate the mechanisms at the origin of these photometric effects by adopting a Montecarlo raytracing, in the geometric optics limit. We report about the results obtained from several simulations varying rings physical properties (optical depth, particle size distribution, single particle phase function) in order to investigate the variation of the angular distribution of the light scattered by the ring plane. The results of these simulations indicate that even if the total power reflected by the rings plane is dominated by single scattered light, the multiple scattered fraction (inter-particle scattering) produces a dependence of the spectral features on observation geometry (phase angle) at least for the denser regions of the rings. Moreover using the same Montecarlo code we are able to reproduce the dependence of the spectral features (band depths, spectral slopes) on viewing geometry (incidence, emergence and phase angles). Disentangling illumination effects from rings particle albedo permits a more accurate retrieval of the physical properties (grain size, amount of contaminants) of the regolith that covers the ring particles when radiative transfer models are applied to fit remote sensing spectra. This research is supported by an Italian Space Agency (ASI) grant.

  14. Wave constraints for Titan's Jingpo Lacus and Kraken Mare from VIMS specular reflection lightcurves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Stephan et al. (Stephan, K. et al. [2010]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, 7104-+.) first saw the glint of sunlight specularly reflected off of Titan's lakes. We develop a quantitative model for analyzing the photometric lightcurve generated during a flyby in which the specularly reflected light flux depends on the fraction of the solar specular footprint that is covered by liquid. We allow for surface waves that spread out the geographic specular intensity distribution. Applying the model to the VIMS T58 observations shows that the waves on Jingpo Lacus must have slopes of no greater than 0.15??, two orders of magnitude flatter than waves on Earth's oceans. Combining the model with theoretical estimates of the intensity of the specular reflection allows a tighter constraint on the waves: <0.05?? Residual specular signal while the specular point lies on land implies that either the land is wetted, the wave slope distribution is non-Gaussian, or that 5% of the land off the southwest edge of Jingpo Lacus is covered in puddles. Another specular sequence off of Kraken Mare acquired during Cassini's T59 flyby shows rapid flux changes that the static model cannot reproduce. Points just 1. min apart vary in flux by more than a factor of two. The present dataset does not uniquely determine the mechanism causing these rapid changes. We suggest that changing wind conditions, kilometer-wavelength waves, or moving clouds could account for the variability. Future specular observations should be designed with a fast cadence, at least 6 points per minute, in order to differentiate between these hypotheses. Such new data will further constrain the nature of Titan's lakes and their interactions with Titan's atmosphere. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Investigating Chemical Compositions of Select Saturnian Satellites via Mosaicking of Cassini VIMS Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Laura; Dalle Ore, C.; Mastrapa, R.; Speck, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cassini has collected data of many of Saturn's moons which provide information on the surface composition of the satellites and ultimately investigate their chemical and physical history. Mosaics are vital in analyzing the large amounts of data gathered from VIMS. Programs ENVI 4.8 and ISIS 3 were utilized and their results compared to determine optimum efficiency and output when creating mosaics. It was desirable to duplicate the cluster analysis of Mimas performed by Marzo [1] to definitively prove ISIS 3's capability to create mosaics identical to ENVI. Concerning the satellites of Saturn we were interested in searching for evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as CO2 via cluster analysis. Preliminary results of Mimas show that the outline of Hershel crater belongs to a different group than the immediate surroundings implicating a variation in the physical properties of the ice. Since the clustering was done focusing on a short wavelength range around the 1.5 micron water band the variation is most likely due to grain size differences as shown by Stephan et al (2005) in their study of Ganymede. The other intriguing feature outlined by the clustering of Mimas is a pattern on the side of the ring outlining the Hershel crater. The representative spectrum of this group shows an anomaly that could be due to contamination of minerals from an impact. Further analysis is necessary to confirm this preliminary result. The ultimate goal of our attempt at reproducing the mosaic independently (with ISIS3) and to repeat the cluster analysis is to investigate this intriguing result.

  16. Simultaneous multi-wavelength observations of Saturn's aurorae : energy budget and magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, L.

    2011-10-01

    Similarly to other magnetized planets, accelerated electrons entering Saturn's auroral regions generate powerful emissions. They divide into Ultraviolet (UV) and Infrared (IR) aurorae, originating from collisions with the upper atmosphere, and Saturn's Kilometric Radiation (SKR), radiated by an electron cyclotron resonance above the atmosphere up a few Saturn's radii (Rs). Previous studies have identified a large scale conjugacy between radio and UV, as well as IR and UV auroral emissions. Here, we investigate two days of observations of Saturn's aurorae at radio, UV and IR wavelengths, by the Cassini RPWS, UVIS and VIMS instruments, and their relationship with a reservoir of equatorial energetic particles mapped by energetic neutral atoms (ENA), as measured by MIMI-INCA (see Figure ??). This interval of time reveals a series of regular SKR modulations at the southern SKR phase, and interestingly includes an unusual (while also regular) enhancement of the auroral activity observed simultaneously at all wavelengths. This event is likely to illustrate a (regular) nightside injection of energetic particles, possibly induced by a plasmoid ejection, then co-rotating with the planet at the southern SKR period, while feeding an extended longitudinal sector of intense auroral emissions. We analyze quantitatively complementary informations brought by these different datasets in terms of energy budget transferred to the southern auroral region, as well as magnetospheric dynamics, in order to address the nature and the scheme of the Saturn's southern rotational modulation.

  17. Uplift of the South African Plateau: mantle-scale deformation, long wavelength relief growth and offshore sediment budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillocheau, François; Dauteuil, Olivier; Baby, Guillaume; Robin, Cécile

    2013-04-01

    The South African Plateau is one of the largest very long wavelength relief (x1000 km) of the world that could be related to mantle dynamics and the effect of the African superplume. Unfortunately, the timing of the uplift and the different steps of the relief growth are still debated with a Late Cretaceous uplift scenario and an Oligocene one. Whatever model, few attentions were paid to the evolution of the overall geomorphic system, from the upstream erosional system to the downstream depositional system. This study is based, onshore, on the mapping and chronology of all the macroforms (weathering surfaces and associated alterites, pediments and pediplains, incised rivers, wave-cut platforms) dated by intersection with the few preserved sediments and the volcanics (mainly kimberlites pipes) and, offshore, on a more classical dataset of seismic lines and petroleum wells (characterization and dating of forced regression, sediment volume measurement, etc..). The main result of this study is that the South African Plateau is an old Late Cretaceous Plateau reactivated during Paleogene times and fossilized since the Middle Miocene. • During Late Cretaceous, in a semiarid climatic setting, the main uplift occurred from the east (around 95 Ma) to the west (around 75 Ma) and could result from the migration of the African plate over the African superplume: This is the paroxysm of the erosion with the growth of a large delta offshore present-day Orange River mouth (sedimentation rate around 100 000 km3/Ma). • During Paleocene - Mid Eocene times, in more humid conditions and in response to a more subtle long wavelength deformation, pedimentation occurred mainly localised along Cape Fold Belt feeding a large delta offshore western Cape Peninsula. During Mid Eocene times, all those landscapes are fossilized and weathered by laterites. • Late Eocene and Oligocene is the second period of uplift of the Plateau, localised along its Indian Ocean side (Drackensberg Moutains

  18. Hot Electron and X-ray Production from Intense Laser Irradiation of Wavelength-scale Polystyrene Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmire, T.; Sumeruk, H. A.; Kneip, S.; Symes, D. R.; Churina, I. V.; Belolipetski, A. V.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A.; Donnelly, T. D.

    2008-04-01

    In an attempt to control the electric fields at the surface of a high intensity solid target we have studied hot electron generation and x-ray production from targets coated with microspheres. This work is motivated by the possibility that spheres with size comparable to the wavelength of the incident laser radiation can result in electric field enhancements through well know Mie resonances. This local field enhancement can then lead to more efficient electron generation. We investigated hard x-ray (above 100 keV) generation from copper and fused silica targets coated with a monolayer covering of polystyrene microspheres. We performed the experiment using the 20 TW THOR laser system at the University of Texas. We frequency doubled the laser to improve temporal contrast and irradiated the spheres with 400 nm pulses at an intensity of 2 x 1017 W/cm2. Hard X-ray emission from the plasma was observed using filtered NaI scintillation detectors and K-alpha emission was measured with a Von Hamos spectrometer. We illuminated polystyrene spheres of diameters 0.1 -2.9 microns on a glass substrate, with the 400 nm 100fs pulse, and find that there is a clear Mie enhancement in the field and hot electron generation for a specific range of sphere sizes.

  19. Multi-wavelength studies of Saturn's rings to constrain ring particle properties and ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M.; Nicholson, P.; Colwell, J.; Bradley, T.

    2012-04-01

    A great deal can be learned about the nature of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. In the CIRS data, over a range of solar elevations from -23 degrees to -8 degrees, the bulk of the temperature variations are confined primarily to phase angle. Only small temperature differences are observed with changing spacecraft elevation. Similar behavior is seen in the ISS color data. Color and temperature dependence with changing solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are (almost) independent of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces

  20. Fuel Rod Thermal-Mechanical Behavior, Versions FRAPCON2, FRAPCON2/VIM4 & FRAPCON2/VIM5.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-03-25

    Version 02 This package contains three versions of the FRAPCON series of fuel rod response modeling programs. The FRAPCON series, like the earlier FRAP-S and GAPCON-THERMAL codes, is designed to predict the steady-state long-term burnup response of oxide fuel rods in light water reactors (LWRs). In addition, these codes generate the initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by the FRAP-T6 or thermal-hydraulic analysis programs. The FRAPCON2 programs calculate the temperature, pressure, deformation, and failuremore » histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, cladding elastic and plastic deformation, fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, fission gas release, fuel rod internal gas pressure, heat transfer between fuel and cladding, cladding oxidation, and heat transfer from cladding to coolant. Material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlation data are included. The FRAPCON series replaced the FRAP-S1, FRAP-S2, and FRAP-S3 series of programs. The fuel temperature computation used in the FRAPCON series was taken from the GAPCON-THERMAL2 code (NESC 618). FRAPCON2/VIM4 generates the initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis used either by FRAP-T6 (NESC 658) or RELAP4/MOD7 (NESC 369).« less

  1. Molecular epidemiology of VIM-1 producing Escherichia coli from Germany referred to the National Reference Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kaase, Martin; Pfennigwerth, Niels; Lange, Felix; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören G

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of carbapenemase genes in Escherichia coli strains isolated between September 2009 and May 2013 in Germany was investigated. Out of 192 isolates with carbapenemase production OXA-48 was found in 44.8%, VIM-1 in 18.8%, NDM-1 in 11.5% and KPC-2 in 6.8%. Patients with VIM-1 producing E. coli (n=36) differed from patients with OXA-48 by an older age, less frequent mention of travel history and an increased proportion of clinical over screening specimens. These data might indicate that introduction from abroad is of minor importance for VIM-1 producing E. coli compared to other carbapenemases. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that E. coli with VIM-1 were mostly multiclonal, emphasizing the role of horizontal gene transfer in its spread. Susceptibility testing of VIM-1 producing E. coli demonstrated aztreonam susceptibility in 55.6%. Among non-β-lactams susceptibility rates of >90% were observed for amikacin, tigecycline, colistin, fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin. PMID:26321009

  2. Nosocomial emerging of (VIM1) carbapenemase-producing isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rajabnia, Ramazan; Asgharpour, Fariba; Ferdosi Shahandashti, Elaheh; Moulana, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The rapid emergence and dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae poses a considerable threat to the care of hospitalized patients and to public health. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) and VIM-1 gene in multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae. Methods: 50 isolates of non – duplicated K. pneumoniae cultured from patients at intensive care units were tested for their susceptibilities to 13 different antibiotics using microbroth dilution assay. Isolates showing resistance to at least one of the carbapenems were checked for production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) using imipenem–EDTA synergy tests. PCR was used to detect the gene encoding VIM-1 metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Results: Of 50 clinical isolates, 26 (52%) were resistant to imipenem in disk diffusion method. Using imipenem–EDTA synergy tests, production of MBL was detected in 15 (30%) isolates. PCR assay showed that 15 isolates were positive for VIM and these included 10 and 5 isolates showing positive and negative results in phenotypic method of MBL detection test respectively. Amikacin was found as the most effective antibiotic against the MBL producers in this study. Conclusion: The emergence of bla(VIM-1) producing K. pneumoniae in North of Iran is concerning. Microorganisms producing bla(VIM-1) constitute the prevalent multidrug-resistant population of K. pneumoniae in that region. PMID:26622969

  3. VIM1, a methylcytosine-binding protein required for centromeric heterochromatinization

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hye Ryun; Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S.; Richards, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in eukaryotes is executed by a complex set of signaling interactions among small RNA species and chromatin marks, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We identified vim1 (VARIANT IN METHYLATION 1), an Arabidopsis mutation causing cytosine hypomethylation and decondensation of centromeres in interphase. VIM1 is a member of a small gene family, encoding proteins containing PHD, RING, and SRA (SET- and RING-associated) domains, which are found together in mammalian proteins implicated in regulation of chromatin modification, transcription, and the cell cycle. VIM1 is an unconventional methylcytosine-binding protein that interacts in vitro with 5mCpG- and 5mCpHpG-modified DNA (via its SRA domain), as well as recombinant histones (H2B, H3, H4, and HTR12) in plant extracts. VIM1 associates with methylated genomic loci in vivo and is enriched in chromocenters. Our findings suggest that VIM1 acts at the DNA methylation–histone interface to maintain centromeric heterochromatin. PMID:17242155

  4. Cassini-VIMS observations of Saturn's main rings: I. Spectral properties and temperature radial profiles variability with phase angle and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Brown, R. H.; Cerroni, P.; Altobelli, N.; Spilker, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral properties and thermal behavior of Saturn's rings are determined from a dataset of ten radial mosaics acquired by Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) between October 29th 2004 and January 27th 2010 with phase angle ranging between 5.7° and 132.4° and elevation angles between -23.5° and 2.6°. These observations, after reduction to spectrograms, e.g. 2D arrays containing the VIS-IR (0.35-5.1 μm) spectral information versus radial distance from Saturn (from 73.500 to 141.375 km, 400 km/bin), allow us to compare the derived spectral and thermal properties of the ring particles on a common reference. Spectral properties: rings spectra are characterized by an intense reddening at visible wavelengths while they maintain a strong similarity with water ice in the infrared domain. Significant changes in VIS reddening, water ice abundance and grain sizes are observed across different radial regions resulting in correlation with optical depth and local structures. The availability of observations taken at very different phase angles allows us to examine spectrophotometric properties of the ring's particles. When observed at high phase angles, a remarkable increase of visible reddening and water ice band depths is found, probably as a consequence of the presence of a red-colored contaminant intimately mixed within water ice grains and of multiple scattering. At low phases the analysis of the 3.2-3.6 μm range shows faint spectral signatures at 3.42-3.52 μm which are compatible with the CH2 aliphatic stretch. The 3.29 μm PAH aromatic stretch absorption is not clearly detectable on this dataset. VIMS results indicate that ring particles contain about 90-95% water ice while the remaining 5-10% is consistent with different contaminants like amorphous carbon or tholins. However, we cannot exclude the presence of nanophase iron or hematite produced by iron oxidation in the rings tenuous oxygen atmosphere, intimately mixed with the ice grains

  5. COS Internal FUV Wavelength Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    This program will be executed after the uplink of the OSM1 position updates derived from the determination of the wavelength-scale zero points and desired spectral ranges for each grating in activity COS29 {program 11487 - COS FUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales}. This program will verify that the operational spectral ranges for each grating, central wavelength, and FP-POS are those desired. Subsequent to a successful verification, COS FUV ERO observations that require accurate wavelength scales {if any} and FUV science can be enabled. An internal wavelength calibration spectrum using the default PtNe lamp {lamp 1} with each FUV grating at each central wavelength setting and each FP-POS position will be obtained for the verification. Additional exposures and waits between certain exposures will be required to avoid - and to evaluate - mechanism drifts.

  6. [First outbreak report of VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Japan].

    PubMed

    Miki, Kanji; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Etoh, Masaaki; Hayashi, Michio; Haruta, Tsunekazu; Yamane, Kunikazu; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2010-11-01

    VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from 35 Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital patients from September 2007 to July 2008. All but one were highly resistant to all beta-lactams, aminoglycoside, and fluoroquinolone, and one susceptible to amikacin. Strains negative to a disk diffusion screening test using sodium mercaptoacetate for detecting MBL numbered 35. PCR for MBL indicated all strains were positive for bla(VIWM-1). These strains were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, indicating an outbreak of infections caused by VIM-1 MBL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After intervention to control contact, the outbreak was controlled. PMID:21226324

  7. The geology of Hotei Regio, Titan: Correlation of Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, J.M.; Barnes, J.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Sotin, C.; Jaumann, R.; MacKinnon, D.J.; Mackowski, D.W.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Joint Cassini VIMS and RADAR SAR data of ???700-km-wide Hotei Regio reveal a rich collection of geological features that correlate between the two sets of images. The degree of correlation is greater than anywhere else seen on Titan. Central to Hotei Regio is a basin filled with cryovolcanic flows that are anomalously bright in VIMS data (in particular at 5 ??m) and quite variable in roughness in SAR. The edges of the flows are dark in SAR data and appear to overrun a VIMS-bright substrate. SAR-stereo topography shows the flows to be viscous, 100-200 m thick. On its southern edge the basin is ringed by higher (???1 km) mountainous terrain. The mountains show mixed texture in SAR data: some regions are extremely rough, exhibit low and spectrally neutral albedo in VIMS data and may be partly coated with darker hydrocarbons. Around the southern margin of Hotei Regio, the SAR image shows several large, dendritic, radar-bright channels that flow down from the mountainous terrain and terminate in dark blue patches, seen in VIMS images, whose infrared color is consistent with enrichment in water ice. The patches are in depressions that we interpret to be filled with fluvial deposits eroded and transported by liquid methane in the channels. In the VIMS images the dark blue patches are encased in a latticework of lighter bands that we suggest to demark a set of circumferential and radial fault systems bounding structural depressions. Conceivably the circular features are tectonic structures that are remnant from an ancient impact structure. We suggest that impact-generated structures may have simply served as zones of weakness; no direct causal connection, such as impact-induced volcanism, is implied. We also speculate that two large dark features lying on the northern margin of Hotei Regio could be calderas. In summary the preservation of such a broad suite of VIMS infrared color variations and the detailed correlation with features in the SAR image and SAR topography

  8. Spread of integron-associated VIM-type metallo-beta-lactamase genes among imipenem-nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Greek hospitals.

