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1

Ebola viral disease outbreak - west Africa, 2014.  

PubMed

On March 21, 2014, the Guinea Ministry of Health reported the outbreak of an illness characterized by fever, severe diarrhea, vomiting, and a high case-fatality rate (59%) among 49 persons. Specimens from 15 of 20 persons tested at Institut Pasteur in Lyon, France, were positive for an Ebola virus by polymerase chain reaction. Viral sequencing identified Ebola virus (species Zaïre ebolavirus), one of five viruses in the genus Ebolavirus, as the cause. Cases of Ebola viral disease (EVD) were initially reported in three southeastern districts (Gueckedou, Macenta, and Kissidougou) of Guinea and in the capital city of Conakry. By March 30, cases had been reported in Foya district in neighboring Liberia (1), and in May, the first cases identified in Sierra Leone were reported. As of June 18, the outbreak was the largest EVD outbreak ever documented, with a combined total of 528 cases (including laboratory-confirmed, probable, and suspected cases) and 337 deaths (case-fatality rate = 64%) reported in the three countries. The largest previous outbreak occurred in Uganda during 2000-2001, when 425 cases were reported with 224 deaths (case-fatality rate = 53%). The current outbreak also represents the first outbreak of EVD in West Africa (a single case caused by Taï Forest virus was reported in Côte d'Ivoire in 1994 [3]) and marks the first time that Ebola virus transmission has been reported in a capital city. PMID:24964881

Dixon, Meredith G; Schafer, Ilana J

2014-06-27

2

Fish and Shellfish Associated Disease Outbreaks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a literature review of disease outbreaks related to fish and shellfish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers the chemical, bacterial, and viral diseases that are transmitted by fish and shellfish. A list of 50 references is also presented. (HM)

Levin, M.

1978-01-01

3

Outbreaks of porcine parvovirus disease in Panama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first recorded isolation of porcine parvovirus (PPV) in Panama is described. The outbreaks of PPV disease were characterised by a high prevalence of mummified foetuses, stillborn and weak pigs and a common source of exposure. Diagnosis was based on virus isolation and by demonstrating viral antigen in lungs of affected foetuses. Six farms in four different provinces were involved.

N. Obaldia

1991-01-01

4

Waterborne disease outbreaks, 1986-1988.  

PubMed

From 1986 to 1988, 24 states and Puerto Rico reported 50 outbreaks of illness due to water that people intended to drink, affecting 25,846 persons. The protozoal parasite Giardia lamblia was the agent most commonly implicated in outbreaks, as it has been for the last 10 years; many of these outbreaks were associated with ingestion of chlorinated but unfiltered surface water. Shigella sonnei was the most commonly implicated bacterial pathogen; in outbreaks caused by this pathogen, water supplies were found to be contaminated with human waste. Cryptosporidium contamination of a chlorinated, filtered public water supply caused the largest outbreak during this period, affecting an estimated 13,000 persons. A large multistate outbreak caused by commercially produced ice made from contaminated well water caused illness with Norwalk-like virus among an estimated 5,000 persons. The first reported outbreak of chronic diarrhea of unknown cause associated with drinking untreated well water occurred in 1987. Twenty-six outbreaks due to recreational water use were also reported, including outbreaks of Pseudomonas dermatitis associated with the use of hot tubs or whirlpools, and swimming-associated shigellosis, giardiasis, and viral illness. Although the total number of reported water-related outbreaks has been declining in recent years, the few large outbreaks due to Cryptosporidium, Norwalk-like agent, Shigella sonnei, and Giardia lamblia caused more cases of illness in 1987 than have been reported to the Water-Related Disease Outbreak Surveillance System for any other year since CDC and the Environmental Protection Agency began tabulating these data in 1971. PMID:2156147

Levine, W C; Stephenson, W T; Craun, G F

1990-03-01

5

Disease Outbreaks Caused by Water.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a literature review of the disease outbreaks caused by drinking polluted water, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the waterborn outbreaks included are: (1) cholera; (2) gastroenteritis; (3) giardiasis; and (4) typhoid fever and salmonellosis. A list of 66 references is also presented. (HM)

Craun, Gunther F.

1978-01-01

6

INVESTIGATIONS OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS  

EPA Science Inventory

From 1971-2000, there were about 751 waterborne disease outbreaks recognized and reported, with over 500,000 associated cases of illness. From 1989-1994, of 90 total outbreaks, 2% were associated with untreated surface water, 30% with untreated ground water, 42% with treatment de...

7

Viral Disease Networks?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

2010-03-01

8

Outbreaks of food-borne and waterborne viral gastroenteritis.  

PubMed Central

Norwalk virus infection is the epidemiologic prototype for outbreaks of food-borne and waterborne gastroenteritis. Around the world, Norwalk virus and Norwalk-like viruses appear to be major causes of food-borne and waterborne illness. Assessment of the overall significance of viral agents to the epidemiology of food-borne and waterborne illness is hampered by the lack of surveillance throughout much of the world. In areas where food-borne and waterborne illness surveillance is conducted, outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis are underreported because of the lack of availability of routine laboratory services to confirm the viral etiology. Routine use of epidemiologic criteria as an alternative to laboratory confirmation will allow better assessments of the importance of viral gastroenteritis until effective laboratory methods can be widely implemented. Outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis have been propagated by contamination of water supplies, raw foods, and ill food handlers. Controlling an outbreak depends on identifying and removing the source of contamination. The demonstrated occurrence of person-to-person transmission and the likely occurrence of transmission of Norwalk-like viruses by aerosol make it necessary to evaluate the potential for transmission by food handlers and servers in every outbreak, regardless of primary source.

Hedberg, C W; Osterholm, M T

1993-01-01

9

Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease  

PubMed Central

Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included.

Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

2001-01-01

10

DISEASE OUTBREAKS CAUSED BY DRINKING WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Thirty-two waterborne disease outbreaks were reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Environmental Protection Agency in 1981. The outbreaks occurred in 17 states and involved 4430 cases. This was only 64% of the number of outbreaks that were reported in 1980 and...

11

New CDC Data on Foodborne Disease Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button CDC Features New CDC Data on Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Outbreaks provide ... is the first step towards prevention. Highlights of New Reports: CDC published two new reports for 2011 ...

12

Clostridium difficile is not associated with outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis in the elderly in the Netherlands.  

PubMed

The coincidental increase in norovirus outbreaks and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) raised the question of whether these events could be related, e.g. by enhancing spread by diarrhoeal disease outbreaks. Therefore, we studied the prevalence of C. difficile in outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis in nursing homes for the elderly and characterised enzyme immunoassay (EIA)-positive stool samples. Stool samples from nursing home residents (n = 752) in 137 outbreaks of viral aetiology were investigated by EIA for the presence of C. difficile toxins. Positive samples were further tested by a cell neutralisation cytotoxicity test, a second EIA and culture. Cultured isolates were tested for the presence of toxin genes, the production of toxins and characterised by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Twenty-four samples (3.2%) tested positive in the EIA. Of these 24 positive samples, only two were positive by cytotoxicity and three by a second EIA. Bacterial culture of 21 available stool samples yielded a toxinogenic C. difficile PCR ribotype 001 in one patient sample only. In conclusion, we found no evidence in this retrospective study for an association between viral gastroenteritis outbreaks and C. difficile. The high rate of false-positive EIA samples emphasises the need for second confirmation tests to diagnose CDI. PMID:20339889

Svraka, S; Kuijper, E; Duizer, E; Bakker, D; Koopmans, M

2010-06-01

13

Incentives for Reporting Infectious Disease Outbreaks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The global spread of diseases such as swine flu and SARS highlights the difficult decision governments face when presented with evidence of a local outbreak. Reporting the outbreak may bring medical assistance but is also likely to trigger trade sanctions by countries hoping to contain the disease. Suppressing the information may avoid trade…

Malani, Anup; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

2011-01-01

14

Clinical progression and viral load in a community outbreak of coronavirus-associated SARS pneumonia: a prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Background We investigated the temporal progression of the clinical, radiological, and virological changes in a community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods We followed up 75 patients for 3 weeks managed with a standard treatment protocol of ribavirin and corticosteroids, and assessed the pattern of clinical disease, viral load, risk factors for poor clinical outcome, and the

JSM Peiris; CM Chu; VCC Cheng; KS Chan; IFN Hung; LLM Poon; KI Law; BSF Tang; TYW Hon; CS Chan; KH Chan; JSC Ng; BJ Zheng; WL Ng; RWM Lai; Y Guan; KY Yuen

2003-01-01

15

Countermeasures against viral diseases of farmed fish.  

PubMed

Farmed fish provide an increasing fraction of the human food supply, and are of major economic importance in many countries. As in the case of terrestrial agriculture, bringing together large numbers of animals of a single species (i.e., monoculture) increases the risk of infectious disease outbreaks, including viral infections. Aquaculture, in which farmed fish are kept at high population densities in close proximity with wild fish reservoirs, is ideal for the emergence of wild-type pathogens that exist benignly in local wild fish and/or the spreading of aquatic pathogens to wild fish that enter into or come into close proximity with net cages and with fish escaping from them. This paper provides a general review for the nonspecialist of viral diseases of farmed fish and how they could be prevented or treated. It has five principal objectives: (1) to provide an update on the most important and emerging viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture; (2) to review general aspects of innate antiviral defense against virus infections in fish, including recent advances in antiviral signaling; (3) to discuss current principles and practices of vaccinating fish; (4) to review antiviral drugs that have activity against viruses of farmed fish, and current barriers to employing them in aquaculture; and (5) to discuss the growing use of "functional feeds" in salmonid aquaculture to mitigate viral diseases. In conclusion, despite the challenging aquatic environment, it is expected that well thought-out combinations of vaccination and immunostimulants and/or antiviral drugs could provide solid protection against viral diseases of farmed fish. PMID:22721634

Kibenge, Frederick S B; Godoy, Marcos G; Fast, Mark; Workenhe, Samuel; Kibenge, Molly J T

2012-09-01

16

IMPROVING WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAK INVESTIGATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

This article summarizes the discussions and conclusions of a workshop held December 7-8, 1998, to consider the inherent limitations and weaknesses of waterborne outbreak investigations and make recommendations for their improvement. In recent years, an increased number of suspec...

17

OutbreakTools: A new platform for disease outbreak analysis using the R software  

PubMed Central

The investigation of infectious disease outbreaks relies on the analysis of increasingly complex and diverse data, which offer new prospects for gaining insights into disease transmission processes and informing public health policies. However, the potential of such data can only be harnessed using a number of different, complementary approaches and tools, and a unified platform for the analysis of disease outbreaks is still lacking. In this paper, we present the new R package OutbreakTools, which aims to provide a basis for outbreak data management and analysis in R. OutbreakTools is developed by a community of epidemiologists, statisticians, modellers and bioinformaticians, and implements classes and methods for storing, handling and visualizing outbreak data. It includes real and simulated outbreak datasets. Together with a number of tools for infectious disease epidemiology recently made available in R, OutbreakTools contributes to the emergence of a new, free and open-source platform for the analysis of disease outbreaks.

Jombart, Thibaut; Aanensen, David M.; Baguelin, Marc; Birrell, Paul; Cauchemez, Simon; Camacho, Anton; Colijn, Caroline; Collins, Caitlin; Cori, Anne; Didelot, Xavier; Fraser, Christophe; Frost, Simon; Hens, Niel; Hugues, Joseph; Hohle, Michael; Opatowski, Lulla; Rambaut, Andrew; Ratmann, Oliver; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Suchard, Marc A.; Wallinga, Jacco; Ypma, Rolf; Ferguson, Neil

2014-01-01

18

OutbreakTools: A new platform for disease outbreak analysis using the R software.  

PubMed

The investigation of infectious disease outbreaks relies on the analysis of increasingly complex and diverse data, which offer new prospects for gaining insights into disease transmission processes and informing public health policies. However, the potential of such data can only be harnessed using a number of different, complementary approaches and tools, and a unified platform for the analysis of disease outbreaks is still lacking. In this paper, we present the new R package OutbreakTools, which aims to provide a basis for outbreak data management and analysis in R. OutbreakTools is developed by a community of epidemiologists, statisticians, modellers and bioinformaticians, and implements classes and methods for storing, handling and visualizing outbreak data. It includes real and simulated outbreak datasets. Together with a number of tools for infectious disease epidemiology recently made available in R, OutbreakTools contributes to the emergence of a new, free and open-source platform for the analysis of disease outbreaks. PMID:24928667

Jombart, Thibaut; Aanensen, David M; Baguelin, Marc; Birrell, Paul; Cauchemez, Simon; Camacho, Anton; Colijn, Caroline; Collins, Caitlin; Cori, Anne; Didelot, Xavier; Fraser, Christophe; Frost, Simon; Hens, Niel; Hugues, Joseph; Höhle, Michael; Opatowski, Lulla; Rambaut, Andrew; Ratmann, Oliver; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Suchard, Marc A; Wallinga, Jacco; Ypma, Rolf; Ferguson, Neil

2014-06-01

19

Foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia, 1995 to 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health agencies are increasingly conducting systematic reviews of foodborne disease outbreak inves- tigations to develop strategies to prevent future outbreaks. We surveyed state and territory health departments to summarise the epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia from 1995 to 2000. From 1995 through 2000, 293 outbreaks were identifi ed, with 214 being of foodborne origin. One hundred and seventy-four

Craig B Dalton; Joy Gregory; Martyn D Kirk; Russell J Stafford; Rod Givney; Ed Kraa; David Gould

2004-01-01

20

Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Murcia, Spain.  

PubMed

An explosive outbreak of Legionnaires' disease occurred in Murcia, Spain, in July 2001. More than 800 suspected cases were reported; 449 these cases were confirmed, which made this the world's largest outbreak of the disease reported to date. Dates of onset for confirmed cases ranged from June 26 to July 19, with a case-fatality rate of 1%. The epidemic curve and geographic pattern from the 600 competed epidemiologic questionnaires indicated an outdoor point-source exposure in the northern part of the city. A case-control study matching 85 patients living outside the city of Murcia with two controls each was undertaken to identify to outbreak source; the epidemiologic investigation implicated the cooling towers at a city hospital. An environmental isolate from these towers with an identical molecular pattern as the clinical isolates was subsequently identified and supported that epidemiologic conclusion. PMID:12967487

García-Fulgueiras, Anna; Navarro, Carmen; Fenoll, Daniel; García, José; González-Diego, Paulino; Jiménez-Buñuales, Teresa; Rodriguez, Miguel; Lopez, Rosa; Pacheco, Francisco; Ruiz, Joaquín; Segovia, Manuel; Balandrón, Beatriz; Pelaz, Carmen

2003-08-01

21

Mosquito-host interactions during and after an outbreak of equine viral encephalitis in Eastern Panama.  

PubMed

Mosquito blood meals provide information about the feeding habits and host preference of potential arthropod-borne disease vectors. Although mosquito-borne diseases are ubiquitous in the Neotropics, few studies in this region have assessed patterns of mosquito-host interactions, especially during actual disease outbreaks. Based on collections made during and after an outbreak of equine viral encephalitis, we identified the source of 338 blood meals from 10 species of mosquitoes from Aruza Abajo, a location in Darien province in eastern Panama. A PCR based method targeting three distinct mitochondrial targets and subsequent DNA sequencing was used in an effort to delineate vector-host relationships. At Aruza Abajo, large domesticated mammals dominated the assemblage of mosquito blood meals while wild bird and mammal species represented only a small portion of the blood meal pool. Most mosquito species fed on a variety of hosts; foraging index analysis indicates that eight of nine mosquito species utilize hosts at similar proportions while a stochastic model suggests dietary overlap among species was greater than would be expected by chance. The results from our null-model analysis of mosquito diet overlap are consistent with the hypothesis that in landscapes where large domestic animals dominate the local biomass, many mosquito species show little host specificity, and feed upon hosts in proportion to their biomass, which may have implications for the role of livestocking patterns in vector-borne disease ecology. PMID:24339965

Navia-Gine, Wayra G; Loaiza, Jose R; Miller, Matthew J

2013-01-01

22

Chikungunya Outbreaks — The Globalization of Vectorborne Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

n 2006, an outbreak of chi k un - gunya fever — an arthralgic disease caused by a mosquito- borne alphavirus — swept over a number of islands in the Indian Ocean (the Comoros, Mauritius, the Seychelles, Madagascar, May- otte, and Reunion). In Reunion, which has a population of 770,000, there were 265,000 clinical cases (an incidence of 34%), and

Rémi N. Charrel; Xavier de Lamballerie; Didier Raoult

2007-01-01

23

Factors affecting prevention and control of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks in care homes.  

PubMed

We assess the effect of key care quality indicators on viral gastroenteritis outbreaks and control in care homes using mandatory inspection data collected by a non-departmental public body. Outbreak occurrence was associated with care home size but not with overall quality or individual environmental standards. Care home size, hygiene and infection control standard scores were inversely associated with attack rate in residents, whereas delayed reporting to the local public health agency was associated with higher attack rates. PMID:22926136

Vivancos, R; Trainor, E; Oyinloye, A; Keenan, A

2012-10-01

24

Viral diseases of marine invertebrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of Penaeus and causes catastrophic mortalities in P. stylirostris, but usually exhibits only inapparent infection in P. vannamei. Some shrimp viruses apparently are latent in larvae, causing disease only when shrimp have reached the postlarval or juvenile stages. Others are equally or more pathogenic in larvae. Studies of shrimp viruses and iridovirus-associated disease in cultured oysters point up the need for rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Until appropriate cell cultures from marine invertebrates are devised, the viral identifications necessary for understanding of epizootiology, rapid containment of epizootics in cultured animals, and decisions regarding introductions of exotic species will be difficult or impossible.

Johnson, P. T.

1984-03-01

25

[Is fibromyalgia a viral disease?].  

PubMed

Are viruses responsible for the pain in patients with fibromyalgia? Are viruses the trigger for rheumatoid arthritis? Is chronic fatigue syndrome a viral disease? There are many open questions with few or controversial answers. According to the current state of knowledge on the origin of the pain in fibromyalgia the varied symptomatic of fibromyalgia is triggered by peripheral as well as central mechanisms. Despite the broad spectrum of symptoms the disease is a specific entity which is mainly treated with dual reuptake inhibitors, anticonvulsives, tramadol, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, gamma-hydroxybutyrate and dopamine agonists in individually selected combinations. PMID:21698474

Sprott, H

2011-10-01

26

Investigation of an outbreak of mucosal disease in a beef cattle herd in southwestern Saskatchewan.  

PubMed

This study describes the epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of mucosal disease that occurred on a ranch in southwestern Saskatchewan. Over a six month period during the fall and winter of 1991-1992,in a herd of 515 beef cattle and 96 bison, 20 yearling cattle from a group of 105 housed in one feedlot pen died from mucosal disease. A further eight yearlings were slaughtered for salvage because they were at risk of dying from mucosal disease. Mucosal disease mortalities were the first observed evidence of fetal infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus in this herd. Animals that died from mucosal disease exhibited signs of ill thrift prior to death. Deaths from mucosal disease were confined to the progeny of one herd of beef cows. Following an outbreak of fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus during 1989-1990, at least 28 (22%) of the 128 calves born from this herd of cows in the spring of 1990 were persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus. However, only one calf born from this herd in 1991, and five calves born from all herds in 1992 were persistently infected. Of the five persistently infected calves born in 1992, three were born to persistently infected replacement heifers born in 1990. These heifers calved without assistance in 1992, but only one of their calves survived past three days of age, and it was persistently infected. In January 1992, 82% of the total herd had reciprocal antibody titers to bovine viral diarrhea virus of >/=1024 which suggested a high level of herd immunity to bovine viral diarrhea virus. Thus, following the outbreak of fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus in 1989-1990, herd immunity to bovine viral diarrhea virus had developed rapidly in the breeding cows and heifers. Subsequently, in the next two years, there was a dramatic decline in the number of calves born persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus. PMID:8076288

Taylor, L F; Van Donkersgoed, J; Radostits, O M; Booker, C W; Dubovi, E J; van den Hurk, J V; Janzen, E D

1994-07-01

27

OUTBREAKS OF WATERBORNE DISEASE IN THE UNITED STATES, 1978  

EPA Science Inventory

Surveillance of outbreaks of waterborne disease is jointly conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta, Ga., and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati, Ohio. Waterborne outbreaks are reported to the CDC and EPA by state and local health departments ...

28

A description of two outbreaks of capripoxvirus disease in Mongolia  

PubMed Central

Mongolia had no reported cases of capripoxvirus disease from 1977 until an outbreak of sheeppox in 2006–2007 and then goatpox in 2008. The two outbreaks occurred in geographically distant areas of Mongolia and, most strikingly, were highly species-specific. The 2006–2007 sheeppox outbreak affected no goats and the 2008 goatpox outbreak affected no sheep despite communal herding. The diseases were diagnosed using the polymerase chain reaction and virus neutralisation test. The P32 gene of the Mongolian sheeppox and goatpox viruses from the recent outbreaks were sequenced and compared with an archived 1967 strain of Goatpox virus from Mongolia. The P32 gene of the 2006–2007 Mongolian Sheeppox virus strain was identical to previously published sheeppox strains. The P32 gene of the 2008 Mongolian Goatpox virus strain was identical to the gene from virus isolated from recent goatpox outbreaks in China and Vietnam. The archived Mongolian Goatpox virus strain was unique.

Beard, P.M.; Sugar, S.; Bazarragchaa, E.; Gerelmaa, U.; Tserendorj, Sh.; Tuppurainen, E.; Sodnomdarjaa, R.

2010-01-01

29

An outbreak of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease pneumonia.  

PubMed

In October 1981, an outbreak of 29 cases of community-acquired pneumonia occurred among adult residents of Johnson County, Iowa. Retrospective study revealed 12 cases (41 per cent) had laboratory evidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD). No significant differences in clinical or epidemiological features were found between LD cases and the other pneumonias in the outbreak. All LD cases received erythromycin; one case died for a case-fatality rate of 8 per cent. The outbreak's focus could not be identified. PMID:6742277

Helms, C M; Wintermeyer, L A; Zeitler, R R; Larew, R E; Massanari, R M; Hall, N H; Hausler, W J; Johnson, W

1984-08-01

30

An outbreak of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease pneumonia.  

PubMed Central

In October 1981, an outbreak of 29 cases of community-acquired pneumonia occurred among adult residents of Johnson County, Iowa. Retrospective study revealed 12 cases (41 per cent) had laboratory evidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD). No significant differences in clinical or epidemiological features were found between LD cases and the other pneumonias in the outbreak. All LD cases received erythromycin; one case died for a case-fatality rate of 8 per cent. The outbreak's focus could not be identified.

Helms, C M; Wintermeyer, L A; Zeitler, R R; Larew, R E; Massanari, R M; Hall, N H; Hausler, W J; Johnson, W

1984-01-01

31

Genetic stability of equine arteritis virus during horizontal and vertical transmission in an outbreak of equine viral arteritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An imported carrier stallion (A) from Europe was implicated in causing an extensive outbreak of equine viral arteritis (EVA) on a Warmblood breeding farm in Pennsylvania, USA. Strains of equine arteritis virus (EAV) present in the semen of two carrier stallions (A and G) on the farm were compared to those in tissues of foals born during the outbreak, as

Udeni B. R. Balasuriya; Jodi F. Hedges; Steven A. Nadler; William H. McCollum; Peter J. Timoney; N. James MacLachlan

1999-01-01

32

Climate variability and outbreaks of infectious diseases in Europe  

PubMed Central

Several studies provide evidence of a link between vector-borne disease outbreaks and El Niño driven climate anomalies. Less investigated are the effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Here, we test its impact on outbreak occurrences of 13 infectious diseases over Europe during the last fifty years, controlling for potential bias due to increased surveillance and detection. NAO variation statistically influenced the outbreak occurrence of eleven of the infectious diseases. Seven diseases were associated with winter NAO positive phases in northern Europe, and therefore with above-average temperatures and precipitation. Two diseases were associated with the summer or spring NAO negative phases in northern Europe, and therefore with below-average temperatures and precipitation. Two diseases were associated with summer positive or negative NAO phases in southern Mediterranean countries. These findings suggest that there is potential for developing early warning systems, based on climatic variation information, for improved outbreak control and management.

Morand, Serge; Owers, Katharine A.; Waret-Szkuta, Agnes; McIntyre, K. Marie; Baylis, Matthew

2013-01-01

33

Waterborne Disease Outbreaks, 1986-1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

From 1986 to 1988, 24 states and Puerto Rico reported 50 outbreaks of illness due to water that people intended to drink, affecting 25,846 persons. The protozoal parasite Giardia lamblia was the agent most commonly implicated in outbreaks, as it has been ...

W. C. Levine W. T. Stephenson G. F. Craun

1990-01-01

34

Ebola Outbreak Response; Experience and Development of Screening Tools for Viral Haemorrhagic Fever (VHF) in a HIV Center of Excellence Near to VHF Epicentres  

PubMed Central

Introduction There have been 3 outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in Uganda in the last 2 years. VHF often starts with non-specific symptoms prior to the onset of haemorrhagic signs. HIV clinics in VHF outbreak countries such as Uganda see large numbers of patients with HIV 1/2 infection presenting with non-specific symptoms every day. Whilst there are good screening tools for general health care facilities expecting VHF suspects, we were unable to find tools for use in HIV or other non-acute clinics. Methods We designed tools to help with communication to staff, infection control and screening of HIV patients with non-specific symptoms in a large HIV clinic during the outbreaks in Uganda. We describe our experiences in using these tools in 2 Ebola Virus Disease outbreaks in Uganda. Results During the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, enhanced infection control and communication procedures were implemented within 24 hours of the WHO/Ministry of Health announcement of the outbreaks. During course of these outbreaks the clinic saw 12,544 patients with HIV 1/2 infection, of whom 3,713 attended without an appointment, suggesting new symptoms. Of these 4 were considered at risk of EVD and seen with full infection procedures; 3 were sent home after further investigation. One patient was referred to the National Referral Hospital VHF unit, but discharged on the same day. One additional VHF suspect was identified outside of a VHF outbreak; he was transferred to the National Referral Hospital and placed in isolation within 2 hours of arriving at the HIV clinic. Discussion Use of simple screening tools can be helpful in managing large numbers of symptomatic patients attending for routine and non-routine medical care (including HIV care) within a country experiencing a VHF outbreak, and can raise medical staff awareness of VHF outside of the epidemics.

Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Elbireer, Ali; Mbambu, Betty; Mayanja, Faridah; Coutinho, Alex; Merry, Concepta

2014-01-01

35

Rumors of disease in the global village: outbreak verification.  

PubMed Central

Emerging infectious diseases and the growth of information technology have produced new demands and possibilities for disease surveillance and response. Increasing numbers of outbreak reports must be assessed rapidly so that control efforts can be initiated and unsubstantiated reports can be identified to protect countries from unnecessary economic damage. The World Health Organization has set up a process for timely outbreak verification to convert large amounts of data into accurate information for suitable action. We describe the context and processes of outbreak verification and information dissemination.

Grein, T. W.; Kamara, K. B.; Rodier, G.; Plant, A. J.; Bovier, P.; Ryan, M. J.; Ohyama, T.; Heymann, D. L.

2000-01-01

36

Investigating an outbreak of acute viral hepatitis caused by hepatitis E virus variants in Karachi, South Pakistan.  

PubMed

Hepatitis E is a classic water-borne disease in developing countries. Detection of anti-HEV IgM and IgG antibodies, in addition to HEV RNA are useful epidemiological markers in diagnosis of hepatitis E. This study was conducted to investigate an outbreak of acute viral hepatitis in South-Pakistan. Anti-HEV IgM and IgG were assessed comparatively with serological kits manufactured by Abbott, Cosmic, TGH, and Wantai, selecting HEV RNA as reference assay. Molecular evolutionary analysis was performed by phylogeny and HEV spread time analysis by Bayesian Coalescent Theory approach. Of the 89 patients, 24 (26.9%) did not have acute hepatitis viral marker. Of the remaining 65 cases, 4 (6.1%) were positive for anti-HAV IgM, one (1.5%) for anti-HBc IgM, 2 (3%) for HCV, 53 (81.5%) for anti-HEV IgM, and 5 (7.7%) were hepatitis-negative. The Wantai test was 100% sensitive and specific followed by Cosmic (98.1% and 100%), TGH (98.1% and 97.2%) and Abbott (79.2% and 83.3%). Two HEV variant strains were detected by phylogeny responsible for this acute hepatitis outbreak. Estimates on demographic history of HEV showed that HEV in Pakistan has remained at a steady nonexpanding phase from around 1970 to the year 2005, in which it expanded explosively with the emergence of new HEV variants. In conclusion, the limited sensitivity of available assay (Abbott anti-HEV EIA) may be a concern in HEV diagnosis in Pakistan. This study cautions that the dissemination of the variant strains to other areas of Pakistan may lead to explosive HEV outbreaks. PMID:21328376

Khan, Anis; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Elkady, Abeer; Abbas, Zaigham; Azam, Zahid; Subhan, Amna; Raza, Sajjad; Razza, Sajjad; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim; Shih, James; Xia, Ningshao; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mishiro, Shunji; Mizokami, Masashi

2011-04-01

37

Waterborne disease in Colorado: three years' surveillance and 18 outbreaks.  

PubMed Central

The Colorado Department of Health conducted intensive surveillance for waterborne diseases during the three-year period July 1, 1980-June 30, 1983. Eighteen outbreaks of waterborne illness were investigated. Outbreaks involved from 15 to 1,500 ill persons. Giardia lamblia was confirmed or suspected as the agent in nine outbreaks, rotavirus in one, and no agent could be identified in eight. Seventeen outbreaks occurred on surface-water systems; none of these had adequate chemical pretreatment and filtration. Investigation of water systems exhibiting positive coliform results during the first year detected no outbreaks. Activities important to effective surveillance included educational outreach programs to local health agencies, physicians and the public, and the designation of one individual to whom all water-related public complaints and health department inquiries were directed.

Hopkins, R S; Shillam, P; Gaspard, B; Eisnach, L; Karlin, R J

1985-01-01

38

Emerging viral diseases in dromedary camels in the Southern Morocco.  

PubMed

During the last fifteen years, new viral diseases such Bluetongue (BT), West Nile (WN), African horse sickness (AHS), Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) and Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) have extended their geographic distribution and emerged in North Africa and in Europe. Camel (Camelus dromedarius) is considered as a potential vector in the transmission of some of these diseases while it is host-specific for Camelpox (CP). A serological survey was conducted on 1392 sera to estimate changes of these diseases prevalence in camels over two different time spans (2003 and 2009) and across different sites of South Morocco. Results indicate clearly that BT was circulating in camels before the first notified outbreak in Morocco (2004) with 42% positive sera in Guelmim in 2003. BT and WN prevalence's increased over time from 11 to 25% and from 10 to 13% respectively. Higher prevalence of both diseases was found in camels living in oases indicating an increased intensity of viral circulation in these sites. Camels have been tested negative for AHS, EHD and PPR viruses while higher CP prevalence has been detected in camels living in Smara, the most closed site to eastern borders (i.e. Mauritania). The seroprevalence of CP in camels at interval of 7 years increases from 23% to 37%. This survey could provide information on the possible use of camel as a sentinel animal for surveillance of emerging diseases such BT and WN. PMID:22222004

Touil, N; Cherkaoui, Z; Lmrabih, Z; Loutfi, C; Harif, B; El Harrak, M

2012-04-01

39

Infectious bill atrophy syndrome caused by parvovirus in a co-outbreak with duck viral hepatitis in ducklings in Taiwan.  

PubMed

In October 1989, an epizootic duckling disease with high mortality occurred in Taiwan. The disease was characterized by droopiness, inappetence, ataxia, ruffled feathers, and watery diarrhea. Affected ducklings were lame, were unable to stand, showed opisthotonos, and often died 3 or 4 days after the onset of the disease. Tolerant maturing ducklings displayed atrophic upper bills with a protruding tongue and became stunted as they reached maturity. No diagnostic histopathologic lesions were found in these ducklings. Fourteen parvovirus isolates, 33 duck viral hepatitis virus (DVHV) isolates, two adenovirus isolates, and two reovirus isolates were obtained and identified from more than 500 sick ducklings in the epizootic. The epizootic was diagnosed as a co-outbreak of duck parvovirus infections and duck viral hepatitis. The high mortality in ducklings and the bill atrophy syndrome were reproduced in ducklings by inoculating the parvovirus isolates alone. The epizootic was controlled by an emergency immunization program of ducklings with sera collected from recovered ducks or a bivalent inactivated vaccine composed of local DVHV and parvovirus isolates. PMID:8395811

Lu, Y S; Lin, D F; Lee, Y L; Liao, Y K; Tsai, H J

1993-01-01

40

Investigation of an outbreak of mucosal disease in a beef cattle herd in southwestern Saskatchewan.  

PubMed Central

This study describes the epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of mucosal disease that occurred on a ranch in southwestern Saskatchewan. Over a six-month period during the fall and winter of 1991-1992, in a herd of 515 beef cattle and 96 bison, 20 yearling cattle from a group of 105 housed in one feedlot pen died from mucosal disease. A further eight yearlings were slaughtered for salvage because they were at risk of dying from mucosal disease. Mucosal disease mortalities were the first observed evidence of fetal infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus in this herd. Animals that died from mucosal disease exhibited signs of ill thrift prior to death. Deaths from mucosal disease were confined to the progeny of one herd of beef cows. Following an outbreak of fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus during 1989-1990, at least 28 (22%) of the 128 calves born from this herd of cows in the spring of 1990 were persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus. However, only one calf born from this herd in 1991, and five calves born from all herds in 1992 were persistently infected. Of the five persistently infected calves born in 1992, three were born to persistently infected replacement heifers born in 1990. These heifers calved without assistance in 1992, but only one of their calves survived past three days of age, and it was persistently infected. In January 1992, 82% of the total herd had reciprocal antibody titers to bovine viral diarrhea virus of > or = 1024 which suggested a high level of herd immunity to bovine viral diarrhea virus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Taylor, L F; Van Donkersgoed, J; Radostits, O M; Booker, C W; Dubovi, E J; van den Hurk, J V; Janzen, E D

1994-01-01

41

Meningococcal disease at the University of Southampton: outbreak investigation.  