    PubMed

    Giakkoupi, P; Petrikkos, G; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tsonas, S; Legakis, N J; Vatopoulos, A C

    2003-02-01

    Fifty-eight imipenem-nonsusceptible (MIC >or= 8 microg/ml) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated during May 2001 in 15 Greek hospitals were studied. Thirty-six isolates derived from nine hospitals carried VIM-type metallo-beta-lactamase genes, as found by PCR. In 34 isolates, bla(VIM) was associated with class 1 integrons of various sizes. DNA sequencing indicated the presence of bla(VIM-2) gene cassettes in a variety of integron structures. Random amplified polymorphic DNA typing suggested diversity of the bla(VIM)-positive strains. Synergy between 2-mercaptoacetic acid and imipenem indicated carbapenemase activity in 26 bla(VIM)-positive strains. PMID:12574292

  9. High-resolution CASSINI-VIMS mosaics of Titan and the icy Saturnian satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Cerroni, P.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Soderbloom, L.A.; Griffith, C.; Matz, K.-D.; Roatsch, Th.; Scholten, F.; Porco, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the CASSINI spacecraft obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn after its arrival at Saturn in June 2004. VIMS operates in a spectral range from 0.35 to 5.2 ??m, generating image cubes in which each pixel represents a spectrum consisting of 352 contiguous wavebands. As an imaging spectrometer VIMS combines the characteristics of both a spectrometer and an imaging instrument. This makes it possible to analyze the spectrum of each pixel separately and to map the spectral characteristics spatially, which is important to study the relationships between spectral information and geological and geomorphologic surface features. The spatial analysis of the spectral data requires the determination of the exact geographic position of each pixel on the specific surface and that all 352 spectral elements of each pixel show the same region of the target. We developed a method to reproject each pixel geometrically and to convert the spectral data into map projected image cubes. This method can also be applied to mosaic different VIMS observations. Based on these mosaics, maps of the spectral properties for each Saturnian satellite can be derived and attributed to geographic positions as well as to geological and geomorphologic surface features. These map-projected mosaics are the basis for all further investigations. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cartographic Mapping of the Icy Satellites Using ISS and VIMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Th.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Thomas, P. C.

    The sizes and shapes of six icy Saturnian satellites have been measured from Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) data, employing limb coordinates and stereogram-metric control points. Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea are well described by triaxial ellipsoids; Iapetus is best represented by an oblate spheroid. The ISS acquired many high-resolution images (<1 km/pixel) during close flybys of the medium-sized icy Saturnian satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Iapetus, and Phoebe). We combined these images with lower-resolution coverage and a few images taken by Voyager cameras to produce high-resolution mosaics of these satellites. The global mosaics are the baseline for high-resolution atlases. The atlases consist of 15 tiles each for Enceladus, Dione, and Tethys, whereas the Iapetus, Mimas, and Phoebe atlases consist of 3, 1, and 1 tile, respectively. The nomenclature used in these atlases was suggested by the Cassini-ISS team and approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The whole atlases are available to the public through the Imaging Team's website (http://ciclops.org/maps/) and from the Planetary Data System (PDS, http://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/). Additionally to ISS, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft detected the chemical and physical surface properties of the Saturnian satellites. Multiple VIMS observations were combined into global VIMS maps representing the VIMS coverage achieved during the nominal Cassini mission. Progressed mapping has been done for the satellites Dione, Rhea, and Enceladus.

  11. Biochemical, Mechanistic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study examines metal binding to metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2, demonstrating the first successful preparation of a Co(II)-substituted VIM-2 analogue. Spectroscopic studies of the half- and fully metal loaded enzymes show that both Zn(II) and Co(II) bind cooperatively, where the major species present, regardless of stoichiometry, are apo- and di-Zn (or di-Co) enzymes. We determined the di-Zn VIM-2 structure to a resolution of 1.55 Å, and this structure supports results from spectroscopic studies. Kinetics, both steady-state and pre-steady-state, show that VIM-2 utilizes a mechanism that proceeds through a very short-lived anionic intermediate when chromacef is used as the substrate. Comparison with other B1 enzymes shows that those that bind Zn(II) cooperatively are better poised to protonate the intermediate on its formation, compared to those that bind Zn(II) non-cooperatively, which uniformly build up substantial amounts of the intermediate. PMID:25356958

  12. Audiovisual Aids and Publications Available from the VIMS/Sea Grant Marine Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammisch, Sue, Comp.

    This catalog contains an inventory of 16mm films, filmstrips, film loops, slide programs, records, and publications about the marine sciences and sea life that are available from VIMS/Sea Grant Marine Education Center; information on the borrowing of the AV materials is included, as well as prices for books and leaflets. The entries are listed…

  13. VimA-dependent modulation of the secretome in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Osbourne, D; Aruni, A Wilson; Dou, Y; Perry, C; Boskovic, D S; Roy, F; Fletcher, H M

    2012-12-01

    The VimA protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a multifunctional protein involved in cell surface biogenesis. To further determine if its acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) transfer and putative sorting functions can affect the secretome, its role in peptidoglycan biogenesis and effects on the extracellular proteins of P. gingivalis FLL92, a vimA-defective mutant, were evaluated. There were structural and compositional differences in the peptidoglycan of P. gingivalis FLL92 compared with the wild-type strain. Sixty-eight proteins were present only in the extracellular fraction of FLL92. Fifteen proteins present in the extracellular fraction of the parent strain were missing in the vimA-defective mutant. These proteins had protein sorting characteristics that included a C-terminal motif with a common consensus Gly-Gly-CTERM pattern and a polar tail consisting of aromatic amino acid residues. These observations suggest that the VimA protein is likely involved in peptidoglycan synthesis, and corroborates our previous report, which suggests a role in protein sorting. PMID:23134608

  14. Biochemical, Mechanistic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2

    SciTech Connect

    Aitha, Mahesh; Marts, Amy R.; Bergstrom, Alex; Møller, Abraham Jon; Moritz, Lindsay; Turner, Lucien; Nix, Jay C.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Page, Richard C.; Tierney, David L.; Crowder, Michael W.

    2014-11-25

    Our study examines metal binding to metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2, demonstrating the first successful preparation of a Co(II)-substituted VIM-2 analogue. Spectroscopic studies of the half- and fully metal loaded enzymes show that both Zn(II) and Co(II) bind cooperatively, where the major species present, regardless of stoichiometry, are apo- and di-Zn (or di-Co) enzymes. We also determined the di-Zn VIM-2 structure to a resolution of 1.55 Å, and this structure supports results from spectroscopic studies. Kinetics, both steady-state and pre-steady-state, show that VIM-2 utilizes a mechanism that proceeds through a very short-lived anionic intermediate when chromacef is used as the substrate. Comparison with other B1 enzymes shows that those that bind Zn(II) cooperatively are better poised to protonate the intermediate on its formation, compared to those that bind Zn(II) non-cooperatively, which uniformly build up substantial amounts of the intermediate.

  15. Titan's Ground Reflectance Retrieval from Cassini-Vims Data Taken during the July 2ND, 2004 Fly-By at 2 AM UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; Gardini, A.; Orosei, R.; D'Aversa, E.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.

    2005-06-01

    An attempt to evaluate the preliminary values of the Titan's surface albedo at 2 μm from the first Cassini-VIMS observations of the moon is presented. The methodology is based on the application of radiative transfer calculations and a microphysical model of the Titan atmosphere based on fractal aerosol. As a first guess, the surface has been considered flat and lambertian. The results are presented as a function of the geographical coordinates associated to the image pixels. The libRadtran package, using the radiative transfer equation solver DISORT 2.0, has been applied for the calculations. A test run to evaluate the model performances, using ground based observations of Titan as reference in the range of wavelengths 0.3-1.0 μm, has been carried out.The retrieved values of the surface albedo range between 0.03 and 0.22.

  16. Epidemiology of VIM-1-imipenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which causes serious problems, especially in people who have immunodeficiency. Metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) resistance in this bacterium has led some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. MBLs are being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to collect data about the relative frequency (RF) of VIM-1-imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa (VIM-1-IRPA) in different regions of Iran and report an overall prevalence if possible. Materials and Methods: PubMed, ISI web of science, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched using following key terms: “P. aeruginosa,” “imipenem,” “VIM-1” and “Iran” were. Articles/abstracts, which used clinical specimens and had done polymerase chain reaction to detect the VIM-1 gene of MBL genes, were included in this review. STATA SE version 11.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA) was used for statistical analysis. Results: Out of 5457 results found, 10 articles were eligible to be included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. These studies were carried out in Tehran, Isfahan, Kurdistan, Ahvaz, Markazi and Northwest of Iran (Orumieh and Tabriz). Pooled estimation of 1972 P. aeruginosa samples showed that 13% (95% confidence interval = 10.5-16.5%]) of strains were VIM-1 positive. VIM-1-IRPA RF in different studies varied from 0% to 19.5% in Isfahan and Markazi provinces, respectively. We found a moderate heterogeneity (Chochran Q-test, P = 0.032, I-squared = 50.7%) of VIM-1-IRPA RF among studies. Conclusion: According to the results of this study VIM-1-IRPA RF in Iran is in low-level Prevention strategies to reduce the prevalence rates of VIM-1 positive strains in Iran are needed. PMID:25535506

  17. Fast forward modeling of Titan’s infrared spectra to invert VIMS/CASSINI hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rannou, P.; Combe, J.; Le Corre, L.; Griffith, C. A.; Tobie, G.; Barnes, J. W.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    The surface of Titan, the largest icy moon of Saturn, is veiled by a very thick and hazy atmosphere. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, has been conducting an intensive survey of Titan with the objective of understanding the complex nature and interaction of the atmosphere and surface of this mysterious moon. Retrieving and separating contributions from the surface and the atmosphere in Titan’s infrared spectra requires accurate radiative transfer modeling, which is often very demanding of computer resources. As Cassini has gathered hitherto millions of spectra of Titan and will continue to observe it until at least 2010, we report here on the development of a new rapid, simple and versatile radiative transfer model specially designed to process VIMS datacubes. Currently, our model accounts for gas absorption, haze scattering and surface reflectance and can be implemented in an inversion scheme. First results of forward modeling provide spectral shapes that are consistent with VIMS measurements, as well as surface and aerosol properties in the range of validity for Titan. Further inversion tests will be carried on VIMS hyperspectral images for the estimate of spatial coherence of the results, accuracy of the surface reflectance within the atmospheric windows, and potential needs for improved input data and modeling. This work was partly performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Calibrated VIMS data appear courtesy of the VIMS team. We thank the CNES French agency for its financial support.

  18. Aromatic and aliphatic organic materials on Iapetus: Analysis of Cassini VIMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Clark, Roger N.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2014-05-01

    , D.P., Clark, R.N. [2012], op. cit.) and Phoebe (Dalle Ore, C.M., Cruikshank, D.P., Clark, R.N. [2012], op. cit.). Our Gaussian decomposition of the organic band region suggests the presence of molecular bands in addition to those noted above, specifically bands attributable to cycloalkanes, olefinic compounds, CH3OH, and N-substituted PAHs, as well as possible Hn-PAHs (PAHs with excess peripheral H atoms). In a minimalist interpretation of the Gaussian band fitting, we find the ratio of aromatic CH to aliphatic CH2 + CH3 functional groups for both the leading and trailing hemispheres of Iapetus is ∼10, with no clear difference between them. In the aliphatic component of the surface material, the ratio CH2/CH3 is 4.0 on the leading hemisphere and 3.0 on the trailing; both values are higher than those found in interstellar dust and other Solar System materials and the difference between the two hemispheres may be statistically significant. The superficial layer of low-albedo material on Iapetus originated in the interior of Phoebe and is being transported to and deposited on Iapetus (and Hyperion) in the current epoch via the Phoebe dust ring (Tosi, F., Turrini, D., Coradini, A., Filacchione, G., and the VIMS Team [2010]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 403, 1113-1130; Tamayo, D., Burns, J.A., Hamilton, D.P., Hedman, M.M. [2011]. Icarus 215, 260-278). The PAHs on Iapetus exist in a H2O-rich environment, and consequently are subject to UV destruction by hydrogenation on short time-scales. The occurrence of this material is therefore consistent with the assertion that the deposition of the PAH-bearing dust is occurring at the present time. If the organic inventory we observe represents the interior composition of Phoebe, we may be sampling the original material from a region of the solar nebula beyond Neptune where Phoebe formed prior to its capture by Saturn (Johnson, T.V., Lunine, J.I. [2005]. Nature 435, 69-71).

  19. COS Internal NUV Wavelength Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    This program will be executed after the uplink of the OSM2 position updates derived from the determination of the wavelength-scale zero points and desired spectral ranges for each grating in activity COS14 {program 11474 - COS NUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales}. This program will verify that the operational spectral ranges for each grating, central wavelength, and FP-POS are those desired. Subsequent to a successful verification, COS NUV ERO observations and NUV science can be enabled. An internal wavelength calibration spectrum using the default PtNe lamp {lamp 1} with each NUV grating at each central wavelength setting and each FP-POS position will be obtained for the verification. Additional exposures and waits between certain exposures will be required to avoid - and to evaluate - mechanism drifts.

  20. KPC and VIM producing Enterobacter cloacae strain from a hospital in northeastern Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Dianny; Marcano, Daniel; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Salgado, Nurys; Cuaical, Nirvia; Rodriguez, Lucy; Caña, Luisa; Medina, Belkis; Guzman, Militza; De Donato, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    An 83-year-old male patient is admitted to the central hospital in Cumana, Venezuela with severe urinary infection, history of hospitalizaions and prolonged antimicrobial treatments. A strain of Enterobacter cloacae was isolated showing resistance to multiple types of antibiotics (only sensitive to gentamicin), with phenotype of serine- and metallo-carbapenemases. Both, bla(VIM-2) and bla(KPC) genes were detected in the isolate. This is the first report of an Enterobacteriaceae species producing both KPC carbapenemase and VIM metallo carbapenemase in Venezuela. This finding has a great clinical and epidemiological impact in the region, because of the feasibility of transferring these genes, through mobile elements to other strains of Enterobacter and to other infection-causing species of bacteria. PMID:26299058

  1. VIM-Based Dynamic Sparse Grid Approach to Partial Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Shu-Li

    2014-01-01

    Combining the variational iteration method (VIM) with the sparse grid theory, a dynamic sparse grid approach for nonlinear PDEs is proposed in this paper. In this method, a multilevel interpolation operator is constructed based on the sparse grids theory firstly. The operator is based on the linear combination of the basic functions and independent of them. Second, by means of the precise integration method (PIM), the VIM is developed to solve the nonlinear system of ODEs which is obtained from the discretization of the PDEs. In addition, a dynamic choice scheme on both of the inner and external grid points is proposed. It is different from the traditional interval wavelet collocation method in which the choice of both of the inner and external grid points is dynamic. The numerical experiments show that our method is better than the traditional wavelet collocation method, especially in solving the PDEs with the Nuemann boundary conditions. PMID:24723805

  2. VIM-based dynamic sparse grid approach to partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Mei, Shu-Li

    2014-01-01

    Combining the variational iteration method (VIM) with the sparse grid theory, a dynamic sparse grid approach for nonlinear PDEs is proposed in this paper. In this method, a multilevel interpolation operator is constructed based on the sparse grids theory firstly. The operator is based on the linear combination of the basic functions and independent of them. Second, by means of the precise integration method (PIM), the VIM is developed to solve the nonlinear system of ODEs which is obtained from the discretization of the PDEs. In addition, a dynamic choice scheme on both of the inner and external grid points is proposed. It is different from the traditional interval wavelet collocation method in which the choice of both of the inner and external grid points is dynamic. The numerical experiments show that our method is better than the traditional wavelet collocation method, especially in solving the PDEs with the Nuemann boundary conditions. PMID:24723805

  3. Cassini VIMS-V observations of a giant dynamical structure in the Saturn's northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Adriani, A.; Filacchione, G.

    2012-12-01

    Vortices have been observed on Saturn since the years of the Voyager's missions. Successively high resolution Cassini's images, provided by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) cameras, permitted longer periods of observation of the Saturn's dynamical structures, included a long-lived cyclone in the southern hemisphere (del Río-Gaztelurrutia et al., 2010). The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini spacecraft on January 4th 2012 has observed an oval structure, about 8000 km in diameter size and 0.87 eccentricity in the Saturn's north hemisphere. The vortex is centered at an average planetocentric latitude of 37.5 °North, inside the storm system detected at the end of 2010 (Fletcher et al, 2011). To find the first occurrence of this vortex we started the examination of the VIMS and ISS databases from the 2010 fall until the end of January 2012. We searched also in the archive of ISS narrow angle (NAC) and wide angle (WAC) cameras, publicly available from the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) Imaging Node, for those images both in concomitance and time shifted with respect to the VIMS ones. We adopted the same identification criterion used by del Río-Gaztelurrutia et al. (2010), by searching for an oval of analogous dimension in the same zonal region. ISS data helped us in checking the existence of the oval in time periods not covered by VIMS data and in resolving oval's details that we cannot appreciate in the VIMS spectral frames, less spatially resolved than the cameras' corresponding filters. This vortex has been observed at different distances and viewing geometries at least 6 and 5 times by VIMS and ISS, respectively, in the examined time period. We estimate that the first vortex's detection occurred in the first half of January 2011 (ISS) while the last one in January 2012 (VIMS). In this study we aim to determine the oval identity in a univocal way, on the basis of its position and size, in order to monitor both the structure living

  4. Correlations between Cassini VIMS spectra and RADAR SAR images: Implications for Titan's surface composition and the character of the Huygens Probe Landing Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Lunine, J.I.; Anderson, J.A.; Baines, K.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Barrett, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Elachi, C.; Janssen, M.A.; Jaumann, R.; Karkoschka, E.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lopes, R.M.; Lorenz, R.D.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Radebaugh, J.; Rizk, B.; Sotin, C.; Stofan, E.R.; Sucharski, T.L.; Tomasko, M.G.; Wall, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Titan's vast equatorial fields of RADAR-dark longitudinal dunes seen in Cassini RADAR synthetic aperture images correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated as "brown" and "blue" in Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) color composites of short-wavelength infrared spectral cubes (RGB as 2.0, 1.6, 1.3 ??m). In such composites bluer materials exhibit higher reflectance at 1.3 ??m and lower at 1.6 and 2.0 ??m. The dark brown unit is highly correlated with the RADAR-dark dunes. The dark brown unit shows less evidence of water ice suggesting that the saltating grains of the dunes are largely composed of hydrocarbons and/or nitriles. In general, the bright units also show less evidence of absorption due to water ice and are inferred to consist of deposits of bright fine precipitating tholin aerosol dust. Some set of chemical/mechanical processes may be converting the bright fine-grained aerosol deposits into the dark saltating hydrocarbon and/or nitrile grains. Alternatively the dark dune materials may be derived from a different type of air aerosol photochemical product than are the bright materials. In our model, both the bright aerosol and dark hydrocarbon dune deposits mantle the VIMS dark blue water ice-rich substrate. We postulate that the bright mantles are effectively invisible (transparent) in RADAR synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images leading to lack of correlation in the RADAR images with optically bright mantling units. RADAR images mostly show only dark dunes and the water ice substrate that varies in roughness, fracturing, and porosity. If the rate of deposition of bright aerosol is 0.001-0.01 ??m/yr, the surface would be coated (to optical instruments) in hundreds-to-thousands of years unless cleansing processes are active. The dark dunes must be mobile on this very short timescale to prevent the accumulation of bright coatings. Huygens landed in a region of the VIMS bright and dark blue materials and about 30 km south of the

  5. Looking at some equatorial regions on Titan using Cassini/VIMS and RADAR data: a case for changes in surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Drossart, Pierre; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin; Bampasidis, Georgios; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a complex, dynamic and -in some aspects- Earth-like atmosphere and surface. Data from the remote sensing instruments on board Cassini, particularly VIMS and the RADAR, have shown the presence of diverse terrains on the surface, suggesting exogenic and endogenic processes [1;2;3]. In this research we focus on some equatorial regions that have been identified as possibly subject to changes, having particular spectral properties and possibly being the strongest cryovolcanic candidate regions, that is: Sotra Patera, Hotei Regio and Tui Regio [1,4,5]. We use VIMS data, to which we apply a state-of-the-art Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and radiative transfer methods [4;7] with updated parameterization for the spectroscopic data and infer the surface albedos of all of these regions, that we interpret in terms of possible surface composition and morphology combining with information from RADAR data. Indeed, by including despeckled SAR images we identify geomorphological units and investigate spatial and temporal geological relationships [6]. This combination provides us with implications on the surface composition of different units. By looking at evolution with time, we find that two of these regions show albedo changes with time, for Tui Regio from 2005-2009 (darkening) and Sotra Patera from 2005-2006 (brightening) at all wavelengths, indicating that dynamical processes control the regions, compatible with their complex morphology. In conclusion, we also associate radiometry and topographic data with the compositional information from VIMS to derive constraints on the chemical composition and the geology of the surface and finally the nature of these regions. References: [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: JGR, 118, 416-435; [2] Solomonidou, A., et al.: PSS, 70, 77-104; [3] Moore, J.M., and Howard, A.D.: GRL, 37, L22205, 2010; [4] Solomonidou, A., et al.: submitted(a); [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: submitted(b); [6] Bratsolis, E., et al.: PSS

  6. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Bellucci, G.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbitts, K.; Showalter, M.; Newman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Saturn's icy satellites are among the main scientific objectives of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment. This paper contains a first systematic and comparative analysis of the full-disk spectral properties of Dione, Enceladus, Epimetheus, Hyperion, Iapetus, Mimas, Phoebe, Rhea and Tethys as observed by VIMS from July 2004 to June 2005. The disk integrated properties (350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves at 550-2232 nm) and images of satellites are reported and discussed in detail together with the observed geometry. In general, the spectra in the visible spectral range are almost featureless and can be classified according to the spectral slopes: from the bluish Enceladus and Phoebe to the redder Iapetus, Hyperion and Epimetheus. In the 1000-1300 nm range the spectra of Enceladus, Tethys, Mimas and Rhea are characterized by a negative slope, consistent with a surface largely dominated by water ice, while the spectra of Iapetus, Hyperion and Phoebe show a considerable reddening pointing out the relevant role played by darkening materials present on the surface. In between these two classes are Dione and Epimetheus, which have a flat spectrum in this range. The main absorption bands identified in the infrared are the 1520, 2020, 3000 nm H2O/OH bands (for all satellites), although Iapetus dark terrains show mostly a deep 3000 nm band while the 1520 and 2020 nm bands are very faint. In this spectral range, the Iapetus spectrum is characterized by a strong reddening. The CO2 band at 4260 nm and the Fresnel ice peak around 3100 nm are evident only on Hyperion, Phoebe and Iapetus. The phase curves at 550 and at 2232 nm are reported for all the available observations in the 0??-144?? range; Rhea shows an opposition surge at visible wavelengths in the 0.5??-1.17?? interval. The improvement on the retrieval of the full-disk reflectance spectra can be appreciated by a direct comparison with ground-based telescopic data available

  7. EEG based time and frequency dynamics analysis of visually induced motion sickness (VIMS).

    PubMed

    Arsalan Naqvi, Syed Ali; Badruddin, Nasreen; Jatoi, Munsif Ali; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Hazabbah, Wan; Abdullah, Baharudin

    2015-12-01

    3D movies are attracting the viewers as they can see the objects flying out of the screen. However, many viewers have reported various problems which are usually faced after watching 3D movies. These problems include visual fatigue, eye strain, headaches, dizziness, blurred vision or collectively may be termed as visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). This research focuses on the comparison between 3D passive technology with a conventional 2D technology to find that whether 3D is causing trouble in the viewers or not. For this purpose, an experiment was designed in which participants were randomly assigned to watch 2D or a 3D movie. The movie was specially designed to induce VIMS. The movie was shown for the duration of 10 min to every participant. The electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded throughout the session. At the end of the session, participants rated their feelings using simulator sickness questionnaire (SSQ). The SSQ data was analyzed and the ratings of 2D and 3D participants were compared statistically by using a two tailed t test. From the SSQ results, it was found that participants watching 3D movies reported significantly higher symptoms of VIMS (p value <0.05). EEG data was analyzed by using MATLAB and topographic plots are created from the data. A significant difference has been observed in the frontal-theta power which increases with the passage of time in 2D condition while decreases with time in 3D condition. Also, a decrease in beta power has been found in the temporal lobe of 3D group. Therefore, it is concluded that there are negative effects of 3D movies causing significant changes in the brain activity in terms of band powers. This condition leads to produce symptoms of VIMS in the viewers. PMID:26462677

  8. Titan's surface and atmosphere from Cassini/VIMS data with updated methane opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtzig, M.; Bézard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Lellouch, E.; Drossart, P.; deBergh, C.; Campargue, A.; Boudon, V.; Tyuterev, V.; Rannou, P.; Cours, T.; Kassi, S.; Nikitin, A.; Wang, L.; Solomonidou, A.; Schmitt, B.; Rodriguez, S.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present an updated analysis of VIMS data in view of recent developments on the methane opacity in the 1.3-5.2 µm region, a very important parameter in simulating Titan's spectrum. We use a multi-stream radiative transfer model, benefitting from the latest methane absorption coefficients available [1], which allows us to determine more accurately the haze and surface contributions. This code is applied to Cassini/VIMS spectro-imaging data of various regions with very different spectral responses to extract information on the content of the lower atmosphere (0-200 km) as well as on the surface properties. In particular, we update the DISR aerosol model [2] for the Huygens landing site that we then adjust to fit the data for other locations on Titan's disk. Fitting VIMS data taken from 2004 to 2010 (TA to T70), around Titan's mid-latitudes (40°S-40°N), we determine the latitudinal and temporal evolution of the aerosol population, monitoring the North-South Asymmetry. While around the equinox [3] witnessed the collapse of the detached haze layer, we measure a continuous depletion of the aerosols throughout the atmosphere, although the NSA remains with a brighter northern hemisphere. Using this improved atmospheric model, we also retrieve surface albedos simultaneously for all the seven windows in the whole VIMS range for these regions, also recovering the shape of the surface albedo within each window. Eventually, we look for Titan's surface probable chemical composition, using mixtures of dark and complex hydrocarbons like bitumens and tholins, as well as bright CH4, CO2, NH3 and H2O ices of various grain sizes. [4] [1] Campargue, A. et al., (2012) Icarus, submitted. [2] Tomasko, M. et al., (2008) Planetary and Space Science, 56, 669. [3] West, R.A. et al., (2011) Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L06204. [4] Hirtzig, M. et al., (2012) Planetary and Space Science, submitted.

  9. Titan through the time of Cassini: a database of VIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo

    2010-04-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn, VIMS has recorded over 104 cubes, containing over 10^7 spectra. This still increasing amount of observations precludes direct inspection of all data, either to select the observations, or to identify the occurrence and time variation of specific spectral or spatial features. Additionally, many VIMS observations are taken as a large number of cubes with small spatial extent, which cannot be meaningfully visualized without assembling mosaics. This work presents titan_browse, a tool developed to deal with these difficulties. Titan_browse comprises both a database of observations, and a visualization tool to inspect them. The database contains every VIMS observation of Titan in the PDS archive, and provides a flexible query system, which can select individual cubes or spatial pixels based on arbitrary functions of the instrumental or photometric data. Once observations are selected, titan_browse can be used to directly inspect them, through mosaics in several map projections, or displaying images of selected bands, or spectra of selected spatial pixels. This allows users to interactively explore the data, to refine queries to obtain those most useful to the intended analysis. The selected cubes or spectra can them be directly exported from the database, either to an IDL session, or to files (one format being the original cubes, in ISIS format). The cubes used in the database were processed to contain more geometric information than either the original PDS files or those that are produced by the VIMS pipeline, including the coordinates of the edges of each spatial pixel (necessary for precise mosaics), and more information on the illumination angles (to aid in analyses of specular reflections). This version of the titan_browse is a complete reimplementation of its previous titan_browse, to overcome the previous coverage and performance limitations, and is the first to be made publicly available.

  10. Multi-wavelength High-resolution Observations of a Small-scale Emerging Magnetic Flux Event and the Chromospheric and Coronal Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ~45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the surge

  11. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-10-20

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ∼45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the surge

  12. Unbiased estimations of atmosphere vortices: the Saturn's storm by Cassini VIMS-V as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriconi, M. L.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Liberti, G. L.; Filacchione, G.; Oliva, F.

    The size determination of dynamical structures from spectral images poses the question where to fix the shape's boundary. Here we propose a method, suitable for nearly elliptical shape, based on the fit of a 2D Gaussian to the pixel intensities of the spectral image. This method has been tested on a vortex structure embedded in the wake of the 2010 Saturn's giant storm. On January 4th 2012 the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), onboard Cassini, observed a giant vortex in the Saturn's northern hemisphere. The structure was embedded in the wake storm system detected on December 2010 by Fletcher et al. (2011). Therefore, all the VIMS observations focused on the Saturn's storm have been analyzed to investigate its morphology and development. VIMS detected the vortex from May 2011 up to January 2012. The shape and size evolution has been determined for the vortex cloud top, visible at 890 nm. The largest size resulted 4000 km about and seemed to shrinks continuously up to January 2012, while the shape varied in the second half of the year. The vortex oscillated in 2 degrees latitude around 37°N planetocentric latitude, and drifted in longitude by ∼ 0.75 deg/day in westward direction.

  13. Opposition Surges on Icy Moons: Observations by Cassini VIMS and ISS between 0.2 and five microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie; Dalba, Paul; Brown, Robert; Clark, Roger; Hillier, John; Mosher, Joel; Baines, Kevin; Nicholson, Phillip

    2013-04-01

    The opposition effect is the surge in brightness that most airless bodies exhibit as they become fully illuminated to an observer. Important information about the physical nature of the surface, including the constituent particle sizes and their size distribution, the compaction state of the upper regolith, and composition are embedded in the effect. Models that describe the surge in terms of physical parameters have been developed during recent decades. The acquisition of "true opposition" is rare and fleeting (and for objects in inclined orbits, nearly unattainable), so testing and application of the models has been hampered. During the 9 years of the Cassini-Huygens mission, a wealth of data at and near opposition has been collected for the 6 main icy satellites of Saturn: Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus, including some recently obtained key data for Enceladus and Mimas. Furthermore, the combined spectral range of the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visible Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) cameras spans 0.20-5.1 microns, which includes many spectral regions not observable from the ground. This extraordinary coverage in solar phase angle and in spectral range provides in essence a laboratory in which to test models of the opposition effect. Although these moons are bright in the visible region, where multiple scattering complicates the modeling, they are dark in many regions of the infrared, enabling a more robust analysis. Some satellites have data for both leading and trailing sides, allowing an investigation of alteration effects such as meteoritic and magnetospheric bombardment and accretion of E-ring particles. Small particles accreted onto their surfaces from the E-ring appear to become "invisible" at the longer wavelengths. All of the moons exhibit a very steep curve at solar phase angles less than one degree, suggesting that coherent backscatter is present. However, this "supersurge" is present even at wavelengths where there is

  14. Saturn’s Helium Abundance from Cassini VIMS Stellar Occultations and CIRS Limb Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Don; Gierasch, Peter J.; Conrath, Barney J.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2014-11-01

    We have used Saturn stellar occultations as observed by Cassini VIMS, in concert with Saturn limb temperature profiles derived from Cassini CIRS data to determine the Helium abundance in Saturn’s atmosphere near a few mbars. This quantity is long sought, as indication of the internal evolution that Saturn has undergone. Additionally, previous attempts to determine this quantity have produced inconsistent results ranging from He/H2=0.03±0.02 using Voyager IRIS and RSS (Conrath et al., 1984) to He/H2=0.13±0.02 using only Voyager IRIS (Conrath & Gautier, 2000) with a similar result being found by Orton and Ingersoll (1980) using Pioneer IRR and RSS (He/H2=0.11±0.04). These discordant results motivate us to try yet another approach to yield this quantity, in this case using the Cassini VIMS stellar occultations to yield a profile of atmospheric density, and nearly co-located Cassini CIRS limb profiles to yield atmospheric temperature. Combining the two results then yields the mean molecular weight and thus the He/H2 mixing ratio. We reported preliminary values from an occultation from the 151st Cassini orbit at DPS in 2011 (He/H2=0.14±0.05), but have since identified errors in that analysis that have caused us to revisit the problem. Additionally, that occultation occurred near the large Saturn northern hemisphere storm, with significant longitudinal temperature gradients present. The longitudinal separation between the CIRS and VIMS footprints could have skewed the results. In this report, we will discuss our latest results with the algorithm errors corrected, and using data from an occultation of Betelgeuse on the 161st Cassini orbit. These data have the best S/N of all stellar occultations caught by Cassini VIMS to date, and the combination of the VIMS/CIRS data doesn’t suffer from problems due to proximity to the storm and its associated spatial gradients in temperature.

  15. The two-micron spectral characteristics of the Titanian haze derived from Cassini/VIMS solar occultation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Chae Kyung; Kim, Sang Joon; Courtin, Régis; Sohn, Mirim; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2013-11-01

    Vertically-resolved spectral characteristics of the Titanian haze in the 2-μm wavelength range were derived from solar occultation spectra measured by Cassini/VIMS on January 15, 2006. At the various altitudes probed by the solar occultation measurements, we reproduced the observed spectra using a radiative transfer program including absorption by CH4 ro-vibrational bands, collision-induced absorption by N2-N2 pairs, and H2-N2 dimers, as well as absorption and scattering by the haze particles. The retrieved optical depth spectra (or τ-spectra) for the haze show marked variations in the 2.1-2.8 μm range, with peaks near 2.30 and 2.35 μm, and the relative amplitude of these peaks changing with altitude. The gross spectral shape of the τ-spectra is found similar to the typical 2-μm absorption spectra of the alkane group of hydrocarbon (CnH2n+2) ices. The τ-spectra retrieved at 2 μm and those previously retrieved at 3 μm by Kim et al. (2011) are simultaneously reproduced by combinations of 2- and 3-μm absorbance spectra of alkane ices such as CH4, C2H6, C5H12, C6H14, with the addition of a nitrile ice, CH3CN. These combinations are neither unique nor limited and need more fine-tuning to fit the detailed features of the τ-spectra. There is a need for additional laboratory measurements of absorbance and indices of refraction for a wider variety of hydrocarbon and nitrile ices in the temperature range relevant to Titan.