PubMed

In October 1997, an outbreak of meningococcal disease occurred at the University of Southampton. All six cases were first year students living in halls of residence. Microbiological characterization of case and carrier strains, case interviews, and a meningococcal carriage prevalence survey were used to investigate the outbreak. Five cases were due to serogroup C strains, one case was unconfirmed. Serotyping did not distinguish between the strains but gene sequencing permitted identification of two distinct strains in the outbreak. Although none of the cases was known to each other, three had attended the same nightclub one evening 3-4 days before illness. Meningococcal carriage rates in undergraduates were within the range expected (147/587, 25%), but no carriers of outbreak strains were identified in this sample. The findings suggest that in communities with a high degree of social interaction, the introduction of highly virulent meningococcal strains may result in enhanced transmission with clustering of cases. PMID:10579436

Gilmore, A; Jones, G; Barker, M; Soltanpoor, N; Stuart, J M

1999-10-01

42

Outbreaks of budgerigar fledgling disease in three aviaries in Ontario  

PubMed Central

Outbreaks of budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) occurred in three budgerigar aviaries in Ontario. Acute death in seven to ten-day-old nestlings and feather abnormalities in birds over three weeks of age were common findings. Ascites, hepatomegaly and hydropericardium were prominent gross lesions. Histologically, basophilic intranuclear inclusions were seen in many tissues. A severe drop in hatchability occurred in one aviary—a finding not previously reported with BFD. Interruption of breeding controlled the disease in aviary 1, but failed in two consecutive attempts in aviary 2. A third outbreak occurred in aviary 2 after depopulation and restocking. In aviary 3, the spread of disease was very rapid; 90% of the nestlings died within a few weeks. A papovavirus similar to a previously described isolate was recovered in this outbreak.

Gough, Joan F.

1989-01-01

43

Detection and isolation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus on a broiler farm after a disease outbreak.  

PubMed

A broiler farm in North Alabama suffered a mild infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) outbreak, as determined by clinical disease and PCR. The poultry integrator sought help to control further outbreaks in subsequent flocks. Samples were collected from various areas of the poultry houses on the farm over an 8-wk period. The first sampling was conducted 8 days after the infected farm was depopulated; the second was conducted 2 days prior to subsequent flock placement; and the third was conducted when the new flock was 5 wk of age. Samples were examined for ILT virus (ILTV) DNA by real-time PCR and virus isolation in embryos. The infected houses were cleaned, disinfected, heated, litter composted, and curtains replaced after the first sampling and prior to placement of the next flock. Samples from all periods were positive for ILTV DNA. However, the number of positive samples and crossing point values indicated a decrease in the amount of viral DNA, while virus isolation in embryos was successful only on the first sampling. The subsequent flock was vaccinated against ILTV by in ovo route using a commercial recombinant vaccine. Cleaning and sanitation after the disease outbreak reduced the amount of ILTV on the farm and together with in ovo vaccination of the new flock may have prevented a recurrence of another ILT outbreak. PMID:24597126

Dormitorio, Teresa V; Giambrone, Joseph J; Macklin, Kenneth S

2013-12-01

44

Exotic emerging viral diseases: progress and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The agents causing viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) are a taxonomically diverse group of viruses that may share commonalities in the process whereby they produce systemic and frequently fatal disease. Significant progress has been made in understanding the biology of the Ebola virus, one of the best known examples. This knowledge has guided our thinking about other VHF agents, including Marburg,

Thomas W Geisbert; Peter B Jahrling

2004-01-01

45

Chronic viral hepatitis and chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major public health problem worldwide over the past few decades because of the increasing prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and elderly individuals in most countries. Chronic viral hepatitis (due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)) also poses significant morbidity and mortality globally. Both these viruses can cause CKD and

Elias C Chacko; Soondal Koomar Surrun; T. P. Mubarack Sani; Joseph M Pappachan

2010-01-01

46

Approved and experimental countermeasures against pestiviral diseases: Bovine viral diarrhea, classical swine fever and border disease.  

PubMed

The pestiviruses, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), classical swine fever (CSFV) and border disease virus, are important livestock pathogens in many countries, but current vaccines do not completely prevent the spread of infection. Control of pestiviral diseases is especially difficult due to the constant viremia and viral shedding of persistently infected (PI) animals, which must be identified and eliminated to prevent disease transmission. Existing vaccines are limited by the delay between vaccination and the onset of protection, the difficulty of differentiating serologically between vaccinated and naturally infected animals and the need for broad vaccine cross-protection against diverse virus strains. Antiviral therapy could potentially supplement vaccination by providing immediate protection in the case of an outbreak. Numerous compounds with in vitro antiviral activity against BVDV have been identified through its role as a surrogate for hepatitis C virus. Fewer drugs active against CSFV have been identified, but many compounds that are effective against BVDV will likely inhibit CSFV, given their similar genomic sequences. While in vitro research has been promising, the paucity of efficacy studies in animals has hindered the commercial development of effective antiviral drugs against the pestiviruses. In this article, we summarize the clinical syndromes and routes of transmission of BVD, CSF and border disease, discuss currently approved vaccines, review efforts to develop antiviral therapies for use in outbreak control and suggest promising directions for future research. PMID:23928259

Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, M Daniel

2013-10-01

47

An outbreak of Barmah Forest virus disease in Victoria.  

PubMed

This report describes the epidemiological and clinical features of an outbreak of 47 cases of laboratory-confirmed Barmah Forest virus disease (BF disease) that occurred in Victoria between January and May 2002. Laboratory-confirmed cases were investigated, and information on travel history and clinical details was collected. Surveillance data from adult mosquito trappings and climatic conditions in the Wellington Shire were also reviewed. The response rate for interviews was 85 per cent (40/47). The most common symptoms reported by cases included arthralgia (95%), lethargy (90%) and maculopapular rash (72.5%). Transmission of BF disease in the Gippsland region was associated with unusually high numbers of Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus mosquitoes. This outbreak was of interest due to the fact that cases of BF disease outnumbered cases of Ross River virus disease (RR disease) in Victoria for the first time since data were available. Similar outbreaks of BF disease, in the absence of RR disease, occurred in Western Australia in 1993 and New South Wales in 1994/1995. Although the majority of BF disease cases reported regular outdoor activity during which they could be exposed to mosquito populations, they infrequently take precautions to limit exposure. Further efforts need to be made to educate people of the importance of using repellents and other personal preventative measures. PMID:12549534

Passmore, Jonathon; O'Grady, Kerry Ann; Moran, Rodney; Wishart, Elwyn

2002-01-01

48

SURVEILLANCE AND INVESTIGATION OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS - VOLUME I: HANDBOOK  

EPA Science Inventory

This work consists of two volumes. olume I is a series of articles based on selected presentations made at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Association of State Drinking Water Administrators Workshop on Methods for Investigation of Water-borne Disease Outbreaks ...

49

Risks of water-borne disease outbreaks after extreme events  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climatic changes are associated with heat waves, droughts, and floods which have significant impacts on human health. Floods enhance the effects of water-borne pathogens increasing the concentration of biological agents in surface water. On the basis of national statistics collected by the Italian Ministry of Health, this work illustrates preliminary observations concerning outbreaks of water-borne diseases after flood events in

Stefania Marcheggiani; Camilla Puccinelli; Simone Ciadamidaro; Valentina Della Bella; Mario Carere; Monica Francesca Blasi; Nic Pacini; Enzo Funari; Laura Mancini

2010-01-01

50

Immunization with viral antigens: viral diseases of carp and catfish.  

PubMed

The viral diseases of carp and catfish for which vaccines have been produced are spring viraemia of carp (SVC), grass carp haemorrhage disease (GCHD) and channel catfish virus disease (CCVD). Field trials of a commercially produced injectable vaccine conducted over several years have shown that carp can be protected against SVC. However the supporting data were predominantly qualitative rather than quantitative. Large-scale field trials of an experimental oral attenuated vaccine against SVC virus over a five year period were successful, and no reversion to virulence of the vaccine was recorded. Injectable inactivated and attenuated vaccines against GCHD have predominantly been tested under laboratory conditions, although a small number of field trials have been reported. In such trials of bath and injectable vaccines, survival rates of 50-90% were achieved. In China, commercially available vaccines are being used against GCHD. Only laboratory trials of vaccines against CCVD have been reported. Bath vaccination of eggs of fry with a subunit vaccine and bath immunisation of fingerlings with an attenuated virus vaccine have been successful. Problems with current approaches and areas for research are discussed. PMID:9270851

Dixon, P

1997-01-01

51

An investigation of 11 outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in villages in northern Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of investigations of 11 outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in villages in northern Thailand are described. The causative virus was Asia in one in seven outbreaks, Type O in two outbreaks and unknown in two outbreaks. The most probable sources of the outbreaks were co-mingling of cattle and\\/or buffalo with livestock from an infected neighbouring village (four) and recent

P. C. Cleland; P. Chamnanpood; F. C. Baldock; L. J. Gleeson

1995-01-01

52

Molecular Epidemiology of Human Oral Chagas Disease Outbreaks in Colombia  

PubMed Central

Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI). In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. Methodology and Principal Findings High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing) and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing) strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. Conclusions These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed.

Ramirez, Juan David; Montilla, Marleny; Cucunuba, Zulma M.; Florez, Astrid Carolina; Zambrano, Pilar; Guhl, Felipe

2013-01-01

53

Seasonal increase in sea temperature triggers pancreas disease outbreaks in Norwegian salmon farms.  

PubMed

Pancreas disease (PD) is a viral disease causing negative impacts on economy of salmon farms and fish welfare. Its transmission route is horizontal, and water transport by ocean currents is an important factor for transmission. In this study, the effect of temperature changes on PD dynamics in the field has been analysed for the first time. To identify the potential time of exposure to the virus causing PD, a hydrodynamic current model was used. A cohort of salmon was assumed to be infected the month it was exposed to virus from other infective cohorts by estimated water contact. The number of months from exposure to outbreak defined the incubation period, which was used in this investigation to explore the relationship between temperature changes and PD dynamics. The time of outbreak was identified by peak in mortality based on monthly records from active sites. Survival analysis demonstrated that cohorts exposed to virus at decreasing sea temperature had a significantly longer incubation period than cohorts infected when the sea temperature was increasing. Hydrodynamic models can provide information on the risk of being exposed to pathogens from neighbouring farms. With the knowledge of temperature-dependent outbreak probability, the farmers can emphasize prophylactic management, avoid stressful operations until the sea temperature is decreasing and consider removal of cohorts at risk, if possible. PMID:23980568

Stene, A; Bang Jensen, B; Knutsen, O; Olsen, A; Viljugrein, H

2014-08-01

54

Outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by dengue virus type 3 in Al-Mukalla, Yemen  

PubMed Central

Background Investigations were conducted by the authors to explore an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) reported in 2010 from Al-Mukalla city, the capital of Hadramout in Yemen. Methods From 15–17 June 2010, the outbreak investigation period, specimens were obtained within 7?days after onset of illness of 18 acutely ill patients hospitalized with VHF and 15 household asymptomatic contacts of 6 acute cases. Additionally, 189 stored sera taken from acutely ill patients with suspected VHF hospitalized in the preceding 12?months were obtained from the Ministry of Health of Yemen. Thus, a total of 222 human specimens were collected; 207 specimens from acute cases and 15 specimens from contacts. All samples were tested with RT-PCR for dengue (DENV), Alkhumra (ALKV), Rift Valley Fever (RVFV), Yellow Fever (YFV), and Chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Samples were also tested for DENV IgM, IgG, and NS1-antigen. Medical records of patients were reviewed and demographic, clinical, and laboratory data was collected. Results Of 207 patients tested, 181 (87.4%) patients were confirmed to have acute dengue with positive dengue NS1-antigen (97 patients, 46.9%) and/or IgM (163 patients, 78.7%). Of the 181 patients with confirmed dengue, 100 (55.2%) patients were IgG-positive. DENV RNA was detected in 2 (1%) patients with acute symptoms; both samples were molecularly typed as DENV type 3. No other VHF viruses were detected. For the 15 contacts tested, RT-PCR tests for the five viruses were negative, one contact was dengue IgM positive, and another one was dengue IgG positive. Of the 181 confirmed dengue patients, 120 (66.3%) patients were males and the median age was 24?years. The most common manifestations included fever (100%), headache (94.5%), backache (93.4%), malaise (88.4%), arthralgia (85.1%), myalgia (82.3%), bone pain (77.9%), and leukopenia (76.2%). Two (1.1%) patients died. Conclusions DENV-3 was confirmed to be the cause of an outbreak of VHF in Al-Mukalla. It is important to use both IgM and NS1-antigen tests to confirm acute dengue particularly under the adverse field conditions, where proper storage and transportation of specimens are missing, which substantially reduce the sensitivity of the RT-PCR for detecting DENV RNA.

2013-01-01

55

Mass Vaccination Campaign Following Community Outbreak of Meningococcal Disease  

PubMed Central

During December 12–29, 1998, seven patients ages 2–18 years were diagnosed with serogroup C meningococcal disease in two neighboring Florida towns with 33,000 residents. We evaluated a mass vaccination campaign implemented to control the outbreak. We maintained vaccination logs and recorded the resources used in the campaign that targeted 2- to 22-year-old residents of the two towns. A total of 13,148 persons received the vaccinations in 3 days. Vaccination coverage in the target population was estimated to be 86% to 99%. Five additional cases of serogroup C meningococcal disease occurred in the community during the year after the campaign began, four in patients who had not received the vaccine. The cost of control efforts was approximately $370,000. Although cases continued to occur, the vaccination campaign appeared to control the outbreak. Rapid implementation, a targeted approach, and high coverage were important to the campaign's success.

Blackmore, Carina; Wiersma, Steven; Lesneski, Cheryll; Gauch, Laurey; Hopkins, Richard S.

2002-01-01

56

ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAK INVESTIGATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Two recent headline causing events have reinforced the concern about the spread f diseases through waterborne routes. hese events include the current cholera epidemic in the Western Hemisphere that has caused more than 750,000 reported case of cholera through April, 1993, and the...

57

Viral respiratory diseases: vaccines and antivirals*  

PubMed Central

Acute respiratory diseases, most of which are generally attributed to viruses, account for about 6% of all deaths and for about 60% of the deaths associated with all respiratory disease. The huge cost attributable to viral respiratory infections as a result of absenteeism and the disruption of business and the burden of medical care makes control of these diseases an important objective. The viruses that infect the respiratory tract fall taxonomically into five viral families. Although immunoprophylaxis would appear to be the logical approach, the development of suitable vaccines has been confronted with numerous obstacles, including antigenic drift and shift in the influenzaviruses, the large number of antigenically distinct immunotypes among rhinoviruses, the occurrence after immunization of rare cases of a severe form of the disease following subsequent natural infection with respiratory syncytial virus, and the risk of oncogenicity of adenoviruses for man. Considerable expenditure on the development of new antiviral drugs has so far resulted in only three compounds that are at present officially approved and licensed for use in the USA. Efforts to improve the tools available for control should continue and imaginative and inventive approaches are called for. However, creativity and ingenuity must operate within the constraints imposed by economic, political, ethical, and legal considerations.

Lennette, Edwin H.

1981-01-01

58

Mixture Likelihood Ratio Scan Statistic for Disease Outbreak Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE This article describes the methodology and results of Team #134's submission to the 2007 ISDS Technical Contest. BACKGROUND The prospective disease surveillance contest consisted of three synthetic outbreaks (E. Coli, Cryptosporid- ium, and In?uenza) injected into three data sources (emergency department visits (ED), over-the-counter anti-diarrheal and anti-nauseant sales (OTC), and nurse hotline calls (TH)). The training data included 30

Jarad B. Niemi; Michael D. Porter; Brian J. Reich

59

Comparison of various statistical methods for detecting disease outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we compared seven statistical methods for detecting outbreaks of infectious disease; Historical limits, English\\u000a model, SPOTv2, CuSums, Bayesian predictive model, RKI method and Serfling model. We used simulated data and real data to compare\\u000a those seven methods. Simulated data have parameters such as trend, seasonality, mean and standard deviation. Among these methods,\\u000a SPOTv2 shows the best performance

Byeong Yeob Choi; Ho Kim; Un Yeong Go; Jong-Hyeon Jeong; Jae Won Lee

2010-01-01

60

Strategic approach to control of viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: report from a regional consultation.  

PubMed

The viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are a growing public health threat in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Nearly all of them are of zoonotic origin. VHF often cause outbreaks with high fatalities and, except for yellow fever, currently there are no specific treatment or vaccination options available. In response to this growing threat, the Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean of the World Health Organization convened a technical consultation in Tehran on 27-30 November 2011 to review the current gaps in prevention and control of VHF outbreaks in the Region. The meeting recommended a number of strategic public health approaches for prevention and control of VHF outbreaks through synergizing effective collaboration between the human and animal health sectors on areas that involve better preparedness, early detection and rapid response. Implementation of these approaches would require working together with vision, commitment and a sense of purpose involving partnerships and cooperation from all relevant sectors. PMID:24313155

Malik, M R; El Bushra, H E; Opoka, M; Formenty, P; Velayudhan, R; Eremin, S

2013-10-01

61

Outbreak of viral hepatitis B in a rural community in India linked to inadequately sterilized needles and syringes.  

PubMed

In India, virtually all outbreaks of viral hepatitis are considered to be due to faeco-orally transmitted hepatitis E virus. Recently, a cluster of 15 cases of viral hepatitis B was found in three villages in Gujarat State. The cases were epidemiologically linked to the use of inadequately sterilized needles and syringes by a local unqualified medical practitioner. The outbreak evolved slowly over a period of 3 months and was marked by a high case fatality rate (46.7%), probably because of concurrent infection with hepatitis D virus (HDV) or sexually transmitted infections. But for the many fatalities within 2-3 weeks of the onset of illness, the outbreak would have gone unnoticed. The findings emphasize the importance of inadequately sterilized needles and syringes in the transmission of viral hepatitis B in India, the need to strengthen the routine surveillance system, and to organize an education campaign targeting all health care workers including private practitioners, especially those working in rural areas, as well as the public at large, to take all possible measures to prevent this often fatal infection. PMID:9615501

Singh, J; Bhatia, R; Gandhi, J C; Kaswekar, A P; Khare, S; Patel, S B; Oza, V B; Jain, D C; Sokhey, J

1998-01-01

62

Outbreak of viral hepatitis B in a rural community in India linked to inadequately sterilized needles and syringes.  

PubMed Central

In India, virtually all outbreaks of viral hepatitis are considered to be due to faeco-orally transmitted hepatitis E virus. Recently, a cluster of 15 cases of viral hepatitis B was found in three villages in Gujarat State. The cases were epidemiologically linked to the use of inadequately sterilized needles and syringes by a local unqualified medical practitioner. The outbreak evolved slowly over a period of 3 months and was marked by a high case fatality rate (46.7%), probably because of concurrent infection with hepatitis D virus (HDV) or sexually transmitted infections. But for the many fatalities within 2-3 weeks of the onset of illness, the outbreak would have gone unnoticed. The findings emphasize the importance of inadequately sterilized needles and syringes in the transmission of viral hepatitis B in India, the need to strengthen the routine surveillance system, and to organize an education campaign targeting all health care workers including private practitioners, especially those working in rural areas, as well as the public at large, to take all possible measures to prevent this often fatal infection.

Singh, J.; Bhatia, R.; Gandhi, J. C.; Kaswekar, A. P.; Khare, S.; Patel, S. B.; Oza, V. B.; Jain, D. C.; Sokhey, J.

1998-01-01

63

Two different epidemiological scenarios of border disease in the populations of Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra p. pyrenaica) after the first disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

Since 2001 several outbreaks of a new disease associated with Border disease virus (BDV) infection have caused important declines in Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) populations in the Pyrenees. The goal of this study was to analyze the post-outbreak BDV epidemiology in the first two areas affected by disease with the aim to establish if the infection has become endemic. We also investigated if BDV infected wild and domestic ruminants sharing habitat with chamois. Unexpectedly, we found different epidemiological scenarios in each population. Since the disease outbreaks, some chamois populations recuperated quickly, while others did not recover as expected. In chamois from the first areas, prevalence was high (73.47%) and constant throughout the whole study period and did not differ between chamois born before and after the BDV outbreak; in all, BDV was detected by RT-PCR in six chamois. In the other areas, prevalence was lower (52.79%) and decreased during the study period; as well, prevalence was significantly lower in chamois born after the disease outbreak. No BDV were detected in this population. A comparative virus neutralisation test performed with four BDV strains and one Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) strain showed that all the chamois had BDV-specific antibodies. Pestivirus antibodies were detected in all the rest of analyzed species, with low prevalence values in wild ruminants and moderate values in domestic ruminants. No viruses were detected in these species. These results confirm the hypothesis that outbreaks of BDV infection only affect the Pyrenean chamois, although other wild ruminants can occasionally be infected. In conclusion, two different scenarios have appeared since the first border disease outbreaks in Pyrenean chamois: on the one hand frequent BDV circulation with possible negative impact on population dynamics in some areas and on the other, lack of virus circulation and quick recovery of the chamois population. PMID:23251417

Fernández-Sirera, Laura; Cabezón, Oscar; Allepuz, Alberto; Rosell, Rosa; Riquelme, Cristina; Serrano, Emmanuel; Lavín, Santiago; Marco, Ignasi

2012-01-01

64

Relating phylogenetic trees to transmission trees of infectious disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

Transmission events are the fundamental building blocks of the dynamics of any infectious disease. Much about the epidemiology of a disease can be learned when these individual transmission events are known or can be estimated. Such estimations are difficult and generally feasible only when detailed epidemiological data are available. The genealogy estimated from genetic sequences of sampled pathogens is another rich source of information on transmission history. Optimal inference of transmission events calls for the combination of genetic data and epidemiological data into one joint analysis. A key difficulty is that the transmission tree, which describes the transmission events between infected hosts, differs from the phylogenetic tree, which describes the ancestral relationships between pathogens sampled from these hosts. The trees differ both in timing of the internal nodes and in topology. These differences become more pronounced when a higher fraction of infected hosts is sampled. We show how the phylogenetic tree of sampled pathogens is related to the transmission tree of an outbreak of an infectious disease, by the within-host dynamics of pathogens. We provide a statistical framework to infer key epidemiological and mutational parameters by simultaneously estimating the phylogenetic tree and the transmission tree. We test the approach using simulations and illustrate its use on an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease. The approach unifies existing methods in the emerging field of phylodynamics with transmission tree reconstruction methods that are used in infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:24037268

Ypma, Rolf J F; van Ballegooijen, W Marijn; Wallinga, Jacco

2013-11-01

65

Outbreaks of Enteric Disease Associated with Animal Contact: Not Just a Foodborne Problem Anymore  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past 10 years, an increasing number of outbreaks of enteric disease associated with animals in public settings, such as fairs and petting zoos, have been reported. Fifty-five of these outbreaks that occurred in the United States during 1991- 2005 are reviewed in this article. Lessons learned from these outbreaks and recommendations for prevention are also discussed. Physicians should

Frederick J. Angulo; Nicole Steinmuller; Linda Demma; Jeff B. Bender; Millicent Eidson

2006-01-01

66

Origin Detection During Food-borne Disease Outbreaks - A Case Study of the 2011 EHEC/HUS Outbreak in Germany.  

PubMed

The key challenge during food-borne disease outbreaks, e.g. the 2011 EHEC/HUS outbreak in Germany, is the design of efficient mitigation strategies based on a timely identification of the outbreak's spatial origin. Standard public health procedures typically use case-control studies and tracings along food shipping chains. These methods are time-consuming and suffer from biased data collected slowly in patient interviews. Here we apply a recently developed, network-theoretical method to identify the spatial origin of food-borne disease outbreaks. Thereby, the network captures the transportation routes of contaminated foods. The technique only requires spatial information on case reports regularly collected by public health institutions and a model for the underlying food distribution network. The approach is based on the idea of replacing the conventional geographic distance with an effective distance that is derived from the topological structure of the underlying food distribution network. We show that this approach can efficiently identify most probable epicenters of food-borne disease outbreaks. We assess and discuss the method in the context of the 2011 EHEC epidemic. Based on plausible assumptions on the structure of the national food distribution network, the approach can correctly localize the origin of the 2011 German EHEC/HUS outbreak. PMID:24818065

Manitz, Juliane; Kneib, Thomas; Schlather, Martin; Helbing, Dirk; Brockmann, Dirk

2014-01-01

67

Origin Detection During Food-borne Disease Outbreaks - A Case Study of the 2011 EHEC/HUS Outbreak in Germany  

PubMed Central

The key challenge during food-borne disease outbreaks, e.g. the 2011 EHEC/HUS outbreak in Germany, is the design of efficient mitigation strategies based on a timely identification of the outbreak's spatial origin. Standard public health procedures typically use case-control studies and tracings along food shipping chains. These methods are time-consuming and suffer from biased data collected slowly in patient interviews. Here we apply a recently developed, network-theoretical method to identify the spatial origin of food-borne disease outbreaks. Thereby, the network captures the transportation routes of contaminated foods. The technique only requires spatial information on case reports regularly collected by public health institutions and a model for the underlying food distribution network. The approach is based on the idea of replacing the conventional geographic distance with an effective distance that is derived from the topological structure of the underlying food distribution network. We show that this approach can efficiently identify most probable epicenters of food-borne disease outbreaks. We assess and discuss the method in the context of the 2011 EHEC epidemic. Based on plausible assumptions on the structure of the national food distribution network, the approach can correctly localize the origin of the 2011 German EHEC/HUS outbreak.

Manitz, Juliane; Kneib, Thomas; Schlather, Martin; Helbing, Dirk; Brockmann, Dirk

2014-01-01

68

Planning for infectious disease outbreaks: A geographic disease spread, clinic location, and resource allocation simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the event of an outbreak of a highly contagious communicable disease, public health departments often open mass-vaccination or antiviral dispensing clinics to treat the infected population or reduce the further spread of disease. In this research, we have created a simulation of the disease spread process employing a SEIR compartmental model. The model includes employment patterns and separates the

Sean Carr; Stephen Roberts

2010-01-01

69

Viral diseases of olive flounder in Korean hatcheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to elucidate the state of diseases, especially viral diseases, and to prevent viral diseases from occurring in olive flounder hatcheries, a range of studies, including epidemiological study, were performed from 1997 to 2003. The location of the hatcheries investigated includes several representative sites in the east (Kangnung, Uljin, Pohang, Yangsan, Ulsan, Pusan), south (Wando, Changheung, Goheung, Yeosu, Namhae,

M.-J. Oh; S.-J. Jung; S.-I. Kitamura; H.-Y. Kim; S. Y. Kang

2006-01-01

70

Outbreaks of an ulcerative and haemorrhagic disease in Arctic char Salvelinus alpinus caused by Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. smithia.  

PubMed

Arctic char Salvelinus alpinus farmed in different places in Austria and free of the viral diseases viral haemorrhagic septcaemia (VHS), infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) experienced disease and mortality. Diseased fish showed skin ulceration and pathological signs of sepsis. Aeromonas sp. was isolated as pure culture from the kidney of freshly euthanized diseased fish. Three independent isolates from outbreaks that occurred on 2 of the affected farms were analyzed phylogenetically by DNA sequence analysis of the rrs and gyrB genes and phenotypically with biochemical reactions. All 3 isolates were identified as Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. smithia. Analysis of virulence genes in these isolates revealed the presence of a Type III secretion system as well as several related virulence effector genes including aexT, encoding the Aeromonas exotoxin AexT, aopP and aopH. These genes are characteristic for virulent strains of typical and atypical subspecies of A. salmonicida. PMID:19899353

Goldschmidt-Clermont, E; Hochwartner, O; Demarta, A; Caminada, A-P; Frey, J

2009-09-01

71

Animal disease outbreak control: the use of crisis management tools.  

PubMed

In this era of globalisation the effective control of animal disease outbreaks requires powerful crisis management tools. In the 1990s software packages for different sectors of the government and agricultural industry began to be developed. In 2004, as a special application for tracking the movement of animals and animal products, the European Union developed the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES) on the basis of its predecessor, the ANImal MOvement (ANIMO) project. The nationwide use of the ANIMO system by the veterinary authorities in Germany marked the beginning of the development in 1993 of a computerised national animal disease reporting system--the TierSeuchenNachrichten (TSN)--using the ANIMO hardware and software components. In addition to TRACES and TSN the third pillar for the management of animal disease outbreaks and crises in Germany is the national cattle and swine database--called Herkunftssicherungs- und Informationssystem für Tiere. A high degree of standardisation is necessary when integrating the different solutions at all levels of government and with the private sector. In this paper, the authors describe the use of these tools on the basis of their experience and in relation to what we can do now and what we should opt for in the future. PMID:16796050

Kroschewski, K; Kramer, M; Micklich, A; Staubach, C; Carmanns, R; Conraths, F J

2006-04-01

72

Exotic emerging viral diseases: progress and challenges.  

PubMed

The agents causing viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) are a taxonomically diverse group of viruses that may share commonalities in the process whereby they produce systemic and frequently fatal disease. Significant progress has been made in understanding the biology of the Ebola virus, one of the best known examples. This knowledge has guided our thinking about other VHF agents, including Marburg, Lassa, the South American arenaviruses, yellow fever, Crimean-Congo and Rift Valley fever viruses. Comparisons among VHFs show that a common pathogenic feature is their ability to disable the host immune response by attacking and manipulating the cells that initiate the antiviral response. Of equal importance, these comparisons highlight critical gaps in our knowledge of these pathogens. PMID:15577929

Geisbert, Thomas W; Jahrling, Peter B

2004-12-01

73

Antibiotic prescribing during an outbreak of meningococcal disease.  

PubMed Central

During a prolonged outbreak of meningococcal disease caused by serogroup B serotype 15 sulphonamide-resistant strains in one British health district, there was considerable variation in attack rates by town. General practitioner (GP) antibiotic prescribing rates were compared in high and low incidence towns. The only significant difference found was that erythromycin prescribing was more frequent in the high incidence towns (rate ratio 4.0, 95% CI 3.2-4.8, in March 1987 and 3.0, 95% CI 2.4-3.7, in November 1987). This was probably due to increased GP consultation rates for upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), but higher erythromycin usage may have increased meningococcal acquisition rates or susceptibility to meningococcal disease. Antibiotic prescribing rates should be further investigated in defined areas of high and low incidence of meningococcal disease.

Stuart, J. M.; Robinson, P. M.; Cartwright, K.; Noah, N. D.

1996-01-01

74

Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp  

PubMed Central

The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

Walker, Peter J.; Winton, James R.

2010-01-01

75

Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease associated with person to person spread in hotels and restaurants.  

PubMed

Twenty-eight outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, reported as being transmitted mainly by the person to person route, were identified in association with retail catering premises, such as hotels, restaurants, and public houses, in England and Wales between 1992 and 1994. Five thousand and forty-eight people were at risk in these outbreaks and 1234 were affected. Most of the outbreaks (over 90%) occurred in hotels. Small round structured viruses were the most commonly detected pathogens. Diarrhoea and vomiting were common symptoms and most of the outbreaks occurred in the summer months. Control measures to contain infectious individuals and improved hygiene measures are necessary to contain such outbreaks. PMID:7550587

McDonnell, R J; Wall, P G; Adak, G K; Evans, H S; Cowden, J M; Caul, E O

1995-09-15

76

[Diagnosis of bovine viral respiratory diseases].  

PubMed

Enzootic bronchopneumonia (EBP) is an infectious, multifactorial respiratory disease of cattle. Different viruses may be involved in its pathogenesis. In this study an adapted method of endoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of caudal parts of the right cranial lung lobe was established and evaluated. The obtained bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) served as template for the detection of BRSV, BPIV-3 and BCoV specific nucleic acids by RT-PCR. BALF samples of 44 cattle affected with respiratory disease were compared to nasal swabs in their reliability to detect the causative agent(s). In 6/7 animals tested positive for BRSV, RNA of this virus was detected in the BALF, in 4 animals it could be found in the nasal swabs. In two of the three BPIV-3 positive animals, the BALF was the only material that tested positive. The most reliable samples for detection of 15 BCoV positive animals were the nasal swabs. BAL was easy to perform, it led to severe coughing in one case and moderate worsening of dyspnoe in three cases. In conclusion this study shows that BAL of the right cranial lung lobe is in many cases the only tool to detect BRSV and BPIV-3, major viral triggers of EBP. PMID:21971671

Iglseder, A; Franz, S; Benetka, V; Möstl, K; Latif, M; Walk, K; Baumgartner, W

2011-10-01

77

Epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998-2010.  

PubMed

Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998-2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities. PMID:23379281

Grass, Julian E; Gould, L Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E

2013-02-01

78

Surveillance for waterborne disease outbreaks--United States, 1991-1992.  

PubMed

Problem/Condition: Since 1971, CDC and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have maintained a collaborative surveillance program for collection and periodic reporting of data on the occurrence and causes of waterborne disease outbreaks. Reporting Period Covered: January 1991 through December 1992. Description of System: The surveillance system includes data about outbreaks associated with water intended for drinking and also about those associated with recreational water. State and local public health departments are the agencies with primary responsibility for the detection and investigation of outbreaks. State and territorial health departments report these outbreaks to CDC on a standard form. Results: For the 2-year period 1991-1992, 17 states and territories reported 34 outbreaks associated with water intended for drinking. The outbreaks caused an estimated 17,464 persons to become ill. A protozoal parasite (Giardia lamblia or Cryptosporidium) was identified as the etiologic agent for seven of the 11 outbreaks for which an agent was determined. Five (71%) of the outbreaks caused by protozoa were associated with a surface-influenced groundwater source. One outbreak of cryptosporidiosis was associated with filtered and chlorinated surface water. Shigella sonnei and hepatitis A virus were implicated in one outbreak each; both were linked to consumption of contaminated well water. Two outbreaks due to acute chemical poisoning were reported; one had an associated fatality. No etiology was established for 23 (68%) of the 34 outbreaks, including the largest one reported during this period, in which an estimated 9,847 persons using a filtered surface water supply developed gastroenteritis. Most (76%) of the 34 outbreaks were associated with a well water source. Twenty-one states reported 39 outbreaks associated with recreational water, in which an estimated 1,825 persons became ill. The most frequently reported illness was hot tub- or whirlpool-associated Pseudomonas dermatitis (12 outbreaks). Of 11 outbreaks of swimming-associated gastroenteritis, six were caused by Giardia or Cryptosporidium, including three outbreaks associated with chlorinated, filtered pool water. The first reported outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with recreational exposure occurred during this period. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis, caused by Naegleria fowleri infection, resulted in six deaths. Interpretation: The number of waterborne disease outbreaks reported per year has not changed substantially in the past 5 years. However, etiologic agents only recently associated with waterborne disease, such as E. coli O157:H7 and Cryptosporidium, are being reported more frequently and from new settings. Water quality data for outbreaks during the period 1991-1992 indicate that available water disinfection technology is not always in place or used reliably.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8232179

Moore, A C; Herwaldt, B L; Craun, G F; Calderon, R L; Highsmith, A K; Juranek, D D

1993-11-19

79

Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp.  

PubMed

The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change. PMID:20409453

Walker, Peter J; Winton, James R

2010-01-01

80

Contributing factors in restaurant-associated foodborne disease outbreaks, FoodNet sites, 2006 and 2007.  

PubMed

An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness occur each year in the United States, resulting in approximately 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Over half of all foodborne disease outbreaks reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are associated with eating in restaurants or delicatessens. We reviewed data from restaurant-associated foodborne disease outbreaks to better understand the factors that contribute to these outbreaks. Data on restaurant-associated foodborne disease outbreaks reported by sites participating in the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) were analyzed to characterize contributing factors reported in foodborne disease outbreaks and the levels of evidence used to identify these factors. Of 457 foodborne disease outbreaks reported in 2006 and 2007 by FoodNet sites, 300 (66%) were restaurant associated, and of these 295 (98%) had at least one reported contributing factor. One to nine (with a median of two) contributing factors were reported per outbreak. Of the 257 outbreaks with a single etiology reported, contributing factors associated with food worker health and hygiene were reported for 165 outbreaks (64%), factors associated with food preparation practices within the establishment were reported for 88 outbreaks (34%), and factors associated with contamination introduced before reaching the restaurant were reported for 56 outbreaks (22%). The pronounced role of food workers in propagating outbreaks makes it clear that more work is needed to address prevention at the local level. Food workers should be instructed not to prepare food while ill to prevent the risk of transmitting pathogens. PMID:24215683

Gould, L Hannah; Rosenblum, Ida; Nicholas, David; Phan, Quyen; Jones, Timothy F

2013-11-01

81

A qualitative study of the duty to care in communicable disease outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care providers’ (HCPs’) duty to care during communicable disease outbreaks has resurfaced as an important and contentious topic. This renewed interest follows the re-emergence of communicable diseases, largely thought to have disappeared and therefore irrelevant to modern day practitioners. The 2003 SARS outbreak particularly presented propitious circumstances for reconsidering this issue. This study seeks to characterize the views of

Cécile M. Bensimon; C. Shawn Tracy; Mark Bernstein; Randi Zlotnik Shaula; Ross E. G. Upshur

2007-01-01

82

Outbreak of pink disease caused by Corticium salmonicolor in Eucalyptus grandis in Kerala, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

An outbreak of pink disease caused by Corticium salmonicolor Berk. & Br. in Eucalyptus grandis plantations in Kerala State is reported. The sporadic infection recorded during 1979 spread to an epidemic proportion within four years, affecting more than 50% of trees in the two plantations surveyed. Probable factors responsible for this outbreak of pink disease are discussed.

J. K. Sharma; C. Mohanan; E. J. Maria Florence

1984-01-01

83

Detecting Disease Outbreaks in Mass Gatherings Using Internet Data  

PubMed Central

Background Mass gatherings, such as music festivals and religious events, pose a health care challenge because of the risk of transmission of communicable diseases. This is exacerbated by the fact that participants disperse soon after the gathering, potentially spreading disease within their communities. The dispersion of participants also poses a challenge for traditional surveillance methods. The ubiquitous use of the Internet may enable the detection of disease outbreaks through analysis of data generated by users during events and shortly thereafter. Objective The intent of the study was to develop algorithms that can alert to possible outbreaks of communicable diseases from Internet data, specifically Twitter and search engine queries. Methods We extracted all Twitter postings and queries made to the Bing search engine by users who repeatedly mentioned one of nine major music festivals held in the United Kingdom and one religious event (the Hajj in Mecca) during 2012, for a period of 30 days and after each festival. We analyzed these data using three methods, two of which compared words associated with disease symptoms before and after the time of the festival, and one that compared the frequency of these words with those of other users in the United Kingdom in the days following the festivals. Results The data comprised, on average, 7.5 million tweets made by 12,163 users, and 32,143 queries made by 1756 users from each festival. Our methods indicated the statistically significant appearance of a disease symptom in two of the nine festivals. For example, cough was detected at higher than expected levels following the Wakestock festival. Statistically significant agreement (chi-square test, P<.01) between methods and across data sources was found where a statistically significant symptom was detected. Anecdotal evidence suggests that symptoms detected are indeed indicative of a disease that some users attributed to being at the festival. Conclusions Our work shows the feasibility of creating a public health surveillance system for mass gatherings based on Internet data. The use of multiple data sources and analysis methods was found to be advantageous for rejecting false positives. Further studies are required in order to validate our findings with data from public health authorities.

Yom-Tov, Elad; Cox, Ingemar J; McKendry, Rachel A

2014-01-01

84

Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: Since 1978, CDC, EPA, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) to capture data on waterborne disease outbreaks associated with recreational water. WBDOSS is the prima...

85

Viral diseases of olive flounder in Korean hatcheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to elucidate the state of diseases, especially viral diseases, and to prevent viral diseases from occurring in olive\\u000a flounder hatcheries, a range of studies, including epidemiological study, were performed from 1997 to 2003. The location of\\u000a the hatcheries investigated includes several representative sites in the east (Kangnung, Uljin, Pohang, Yangsan, Ulsan, Pusan),\\u000a south (Wando, Changheung, Goheung, Yeosu, Namhae,

M.-J. Oh; S.-J. Jung; S.-I. Kitamura; H.-Y. Kim; S. Y. Kang

2006-01-01

86

Climate Teleconnections and Recent Patterns of Human and Animal Disease Outbreaks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Background: Recent clusters of outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases (Rift Valley fever and chikungunya) in Africa and parts of the Indian Ocean islands illustrate how interannual climate variability influences the changing risk patterns of disease outbrea...

A. Anyamba C. J. Tucker J. L. Small K. J. Linthicum K. M. Collins

2012-01-01

87

Viral Gastroenteritis Agents and Waterborne Disease.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The application of electron microscopic techniques in the study of human gastroenteritis led in the 1970's to the identification of new viral agents that had previously escaped detection by routine cell culture procedures. These agents have been the focus...

F. P. Williams

1987-01-01

88

Nucleic acid probes in diagnosis of viral diseases of man  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary With the recent, rapid advances in recombinant DNA technology, it has become possible to consider the use of nucleic acid probes in diagnosis of human viral diseases. Several examples are discussed which employ techniques of dot blot hybridization, sandwich hybridization andin situ hybridization. Typing of viral strains using restriction endonuclease digestion as an epidemiological tool is considered. Finally, the

J. K. Kulski; Mary Norval

1985-01-01

89

Ménière’s Disease Is a Viral Neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Morphological and clinical evidence supports a viral neuropathy in Ménière’s disease (MD). Quantitative examination of 11 sectioned temporal bones (TBs) from 8 patients with a history of MD revealed a significant loss of vestibular ganglion cells in both the endolymph hydropic (EH) and non-EH ears. Transmission electron microscopy of vestibular ganglion cells excised from a patient with MD revealed viral

Richard R. Gacek

2009-01-01

90

The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture.  

PubMed

Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include:Improved taxonomic classification of viruses. A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses. An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture. An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range. An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks. Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools. An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function. While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate and analyse knowledge from a range of more traditional information sources. The development of methods to systematically record and share such epidemiologically important information thus represents a major challenge for fish health professionals in making the best future use of molecular data in supporting fish health policy and disease control. PMID:21466673

Snow, Michael

2011-01-01

91

Planning for smallpox outbreaks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors affecting disease spread in contemporary populations must be elucidated largely from historical studies undertaken before disease eradication in 1979. We review the use of models in smallpox planning within the broader epidemiological context set by recent outbreaks of both novel and re-emerging pathogens.

Ferguson, Neil M.; Keeling, Matt J.; John Edmunds, W.; Gani, Raymond; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Anderson, Roy M.; Leach, Steve

2003-10-01

92

Rapid diagnosis of Ebola hemorrhagic fever by reverse transcription-PCR in an outbreak setting and assessment of patient viral load as a predictor of outcome.  

PubMed

The largest outbreak on record of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) occurred in Uganda from August 2000 to January 2001. The outbreak was centered in the Gulu district of northern Uganda, with secondary transmission to other districts. After the initial diagnosis of Sudan ebolavirus by the National Institute for Virology in Johannesburg, South Africa, a temporary diagnostic laboratory was established within the Gulu district at St. Mary's Lacor Hospital. The laboratory used antigen capture and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to diagnose Sudan ebolavirus infection in suspect patients. The RT-PCR and antigen-capture diagnostic assays proved very effective for detecting ebolavirus in patient serum, plasma, and whole blood. In samples collected very early in the course of infection, the RT-PCR assay could detect ebolavirus 24 to 48 h prior to detection by antigen capture. More than 1,000 blood samples were collected, with multiple samples obtained from many patients throughout the course of infection. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the viral load in multiple samples from patients with fatal and nonfatal cases, and these data were correlated with the disease outcome. RNA copy levels in patients who died averaged 2 log(10) higher than those in patients who survived. Using clinical material from multiple EHF patients, we sequenced the variable region of the glycoprotein. This Sudan ebolavirus strain was not derived from either the earlier Boniface (1976) or Maleo (1979) strain, but it shares a common ancestor with both. Furthermore, both sequence and epidemiologic data are consistent with the outbreak having originated from a single introduction into the human population. PMID:15047846

Towner, Jonathan S; Rollin, Pierre E; Bausch, Daniel G; Sanchez, Anthony; Crary, Sharon M; Vincent, Martin; Lee, William F; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Lukwiya, Mathew; Kaducu, Felix; Downing, Robert; Nichol, Stuart T

2004-04-01

93

Outbreak of poliomyelitis in Finland in 1984-85 - Re-analysis of viral sequences using the current standard approach.  

PubMed

In 1984, a wild type 3 poliovirus (PV3/FIN84) spread all over Finland causing nine cases of paralytic poliomyelitis and one case of aseptic meningitis. The outbreak was ended in 1985 with an intensive vaccination campaign. By limited sequence comparison with previously isolated PV3 strains, closest relatives of PV3/FIN84 were found among strains circulating in the Mediterranean region. Now we wanted to reanalyse the relationships using approaches currently exploited in poliovirus surveillance. Cell lysates of 22 strains isolated during the outbreak and stored frozen were subjected to RT-PCR amplification in three genomic regions without prior subculture. Sequences of the entire VP1 coding region, 150 nucleotides in the VP1-2A junction, most of the 5' non-coding region, partial sequences of the 3D RNA polymerase coding region and partial 3' non-coding region were compared within the outbreak and with sequences available in data banks. In addition, complete nucleotide sequences were obtained for 2 strains isolated from two different cases of disease during the outbreak. The results confirmed the previously described wide intraepidemic variation of the strains, including amino acid substitutions in antigenic sites, as well as the likely Mediterranean region origin of the strains. Simplot and bootscanning analyses of the complete genomes indicated complicated evolutionary history of the non-capsid coding regions of the genome suggesting several recombinations with different HEV-C viruses in the past. PMID:19883702

Simonen, Marja-Leena; Roivainen, Merja; Iber, Jane; Burns, Cara; Hovi, Tapani

2010-01-01

94

Assessment of viral interference using a chemical receptor blocker against avian influenza and establishment of protection levels in field outbreaks.  

PubMed

Avian influenza (AI) currently poses a serious problem for poultry farming worldwide. Its prevalence in Mexico, despite vaccination, has highlighted the need for new approaches to control AI and reduce the economic losses associated with its occurrence in susceptible birds. The different interactions between AI viruses (AIV) and cellular receptors have been described, along with the affinity of some viruses for certain types of species-specific receptors. This receptor-ligand specificity, combined with an understanding of viral interference processes and their relevance in different viral models, permits the assessment of new strategies for controlling AIV. The present study was designed to investigate the feasibility of using viral interference as a novel approach for AIV control, taking advantage of the high receptor-ligand specificity between AIV and animal cells. The results from field outbreak tests and cell culture analysis along with measurements of specific antibodies against AIV demonstrate that the mortality associated with AI infection can be reduced by using a receptor blocker against AIV. This receptor blocker approach also has the potential to be used on an industrial scale for the efficient control of AIV. PMID:24440209

Fernandez-Siurob, I; Retana, M A; Tellez, G; Arroyo-Navarro, L; Bañuelos-Hernandez, B; Castellanos-Huerta, I

2014-03-01

95

Using network theory to identify the causes of disease outbreaks of unknown origin  

PubMed Central

The identification of undiagnosed disease outbreaks is critical for mobilizing efforts to prevent widespread transmission of novel virulent pathogens. Recent developments in online surveillance systems allow for the rapid communication of the earliest reports of emerging infectious diseases and tracking of their spread. The efficacy of these programs, however, is inhibited by the anecdotal nature of informal reporting and uncertainty of pathogen identity in the early stages of emergence. We developed theory to connect disease outbreaks of known aetiology in a network using an array of properties including symptoms, seasonality and case-fatality ratio. We tested the method with 125 reports of outbreaks of 10 known infectious diseases causing encephalitis in South Asia, and showed that different diseases frequently form distinct clusters within the networks. The approach correctly identified unknown disease outbreaks with an average sensitivity of 76 per cent and specificity of 88 per cent. Outbreaks of some diseases, such as Nipah virus encephalitis, were well identified (sensitivity = 100%, positive predictive values = 80%), whereas others (e.g. Chandipura encephalitis) were more difficult to distinguish. These results suggest that unknown outbreaks in resource-poor settings could be evaluated in real time, potentially leading to more rapid responses and reducing the risk of an outbreak becoming a pandemic.

Bogich, Tiffany L.; Funk, Sebastian; Malcolm, Trent R.; Chhun, Nok; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Chmura, Aleksei A.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Brownstein, John S.; Hutchison, O. Clyde; Doyle-Capitman, Catherine; Deaville, Robert; Morse, Stephen S.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Daszak, Peter

2013-01-01

96

Classifying infectious disease outbreaks to improve timeliness and efficiency of response.  

PubMed

Following the intentional dissemination of B.anthracis through the U.S. Postal Service in 2001, use of the term "naturally occurring" to classify some infectious disease outbreaks has become more evident. However, this term is neither a scientific nor an epidemiologic classification that is helpful in describing either the source or the mode of transmission in outbreaks. In this paper, the authors provide examples of how and when the public health community has recognized potentially flawed or misleading taxonomy in the past and taken steps to improve the taxonomy's accuracy and usefulness. We also offer examples of alternative terms for classifying outbreaks since inaccurate descriptions of outbreaks could potentially lead to a flawed or incomplete set of underlying assumptions about the outbreak's causal factors. This, in turn, could lead to implementing a flawed or incomplete intervention or response strategy which could extend the duration of the outbreak, resulting in avoidable morbidity and mortality. PMID:24612828

Posid, Joseph M; Goodman, Richard A; Khan, Ali S

2014-02-01

97

Live viral vaccines for respiratory and enteric tract diseases.  

PubMed

In its programme for accelerated development of vaccines for viral respiratory and enteric tract diseases the WHO has assigned a very high priority to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza viruses and rotaviruses. There is also some interest in alternative approaches to immunization against influenza viruses because of the failure of inactivated vaccines to provide complete and reasonably durable immunity. Current attempts to develop satisfactorily attenuated viruses for use in prevention of disease caused by the above viral pathogens are described. PMID:2838984

Chanock, R M; Murphy, B R; Collins, P L; Coelingh, K V; Olmsted, R A; Snyder, M H; Spriggs, M K; Prince, G A; Moss, B; Flores, J

1988-04-01

98

Outbreak of Legionnaires' disease among cruise ship passengers exposed to a contaminated whirlpool spa  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground Outbreaks of travel-related Legionnaires' disease present a public-health challenge since rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic tests are not widely used and because detection of clusters of disease among travellers is difficult. We report an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease among cruise ship passengers that occurred in April, 1994, but that went unrecognised until July, 1994.Methods After rapid diagnosis of Legionnaires'

D. B Jernigan; J Hofmann; M. S Cetron; J. P Nuorti; B. S Fields; R. F Benson; R. F Breiman; H. B Lipman; R. J Carter; C. A Genese; S. M Paul; P. H Edelstein; I. C Guerrero

1996-01-01

99

Phylogenetic analysis of strains of Orf virus isolated from two outbreaks of the disease in sheep in Greece  

PubMed Central

Background Although orf is endemic around the world, there are few descriptions of Orf virus strains and comparisons of these strains. We report the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the partial B2L gene of Orf virus from two outbreaks of the disease in Greece. The first was an outbreak of genital form of the disease in a flock imported from France, whilst the second was an outbreak of the disease in the udder skin of ewes and around the mouth of lambs in an indigenous flock. Results Phylogenetic analysis was performed on a part (498 bp) of the B2L gene of 35 Parapoxvirus isolates, including the two Orf virus isolates recovered from each of the two outbreaks in the present study. This analysis revealed that the maximum nucleotide and amino-acid variation amongst Orf virus strains worldwide (n = 33) was 8.1% and 9.6%, respectively. The homology of the nucleotide and amino-acid sequences between the two Greek isolates was 99.0% and 98.8%, respectively. The two Greek isolates clustered only with Orf virus strains. Conclusions We suggest that there can be differences between strains based on their geographical origin. However, differences in the origin of strains or in the clinical presentation of the disease may not be associated with their pathogenicity. More work is required to determine if differing clinical presentations are linked to viral strain differences or if other factors, e.g., flock immunity, method of exposure or genetic susceptibility, are more important to determine the clinical presentation of the infection.

2012-01-01

100

Estimating the Burden of Disease Associated with Outbreaks Reported to the U.S. Waterborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System: Identifying Limitations and Improvements (Final Report)  

EPA Science Inventory

This report demonstrates how data from the Waterborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) can be used to estimate disease burden and presents results using 30 years of data. This systematic analysis does not attempt to provide an estimate of the actual incidence and b...

101

Cholestatic Variants of Viral Disease and Alcohol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hepatitis of any etiology routinely presents with elevated transaminases. However, the presence of cholestasis should not\\u000a necessarily rule out the presence of viral or alcoholic hepatitis. Hepatotropic viruses, such as hepatitis A, B, C, and E,\\u000a can present with an elevated alkaline phosphatase and hyperbilirubinemia. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections\\u000a may also present in this manner. Alcoholic hepatitis, often defined

Sakib Khalid; Jeffrey S. Crippin

102

War diseases revealed by the social media: massive leishmaniasis outbreak in the Syrian Spring  

PubMed Central

Social media introduce pivotal changes to communication between individuals, organizations and communities. A clear example of the power of social media is the spread of the revolutionary outbreaks in the Arabic countries during 2011, where people used Facebook, YouTube and Skype to communicate, organise meetings and protest actions. Here I report how Doctor-Activists use these social media as an alarm system for ‘war diseaseoutbreaks in the Syrian Spring. Social media are used as an alarm system to attract the attention of international organizations, which should assume their responsibilities and play their part in controlling the outbreak of such war diseases.

2013-01-01

103

Comparative molecular and antibody typing during the investigation of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease.  

PubMed

An outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 113 confirmed cases was reported in the town of Mataró, Spain, in August 2002. In this study, we compared three different typing methods and characterized the clinical isolates by comparing them with other clinical isolates with the same ST from our own database to further characterize the outbreak. In the outbreak, a total of 16 clinical (nine patients) and 32 environmental (from four environmental sources) Legionella pneumophila isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE), sequence-based typing (SBT), and monoclonal antibody typing (MAb). We compared the MAb and SBT profiles of the outbreak clinical isolates and other unrelated clinical isolates showing the same ST profile. We obtained seven different PFGE and SBT profiles and six MAb patterns from the outbreak isolates. PFGE and SBT showed 100% concordance during the outbreak. SBT proved to be highly discriminatory, particularly with the addition of the new neuA gene. One PFGE, SBT (ST-37), and Philadelphia profile was observed among the clinical isolates. Using PFGE, this ST37 Philadelphia profile was closely related to other unrelated clinical isolates. These findings suggest that the ST37 Philadelphia profile could be a virulence marker in our area. The combination of the three methodologies was useful to further characterize and obtain additional information on a very explosive outbreak. Despite the minor discrimination of PFGE versus SBT, the two genetic methods are recommended in outbreak investigations. Further studies are currently underway in this area to obtain more definitive conclusions. PMID:23572275

Garcia-Nuñez, Marian; Quero, Sara; Catini, Stella; Pedro-Botet, Maria Lluisa; Mateu, Lourdes; Sopena, Nieves; Sabria, Miguel

2013-10-01

104

Viral Gastroenteritis  

MedlinePLUS

... gastroenteritis in adults. Norovirus is usually responsible for epidemics of viral gastroenteritis. Norovirus outbreaks occur all year ... as the cause of the gastroenteritis. During an epidemic of viral gastroenteritis, health care providers or public ...

105

Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 2. Description of outbreaks by size, severity, and settings.  

PubMed

This article is the second in a series of several by members of the Committee on the Control of Foodborne Illness of the International Association of Food Protection, and it continues the analysis of 816 outbreaks where food workers were implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. In this article, we discuss case morbidity and mortality and the settings where the 816 outbreaks occurred. Some of the outbreaks were very large; 11 involved more than 1,000 persons, 4 with more than 3,000 ill. The larger outbreaks tended to be extended over several days with a continuing source of infections, such as at festivals, resorts, and community events, or the contaminated product had been shipped to a large number of customers, e.g., icing on cakes or exported raspberries. There were five outbreaks with more than 100 persons hospitalized, with rates ranging from 9.9 to 100%. However, overall, the hospitalization rate was low (1.4%), and deaths were rare (0.11% of the 80,682 cases). Many of the deaths were associated with high-risk persons (i.e., those who had underlying diseases, malnutrition, or both, as in a refugee camp, or young children), but a few occurred with apparently healthy adults. An analysis of the settings for the food worker-related events showed that most of the outbreaks came from food service facilities (376 outbreaks [46.1%]), followed by catered events (126 outbreaks [15.4%]), the home (83 outbreaks [10.2%]), schools and day care centers (49 [6.0%]), and health care institutions (43 outbreaks [5.3%]). However, many cases resulted from relatively few outbreaks (< 30 each) associated with community events (9,726), processing plants (8,580), mobile/temporary service (5,367), and camps/ armed forces (5,117). The single most frequently reported setting was restaurants, with 324 outbreaks and 16,938 cases. Improper hygienic practices in homes, on picnics, or at community events accounted for 89 of the 816 outbreaks. There were 18 outbreaks associated with commercial travel in air flights, trains, and cruise ships over several decades, although only the last seems to be a major concern today. Sixteen outbreaks occurred where food, primarily produce, was harvested and shipped from one country to another. Sometimes the presence of an infected worker preparing food was only one of several factors contributing to the outbreak. PMID:17803160

Todd, Ewen C D; Greig, Judy D; Bartleson, Charles A; Michaels, Barry S

2007-08-01

106

The Diagnosis of Viral Respiratory Disease in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Viral respiratory disease in older adults has been increasingly recognized as a significant cause of hospitalizations and death. Unfortunately, the recognition and diagnosis of infection due to many viral respiratory pathogens in older adults can be elusive due to atypical clinical presentations and the insensitivity of current laboratory diagnostic tests in this population. For influenza diagnosis, rapid antigen tests followed by viral culture if negative, can be useful in older adults as long as clinicians are mindful of test limitations. Although specific, rapid antigen tests are insensitive in this population. Erroneous negative results may lead to delays in timely administration of antiviral treatment and institution of appropriate isolation precautions. The increasing availability of new rapid and sensitive molecular diagnostics such as polymerase chain reaction testing, should provide more accurate and timely diagnoses of viral respiratory infections in older adults in the near future.

Talbot, H. Keipp; Falsey, Ann R.

2009-01-01

107

General outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales 1992 to 1994.  

PubMed

Data from the surveillance scheme of general outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales, reported to the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC), were used to review 1280 of the 1594 outbreaks identified between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 1994 for which a minimum data set was captured. The number of outbreaks reported in each regional health authority ranged from 31 in Mersey to 221 in Yorkshire. The commonest pathogens reported were salmonellas in 32% (412) of outbreaks, small round structured virus (SRSV) in 27% (342), Clostridium perfringens in 7% (90), and Shigella sonnei in 4% (46). The main mode of transmission was described as foodborne in 50% (642), over half of which were caused by salmonellas, and person to person in 39% (496), over half of which were caused by SRSV. Most outbreaks transmitted from person to person occurred in hospitals and in residential institutions for elderly people. Outbreaks lasted from one to 217 days (median five days) and their duration varied with the pathogen. The median attack rate was 37%. Illness was reported in 34,158 people, 751 of whom (2%) were admitted to hospital. There were 55 deaths, 28 of which were associated with salmonella and 12 with SRSV. Most of the outbreaks reported and the associated morbidity and mortality could have been prevented by following standard food hygiene practices, implementing infection control policies, and ensuring that food entering kitchens was of the highest microbiological quality possible. PMID:8881602

Djuretic, T; Wall, P G; Ryan, M J; Evans, H S; Adak, G K; Cowden, J M

1996-03-29

108

A review of outbreaks of infectious disease in schools in England and Wales 1979-88.  

PubMed Central

In this review of 66 outbreaks of infectious disease in schools in England and Wales between 1979-88, 27 were reported from independent and 39 from maintained schools. Altogether, over 8000 children and nearly 500 adults were affected. Most of the outbreaks investigated were due to gastrointestinal infections which affected about 5000 children: respiratory infections affected a further 2000 children. Fifty-two children and seven adults were admitted to hospital and one child with measles died. Vaccination policies and use of immunoglobulin for control and prevention of outbreaks in schools have been discussed.

Joseph, C.; Noah, N.; White, J.; Hoskins, T.

1990-01-01

109

Latent Viral Diseases in the Dog.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Respiratory disease is one of the most common causes of illness in the domestic dog. Veterinary clinicians have recognized canine distemper for many years, but minor respiratory complications have not received much attention until recently. Today pet owne...

E. L. Massie

1966-01-01

110

A Simulation Model of Waterborne Gastro-Intestinal Disease Outbreaks: Description and Initial Evaluation  

PubMed Central

We present an agent-based simulation model for generating realistic multivariable outbreak signals. The model defines a synthetic population and simulates the dissemination of pathogenic organisms through a municipal water distribution system, the mobility of individuals between geographic locations, their exposure to pathogens through water consumption, and disease progression in infected individuals. We present the results of an initial evaluation of the model – a simulation study replicating the historical outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Milwaukee in 1993.

Okhmatovskaia, Anya; Verma, Aman D.; Barbeau, Benoit; Carriere, Annie; Pasquet, Romain; Buckeridge, David L.

2010-01-01

111

Sensitivity of three serum antibody tests in a large outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999, an outbreak involving 188 patients with Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred at a flower show in the Netherlands. This large outbreak provided the opportunity to evaluate serum antibody tests to assay anti-Legionella pneumophila, since limited data are available on the sensitivity of these tests. The sensitivities of an indirect serotype 1-6 immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), a rapid micro-agglutination test

Ed P. F. Yzerman; Boer de J. W; Kamilla D. Lettinga; Arnoud J. Schel; Joop Schellekens; Marcel Peeters

2006-01-01

112

Outbreaks of gastrointestinal diseases on cruise ships: Lessons from three decades of progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dramatic improvements in sanitary engineering and, especially, operational procedures aboard cruise ships began in the mid-1970s\\u000a after several large outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Vessel Sanitation\\u000a Program, working with the cruise industry, conducts ship inspections, provides public access to ship sanitation scores, and\\u000a reports outbreak investigations. The significant increase in median ship sanitation

Dale N. Lawrence

2004-01-01

113

Gastrointestinal Disease Outbreak Detection Using Multiple Data Streams from Electronic Medical Records  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background: Passive reporting and laboratory testing delays may limit gastrointestinal (GI) disease outbreak detection. Healthcare systems routinely collect clinical data in electronic medical records (EMRs) that could be used for surveillance. This study's primary objective was to identify data streams from EMRs that may perform well for GI outbreak detection. Methods: Zip code-specific daily episode counts in 2009 were generated for 22 syndromic and laboratory-based data streams from Kaiser Permanente Northern California EMRs, covering 3.3 million members. Data streams included outpatient and inpatient diagnosis codes, antidiarrheal medication dispensings, stool culture orders, and positive microbiology tests for six GI pathogens. Prospective daily surveillance was mimicked using the space-time permutation scan statistic in single and multi-stream analyses, and space-time clusters were identified. Serotype relatedness was assessed for isolates in two Salmonella clusters. Results: Potential outbreaks included a cluster of 18 stool cultures ordered over 5 days in one zip code and a Salmonella cluster in three zip codes over 9 days, in which at least five of six cases had the same rare serotype. In all, 28 potential outbreaks were identified using single stream analyses, with signals in outpatient diagnosis codes most common. Multi-stream analyses identified additional potential outbreaks and in one example, improved the timeliness of detection. Conclusions: GI disease-related data streams can be used to identify potential outbreaks when generated from EMRs with extensive regional coverage. This process can supplement traditional GI outbreak reports to health departments, which frequently consist of outbreaks in well-defined settings (e.g., day care centers and restaurants) with no laboratory-confirmed pathogen. Data streams most promising for surveillance included microbiology test results, stool culture orders, and outpatient diagnoses. In particular, clusters of microbiology tests positive for specific pathogens could be identified in EMRs and used to prioritize further testing at state health departments, potentially improving outbreak detection.

Huang, Jie; Abrams, Allyson M.; Gilliss, Debra; Reed, Mary; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.; Kulldorff, Martin

2012-01-01

114

The Emerging Science of Very Early Detection of Disease Outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A surge of development of new public health surveillance systems designed to provide more timely detection of outbreaks suggests that public health has a new requirement: extreme timeliness of detection. The authors review previous work relevant to measuring timeliness and to defining timeliness requirements. Using signal detection theory and decision theory, the authors identify strategies to improve timeliness of detection

Michael M. Wagner; Fu-Chiang Tsui; Jeremy U. Espino; Virginia M. Dato; Dean F. Sittig; Richard A. Caruana; Laura F. McGinnis; David W. Deerfield; Marek J. Druzdzel; Douglas B. Fridsma

2001-01-01

115

Bayesian Reconstruction of Disease Outbreaks by Combining Epidemiologic and Genomic Data  

PubMed Central

Recent years have seen progress in the development of statistically rigorous frameworks to infer outbreak transmission trees (“who infected whom”) from epidemiological and genetic data. Making use of pathogen genome sequences in such analyses remains a challenge, however, with a variety of heuristic approaches having been explored to date. We introduce a statistical method exploiting both pathogen sequences and collection dates to unravel the dynamics of densely sampled outbreaks. Our approach identifies likely transmission events and infers dates of infections, unobserved cases and separate introductions of the disease. It also proves useful for inferring numbers of secondary infections and identifying heterogeneous infectivity and super-spreaders. After testing our approach using simulations, we illustrate the method with the analysis of the beginning of the 2003 Singaporean outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), providing new insights into the early stage of this epidemic. Our approach is the first tool for disease outbreak reconstruction from genetic data widely available as free software, the R package outbreaker. It is applicable to various densely sampled epidemics, and improves previous approaches by detecting unobserved and imported cases, as well as allowing multiple introductions of the pathogen. Because of its generality, we believe this method will become a tool of choice for the analysis of densely sampled disease outbreaks, and will form a rigorous framework for subsequent methodological developments.

Jombart, Thibaut; Cori, Anne; Didelot, Xavier; Cauchemez, Simon; Fraser, Christophe; Ferguson, Neil

2014-01-01

116

Bayesian reconstruction of disease outbreaks by combining epidemiologic and genomic data.  

PubMed

Recent years have seen progress in the development of statistically rigorous frameworks to infer outbreak transmission trees ("who infected whom") from epidemiological and genetic data. Making use of pathogen genome sequences in such analyses remains a challenge, however, with a variety of heuristic approaches having been explored to date. We introduce a statistical method exploiting both pathogen sequences and collection dates to unravel the dynamics of densely sampled outbreaks. Our approach identifies likely transmission events and infers dates of infections, unobserved cases and separate introductions of the disease. It also proves useful for inferring numbers of secondary infections and identifying heterogeneous infectivity and super-spreaders. After testing our approach using simulations, we illustrate the method with the analysis of the beginning of the 2003 Singaporean outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), providing new insights into the early stage of this epidemic. Our approach is the first tool for disease outbreak reconstruction from genetic data widely available as free software, the R package outbreaker. It is applicable to various densely sampled epidemics, and improves previous approaches by detecting unobserved and imported cases, as well as allowing multiple introductions of the pathogen. Because of its generality, we believe this method will become a tool of choice for the analysis of densely sampled disease outbreaks, and will form a rigorous framework for subsequent methodological developments. PMID:24465202

Jombart, Thibaut; Cori, Anne; Didelot, Xavier; Cauchemez, Simon; Fraser, Christophe; Ferguson, Neil

2014-01-01

117

Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare. PMID:21983132

Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

2012-02-01

118

Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown  

PubMed Central

Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model.

Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

2013-01-01

119

VIRAL DISEASES OF INVERTEBRATES OTHER THAN INSECTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Thirteen examples of virus or viruslike related pathoses in non-insect invertebrates are described. From consideration of these examples, it becomes obvious that detailed descriptions of pathogenesis of virus diseases in non-insect invertebrates has not kept pace with the frequen...

120

Climate Teleconnections and Recent Patterns of Human and Animal Disease Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Background Recent clusters of outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases (Rift Valley fever and chikungunya) in Africa and parts of the Indian Ocean islands illustrate how interannual climate variability influences the changing risk patterns of disease outbreaks. Although Rift Valley fever outbreaks have been known to follow periods of above-normal rainfall, the timing of the outbreak events has largely been unknown. Similarly, there is inadequate knowledge on climate drivers of chikungunya outbreaks. We analyze a variety of climate and satellite-derived vegetation measurements to explain the coupling between patterns of climate variability and disease outbreaks of Rift Valley fever and chikungunya. Methods and Findings We derived a teleconnections map by correlating long-term monthly global precipitation data with the NINO3.4 sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly index. This map identifies regional hot-spots where rainfall variability may have an influence on the ecology of vector borne disease. Among the regions are Eastern and Southern Africa where outbreaks of chikungunya and Rift Valley fever occurred 2004–2009. Chikungunya and Rift Valley fever case locations were mapped to corresponding climate data anomalies to understand associations between specific anomaly patterns in ecological and climate variables and disease outbreak patterns through space and time. From these maps we explored associations among Rift Valley fever disease occurrence locations and cumulative rainfall and vegetation index anomalies. We illustrated the time lag between the driving climate conditions and the timing of the first case of Rift Valley fever. Results showed that reported outbreaks of Rift Valley fever occurred after ?3–4 months of sustained above-normal rainfall and associated green-up in vegetation, conditions ideal for Rift Valley fever mosquito vectors. For chikungunya we explored associations among surface air temperature, precipitation anomalies, and chikungunya outbreak locations. We found that chikungunya outbreaks occurred under conditions of anomalously high temperatures and drought over Eastern Africa. However, in Southeast Asia, chikungunya outbreaks were negatively correlated (p<0.05) with drought conditions, but positively correlated with warmer-than-normal temperatures and rainfall. Conclusions/Significance Extremes in climate conditions forced by the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) lead to severe droughts or floods, ideal ecological conditions for disease vectors to emerge, and may result in epizootics and epidemics of Rift Valley fever and chikungunya. However, the immune status of livestock (Rift Valley fever) and human (chikungunya) populations is a factor that is largely unknown but very likely plays a role in the spatial-temporal patterns of these disease outbreaks. As the frequency and severity of extremes in climate increase, the potential for globalization of vectors and disease is likely to accelerate. Understanding the underlying patterns of global and regional climate variability and their impacts on ecological drivers of vector-borne diseases is critical in long-range planning of appropriate disease and disease-vector response, control, and mitigation strategies.