  16. A color sensor wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin; Jackson, Jarom; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Archibald, James

    2016-05-01

    We will discuss a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip consisting of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined with picometer-level precision and with picometer-scale calibration drift over a period longer than a month. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  17. Studies of Saturn's Main Rings at Multiple Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Deau, E.; Filacchione, G.; Morishima, R.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E. T.; Showalter, M.; Pilorz, S.; Brooks, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A wealth of information about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regolith can be obtained by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations over 11 years of the Cassini mission. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as well as a contribution from scattering between individual particles in a many-particle-thick layer. Preliminary results from our joint studies will be presented. This research was carried out in part at

  18. Infections with VIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacter cloacae and Their Correlation with Clinical Outcome▿

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Marco; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Forcella, Chiara; Giordano, Alessandra; Cafiso, Viviana; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence and clinical significance of metallo-β-lactamases among Enterobacter strains isolated from patients with nosocomial infections. We prospectively collected data on patients with Enterobacter infection during a 13-month period. All of the strains were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility, the presence and expression of metallo-β-lactamases, and clonality. Of 29 infections (11 involving the urinary tract, 7 pneumonias, 3 skin/soft tissue infections, 3 intra-abdominal infections, 3 bacteremias, and 2 other infections), 7 (24%) were caused by Enterobacter cloacae strains harboring a blaVIM-1 gene associated or not with a blaSHV12 gene. Infections caused by VIM-1-producing strains were more frequently associated with a recent prior hospitalization (P = 0.006), cirrhosis (P = 0.03), relapse of infection (P < 0.001), and more prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy (P = 0.01) than were other infections. All of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem and had blaVIM-1 preceded by a weak P1 promoter and inactivated P2 promoters. Most VIM-1-producing Enterobacter isolates belonged to a main clone, but four different clones were found. Multiclonal VIM-1-producing E. cloacae infections are difficult to diagnose due to an apparent susceptibility to various beta-lactams, including carbapenems, and are associated with a high relapse rate and a more prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy. PMID:19741074

  19. Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant isolates of pseudomonas putida producing VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Gianluigi; Luzzaro, Francesco; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Riccio, Maria Letizia; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Colì, Alessandra; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Toniolo, Antonio

    2002-11-01

    Successful carbapenem-based chemotherapy for the treatment of Pseudomonas infections has been seriously hindered by the recent appearance of IMP- and VIM-type metallo-beta-lactamases, which confer high-level resistance to carbapenems and most other beta-lactams. Recently, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas putida isolates for which carbapenem MICs were >/=32 micro g/ml were recovered from cultures of urine from three inpatients in the general intensive care unit of the Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy. Enzyme assays revealed production of a metallo-beta-lactamase activity, while molecular analysis detected in each isolate a bla(VIM-1) determinant carried by an apparently identical medium-sized plasmid. Conjugation experiments were unsuccessful in transferring the beta-lactamase determinant to Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Macrorestriction analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the isolates were of clonal origin. PCR mapping and sequencing of the variable region of the plasmid-borne class 1 integron carrying the bla(VIM-1) determinant (named In110) showed that the bla(VIM-1)-containing cassette was identical to that previously found in strains of different species from other Italian hospitals and that the cassette array of In110 was not identical but clearly related to that of In70 (a bla(VIM-1)-containing plasmid-borne integron from an Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolate), pointing to a common origin of this cassette and to a related evolutionary history of their cognate integrons. PMID:12409373

  20. Polar views of Saturn's deep atmosphere from Cassini/VIMS: New insights into waves, storms, and global circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, K.; Momary, T.; Temma, T.; Roos-Serote, M.; Showman, A.; Morales-Juberias, R.; Dowling, T.; Atreya, S.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2007-08-01

    We present recently-acquired imagery of cloud and wave systems spanning the depths of Saturn down to the 3-bar level in the polar regions of Saturn, obtained by the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini/Huygens orbiter. Images taken in both reflected sunlight and in Saturn's thermal glow at 5 microns wavelengths, will be presented. The 5-micron images reveal thick clouds at depth, seen silhouetted against the upwelling radiation. In the south polar region, a significant fraction of these deep discrete clouds appear surprisingly dark in reflected sunlight, indicating a nearly wavelength-independent dark absorber spanning the 0.5-3 micron region exists in or above these clouds. These compositionally-different cloud regions then may indicate that unusually strong vertical upwelling occurs at discrete locations near the south pole. In the north polar region, Saturn's Polar Hexagon, discovered in Voyager imagery by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988), is a prominent feature at 5 microns, indicating that the feature is comprised of relatively large particles (> 1 micron) and extends at least several bars of pressure down into the atmosphere. The re-acquisition of this feature near 77.5 degrees planetocentric latitude indicates that the hexagon is a multi-decade, long-lived feature which survives the Saturn seasons. A second hexagon, significantly darker at 5 micron than the brighter historical feature, is located near 74.2 degrees planetocentric latitude. The clouds in the 5-micron-bright hexagon are relatively deep: 3.5 bars compared to the 2.5-3.0-bar level of clouds in the dark hexagon. Observed three times over a 12-day period between October 29 and November 10, 2006, both hexagonal features stay fixed in a rotational system defined by the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch and Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253- 256, 1981) to within an accuracy of 11 seconds per rotational period. This agrees with the stationary nature of the wave in

  1. Nosocomial dissemination of VIM-2-producing ST235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Mikucionyte, G; Zamorano, L; Vitkauskiene, A; López-Causapé, C; Juan, C; Mulet, X; Oliver, A

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa multidrug resistance, and particularly the production of carbapenemases linked to international high-risk clones, is of growing concern. While high levels of carbapenem resistance (>60 %) have been reported in Lithuania, so far, there is no information on the underlying mechanisms. Thus, the aim of this work was to determine the molecular epidemiology and prevalence of acquired carbapenemases among 73 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates recovered in a hospital from Kaunas, Lithuania in 2011-2012. The presence of acquired carbapenemases was evaluated through phenotypic (modified Hodge test, cloxacillin inhibition test, double-disc synergy test) and genetic methods [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing]. Clonal relatedness was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Acquired β-lactamases were detected in 19 (26 %) of the isolates, whereas resistance was exclusively chromosomal (OprD inactivation ± AmpC hyperproduction) in the remaining 54 (74 %) isolates. The acquired β-lactamases detected included 16 VIM-2, one PER-1 and two GES enzymes. PFGE revealed that 15 of the 16 VIM-2 isolates belonged to a single clone, identified as the international high-risk clone ST235 by MLST. bla VIM-2 was preceded by aacA7 in a class I integron, similar to epidemic ST235 isolates described in nearby countries. Additionally, sequencing of bla GES revealed the presence of the carbapenem-hydrolysing enzyme GES-5 in one of the isolates and a novel GES variant, designated GES-27, in the other. GES-27 differed from GES-5 by a single amino acid substitution, proline 167, that was replaced by glutamine. Increasing emergence and dissemination of concerning resistance mechanisms and international clones warrants global surveillance and control strategies. PMID:26638216

  2. Study on imipenem resistance and prevalence of blaVIM1 and blaVIM2 metallo-beta lactamases among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mashhad, Northeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mirbagheri, Seyedeh Zohreh; Meshkat, Zahra; Naderinasab, Mahboubeh; Rostami, Sina; Nabavinia, Maryam Sadat; Rahmati, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The main cause of serious nosocomial infections is a Gram-negative pathogen known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Carbapenems are widely used as an appropriate treatment for these infections, however resistance to these agents has been observed and is increasing. Metallo beta-lactamase (MBLs) enzyme is one of the main causes of resistance to carbapenem. In the current study the frequency and production of VIM1 and VIM2 by imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates of patients hospitalized in Imam Reza hospital were evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this study, 131 clinical samples were collected from patients hospitalized in Imam Reza hospital in Mashhad during a 15-month period from May 2011 to November 2012. After verification of P. aeruginosa isolates, antibiotic resistance patterns of isolates were determined for 14 antibiotics by Kirby-Bauer standard disk diffusion according to the CLSI guidelines. Combined-disk test was used for phenotypic determination of MBLs-producing isolates and after DNA extraction, genotypic determination of VIM1 and VIM2 metallo beta-lactamase genes was carried out using Multiplex-PCR. Results: Of 63 imipenem-resistant isolates (48.5%), 56 (88.8%) were MBL-producing in phenotypic assessments. Also amongst imipenem-resistant isolates, the frequency of VIM1 and VIM2 genes were 58.7 and 3.17%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the current study along with the results of the other conducted studies in Iran in recent years demonstrate that the average resistance to imipenem in P. aeruginosa isolates was 51.3% which has increased in comparison with the results in 2006 (32.9%). It was also determined that the frequency of VIM1 gene was more than VIM2 gene. In phenotypic assessment by using CD method, 49.6% of isolates were determined as MBLs-producing. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were verified in comparison with the results of PCR test. PMID:26622967

  3. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction. PMID:17328735

  4. Compositional and spatial variations in Titan dune and interdune regions from Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, Léa E.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Hayne, Paul O.; Malaska, Michael J.; Le Gall, Alice; Solomonidou, Anezina; Lucas, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Dunes cover about 15 % of Titan's visible surface, and represent one of the largest reservoirs of hydrocarbon solids on Titan (Rodriguez, S. et al. [2014]. Icarus 230, 168-179; Lopes, R.M.C. et al. [2016]. Icarus 270, 162-182.). Herein, we use data from the Cassini spacecraft to derive constraints on the compositional and regional variability of Titan's dune and interdune regions by combining spectral information from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and spatial information from Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) data. Using the combined datasets, we extract pure infrared spectra of dune and interdune regions by extrapolating linear correlations between VIMS reflectance and dune area fraction calculated in each VIMS footprint from SAR images. We applied the same method using the Cassini RADAR Radiometer dataset to extract the microwave surface emissivity of the dune and interdune regions. Globally the dune spectra show little variation, but we find that the interdune spectra exhibit several different behaviors. Similarly, we extract from passive radiometry a mean dune emissivity of 0.98 ± 0.01, while interdune emissivity varies from 0.86 to 0.98. We find that the interdune regions are often spectrally similar to other Titan terrain units, namely Caladan Planitia, the Adiri Mountains, and Sinlap crater, while the dunes are spectrally distinct from all terrain units. Around Sinlap crater, the interdune regions correspond to the dark blue VIMS unit: the dunes could be forming on top of the ejecta, or the material corresponding to the blue unit could be depositing preferentially in the interdunes areas. There was one region in the Belet sand sea where we were unable to extract the dune and interdune spectra and emissivities in spite of high-quality data, which we interpret to result from a thick sand cover in the interdune regions, implying inactive or saturated dune fields. However, the fact that we were able to extract distinct dune and interdune

  5. Studying Titan's surface photometry in the 5 microns atmospheric window with the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Altobelli, N.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Philippe, S.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the influence of methane gas and a thick aerosols haze in the atmosphere, Titan's surface is only visible in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centered at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns with the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The 5 microns atmospheric window constitutes the only one being almost insensitive to the haze scattering and which presents only a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by the instrument. Despite these advantages leading to the almost direct view of the surface, the 5 microns window is also the noisiest spectral window of the entire VIMS spectrum (an effect highly dependent on the time exposure used for the observations), and it is not totally free from atmospheric contributions, enough to keep "artefacts" in mosaics of several thousands of cubes due to atmospheric and surface photometric effects amplified by the very heterogeneous viewing conditions between each Titan flyby. At first order, a lambertian surface photometry at 5 microns has been used as an initial parameter in order to estimate atmospheric opacity and surface photometry in all VIMS atmospheric windows and to determine the albedo of the surface, yet unknown, both using radiative transfer codes on single cubes or empirical techniques on global hyperspectral mosaics. Other studies suggested that Titan's surface photometry would not be uniquely lambertian but would also contain anisotropic lunar-like contributions. In the present work, we aim at constraining accurately the surface photometry of Titan and residual atmospheric absorption effects in this 5 microns window using a comprehensive study of relevant sites located at various latitudes. Those include bright and dark (dunes) terrains, 5-microns bright terrains (Hotei Regio and Tui Regio), the Huygens Landing Site and high latitudes polar lakes and seas. The VIMS 2004 to 2014 database, composed of more than 40,000 hyperspectral cubes acquired on

  6. Haze and clouds properties of Saturn's 2011 giant vortex retrieved from Cassini VIMS-V data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; d'Aversa, E.

    2014-04-01

    This work is focused on the retrieval of the microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds and hazes overlying the giant vortex observed in 2011 at Saturn, by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board of Cassini. The retrieval algorithm is based on the optimal estimation technique [15] and takes advantage of a forward radiative transfer model developed by adapting the LibRadtran code [13] to the atmosphere of Saturn. For each of the retrieved parameters - that are effective radii, top pressures and total number densities for each considered deck - a 2D spatial map has been produced.

  7. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  8. ISO terminological analysis of the VIM3 concepts 'quantity' and 'kind-of-quantity'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybkaer, René

    2010-06-01

    The recent third edition of the International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and General Concepts and Associated Terms (VIM3) (JCGM 200:2008 (Sèvres: BIPM); also ISO/IEC Guide 99:2007 3rd edn (Geneva: ISO)) has undergone important changes, not least by adhering to ISO International Standards on terminology work (ISO 704:2000 Terminology Work—Principles and Methods; ISO 1087-1:2000 Terminology Work—Vocabulary—Part 1: Theory and Application; ISO 10241:1992 International Terminology Standards—Preparation and Layout). A recent critique (Mari 2009 Metrologia 46 L11-L15)—based on Object-Oriented Analysis—centres on the meaning and relation of the two first and fundamental concepts 'quantity'Single quotation marks ('...') or bold type indicate a concept when necessary, double quotation marks ("...") a term or quotation. and the new entry 'kind-of-quantity'. This makes it timely to analyse the two concepts, their relation and their respective role in forming the generic hierarchical concept system of VIM3 from 'property' to individual quantities. It is suggested that 'kind-of-quantity' acts as a division criterionSynonyms are "criterion of subdivision", "type of characteristic(s)", see the annexe..

  9. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface as derived from Cassini-VIMS measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hansen, G.B.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Newman, S.F.; Bellucci, G.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Griffith, C.A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Enceladus consists almost completely of water ice. As the band depths of water ice absorptions are sensitive to the size of particles, absorptions can be used to map variations of icy particles across the surface. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed Enceladus with a high spatial resolution during three Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbits EN 003, EN 004 and EN 011). Based on these data we measured the band depths of water ice absorptions at 1.04, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 ??m. These band depths were compared to water ice models that represent theoretically calculated reflectance spectra for a range of particle diameters between 2 ??m and 1 mm. The agreement between the experimental (VIMS) and model values supports the assumption that pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and therefore that variations in band depth correspond to variations in water ice particle diameters. Our measurements show that the particle diameter of water ice increases toward younger tectonically altered surface units with the largest particles exposed in relatively "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old densely cratered terrains. The largest particles (???0.2 mm) are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" at the south pole. In general, the particle diameters are strongly correlated with geologic features and surface ages, indicating a stratigraphic evolution of the surface that is caused by cryovolcanic resurfacing and impact gardening. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cloud structure and composition of Jupiter's troposphere from 5- μ m Cassini VIMS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, R. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2015-09-01

    Jupiter's tropospheric composition and cloud structure are studied using Cassini VIMS 4.5-5.1 μ m thermal emission spectra from the 2000-2001 flyby. We make use of both nadir and limb darkening observations on the planet's nightside, and compare these with dayside observations. Although there is significant spatial variability in the 5- μ m brightness temperatures, the shape of the spectra remain very similar across the planet, suggesting the presence of a spectrally-flat, spatially inhomogeneous cloud deck. We find that a simple cloud model consisting of a single, compact cloud is able to reproduce both nightside and dayside spectra, subject to the following constraints: (i) the cloud base is located at pressures of 1.2 bar or lower; (ii) the cloud particles are highly scattering; and (iii) the cloud is sufficiently spectrally flat. Using this cloud model, we search for global variability in the cloud opacity and the phosphine deep volume mixing ratio. We find that the vast majority of the 5- μ m inhomogeneity can be accounted for by variations in the thickness of the cloud decks, with huge differences between the cloudy zones and the relatively cloud-free belts. The relatively low spectral resolution of VIMS limits reliable retrievals of gaseous species, but some evidence is found for an enhancement in the abundance of phosphine at high latitudes.

  11. AMA overcomes antibiotic resistance by NDM and VIM metallo-β-lactamases

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew M.; Reid-Yu, Sarah A.; Wang, Wenliang; King, Dustin T.; De Pascale, Gianfranco; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Coombes, Brian K.; Wright, Gerard D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens is a global public health problem. The acquisition of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) such as NDM-1 is a principle contributor to the emergence of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens that threatens the use of penicillin, cephalosporin, and carbapenem antibiotics to treat infections. So far a clinical inhibitor of MBLs that could reverse resistance and re-sensitize resistant Gram-negative pathogens to carbapenems does not exist. Here we have identified a fungal natural product, aspergillomarasmine A (AMA) that is a rapid and potent inhibitor of the NDM-1 enzyme and another clinically relevant MBL, VIM-2. AMA also fully restored the activity of meropenem against Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. possessing either VIM or NDM-type alleles. In mice infected with NDM-1-expressing Klebsiella pneumoniae, AMA efficiently restored meropenem activity, demonstrating that a combination of AMA and a carbapenem antibiotic has therapeutic potential to address the clinical challenge of MBL positive carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:24965651

  12. His224 Alters the R2 Drug Binding Site and Phe218 Influences the Catalytic Efficiency of the Metallo-β-Lactamase VIM-7

    PubMed Central

    Skagseth, Susann; Edvardsen, Kine Susann Waade; Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Bjerga, Gro Elin Kjæreng; Leiros, Ingar; Samuelsen, Ørjan

    2014-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) are the causative mechanism for resistance to β-lactams, including carbapenems, in many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. One important family of MBLs is the Verona integron-encoded MBLs (VIM). In this study, the importance of residues Asp120, Phe218, and His224 in the most divergent VIM variant, VIM-7, was investigated to better understand the roles of these residues in VIM enzymes through mutations, enzyme kinetics, crystal structures, thermostability, and docking experiments. The tVIM-7-D120A mutant with a tobacco etch virus (TEV) cleavage site was enzymatically inactive, and its structure showed the presence of only the Zn1 ion. The mutant was less thermostable, with a melting temperature (Tm) of 48.5°C, compared to 55.3°C for the wild-type tVIM-7. In the F218Y mutant, a hydrogen bonding cluster was established involving residues Asn70, Asp84, and Arg121. The tVIM-7-F218Y mutant had enhanced activity compared to wild-type tVIM-7, and a slightly higher Tm (57.1°C) was observed, most likely due to the hydrogen bonding cluster. Furthermore, the introduction of two additional hydrogen bonds adjacent to the active site in the tVIM-7-H224Y mutant gave a higher thermostability (Tm, 62.9°C) and increased enzymatic activity compared to those of the wild-type tVIM-7. Docking of ceftazidime in to the active site of tVIM-7, tVIM-7-H224Y, and VIM-7-F218Y revealed that the side-chain conformations of residue 224 and Arg228 in the L3 loop and Tyr67 in the L1 loop all influence possible substrate binding conformations. In conclusion, the residue composition of the L3 loop, as shown with the single H224Y mutation, is important for activity particularly toward the positively charged cephalosporins like cefepime and ceftazidime. PMID:24913158

  13. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  14. Analysis of long-wavelength signals in InSAR to resolve large-scale deformation: Application to the Western Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelung, F.; Greene, F.; Wdowinski, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present the contemporary velocity field in the western Basin and Range province observed by satellite radar imagery. We use 18 years of ERS 1,2 and Envisat data to study 5 descending swaths nearly 600 to 700 km long. We followed the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm to generate time series of ground displacements and average velocities. We only exploit pixels of the interferograms, which remain coherent through time in the SAR dataset. Our time-series mean velocity maps show a broad area of uplift located in Central Nevada Seismic Belt (CNSB) with velocities as high as 2 to 3 mm/yr. Previous studies based on 9 years of SAR data explained this uplift as postseismic mantle relaxation after a sequence of four earthquakes (M ~ 7) that occurred in the first half of the 20th century. After increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of SAR imagery, results indicate that the velocity is slowing down during the decade covered by Envisat and post-2000 ERS 2 acquisitions. Unfortunately, long-wavelength noise is introduced to InSAR data from uncertainties in the satellite orbits, and an improper estimation and removal of these artifacts can lead to significant error in the estimated displacements. To understand how these errors affect our results we produce time-series in non-deforming areas and analyze long-wavelength residuals in terms of vertical and horizontal baseline errors, however ERS SAR imagery in non-deforming areas is limited in temporal and spatial coverage. We thus extend our analysis of ERS data using InSAR time-series near the Nevada-Utah border, were we expect to observe low rates of deformation. Finally we perform an analysis of short and long-wavelength signals for all the overlapping areas of the adjacent tracks localized between CNSB and the Nevada-Utah border. The error distribution in areas with low rates or no deformation is valuable for the assessment of the apparent deformation signal observed at CNSB.