Anyamba, Assaf; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Small, Jennifer L.; Collins, Kathrine M.; Tucker, Compton J.; Pak, Edwin W.; Britch, Seth C.; Eastman, James Ronald; Pinzon, Jorge E.; Russell, Kevin L.

2012-01-01

121

Detection of Severe Respiratory Disease Epidemic Outbreaks by CUSUM-Based Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index Model  

PubMed Central

A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008–2010) taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts.

Castanon-Gonzalez, Jorge Alberto; Macias, Alejandro E.; Samaniego, Jose Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Villanueva-Martinez, Sebastian

2013-01-01

122

Detection of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks by CUSUM-based overcrowd-severe-respiratory-disease-index model.  

PubMed

A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008-2010) taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts. PMID:24069063

Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Macías, Alejandro E; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Villanueva-Martínez, Sebastián

2013-01-01

123

A Plague on Both Houses: Modeling Viral Infection to Control a Pest Outbreak  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Introduced as a control measure for reducing the rabbit population in Australia, the Myxoma virus produced some unintended effects. A computationally rich Excel workbook based on a SIR model for disease transmission provides an opportunity to explore the use of an infectious disease as a control agent. Modeling the emergence of multiple Myxoma strains offers intriguing insights into the complexities of control. * explore the dynamics of the evolving Myxoma virus on virtual rabbit populations in an Excel workbook

Anton E. Weisstein (Truman State University;Biology)

2006-05-20

124

Climate Teleconnections and Recent Patterns of Human and Animal Disease Outbreaks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent clusters of outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases (Rift Valley fever and chikungunya) in Africa and parts of the Indian Ocean islands illustrate how interannual climate variability influences the changing risk patterns of disease outbreaks. Extremes in rainfall (drought and flood) during the period 2004 - 2009 have privileged different disease vectors. Chikungunya outbreaks occurred during the severe drought from late 2004 to 2006 over coastal East Africa and the western Indian Ocean islands and in the later years India and Southeast Asia. The chikungunya pandemic was caused by a Central/East African genotype that appears to have been precipitated and then enhanced by global-scale and regional climate conditions in these regions. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever occurred following excessive rainfall period from late 2006 to late 2007 in East Africa and Sudan, and then in 2008 - 2009 in Southern Africa. The shift in the outbreak patterns of Rift Valley fever from East Africa to Southern Africa followed a transition of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomena from the warm El Nino phase (2006-2007) to the cold La Nina phase (2007-2009) and associated patterns of variability in the greater Indian Ocean basin that result in the displacement of the centres of above normal rainfall from Eastern to Southern Africa. Understanding the background patterns of climate variability both at global and regional scale and their impacts on ecological drivers of vector borne-diseases is critical in long-range planning of appropriate response and mitigation measures.

Anyamba, Assaf; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Small, Jennifer L.; Collins, Katherine M.; Tucker, Compton J.; Pak, Edwin W.; Britch, Seth C.; Eastman, James Ronald; Pinzon, Jorge E.; Russell, Kevin L.

2011-01-01

125

Carcass disposal: lessons from Great Britain following the foot and mouth disease outbreaks of 2001.  

PubMed

The foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak that occurred in the United Kingdom in 2001 was of an unprecedented scale and severity and presented a massive logistical challenge to Government. Over 6.5 million animals were slaughtered and disposed of, over 4 million as a direct result of disease and a further 2.5 million on welfare grounds. On-farm burial and on-farm burning were the principal routes for disposal at the commencement of the outbreak. On-farm burial was limited by legislation to protect groundwater supplies and pyre burning came increasingly under attack from local communities concerned about health risks from smoke and emissions. Burning also painted a vivid but distressing picture of the war against disease. Increasingly, rendering capacity made an important contribution to disposal. The peak of the outbreak could only be managed by the development of a new disposal route--mass burial in engineered sites and by using licensed landfill where available. During the course of the outbreak, a disposal hierarchy was developed to reflect environmental and public health concerns, namely: rendering and incineration ranked first, licensed landfill next, followed by burning with mass burial or on-farm burial as the least preferred options. However, the campaign against the disease could not have been won without the tactical use of mass burial in addition to all the other available disposal routes. The authors describe the development and deployment of the disposal routes used in the 2001 outbreak. PMID:12523714

Scudamore, J M; Trevelyan, G M; Tas, M V; Varley, E M; Hickman, G A W

2002-12-01

126

Multiple Origins of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype Asia 1 Outbreaks, 2003-2007  

PubMed Central

We investigated the molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype Asia 1, which caused outbreaks of disease in Asia during 2003–2007. Since 2004, the region affected by outbreaks of this serotype has increased from disease-endemic countries in southern Asia (Afghanistan, India, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan) northward to encompass Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, several regions of the People’s Republic of China, Mongolia, Eastern Russia, and North Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of complete virus capsid protein 1 (VP1) gene sequences demonstrated that the FMDV isolates responsible for these outbreaks belonged to 6 groups within the Asia 1 serotype. Some contemporary strains were genetically closely related to isolates collected historically from the region as far back as 25 years ago. Our analyses also indicated that some viruses have spread large distances between countries in Asia within a short time.

Valarcher, Jean-Francois; Zakharov, Valery; Scherbakov, Alexey; Zhang, Zhidong; Shang, You-Jun; Liu, Zai-Xin; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Sanyal, Aniket; Hemadri, Divakar; Tosh, Chakradhar; Rasool, Thaha J.; Pattnaik, Bramhadev; Schumann, Kate R.; Beckham, Tammy R.; Linchongsubongkoch, Wilai; Ferris, Nigel P.; Roeder, Peter L.; Paton, David J.

2009-01-01

127

Using multitype branching processes to quantify statistics of disease outbreaks in zoonotic epidemics.  

PubMed

Branching processes have served as a model for chemical reactions, biological growth processes, and contagion (of disease, information, or fads). Through this connection, these seemingly different physical processes share some common universalities that can be elucidated by analyzing the underlying branching process. In this work we focus on coupled branching processes as a model of infectious diseases spreading from one population to another. An exceedingly important example of such coupled outbreaks are zoonotic infections that spill over from animal populations to humans. We derive several statistical quantities characterizing the first spillover event from animals to humans, including the probability of spillover, the first passage time distribution for human infection, and disease prevalence in the animal population at spillover. Large stochastic fluctuations in those quantities can make inference of the state of the system at the time of spillover difficult. Focusing on outbreaks in the human population, we then characterize the critical threshold for a large outbreak, the distribution of outbreak sizes, and associated scaling laws. These all show a strong dependence on the basic reproduction number in the animal population and indicate the existence of a novel multicritical point with altered scaling behavior. The coupling of animal and human infection dynamics has crucial implications, most importantly allowing for the possibility of large human outbreaks even when human-to-human transmission is subcritical. PMID:24730870

Singh, Sarabjeet; Schneider, David J; Myers, Christopher R

2014-03-01

128

An emerging recombinant human enterovirus 71 responsible for the 2008 outbreak of hand foot and mouth disease in Fuyang city of China.  

PubMed

Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), a common contagious disease that usually affects children, is normally mild but can have life-threatening manifestations. It can be caused by enteroviruses, particularly Coxsackieviruses and human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) with highly variable clinical manifestations. In the spring of 2008, a large, unprecedented HFMD outbreak in Fuyang city of Anhui province in the central part of southeastern China resulted in a high aggregation of fatal cases. In this study, epidemiologic and clinical investigations, laboratory testing, and genetic analyses were performed to identify the causal pathogen of the outbreak. Of the 6,049 cases reported between 1 March and 9 May of 2008, 3023 (50%) were hospitalized, 353 (5.8%) were severe and 22 (0.36%) were fatal. HEV71 was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of the outbreak. Phylogenetic analyses of entire VP1 capsid protein sequence of 45 Fuyang HEV71 isolates showed that they belong to C4a cluster of the C4 subgenotype. In addition, genetic recombinations were found in the 3D region (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, a major component of the viral replication complex of the genome) between the Fuyang HEV71 strain and Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16), resulting in a recombination virus. In conclusion, an emerging recombinant HEV71 was responsible for the HFMD outbreak in Fuyang City of China, 2008. PMID:20459851

Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Yang, Weizhong; Ren, Jun; Tan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yu; Mao, Naiying; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Shuangli; Cui, Aili; Zhang, Yong; Yan, Dongmei; Li, Qun; Dong, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yueping; Wan, Junfeng; Feng, Zijian; Sun, Junling; Wang, Shiwen; Li, Dexin; Xu, Wenbo

2010-01-01

129

The AFHSC-Division of GEIS Operations Predictive Surveillance Program: a multidisciplinary approach for the early detection and response to disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Division of Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Operations (AFHSC-GEIS) initiated a coordinated, multidisciplinary program to link data sets and information derived from eco-climatic remote sensing activities, ecologic niche modeling, arthropod vector, animal disease-host/reservoir, and human disease surveillance for febrile illnesses, into a predictive surveillance program that generates advisories and alerts on emerging infectious disease outbreaks. The program's ultimate goal is pro-active public health practice through pre-event preparedness, prevention and control, and response decision-making and prioritization. This multidisciplinary program is rooted in over 10 years experience in predictive surveillance for Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Eastern Africa. The AFHSC-GEIS Rift Valley fever project is based on the identification and use of disease-emergence critical detection points as reliable signals for increased outbreak risk. The AFHSC-GEIS predictive surveillance program has formalized the Rift Valley fever project into a structured template for extending predictive surveillance capability to other Department of Defense (DoD)-priority vector- and water-borne, and zoonotic diseases and geographic areas. These include leishmaniasis, malaria, and Crimea-Congo and other viral hemorrhagic fevers in Central Asia and Africa, dengue fever in Asia and the Americas, Japanese encephalitis (JE) and chikungunya fever in Asia, and rickettsial and other tick-borne infections in the U.S., Africa and Asia. PMID:21388561

Witt, Clara J; Richards, Allen L; Masuoka, Penny M; Foley, Desmond H; Buczak, Anna L; Musila, Lillian A; Richardson, Jason H; Colacicco-Mayhugh, Michelle G; Rueda, Leopoldo M; Klein, Terry A; Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer; Pavlin, Julie A; Fukuda, Mark M; Gaydos, Joel; Russell, Kevin L; Wilkerson, Richard C; Gibbons, Robert V; Jarman, Richard G; Myint, Khin S; Pendergast, Brian; Lewis, Sheri; Pinzon, Jorge E; Collins, Kathrine; Smith, Matthew; Pak, Edwin; Tucker, Compton; Linthicum, Kenneth; Myers, Todd; Mansour, Moustafa; Earhart, Ken; Kim, Heung Chul; Jiang, Ju; Schnabel, Dave; Clark, Jeffrey W; Sang, Rosemary C; Kioko, Elizabeth; Abuom, David C; Grieco, John P; Richards, Erin E; Tobias, Steven; Kasper, Matthew R; Montgomery, Joel M; Florin, Dave; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Philip, Trudy L

2011-01-01

130

[Model for evaluating the risk of introducing rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease based on experience in Mexico].  

PubMed

Viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) of rabbits was introduced into Mexico from the United States of America in November 1988, following the importation of infected carcasses from China. In February 1989, the National System for Animal Health Emergencies was created, and an eradication programme was implemented at that time. The VHD virus was eradicated in 1992, by means of disease control procedures which included active epidemiological surveillance, publicity campaigns, slaughter, cleaning and disinfection of affected premises, the use of sentinel animals, serological monitoring and repopulation. The eradication programme involved the serological sampling of 39,727 rabbits (revealing an incidence of 1.4%) and the slaughter of 121,275 affected rabbits and rabbits at risk of exposure to infection. The final outbreak of the disease was recorded in April 1991. The country maintained strict epidemiological surveillance through serological testing, certification of premises free from the disease, and control of movement of animals and animal products. Mexico was declared free from the disease on 20 January 1993, becoming the first country to have eradicated VHD. The authors propose a model to evaluate the risk of introducing VHD through the importation of animals and animal products. A guide is provided to evaluate each branch of the relevant scenario tree and the principal criteria which indicate the event at each parameter. PMID:9537746

Heneidi Zeckua, A; Zepeda Sein, C; Mateos Poumián, A; Velázquez, G

1997-04-01

131

Onychomadesis outbreak in Valencia, Spain associated with hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by enteroviruses.  

PubMed

This report evaluates the June 2008 onychomadesis outbreak in Valencia, Spain. The study sample consisted of 221 onychomadesis cases and 77 nonaffected individuals who lived close to those affected. We collected data on dietary variables, hygiene products, and individual pathological histories. Feces and blood specimens were collected from 44 cases and 24 controls to evaluate exposure to infectious agents. Pathological background data revealed a high frequency (61%) of hand, foot, and mouth disease among the onychomadesis cases. Coxsackievirus A10 was the most commonly detected enterovirus in both case and control groups (49%). Other enteroviruses such as coxsackieviruses A5, A6, A16, B1, and B3; echoviruses 3, 4, and 9; and enterovirus 71 were present in low frequencies in the case and control groups (3-9%). The 2008 onychomadesis outbreak in the metropolitan area of Valencia was associated with an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease primarily caused by coxsackievirus A10. PMID:20553401

Davia, Javier López; Bel, Pablo Hernández; Ninet, Violeta Zaragoza; Bracho, María Alma; González-Candelas, Fernando; Salazar, Antonio; Gobernado, Miguel; Bosch, Isabel Febrer

2011-01-01

132

Using blood glucose data as an indicator for epidemic disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

In the future, transfer of vital sensor data from patients to the public health care system is likely to become commonplace. Systems for automatic transfer of sensor data are now at the prototype stage. As electronic health record (EHR) systems adapt such functionality, widespread use may become an actuality in the foreseeable future.To prevent spreading of diseases, an early detection of infection is important. At the time an outbreak is diagnosed, many people may already be infected due to the incubation period. This study suggests an approach for detecting an epidemic outbreak at an early stage by monitoring blood glucose data collected from people with diabetes. Continuous analysis of blood glucose data may have the potential to prevent large outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as different strains of Influenza, Cholera, Plague, Ebola, Anthrax and SARS.When a person gets infected, the blood glucose value increases. If the blood glucose data from a large number of patients with diabetes are collected in a central database, it may be possible to detect an epidemic disease outbreak at an early stage. Advanced data analysis on the data may detect predominant numbers of incidences, indicating a possible outbreak. This gives the health authorities the possibilities to take actions to limit the outbreak and its consequences for all the inhabitants in an affected area.At the Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, a mobile system for automatic transfer of blood glucose values has been constructed. By using wireless communication standards such as Bluetooth and GSM, the system transfers blood glucose data to an electronic health record system. Combined with a system accessing and querying data from EHR systems for patient surveillance we are extending our work into an Epidemic Disease Detection using blood Glucose (EDDG) system. PMID:16160262

Arsand, Eirik; Walseth, Ole Anders; Andersson, Niklas; Fernando, Ruchith; Granberg, Ove; Bellika, Johan G; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

2005-01-01

133

Water-Borne Infectious Disease Outbreaks Associated with Water Scarcity and Rainfall Events  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a An important number of major infectious diseases are related to water. The greatest consequences for the human population\\u000a are the faecal-oral water-borne infectious diseases, which are transmitted by ingestion of the causal agents that are released\\u000a into water through faeces. The occurrence of outbreaks of water-borne infectious diseases could be affected by water scarcity\\u000a at different degrees depending on the

Juan Jofre; Anicet R. Blanch; Francisco Lucena

134

Outbreaks of foodborne infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993.  

PubMed

We have analysed data from the surveillance scheme of general foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales reported to, or otherwise identified by, the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre in 1992 and 1993. Data were available about 458 outbreaks, 197 (43%) in commercial catering premises (restaurants, cafés, hotels, public houses, and canteens), 77 (17%) associated with food prepared in private houses, and 58 (13%) in hospitals and residential institutions. Salmonellas and Clostridium perfringens were responsible for 340 outbreaks (74%) and no pathogen was identified in 55 outbreaks (12%). Organisms associated with the highest mean attack rates were Staphylococcus aureus (66%) and C. perfringens (53%). Eleven thousand people were reported to be il and 362 were admitted to hospital. There were 15 deaths, 13 of which were associated with salmonellosis. A specified food was suspected to be the vehicle of infection in 204 outbreaks (45%). Possible contributory factors were identified in 277 (61%), most commonly inappropriate storage, cross contamination, and inadequate heat treatment. Reducing the incidence of food poisoning will depend on concerted action on farms, in abattoirs and food processing plants, in wholesale and retail outlets, and in kitchens. PMID:7663603

Cowden, J M; Wall, P G; Adak, G; Evans, H; Le Baigue, S; Ross, D

1995-07-21

135

Viral, parasitic and prion diseases of farmed deer and bison.  

PubMed

The most important viral disease of farmed deer and bison is malignant catarrhal fever. The other herpesviruses which have been isolated from these species are briefly described. Other viral agents that are recognised in these animals, including adenovirus, parapox, foot and mouth disease, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, bovine virus diarrhoea, rotavirus and coronavirus, are also discussed. Ectoparasites of importance in this group in various parts of the world include a variety of ticks, as well as lice, keds, Oestridae, mange mites and fire ants. Helminth parasites include liver flukes (Fascioloides and Fasciola), gastrointestinal nematodes of the family Trichostrongylidae, pulmonary lungworms of the genus Dictyocaulus and extra-pulmonary lungworms of the family Protostrongylidae. Chronic wasting disease is principally important in North America, where the disease occurs in wild cervids in a limited area and has been reported in farmed deer in a small number of states in the United States of America and one province in Canada. These diseases are summarised in terms of their classification, epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, treatment and control. PMID:11974612

Haigh, J C; Mackintosh, C; Griffin, F

2002-08-01

136

Diagnosis and treatment of viral diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation  

PubMed Central

Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell hematopoietic transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although most viral infections present with asymptomatic or subclinical manifestations, viruses may result in fatal complications in severe immunocompromised recipients. Reactivation of latent viruses, such as herpesviruses, is frequent during the immunosuppression that occurs with allo-HSCT. Viruses acquired from community, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses, are also important pathogens of post-transplant viral diseases. Currently, molecular diagnostic methods have replaced or supplemented traditional methods, such as viral culture and antigen detection, in diagnosis of viral infections. The utilization of polymerase chain reaction facilitates the early diagnosis. In view of lacking efficacious agents for treatment of viral diseases, prevention of viral infections is extremely valuable. Application of prophylactic strategies including preemptive therapy reduces viral infections and diseases. Adoptive cellular therapy for restoring virus-specific immunity is a promising method in the treatment of viral diseases.

2013-01-01

137

SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS - UNITED STATES, 1999-2000  

EPA Science Inventory

PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for the occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs).This surv...

138

Infectious Disease Outbreaks in Competitive SportsA Review of the Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent outbreaks of infectious diseases in athletes in competitive sports have stimulated considerable interest. The environments in which these athletes compete, practice, receive therapy for injuries, and travel, both domestically and internationally, provide varied opportunities for the transmission of infectious organisms. The purpose of this medical literature review is to identify the agents most commonly reported in the medical literature

Sean D. Turbeville; Linda D. Cowan; Ronald A. Greenfield

2006-01-01

139

SURVEILLANCE AND INVESTIGATION OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS - VOLUME II: SELECTED REPRINTS  

EPA Science Inventory

This work consists of two volumes. olume I is a series of articles based on selected presentations made at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Association of State Drinking Water Administrators Workshop on Methods for Investigation of Water borne Disease Outbreaks ...

140

SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS-UNITED STATES, 1997-1998  

EPA Science Inventory

PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting data relating to occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs). REPORTING PERIOD CO...

141

An outbreak of Legionnaire's disease among visitors to a fair in Belgium in 1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease at Kapellen in Belgium among visitors of the annual fair. The investigation started on 13th November 1999 after a respiratory physician notified the health authorities of the province of Antwerp of presumptive cases of legionellosis. The annual commercial fair at Kapellen, a small town in northern Belgium, was held 10 days previously

K De Schrijver; K Dirven; K Van Bouwel; L Mortelmans; P Van Rossom; T De Beukelaar; C Vael; M Fajo; O Ronveaux; M. F Peeters; A Van der Zee; A Bergmans; M Ieven; H Goossens

2003-01-01

142

Serogroup C meningococcal disease outbreak associated with discotheque attendance during carnival.  

PubMed

In the week following a carnival during 19-24 February 1998, an outbreak of meningococcal disease occurred in a rural German county. The available isolates belonged to phenotype C:2a:P1.2,5 and were clonally related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A case-control study was done to identify risk factors for the outbreak and to define possible vaccination target groups. Five persons aged 13-16 years who fell ill during 24-27 February were included in the study. Four of 5 cases and 10 of 32 controls visited local discotheques (OR = 8.8; P = 0.06). Cases also visited discotheques more frequently than controls (chi2 for trend, P = 0.0002). Multiple discotheques during the carnival may have been predominant locations of transmission in this outbreak. Because this risk factor was limited in time, a mass community vaccination campaign was not initiated. PMID:10722132

Hauri, A M; Ehrhard, I; Frank, U; Ammer, J; Fell, G; Hamouda, O; Petersen, L

2000-02-01

143

VIRAL AND RICKETTSIAL DISEASES--Laboratory Methods in Diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Factors contributing to the development of viral diagnostic services have been: (1) technical advances, and (2) increasing demand for services due to relative and actual increases in the prevalence of these illnesses. This increase has been both relative, as in the case of diphtheria, etc., and actual as in the cases of poliomyelitis. Technical advances have been numerous and frequent. One of the most spectacular has been the development of methods for the culture of living cells for the propagation of viruses. Emphasis must be placed on the fact that the diagnosis of many viral diseases requires close teamwork between local, state, federal, and privately supported agencies. Laboratory procedures remain expensive but are frequently the only way to determine the exact nature of a particular illness. The available or practical procedures are emphasized in this discussion.

Rasmussen, A. F.; Pait, C. F.

1955-01-01

144

Auditing the Management of Vaccine-Preventable Disease Outbreaks: The Need for a Tool  

PubMed Central

Public health activities, especially infectious disease control, depend on effective teamwork. We present the results of a pilot audit questionnaire aimed at assessing the quality of public health services in the management of VPD outbreaks. Audit questionnaire with three main areas indicators (structure, process and results) was developed. Guidelines were set and each indicator was assessed by three auditors. Differences in indicator scores according to median size of outbreaks were determined by ANOVA (significance at p?0.05). Of 154 outbreaks; eighteen indicators had a satisfactory mean score, indicator “updated guidelines” and “timely reporting” had a poor mean score (2.84±106 and 2.44±1.67, respectively). Statistically significant differences were found according to outbreak size, in the indicators “availability of guidelines/protocol updated less than 3 years ago” (p?=?0.03) and “days needed for outbreak control” (p?=?0.04). Improving availability of updated guidelines, enhancing timely reporting and adequate recording of control procedures taken is needed to allow for management assessment and improvement.

Torner, Nuria; Carnicer-Pont, Dolors; Castilla, Jesus; Cayla, Joan; Godoy, Pere; Dominguez, Angela

2011-01-01

145

Application of foodborne disease outbreak data in the development and maintenance of HACCP systems.  

PubMed

Five-hundred and thirty general foodborne outbreaks of food poisoning reported in England and Wales between 1992 and 1996 were reviewed to study their application to the development and maintenance of HACCP systems. Retrospective investigations of foodborne disease outbreaks provided information on aetiological agents, food vehicles and factors that contributed to the outbreaks. Salmonella spp. and foods of animal origin (red meat, poultry and seafood) were most frequently associated with outbreaks during this period. Improper cooking, inadequate storage, cross-contamination and use of raw ingredients in the preparation of food were the most common factors contributing to outbreaks. Classification and cross tabulation of surveillance information relating to aetiological agents, food vehicles and contributory factors facilitates hazard analysis. In forming control measures and their corresponding critical limits, this approach focuses monitoring on those aspects that are critical to the safety of the product. Incorporation of epidemiological data in the documentation of HACCP systems provides assurance that the system is based on the best scientific information available. PMID:11020042

Panisello, P J; Rooney, R; Quantick, P C; Stanwell-Smith, R

2000-09-10

146

Get the news out loudly and quickly: the influence of the media on limiting emerging infectious disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

During outbreaks of infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality, individuals closely follow media reports of the outbreak. Many will attempt to minimize contacts with other individuals in order to protect themselves from infection and possibly death. This process is called social distancing. Social distancing strategies include restricting socializing and travel, and using barrier protections. We use modeling to show that for short-term outbreaks, social distancing can have a large influence on reducing outbreak morbidity and mortality. In particular, public health agencies working together with the media can significantly reduce the severity of an outbreak by providing timely accounts of new infections and deaths. Our models show that the most effective strategy to reduce infections is to provide this information as early as possible, though providing it well into the course of the outbreak can still have a significant effect. However, our models for long-term outbreaks indicate that reporting historic infection data can result in more infections than with no reporting at all. We examine three types of media influence and we illustrate the media influence with a simulated outbreak of a generic emerging infectious disease in a small city. Social distancing can never be complete; however, for a spectrum of outbreaks, we show that leaving isolation (stopping applying social distancing measures) for up to 4 hours each day has modest effect on the overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:23990974

Mummert, Anna; Weiss, Howard

2013-01-01

147

Get the News Out Loudly and Quickly: The Influence of the Media on Limiting Emerging Infectious Disease Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

During outbreaks of infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality, individuals closely follow media reports of the outbreak. Many will attempt to minimize contacts with other individuals in order to protect themselves from infection and possibly death. This process is called social distancing. Social distancing strategies include restricting socializing and travel, and using barrier protections. We use modeling to show that for short-term outbreaks, social distancing can have a large influence on reducing outbreak morbidity and mortality. In particular, public health agencies working together with the media can significantly reduce the severity of an outbreak by providing timely accounts of new infections and deaths. Our models show that the most effective strategy to reduce infections is to provide this information as early as possible, though providing it well into the course of the outbreak can still have a significant effect. However, our models for long-term outbreaks indicate that reporting historic infection data can result in more infections than with no reporting at all. We examine three types of media influence and we illustrate the media influence with a simulated outbreak of a generic emerging infectious disease in a small city. Social distancing can never be complete; however, for a spectrum of outbreaks, we show that leaving isolation (stopping applying social distancing measures) for up to 4 hours each day has modest effect on the overall morbidity and mortality.

Mummert, Anna; Weiss, Howard

2013-01-01

148

Stochastical modeling for Viral Disease: Statistical Mechanics and Network Theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theoretical methods of statistical mechanics are developed and applied to study the immunological response against viral disease, such as dengue. We use this theory to show how the immune response to four different dengue serotypes may be sculpted. It is the ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. Here we propose to utilize a scale free network based stochastic model to investigate the mitigation strategies and analyze the risk.

Zhou, Hao; Deem, Michael

2007-04-01

149

Altered Oral Viral Ecology in Association with Periodontal Disease  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The human oral cavity is home to a large and diverse community of viruses that have yet to be characterized in patients with periodontal disease. We recruited and sampled saliva and oral biofilm from a cohort of humans either periodontally healthy or with mild or significant periodontal disease to discern whether there are differences in viral communities that reflect their oral health status. We found communities of viruses inhabiting saliva and the subgingival and supragingival biofilms of each subject that were composed largely of bacteriophage. While there were homologous viruses common to different subjects and biogeographic sites, for most of the subjects, virome compositions were significantly associated with the oral sites from which they were derived. The largest distinctions between virome compositions were found when comparing the subgingival and supragingival biofilms to those of planktonic saliva. Differences in virome composition were significantly associated with oral health status for both subgingival and supragingival biofilm viruses but not for salivary viruses. Among the differences identified in virome compositions was a significant expansion of myoviruses in subgingival biofilm, suggesting that periodontal disease favors lytic phage. We also characterized the bacterial communities in each subject at each biogeographic site by using the V3 hypervariable segment of the 16S rRNA and did not identify distinctions between oral health and disease similar to those found in viral communities. The significantly altered ecology of viruses of oral biofilm in subjects with periodontal disease compared to that of relatively periodontally healthy ones suggests that viruses may serve as useful indicators of oral health status.

Ly, Melissa; Abeles, Shira R.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Naidu, Mayuri; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha

2014-01-01

150

Learning from history, predicting the future: the UK Dutch elm disease outbreak in relation to contemporary tree disease threats.  

PubMed

Expanding international trade and increased transportation are heavily implicated in the growing threat posed by invasive pathogens to biodiversity and landscapes. With trees and woodland in the UK now facing threats from a number of disease systems, this paper looks to historical experience with the Dutch elm disease (DED) epidemic of the 1970s to see what can be learned about an outbreak and attempts to prevent, manage and control it. The paper draws on an interdisciplinary investigation into the history, biology and policy of the epidemic. It presents a reconstruction based on a spatial modelling exercise underpinned by archival research and interviews with individuals involved in the attempted management of the epidemic at the time. The paper explores what, if anything, might have been done to contain the outbreak and discusses the wider lessons for plant protection. Reading across to present-day biosecurity concerns, the paper looks at the current outbreak of ramorum blight in the UK and presents an analysis of the unfolding epidemiology and policy of this more recent, and potentially very serious, disease outbreak. The paper concludes by reflecting on the continuing contemporary relevance of the DED experience at an important juncture in the evolution of plant protection policy. PMID:21624917

Potter, Clive; Harwood, Tom; Knight, Jon; Tomlinson, Isobel

2011-07-12

151

Clinical Disease Severity of Respiratory Viral Co-Infection versus Single Viral Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Results from cohort studies evaluating the severity of respiratory viral co-infections are conflicting. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical severity of viral co-infections as compared to single viral respiratory infections. Methods We searched electronic databases and other sources for studies published up to January 28, 2013. We included observational studies on inpatients with respiratory illnesses comparing the clinical severity of viral co-infections to single viral infections as detected by molecular assays. The primary outcome reflecting clinical disease severity was length of hospital stay (LOS). A random-effects model was used to conduct the meta-analyses. Results Twenty-one studies involving 4,280 patients were included. The overall quality of evidence applying the GRADE approach ranged from moderate for oxygen requirements to low for all other outcomes. No significant differences in length of hospital stay (LOS) (mean difference (MD) ?0.20 days, 95% CI ?0.94, 0.53, p?=?0.59), or mortality (RR 2.44, 95% CI 0.86, 6.91, p?=?0.09) were documented in subjects with viral co-infections compared to those with a single viral infection. There was no evidence for differences in effects across age subgroups in post hoc analyses with the exception of the higher mortality in preschool children (RR 9.82, 95% CI 3.09, 31.20, p<0.001) with viral co-infection as compared to other age groups (I2 for subgroup analysis 64%, p?=?0.04). Conclusions No differences in clinical disease severity between viral co-infections and single respiratory infections were documented. The suggested increased risk of mortality observed amongst children with viral co-infections requires further investigation.

Asner, Sandra A.; Science, Michelle E.; Tran, Dat; Smieja, Marek; Merglen, Arnaud; Mertz, Dominik

2014-01-01

152

Biological characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a novel genetic group of Newcastle disease virus isolated from outbreaks in commercial poultry and from backyard poultry flocks in Pakistan.  

PubMed

Newcastle disease (ND) is a contagious viral disease of many avian species particularly domestic poultry, and is responsible for devastating outbreaks in the poultry industries around the globe. In spite of its importance and endemicity in Southern Asia, data on the genetic nature of the viruses and epizootiological information of the disease is scarce. In this study, six isolates from an emerging wave of ND outbreaks in the north of Pakistan and two isolates from healthy poultry flocks were biologically and genetically characterized. Based on pathogenicity indices such as intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI), mean death time (MDT) and cleavage motifs in the fusion protein, all these isolates were classified as virulent. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion (F), hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and matrix (M) genes indicated the emergence of a novel genetic group within lineage 5, distinct from isolates previously reported in the region. Several mutations in the neutralizing epitopes and functionally important motifs of the F and HN genes pose a need for re-evaluation of the currently used vaccine and vaccination practices. The characteristics of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as virulent (F protein cleavage site, ICPI and MDT) in apparently healthy backyard poultry (BYP) explain that BYP can play crucial role in the epizootiology and spread of the disease. The present investigation provides essential information on the genetic nature of NDV circulating in Pakistan and its implication on disease diagnosis and control. Furthermore, these investigations emphasize the importance of continuous surveillance of ND in developing countries. PMID:22418457

Munir, Muhammad; Cortey, Martí; Abbas, Muhammad; Qureshi, Zafar Ul Ahsan; Afzal, Farhan; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Khan, Muhammad Tanveer; Ahmed, Safia; Ahmad, Saeed; Baule, Claudia; Ståhl, Karl; Zohari, Siamak; Berg, Mikael

2012-07-01

153

Planning for rapid response to outbreaks of animal diseases transmissible to humans via food.  

PubMed

Planning for rapid response to outbreaks of foodborne zoonoses requires coordination and intersectoral collaboration, making the process inherently complex. Guidance documents have been published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) on the topics of foodborne outbreak investigation, establishing food safety emergency response plans, applying risk analysis principles during food safety emergencies, and developing national food recall systems. These guides should be used as resources by national authorities to develop national plans which should each reference the other in order to maintain consistency at the country level. FAO and WHO, together with the World Organisation for Animal Health (O1E), are the international organisations responsible at the global level for the health of people and animals and for food safety and security. As such, these organisations need to continue to work together to develop an intersectoral mechanism to conduct robust and timely joint risk assessments in the face of foodborne outbreaks and other food safety emergencies. Three international instruments have the potential to aid countries in their preparedness to face outbreaks of foodborne zoonoses and organise subsequent response efforts: the International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN), the newly enhanced Global Early Warning System for Major Animal Diseases, including Zoonoses (GLEWS+), and the FAO Emergency Prevention System for Food Safety (EMPRES Food Safety). PMID:24547650

Savelli, C J; Abela-Ridder, B; Miyagishima, K

2013-08-01

154

VESSEL SANITATION PROGRAM (VSP) - DISEASES SURVEILLANCE AND OUTBREAK INVESTIGATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Under the authority of the Public Health Service Act to take measures necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases in the United States from a foreign country [42 United States Code Section 264(a)], a surveillance system for diarrhea ill...