  15. First Report of an Extensively Drug-Resistant VIM-2 Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Brevundimonas diminuta Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa N.; Barberis, Claudia M.; Rodríguez, Carlos H.; Famiglietti, Angela M. R.; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2012-01-01

    In the literature, only three Brevundimonas diminuta environmental isolates carrying metallo-β-lactamase genes were recently published. However, so far, no B. diminuta clinical isolates carrying these carbapenem resistance genes have been described. Here we report the first VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamase-producing B. diminuta clinical isolate obtained from an immunocompromised patient. PMID:22692741

  16. First report of an extensively drug-resistant VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamase-producing Brevundimonas diminuta clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa N; Barberis, Claudia M; Rodríguez, Carlos H; Famiglietti, Angela M R; Ramirez, Maria S; Vay, Carlos A

    2012-08-01

    In the literature, only three Brevundimonas diminuta environmental isolates carrying metallo-β-lactamase genes were recently published. However, so far, no B. diminuta clinical isolates carrying these carbapenem resistance genes have been described. Here we report the first VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamase-producing B. diminuta clinical isolate obtained from an immunocompromised patient. PMID:22692741

  17. Geology of the Selk crater region on Titan from Cassini VIMS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, C.; Stephan, K.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of Titan obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have revealed Selk crater, a geologically young, bright-rimmed, impact crater located ???800. km north-northwest of the Huygens landing site. The crater rim-crest diameter is ???90. km; its floor diameter is ???60. km. A central pit/peak, 20-30. km in diameter, is seen; the ratio of the size of this feature to the crater diameter is consistent with similarly sized craters on Ganymede and Callisto, all of which are dome craters. The VIMS data, unfortunately, are not of sufficient resolution to detect such a dome. The inner rim of Selk crater is fluted, probably by eolian erosion, while the outer flank and presumed ejecta blanket appear dissected by drainages (particularly to the east), likely the result of fluvial erosion. Terracing is observed on the northern and western walls of Selk crater within a 10-15. km wide terrace zone identified in VIMS data; the terrace zone is bright in SAR data, consistent with it being a rough surface. The terrace zone is slightly wider than those observed on Ganymede and Callisto and may reflect differences in thermal structure and/or composition of the lithosphere. The polygonal appearance of the crater likely results from two preexisting planes of weakness (oriented at azimuths of 21?? and 122?? east of north). A unit of generally bright terrain that exhibits similar infrared-color variation and contrast to Selk crater extends east-southeast from the crater several hundred kilometers. We informally refer to this terrain as the Selk "bench." Both Selk and the bench are surrounded by the infrared-dark Belet dune field. Hypotheses for the genesis of the optically bright terrain of the bench include: wind shadowing in the lee of Selk crater preventing the encroachment of dunes, impact-induced cryovolcanism, flow of a fluidized-ejecta blanket (similar to the bright crater outflows observed on Venus), and erosion of a streamlined upland formed

  18. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  19. The roles of RgpB and Kgp in late onset gingipain activity in the vimA-defective mutant of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Dou, Y; Robles, A; Roy, F; Aruni, A W; Sandberg, L; Nothnagel, E; Fletcher, H M

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that VimA, an acetyltransferase, can modulate gingipain biogenesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Inactivation of the vimA gene resulted in isogenic mutants that showed a late onset of gingipain activity that only occurred during the stationary growth phase. To further elucidate the role and contribution of the gingipains in this VimA-dependent process, isogenic mutants defective in the gingipain genes in the vimA-deficient genetic background were evaluated. In contrast with the wild-type strain, RgpB and Kgp gingipain activities were absent in exponential phase in the ∆rgpA::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant. However, these activities increased to 31 and 53%, respectively, of that of the wild-type during stationary phase. In the ∆rgpA::cat-∆kgp::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant, the RgpB protein was observed in the extracellular fraction but no activity was present even at the stationary growth phase. There was no gingipain activity observed in the ∆rgpB::cat-∆kgp::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant whereas Kgp activity in ∆rgpA::cat-∆rgpB::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant was 24% of the wild-type at late stationary phase. In contrast to RgpA, the glycosylation profile of the RgpB catalytic domain from both W83 and P. gingivalis FLL92 (vimA::ermF) showed similarity. Taken together, the results suggest multiple gingipain activation pathways in P. gingivalis. Whereas the maturation pathways for RgpA and RgpB are different, the late-onset gingipain activity in the vimA-defective mutant was due to activation/maturation of RgpB and Kgp. Moreover, unlike RgpA, which is VimA-dependent, the maturation/activation pathways for RgpB and Kgp are interdependent in the absence VimA. PMID:25858089

  20. Simultaneous mapping of Titan's surface albedo and aerosol opacity from Cassini/VIMS massive inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, L.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Cornet, T.; Rannou, P.; Le Mouelic, S.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R.

    2015-10-01

    Titan still lacks information on the cartography of its surface albedo, due to the complications linked to the treatment of the atmospheric contributions on surface observations. We present in this paper the results of our massive inversion method that we developed to treat Cassini/VIMS h yperspectral data of Titan. Our minimization procedure is based on look-up tables (LUTs) we create from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer (RT) model[1]. This allows us to decrease the computational time by a factor of several thousands with respect to the standard radiative transfer applications. We will present the improvements on the RT modeling thanks to the acquisition of new information on Titan's aerosol properties and our results for the simultaneous mapping of Titan's surface albedo and aerosol abundance in some regions of interest.

  1. Characterization of Inclusions in VIM/VAR NiTi Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coda, A.; Zilio, S.; Norwich, D.; Sczerzenie, F.

    2012-12-01

    Inclusions content is important for the mechanical behavior and performances of NiTi-based products particularly in fatigue-rated devices. Higher inclusions content has been correlated to reductions in transformation temperatures and strain recovery under mechanical or thermo-mechanical cycling. Moreover, most fatigue fractures show inclusions at the initiation site. However, there is a general lack of information on the nature and characteristics of such inclusions, especially those typically recognized as intermetallics oxides. In this study, the common scanning electron microscopy technique has been used to investigate the chemistry and morphology of inclusions in commercial standard VIM/VAR binary NiTi alloys. The defined experimental procedure, results, and their significance will be presented and discussed.

  2. Fast forward modeling of Titan's infrared spectra to invert VIMS/Cassini hyperspectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rannou, P.; Combe, J.-P.; Corre, L.L.; Tobie, G.; Barnes, J.W.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    The surface of Titan, the largest icy moon of Saturn, is veiled by a very thick and hazy atmosphere. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, conduct an intensive survey of Titan with the objective to understand the complex nature of the atmosphere and surface of the mysterious moon and the way they interact. Accurate radiative transfer modeling is necessary to analyze Titan's infrared spectra, but are often very computer resources demanding. As Cassini has gathered hitherto millions of spectra of Titan and will still observe it until at least 2010, we report here on the development of a new rapid, simple and versatile radiative transfer model specially designed to invert VIMS datacubes. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  3. Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral observations of the HUYGENS landing site on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Sotin, C.; Clenet, H.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.; Brown, R.H.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    Titan is one of the primary scientific objectives of the NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini-Huygens mission. Scattering by haze particles in Titan's atmosphere and numerous methane absorptions dramatically veil Titan's surface in the visible range, though it can be studied more easily in some narrow infrared windows. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft successfully imaged its surface in the atmospheric windows, taking hyperspectral images in the range 0.4-5.2 ??m. On 26 October (TA flyby) and 13 December 2004 (TB flyby), the Cassini-Huygens mission flew over Titan at an altitude lower than 1200 km at closest approach. We report here on the analysis of VIMS images of the Huygens landing site acquired at TA and TB, with a spatial resolution ranging from 16 to14.4 km/pixel. The pure atmospheric backscattering component is corrected by using both an empirical method and a first-order theoretical model. Both approaches provide consistent results. After the removal of scattering, ratio images reveal subtle surface heterogeneities. A particularly contrasted structure appears in ratio images involving the 1.59 and 2.03 ??m images north of the Huygens landing site. Although pure water ice cannot be the only component exposed at Titan's surface, this area is consistent with a local enrichment in exposed water ice and seems to be consistent with DISR/Huygens images and spectra interpretations. The images show also a morphological structure that can be interpreted as a 150 km diameter impact crater with a central peak. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopy, morphometry, and photoclinometry of Titan's dunefields from Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Sotin, C.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Jaumann, R.; Beyer, R.A.; Buratti, B.J.; Pitman, K.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-resolution (500 m/pixel) Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) T20 observations of Titan resolve that moon's sand dunes. The spectral variability in some dune regions shows that there are sand-free interdune areas, wherein VIMS spectra reveal the exposed dune substrate. The interdunes from T20 are, variously, materials that correspond to the equatorial bright, 5-??m-bright, and dark blue spectral units. Our observations show that an enigmatic "dark red" spectral unit seen in T5 in fact represents a macroscopic mixture with 5-??m-bright material and dunes as its spectral endmembers. Looking more broadly, similar mixtures of varying amounts of dune and interdune units of varying composition can explain the spectral and albedo variability within the dark brown dune global spectral unit that is associated with dunes. The presence of interdunes indicates that Titan's dunefields are both mature and recently active. The spectrum of the dune endmember reveals the sand to be composed of less water ice than the rest of Titan; various organics are consistent with the dunes' measured reflectivity. We measure a mean dune spacing of 2.1 km, and find that the dunes are oriented on the average in an east-west direction, but angling up to 10?? from parallel to the equator in specific cases. Where no interdunes are present, we determine the height of one set of dunes photoclinometrically to be between 30 and 70 m. These results pave the way for future exploration and interpretation of Titan's sand dunes. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. II. HYDRODYNAMIC SCALING LAWS AND THERMAL ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Shimizu, Toshifumi E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp

    2013-10-20

    In this study we measure physical parameters of the same set of 155 M- and X-class solar flares observed with AIA/SDO as analyzed in Paper I, by performing a differential emission measure analysis to determine the flare peak emission measure EM{sub p} , peak temperature T{sub p} , electron density n{sub p} , and thermal energy E{sub th}, in addition to the spatial scales L, areas A, and volumes V measured in Paper I. The parameter ranges for M- and X-class flares are log (EM{sub p}) = 47.0-50.5, T{sub p} = 5.0-17.8 MK, n{sub p} = 4 × 10{sup 9}-9 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –3}, and thermal energies of E{sub th} = 1.6 × 10{sup 28}-1.1 × 10{sup 32} erg. We find that these parameters obey the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law T{sub p}{sup 2}∝n{sub p} L and H∝T {sup 7/2} L {sup –2} during the peak time t{sub p} of the flare density n{sub p} , when energy balance between the heating rate H and the conductive and radiative loss rates is achieved for a short instant and thus enables the applicability of the RTV scaling law. The application of the RTV scaling law predicts power-law distributions for all physical parameters, which we demonstrate with numerical Monte Carlo simulations as well as with analytical calculations. A consequence of the RTV law is also that we can retrieve the size distribution of heating rates, for which we find N(H)∝H {sup –1.8}, which is consistent with the magnetic flux distribution N(Φ)∝Φ{sup –1.85} observed by Parnell et al. and the heating flux scaling law F{sub H} ∝HL∝B/L of Schrijver et al.. The fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model in conjunction with the RTV scaling law reproduces the observed power-law distributions and their slopes for all geometrical and physical parameters and can be used to predict the size distributions for other flare data sets, instruments, and detection algorithms.

  6. Vertical structure mapping of Saturn's 2011 giant vortex by means of Cassini VIMS-V data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Adriani, Alberto; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Liberti, Gian Luigi

    On December 2010 a giant storm erupted in Saturn's North springtime hemisphere. A giant vortex formed in the storm wake and persisted after the principal outburst exhausted on July 2011. The vortex had been imaged several times by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini probe, starting from May 2011, and it was still present in the December 2012 observations In this work we have analyzed the data recorded by the visual channel of the spectrometer (VIMS-V). VIMS-V operates in the spectral range 350 - 1050 nm with a nominal spectral resolution of 7.3 nm and a nominal angular resolution of 500 μrad. Spectral data have been first analyzed by a forward radiative transfer model based on the LibRadtran code, then an inverse model has used to retrieve microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds overlying the vortex. The forward model relies on the assumptions of a plane parallel atmosphere, multiple scattering, the Mie theory to compute single scattering properties and the molecular scattering adapted to Saturn’s atmosphere. The inverse code is based on the optimal estimation technique, it is robust and capable to handle several free parameters at a time. The best fits to the observed radiance spectra are obtained by means of a least square analysis, in which the cost function is minimized taking advantage of the Gauss-Newton method. Applying this procedure, we produced spatial maps for each of the free parameters, including: effective radii for the particles size distributions of each cloud or aerosol deck; total number densities of the particles; and top pressures of each deck. In this work we focused on the data retrieved by VIMS on August 2011. We plan to extend the analysis on data retrieved months later, to map the evolution the parameters undergo in time. The analysis extension to the range 1.0-5.0 micron, covered by the infrared channel of VIMS (VIMS-IR) is also planned.

  7. Dispersal of carbapenemase blaVIM-1 gene associated with different Tn402 variants, mercury transposons, and conjugative plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tato, Marta; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of bla(VIM-1) within four different genetic platforms from distinct Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an area with a low prevalence of metallo-beta-lactamase producers is reported. Forty-three VIM-1-producing isolates (including 19 Enterobacter cloacae, 2 Escherichia coli, and 2 P. aeruginosa isolates, 18 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate, and 2 Klebsiella oxytoca isolate) recovered from 2005 to 2007 and corresponding to 15 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types were studied. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates corresponded to a hospital outbreak, and the P. aeruginosa isolates were sporadically recovered. The genetic context of the integrons carrying bla(VIM-1) (arbitrarily designated types A, B, C, and D) was characterized by PCR mapping based on known Tn402 and mercury transposons and further sequencing. Among Enterobacteriaceae isolates, bla(VIM-1) was part of integrons located either in an In2-Tn402 element linked to Tn21 (type A; In110-bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-aadA1) or in a Tn402 transposon lacking the whole tni module [type B; In113-bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-dhfrII (also called dfrB1)-aadA1-catB2] and the transposon was associated with an IncHI2 or IncI1 plasmid, respectively. Among P. aeruginosa isolates, bla(VIM-1) was part of a new gene cassette array located in a defective Tn402 transposon carrying either tniBDelta3 and tniA (type C; bla(VIM-1)-aadA1) or tniC and DeltatniQ (type D; bla(VIM-1)-aadB), and both Tn402 variants were associated with conjugative plasmids of 30 kb. The dissemination of bla(VIM-1) was associated with different genetic structures and bacterial hosts, depicting a complex emergence and evolutionary network scenario in our facility, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Knowledge of the complex epidemiology of bla(VIM-1) is necessary to control this emerging threat. PMID:19901094

  8. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  9. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  10. Clonal relatedness and conserved integron structures in epidemiologically unrelated Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing the VIM-1 metallo-{beta}-lactamase from different Italian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Pallecchi, Lucia; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Cresti, Stefania; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Pagani, Laura; Lagatolla, Cristina; Cornaglia, Giuseppe; Fontana, Roberta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2005-01-01

    Three epidemiologically independent Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, representative of the first VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase producers detected at three different hospitals in northern Italy, were investigated to determine their genomic relatedness and to compare the structures of the genetic supports for the VIM-1 determinants. The three isolates, all of serotype O11, appeared to be clonally related according to the results of genotyping by macrorestriction analysis of genomic DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA. Investigation of the genetic support for the bla(VIM-1) determinant revealed that it was carried on identical or almost identical integrons (named In70.2 and In70.3) located within a conserved genomic context. The integrons were structurally related to In70 and In110, two plasmid-borne bla(VIM-1)-containing integrons from Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Pseudomonas putida isolates, respectively, from the same geographic area (northern Italy) and were found to be inserted close to the res site of a Tn5051-like transposon, different from any of those described previously, that was apparently carried on the bacterial chromosome. The present findings suggest that the three VIM-1-producing isolates are members of the same clonal complex which have been spreading in hospitals in northern Italy since the late 1990s and point to a common ancestry of their bla(VIM-1)-containing integrons. PMID:15616282

  11. Saturn's Regional and Global Cloud Properties from Cassini/VIMS 4.5-5.1 Micron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, K. H.; Momary, T. W.; Orton, G. S.; Roos-Serote, M.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2009-09-01

    Exploiting a region of Saturn's thermal-IR spectrum between 4.5-5.1 microns where there is a dearth of opacity sources, Cassini/VIMS has revealed a wealth of dynamical phenomena in the 1-4 bar region that are transforming our understanding of the gas giant. Narrow dark lanes and discrete cloud features are observed in silhouette against the 5-micron background thermal glow of Saturn's deep atmosphere. The NEMESIS optimal-estimation retrieval algorithm (Irwin et al., JSQRT, 2008) is used to model the 4.5-5.1 micron region using the correlated-k approximation. We determine (a) the sensitivity and correlations associated with determinations of cloud properties and gaseous composition from the Cassini/VIMS dataset; (b) the meridional variation in opacity sources (a multi-layer cloud model, the abundances of phosphine and arsine); (c) the contribution of the thermal and reflected components to VIMS spectra and (d) the spatial variability of opacity sources associated with Saturn's string of pearls and ribbon wave features in the northern hemisphere. The meridional gradients in composition are compared to the Cassini/CIRS derivations of phosphine at higher altitudes (pressures less than 1 bar; Fletcher et al., Icarus, 2009). The seasonal origin of the north-south asymmetry in 5-micron opacity (Baines et al., BAAS, 2006) and the dynamical motions associated with Saturn's complex zonal wave activity will be discussed. The vertical distribution of cloud opacity demonstrates the necessity for aerosols at the 2-3 bar level to successfully replicate the VIMS data. Finally, we search Cassini/CIRS mapping observations at 15.0 cm-1 resolution for mid-IR counterparts (0.1-0.5 bar) to the zonal wave activity in the deeper troposphere (1-4 bars) to investigate the vertical coupling in Saturn's troposphere.

  12. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  13. Wavelength Swept Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Bouma, Brett E.

    In optical interferometric metrology, the wavelength of light serves as a reference for length. At a given optical wavelength, an interference signal varies as a sinusoidal function of distance with a period equal to the wavelength. Although this approach offers unrivaled precision, the periodic signal results in a 2π ambiguity for measurement of lengths greater than one wavelength. In optical coherence tomography (OCT), one wishes to determine light scattering distances and distribution within a sample, but without the ambiguity. To accomplish this, OCT is based on interferometry using many optical wavelengths, each serving as a "ruler" with different periodicities. OCT traditionally has used broadband light sources providing a wide range of wavelengths, all simultaneously. Alternatively, a tunable light source emitting one wavelength at a time, rapidly swept over a broad spectral range, can also be used to achieve the absolute ranging capability in OCT. In this chapter, we describe a technical overview of these new emerging sources. We begin with a discussion general specifications of these light sources, the review basic fundamentals of laser and wavelength tuning. Finally, we discuss the principles of various techniques developed to date for high-speed and wide tuning range.

  14. Titan's cloud seasonal activity from winter to spring with Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Griffith, C.A.; Burgalat, J.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Since Saturn orbital insertion in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter has been observing Titan throughout most of the northern winter season (October 2002-August 2009) and the beginning of spring, allowing a detailed monitoring of Titan's cloud coverage at high spatial resolution with close flybys on a monthly basis. This study reports on the analysis of all the near-infrared images of Titan's clouds acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during 67 targeted flybys of Titan between July 2004 and April 2010.The VIMS observations show numerous sporadic clouds at southern high and mid-latitudes, rare clouds in the equatorial region, and reveal a long-lived cloud cap above the north pole, ubiquitous poleward of 60??N. These observations allow us to follow the evolution of the cloud coverage during almost a 6-year period including the equinox, and greatly help to further constrain global circulation models (GCMs). After 4. years of regular outbursts observed by Cassini between 2004 and 2008, southern polar cloud activity started declining, and completely ceased 1. year before spring equinox. The extensive cloud system over the north pole, stable between 2004 and 2008, progressively fractionated and vanished as Titan entered into northern spring. At southern mid-latitudes, clouds were continuously observed throughout the VIMS observing period, even after equinox, in a latitude band between 30??S and 60??S. During the whole period of observation, only a dozen clouds were observed closer to the equator, though they were slightly more frequent as equinox approached. We also investigated the distribution of clouds with longitude. We found that southern polar clouds, before disappearing in mid-2008, were systematically concentrated in the leading hemisphere of Titan, in particular above and to the east of Ontario Lacus, the largest reservoir of hydrocarbons in the area. Clouds are also non-homogeneously distributed with longitude at southern mid

  15. Epidemiology and virulence of VIM-4 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients in eastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meradji, Samah; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Bentakouk, Mohamed Cherif; Nayme, Kaotar; Zerouali, Khalid; Mazouz, Dekhil; Chettibi, Houria; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) in burn patients from eastern Algeria, CRPA virulence factors and the molecular epidemiology of CRPA. The overall prevalence of CRPA was 48.38%. Seven (46.66%) isolates were metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) producers and contained the MBL genes blaVIM-4 (n=6) and blaVIM-2 (n=1). Risk factors for CRPA infection were urinary catheter use and intubation (p=0.008). A high percentage of virulence factors (86.6% of these isolates were able to produce protease; 73.3% of isolates has DNase; and 66.6% were haemolysin positive) was observed in CRPA isolates. Among the seven MBL-producing isolates, four had the same clonal profile. The class 1 integrons, which contained the aadA7 gene cassette, were detected in six isolates. The 16SrRNA methylase gene, rmtB, was detected in one strain. All CRPA isolates were biofilm formers. A study on the kinetics of biofilm production revealed that biofilm production increased when the concentration of imipenem or ciprofloxacin and the incubation time increased. This is the first study to report the presence of VIM-4-producing P. aeruginosa from North Africa and also of the high prevalence of CRPA isolates. Based on our study of burn unit patients, the high percentage of P. aeruginosa with virulence factors and multi-drug resistance is alarming. PMID:27156788

  16. The Polar Winds of Saturn as Determined by Cassini/VIMS: Seasonally Variable or Not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, K. H.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.; Cassini/VIMS Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The high inclination of Cassini's current orbit allows VIMS to once again obtain spectacular views of Saturn’s poles, not seen since 2008. We present new imagery and investigate the effect of seasonal variability on Saturn’s polar winds. The north pole now basks in spring daylight and we again observe the long-enduring northern Polar Hexagon, discovered in Voyager imagery by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988). This feature seemed to stay fixed in a rotational system defined by the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch & Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253-256, 1981) in both original Voyager and 2008 VIMS observations. Yet new images indicate a shift, with the hexagon rotating ~10° of longitude from Nov. 2012 to May 2013. Discrete clouds still race around the edges of the 5-μm-bright hexagon at speeds of ~100 m/s, as we observed in 2008 (Baines, Momary, et al., Plan. Space. Sci 57, 1671-1681, 2009). We also recover a massive storm system residing just inside the hexagon edge at ~80° N. lat. Since 2008, this storm has shifted poleward by 1.5° and turned 5 μm dark (cloudy), where it was 5 μm bright when last observed (i.e. cloud free). It now moves zonally faster at ~25 m/s vs. ~14 m/s in 2008. This enduring "shepherd" storm may force and maintain the hexagon shape. We also recover twin 5-μm-dark storms (Snake Eyes) moving slowly at ~15 m/s near 67° N lat. However, while the two features appear to maintain a relatively constant zonal separation on average (14° ), with the trailing feature remaining near 67° N lat., the leading storm appears to oscillate ~1° in latitude and drift in longitude. At the south pole, discrete clouds whirl, now in darkness, around a hurricane-like vortex consisting of a cloudless "eye" extending at least 1 bar deeper than surrounding rings of clouds. These clouds still appear to be moving as a classical vortex with winds reaching a maximum of ~200 m/s near 87° S lat. and then falling off to zero at the pole. In contrast

  17. Spectroscopic Identification of E-Ring Deposits on Enceladus Using Cassini-Vims Dat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, F.; Schenk, P.; Tosi, F.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus' surface is composed mostrly of pure water ice. The Cassini spacecraft has observed present-day geologic activity at the moon's South Polar region (the so-called "Tiger Stripes"). Plumes of micron-sized particles composed of water ice and other contaminants (CO2, NH3, CH4) erupting from this region are the major source of Saturn's E-ring. Some of this material, however, falls on Enceladus' surface to form deposits that extend to the north at ~220°E and ~40°E and whose highest concentration is at the south pole. The Cassini VIMS spectrometer acquires hyperspectral data in the 0.3-5.1 μm spectral range. We selected VIMS cubes of Enceladus in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm), and minimized photometric effects due to different illumination conditions by normalizing all spectra at 2.23 μm. We aim to identify E-ring deposits across Enceladus' surface through the variation in band depth of the main water-ice spectral features located at 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 μm. Since plumes deposits on the surface undergo darkening processes for less time than surrounding terrains, they appear brighter and so the water-ice absorption bands must be deeper. For all pixels in the selected cubes, we measured the band depths for the main water-ice absorptions and the height of the 3.6 μm reflection peak, whose value relates to grain size. To characterize the global variation of water-ice band depths across Enceladus, we divided the surface into a 1°x1° grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell. This approach clearly identifies plums deposits. As expected, the highest concentrations occur at Enceladus' south pole, where band depths values are the deepest across the entire moon's surface. Our results confirm that plume particles fall in north-oriented patterns at ~40°E and ~220°E, and disappear around ~0°E and ~180°E. In addition, we observed a possible non-plume related regional variation in all major water ice absorption bands on the leading

  18. Cassini VIMS Spectra of the Earth from Saturn Orbit: an Extrasolar Planet Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roger Nelson; Hedman, Matthew M.; Brown, Robert H.; Filacchione, Gianrico; Nicholson, Philip D.; Barnes, Jason W.

    2015-11-01

    Cassini VIMS has obtained spectra of the Earth while in Saturn orbit making observations of the Saturn system when the sun was behind Saturn. The observations, made in September 15, 2006 and July 19, 2013 are visible-near-infrared spectra (0.35 - 5.1 microns) of the Earth obtained at the furthest distance from the sun to date. The Earth was sub-pixel, 0.0088 milliradian in 2013 and 0.0085 milliradian in 2006, and the signal-to-noise ratio is low. A VIMS pixel IFOV is 0.25 x 0.5milliradian. As such, these data are likely representative of the first spectra that might be obtained of extrasolar terrestrial-like planets. What information can be derived from such remote observations? The observation made in 2013 had a phase angle of 97 degrees with multipleimage cubes providing a higher S/N average. The 2006 observation was made at a phase angle of 33 degrees but is a single cube, 1 pixel. The 2006 observation has Africa dominant on the disk, while the 2013 observation is mostly ocean with part of South America in sunlight. The 2013 visible data show clear signatures of Rayleigh scattering but this blue coloring can be from both the atmosphere and/or ocean. The 2006 data show a flatter spectrum, a signature of land. Both observations include the Moon in the field of view. The 0.35-2.5 micron spectral range shows significant absorption due to H2O liquid + gas. The thermal signature is very strong with the highest S/N of the entire spectrum. The best fit preliminary temperatures are 280 K with a small 380 K component (from the Moon), putting at least some of the planet in the goldilocks zone. There is strong absorption by CO2 at 4.25 microns in both 2013 and 2006 data. There is possible detection of chlorophyll and oxygen emission but higher S/N would be required for a positive detection. The spectral profile of the thermal emission could be used to constrain the diameter of the planet. If such spectra were obtained of an extrasolar planet, we could conclude that the

  19. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Edmund YS; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation. PMID:17343764

  1. Laser wavelength metrology with color sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tyler B; Otterstrom, Nils; Jackson, Jarom; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin S

    2015-12-14

    We present a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip. The chip consists of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined. In addition to absorption in the filters, etalon effects add additional spectral features which improve the precision of the device. Comparing the measurements from the device to a commercial wavelength meter and to an atomic reference, we found that the device has picometer-level precision and picometer-scale drift over a period longer than a month. PMID:26699036

  2. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  3. Investigations of Saturn’s Main Rings over Broad Range of Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Showalter, Mark; Pilorz, Stu; Brooks, Shawn; Ciarniello, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    An abundance of information about the characteristics of Saturn’s ring particles and their regolith can be obtained by comparing the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations over 11 years of the Cassini mission. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation.CIRS temperatures, ISS colors and UVIS brightness appear to vary noticeably with phase angle, but are not a strong function of spacecraft elevation angle. Color, temperature and brightness dependence on solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the infrared ice absorption band depths change with the solar phase angle, in particular between 0-20° and at high phase. This trend indicates that single scattering approximation is correct only at low phases (<20°) while at high phase multiple scattering must be taken into account.These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith, as well as scattering between individual particles or clumps in a many-particle-thick layer. Initial results from our joint studies will be presented.This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA

  4. Multi-wavelength Studies Of Saturn's Rings To Constrain Ring Particle Properties And Ring Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P.; Bradley, T.; Colwell, J.

    2012-10-01

    The characteristics of Saturn’s ring particles and their regoliths are examined by modeling variations in brightness, color, temperature and spectral parameters with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths. Data from Cassini CIRS, ISS, VIMS and UVIS scans of the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations are used. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, and particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. Over a range of solar elevations the CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that IR water ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to 140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as well as a contribution from scattering between individual particles in a many-particle-thick layer. Preliminary results from our joint studies will be presented. This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship is acknowledged.

  5. The Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  6. Constrains on the nature of Titan's surface from Cassini/VIMS and RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Drossart, Pierre; Schmitt, Bernard; Philippe, Sylvain; Malaska, Michael; Janssen, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Lawrence, Kenneth; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert; Bratsolis, Emannuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Cassini remote-sensing instruments for more than 10 years now and in situ by the Huygens instruments back in 2005. For the surface, the presence of diverse terrains in terms of morphology and composition suggest both exogenic and endogenic processes to be at play. In this study, we investigate the surface and atmospheric contributions from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) spectro-imaging data by use of a radiative transfer code in the near-IR range and the RADAR/SAR data for the distinction of geomorphological units. We focus here on those units identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1; 2] and Malaska et al. (2015) [3]: mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and the areas previously suggested to have experienced change such as the possible cryovolcanic and evaporite features (Barnes et al. 2013; Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2015) [4; 5; 6]. With the use of a recently updated radiative transfer code, we evaluate the atmospheric contribution and extract the pure surface albedo information for each region of interest. The extracted albedo shapes and values are then tested against spectra of constituents that are considered to be the best Titan candidate materials, including a very recent library of Titan ice spectra [7]. We find that many of the units show compositional variations while units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar materials, which help us provide implications on their endogenic or exogenic origin. Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the regions that have shown temporal changes are also presented. References: [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-558, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, in press; [3] Malaska, M., et al. : Icarus, submitted; [4] Barnes, J., et al.: Planetary Science, 2:1, 2013; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [6] Solomonidou, A., et al.: Icarus, in press; [7] Schmitt, B., et al.: GhoSST datacase (ghosst.osug.fr).

  7. Implications for Titan's potentially active regions: A study on Cassini/VIMS data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe; Bampasidis, Georgios; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Moussas, Xenophon

    Continuing investigations of Titan's surface have shown that this Earth-like Saturnian satellite presents an extremely complex geology [1, 2, 3]. The Cassini Mission Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) acquires data operating as a multi-spectral camera that allow for a complete analysis of the composition, geology and morphology of Titan's surface [4]. Two of the most geologically interesting areas on Titan are Xanadu's Tui Regio (20S, 130W) and Hotei Regio (26S, 78W) as they present higher 5m reflectivities than the surrounding areas [5] and have been interpreted as cryovolcanic in origin [6]. We present our study on both possibly active regions with the aim to identify the composition as well as the alterations of the components that compose the possible calderas and lava flows [7], by using radiative transfer modeling [8] and a classical staitistical method, the Principal Component Analysis [9]. [1] Jaumann, R. et al., (2009) Springer Netherlands pp. 75-140. [2] Nelson, R. M. et al., (2009) Icarus 199, 429-441. [3] Solomonidou, A. et al., (2009) European Planetary Science Congress Vol. 4, EPSC2009-710. [4] Jaumann, R. et al., (2006) Planet Space Science 54:1146-1155. [5] Barnes, J. W. et al., (2006) Geophysical Research Letters Vol. 33, L16204. [6] Lopes, R. M. C. et al., (2010) Icarus Vol. 205 pp:540-558. [7] Sotin, C. (2005) Nature, Vol 435. [8] Rodriguez, S. et al., (2009) Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution on Remore Sensing pp. 1-4. [9] Bellucci, G. et al., (2004) Advances in Space Research 34 pp. 1640-1646.

  8. New processing of Cassini/VIMS data on potentially geologically varying regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, A.; Hirtzig, M.; Bratsolis, E.; Bampasidis, G.; Coustenis, A.; Kyriakopoulos, K.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Drossart, P.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.; Seymour, K.; Moussas, X.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of Titan's geology with a view to enhance our current understanding of the satellite's potentially geologically varying regions. We apply here a statistical method, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) [1, 2] and a radiative transfer method [3, 1] on three potentially "active" regions on Titan, i.e. regions possibly subject to change over time (in brightness and/or in color etc) [4] namely Tui Regio, Hotei Regio, and Sotra Facula. With our method of PCA we have managed to isolate specific regions of distinct and diverse chemical composition. Then, with our follow-up RT method, we retrieved the surface albedo of the three isolated regions and of the surrounding terrains with different spectral response. These methods enabled us to evaluate the atmospheric contribution and allowed us to better constrain the real surface alterations, by comparing the spectra of these regions. Finally, the temporal surface variation of Hotei Regio as suggested by Nelson et al. 2009 [5], has been tested through the use of the RT method while we have superimposed this area's Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and RADAR data in order to 'view' the morphological potential. Even though we have used exactly the same dataset as Nelson and coauthors in 2009, we did not detect any significant surface albedo variations over time; this led us to revise the definition of "active" regions: even if these regions have not visually changed over the course of the Cassini mission, the determination of the chemical composition and the correlation with the morphological structures [6] observed in these areas do not rule out that past and/or ongoing cryovolcanic processes are still a possible interpretation.