155

Modelling disease outbreaks in realistic urban social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most mathematical models for the spread of disease use differential equations based on uniform mixing assumptions or ad hoc models for the contact process. Here we explore the use of dynamic bipartite graphs to model the physical contact patterns that result from movements of individuals between specific locations. The graphs are generated by large-scale individual-based urban traffic simulations built on

Stephen Eubank; Hasan Guclu; V. S. Anil Kumar; Madhav V. Marathe; Aravind Srinivasan; Zoltán Toroczkai; Nan Wang

2004-01-01

156

Predictability and epidemic pathways in global outbreaks of infectious diseases: the SARS case study  

PubMed Central

Background The global spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic has clearly shown the importance of considering the long-range transportation networks in the understanding of emerging diseases outbreaks. The introduction of extensive transportation data sets is therefore an important step in order to develop epidemic models endowed with realism. Methods We develop a general stochastic meta-population model that incorporates actual travel and census data among 3 100 urban areas in 220 countries. The model allows probabilistic predictions on the likelihood of country outbreaks and their magnitude. The level of predictability offered by the model can be quantitatively analyzed and related to the appearance of robust epidemic pathways that represent the most probable routes for the spread of the disease. Results In order to assess the predictive power of the model, the case study of the global spread of SARS is considered. The disease parameter values and initial conditions used in the model are evaluated from empirical data for Hong Kong. The outbreak likelihood for specific countries is evaluated along with the emerging epidemic pathways. Simulation results are in agreement with the empirical data of the SARS worldwide epidemic. Conclusion The presented computational approach shows that the integration of long-range mobility and demographic data provides epidemic models with a predictive power that can be consistently tested and theoretically motivated. This computational strategy can be therefore considered as a general tool in the analysis and forecast of the global spreading of emerging diseases and in the definition of containment policies aimed at reducing the effects of potentially catastrophic outbreaks.

Colizza, Vittoria; Barrat, Alain; Barthelemy, Marc; Vespignani, Alessandro

2007-01-01

157

Public health response to an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Edinburgh, United Kingdom, June 2012.  

PubMed

We report an outbreak comprising 50 confirmed cases of Legionnaires' disease in Edinburgh, Scotland, June 2012. In addition, there were 49 suspected cases. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a common outdoor airborne exposure occurred over south-west Edinburgh. This probably emanated from cooling towers in the north-east of the affected area, although not yet clearly linked by scientific evidence. The co-ordinated public health, environmental and clinical response helped prevent ongoing exposure and mitigated associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:22835439

McCormick, D; Thorn, S; Milne, D; Evans, C; Stevenson, J; Llano, M; Donaghy, M

2012-01-01

158

Human repercussions of foot and mouth disease and other similar viral diseases.  

PubMed

Foot and mouth disease is a frequent viral zoonosis in livestock that may occasionally also affect humans. Transmission to man usually occurs as a result of the consumption of unprocessed milk. The clinical manifestations include fever, headache, weakness, muscle pain, and the development of vesicles and ulcers throughout the oral mucosa. Vesicular stomatitis is another zoonosis similar to foot and mouth disease that can likewise affect humans with similar clinical manifestations, in which the presence of aphthae is highly suggestive. In turn, hand, foot and mouth disease and herpangina are two exclusively human diseases caused by different enteroviruses, with a special predilection for children under five years of age, and characterized by the presence of vesicles and ulcerations in the oral cavity. The present study provides a brief review of the salient characteristics of foot and mouth disease and of other similar viral diseases with which the differential diagnosis should be established. PMID:12556720

López-Sánchez, Antonio; Guijarro Guijarro, Begoña; Hernández Vallejo, Gonzalo

2003-01-01

159

Failure of vaccination to prevent outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease.  

PubMed Central

Outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease persist in dairy cattle herds in Saudi Arabia despite revaccination at intervals of 4-6 months. Vaccine trials provide data on antibody responses following vaccination. Using this information we developed a mathematical model of the decay of protective antibodies with which we estimated the fraction of susceptible animals at a given time after vaccination. The model describes the data well, suggesting over 95% take with an antibody half-life of 43 days. Farm records provided data on the time course of five outbreaks. We applied a 'SLIR' epidemiological model to these data, fitting a single parameter representing disease transmission rate. The analysis provides estimates of the basic reproduction number R(0), which may exceed 70 in some cases. We conclude that the critical intervaccination interval which would provide herd immunity against FMDV is unrealistically short, especially for heterologous challenge. We suggest that it may not be possible to prevent foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks on these farms using currently available vaccines.

Woolhouse, M. E.; Haydon, D. T.; Pearson, A.; Kitching, R. P.

1996-01-01

160

Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 3. Factors contributing to outbreaks and description of outbreak categories.  

PubMed

In this article, the third in a series of several reviewing the role of food workers in 816 foodborne outbreaks, factors contributing to outbreaks and descriptions of different categories of worker involvement are discussed. All the outbreaks had worker involvement of some kind, and the majority of food workers were infected. The most frequently reported factor associated with the involvement of the infected worker was bare hand contact with the food followed by failure to properly wash hands, inadequate cleaning of processing or preparation equipment or utensils, cross-contamination of ready-to-eat foods by contaminated raw ingredients, and (for bacterial pathogens) temperature abuse. Many of the workers were asymptomatic shedders or had infected family members and/or used improper hygienic practices. Outbreaks were sorted into categories based on how many workers were implicated, the origin of the infective agent (outbreak setting or off site), the degree of certainty that the worker(s) were the cause or were victims, whether or not the workers denied illness, the ability of the agent to grow in the food, whether only the workers and not the patrons were ill, and whether patrons were more responsible for their illnesses than were the workers. The most frequent scenarios were (i) a single worker causing an outbreak by directly infecting patrons; (ii) an infected worker fecally contaminating foods that were then temperature abused, leading to an outbreak; and (iii) multiple workers linked to an outbreak but with no clear initiating source. Multi-ingredient foods with limited descriptions were most frequently implicated and usually were served in restaurants or hotels, at schools, and at catered events. Identified contaminated ready-to-eat foods included produce, baked goods, beverages, and meat and poultry items. In some situations, it was not clear whether some of the workers were the cause or the victims of the outbreak. However, in other situations there may have been an underestimation of the role of the worker. For instance, workers sometimes denied infection or illness for a variety of reasons, but subsequent investigation provided evidence of infection. PMID:17900100

Todd, Ewen C D; Greig, Judy D; Bartleson, Charles A; Michaels, Barry S

2007-09-01

161

False rumours of disease outbreaks caused by infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) in the whiteleg shrimp in Asia  

PubMed Central

Background Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) disease outbreaks in cultivated whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei are characterized by gross signs of whitened abdominal muscles and by slow mortality reaching up to 70%. In 2006 the first disease outbreaks caused by IMNV in Asia occurred in Indonesia. Since then rumours have periodically circulated about IMNV disease outbreaks in other Asian countries. Our findings indicate that these are false rumours. Findings Our continual testing by nested RT-PCR of shrimp samples suspected of IMNV infection from various Asian countries since 2006 has yielded negative results, except for samples from Indonesia. Our results are supported by the lack of official reports of IMNV outbreaks since January 2007 in the Quarterly Report on Aquatic Animal Diseases (QAAD) from the Network of Aquaculture Centers in Asia Pacific (NACA). In most cases, our shrimp samples for which tissue sections were possible showed signs of muscle cramp syndrome that also commonly causes muscle whitening in stressed whiteleg shrimp. Thus, we suspect that most of the false rumours in Asia about IMNV outside of Indonesia have resulted because of muscle cramp syndrome. Conclusions Results from continual testing of suspected IMNV outbreaks in Asian countries other than Indonesia since 2006 and the lack of official country reports of IMNV outbreaks since January 2007, indicate that rumours of IMNV outbreaks in Asian countries outside of Indonesia are false. We suspect that confusion has arisen because muscle cramp syndrome causes similar signs of whitened tail muscles in whiteleg shrimp.

2011-01-01

162

An outbreak of coxsackievirus A6 hand, foot, and mouth disease associated with onychomadesis in Taiwan, 2010  

PubMed Central

Background In 2010, an outbreak of coxsackievirus A6 (CA6) hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred in Taiwan and some patients presented with onychomadesis and desquamation following HFMD. Therefore, we performed an epidemiological and molecular investigation to elucidate the characteristics of this outbreak. Methods Patients who had HFMD with positive enterovirus isolation results were enrolled. We performed a telephone interview with enrolled patients or their caregivers to collect information concerning symptoms, treatments, the presence of desquamation, and the presence of nail abnormalities. The serotypes of the enterovirus isolates were determined using indirect immunofluorescence assays. The VP1 gene was sequenced and the phylogenetic tree for the current CA6 strains in 2010, 52 previous CA6 strains isolated in Taiwan from 1998 through 2009, along with 8 reference sequences from other countries was constructed using the neighbor-joining command in MEGA software. Results Of the 130 patients with laboratory-confirmed CA6 infection, some patients with CA6 infection also had eruptions around the perioral area (28, 22%), the trunk and/or the neck (39, 30%) and generalized skin eruptions (6, 5%) in addition to the typical presentation of skin eruptions on the hands, feet, and mouths. Sixty-six (51%) CA6 patients experienced desquamation of palms and soles after the infection episode and 48 (37%) CA6 patients developed onychomadesis, which only occurred in 7 (5%) of 145 cases with non-CA6 enterovirus infection (p < 0.001). The sequences of viral protein 1 of CA6 in 2010 differ from those found in Taiwan before 2010, but are similar to those found in patients in Finland in 2008. Conclusions HFMD patients with CA6 infection experienced symptoms targeting a broader spectrum of skin sites and more profound tissue destruction, i.e., desquamation and nail abnormalities.

2011-01-01

163

Recovery and Sequence Analysis of Hepatitis A Virus from Springwater Implicated in an Outbreak of Acute Viral Hepatitis?  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of acute hepatitis A virus in North Carolina was linked to drinking water from a contaminated shallow spring by phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis A virus (HAV) genomic sequences. Detection of HAV and fecal indicators in the water provided useful and timely information to assist with public health prevention and control measures.

Tallon, Lindsay A.; Love, David C.; Moore, Zack S.; Sobsey, Mark D.

2008-01-01

164

Recovery and sequence analysis of hepatitis a virus from springwater implicated in an outbreak of acute viral hepatitis.  

PubMed

An outbreak of acute hepatitis A virus in North Carolina was linked to drinking water from a contaminated shallow spring by phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis A virus (HAV) genomic sequences. Detection of HAV and fecal indicators in the water provided useful and timely information to assist with public health prevention and control measures. PMID:18708522

Tallon, Lindsay A; Love, David C; Moore, Zack S; Sobsey, Mark D

2008-10-01

165

Investigating disease outbreaks under a protocol to the biological and toxin weapons convention.  

PubMed Central

The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, and stockpiling of biological weapons agents or delivery devices for anything other than peaceful purposes. A protocol currently in the final stages of negotiation adds verification measures to the convention. One of these measures will be international investigation of disease outbreaks that suggest a violation of the convention, i.e., outbreaks that may be caused by use of biological weapons or release of harmful agents from a facility conducting prohibited work. Adding verification measures to the current Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention will affect the international public health and epidemiology communities; therefore, active involvement of these communities in planning the implementation details of the protocol will be important.

Wheelis, M.

2000-01-01

166

Legionnaires' disease in a Johannesburg teaching hospital. Investigation and control of an outbreak.  

PubMed

During the period 11 November 1985 - 21 February 1986, 12 cases of Legionnaires' disease were identified at a Johannesburg teaching hospital. Only 2 patients definitely acquired the disease in hospital. Both responded well to treatment. An epidemiological investigation was initiated to determine the source of infection and mode of transmission of the causative agent (Legionella pneumophila), which may be recovered from a wide variety of water sources. Although L. pneumophila was cultured from the hospital hot-water system, there was no association between the location of patients and culture-positive water sites. Cases were clustered in the medical and surgical intensive care units. Being on a ventilator was a significant risk factor for acquiring Legionnaires' disease (relative risk 18,4; 95% confidence interval 2,4 - 142,2). The potential role of ventilators in the transmission of the disease is discussed together with the infection control measures adopted to interrupt the outbreak. To our knowledge this is the first investigation of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in South Africa. PMID:3162619

Strebel, P M; Ramos, J M; Eidelman, I J; Tobiansky, L; Koornhof, H J; Küstner, H G

1988-03-19

167

Algal bloom-associated disease outbreaks among users of freshwater lakes--United States, 2009-2010.  

PubMed

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are excessive accumulations of microscopic photosynthesizing aquatic organisms (phytoplankton) that produce biotoxins or otherwise adversely affect humans, animals, and ecosystems. HABs occur sporadically and often produce a visible algal scum on the water. This report summarizes human health data and water sampling results voluntarily reported to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) via the National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS) and the Harmful Algal Bloom-Related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS)* for the years 2009-2010. For 2009-2010, 11 waterborne disease outbreaks associated with algal blooms were reported; these HABs all occurred in freshwater lakes. The outbreaks occurred in three states and affected at least 61 persons. Health effects included dermatologic, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and neurologic signs and symptoms. These 11 HAB-associated outbreaks represented 46% of the 24 outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water reported for 2009-2010, and 79% of the 14 freshwater HAB-associated outbreaks that have been reported to CDC since 1978. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for HAB-associated illness among patients with a history of exposure to freshwater. PMID:24402467

Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Roberts, Virginia A; Backer, Lorraine; Deconno, Erin; Egan, Jessica S; Hyde, James B; Nicholas, David C; Wiegert, Eric J; Billing, Laurie M; Diorio, Mary; Mohr, Marika C; Hardy, Joan F; Wade, Timothy J; Yoder, Jonathan S; Hlavsa, Michele C

2014-01-10

168

Intrafamilial Transmission of Vaccinia virus during a Bovine Vaccinia Outbreak in Brazil: A New Insight in Viral Transmission Chain.  

PubMed

Bovine vaccinia (BV) is an emerging zoonosis caused by the Vaccinia virus (VACV), genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV), Poxviridae family. In general, human cases are related to direct contact with sick cattle but there is a lack of information about human-to-human transmission of VACV during BV outbreaks. In this study, we epidemiologically and molecularly show a case of VACV transmission between humans in São Francisco de Itabapoana County, Rio de Janeiro state. Our group collected samples from the patients, a 49-year-old patient and his son. Our results showed that patients had developed anti-OPV IgG or IgM antibodies and presented neutralizing antibodies against OPV. The VACV isolates displayed high identity (99.9%) and were grouped in the same phylogenetic tree branch. Our data indicate that human-to-human VACV transmission occurred during a BV outbreak, raising new questions about the risk factors of the VACV transmission chain. PMID:24615135

Pereira Oliveira, Graziele; Tavares Silva Fernandes, André; Lopes de Assis, Felipe; Augusto Alves, Pedro; Moreira Franco Luiz, Ana Paula; Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Costa de Almeida, Cláudia Maria; Pires Ferreira Travassos, Carlos Eurico; de Souza Trindade, Giliane; Santos Abrahão, Jônatas; Geessien Kroon, Erna

2014-06-01

169

A large Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Pamplona, Spain: early detection, rapid control and no case fatality.  

PubMed

An outbreak of Legionnaire's disease was detected in Pamplona, Spain, on 1 June 2006. Patients with pneumonia were tested to detect Legionella pneumophila antigen in urine (Binax Now; Binax Inc., Scarborough, ME, USA), and all 146 confirmed cases were interviewed. The outbreak was related to district 2 (22 012 inhabitants), where 45% of the cases lived and 50% had visited; 5% lived in neighbouring districts. The highest incidence was found in the resident population of district 2 (3/1000 inhabitants), section 2 (14/1000). All 31 cooling towers of district 2 were analysed. L. pneumophila antigen (Binax Now) was detected in four towers, which were closed on 2 June. Only the strain isolated in a tower situated in section 2 of district 2 matched all five clinical isolates, as assessed by mAb and two genotyping methods, AFLP and PFGE. Eight days after closing the towers, new cases ceased appearing. Early detection and rapid coordinated medical and environmental actions permitted immediate control of the outbreak and probably contributed to the null case fatality. PMID:17662166

Castilla, J; Barricarte, A; Aldaz, J; García Cenoz, M; Ferrer, T; Pelaz, C; Pineda, S; Baladrón, B; Martín, I; Goñi, B; Aratajo, P; Chamorro, J; Lameiro, F; Torroba, L; Dorronsoro, I; Martínez-Artola, V; Esparza, M J; Gastaminza, M A; Fraile, P; Aldaz, P

2008-06-01

170

The relationship between infecting dose and severity of disease in reported outbreaks of Salmonella infections.  

PubMed Central

The relationship between size of the infecting dose and severity of the resulting disease has been investigated for salmonella infections by reanalysis of data within epidemics for 32 outbreaks, and comparing data between outbreaks for 68 typhoid epidemics and 49 food-poisoning outbreaks due to salmonellas. Attack rate, incubation period, amount of infected food consumed and type of vehicle are used as proxy measures of infecting dose, while case fatality rates for typhoid and case hospitalization rates for food poisoning salmonellas were used to assess severity. Limitations of the data are discussed. Both unweighted and logit analysis models are used. There is no evidence for a dose-severity relationship for Salmonella typhi, but evidence of a correlation between dose and severity is available from within-epidemic or between-epidemic analysis, or both, for Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. infantis, S. newport, and S. thompson. The presence of such a relationship affects the way in which control interventions should be assessed.

Glynn, J. R.; Bradley, D. J.

1992-01-01

171

Genetic and antigenic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses from recent outbreaks in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Portions of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F) genes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from recent outbreaks in Taiwan were amplified and sequenced. These isolates were velogenic, based on the amino acid sequences of the F protein cleavage site and the mean death time in chicken embryos. All the recent viruses contained the amino acid sequences 112RRQKR116 for the C-terminus of the F2 protein. The serological relatedness of recent isolates was determined using a serum neutralization (SN) test. Relatedness values, determined by a cross-SN test, revealed that all belonged to a single serotype but could be classified into distinct subtypes, suggesting that antigenic variations occurred in these isolates. Phylogenetic trees based on the nucleotide sequences of the HN and F genes revealed that recent Taiwanese isolates had evolved into two groups. Antigenic analysis also suggested that there are at least two groups of NDVs involved in recent outbreaks and that these outbreaks in Taiwan might have been caused by co-circulation of multiple velogenic NDV strains. PMID:17585457

Lin, Maw Y; Liu, Hung J; Ke, Guan M

2003-08-01

172

Reasons for the increase in emerging and re-emerging viral infectious diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past two decades, humans have faced many new viral infectious agents in emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). Many factors contribute to the appearance of EIDs. These factors are complex but can be classified into three different categories: virus factors, human factors, and ecological factors. The factors contributing to the cause of such viral infectious diseases will be

Eric Ka-Wai Hui

2006-01-01

173

Post-transplant recurrent hepatitis B viral liver disease. Viral-burden, steatoviral, and fibroviral hepatitis B.  

PubMed Central

Recurrence of hepatitis is a well-documented complication of hepatitis B liver disease, post-transplantation. It is well established also that the earliest hepatocellular change is the appearance of hepatitis B viral (HBV) markers and that the disease is rapidly progressive. In this article on 17 liver transplants in 16 HBV positive patients with long-term follow-ups (100-1234 days), the distinctive pathologic features of this disease are emphasized: the extreme viral load, the steatosis, and/or fibrosis. An attempt to quantitate the magnitude of the viral burden was made and the result was a staggering figure. In one patient, an estimated 10(18) HBV core particles were present in the liver. One of two patterns of progression were noted. In four patients in addition to the massive nuclear hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) and cytoplasmic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity, superimposed hepatitic changes led to diffuse hepatic fibrosis (fibroviral hepatitis B); and in another six patients, extraordinary hepatocellular viral marker positivity and steatosis were the hallmarks (steatoviral hepatitis B). Steatosis is not usually considered a feature of HBV liver pathology. These results suggest that more than one type of posttransfusion recurrent hepatitis B liver disease exists pathologically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

Phillips, M. J.; Cameron, R.; Flowers, M. A.; Blendis, L. M.; Greig, P. D.; Wanless, I.; Sherman, M.; Superina, R.; Langer, B.; Levy, G. A.

1992-01-01

174

An outbreak of serogroup C (ST-11) meningococcal disease in Tijuana, Mexico  

PubMed Central

Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has been reported to be endemic in children from Tijuana, Mexico and the risk of an outbreak was always a threat. Objectives To describe all clinical, epidemiological and microbiological features of a meningococcal outbreak that occurred in Tijuana, Mexico. Methods All cases with IMD were admitted at different emergency departments within the city and diagnosed by culture and agglutination tests. Further restriction fragment length polymorphism pulse field gel electrophoresis (RFLP–PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. All clinical and epidemiological characteristics and interventions were evaluated, as well as risk factors associated with mortality. Results From 30 January 2013 to 30 March 2013 there were 19 cases of IMD all caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. The median age was 16 years (2–47), with higher frequency among individuals at least 13 years old (73.7%). At admission, meningitis was the main clinical presentation (94.7%), followed by purpura (78.9%), septic shock (42.1%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, 36.8%). Overall mortality was seven (36.8%). Variables associated with higher mortality were, at admission, presence of septic shock, DIC and thrombocytopenia less than 70,000. All 19 cases had no identifiable site or cluster as the source of the outbreak. RFLP-PFGE showed a discriminatory power for only one profile on all N. meningitidis strains analyzed and a clone ST-11 was identified in all strains. Public health interventions were continuous case reporting of all suspected cases of IMD, an increase in active surveillance in all hospitals, training of medical and laboratory personnel, massive and rapid chemoprophylaxis to all close contacts as indicated, and promotion of good health habits. Conclusions An outbreak with high mortality of IMD occurred in Tijuana, Mexico. This event and evidence of endemicity should encourage health authorities to evaluate meningococcal vaccination in the region.

Espinosa-De Los Monteros, Luz Elena; Navarro-Alvarez, Samuel; Aranda-Lozano, Jose Luis; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Alvelais-Arzamendi, Ariadna Annete; Vazquez, Julio Alberto

2014-01-01

175

Minimization of the impact of Aujeszky's disease outbreaks in The Netherlands: a conceptual framework.  

PubMed

In the Netherlands, outbreaks of Aujeszky's Disease (AD) are controlled by vaccination and movement restriction zones (MRZ). Although this strategy avoids the socio-ethical concerns associated with pre-emptive slaughter, it can easily result in animal welfare problems and negative economic consequences. These arise because movement restrictions result in surpluses of live (vaccinated) piglets on farms. The aim is to provide insight into the development of these surpluses and its impact and to describe how measures that allow early transportation of pigs under certain conditions and to specific destinations (channelling) could reduce these problems. For the analysis, a deterministic simulation model was developed, which calculates surpluses of piglets at multiplier farms during AD outbreaks. This is performed on a weekly basis for two areas (with and without piglet surplus), three outbreak durations (minimum, moderate and long) and three strategies for movement restrictions (strict, transports within the MRZ allowed and transports outside the MRZ allowed). The results show that in case of complete movement restrictions, surpluses of piglets varying in age and vaccination status will quickly arise. These surpluses are larger for longer epidemics and can become as large as 180-340 thousand piglets (45-75% of weekly domestic production) for moderate and long epidemics, respectively. Implementation of channelling strategies that allow earlier transportation within the MRZ can reduce surpluses by about 50% to 100-150 thousand piglets maximum. Strategies that also allow transportation outside the MRZ can reduce surpluses even further to below 100 thousand piglets. It was concluded that channelling of live piglets during AD outbreaks results in a drastic reduction of problems with accommodating ready-for-transport piglets. Moreover, it reduces shortages during movement restrictions and peak supply immediately after removing the restrictions. Channelling could therefore be an important instrument to reduce the economic and animal welfare impacts of containment measures. PMID:22690811

Bosman, K J; Mourits, M C M; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

2013-08-01

176

Using Satellite Images of Environmental Changes to Predict Infectious Disease Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Recent events clearly illustrate a continued vulnerability of large populations to infectious diseases, which is related to our changing human-constructed and natural environments. A single person with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in 2007 provided a wake-up call to the United States and global public health infrastructure, as the health professionals and the public realized that today’s ease of airline travel can potentially expose hundreds of persons to an untreatable disease associated with an infectious agent. Ease of travel, population increase, population displacement, pollution, agricultural activity, changing socioeconomic structures, and international conflicts worldwide have each contributed to infectious disease events. Today, however, nothing is larger in scale, has more potential for long-term effects, and is more uncertain than the effects of climate change on infectious disease outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics. We discuss advances in our ability to predict these events and, in particular, the critical role that satellite imaging could play in mounting an effective response.

Colwell, Rita R.; Rose, Joan B.; Morse, Stephen S.; Rogers, David J.; Yates, Terry L.

2009-01-01

177

Disease Profile 2006: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This disease profile is an important new development in advancing integrated disease surveillance as part of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Preventions (NCHHSTP) Program Collaboration and Service Integration (PCSI) strategi...

2006-01-01

178

Viral Load Drives Disease in Humans Experimentally Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus  

PubMed Central

Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of childhood lower respiratory infection, yet viable therapies are lacking. Two major challenges have stalled antiviral development: ethical difficulties in performing pediatric proof-of-concept studies and the prevailing concept that the disease is immune-mediated rather than being driven by viral load. Objectives: The development of a human experimental wild-type RSV infection model to address these challenges. Methods: Healthy volunteers (n = 35), in five cohorts, received increasing quantities (3.0–5.4 log plaque-forming units/person) of wild-type RSV-A intranasally. Measurements and Main Results: Overall, 77% of volunteers consistently shed virus. Infection rate, viral loads, disease severity, and safety were similar between cohorts and were unrelated to quantity of RSV received. Symptoms began near the time of initial viral detection, peaked in severity near when viral load peaked, and subsided as viral loads (measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction) slowly declined. Viral loads correlated significantly with intranasal proinflammatory cytokine concentrations (IL-6 and IL-8). Increased viral load correlated consistently with increases in multiple different disease measurements (symptoms, physical examination, and amount of nasal mucus). Conclusions: Viral load appears to drive disease manifestations in humans with RSV infection. The observed parallel viral and disease kinetics support a potential clinical benefit of RSV antivirals. This reproducible model facilitates the development of future RSV therapeutics.

DeVincenzo, John P.; Wilkinson, Tom; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Cehelsky, Jeff; Meyers, Rachel; Nochur, Saraswathy; Harrison, Lisa; Meeking, Patricia; Mann, Alex; Moane, Elizabeth; Oxford, John; Pareek, Rajat; Moore, Ryves; Walsh, Ed; Studholme, Robert; Dorsett, Preston; Alvarez, Rene; Lambkin-Williams, Robert

2010-01-01

179

The effect of an outbreak of respiratory disease on herd-level milk production of Norwegian dairy farms.  

PubMed

This study was done to evaluate the effect of an outbreak of acute respiratory disease associated with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) on the daily milk yield per cow in Norwegian dairy-cattle farms. Retrospective data from 184 dairy herds located in two neighbouring veterinary districts during the study period (December 1994-May 1995, during which an epidemic of acute respiratory disease associated with BRSV occurred in this area) were analysed. Data on the bulk-milk deliveries and the date of the outbreak were collected at herd level, whereas information on calving dates and parity was collected at cow-level. The effect of the herd outbreaks on the daily milk yield was analysed with a repeated-measurement approach. The average daily milk loss was estimated to be 0.70kg per cow for 7 days after a herd outbreak (compared with the period >1 week prior to an outbreak), adjusted for the herd-level lactation stage, parity and their interaction term. We consider the estimated milk loss associated with a herd outbreak of epidemic respiratory disease to be of minor importance. PMID:11535284

Norström, M; Edge, V L; Jarp, J

2001-10-11

180

Serotype 5 Pneumococci Causing Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Outbreaks in Barcelona, Spain (1997 to 2011)  

PubMed Central

In this study, we analyzed the clinical and molecular epidemiology of invasive serotype 5 (Ser5) pneumococcal isolates in four teaching hospitals in the Barcelona, Spain, area (from 1997 to 2011). Among 5,093 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected, 134 (2.6%) Ser5 isolates were detected. Although the overall incidence of Ser5-related invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was low (0.25 cases/100,000 inhabitants), three incidence peaks were detected: 0.63/100,000 in 1999, 1.15/100,000 in 2005, and 0.37/100,000 in 2009. The rates of Ser5 IPD were higher among young adults (18 to 64 years old) and older adults (>64 years old) in the first two peaks, whereas they were higher among children in 2009. The majority (88.8%) of the patients presented with pneumonia. Comorbid conditions were present in young adults (47.6%) and older adults (78.7%), the most common comorbid conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (20.6% and 38.3%, respectively) and cardiovascular diseases (11.1% and 38.3%, respectively). The mortality rates were higher among older adults (8.5%). All Ser5 pneumococci tested were fully susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance rates were 48.5% for co-trimoxazole, 6.7% for chloramphenicol, and 6% for tetracycline. Two major related sequence types (STs), ST1223 (n = 65) and ST289 (n = 61), were detected. The Colombia5-ST289 clone was responsible for all the cases in the Ser5 outbreak in 1999, whereas the ST1223 clone accounted for 73.8% and 61.5% of the isolates in 2005 and 2009, respectively. Ser5 pneumococci are a frequent cause of IPD outbreaks in the community and involve children and adults with or without comorbidities. The implementation of the new pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13) might prevent such outbreaks.

Rolo, Dora; Fenoll, Asuncion; Fontanals, Dionisia; Larrosa, Nieves; Gimenez, Montserrat; Grau, Immaculada; Pallares, Roman; Linares, Josefina

2013-01-01

181

An outbreak of blackhead disease (Histomonas meleagridis) in farm-reared bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus).  

PubMed

An outbreak of blackhead disease (Histomonas meleagridis) in farm-reared flock of 13,500 bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) resulted in mortality totaling approximately 1500 in 4 wk. Necropsy of 56 dead birds at midoutbreak (from a total that day of 131) revealed that 55 had severe cecal lesions typical of blackhead, and only 3 had visible lesions in the liver. Necropsy of apparently healthy birds failed to detect any signs of infection. Presence of H. meleagridis in affected ceca was proved by culture in vitro and PCR tests. PMID:23397851

McDougald, L R; Abraham, M; Beckstead, R B

2012-12-01

182

An outbreak of respiratory disease complex in sheep in Central Ethiopia.  

PubMed

An investigation was carried out into an outbreak of respiratory disease complex (RDC) in 3641 Menz and Awassi x Menz cross sheep in Central Ethiopia between 1998 and 1999 by clinical, serological, microbiological, post-mortem and histopathological examinations. The monthly incidence of RDC varied from 2.8% to 4.0% and the prevalence was as high as 17%. The case fatality rate was 18%, despite culling of sick sheep. Over 76% of the morbidity occurred in adults, followed by 19% among weaners. Similarly, 62% of the mortality was in adults. However, 27% of the mortality occurred in lambs despite the low morbidity in the group. Significant breed and age differences were seen in the morbidity and mortality rates (p < 0.05). Clinical signs, gross and microscopic lesions and serological and bacteriological examinations showed an interplay of several causes of the RDC, including pestes des petits ruminants (PPR) (72.3%, serologically confirmed), lung worms, maedi-visna, bacterial bronchopneumonia (staphylococcal and streptococcal), enzootic pneumonia and some fungal infections. Cold temperatures, which may be as low as -8.5 degrees C at night, are major predisposing factors along with managemental stresses. Vaccination of animals with a homologous PPR vaccine appeared to decrease dramatically the occurrence of the disease, showing that PPR played an important role in the outbreak. Several of the pathogens do not appear to be individually capable of causing the respiratory disease. Appropriate strategies for the prevention of RDC are suggested. PMID:11556615

Tibbo, M; Woldemeskel, M; Gopilo, A

2001-10-01

183

Recent weather extremes and impacts on agricultural production and vector-borne disease outbreak patterns.  

PubMed

We document significant worldwide weather anomalies that affected agriculture and vector-borne disease outbreaks during the 2010-2012 period. We utilized 2000-2012 vegetation index and land surface temperature data from NASA's satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to map the magnitude and extent of these anomalies for diverse regions including the continental United States, Russia, East Africa, Southern Africa, and Australia. We demonstrate that shifts in temperature and/or precipitation have significant impacts on vegetation patterns with attendant consequences for agriculture and public health. Weather extremes resulted in excessive rainfall and flooding as well as severe drought, which caused ?10 to 80% variation in major agricultural commodity production (including wheat, corn, cotton, sorghum) and created exceptional conditions for extensive mosquito-borne disease outbreaks of dengue, Rift Valley fever, Murray Valley encephalitis, and West Nile virus disease. Analysis of MODIS data provided a standardized method for quantifying the extreme weather anomalies observed during this period. Assessments of land surface conditions from satellite-based systems such as MODIS can be a valuable tool in national, regional, and global weather impact determinations. PMID:24658301

Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer L; Britch, Seth C; Tucker, Compton J; Pak, Edwin W; Reynolds, Curt A; Crutchfield, James; Linthicum, Kenneth J

2014-01-01

184

Maximum linkage space-time permutation scan statistics for disease outbreak detection  

PubMed Central

Background In disease surveillance, the prospective space-time permutation scan statistic is commonly used for the early detection of disease outbreaks. The scanning window that defines potential clusters of diseases is cylindrical in shape, which does not allow incorporating into the cluster shape potential factors that can contribute to the spread of the disease, such as information about roads, landscape, among others. Furthermore, the cylinder scanning window assumes that the spatial extent of the cluster does not change in time. Alternatively, a dynamic space-time cluster may indicate the potential spread of the disease through time. For instance, the cluster may decrease over time indicating that the spread of the disease is vanishing. Methods This paper proposes two irregularly shaped space-time permutation scan statistics. The cluster geometry is dynamically created using a graph structure. The graph can be created to include nearest-neighbor structures, geographical adjacency information or any relevant prior information regarding the contagious behavior of the event under surveillance. Results The new methods are illustrated using influenza cases in three New England states, and compared with the cylindrical version. A simulation study is provided to investigate some properties of the proposed arbitrary cluster detection techniques. Conclusion We have successfully developed two new space-time permutation scan statistics methods with irregular shapes and improved computational performance. The results demonstrate the potential of these methods to quickly detect disease outbreaks with irregular geometries. Future work aims at performing intensive simulation studies to evaluate the proposed methods using different scenarios, number of cases, and graph structures.

2014-01-01

185

Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Viral Proteins in Borna Disease Virus Infection  

PubMed Central

Nuclear import and export of viral RNA and proteins are critical to the replication cycle of viruses that replicate in the nucleus. Borna disease virus (BDV) is a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus that belongs to the order Mononegavirales. BDV has several distinguishing features, one of the most striking being the site of its replication. BDV RNA is transcribed and replicated in the nucleus, while most other negative-strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm. Therefore, the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of BDV macromolecules plays a key role in virus replication. Growing evidence indicates that several BDV proteins, including the nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, protein X and large protein, contribute to the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of BDV ribonucleoprotein (RNP). The directional control of BDV RNP trafficking is likely determined by the ratios of and interactions between the nuclear localization signals and nuclear export signals in the RNP. In this review, we present a comprehensive view of several unique mechanisms that BDV has developed to control its RNP trafficking and discuss the significance of BDV RNP trafficking in the replication cycle of BDV.

Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

2013-01-01

186

Complicated infectious coryza outbreaks in Argentina.  

PubMed

Seventeen complicated outbreaks of infectious coryza in layer, broiler-breeder, and broiler flocks were studied. In the layer flock outbreaks, drops in egg production of up to 35% were seen. In the broiler flocks and several of the layer flocks, losses due to persistent mortality and/or culling varied between 2 and 5%. Signs of infectious coryza in both layers and broiler-breeders were typical; in broilers, however, swollen head-like syndrome was seen. Except in one flock, no viral diseases were clinically or serologically detected. Excluding broiler-breeders, birds from most other flocks were serologically positive for Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and some were also positive for M. synoviae. Haemophilus paragallinarum was isolated from all of the outbreaks, but only as a pure culture in three outbreaks. Isolation of H. paragallinarum from sites such as liver, kidney, and particularly tarsal arthritis and ocular globes appears to be reported for the first time. Serovar A was isolated in eight outbreaks, serovar B in six, serovar C in one, and untypable serovars in two. The severity of these infectious coryza outbreaks may have been increased by concurrent salmonellosis, pasteurellosis, and mycoplasmosis, although under certain conditions H. paragallinarum is able to cause septicemia. Ten of the outbreaks occurred in birds vaccinated against infectious coryza; this may be due to the use of vaccines that do not provide protection against the types of H. paragallinarum that affect poultry in the region. PMID:7832727

Sandoval, V E; Terzolo, H R; Blackall, P J

1994-01-01

187

Molecular Mechanisms Deployed by Virally Encoded G Protein Coupled Receptors in Human Diseases  

PubMed Central

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transduction. Surprisingly, open reading frames for multiple GPCRs were hijacked in the process of co-evolution between herpesviridae family viruses and their human and mammalian hosts. Virally encoded GPCRs (vGPCRs) evolved as parts of viral genomes, which allowed harnessing the power of host GPCR signaling circuitries to ensure viral replicative success. Although vGPCRs are phylogenetically related to human chemokine receptors, they feature a number of unique characteristics. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying vGPCR-mediated viral pathogenesis which include constitutive activity, aberrant coupling to human G-proteins and ?-arrestins, binding and activation by human chemokines, and dimerization with human GPCRs expressed in infected cells. The likely structural basis for these molecular events is described for the two closest viral homologs of human GPCRs. This information can be exploited for developing novel targeted therapeutic strategies against viral diseases.

Montaner, Silvia; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Gutkind, J. Silvio

2014-01-01

188

Foodborne viral illness - status in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Norwalk-like virus contamination of oysters and orange juice, and hepatitis A virus contamination of oysters have been responsible for large outbreaks of foodborne viral disease in Australia. Rotavirus, adenovirus, astrovirus, parvovirus and other enteroviruses also contribute to the incidence of gastroenteritis in this country but the role of foods and waters in transmitting these viruses is unclear. Protocols for the

Graham H Fleet; Paul Heiskanen; Iona Reid; Ken A Buckle

2000-01-01

189

A biosecure composting system for disposal of cattle carcasses and manure following infectious disease outbreak.  

PubMed

During outbreaks of infectious animal diseases, composting may be an effective method of disposing of mortalities and potentially contaminated manure. Duplicate biosecure structures containing 16 cattle (Bos taurus) mortalities (343 kg average weight) were constructed with carcasses placed on a 40-cm straw layer and overlaid with 160 cm of feedlot manure. At a depth of 80 cm (P80), compost heated rapidly, exceeding 55 degrees C after 8 d and maintained temperatures of 55 to 65 degrees C for > 35 d. Temperatures at 160 cm (P160) failed to exceed 55 degrees C, but remained above 40 degrees C for >4 mo. To investigate rates of microbial inactivation, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni, and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were inoculated in manure (E. coli O157:H7 and C. jejuni approximately 10(8) CFU g(-1); NDV, approximately 10(6) EID(50) g(-1)), embedded at P80 and P160 and retrieved at intervals during composting. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and NDV were undetectable after 7 d at both depths. The C. jejuni DNA was detected up to 84 d at P80 and >147 d at P160. To estimate degradation of recalcitrant substrates, bovine brain, hoof, and rib bones were also embedded at P80 and P160 and retrieved at intervals. Residues of soft tissues remained in carcasses after opening at 147 d and bovine tissue decomposition ranked as brain > hoof > bone. More than 90% dry matter (DM) of brain disappeared after 7 d and 80% DM of hoof decomposed after 56 d. High degradation of cattle carcasses, rapid suppression of E. coli O157:H7 and NDV and reduction in viable cell densities of >6 logs for C. jejuni demonstrates that the biosecure composting system can dispose of cattle carcasses and manure in an infectious disease outbreak. PMID:19202014

Xu, Weiping; Reuter, Tim; Inglis, G Douglas; Larney, Francis J; Alexander, Trevor W; Guan, Jiewen; Stanford, Kim; Xu, Yongping; McAllister, Tim A

2009-01-01

190

Biocontained carcass composting for control of infectious disease outbreak in livestock.  

PubMed

Intensive livestock production systems are particularly vulnerable to natural or intentional (bioterrorist) infectious disease outbreaks. Large numbers of animals housed within a confined area enables rapid dissemination of most infectious agents throughout a herd. Rapid containment is key to controlling any infectious disease outbreak, thus depopulation is often undertaken to prevent spread of a pathogen to the larger livestock population. In that circumstance, a large number of livestock carcasses and contaminated manure are generated that require rapid disposal. Composting lends itself as a rapid-response disposal method for infected carcasses as well as manure and soil that may harbor infectious agents. We designed a bio-contained mortality composting procedure and tested its efficacy for bovine tissue degradation and microbial deactivation. We used materials available on-farm or purchasable from local farm supply stores in order that the system can be implemented at the site of a disease outbreak. In this study, temperatures exceeded 55 degrees C for more than one month and infectious agents implanted in beef cattle carcasses and manure were inactivated within 14 days of composting. After 147 days, carcasses were almost completely degraded. The few long bones remaining were further degraded with an additional composting cycle in open windrows and the final mature compost was suitable for land application. Duplicate compost structures (final dimensions 25 m x 5 m x 2.4 m; L x W x H) were constructed using barley straw bales and lined with heavy black silage plastic sheeting. Each was loaded with loose straw, carcasses and manure totaling approximately 95,000 kg. A 40-cm base layer of loose barley straw was placed in each bunker, onto which were placed 16 feedlot cattle mortalities (average weight 343 kg) aligned transversely at a spacing of approximately 0.5 m. For passive aeration, lengths of flexible, perforated plastic drainage tubing (15 cm diameter) were placed between adjacent carcasses, extending vertically along both inside walls, and with the ends passed though the plastic to the exterior. The carcasses were overlaid with moist aerated feedlot manure (approximately 1.6 m deep) to the top of the bunker. Plastic was folded over the top and sealed with tape to establish a containment barrier and eight aeration vents (50 x 50 x 15 cm) were placed on the top of each structure to promote passive aeration. After 147 days, losses of volume and mass of composted materials averaged 39.8% and 23.7%, respectively, in each structure. PMID:20461054

Reuter, Tim; Xu, Weiping; Alexander, Trevor W; Gilroyed, Brandon H; Inglis, G Douglas; Larney, Francis J; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

2010-01-01

191

Effects of Phosgene Exposure on Bacterial, Viral, and Neoplastic Lung Disease Susceptibility in Mice.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of phosgene inhalation exposure on host resistance models representative of bacterial, viral, and neoplastic lung diseases were assessed. A single 4 h exposure to concentrations of phosgene of 0.025 ppm and above significantly enhanced mortali...

M. K. Selgrade D. M. Starnes J. W. Illing M. J. Daniels J. A. Graham

1989-01-01

192

The impact of viral genotype on pathogenesis and disease severity: respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinoviruses.  

PubMed

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRI) and viral death in infants. RSV disease in infants is characterized by epithelial desquamation, neutrophilic bronchiolitis and pneumonia and obstructive pulmonary mucus. Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are by far the most common cause of symptomatic upper respiratory tract infection (URI) in people and are more recently appreciated as a significant cause of LRI. RSV and HRV are also implicated in asthma pathogenesis. Within both RSV and HRV, viral genetic differences play a role in disease severity and/or prevalence in patient populations, and viral genetic differences affect pathogenesis. Here, we review data on how viral genetic differences impact disease using RSV and HRV as examples, including effects on the host immune response. Virus genotype–phenotype relationships can be exploited in the laboratory to gain insight into mechanisms by which respiratory viruses modulate host immune responses and cause disease. PMID:24455766

Moore, Martin L; Stokes, Kate L; Hartert, Tina V

2013-12-01

193

Long-term RNA persistence of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV-LPMV) after an outbreak of a natural infection: The detection of viral mRNA in sentinel pigs suggests viral transmission.  

PubMed

The persistence of porcine rubulavirus (PorPV-LPMV) in five pigs that had survived an outbreak of a natural infection was determined. After the resolution of the outbreak, each animal was housed in an isolation pen together with one sentinel pig. Approximately every 2 months thereafter one group of animals was euthanized and tissue samples taken for virological and serological analysis. Infectious virus was not isolated from any samples; antibodies to PorPV-LPMV were detected in convalescent pigs by virus neutralisation test and blocking ELISA but not in sentinel pigs. PorPV-LPMV mRNA of the nucleoprotein (NP) and phosphoprotein (P) genes was detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) in samples of trigeminal and optic nerves, cervical spinal cord, tonsils, salivary gland, lung and pancreas from convalescent pigs. mRNA was also detected in the midbrain, corpus callosum, or olfactory bulb in four out of five pigs by nRT-PCR, this result was confirmed by the sequencing of a 260bp PCR product of P gene region. The highest average viral copies/?g of total RNA occurred in the olfactory bulb and pancreas tissues of convalescent pigs and midbrain, tonsil and pancreas of sentinel pigs housed with the convalescent pigs. Satellitosis and gliosis of the midbrain, olfactory bulb, corpus callosum, medulla oblongata or choroid plexus were microscopically observed in four convalescent pigs. The control pig remained negative in all tests. The results indicate that PorPV-LPMV mRNA persists and induces a durable humoral immune response in pigs that have recovered from a natural infection. After a possible reactivation of the virus, it was transmitted to sentinel pigs in contact with the convalescent pigs. PMID:24768705

Cuevas-Romero, S; Hernández-Baumgarten, E; Kennedy, S; Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Berg, M; Moreno-López, J

2014-08-01

194

A model for autumn outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease associated with cooling towers, linked to system operation and size.  

PubMed

Cooling towers have been demonstrated to be amplifiers and disseminators of legionella, the causative organism of Legionnaires' disease. Community outbreaks associated with cooling towers have been reported with several common factors. Small towers (< 300 kW) have predominantly been implicated in outbreaks. Cooling tower-associated outbreaks are most frequent in autumn, and frequently implicated systems have been operated after a period of shutdown. This paper reports field study data relating system operation to legionella colonization of systems. Operating systems have been shown to be more frequently colonized by legionella than shutdown systems. In some cases operation of systems after periods of shutdown raised legionella concentrations from below detection limits to between 50 and 950 c.f.u./ml within 10 min. These data and previously reported data relating to biofilm and sediment colonization of the systems, and community outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, have been used to develop a model explaining the seasonal nature of outbreaks associated with irregularly operated, small cooling tower systems. PMID:8405155

Bentham, R H; Broadbent, C R

1993-10-01

195

Analysis of outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in Ireland: 1998 and 1999.  

PubMed

Surveillance of general outbreaks of infectious gastroenteritis was introduced in 1998 by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), in co-operation with the eight health boards. A total of 67 general outbreaks of gastroenteritis in Ireland were reported to the FSAI in 1998 and 1999. Over 1900 people were ill as a result of these outbreaks. Four percent required hospitalisation and there were two deaths. The duration of the outbreaks varied between one day and 38 days. Salmonellae (44%) and small round structured viruses (SRSV) (12%) were the most commonly reported pathogens. In 25% of the outbreaks the aetiology was unknown. The commonest settings were restaurants, hotels and take-aways, which accounted for 45% (30/67) of all outbreaks. Sixteen percent of all outbreaks occurred in hospitals and residential institutions. Over half of the outbreaks were reported to be foodborne, 63% of which were due to various serotypes of Salmonella enterica. Eggs were implicated as the vehicle of infection in 13% of all outbreaks. An infected food handler was identified in almost one third of outbreaks, although it could not be established if this had contributed directly to the outbreak. PMID:11474854

Bonner, C; Foley, B; Wall, P; Fitzgerald, M

2001-05-01

196

Epidemiologic characteristics of an outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease and the public health response.  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease occurred in six counties in the State of Washington from January 1989 through mid-1991. This report describes epidemiologic data collected from hospitals and health departments, the results of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis of isolates, and the vaccination of high-risk populations in one county. A total of 45 confirmed or probable cases (10 per 100,000 population) occurred. Infants younger than age 1, Hispanics and American Indians, and low-income populations had high attack rates. Nine (20 percent) patients died. The predominant enzyme type, ET-22, had not been detected previously in Washington. More than 22,000 persons were vaccinated in one of the counties. Major challenges to health care personnel included deciding when and where to employ vaccination, obtaining sufficient vaccine, and responding to public anxiety.

Houck, P; Patnode, M; Atwood, R; Powell, K

1995-01-01

197

Restaurant outbreak of Legionnaires' disease associated with a decorative fountain: an environmental and case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: From June to November 2005, 18 cases of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease (LD) were reported in Rapid City South Dakota. We conducted epidemiologic and environmental investigations to identify the source of the outbreak. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study that included the first 13 cases and 52 controls randomly selected from emergency department records and matched on underlying illness. We

Rosalyn E O'Loughlin; Lon Kightlinger; Matthew C Werpy; Ellen Brown; Valerie Stevens; Clark Hepper; Tim Keane; Robert F Benson; Barry S Fields; Matthew R Moore

2007-01-01

198

Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008*  

EPA Science Inventory

Problem/Condition: Since 1978, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) for collecting and reporting data on occurrences and causes...

199

The impact of movements and animal density on continental scale cattle disease outbreaks in the United States.  

PubMed

Globalization has increased the potential for the introduction and spread of novel pathogens over large spatial scales necessitating continental-scale disease models to guide emergency preparedness. Livestock disease spread models, such as those for the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the United Kingdom, represent some of the best case studies of large-scale disease spread. However, generalization of these models to explore disease outcomes in other systems, such as the United States's cattle industry, has been hampered by differences in system size and complexity and the absence of suitable livestock movement data. Here, a unique database of US cattle shipments allows estimation of synthetic movement networks that inform a near-continental scale disease model of a potential FMD-like (i.e., rapidly spreading) epidemic in US cattle. The largest epidemics may affect over one-third of the US and 120,000 cattle premises, but cattle movement restrictions from infected counties, as opposed to national movement moratoriums, are found to effectively contain outbreaks. Slow detection or weak compliance may necessitate more severe state-level bans for similar control. Such results highlight the role of large-scale disease models in emergency preparedness, particularly for systems lacking comprehensive movement and outbreak data, and the need to rapidly implement multi-scale contingency plans during a potential US outbreak. PMID:24670977

Buhnerkempe, Michael G; Tildesley, Michael J; Lindström, Tom; Grear, Daniel A; Portacci, Katie; Miller, Ryan S; Lombard, Jason E; Werkman, Marleen; Keeling, Matt J; Wennergren, Uno; Webb, Colleen T

2014-01-01

200

The Impact of Movements and Animal Density on Continental Scale Cattle Disease Outbreaks in the United States  

PubMed Central

Globalization has increased the potential for the introduction and spread of novel pathogens over large spatial scales necessitating continental-scale disease models to guide emergency preparedness. Livestock disease spread models, such as those for the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the United Kingdom, represent some of the best case studies of large-scale disease spread. However, generalization of these models to explore disease outcomes in other systems, such as the United States’s cattle industry, has been hampered by differences in system size and complexity and the absence of suitable livestock movement data. Here, a unique database of US cattle shipments allows estimation of synthetic movement networks that inform a near-continental scale disease model of a potential FMD-like (i.e., rapidly spreading) epidemic in US cattle. The largest epidemics may affect over one-third of the US and 120,000 cattle premises, but cattle movement restrictions from infected counties, as opposed to national movement moratoriums, are found to effectively contain outbreaks. Slow detection or weak compliance may necessitate more severe state-level bans for similar control. Such results highlight the role of large-scale disease models in emergency preparedness, particularly for systems lacking comprehensive movement and outbreak data, and the need to rapidly implement multi-scale contingency plans during a potential US outbreak.

Buhnerkempe, Michael G.; Tildesley, Michael J.; Lindstrom, Tom; Grear, Daniel A.; Portacci, Katie; Miller, Ryan S.; Lombard, Jason E.; Werkman, Marleen; Keeling, Matt J.; Wennergren, Uno; Webb, Colleen T.

2014-01-01

201

Short communication: Strengthening sub-national communicable disease surveillance in a remote Pacific Island country by adapting a successful African outbreak surveillance model.  

PubMed

Successful communicable disease surveillance depends on effective bidirectional information flow between clinicians at the periphery and communicable disease control units at regional, national and global levels. Resource-poor countries often struggle to establish and maintain the crucial link with the periphery. A simple syndrome-based outbreak surveillance system initially developed and evaluated in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa was adapted for the Pacific island nation of Tuvalu. Eight syndromes were identified for surveillance: acute flaccid paralysis (poliomyelitis), profuse watery diarrhoea (cholera), diarrhoea outbreak, dysentery outbreak, febrile disease with abdominal symptoms and headache (typhoid), febrile disease with generalized non-blistering rash (measles), febrile disease with intense headache and/or neck stiffness with or without haemorrhagic rash (meningococcal meningitis), and outbreaks of other febrile diseases of unknown origin. A user-oriented manual, the Tuvalu Outbreak Manual (http://www.wepi.org/books/tom/), was developed to support introduction of the surveillance system. Nurses working in seven outer island clinics and the hospital outpatient department on the main island rapidly report suspected outbreaks and submit weekly zero-reports to the central communicable disease control unit. An evaluation of the system after 12 months indicated that the Outbreak Manual was regarded as very useful by clinic nurses, and there was early evidence of improved surveillance and response to the disease syndromes under surveillance. PMID:16398751

Nelesone, Tekaai; Durrheim, David N; Speare, Richard; Kiedrzynski, Tom; Melrose, Wayne D

2006-01-01

202

Potential vectors of West Nile virus following an equine disease outbreak in Italy.  

PubMed

In the late summer of 1998, an outbreak of equine encephalomyelitis due to West Nile virus (WNV) occurred in the Tuscany region of central Italy. The disease was detected in 14 race horses from nine localities in four Provinces: Firenze, Lucca, Pisa and Pistoia. The outbreak area included Fucecchio wetlands (1800 ha), the largest inland marsh in Italy, and the adjacent hilly Cerbaie woodlands with farms breeding horses. To detect potential vectors of WNV, entomological surveys of Fucecchio and Cerbaie were undertaken during 1999-2002 by collecting mosquito larvae from breeding sites and adult mosquitoes by several methods of sampling. Among 6023 mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) collected, 11 species were identified: Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Ae. vexans (Meigen), Anopheles atroparvus Van Thiel, An. maculipennis Meigen s.s., An. plumbeus Stephens, Culex impudicus Ficalbi, Cx. pipiens L., Culiseta longiareolata Macquart), Ochlerotatus caspius (Pallas), Oc. detritus (Haliday) and Oc. geniculatus (Olivier). In Fucecchio marshes, Cx. impudicus predominated with seasonal peak densities in spring and autumn: its greatest abundance during early spring coincides with arrival of migratory birds from Africa. In Cerbaie hills, Cx. pipiens predominated with peak population density in late summer. No viruses were isolated from 665 mosquitoes processed. These findings, plus other data on Italian mosquito bionomics, suggest a possible mode of WNV transmission involving the most abundant Culex in the Fucecchio-Cerbaie areas. Culex impudicus, being partly ornithophilic, might transmit WNV from migratory to non-migratory birds during springtime; Cx. pipiens, having a broader host range, would be more likely to transmit WNV from birds to horses and, perhaps, to humans by late summer. PMID:15009441

Romi, R; Pontuale, G; CIufolini, M G; Fiorentini, G; Marchi, A; Nicoletti, L; Cocchi, M; Tamburro, A

2004-03-01

203

Viral connection between drug rashes and autoimmune diseases: How autoimmune responses are generated after resolution of drug rashes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viral infections are most likely triggering factors of autoimmune diseases, although a single vial infection is not sufficient to cause clinically evident autoimmune diseases. Any disease that profoundly alters the immune system may cause perturbed viral infections, thereby rendering otherwise refractory patients susceptible to autoimmune diseases. In this regard, drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), a drug rash characterized by sequential reactivations

Noriko Aota; Tetsuo Shiohara

2009-01-01

204

The Evolution and Expansion of Regional Disease Surveillance Networks and Their Role in Mitigating the Threat of Infectious Disease Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

We examine the emergence, development, and value of regional infectious disease surveillance networks that neighboring countries worldwide are organizing to control cross-border outbreaks at their source. The regional perspective represented in the paper is intended to serve as an instructive framework for others who decide to launch such networks as new technologies and emerging threats bring countries even closer together. Distinct from more formal networks in geographic regions designated by the World Health Organization (WHO), these networks usually involve groupings of fewer countries chosen by national governments to optimize surveillance efforts. Sometimes referred to as sub-regional, these “self-organizing” networks complement national and local government recognition with informal relationships across borders among epidemiologists, scientists, ministry officials, health workers, border officers, and community members. Their development over time reflects both incremental learning and growing connections among network actors; and changing disease patterns, with infectious disease threats shifting over time from local to regional to global levels. Not only has this regional disease surveillance network model expanded across the globe, it has also expanded from a mostly practitioner-based network model to one that covers training, capacity-building, and multidisciplinary research. Today, several of these networks are linked through Connecting Organizations for Regional Disease Surveillance (CORDS). We explore how regional disease surveillance networks add value to global disease detection and response by complementing other systems and efforts, by harnessing their power to achieve other goals such as health and human security, and by helping countries adapt to complex challenges via multi-sectoral solutions. We note that governmental commitment and trust among participating individuals are critical to the success of regional infectious disease surveillance networks.

Bond, Katherine C.; Macfarlane, Sarah B.; Burke, Charlanne; Ungchusak, Kumnuan; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

2013-01-01

205

Viral vectors for vaccine applications  

PubMed Central

Traditional approach of inactivated or live-attenuated vaccine immunization has resulted in impressive success in the reduction and control of infectious disease outbreaks. However, many pathogens remain less amenable to deal with the traditional vaccine strategies, and more appropriate vaccine strategy is in need. Recent discoveries that led to increased understanding of viral molecular biology and genetics has rendered the used of viruses as vaccine platforms and as potential anti-cancer agents. Due to their ability to effectively induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, viral vectors are deemed as an attractive alternative to the traditional platforms to deliver vaccine antigens as well as to specifically target and kill tumor cells. With potential targets ranging from cancers to a vast number of infectious diseases, the benefits resulting from successful application of viral vectors to prevent and treat human diseases can be immense.

Choi, Youngjoo

2013-01-01

206

Viral vectors for vaccine applications.  

PubMed

Traditional approach of inactivated or live-attenuated vaccine immunization has resulted in impressive success in the reduction and control of infectious disease outbreaks. However, many pathogens remain less amenable to deal with the traditional vaccine strategies, and more appropriate vaccine strategy is in need. Recent discoveries that led to increased understanding of viral molecular biology and genetics has rendered the used of viruses as vaccine platforms and as potential anti-cancer agents. Due to their ability to effectively induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, viral vectors are deemed as an attractive alternative to the traditional platforms to deliver vaccine antigens as well as to specifically target and kill tumor cells. With potential targets ranging from cancers to a vast number of infectious diseases, the benefits resulting from successful application of viral vectors to prevent and treat human diseases can be immense. PMID:23858400

Choi, Youngjoo; Chang, Jun

2013-07-01

207

Implementation of a data fusion algorithm for RODS, a real-time outbreak and disease surveillance system.  

SciTech Connect

Due to the nature of many infectious agents, such as anthrax, symptoms may either take several days to manifest or resemble those of less serious illnesses leading to misdiagnosis. Thus, bioterrorism attacks that include the release of such agents are particularly dangerous and potentially deadly. For this reason, a system is needed for the quick and correct identification of disease outbreaks. The Real-time Outbreak Disease Surveillance System (RODS), initially developed by Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, was created to meet this need. The RODS software implements different classifiers for pertinent health surveillance data in order to determine whether or not an outbreak has occurred. In an effort to improve the capability of RODS at detecting outbreaks, we incorporate a data fusion method. Data fusion is used to improve the results of a single classification by combining the output of multiple classifiers. This paper documents the first stages of the development of a data fusion system that can combine the output of the classifiers included in RODS.

Brown, Douglas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-10-01

208

Observations on the carrier state and related antibody titres during an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in a partially immune population of cattle in Botswana is described. The results show that when cattle immunized by vaccination were presented with natural field challenge of FMD, many animals with immunity sufficient to protect them against clinical disease were, however, susceptible to pharyngeal infection and subsequently became virus carriers. The proportion of animals becoming carriers appeared to vary with the degree of severity of the challenge. Vaccination before exposure to virus appeared to have little effect on the duration of the carrier state. No evidence was obtained of the spread of carrier virus to immune herds following the outbreak. Antibody titres during the outbreak were higher in the clinically infected animals than in the carrier animals and the uninfected animals. Evidence suggested that natural challenge boosted the titres of immune animals. After the outbreak, however, it was not possible to distinguish by their antibody titres between the carrier animal and the virus-negative animal. Antigenic studies on the strains of virus isolated are described.

Hedger, R. S.

1970-01-01

209

Carriage Rate and Effects of Vaccination after Outbreaks of Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease, Brazil, 2010  

PubMed Central

During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies.

Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O.; Goncalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, Jose

2014-01-01

210

Carriage rate and effects of vaccination after outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal disease, Brazil, 2010.  

PubMed

During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies. PMID:24751156

Sáfadi, Marco Aurelio Palazzi; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

2014-05-01

211

[Mass culling in the context of animal disease outbreaks--veterinarians caught between ethical issues and control policies].  

PubMed

In recent years controversial discussions arose during major animal disease outbreaks in the EU about the ethical soundness of mass culling. In contrast to numerous publications about ethical issues and laboratory animals/animal experiments, literature concerning ethical deliberations in the case of mass culling as a means of outbreak control remain scarce. Veterinarians in charge of decision about and implementation of mass culling actions find themselves in an area of conflict in between the officially required animal disease control policy and a public that is increasingly critical. Those veterinarians are faced with the challenge to defend the relevant decisions against all stakeholders and also themselves. In this context an interdisciplinary workshop was initiated in Switzerland in October 2007 with ethicians and (official) veterinarians from Germany, Switzerland and Austria. With the aim to identify ethical components of animal disease control for official veterinarians, talks and moderated group discussions took place. This article summarizes selected discussion points and conclusions. PMID:19425316

Hartnack, Sonja; Doherr, Marcus G; Grimm, Herwig; Kunzmann, Peter

2009-04-01

212

Viral and bacterial diseases of marine fish and shellfish in Japanese hatcheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Japan, seed production techniques have been exploited for about 80 species of marine fish and shellfish. However, mass mortalities due to infectious and non-infectious diseases have often occurred in larvae and juveniles reared in marine hatcheries. Among these problems the viral and bacterial diseases with their control measures are reviewed in this paper. Since around the middle of the

Kiyokuni Muroga

2001-01-01

213

Conscientiousness Predicts Disease Progression (CD4 Number and Viral Load) in People Living With HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Psychosocial factors (e.g., depression, avoidant coping, life stress) have been related to disease progression in HIV. This study examined the relationship between the Big Five Conscientiousness factor and HIV disease progression (CD4 cell and viral load) over 1 year in 119 seropositive participants. The study also examined whether Conscientiousness effects were mediated by adherence, perceived stress, depression, or coping

Conall OCleirigh; Gail Ironson; Alexander Weiss

2007-01-01

214

WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS IN INDIVIDUAL WATER SYSTEMS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1920-80  

EPA Science Inventory

An analysis of the etiologies and causes of 302 waterborne outbreaks occurring in individual water systems during 1920-80 showed Streptococcus typhi to be the most commonly identified pathogen and use of contaminated, untreated well water the major cause of these outbreaks. These...

215

Bluetongue, Schmallenberg - what is next? Culicoides-borne viral diseases in the 21st Century.  

PubMed

In the past decade, two pathogens transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus, have caused serious economic losses to the European livestock industry, most notably affecting sheep and cattle. These outbreaks of arboviral disease have highlighted large knowledge gaps on the biology and ecology of indigenous Culicoides species. With these research gaps in mind, and as a means of assessing what potential disease outbreaks to expect in the future, an international workshop was held in May 2013 at Wageningen University, The Netherlands. It brought together research groups from Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom and The Netherlands, with diverse backgrounds in vector ecology, epidemiology, entomology, virology, animal health, modelling, and genetics. Here, we report on the key findings of this workshop. PMID:24685104

Koenraadt, Constantianus Jm; Balenghien, Thomas; Carpenter, Simon; Ducheyne, Els; Elbers, Armin Rw; Fife, Mark; Garros, Claire; Ibáñez-Justicia, Adolfo; Kampen, Helge; Kormelink, Richard Jm; Losson, Bertrand; van der Poel, Wim Hm; De Regge, Nick; van Rijn, Piet A; Sanders, Christopher; Schaffner, Francis; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M; Takken, Willem; Werner, Doreen; Seelig, Frederik

2014-01-01

216

Bluetongue, Schmallenberg - what is next? Culicoides-borne viral diseases in the 21st Century  

PubMed Central

In the past decade, two pathogens transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus, have caused serious economic losses to the European livestock industry, most notably affecting sheep and cattle. These outbreaks of arboviral disease have highlighted large knowledge gaps on the biology and ecology of indigenous Culicoides species. With these research gaps in mind, and as a means of assessing what potential disease outbreaks to expect in the future, an international workshop was held in May 2013 at Wageningen University, The Netherlands. It brought together research groups from Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom and The Netherlands, with diverse backgrounds in vector ecology, epidemiology, entomology, virology, animal health, modelling, and genetics. Here, we report on the key findings of this workshop.

2014-01-01

217

Viral vectors for neurotrophic factor delivery: A gene therapy approach for neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS  

PubMed Central

The clinical manifestation of most diseases of the central nervous system results from neuronal dysfunction or loss. Diseases such a stroke, epilepsy and neurodegeneration (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease) share common cellular and molecular mechanisms (e.g. oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction) that contribute to the loss of neuronal function. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are secreted proteins that regulate multiple aspects of neuronal development including neuronal maintenance, survival, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity. These properties of NTFs make them likely candidates for preventing neurodegeneration and promoting neuroregeneration. One approach to delivering NTFs to diseased neurons is through viral vector-mediated gene delivery. Viral vectors are now routinely used as tools for studying gene function as well as developing gene-based therapies for a variety of diseases. Currently, many clinical trials using viral vectors in the nervous system are underway or completed, and seven of these trials involve NTFs for neurodegeneration. In this review, we discuss viral vector-mediated gene transfer of NTFs to treat neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system.

Lim, Seung; Airavaara, Mikko; Harvey, Brandon K.

2009-01-01

218

Household outbreaks among culture-confirmed cases of bacterial gastrointestinal disease.  

PubMed

To examine the general frequency of household outbreaks, the authors performed a retrospective search among cases of the five most frequent gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens in Denmark, a country of 5.3 million inhabitants. This was done for 57,667 cases registered from 1991 to 2001 by finding all cases that shared addresses and became infected within 3 weeks of one another. The percentage of cases that were part of household outbreaks was found to be 3.2% for Campylobacter, 13.3% for Salmonella serotype Enteritidis, 5.6% for Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, 2.0% for Yersinia enterocolitica, and 10.4% for Shigella sonnei. The vast majority of the outbreaks had not previously been registered. The wide variation in the ability to cause household outbreaks among the different types of bacteria reflects differences in their epidemiology and most likely also mirrors their overall outbreak potential. Differences in the time occurring between infections of household members may also indicate differences in the importance of person-to-person transmission for the different types of bacteria. The fact that household outbreaks occur with a relatively high frequency may be utilized in future analyses of sources of infection, in particular of Campylobacter, for which more household outbreaks than expected were identified. PMID:14769645

Ethelberg, Steen; Olsen, Katharina E P; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Mølbak, Kåre

2004-02-15

219

Genome-virome interactions: examining the role of common viral infections in complex disease  

PubMed Central

Preface New technologies have widened our view of “complex diseases”--diseases with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Here, we explore recent genetic and virologic evidence implicating host-virus interactions in three diseases—type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and asthma. In these examples, the viruses implicated in disease are mucosal infections that affect most of the population and that are asymptomatic or mild in many hosts. These findings place a new emphasis on common viral infections as an important environmental factor in complex disease pathogenesis, and they compel us to pursue a better understanding of host interactions with the human virome.

Foxman, Ellen F.; Iwasaki, Akiko

2013-01-01

220

Description of recent foot and mouth disease outbreaks in nonendemic areas: exploring the relationship between early detection and epidemic size.  

PubMed

The objective of this investigation was to describe the detection of foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in nonendemic areas, and to consider how events early in an epidemic influence the epidemic's course. We identified 24 epidemics that occurred between 1992 and 2003 in areas officially considered free of FMD. We obtained information about these epidemics from many sources, including the scientific literature, the grey (non peer-reviewed) literature, and individuals involved with the outbreaks. While most of the epidemics consisted of fewer than 150 infected premises, there were 4 extremely large epidemics, each consisting of more than 2000 infected premises. There was no direct relationship between the time to detection and either the total number of infected premises or the number of animals killed for disease control purposes. We believe that the movement of infected animals through markets was the most critical factor that contributed to the unusual magnitude of the very large epidemics. PMID:17987967

McLaws, Melissa; Ribble, Carl

2007-10-01

221

Community outbreak of group B meningococcal disease in southwest France--December 2008 to September 2009.  