  9. Geological mapping and temporal survey of Ontario Lacus on Titan from 2005 to 2009, using VIMS, ISS and Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Tobie, G.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    In June 2004 and July 2005, the ISS multispectral camera onboard the Cassini spacecraft imaged a 235 km-long and 75 km-wide dark feature near the south pole of Titan (McEwen et al., 2005). By comparison with other landforms observed near Titan’s north pole with the Radar instrument (Stofan et al., 2007), this feature has been interpreted as an hydrocarbon lake and named Ontario Lacus. Other observations of the lake, by the VIMS hyperspectral camera in December 2007 and the Radar altimeter in December 2008 are consistent with a liquid filled lake (Brown et al., 2008, Barnes et al., 2009), which lies in an extremely flat depression (Lorenz et al., 2009). In March 2009, VIMS acquired new hyperspectral cubes with a spatial resolution similar to the first ones. Finally, the new Radar observations in SAR mode in June and July 2009, 3 months after the VIMS observation, provided the first spatially resolved images of the lake. By merging all these data sets, we performed an integrated geomorphological and compositional study of Ontario Lacus and its surroundings. Comparisons with optical and radar satellite images of analogous landforms in the Etosha Basin, a semi-arid region of Namibia, allowed us to produce an interpretative geological map of Ontario Lacus in 2009. We also checked for potential surface changes of the lake between 2005 and 2009, i.e. during the austral summer and autumn. To achieve this work, we developed a new empirical processing method to remove atmospheric effects in VIMS images and to improve the surface mapping. This correction pipeline is also applied to ISS images. Our interpretative geological map shows that the lake is surrounded mostly by flat plains, except in the North where mountains are present (rough areas with dendritic valleys and triangular facets in the SAR images). The typical radar-dark signature of liquids is present over half the surface area of the lake only. Channels draining the plains SW of Ontario Lacus can be followed on

  10. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  11. Search for and limits on plume activity on Mimas, Tethys, and Dione with the Cassini Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Faulk, S.P.; Mosher, J.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Cassini Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations of Mimas, Tethys, and Dione obtained during the nominal and extended missions at large solar phase angles were analyzed to search for plume activity. No forward scattered peaks in the solar phase curves of these satellites were detected. The upper limit on water vapor production for Mimas and Tethys is one order of magnitude less than the production for Enceladus. For Dione, the upper limit is two orders of magnitude less, suggesting this world is as inert as Rhea (Pitman, K.M., Buratti, B.J., Mosher, J.A., Bauer, J.M., Momary, T., Brown, R.H., Nicholson, P.D., Hedman, M.M. [2008]. Astrophys. J. Lett. 680, L65-L68). Although the plumes are best seen at ???2.0. ??m, Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) Narrow Angle Camera images obtained at the same time as the VIMS data were also inspected for these features. None of the Cassini ISS images shows evidence for plumes. The absence of evidence for any Enceladus-like plumes on the medium-sized saturnian satellites cannot absolutely rule out current geologic activity. The activity may below our threshold of detection, or it may be occurring but not captured on the handful of observations at large solar phase angles obtained for each moon. Many VIMS and ISS images of Enceladus at large solar phase angles, for example, do not contain plumes, as the active "tiger stripes" in the south pole region are pointed away from the spacecraft at these times. The 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission is scheduled to gather additional measurements at large solar phase angles that are capable of revealing activity on the saturnian moons. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  12. A RT-based Technique for the Analysis and the Removal of Titan's Atmosphere by Cassini/VIMS-IR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoni, G.; Tosi, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Grassi, D.; Oliva, F.; Dinelli, B. M.; Castelli, E.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2004, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), together with the CIRS and UVIS spectrometers, aboard the Cassini spacecraft has provided insight on Saturn and Titan atmospheres through remote sensing observations. The presence of clouds and aerosols in Titan's dense atmosphere makes the analysis of the surface radiation a difficult task. For this purpose, an atmospheric radiative transfer (RT) model is required. The implementation of a RT code, which includes multiple scattering, in an inversion algorithm based on the Bayesian approach, can provide strong constraints about both the surface albedo and the atmospheric composition. The application of this retrieval procedure we have developed to VIMS-IR spectra acquired in nadir or slant geometries allows us to retrieve the equivalent opacity of Titan's atmosphere in terms of variable aerosols and gaseous content. Thus, the separation of the atmospheric and surface contributions in the observed spectrum is possible. The atmospheric removal procedure was tested on the spectral range 1-2.2μm of publicly available VIMS data covering the Ontario Lacus and Ligeia Mare regions. The retrieval of the accurate composition of Titan's atmosphere is a much more complex task. So far, the information about the vertical structure of the atmosphere by limb spectra was mostly derived under conditions where the scattering could be neglected [1,2]. Indeed, since the very high aerosol load in the middle-low atmosphere produces strong scattering effects on the measured spectra, the analysis requires a RT modeling taking into account multiple scattering in a spherical-shell geometry. Therefore the use of an innovative method we are developing based on the Monte-Carlo approach, can provide important information about the vertical distribution of the aerosols and the gases composing Titan's atmosphere.[1]Bellucci et al., (2009). Icarus, 201, Issue 1, p. 198-216.[2]de Kok et al., (2007). Icarus, 191, Issue 1, p. 223-235.

  13. Titan's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS solar occultations: CH4, CO and evidence for C2H6 absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe; de Kok, Remco J.; Sicardy, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the VIMS solar occultations dataset, which allows us to extract vertically resolved information on the characteristics of Titan's atmosphere between ∼100 and 700 km with a vertical resolution of ∼10 km. After a series of data treatment procedures to correct problems in pointing stability and parasitic light, 4 occultations out of 10 are retained. This sample covers different seasons and latitudes of Titan. The transmittances show clearly the evolution of the haze, with the detection of the detached layer at ∼310 km in September 2011 at mid-northern latitudes. Through the inversion of the transmission spectra with a line-by-line radiative transfer code we retrieve the vertical distribution of CH4 and CO mixing ratio. For methane inversion we use its 1.4, 1.7 and 2.3 μm bands. The first two bands are always in good agreement and yield an average stratospheric abundance of 1.28 ± 0.08%, after correcting for forward-scattering effects, with no significant differences between the occultations. This is significantly less than the value of 1.48% obtained by the GCMS/Huygens instrument. We find that the 2.3 μm band cannot be used for the extraction of methane abundance because it is blended with other absorptions, not included in our atmospheric model. The analysis of the residual spectra after the inversion shows that such additional absorptions are present through a great part of the VIMS wavelength range. We attribute many of these bands, including the one at 2.3 μm, to gaseous ethane, whose near-infrared spectrum is not well modeled yet. Ethane also contributes significantly to the strong absorption at 3.2-3.5 μm that was previously attributed only to C-H stretching bands from aerosols. Ethane bands may affect the surface windows too, especially at 2.7 μm. Other residual bands are generated by stretching modes of C-H, C-C and C-N bonds. In addition to the C-H stretch from aliphatic hydrocarbons at 3.4 μm, we detect a strong and

  14. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  15. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  16. Coproduction of KPC-18 and VIM-1 Carbapenemases by Enterobacter cloacae: Implications for Newer β-Lactam-β-Lactamase Inhibitor Combinations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Gina K; Snyder, James W; McElheny, Christi L; Thomson, Kenneth S; Doi, Yohei

    2016-03-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain G6809 with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems was identified from a patient in a long-term acute care hospital in Kentucky. G6809 belonged to sequence type (ST) 88 and carried two carbapenemase genes, bla(KPC-18) and bla(VIM-1). Whole-genome sequencing localized bla(KPC-18) to the chromosome and bla(VIM-1) to a 58-kb plasmid. The strain was highly resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam. Insidious coproduction of metallo-β-lactamase with KPC-type carbapenemase has implications for the use of next-generation β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. PMID:26719440

  17. Saturn's depths in a new light: Novel views of meteorology, circulation and dynamics by Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin; Momary, Thomas; Roos-Serote, Maarten; Showman, Adam; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phillip

    The depths of Saturn below the ubiquitous covering of ammonia hazes have been revealed in detail by the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini orbiter. Using Saturn's own indigenous glow produced by warm air at depth to back-light deep clouds, a diverse array of cloud features have been discovered near the 3-bar level, some 75 km underneath the ammonia clouds. Likely comprised of ammonia hydrosulfide, perhaps with a complement of water, the menagerie of deep cloud structures - including dozens of surprisingly narrow axisymmetric "zones", "smoke rings", a long-lived "string of pearls" spanning 1/4 of the planet, large plume-like and cyclonic features, and a deep-seated hexagonal feature circumscribing the north pole - reveal Saturn at depth to be a dynamic, meteorologically active planet much more like frenetic Jupiter than the classically serene face Saturn shows in sunlight. Additional information on Saturn's dynamically active nature is provided by daytime imagery of discrete clouds observed at the southpole - revealing two compositional types of clouds, suggesting a variety of upwelling phenomena - and the latitudinal variability of the trace disequilibrium gases arsine and phosphine observed in VIMS spectra.

  18. Metabolome variations in the Porphyromonas gingivalis vimA mutant during hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, R.M.E.; Aruni, W.; Johnson, N.A.; Robles, A.; Dou, Y.; Henry, L.; Boskovic, D.S.; Fletcher, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The adaptability and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the oxidative microenvironment of the periodontal pocket are indispensable for survival and virulence, and are modulated by multiple systems. Among the various genes involved in P. gingivalis oxidative stress resistance, vimA gene is a part of the 6.15-kb locus. To elucidate the role of a P. gingivalis vimA-defective mutant in oxidative stress resistance, we used a global approach to assess the transcriptional profile, to study the unique metabolome variations affecting survival and virulence in an environment typical of the periodontal pocket. A multilayered protection strategy against oxidative stress was noted in P. gingivalis FLL92 with upregulation of detoxifying genes. The duration of oxidative stress was shown to differentially modulate transcription with 94 (87%) genes upregulated twofold during 10 min and 55 (83.3%) in 15 min. Most of the up-regulated genes (55%), fell in the hypothetical/unknown/unassigned functional class. Metabolome variation showed reduction in fumarate and formaldehyde, hence resorting to alternative energy generation and maintenance of a reduced metabolic state. There was upregulation of transposases, genes encoding for the metal ion binding protein transport and secretion system. PMID:25055986

  19. Metabolome variations in the Porphyromonas gingivalis vimA mutant during hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R M E; Aruni, W; Johnson, N A; Robles, A; Dou, Y; Henry, L; Boskovic, D S; Fletcher, H M

    2015-04-01

    The adaptability and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the oxidative microenvironment of the periodontal pocket are indispensable for survival and virulence, and are modulated by multiple systems. Among the various genes involved in P. gingivalis oxidative stress resistance, vimA gene is a part of the 6.15-kb locus. To elucidate the role of a P. gingivalis vimA-defective mutant in oxidative stress resistance, we used a global approach to assess the transcriptional profile, to study the unique metabolome variations affecting survival and virulence in an environment typical of the periodontal pocket. A multilayered protection strategy against oxidative stress was noted in P. gingivalis FLL92 with upregulation of detoxifying genes. The duration of oxidative stress was shown to differentially modulate transcription with 94 (87%) genes upregulated twofold during 10 min and 55 (83.3%) in 15 min. Most of the upregulated genes (55%), fell in the hypothetical/unknown/unassigned functional class. Metabolome variation showed reduction in fumarate and formaldehyde, hence resorting to alternative energy generation and maintenance of a reduced metabolic state. There was upregulation of transposases, genes encoding for the metal ion binding protein transport and secretion system. PMID:25055986

  20. Titan's mid-latitude surface regions with Cassini VIMS and SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Drossart, Pierre; Brown, Robert H.; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Bernard; Le Gall, Alice; Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael; Janssen, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Villanueva, Edward; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the surface of Saturn's moon Titan by means of two Cassini instruments used in synergy. We apply a radiative transfer code to VIMS hyperspectral data to correct the strong atmospheric contribution and extract information on surface composition (Hirtzig et al. 2014; Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2015). We then put this in the context of terrain morphology by use of denoised Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images (Bratsolis et al. 2012). We examine here the mid-latitude zones extending from 50ºN to 50ºS, which includes key geological features identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) and Malaska et al. (2015): mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic deposits. We find that many of the different units show compositional variations while units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar material mixtures. The Huygens landing site and the candidate evaporitic regions are compositionally similar to the variable plains. We also find that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for two of the candidate cryovolcanic regions Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, suggesting the presence of surface activity, while a number of other regions such as Hotei Regio and the undifferentiated plains remain unchanged (Solomonidou et al. 2015). The surface albedo variations, together with the presence of volcanic-like morphological features, suggest that the active regions are possibly related to the deep interior, possibly via cryovolcanic processes (with important implications for the satellite's astrobiological potential) as also indicated by recent interior structure models of Titan and corresponding calculations of the spatial pattern of maximum tidal stresses (Sohl et al. 2014). In previous studies (Lopes et al. 2015; Solomonidou et al. 2015) we showed that a variety of surface processes could be linked to the formation of the various geomorphological units (aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine

  1. Cassini VIMS and RADAR investigation of Titan's equatorial regions: a case for changes in surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Malaska, Michael; Stephan, Katrin; Sotin, Christophe; Drossart, Pierre; Jaumann, Ralf; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Brown, Robert H.

    2015-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens instruments revealed that Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has - in many aspects - a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface [1;2;3]. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmosphere interactions, and climate evolution. Data from the remote sensing instruments have shown the presence of diverse terrains, suggesting exogenic and endogenic processes, whose composition remains largely unknown. Interpreting surface features further requires precise knowledge of the contribution by the dense intervening atmosphere, especially the troposphere, which can be recovered from near-IR data such as those collected by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) collects in the so-called "methane windows". In order to simulate the atmospheric contribution and extract surface information, a statistical tool (PCA) and a radiative transfer code are applied on certain regions of interest (i.e. possibly geologically varying and suggested in some cases to be cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic in origin) [4;5;7]. We also analyze RADAR despeckled SAR images in terms of morphology [6]. For comparison, we also look at undifferentiated plains and dune fields regions that are not expected to change with time. We find that Tui Regio and Sotra Patera change with time becoming darker and brighter respectively in terms of surface albedo while the plains and the suggested evaporitic areas in the equatorial regions do not present any significant change [5]. The surface brightening of Sotra supports a possible internal rather than exogenic origin. The unchanged surface behavior of the plains supports a sedimentary origin rather than cryovolcanic. Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the changed regions with time are also presented. We therefore suggest that temporal variations of surface albedo (in chemical composition and/or morphology) exist for some areas

  2. Titan’s mid-latitude surface regions with Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Coustenis, Athena; Malaska, Michael; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Drossart, Pierre; Janssen, Michael; Lawrence, Kenneth; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert H.; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2015-11-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission instruments have revealed Titan to have a complex and dynamic atmosphere and surface. Data from the remote sensing instruments have shown the presence of diverse surface terrains in terms of morphology and composition, suggesting both exogenic and endogenic processes [1]. We define both the surface and atmospheric contributions in the VIMS spectro-imaging data by use of a radiative transfer code in the near-IR range [2]. To complement this dataset, the Cassini RADAR instrument provides additional information on the surface morphology, from which valuable geological interpretations can be obtained [3]. We examine the origin of key Titan terrains, covering the mid-latitude zones extending from 50ºN to 50ºS. The different geological terrains we investigate include: mountains, plains, labyrinths, craters, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporite features. We have found that the labyrinth terrains and the undifferentiated plains seem to consist of a very similar if not the same material, while the different types of plains show compositional variations [3]. The processes most likely linked to their formation are aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine, in addition to the deposition of atmospheric products though the process of photolysis and sedimentation of organics. We show that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for two of the candidate cryovolcanic regions. The surface albedo variations together with the presence of volcanic-like morphological features suggest that the active regions are possibly related to the deep interior, possibly via cryovolcanism processes (with important implications for the satellite’s astrobiological potential) as also indicated by new interior structure models of Titan and corresponding calculations of the spatial pattern of maximum tidal stresses [4]. However, an explanation attributed to exogenic processes is also possible [5]. We will report on results from our most recent

  3. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  4. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  5. Sub-wavelength diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    This report represents the completion of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate sub-wavelength surface relief structures fabricated by direct-write e-beam technology as unique and very high-efficiency optical elements. A semiconductor layer with sub-wavelength sized etched openings or features can be considered as a layer with an effective index of refraction determined by the fraction of the surface filled with semiconductor relative to the fraction filled with air or other material. Such as a layer can be used to implement planar gradient-index lenses on a surface. Additionally, the nanometer-scale surface structures have diffractive properties that allow the direct manipulation of polarization and altering of the reflective properties of surfaces. With this technology a single direct-write mask and etch can be used to integrate a wide variety of optical functions into a device surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surfaces of devices, forming anti-reflection surfaces or fabricating high-efficiency, high-numerical aperture lenses, including integration inside vertical semiconductor laser cavities.

  6. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  7. Galilean Satellite Surface Non-Ice Constituents: New Results from the Cassini/Huygens VIMS Jupiter Flyby in the Context of the Galileo NIMS Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCord, T. B.; Brown, R.; Baines, K.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.; Coradini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Cassini mission Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) is currently returning data for the Galilean satellites. Examples of the new satellite data and the initial interpretations will be presented in the context of the Galileo NIMS data and results. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Characterization of VIM-2, a carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-beta-lactamase and its plasmid- and integron-borne gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate in France.

    PubMed

    Poirel, L; Naas, T; Nicolas, D; Collet, L; Bellais, S; Cavallo, J D; Nordmann, P

    2000-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa COL-1 was identified in a blood culture of a 39-year-old-woman treated with imipenem in Marseilles, France, in 1996. This strain was resistant to beta-lactams, including ureidopenicillins, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, cefepime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and meropenem, but remained susceptible to the monobactam aztreonam. The carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase gene of P. aeruginosa COL-1 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. The deduced 266-amino-acid protein was an Ambler class B beta-lactamase, with amino acid identities of 32% with B-II from Bacillus cereus; 31% with IMP-1 from several gram-negative rods in Japan, including P. aeruginosa; 27% with CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis; 24% with BlaB from Chryseobacterium meningosepticum; 24% with IND-1 from Chryseobacterium indologenes; 21% with CphA-1 from Aeromonas hydrophila; and 11% with L-1 from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. It was most closely related to VIM-1 beta-lactamase recently reported from Italian P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (90% amino acid identity). Purified VIM-2 beta-lactamase had a pI of 5.6, a relative molecular mass of 29.7 kDa, and a broad substrate hydrolysis range, including penicillins, cephalosporins, cephamycins, oxacephamycins, and carbapenems, but not monobactams. As a metallo-beta-lactamase, its activity was zinc dependent and inhibited by EDTA (50% inhibitory concentration, 50 microM). VIM-2 conferred a resistance pattern to beta-lactams in E. coli DH10B that paralleled its in vitro hydrolytic properties, except for susceptibility to ureidopenicillins, carbapenems, and cefepime. bla(VIM-2) was located on a ca. 45-kb plasmid that in addition conferred resistance to sulfamides and that was not self-transmissible either from P. aeruginosa to E. coli or from E. coli to E. coli. bla(VIM-2) was the only gene cassette located within the variable region of a novel class 1 integron, In56, that was weakly related to the bla(VIM-1)-containing

  9. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  10. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  11. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  12. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  13. Hospital outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing VIM-1, a novel transferable metallo-beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, G; Mazzariol, A; Lauretti, L; Rossolini, G M; Fontana, R

    2000-11-01

    A total of 8 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates was collected from 7 different patients in different wards of the University Hospital of Verona, Italy, from February 1997 to February 1998. The high level of resistance to carbapenems (imipenem minimum inhibitory concentration was always >128 microg/mL) and other broad-spectrum beta-lactams and the rate of imipenem hydrolysis and its inhibition by ethylenediamine-tetra-acetic acid were all suggestive of production of a carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-beta-lactamase. A specific DNA probe derived from the recently cloned bla(VIM-1) gene hybridized to all the isolates. A genomic DNA fingerprinting profile revealed clonal relatedness for 7 of 8 isolates. A description of this hospital outbreak is reported, the occurrence of which confirms that proliferation of metallo-beta-lactamase-producing strains multiply resistant to beta-lactams is already a reality outside Japan. These findings emphasize the need for early recognition of similar isolates. PMID:11073738

  14. Fragment-based discovery of inhibitor scaffolds targeting the metallo-β-lactamases NDM-1 and VIM-2.

    PubMed

    Christopeit, Tony; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S

    2016-04-15

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) render bacteria resistant to β-lactam antibiotics and are interesting drug targets to prevent the hydrolysis of β-lactam antibiotics. So far, there are no MBL inhibitors in clinical use and particularly the design of broad spectrum inhibitors targeting several MBLs has been difficult. In this study, we report four fragments inhibiting the clinically relevant New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) and Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase 2 (VIM-2). The fragments were identified from a library using an orthogonal screening strategy combining a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay and an enzyme inhibition assay. The identified fragments showed dissociation constants (KD) ranging from 181 to 2100 μM. The binding mode of the fragments was explored using QM-polarized ligand docking. All four fragments represent interesting scaffolds for the design of broad-spectrum MBL inhibitors. PMID:26976213

  15. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/Vims

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Buratti, B.J.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Drossart, P.; Sicardy, B.; Formisano, V.; Bellucci, G.; Coradini, A.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Jaumann, R.; McCordt, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to ??? 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of ???0.5 ms-1, favoring prograde, from the movement of a persistent

  16. Saturn's North Polar Vortex Revealed by Cassini/VIMS: Zonal Wind Structure and Constraints on Cloud Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Momary, T. W.; Fletcher, L. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Roos-Serote, M.; Showman, A. P.; Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2008-09-01

    We present the first high-spatial resolution, near-nadir imagery and movies of Saturn's north polar region that reveal the wind structure of a north polar vortex. Obtained by Cassini/VIMS on June 15, 2008 from high over Saturn's polar region (sub-spacecraft latitude of 65 degrees N. lat) at an altitude of 0.42 million km during the long polar night, these 210-per-pixel images of the polar region north of 73 degrees N. latitude show several concentric cloud rings and hundreds of individual cloud features in silhouette against the 5-micron background thermal glow of Saturn's deep atmosphere. In contrast to the clear eye of the south polar vortex, the north polar vortex sports a central cloud feature about 650-km in diameter. Zonal winds reach a maximum of 150 m/s near 88 degrees N. latitude (planetocentric) - comparable to the south polar vortex maximum of 190 m/s near 88 degrees S. latitude - and fall off nearly monotonically to 10 m/s near 80 degrees N. latitude. At slightly greater distance from the pole, inside the north polar hexagon in the 75-77 degree N. latitude region, zonal winds increase dramatically to 130 m/s, as silhouetted clouds are seen speeding aroud the "race track” of the hexagonal feature. VIMS 5-micron thermal observations over a 1.6-year period from October 29, 2006 to June 15, 2008 are consistent with the polar hexagon structure itself remaining fixed in the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch and Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253-256, 1981) to within an accuracy of 3 seconds per rotational period. This agrees with the stationary nature of the wave in this rotation system found by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988), but is inconsistent with rotation rates found during the current Cassini era.

  17. Compositional Mapping of Surfaces in the Saturn System with Cassini VIMS: the Role of Water, Cyanide Compounds and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. N.; Brown, R.; Baines, K.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.; Buratti, B.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.; Drossart, P.; Filacchione, G.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.; McCord, T.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.; Nicholson, P.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Curchin, J.; Hoefen, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has completed one year of mapping in Saturn orbit and has provided a wealth of compositional information on the satellite surfaces and rings. While water ice is abundant in the Saturn system, carbon dioxide, cyanide compounds, and organic materials are also detected. The 2.42-micron absorption first observed on Phoebe (Clark et al., Nature, v435, 66-69, 2005), is reported here for the first time on Iapetus, Dione, and the F-ring. Trapped CO2 has also been discovered in the darker regions on Dione and Hyperion. Possible trace amounts of CO2 are seen on Mimas, Tethys, Rhea, and Enceladus. No CO2 has been detected in the F-ring. No 2.42-micron feature has yet been detected in spectra of Hyperion, but VIMS has yet to adequately spatially resolve the darker regions. Following Clark et al., 2005, the 2.42-micron band is due to cyanide compounds, and while the exact cyanide composition is still under study, complex CN molecules are ruled out by observed spectral structure favoring simple molecules such as KCN or HCN. Ultraviolet photolysis experiments conducted on cyanide compounds, nitriles, and organic compounds show that the origin of the trapped CO2 on the satellites of both Jupiter and Saturn can be explained by photolysis of cyanide compounds. The UV photolysis of laboratory samples shows the growth of CO2 with a corresponding decrease in CN, and the production of a brown color, commonly observed in the creation of tholins. The oxygen most likely comes from water in the systems. The cyanide photolysis appears to occur in the Saturn and Jupiter systems and probably in comets explaining a common link in chemistry, photochemical processing, and the commonly observed spectral properties.

  18. Clouds and hazes vertical structure mapping of Saturn 2011 - 2012 giant vortex by means of Cassini VIMS data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; D'Aversa, E.

    On December 2010 a giant storm erupted in Saturn's North hemisphere. A giant vortex formed in the storm wake and persisted after the principal outburst exhausted on July 2011. The vortex had been imaged several times by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini probe starting from May 2011 and it was still present in observations recorded on June 2013. In this work we have analyzed the vortex data recorded by the visual channel of the spectrometer (VIMS-V) in August 2011 and January 2012. An inverse model, based on the Bayesian approach and using the Gauss-Newton iterative method to minimize the cost function, has been developed to analyze those data. The model takes advantage of the results of a supporting forward radiative transfer model which relies on the assumptions of plane parallel atmosphere, multiple scattering, Mie theory to compute particles single scattering properties, and molecular scattering adapted to Saturn's atmosphere. Applying the inverse model we could retrieve the microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds and hazes overlying the vortex and produce spatial maps for each retrieved parameter. Thanks to this study, the vertical structure of the hazes in this region has been quantitatively addressed for the first time. The comparative analysis of the results from the two observations seems to suggest that in 6 months the atmospheric dynamics, responsible for the formation and subsistence of the vortex, is weakening and the atmosphere is returning to a more stationary state. In addition, we suggest a correction for the imaginary part of the refractive index of the tropopause haze. This new value, that allows a better convergence between observed and simulated spectra, does not yet identify a composition of the haze and further investigation is needed to understand the real nature of the need for such a modification.

  19. ECM at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, H. W.; Littlepage, R. S.

    1982-09-01

    ECM techniques appropriate to the millimeter wave band are examined with particular reference to the physics of the atmosphere and component performance capability. Model calculations show that even for state-of-the-art threat radars, the required ECM receiver sensitivity is well within the state-of-the-art for broadband superheterodyne systems. For ECM jammers, the most fundamental limitation arises from deficiencies in broadband/high power amplifiers. The solution to this problem will require different ECM system architectures than used at the lower frequencies. At millimeter wavelengths, atmospheric effects permit new jamming techniques requiring lower jamming power. For example, scattering by hydrometeors significantly raises the apparent sidelobe level of even low sidelobe antennas of threat radars, which reduces the power required to infringe through the sidelobes.

  20. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  1. Prospective Observational Study of the Impact of VIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase on the Outcome of Patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Daikos, George L.; Petrikkos, Panayiotis; Psichogiou, Mina; Kosmidis, Chris; Vryonis, Evangelos; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Georgousi, Kleoniki; Tzouvelekis, Leonidas S.; Tassios, Panayotis T.; Bamia, Christina; Petrikkos, George

    2009-01-01

    VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) is an emerging pathogen. A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the importance of VIM production on outcome of patients with K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs). Consecutive patients with K. pneumoniae BSIs were identified and followed up until patient discharge or death. A total of 162 patients were included in the analysis; 67 (41.4%) were infected with VPKP, and 95 were infected with non-VPKP. Fourteen of the patients infected with VPKP were carbapenem resistant (Carbr) (MIC > 4 μg/ml), whereas none of the non-VPKP exhibited carbapenem resistance. The patients infected with a Carbr organism were more likely (odds ratio, 4.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29 to 12.85; P = 0.02) to receive inappropriate empirical therapy. The all-cause 14-day mortality rates were 15.8% (15 of 95) for patients infected with VIM-negative organisms, 18.9% (10 of 53) for those infected with VIM-positive carbapenem-susceptible organisms, and 42.9% (6 of 14) for those infected with VIM-positive Carbr organisms (P = 0.044). In Cox regression analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.06; P = 0.021), rapidly fatal underlying disease (HR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.26 to 6.39; P = 0.012), and carbapenem resistance (HR, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.08 to 7.41; P = 0.035) were independent predictors of death. After adjustment for inappropriate empirical or definitive therapy, the effect of carbapenem resistance on outcome was reduced to a level of nonsignificance. In patients with K. pneumoniae BSIs, carbapenem resistance, advanced, age, and severity of underlying disease were independent predictors of outcome, whereas VIM production had no effect on mortality. The higher mortality associated with carbapenem resistance was probably mediated by the failure to provide effective therapy. PMID:19223638

  2. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  3. GLAST Science Across Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    The GLAST satellites is almost guaranteed to revolutionize GeV gamma ray astronomy because of the great discoveries that are being made at hard X-ray energy by the Suzaku and Swift satellites and in the TeV range using the H.E.S.S. and Magic telescopes. Unidentified EGRET sources are likely to be identified and new and fainter sources will be found. Known classes of sources blazars, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources and so on will be monitored in much greater detail. Finally, there is the need to limit or even detect dark matter through its annihilation signature. The science that will emerge from GLAST will be determined in large measure by the effort that is put into multiwavelength observing. This will require significant commitments of observing time for monitoring pulsar arrival times, measuring faint galaxy spectra, detecting GeV gamma rays gamma ray bursts and so on. In this talk I will attempt to summarize current thinking on the GLAST multi-wavelength observing program and propose some new approaches.

  4. Predominance of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying blaIMP and blaVIM metallo-β-lactamases in a major hospital in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Toval, Francisco; Guzmán-Marte, Anel; Madriz, Vivian; Somogyi, Teresita; Rodríguez, César; García, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the molecular basis of the resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from a tertiary-level health facility in San José, Costa Rica. A total of 198 non-duplicated isolates were evaluated for their susceptibility to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), the presence of MBL encoding genes (blaIMP, blaVIM and blaGIM-1) and the occurrence of these genes within class 1 integrons were investigated. In addition, an ERIC2 PCR fingerprinting method was used to elucidate the distribution of the detected MBL genes within the strain collection. Of the 198 isolates tested, 125 (63.1 %) were categorized as carbapenem-resistant. The majority (88.8 %) of the carbapemen-resistant isolates also showed resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Among the carbapenem-resistant isolates, 102 (81.6 %) showed MBL activity. Strikingly, both blaIMP and blaVIM genes were simultaneously detected in most (94.1 %) of the 102 MBL producers. Five carbapenem-resistant MBL producers were positive only for blaIMP genes. Almost 70 % of the isolates examined harboured the intI1 gene, accompanied by the sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes in 136 (99 %) and 122 (89 %) isolates, respectively. The majority (94.4 %) of the carbapenem-resistant isolates carried the intI1 gene, in contrast to 26 % of the carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Ninety-three out of 96 (96.9 %) isolates carrying both blaIMP and blaVIM genes also harboured the intI1, sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes. Gene cassettes from carbapenem-susceptible and MBL-negative carbapenem-resistant isolates encoded aminoglycoside-resistance enzymes (aadA2, aadA4 and aadA6) as well as orfD and qacF genes. RAPD analysis distributed 126 of the isolates in 29 clusters. Eighty of the 90 blaIMP (+) blaVIM (+) isolates were sorted into 16

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from a New York City Hospital Belonging to Sequence Type 258 and Carrying blaKPC-2 and blaVIM-4

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Lalitagauri M.; Mills, Janet C.; Jones, Ronald N.; Soave, Rosemary; Jenkins, Stephen G.; Schuetz, Audrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Among 69 of 139 (49.6%) carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae carrying blaKPC, 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae was also positive for blaVIM. The isolate belonged to sequence type 258 (ST258) and carried blaKPC-2 on a copy of Tn4401a and blaVIM-4 on a class 1 integron. Genes were located on distinct plasmids belonging to Inc types A/C and FII. Elevated expression of the efflux pump AcrAB-TolC (acrA, 15.3 times) and reduced expression of outer membrane protein genes ompK35 and ompK37 (0.16 and 0.081 times, respectively) associated with various amino acid alterations on OmpK37 were observed. The presence of two carbapenemases in ST258 K. pneumoniae is of great concern due to the ability of this organism to widely disseminate. PMID:26729504

  6. Similar frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing KPC and VIM carbapenemases in diverse genetic clones at tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Johanna M; Cienfuegos, Astrid V; Ocampo, Ana M; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea; Jiménez, J Natalia

    2014-11-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of bla(VIM), bla(IMP), bla(NDM), bla(OXA-48), and bla(KPC) genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The bla(VIM-2) and bla(KPC-2) genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains. PMID:25210071

  7. Similar Frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing KPC and VIM Carbapenemases in Diverse Genetic Clones at Tertiary-Care Hospitals in Medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas, Johanna M.; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Ocampo, Ana M.; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaNDM, blaOXA-48, and blaKPC genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The blaVIM-2 and blaKPC-2 genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains. PMID:25210071

  8. Plasmid Profile Analysis and bla VIM Gene Detection of Metalo β-lactamase (MBL) Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    M, Jeya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of hospitalized patients. They are responsible for serious infections such as meningitis, urological infections, septicemia and pneumonia. Carbapenem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is currently increasingly reported which is often mediated by production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates may involve reduced cell wall permeability, production of chromosomal and plasmid mediated β lactamases, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and an active multidrug efflux mechanism. Objective: This study is aimed to detect the presence and the nature of plasmids among metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Also to detect the presence of bla VIM gene from these isolates. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showing the metalo-β-lactamase enzyme (MBL) production were isolated. The MBL production was confirmed by three different methods. From the MBL producing isolates plasmid extraction was done by alkaline lysis method. Plasmid positive isolates were subjected for blaVIM gene detection by PCR method. Results: Two thousand seventy six clinical samples yielded 316 (15.22%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, out of which 141 (44.62%) were multidrug resistant. Among them 25 (17.73%) were metallo-β-lactamase enzyme producers. Plasmids were extracted from 18 out of 25 isolates tested. Five out of 18 isolates were positive for the blaVIM gene detection by the PCR amplification. Conclusion: The MBL producers were susceptible to polymyxin /colistin with MIC ranging from 0.5 – 2μg/ml. Molecular detection of specific genes bla VIM were positive among the carbapenem resistant isolates. PMID:25120980

  9. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Metallo-β-Lactamase IMP-1 and VIM-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains From Different Hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abiri, Ramin; Mohammadi, Pantea; Shavani, Navid; Rezaei, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosais a frequent nosocomial pathogen that causes severe diseases in many settings. Carbapenems, including meropenem and imipenem, are effective antibiotics against this organism. However, the use of carbapenems has been hampered by the emergence of strains resistant to carbapenemsvia different mechanisms such as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), which hydrolyze all carbapenems. Several kinds of MBLs have been reported, among them VIM and IMP types being the most clinically significant carbapenemases. Objectives: We aimed to determine the distribution of blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 transferable genes encoding MBLs in P. aeruginosa isolated from three academic hospitals in Kermanshah. Patients and Methods: From 22nd June to 22nd September 2012, 225 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected. These isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility with the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method, and the MBLs were assessed using the imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. The isolates were investigated for blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 genes using polymerase chain reaction. Results: Among the 225 isolates, 33.7% (76/225) and 18.1% (41/225) were resistant to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Of the 76 imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, 45 (59.2%) were positive for MBLs, 34 (75%) strains carried the blaIMP-1 gene, and 1 (2.2%) strain carried the blaVIM-2 gene. Conclusions: Our results showed that there was a high frequency of IMP-1 positive P. aeruginosa in the different wards of the hospitals. PMID:26495110

  10. Photometric properties of Titan's surface from Cassini VIMS: Relevance to titan's hemispherical albedo dichotomy and surface stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Brown, R.H.; Hapke, B.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter returned spectral imaging data as the spacecraft undertook six close encounters with Titan beginning 7 July, 2004. Three of these flybys each produced overlapping coverage of two distinct regions of Titan's surface. Twenty-four points were selected on approximately opposite hemispheres to serve as photometric controls. Six points were selected in each of four reflectance classes. On one hemisphere each control point was observed at three distinct phase angles. From the derived phase coefficients, preliminary normal reflectances were derived for each reflectance class. The normal reflectance of Titan's surface units at 2.0178 ??m ranged from 0.079 to 0.185 for the most absorbing to the most reflective units assuming no contribution from absorbing haze. When a modest haze contribution of ??=0.1 is considered these numbers increase to 0.089-0.215. We find that the lowest three reflectance classes have comparable normal reflectance on either hemisphere. However, for the highest brightness class the normal reflectance is higher on the hemisphere encompassing longitude 14-65?? compared to the same high brightness class for the hemisphere encompassing 122-156?? longitude. We conclude that an albedo dichotomy observed in continental sized units on Titan is due not only to one unit having more areal coverage of reflective material than the other but the material on the brighter unit is intrinsically more reflective than the most reflective material on the other unit. This suggests that surface renewal processes are more widespread on Titan's more reflective units than on its less reflective units. We note that one of our photometric control points has increased in reflectance by 12% relative to the surrounding terrain from July of 2004 to April and May of 2005. Possible causes of this effect include atmospheric processes such as ground fog or orographic clouds; the suggestion of