PubMed

Between December 2008 and September 2009, 11 cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) group B were reported in a 20 km diameter area in the Département Landes, France. Two of them presented with purpura fulminans and one of them died. The strain responsible for this community outbreak was of the clonal complex ST-269.The incidence rate for IMD group B was 3 per 100,000 inhabitants in Landes from week 40 in 2008 to week 40 in 2009; it was the highest in France during that period. The number of cases observed was significantly higher than expected, especially in young adults (standardised incidence ratio: 23.5, p<0.001). A nightclub located in the 20 km diameter area was a possible place of transmission and a prophylaxis recommended for the staff members helped in decreasing the transmission. However, several cases notified later suggested that the bacteria circulated during several months through healthy carriers in the community. This situation prompted increased surveillance of IMD in Landes and medical practitioners were asked to remain vigilant because of the possible emergence of new cases within the following months. PMID:20929645

Delisle, E; Larrieu, S; Simões, J; Laylle, N; De Pommerol, M; Taha, M K; Termignon, J L; Parent du Châtelet, I

2010-09-16

222

An international investigation of an outbreak of Legionnaires disease among UK and French tourists.  

PubMed

Five cases of legionnaires disease and one death were associated with four members of a tour group from the United Kingdom (UK) and one French tourist who all visited Spain in the spring of 1993. The UK group stayed at four hotels, one of which was also used by the French tourist. Phenotypic and genotypic comparison of isolates of Legionella pneumophila obtained from one of the UK cases and the French patient demonstrated that they were indistinguishable from each other and from environmental isolates obtained from the water supply of the hotel at which all five cases had stayed. A cohort study of the UK tour group was carried out to determine the extent of the outbreak and showed that three further members of the group had respiratory illness but were serologically negative to legionella infection. International participation in this investigation has highlighted the value of a European surveillance scheme and the benefit of microbiological collaboration between legionella reference laboratories in Europe. PMID:8884186

Joseph, C; Morgan, D; Birtles, R; Pelaz, C; Martín-Bourgón, C; Black, M; Garcia-Sanchez, I; Griffin, M; Bornstein, N; Bartlett, C

1996-06-01

223

Outbreak of legionnaires' disease from a cooling water system in a power station.  

PubMed Central

In September and October 1981 six cases of pneumonia occurred among men working in a power station under construction. Three were identified as cases of legionella pneumonia and two others had serology suggestive of legionella infection. In a sample of 92 men from the site 10 had low levels of antibodies to legionella; a similar sample of men working on an adjacent site showed none with positive serology. In a case control study it was found that cases of pneumonia were more likely than controls to have worked on a part of the site where four small capacity cooling towers were located. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from the water systems of these four towers but was not found in samples from any other cooling towers or hot or cold water outlets on the site. It would appear that there was airborne spread of the organism from these cooling water systems which had not received conventional treatment to inhibit corrosion and organic growth. This is the first outbreak of legionnaires' disease to be recorded in an industrial setting in the United Kingdom. No cases of legionella infection have occurred on the site since the introduction of control measures.

Morton, S; Bartlett, C L; Bibby, L F; Hutchinson, D N; Dyer, J V; Dennis, P J

1986-01-01

224

Water recirculation and good management: potential methods to avoid disease outbreaks with Flavobacterium psychrophilum.  

PubMed

Flavobacterium psychrophilum infections cause high mortality among rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, fry in Danish fish farms and hatcheries. Hatcheries based entirely on bore-hole water recirculation systems have been suggested as a possibility for eliminating F. psychrophilum or at least keeping the amount of this bacterium low. The occurrence of the bacterium in a bore-hole water recirculation system was compared with a combined bore-hole water and stream water flow-through system in a hatchery where outbreaks of rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by F. psychrophilum often occurred. Broodfish, unfertilized and fertilized eggs, eyed eggs and fry, as well as water samples from the tanks/troughs with broodfish/fry, were examined. Suspect yellow bacterial colonies were either confirmed or rejected as F. psychrophilum by growth characteristics and by PCR. As both virulent and less virulent F. psychrophilum isolates are known, isolates were characterized. The isolates were ribotyped and grouped according to ribotyping patterns. Representatives of the groups were serotyped. Fry isolates were very homogeneous whereas isolates from broodfish were heterogeneous, whether the isolates originated from external surfaces of the fish (mucus from skin and gills, haemorrhages and ulcers) or internal organs. Flavobacterium psychrophilum was isolated from broodfish in both water systems; 56% of investigated broodfish from the borehole/flowthrough system and 36% from the recirculation facility harboured the bacterium. In the recirculation system, the bacterium was isolated from fish (ulcers, milt, liver, abdominal cavity) kept in the system for 11 months. Flavobacterium psychrophilum was found in milt and ovarian fluid as well as on the surface of fertilized eggs, but not inside the eggs. Fry also harboured F. psychrophilum, but in the water recirculation system the bacterium was first isolated from the fry after they had been graded. Flavobacterium psychrophilum was found regularly in other parts of the hatchery (outside the recirculation facility), including at the time of grading, suggesting that the occurrence of F. psychrophilum in the fry recirculation facility was due to contamination from the borehole/flow-through hatchery. It is suggested that the combination of bore-hole water recirculation systems and good management procedures (including egg disinfection) is a possible method for hatcheries to avoid disease outbreaks due to F. psychrophilum. PMID:19238756

Madsen, L; Dalsgaard, I

2008-11-01

225

Potential viral pathogenic mechanism for new variant inflammatory bowel disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: A new form of inflammatory bowel disease (ileocolonic lymphonodular hyperplasia) has been described in a cohort of children with developmental disorder. This study investigates the presence of persistent measles virus in the intestinal tissue of these patients (new variant inflammatory bowel disease) and a series of controls by molecular analysis. Methods: Formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded and fresh frozen

V Uhlmann; C M Martin; O Sheils; L Pilkington; I Silva; A Killalea; S B Murch; A J Wakefield; J J O'Leary

2002-01-01

226

Resolution of a Meningococcal Disease Outbreak from Whole-Genome Sequence Data with Rapid Web-Based Analysis Methods  

PubMed Central

The increase in the capacity and reduction in cost of whole-genome sequencing methods present the imminent prospect of such data being used routinely in real time for investigations of bacterial disease outbreaks. For this to be realized, however, it is necessary that generic, portable, and robust analysis frameworks be available, which can be readily interpreted and used in real time by microbiologists, clinicians, and public health epidemiologists. We have achieved this with a set of analysis tools integrated into the PubMLST.org website, which can in principle be used for the analysis of any pathogen. The approach is demonstrated with genomic data from isolates obtained during a well-characterized meningococcal disease outbreak at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, that occurred in 1997. Whole-genome sequence data were collected, de novo assembled, and deposited into the PubMLST Neisseria BIGSdb database, which automatically annotated the sequences. This enabled the immediate and backwards-compatible classification of the isolates with a number of schemes, including the following: conventional, extended, and ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (MLST, eMLST, and rMLST); antigen gene sequence typing (AGST); analysis based on genes conferring antibiotic susceptibility. The isolates were also compared to a reference isolate belonging to the same clonal complex (ST-11) at 1,975 loci. Visualization of the data with the NeighborNet algorithm, implemented in SplitsTree 4 within the PubMLST website, permitted complete resolution of the outbreak and related isolates, demonstrating that multiple closely related but distinct strains were simultaneously present in asymptomatic carriage and disease, with two causing disease and one responsible for the outbreak itself.

Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Bratcher, Holly B.; Harrison, Odile B.; Feavers, Ian M.; Parkhill, Julian; Maiden, Martin C. J.

2012-01-01

227

Fire fighting truck-based emergency mosquito biolarviciding to prevent outbreaks of malaria and arboviral disease in Kabul, Afghanistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergency control of disease vectors requires high efficacy, rapid reaction and safe use of biocides in order interrupt transmission\\u000a cycles without harming humans, non-target animals and the environment. In countries with complex emergencies, air-borne large-scale\\u000a vector control is often limited, or impossible, due to questionable security as well as military, safety, equipment, or logistical\\u000a constraints. While facing a potential outbreak

M. K. Faulde; J. J. Scharninghausen; M. Tisch

2008-01-01

228

Rapid Diagnosis of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever by Reverse Transcription-PCR in an Outbreak Setting and Assessment of Patient Viral Load as a Predictor of Outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The largest outbreak on record of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) occurred in Uganda from August 2000 to January 2001. The outbreak was centered in the Gulu district of northern Uganda, with secondary transmis- sion to other districts. After the initial diagnosis of Sudan ebolavirus by the National Institute for Virology in Johannesburg, South Africa, a temporary diagnostic laboratory was established

Jonathan S. Towner; Pierre E. Rollin; Daniel G. Bausch; Anthony Sanchez; Sharon M. Crary; Martin Vincent; William F. Lee; Christina F. Spiropoulou; Thomas G. Ksiazek; Mathew Lukwiya; Felix Kaducu; Robert Downing; Stuart T. Nichol

2004-01-01

229

Prediction of province-level outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in Iran using a zero-inflated negative binomial model.  

PubMed

To identify events that could predict province-level frequency of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in Iran, 5707 outbreaks reported from April 1995 to March 2002 were studied. A zero-inflated negative binomial model was used to estimate the probability of a 'no-outbreak' status and the number of outbreaks in a province, using the number of previous occurrences of FMD for the same or adjacent provinces and season as covariates. For each province, the probability of observing no outbreak was negatively associated with the number of outbreaks in the same province in the previous month (odds ratio [OR]=0.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.01, 0.30) and in 'the second previous month' (OR=0.10, 95% CI: 0.02, 0.51), the total number of outbreaks in the second previous month in adjacent provinces (OR=0.57, 95% CI: 0.36, 0.91) and the season (winter [OR=0.18, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.55] and spring [OR=0.27, 95% CI: 0.09, 0.81], compared with summer). The expected number of outbreaks in a province was positively associated with number of outbreaks in the same province in previous month (coefficient [coef]=0.74, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.82) and in the second previous month (coef=0.23, 95% CI: 0.16, 0.31), total number of outbreaks in adjacent provinces in the previous month (coef=0.32, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.41) and season (fall [coef=0.20, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.33] and spring [coef=0.18, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.31], compared to summer); however, number of outbreaks was negatively associated with the total number of outbreaks in adjacent provinces in the second previous month (coef=-0.19, 95% CI: -0.28, -0.09). The findings indicate that the probability of an outbreak (and the expected number of outbreaks if any) may be predicted based on previous province information, which could help decision-makers allocate resources more efficiently for province-level disease control measures. Further, the study illustrates use of zero inflated negative binomial model to study diseases occurrence where disease is infrequently observed. PMID:24768434

Jafarzadeh, S Reza; Norris, Michelle; Thurmond, Mark C

2014-08-01

230

Outbreak Simulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides a problem-based activity on risk assessment of environmental health issues. The activity asks students to "study and research emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, particularly through vector-borne, food-borne, and water-borne educational activities" and "understand that certain exposures in the environment cause various infectious diseases." The activity asks students to simulate a food borne salmonella outbreak, and carry out the resulting investigation. This resource is free to download. Users must first create a login with ATEEC's website to access the file.

2013-07-22

231

Surveillance for Foodborne-Disease Outbreaks: United States, 1998-2002. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 55, No. SS-10, November 10, 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System reviews data on FBDOs, defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. State and local public health departments have primary responsibil...

C. Braden J. Painter M. Lynch R. Woodruff

2006-01-01

232

Pacheco's parrot disease in macaws of the Lisbon's Zoological Garden. Description of an outbreak, diagnosis and management, including vaccination.  

PubMed

The Lisbon's Zoological Garden, Portugal, has maintained for many years a large collection of psittacine birds without any serious health problems. Unexpectedly, in April 1999, a total of nine macaws died after a short period of illness. Clinical signs consisted mainly of anorexia, ruffled feathers and yellowish droppings. A herpesvirus was isolated from brain, trachea, lung, liver, spleen, kidney and intestine of each of the examined dead birds, confirming that all animals succumbed during viraemia. Serotyping of the isolate in cross neutralization tests with reference sera prove that the outbreak was caused by serotype 3 of Pacheco's parrot disease herpesviruses. An autogenous, formalin-inactivated vaccine with adjuvant (aluminium hydroxid gel) was prepared from one of the isolates and injected intramuscularly 14 days and six weeks after the onset of mortality in an attempt to protect the remaining psittacine birds in the zoo from the disease. The autogenous vaccine was well tolerated and was able to rapidly stop virus spread and morbidity and mortality among the psittacine birds. Follow-up studies demonstrate that all nine blood samples from vaccinated birds obtained nine month' after the second vaccination contain neutralizing antibodies. Twenty five month' after vaccination two out of four serum samples were still antibody positive. No herpesvirus was isolated from faecal samples nine and twenty five months after the onset of the outbreak. These data prove that the autogenous vaccine played a major role in containing a severe outbreak of Pacheco's parrot disease in a large collection of psittacine birds. PMID:18077933

Barão Da Cunha, M; Correia, J J; Fagulha, T; Fevereiro, M; Peleteiro, M C; Vollrath, G; Kaleta, E F

2007-11-01

233

EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON HUMAN VIRAL RESPIRATORY DISEASE  

EPA Science Inventory

Many epidemiologic studies have shown excessive respiratory disease morbidity in areas of high atmospheric pollution. This study was designed to develop and characterize an animal model and investigate the possible interactive effects of infection and particulate air pollutants u...

234

Viral Vectors for In Vivo Gene Transfer in Parkinson's disease: Properties and Clinical Grade Production  

PubMed Central

Because Parkinson’s disease is a progressive degenerative disorder that is mainly confined to the basal ganglia, gene transfer to deliver therapeutic molecules is an attractive treatment avenue. The present review focuses on direct in vivo gene transfer vectors that have been developed to a degree that they have been successfully used in animal model of Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, the properties of recombinant adenovirus, recombinant adeno-associated virus, herpes simplex virus, and lentivirus are described and contrasted. In order for viral vectors to be developed into clinical grade reagents, they must be manufactured and tested to precise regulatory standards. Indeed, clinical lots of viral vectors can be produced in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) regulations using industry accepted manufacturing methodologies, manufacturing controls, and quality systems. The viral vector properties themselves combined with physiological product formulations facilitate long-term storage and direct in vivo administration.

Burger, Corinna; Snyder, Richard O.

2009-01-01

235

Viral hepatitis-associated intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma shares common disease processes with hepatocellular carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Bile duct cells and hepatocytes differentiate from the same hepatic progenitor cells. To investigate the possible association of viral hepatitis B and C with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), we conducted a retrospective case–control study using univariate and multivariate logistic analyses to identify risk factors for ICC. Besides hepatic lithiasis (25.6%; P<0.001), seropositivity for hepatitis B surface antigen (37.5% of all ICC patients; odds ratio (OR) =4.985, P<0.001) and seropositivity for hepatitis C antibodies (13.1%; OR=2.709; P=0.021) are the primary independent risk factors for ICC. Cirrhosis exerted synergic effects on the development of ICC. We compared the age distributions of viral-hepatitis associated ICC to that of viral hepatitis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mean age of ICC patients with viral hepatitis B (56.4±11.1 years) were 9 years younger than that of ICC patients with viral hepatitis C (65.6±9.17 years), similar to that observed in HCC. The incidence ratio of HCC?:?ICC?:?CHC (combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinoma) in our population was 233?:?17?:?1 consistent with the theoretic ratio of hepatocyte number to cholangiocyte number in the liver. Our findings indicated that both viral hepatitis-associated ICC and HCC shared common disease process for carcinogenesis and, possibly, both arose from the hepatic progenitor cells.

Lee, C H; Chang, C J; Lin, Y J; Yeh, C N; Chen, M F; Hsieh, S Y

2009-01-01

236

Graft-versus-host disease and sialodacryoadenitis viral infection in bone marrow transplanted rats  

SciTech Connect

The effect of a localized viral infection on the occurrence of graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) was examined in allogeneic rat bone marrow chimeras (ACI/LEW). Animals without clinical evidence of GVHD, 62 days after bone marrow transplant, were infected in salivary and lacrimal glands with sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV), and sacrificed 8-25 days postinfection. Using established histologic criteria, GVHD was found more frequently in salivary and lacrimal glands of SDAV-infected chimeras than uninfected chimeras. Skin and oral mucosa, tissues not infected by the virus, showed no differences in occurrence of GVHD, suggesting that the viral infection induced only local and not systemic GVHD. GVHD and SDAV infection, which are histologically similar, were differentiated by examining tissues for SDAV antigen using immunoperoxidase technique. Histologic changes were present for at least 1 week longer than viral antigen, suggesting they represented GVHD rather than viral infection. GVHD and SDAV infection were also differentiated by looking for a histologic feature characteristic of GVHD and not found in SDAV infection (periductal lymphocytic infiltrate). This was found in SDAV-infected chimeras more frequently than uninfected chimeras, suggesting that the viral infection somehow induced GVHD. Results showed a localized increase in the occurrence of GVHD subsequent to localized viral infection.

Rossie, K.M.; Sheridan, J.F.; Barthold, S.W.; Tutschka, P.J.

1988-06-01

237

Did viral disease of humans wipe out the Neandertals?  

PubMed

Neandertals were an anatomically distinct hominoid species inhabiting a vast geographical area ranging from Portugal to western Siberia and from northern Europe to the Middle East. The species became extinct 28,000 years ago, coinciding with the arrival of anatomically modern humans (AMHs) in Europe 40,000 years ago. There has been considerable debate surrounding the main causes of the extinction of Neandertals. After at least 200,000 years of successful adaption to the climate, flora and fauna of Eurasia, it is not clear why they suddenly failed to survive. For many years, climate change or competition with anatomically modern human (AMH) have been the leading hypotheses. Recently these hypotheses have somewhat fallen out of favour due to the recognition that Neandertals were a highly developed species with complex social structure, culture and technical skills. Were AMHs lucky and survived some catastrophe that eradicated the Neandertals? It seems unlikely that this is the case considering the close timing of the arrival of AMHs and the disappearance of Neandertals. Perhaps the arrival of AMHs also brought additional new non-human microscopic inhabitants to the regions where Neandertals lived and these new inhabitants contributed to the disappearance of the species. We introduce a medical hypothesis that complements other recent explanations for the extinction of Neandertals. After the ancestors of Neandertals left Africa, their immune system adapted gradually to the pathogens in their new Eurasian environment. In contrast, AMHs continued to co-evolve with east African pathogens. More than 200,000 years later, AMHs carried pathogens that would have been alien to pre-historic Europe. First contact between long separated populations can be devastating. Recent European and American history provides evidence for similar events, where introduction of viral, protozoan or bacterial pathogens to immunologically naïve populations lead to mass mortality and local population extinction. We propose that a virus, possibly from the family Herpesviridae, contributed to Neandertal extinction. PMID:20172660

Wolff, Horst; Greenwood, Alex D

2010-07-01

238

Planning for smallpox outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors

Matt J. Keeling; W. John Edmunds; Raymond Gani; Bryan T. Grenfell; Roy M. Anderson; Steve Leach; Neil M. Ferguson

2003-01-01

239

ELR(+) chemokine signaling in host defense and disease in a viral model of central nervous system disease  

PubMed Central

Intracranial infection of the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) into the central nervous system (CNS) of susceptible strains of mice results in an acute encephalomyelitis, accompanied by viral replication in glial cells and robust infiltration of virus-specific T cells that contribute to host defense through cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity. Mice surviving the acute stage of disease develop an immune-mediated demyelinating disease, characterized by viral persistence in white matter tracts and a chronic neuroinflammatory response dominated by T cells and macrophages. Chemokines and their corresponding chemokine receptors are dynamically expressed throughout viral infection of the CNS, influencing neuroinflammation by regulating immune cell infltration and glial biology. This review is focused upon the pleiotropic chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its effects upon neutrophils and oligodendrocytes during JHMV infection and a number of other models of CNS inflammation.

Hosking, Martin P.; Lane, Thomas E.

2014-01-01

240

Black leaf streak and viral leaf streak: New banana diseases in East Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black leaf streak, caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis a virulent pathogen of bananas and plantains, is recorded from Zanzibar. This is the first record of this important pathogen from East Africa. Viral leaf streak of bananas is also identified from Zanzibar. The presence of panama disease and high infestations of root nematode are also noted.

A. J. Dabek; J. M. Waller

1990-01-01

241

Acute and Chronic Airway Responses to Viral Infection: Implications for Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the high clinical impact of established and emerging respi- ratory viruses, some critical aspects of the host response to these pathogens still need to be defined. In that context, we aimed at two major issues: first, what are the innate immune mechanisms that control common respiratory viral infections; and second, whether these mechanisms also cause long-term airway disease. Using

Michael J. Holtzman; Jeffrey W. Tyner; Edy Y. Kim; Mindy S. Lo; Anand C. Patel; Laurie P. Shornick; Eugene Agapov; Yong Zhang

2005-01-01

242

Viral and Bacterial Pathogens in Bovine Respiratory Disease in Finland  

PubMed Central

Pathogens causing bovine respiratory tract disease in Finland were investigated. Eighteen cattle herds with bovine respiratory disease were included. Five diseased calves from each farm were chosen for closer examination and tracheobronchial lavage. Blood samples were taken from the calves at the time of the investigation and from 86 calves 3–4 weeks later. In addition, 6–10 blood samples from animals of different ages were collected from each herd, resulting in 169 samples. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to bovine parainfluenza virus-3 (PIV-3), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronavirus (BCV), bovine adenovirus-3 (BAV-3) and bovine adenovirus-7 (BAV-7). About one third of the samples were also tested for antibodies to bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) with negative results. Bacteria were cultured from lavage fluid and in vitro susceptibility to selected antimicrobials was tested. According to serological findings, PIV-3, BAV-7, BAV-3, BCV and BRSV are common pathogens in Finnish cattle with respiratory problems. A titre rise especially for BAV-7 and BAV-3, the dual growth of Mycoplasma dispar and Pasteurella multocida, were typical findings in diseased calves. Pasteurella sp. strains showed no resistance to tested antimicrobials. Mycoplasma bovis and Mannheimia haemolytica were not found.

Hartel, H; Nikunen, S; Neuvonen, E; Tanskanen, R; Kivela, S-L; Aho, P; Soveri, T; Saloniemi, H

2004-01-01

243

First report of an infectious bursal disease outbreak in a vaccinated chicken flock in Anambra State, Nigeria.  

PubMed

Infectious bursal disease was reported in a flock of 7-week old vaccinated chickens. Clinical findings and post-mortem changes were classical as well as the microscopic pathology of the bursa. Bursal homogenates from dead birds were positive for IBD virus antigen in agar gel diffusion test (AGDT). Convalescent sera obtained from birds 14 days following the onset of clinical signs were also positive for IBD virus antibody in AGDT. Seven-week old susceptible birds, each infected i/m with 0.1 ml of a bursal preparation from the outbreak, showed clinical signs of IBD on the 3rd day and were all dead by the 6th day. Their bursae were also positive for IBD virus antigen in AGDT. This is the first recorded outbreak of IBD in Southern Nigeria following inoculation with a locally produced vaccine. PMID:1668870

Onunkwo, O; Okoye, J O

1991-01-01

244

Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis in Panama: Fatal Endemic Disease and Genetic Diversity of Etiologic Viral Strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961–2004. Recent

Evelia Quiroz; Patricia V. Aguilar; Julio Cisneros; Robert B. Tesh; Scott C. Weaver

2009-01-01

245

Viral respiratory diseases (ILT, aMPV infections, IB): are they ever under control?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract1.?The use of vaccines is the main approach to control of the economically important poultry viral respiratory diseases infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infections and infectious bronchitis (IB). This paper appraises the current methods of vaccine control in the light of the nature of each virus and epidemiological factors associated with each disease.2.?Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) exists as a

Richard C. Jones

2010-01-01

246

Surveillance for Viral Respiratory Diseases and Rotaviruses in Huntington, West Virginia. Final Report March 31, 1980-January 31, 1985,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Surveillance of viral respiratory diseases and rotaviruses in Huntington, West Virginia; Surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae disease; Number of volunteers - summary table; Evaluation of the ts-2 mutant of RSV; Evaluation of meningococcal sero...

R. B. Belshe E. L. Anderson

1985-01-01

247

Review: Micronutrient Selenium Deficiency Influences Evolution of Some Viral Infectious Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently emerged viral infectious diseases (VIDs) include HIV\\/AIDS, influenzas H5N1 and 2009 H1N1, SARS, and Ebola hemorrhagic\\u000a fevers. Earlier research determined metabolic oxidative stress in hosts deficient in antioxidant selenium (Se) (<1 ?Mol Se\\/L\\u000a of blood) induces both impaired human host immunocompetence and rapidly mutated benign variants of RNA viruses to virulence.\\u000a These viral mutations are consistent, rather than stochastic, and long-lived.

Michalann Harthill

248

The evolution of bovine viral diarrhea: a review  

PubMed Central

The economic importance of bovine viral diarrhea is increasing with the emergence of seemingly more virulent viruses, as evidenced by outbreaks of hemorrhagic syndrome and severe acute bovine viral diarrhea beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. It appears that evolutionary changes in bovine viral diarrhea virus were responsible for these outbreaks. The genetic properties of the classical bovine viral diarrhea virus that contribute to the basis of current diagnostic tests, vaccines, and our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms are now being reevaluated because of these “new” virus strains. This shift in virulence has confounded both nomenclature and the significance of current bovine viral diarrhea virus categorization. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of bovine viral diarrhea virus with a chronological review of prevailing scientific tenets and practices as described in clinical and scientific North American veterinary journals and textbooks. The first part of this review describes how we have arrived at our current understanding of the viruses, the diseases, and their nomenclature. The second part of the review deals with current concepts in virology and how these concepts may both explain and predict bovine viral diarrhea virus pathogenesis. By reviewing how knowledge of bovine viral diarrhea has evolved and the theories of how the virus itself is able to evolve, the interpretation of diagnostic tests are more effectively utilized in the control and treatment of bovine viral diarrhea virus associated disease.

Goens, Denise

2002-01-01

249

Persistent activation of an innate immune axis translates respiratory viral infection into chronic lung disease  

PubMed Central

To understand the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease, we analyzed an experimental mouse model of a chronic lung disease that resembles asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans. In this model, chronic lung disease develops after infection with a common type of respiratory virus is cleared to trace levels of noninfectious virus. Unexpectedly, the chronic inflammatory disease arises independently of an adaptive immune response and is driven by IL-13 produced by macrophages stimulated by CD1d-dependent TCR-invariant NKT cells. This innate immune axis is also activated in the lungs of humans with chronic airway disease due to asthma or COPD. These findings provide new insight into the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease with the discovery that the transition from respiratory viral infection into chronic lung disease requires persistent activation of a novel NKT cell-macrophage innate immune axis.

Kim, Edy Y.; Battaile, John T.; Patel, Anand C.; You, Yingjian; Agapov, Eugene; Grayson, Mitchell H.; Benoit, Loralyn A.; Byers, Derek E.; Alevy, Yael; Tucker, Jennifer; Swanson, Suzanne; Tidwell, Rose; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Morton, Jeffrey D.; Castro, Mario; Polineni, Deepika; Patterson, G. Alexander; Schwendener, Reto A.; Allard, John D.; Peltz, Gary; Holtzman, Michael J.

2008-01-01

250

[Kenya Research Station and viral infectious disease research].  

PubMed

The Institute of Tropical Medicine, Kenya Research Station, Nagasaki University was established by a fund of the Ministry of Education (MEXT) in 2005. Currently, the station has been on ''The Clinical and Epidemiological Research Program of Tropical Medicine and Emerging Infectious Diseases-Establishment of Education and Research System between Africa and Japan- ''. The project has been supported by about 20 Japanese staff and 85 Kenyan staff, and in the research station, 10 research teams have worked on their researches for the prevention of tropical medicine and emerging diseases collaborating with other researches and The JICA Grassroots Technical Cooperation Project has also started in 2012. In April 2010, Nagasaki University, Africa Station has been established along with Kenya Research Station, and it made possible for other faculties to join research in Kenya. School of Dentistry has started oral health survey in Mbita, while School of Fishery, School of Engineering and School of Health Science have a plan of a joint project targeting areas by Lake Victoria. Our aim is to develop a foundation which enables all researchers from different fields to carry out their research for improvement health and living standards of the locals. PMID:24769581

Ichinose, Yoshio

2013-01-01

251

From hepatic diseases and jaundice to viral hepatitis: the configuration of a kaleidoscope.  

PubMed

Viral hepatitis A, B, C, D and E--systemic hepatotropic viral infections--present as acute hepatitis that, depending on the etiological agent, viral load and host conditions, may evolve into chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and acute fulminant disease. The ecological versatility of these viruses, their spectrum of transmission in time and space, potentialized by the sub-clinical course of a large proportion of infections, comprise an epidemiological challenge. This essay describes scenarios and tendencies in the socioepidemiologic profile, based on the history of these infections, and indicates the need to overcome patterns, models, and protocols and instead investigate each particular situation. In other words, it highlights the need to explore singularities in order to be able to develop new proposals for general actions tailored to local specificities. PMID:23703137

Gaze, Rosangela; Carvalho, Diana Maul de; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

2013-02-01

252

Exploring relationships between whole carcass condemnation abattoir data, non-disease factors and disease outbreaks in swine herds in Ontario (2001-2007)  

PubMed Central

Background Improving upon traditional animal disease surveillance systems may allow more rapid detection of disease outbreaks in animal populations. In Ontario, between the years 2001 – 2007, widespread outbreaks of several diseases caused major impacts to the swine industry. This study was undertaken to investigate whether whole carcass condemnation data of market pigs from provincial abattoirs from 2001 – 2007 could have provided useful information for disease surveillance of Ontario swine. The objective was to examine the suitability of these data for detection of disease outbreaks using multi-level models and spatial scan statistics. We investigated the ability of these data to provide spatially-relevant surveillance information by determining the approximate distance pigs are shipped from farm to provincial abattoirs in the province, and explored potentially biasing non-disease factors within these data. Results Provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario were found to be located in close proximity to the hog farms of origin. The fall season and increasing abattoir capacity were associated with a decrease in condemnation rates. Condemnation rates varied across agricultural regions by year, and some regions showed yearly trends consistent with the timing of emergence of new disease strains that affected the Ontario swine population. Scan statistics identified stable clusters of condemnations in space that may have represented stable underlying factors influencing condemnations. The temporal scans detected the most likely cluster of high condemnations during the timeframe in which widespread disease events were documented. One space-time cluster took place during the beginning of the historical disease outbreaks and may have provided an early warning signal within a syndromic surveillance system. Conclusions Spatial disease surveillance methods may be applicable to whole carcass condemnation data collected at provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario for disease detection on a local scale. These data could provide useful information within a syndromic disease surveillance system for protecting swine herd health within the province. However, non-disease factors including region, season and abattoir size need to be considered when applying quantitative methods to abattoir data for disease surveillance.

2014-01-01

253

Usefulness of the DNA-fingerprinting pattern and the multilocus enzyme electrophoresis profile in the assessment of outbreaks of meningococcal disease.  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study was to assess whether genotypic characterization by means of DNA-fingerprinting pattern (DFP) and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) profile as compared to phenotypic characterization would improve the differentiation of Neisseria meningitidis strains associated with outbreaks from strains associated with sporadic cases of meningococcal disease. In addition, the differentiation of serogroup C carrier strains from those associated with an outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease was investigated. A total of 118 N. meningitidis strains were available for the study: 59 from patients involved in outbreaks of meningococcal disease (2 serogroup B and 2 serogroup C), 37 patients considered to be sporadic cases and 22 serogroup C carrier strains. Among the 59 strains from patients involved in outbreaks the 4 strains isolated from the patient registered as the first in each outbreak were designated the index strains. Among the remaining 55 outbreak strains 52 were either DFP-identical or DFP-indistinguishable when compared with the one relevant out of the 4 index strains. This was only the case for 17 of the 37 strains isolated from sporadic cases caused by the same serogroup of meningococci during the outbreak periods, and 5 of the 22 meningococcal strains isolated from healthy carriers. Among the 56 (52 + 4) DFP-identical or DFP-indistinguishable outbreak strains 5 different electrophoretic types were identified by MEE. Among 59 assumed outbreak strains a total of 4 were identified as genotypically distinct. Among the 37 mainly DFP-indistinguishable or DFP-different strains from sporadic cases 17 different ETs were identified, and among the 22 mainly DFP-different carrier strains 13 different ETs were identified. Two strains among those selected from sporadic cases were identical to the outbreak strain. None of the local serogroup C carrier strains isolated during the outbreak of serogroup C disease were identical to the outbreak strain. Both DNA-fingerprinting and MEE improved the differentiation of meningococci when compared with phenotypic characterization. The results indicate that tracing a virulent strain within a open group of contacts is irrelevant. Images Fig. 1

Weis, N.; Lind, I.

1996-01-01

254

Evaluation of the Temporal Association between Kawasaki Disease and Viral Infections in South Korea  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives This study is aimed at elucidating potential temporal associations between the occurrence of Kawasaki disease (KD) and various viral infections. Subjects and Methods We obtained monthly patterns of KD from the seventh nationwide survey and viral detection data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2009 to 2011 and evaluated temporal correlations between them for each month. The respiratory viruses detected using a multiplex real-time-polymerase chain reaction kit were influenza virus (A/H1N1, A/H3N2, A/H5N1, and B), adenovirus, parainfluenza virus (type 1, 2, 3), respiratory syncytial virus (type A, B), human rhinovirus, human coronavirus (OC43/229E, NL63), human bocavirus, and enterovirus. Results We obtained data from a total of 13031 patients who were treated for acute KD from 87 hospitals with pediatric residence programs. During this survey, KD showed highest overall incidence in summer and winter seasons and lowest incidence in February and October. We received viral detection data for a total of 14267 patients. Viral detection was highest during winter and spring seasons. The most commonly detected virus was human rhinovirus (32.6%), followed by influenza virus (26.8%). The monthly incidence of KD showed significant correlation with the monthly overall viral detection (p=0.022, r=0.382). In particular, human bocavirus and enterovirus have significant correlations with monthly patterns of KD occurrence (p=0.032 and p=0.007, respectively) and influenza virus correlated with KD occurrence with borderline significance (p=0.063). Conclusion The temporal association between monthly occurrence of KD and viral detection suggests the etiologic importance of precedent infection in the development of KD.

Kim, Gi Beom; Park, Sohee; Han, Ji Whan; Park, Yong Won; Hong, Young Mi

2014-01-01

255

Trypanosoma cruzi IV Causing Outbreaks of Acute Chagas Disease and Infections by Different Haplotypes in the Western Brazilian Amazonia  

PubMed Central

Background Chagas disease is an emergent tropical disease in the Brazilian Amazon Region, with an increasing number of cases in recent decades. In this region, the sylvatic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission, which constitutes a reservoir of parasites that might be associated with specific molecular, epidemiological and clinical traits, has been little explored. The objective of this work is to genetically characterize stocks of T. cruzi from human cases, triatomines and reservoir mammals in the State of Amazonas, in the Western Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 96 T. cruzi samples from four municipalities in distant locations of the State of Amazonas. Molecular characterization of isolated parasites from cultures in LIT medium or directly from vectors or whole human blood was performed by PCR of the non-transcribed spacer of the mini-exon and of the 24 S alfa ribosomal RNA gene, RFLP and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene, and by sequencing of the glucose-phosphate isomerase gene. The T. cruzi parasites from two outbreaks of acute disease were all typed as TcIV. One of the outbreaks was triggered by several haplotypes of the same DTU. TcIV also occurred in isolated cases and in Rhodnius robustus. Incongruence between mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenies is likely to be indicative of historical genetic exchange events resulting in mitochondrial introgression between TcIII and TcIV DTUs from Western Brazilian Amazon. TcI predominated among triatomines and was the unique DTU infecting marsupials. Conclusion/Significance DTU TcIV, rarely associated with human Chagas disease in other areas of the Amazon basin, is the major strain responsible for the human infections in the Western Brazilian Amazon, occurring in outbreaks as single or mixed infections by different haplotypes.

Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Magalhaes, Laylah Kelre Costa; de Sa, Amanda Regina Nichi; Gomes, Monica Lucia; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas; Borges, Lara; Pires, Isa; de Oliveira Guerra, Jorge Augusto; Silveira, Henrique; Barbosa, Maria das Gracas Vale

2012-01-01

256

West Nile fever--a reemerging mosquito-borne viral disease in Europe.  

PubMed Central

West Nile virus causes sporadic cases and outbreaks of human and equine disease in Europe (western Mediterranean and southern Russia in 1962-64, Belarus and Ukraine in the 1970s and 1980s, Romania in 1996-97, Czechland in 1997, and Italy in 1998). Environmental factors, including human activities, that enhance population densities of vector mosquitoes (heavy rains followed by floods, irrigation, higher than usual temperature, or formation of ecologic niches that enable mass breeding of mosquitoes) could increase the incidence of West Nile fever.

Hubalek, Z.; Halouzka, J.

1999-01-01

257

Comparative Evaluation of Three Different Genotyping Methods for Investigation of Nosocomial Outbreaks of Legionnaires' Disease in Hospitals  

PubMed Central

The increased incidence of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease in two hospitals prompted investigation of possible environmental sources. In the search for an effective DNA-typing technique for use in hospital epidemiology, the performance and convenience of three methods—SfiI macrorestriction analysis (MRA), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), and arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR)—were compared. Twenty-nine outbreak-associated and eight nonassociated strains of Legionella pneumophila with 13 MRA types and subtypes were investigated. These strains comprised isolates from bronchoalveolar lavages, from environmental, patient-related sources, and type strains. All three typing methods detected one predominant genotype associated with the outbreaks in both hospitals. All of them correctly assigned epidemiologically associated, environmental isolates to their respective patient specimens. AP-PCR was the least discriminating and least reproducible technique. In contrast, AFLP was demonstrated as being the method with the best interassay reproducibility (90%) and concordance (94%) in comparison to the genotyping standard of MRA and the epidemiological data. Analysis of AFLP fragments revealed 12 different types and subtypes. Because of its simplicity and reproducibility, AFLP proved to be the most effective technique in outbreak investigation.

Jonas, Daniel; Meyer, Heinz-Georg W.; Matthes, Philipp; Hartung, Doris; Jahn, Bernhard; Daschner, Franz D.; Jansen, Bernd

2000-01-01

258

Multiple Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Strains Are Associated with Disease Outbreaks in Sudan, 2008-2009  

PubMed Central

Background Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) activity has recently been detected in the Kordufan region of Sudan. Since 2008, several sporadic cases and nosocomial outbreaks associated with high case-fatality have been reported in villages and rural hospitals in the region. Principal Findings In the present study, we describe a cluster of cases occurring in June 2009 in Dunkop village, Abyei District, South Kordufan, Sudan. Seven CCHF cases were involved in the outbreak; however, clinical specimens could be collected from only two patients, both of whom were confirmed as acute CCHF cases using CCHF-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of the complete S, M, and L segment sequences places the Abyei strain of CCHF virus in Group III, a virus group containing strains from various countries across Africa, including Sudan, South Africa, Mauritania, and Nigeria. The Abyei strain detected in 2009 is genetically distinct from the recently described 2008 Sudanese CCHF virus strains (Al-fulah 3 and 4), and the Abyei strain S and L segments closely match those of CCHF virus strain ArD39554 from Mauritania. Conclusions The present investigation illustrates that multiple CCHF virus lineages are circulating in the Kordufan region of Sudan and are associated with recent outbreaks of the disease occurring during 2008–2009.

Aradaib, Imadeldin E.; Erickson, Bobbie R.; Karsany, Mubarak S.; Khristova, Marina L.; Elageb, Rehab M.; Mohamed, Mohamed E. H.; Nichol, Stuart T.

2011-01-01

259

Restaurant outbreak of Legionnaires' disease associated with a decorative fountain: an environmental and case-control study  

PubMed Central

Background From June to November 2005, 18 cases of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease (LD) were reported in Rapid City South Dakota. We conducted epidemiologic and environmental investigations to identify the source of the outbreak. Methods We conducted a case-control study that included the first 13 cases and 52 controls randomly selected from emergency department records and matched on underlying illness. We collected information about activities of case-patients and controls during the 14 days before symptom onset. Environmental samples (n = 291) were cultured for Legionella. Clinical and environmental isolates were compared using monoclonal antibody subtyping and sequence based typing (SBT). Results Case-patients were significantly more likely than controls to have passed through several city areas that contained or were adjacent to areas with cooling towers positive for Legionella. Six of 11 case-patients (matched odds ratio (mOR) 32.7, 95% CI 4.7-?) reported eating in Restaurant A versus 0 controls. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from four clinical specimens: 3 were Benidorm type strains and 1 was a Denver type strain. Legionella were identified from several environmental sites including 24 (56%) of 43 cooling towers tested, but only one site, a small decorative fountain in Restaurant A, contained Benidorm, the outbreak strain. Clinical and environmental Benidorm isolates had identical SBT patterns. Conclusion This is the first time that small fountain without obvious aerosol-generating capability has been implicated as the source of a LD outbreak. Removal of the fountain halted transmission.

O'Loughlin, Rosalyn E; Kightlinger, Lon; Werpy, Matthew C; Brown, Ellen; Stevens, Valerie; Hepper, Clark; Keane, Tim; Benson, Robert F; Fields, Barry S; Moore, Matthew R

2007-01-01

260

Sensitivity of Three Urinary Antigen Tests Associated with Clinical Severity in a Large Outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease in The Netherlands  

PubMed Central

In 1999 an outbreak involving 188 patients with Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred among visitors to a flower show in the Netherlands. Two enzyme immunoassays (Binax and Biotest) and one immunochromatographic assay (Binax NOW) were tested, using urine samples from LD patients from the 1999 outbreak. Sensitivity was calculated using positive culture and/or seroconversion as the “gold standard” in outbreak-related patients with radiographically confirmed pneumonia who fulfilled the epidemiological critera. The Binax EIA, Biotest EIA, and Binax NOW assay showed overall sensitivities of 69, 71, and 72%, respectively. When the tests were performed with concentrated urine samples, the overall sensitivities increased to 79, 74, and 81%, respectively. Using multiple logistic regression analysis with backward elimination, a statistically significant association was found between clinical severity and test sensitivity for all tests. For patients with mild LD, the test sensitivities ranged from 40 to 53%, whereas for patients with severe LD who needed immediate special medical care, the sensitivities reached 88 to 100%. These findings have major implications for the diagnostic process in patients with mild pneumonia and suggest that patients with mild pneumonia may go underdiagnosed if urine antigen tests alone are used.

Yzerman, Ed P. F.; Boer, Jeroen W. den; Lettinga, Kamilla D.; Schellekens, Joop; Dankert, Jacob; Peeters, Marcel

2002-01-01

261

Sensitivity of three urinary antigen tests associated with clinical severity in a large outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in The Netherlands.  

PubMed

In 1999 an outbreak involving 188 patients with Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred among visitors to a flower show in the Netherlands. Two enzyme immunoassays (Binax and Biotest) and one immunochromatographic assay (Binax NOW) were tested, using urine samples from LD patients from the 1999 outbreak. Sensitivity was calculated using positive culture and/or seroconversion as the "gold standard" in outbreak-related patients with radiographically confirmed pneumonia who fulfilled the epidemiological critera. The Binax EIA, Biotest EIA, and Binax NOW assay showed overall sensitivities of 69, 71, and 72%, respectively. When the tests were performed with concentrated urine samples, the overall sensitivities increased to 79, 74, and 81%, respectively. Using multiple logistic regression analysis with backward elimination, a statistically significant association was found between clinical severity and test sensitivity for all tests. For patients with mild LD, the test sensitivities ranged from 40 to 53%, whereas for patients with severe LD who needed immediate special medical care, the sensitivities reached 88 to 100%. These findings have major implications for the diagnostic process in patients with mild pneumonia and suggest that patients with mild pneumonia may go underdiagnosed if urine antigen tests alone are used. PMID:12202558

Yzerman, Ed P F; den Boer, Jeroen W; Lettinga, Kamilla D; Schellekens, Joop; Dankert, Jacob; Peeters, Marcel

2002-09-01

262

Adventures in Infectious Diseases  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

Fisher-Hoch, Susan (University of Texas School of Public Health) [University of Texas School of Public Health

2011-11-01

263

Control of foot and mouth disease: lessons from the experience of the outbreak in Great Britain in 2001.  

PubMed

An epidemic of foot and mouth disease occurred on an unprecedented scale in Great Britain in 2001. This was characterised by widespread dissemination of disease in sheep due to infection being present but unreported for at least three weeks before the first case was identified. As envisaged by the contingency plans, existing procedures dealt rapidly with disease in many parts of the country where outbreaks were reported. Elsewhere, the scale and speed of disease spread was so great that veterinary resources had to be supplemented on the operational front by a large influx of military and administrative support. At the time of writing (June 2002), the United Kingdom Government has already identified a number of key lessons, and will learn further from this experience and from the findings of inquiries, how a future outbreak of this unprecedented nature and extent could be handled. Lessons identified so far relate to the improvement of contingency plans, the wider impact on rural businesses and communities, reassessing the possible use of emergency vaccination, the availability of serological capacity, better animal identification and movement controls, carcass disposal, communications, data handling and management information. The authors present the initial lessons learned and which formed the basis of official submissions to the inquiries. Further lessons will be learned from the findings of those inquiries. PMID:12523708

Scudamore, J M; Harris, D M

2002-12-01

264

The use of hospital-based nurses for the surveillance of potential disease outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To study a novel surveillance system introduced in Mpumalanga Province, a rural area in the north-east of South Africa, in an attempt to address deficiences in the system of notification for infectious conditions that have the potential for causing outbreaks. Methods Hospital-based infection control nurses in all of Mpumalanga's 32 public and private hospitals were trained to recognize, report,

David N. Durrheim; Bernice N. Harris; Rick Speare; Kelvin Billinghurst

2001-01-01

265

The efficacy of viral capsid inhibitors in human enterovirus infection and associated diseases.  

PubMed

Enteroviruses are members of picornavirus family which causes diverse and severe diseases in humans and animals. Clinical manifestations of enterovirus infections include fever, hand, foot, and mouth disease, and herpangina. Enteroviruses also cause potentially severe and life-threatening infections such as meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, polio-like syndrome, and neonatal sepsis. With the emergence of enterovirus all over the world as the major causative agent of HFMD fatalities in recent years and in the absence of any effective anti-enteroviral therapy, there is clearly a need to find a specific antiviral therapy. Steps such as viral attachment, uncoating, viral RNA replication, and protein synthesis in the replication cycle can serve as potential targets for antiviral agents. Agents targeted at viral protein 1 (VP1), a relatively conserved capsid structure mediating viral adsorption and uncoating process, is of great potential to be anti-enterovirus drugs. Recently, considerable efforts have been made in the development of antiviral compounds targeting the capsid protein of enterovirus. This review summarizes the development of small molecules targeting enteroviral capsid protein as effective antiviral therapy. PMID:17430140

Li, Chin; Wang, Hongtao; Shih, Shin-Ru; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Li, Mei-Ling

2007-01-01

266

The comparative pathology of non-viral bullous skin diseases in domestic animals.  

PubMed

In a review of non-viral bullous skin diseases of domestic animals and a 4-year study of cases presented to the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, we found 15 diseases: pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus vegetans, pemphigus foliaceus, pemphigus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatitis herpetiformis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, drug eruption, epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, familial acantholysis, bovine congenital porphyria, impetigo and subcorneal pustular dermatosis. The 15 diseases were placed in five categories: autoimmune, immune-mediated, hereditary, bacterial and idiopathic. A histologic classification of these disorders based on the site of blister formation and other important clinicopathologic, histologic and immunopathologic findings was developed. PMID:6989092

Scott, D W; Wolfe, M J; Smith, C A; Lewis, R M

1980-05-01

267

Innovative surveillance methods for rapid detection of disease outbreaks and bioterrorism: results of an interagency workshop on health indicator surveillance.  

PubMed

A system designed to rapidly identify an infectious disease outbreak or bioterrorism attack and provide important demographic and geographic information is lacking in most health departments nationwide. The Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections System sponsored a meeting and workshop in May 2000 in which participants discussed prototype systems and developed recommendations for new surveillance systems. The authors provide a summary of the group's findings, including expectations and recommendations for new surveillance systems. The consensus of the group was that a nationally led effort in developing health indicator surveillance methods is needed to promote effective, innovative systems. PMID:12893601

Pavlin, Julie A; Mostashari, Farzad; Kortepeter, Mark G; Hynes, Noreen A; Chotani, Rashid A; Mikol, Yves B; Ryan, Margaret A K; Neville, James S; Gantz, Donald T; Writer, James V; Florance, Jared E; Culpepper, Randall C; Henretig, Fred M; Kelley, Patrick W

2003-08-01

268

Innovative Surveillance Methods for Rapid Detection of Disease Outbreaks and Bioterrorism: Results of an Interagency Workshop on Health Indicator Surveillance  

PubMed Central

A system designed to rapidly identify an infectious disease outbreak or bioterrorism attack and provide important demographic and geographic information is lacking in most health departments nationwide. The Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections System sponsored a meeting and workshop in May 2000 in which participants discussed prototype systems and developed recommendations for new surveillance systems. The authors provide a summary of the group’s findings, including expectations and recommendations for new surveillance systems. The consensus of the group was that a nationally led effort in developing health indicator surveillance methods is needed to promote effective, innovative systems.

Pavlin, Julie A.; Mostashari, Farzad; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Hynes, Noreen A.; Chotani, Rashid A.; Mikol, Yves B.; Ryan, Margaret A. K.; Neville, James S.; Gantz, Donald T.; Writer, James V.; Florance, Jared E.; Culpepper, Randall C.; Henretig, Fred M.; Kelley, Patrick W.

2003-01-01

269

Foodborne Outbreaks Surveillance Data  

MedlinePLUS

... outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd Atlanta, GA 30333 800-CDC- ...

270

Clinical Outcomes of Thirteen Patients with Acute Chagas Disease Acquired through Oral Transmission from Two Urban Outbreaks in Northeastern Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background Outbreaks of orally transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi continue to be reported in Brazil and are associated with a high mortality rate, mainly due to myocarditis. Methods This study is a detailed report on the disease progression of acute Chagas disease in 13 patients who were infected during two micro-outbreaks in two northeastern Brazilian towns. Clinical outcomes as well as EKG and ECHO results are described, both before and after benznidazole treatment. Results Fever and dyspnea were the most frequent symptoms observed. Other clinical findings included myalgia, periorbital edema, headache and systolic murmur. Two patients died of cardiac failure before receiving benznidazole treatment. EKG and ECHO findings frequently showed a disturbance in ventricular repolarization and pericardial effusion. Ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction <55%) was present in 27.3% of patients. After treatment, EKG readings normalized in 91.7% of patients. Ventricular repolarization abnormalities persisted in 50% of the patients, while sinus bradycardia was observed in 18%. The systolic ejection fraction normalized in two out of three patients with initially depressed ventricular function, while pericardial effusion disappeared. Conclusions Myocarditis is frequently found and potentially severe in patients with acute Chagas disease. Benznidazole treatment may improve clinical symptoms, as well as EKG and ECHO findings.

Bastos, Claudilson J. C.; Aras, Roque; Mota, Gildo; Reis, Francisco; Dias, Juarez Pereira; de Jesus, Robson Silva; Freire, Miralba Silva; de Araujo, Eline G.; Prazeres, Juliana; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

2010-01-01

271

Interventions to Mitigate Emergency Department and Hospital Crowding During an Infectious Respiratory Disease Outbreak: Results from an Expert Panel  

PubMed Central

Objective: To identify and prioritize potential Emergency Department (ED) and hospital-based interventions which could mitigate the impact of crowding during patient surge from a widespread infectious respiratory disease outbreak and determine potential data sources that may be useful for triggering decisions to implement these high priority interventions. Design: Expert panel utilizing Nominal Group Technique to identify and prioritize interventions, and in addition, determine appropriate “triggers” for implementation of the high priority interventions in the context of four different infectious respiratory disease scenarios that vary by patient volumes (high versus low) and illness severity (high versus low). Setting: One day in-person conference held November, 2011. Participants: Regional and national experts representing the fields of public health, disease surveillance, clinical medicine, ED operations, and hospital operations. Main Outcome Measure: Prioritized list of potential interventions to reduce ED and hospital crowding, respectively. In addition, we created a prioritized list of potential data sources which could be useful to trigger interventions. Results: High priority interventions to mitigate ED surge included standardizing admission and discharge criteria and instituting infection control measures. To mitigate hospital crowding, panelists prioritized mandatory vaccination and an algorithm for antiviral use. Data sources identified for triggering implementation of these interventions were most commonly ED and hospital utilization metrics. Conclusions: We developed a prioritized list of potentially useful interventions to mitigate ED and hospital crowding in various outbreak scenarios. The data sources identified to “trigger” the implementation of these high priority interventions consist mainly of sources available at the local, institutional level.

Dugas, Andrea Freyer; Morton, Melinda; Beard, Raphaelle; Pines, Jesse M.; Bayram, Jamil D.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kelen, Gabor; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Jeng, Kevin; Cole, Gai; Rothman, Richard

2013-01-01

272

Positive selection signals of hepatitis B virus and their association with disease stages and viral genotypes.  

PubMed

The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a global health problem that causes different types of liver diseases. The high mutation rate of HBV, which results from a lack of proofreading activity of the viral polymerase, leads to the actively adaptive evolution of mutant strains under various selection pressures. This study focuses on the positive selection signals in the whole HBV genome and the association of these selection signals with the disease stages and/or viral genotypes. A total of 486 complete HBV genomes from HBV-infected individuals of different illness categories (i.e., acute, chronic, and severe hepatitis) were analyzed. To obtain a panoramic view of the selection signals, codon-based maximum likelihood analysis, three-dimensional (3D) mapping, and allele frequency comparison were conducted on genotypes B and C HBV from subjects with different stages of hepatitis. A total of 95 selected codons were resolved, and a significantly higher number of positive selection signatures were found in the chronic and severe hepatitis groups compared with the acute groups. Many of the selected codons were associated with either a unique disease stage or a specific genotype. The conservation analysis of the selection signals in the viral core protein (HBcAg) illustrated the occurrence of selected codons in the highly diversified regions. The allele-frequency-based analysis identified eight additional nucleotide substitutions, and the frequencies of these mutations were found to increase with disease progression. Moreover, we found that three substitutions, including A1762T, G1764A, and A2739C, were nearly fixed. The mapping of all of the selected codons and nucleotide substitutions to the functional domains of the viral proteins suggested that more than 60% of the mutations were subject to selection forces from host immune surveillance, antiviral therapy, and replication fitness. PMID:23871771

Xu, Zhe; Wu, Guanghua; Li, Feifei; Bai, Jian; Xing, Wanjin; Zhang, Dake; Zeng, Changqing

2013-10-01

273

SEROSURVEY FOR SELECTED VIRAL DISEASES AND DEMOGRAPHY OF AFRICAN WILD DOGS IN TANZANIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are endangered, with only 3,000-5,000 remaining in the wild. It is believed that wild dogs are unusually vulnerable to viral diseases, particularly rabies and canine distemper (CDV). However, canine distemper has been confirmed by laboratory diagnosis in only one free-living wild dog. The 43,000 km2 Selous Game Reserve (SGR; Tanzania) holds approximately 900 adult wild

Scott Creel; Nancy Marusha Creel; Linda Munson; Dane Sanderlin; Max J. G. AppeI

1997-01-01

274

Epidermal growth factor receptors in idiopathic and virally induced skin diseases.  

PubMed Central

The altered distribution of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) in hyperproliferative skin lesions such as psoriasis vulgaris, seborrheic keratoses, acanthosis nigricans, ichthyosis, and others implies aberrant control of growth/proliferation by epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), and other growth factors/cytokines. Whether overexpression of EGF-R: 1) correlates with epidermal proliferation, 2) serves as a hallmark of specific dermatoses, or 3) is due to modulation by multiple growth factors remains unclear. To correlate distributions of EGF-R with in vivo proliferative status, two benign diseases of unknown etiology, seborrheic keratoses and acrochordons (skin tags), were examined using EGF-R immunolocalization and 125I-EGF binding techniques. Lesions documented as growing by clinical criteria or 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation (a measure of cell proliferation) were compared to nongrowing lesions of the same type. To correlate distributions of EGF-R to specific dermatoses, skin diseases of viral etiology (verruca vulgaris and molluscum contagiosum) were also probed by EGF-R immunolocalization and 125I-EGF binding. Elevated immunostaining for EGF-R and 125I-EGF binding sites were associated with actively growing seborrheic keratoses and skin tags whereas normal patterns of immunostaining and 125I-EGF binding were seen in nongrowing seborrheic keratoses and skin tags. Viral diseases showed unique patterns. No EGF-R were detected in verruca vulgaris. Molluscum contagiosum lesions showed intense EGF-R in basal keratinocytes and no EGF-R in virally infected cells. Thus elevations in EGF-R show a positive in vivo correlation with proliferation in at least two differing benign diseases of the epidermis. The decreased levels of EGF-R in virally infected lesions suggests that EGF-R may show unique patterns for specific dermatoses and are not universally elevated in benign hyperproliferative skin disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7

Nanney, L. B.; Ellis, D. L.; Levine, J.; King, L. E.

1992-01-01

275

Yellow Fever in Africa: Estimating the Burden of Disease and Impact of Mass Vaccination from Outbreak and Serological Data  

PubMed Central

Background Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and non-human primates in tropical areas of Africa and South America. While eradication is not feasible due to the wildlife reservoir, large scale vaccination activities in Africa during the 1940s to 1960s reduced yellow fever incidence for several decades. However, after a period of low vaccination coverage, yellow fever has resurged in the continent. Since 2006 there has been substantial funding for large preventive mass vaccination campaigns in the most affected countries in Africa to curb the rising burden of disease and control future outbreaks. Contemporary estimates of the yellow fever disease burden are lacking, and the present study aimed to update the previous estimates on the basis of more recent yellow fever occurrence data and improved estimation methods. Methods and Findings Generalised linear regression models were fitted to a dataset of the locations of yellow fever outbreaks within the last 25 years to estimate the probability of outbreak reports across the endemic zone. Environmental variables and indicators for the surveillance quality in the affected countries were used as covariates. By comparing probabilities of outbreak reports estimated in the regression with the force of infection estimated for a limited set of locations for which serological surveys were available, the detection probability per case and the force of infection were estimated across the endemic zone. The yellow fever burden in Africa was estimated for the year 2013 as 130,000 (95% CI 51,000–380,000) cases with fever and jaundice or haemorrhage including 78,000 (95% CI 19,000–180,000) deaths, taking into account the current level of vaccination coverage. The impact of the recent mass vaccination campaigns was assessed by evaluating the difference between the estimates obtained for the current vaccination coverage and for a hypothetical scenario excluding these vaccination campaigns. Vaccination campaigns were estimated to have reduced the number of cases and deaths by 27% (95% CI 22%–31%) across the region, achieving up to an 82% reduction in countries targeted by these campaigns. A limitation of our study is the high level of uncertainty in our estimates arising from the sparseness of data available from both surveillance and serological surveys. Conclusions With the estimation method presented here, spatial estimates of transmission intensity can be combined with vaccination coverage levels to evaluate the impact of past or proposed vaccination campaigns, thereby helping to allocate resources efficiently for yellow fever control. This method has been used by the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI Alliance) to estimate the potential impact of future vaccination campaigns. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Garske, Tini; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Yactayo, Sergio; Ronveaux, Olivier; Lewis, Rosamund F.; Staples, J. Erin; Perea, William; Ferguson, Neil M.

2014-01-01

276

An outbreak of angiostrongyliasis in Guanging, People's Republic of China: migrants vulnerable to an emerging disease.  

PubMed

Angiostrongyliasis has been frequently reported from the People's Republic of China during the last decade. An outbreak of angiostrongyliasis among migrant laborers in Guangning, Guangdong Province is described here. A questionnaire was developed to collect epidemiological and clinical information about 17 migrant laborers from the Bai ethnic group in Dali, Yunnan Province. Serum samples were collected and tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Rats and mollusks from the same area where patients had collected Pomacea canaliculata were examined for presence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis. All 17 Bai migrant laborers consumed P. canaliculata and six had meningitis 3-19 days after consumption of P. canaliculata. Headache, myalgia and fatigue were the most common symptoms. Blood samples from 5 patients were positive for antibodies to A. cantonensis. The places where the migrant laborers collected P. canaliculata were identified as endemic areas for A. cantonensis. This outbreak highlights the vulnerability of migrants to angiostrongyliasis. PMID:22299428

Deng, Zhuo-Hui; Lv, Shan; Lin, Jin-Yan; Lin, Rong-Xing; Pei, Fu-Quan

2011-09-01

277

Borna Disease Virus Requires Cholesterol in both Cellular Membrane and Viral Envelope for Efficient Cell Entry?  

PubMed Central

Borna disease virus (BDV), the prototypic member of the family Bornaviridae within the order Mononegavirales, provides an important model for the investigation of viral persistence within the central nervous system (CNS) and of associated brain disorders. BDV is highly neurotropic and enters its target cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process mediated by the virus surface glycoprotein (G), but the cellular factors and pathways determining BDV cell tropism within the CNS remain mostly unknown. Cholesterol has been shown to influence viral infections via its effects on different viral processes, including replication, budding, and cell entry. In this work, we show that cell entry, but not replication and gene expression, of BDV was drastically inhibited by depletion of cellular cholesterol levels. BDV G-mediated attachment to BDV-susceptible cells was cholesterol independent, but G localized to lipid rafts (LR) at the plasma membrane. LR structure and function critically depend on cholesterol, and hence, compromised structural integrity and function of LR caused by cholesterol depletion likely inhibited the initial stages of BDV cell internalization. Furthermore, we also show that viral-envelope cholesterol is required for BDV infectivity.

Clemente, Roberto; de Parseval, Aymeric; Perez, Mar; de la Torre, Juan C.

2009-01-01

278

Protection against Myxomatosis and Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease with Recombinant Myxoma Viruses Expressing Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Capsid Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twomyxomavirus-rabbithemorrhagicdiseasevirus(RHDV)recombinantviruseswereconstructedwiththe SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies

STEPHANE BERTAGNOLI; JACQUELINE GELFI; GHISLAINE LE GALL; ERIC BOILLETOT; JEAN-FRANCOIS VAUTHEROT; DENIS RASSCHAERT; SYLVIE LAURENT; FREDERIQUE PETIT; CORINE BOUCRAUT-BARALON; ANDALAIN MILON

1996-01-01

279

Free-ranging Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and an outbreak of inflammatory bowel disease along the Clark Fork River in Plains, Montana  

PubMed Central

Nine individuals with ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease grew up or lived in Plains, Montana, a 1,200-person community adjacent to the Clark Fork River near herds of free ranging Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. This inflammatory bowel disease outbreak is similar to others that have occurred along rivers contaminated by animal feces.

Pierce, Ellen S.

2012-01-01

280

A phylogenetic analysis using full-length viral genomes of South American dengue serotype 3 in consecutive Venezuelan outbreaks reveals novel NS5 mutation  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus currently causes 50-100 million infections annually. Comprehensive knowledge about the evolution of Dengue in response to selection pressure is currently unavailable, but would greatly enhance vaccine design efforts. In the current study, we sequenced 187 new dengue virus serotype 3(DENV-3) genotype III whole genomes isolated from Asia and the Americas. We analyzed them together with previously-sequenced isolates to gain a more detailed understanding of the evolutionary adaptations existing in this prevalent American serotype. In order to analyze the phylogenetic dynamics of DENV-3 during outbreak periods; we incorporated datasets of 48 and 11 sequences spanning two major outbreaks in Venezuela during 2001 and 2007-2008 respectively. Our phylogenetic analysis of newly sequenced viruses shows that subsets of genomes cluster primarily by geographic location, and secondarily by time of virus isolation. DENV-3 genotype III sequences from Asia are significantly divergent from those from the Americas due to their geographical separation and subsequent speciation. We measured amino acid variation for the E protein by calculating the Shannon entropy at each position between Asian and American genomes. We found a cluster of 7 amino acid substitutions having high variability within E protein domain III, which has previously been implicated in serotype-specific neutralization escape mutants. No novel mutations were found in the E protein of sequences isolated during either Venezuelan outbreak. Shannon entropy analysis of the NS5 polymerase mature protein revealed that a G374E mutation, in a region that contributes to interferon resistance in other flaviviruses by interfering with JAK-STAT signaling was present in both the Asian and American sequences from the 2007-2008 Venezuelan outbreak, but was absent in the sequences from the 2001 Venezuelan outbreak. In addition to E, several NS5 amino acid changes were unique to the 2007-2008 epidemic in Venezuela and may give additional insight into the adaptive response of DENV-3 at the population level.

Schmidt, DJ; Pickett, BE; Camacho, D; Comach, G; Xhaja, K; Lennon, NJ; Rizzolo, K; de Bosch, N; Becerra, A; Nogueira, ML; Mondini, A; da Silva, EV; Vasconcelos, PF; Munoz-Jordan, JL; Santiago, GA; Ocazionez, R; Gehrke, L; Lefkowitz, EJ; Birren, BW; Henn, MR; Bosch, I

2013-01-01

281

Aptamer-Based Therapeutics: New Approaches to Combat Human Viral Diseases  

PubMed Central

Viruses replicate inside the cells of an organism and continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment. Many life-threatening diseases, such as AIDS, SARS, hepatitis and some cancers, are caused by viruses. Because viruses have small genome sizes and high mutability, there is currently a lack of and an urgent need for effective treatment for many viral pathogens. One approach that has recently received much attention is aptamer-based therapeutics. Aptamer technology has high target specificity and versatility, i.e., any viral proteins could potentially be targeted. Consequently, new aptamer-based therapeutics have the potential to lead a revolution in the development of anti-infective drugs. Additionally, aptamers can potentially bind any targets and any pathogen that is theoretically amenable to rapid targeting, making aptamers invaluable tools for treating a wide range of diseases. This review will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of viral therapies that use aptamers. The aptamer selection process will be described, followed by an explanation of the potential for treating virus infection by aptamers. Recent progress and prospective use of aptamers against a large variety of human viruses, such as HIV-1, HCV, HBV, SCoV, Rabies virus, HPV, HSV and influenza virus, with particular focus on clinical development of aptamers will also be described. Finally, we will discuss the challenges of advancing antiviral aptamer therapeutics and prospects for future success.

Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

2013-01-01

282

A sheeppox outbreak in Morocco: isolation and identification of virus responsible for the new clinical form of disease  

PubMed Central

Background Sheeppoxvirus (SPPV) is a member of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family, which causes significant economic losses in Morocco. The resurgence of the sheeppox disease during 2010 was characterized by an emergence of a classical nodular form for the first time in Morocco. However, little is known about the virus strain responsible for nodular form. In this study, thirty three sheep, from the eastern region of Morocco, clinically infected were examined and dead animals were autopsied. A rapid diagnostic assay for SPPV using different type of clinical samples would be useful for outbreak management. The aim of this work was to isolate the virus strain responsible for nodular form and we identified and compared by phylogenetic analysis the field strain with Moroccan vaccine strain targeting the thymidine kinase (TK) gene and the chemokine analogue receptor of interleukin (IL8) gene. Further, it was important to investigate and validate a real-time PCR using different clinical and post-mortem samples to manage epidemic sheeppox disease. Results The nodular form of sheeppox disease observed in Morocco was clinically characterized by fever, depression, lacrimation, diarrhea in lambs and nodule. At necropsy, the most affected organ was the lung. The etiological strain was successfully isolated from lung nodule in a dead lamb and was identified by using real-time PCR that has been tested and validated on different types of clinical and post mortem samples from naturally infected animals. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of TK and IL8 gene showed that there was a very close relationship between field and vaccine strain. They were clustered within other SPPV strains. Conclusion In the current study, we show for the first time the nodular form of sheeppox in Morocco. We demonstrate a robust real-time PCR-based diagnostic assay to detect the sheeppox virus in multiple sample that can be implemented to efficiently manage the disease outbreak. Our study also offers the prospect for future molecular studies to understand the clinical forms.

2014-01-01

283

Genomic Variation between Campylobacter jejuni Isolates Associated with Milk-Borne-Disease Outbreaks.  

PubMed

Bacterial genome sequencing has led to the development of new approaches for the analysis of food-borne epidemics and the exploration of the relatedness of outbreak-associated isolates and their separation from nonassociated isolates. Using Illumina technology, we sequenced a total of six isolates (two from patients, two from raw bulk milk, and two from dairy cattle) associated with a milk-borne Campylobacter jejuni outbreak in a farming family and compared their genomes. These isolates had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types, and their multilocus sequence typing (MLST) type was ST-50. We used the Ma_1 isolate (milk) as the reference, and its genome was assembled and tentatively ordered using the C. jejuni NCTC 11168 genome as the scaffold. Using whole-genome MLST (wgMLST), we identified a total of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and differences in poly(G or C) or poly(A or T) tracts in 12 loci among the isolates. Several new alleles not present in the database were detected. In contrast, the sequences of the unassociated C. jejuni strains P14 and 1-12S (both ST-50) differed by 420 to 454 alleles from the epidemic-associated isolates. We found that the fecal contamination of bulk tank milk occurred by highly related sequence variants of C. jejuni, which are reflected as SNPs and differences in the length of the poly(A or T) tracts. Poly(G or C) tracts are reversibly variable and are thus unstable markers for comparison. Further, unrelated strains of ST-50 were clearly separated from the outbreak-associated isolates, indicating that wgMLST is an excellent tool for analysis. In addition, other useful data related to the genes and genetic systems of the isolates were obtained. PMID:24850348

Revez, Joana; Zhang, Ji; Schott, Thomas; Kivistö, Rauni; Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

2014-08-01

284

Use of a systems-based approach to an environmental health assessment for a waterborne disease outbreak investigation at a snowmobile lodge in Wyoming.  

PubMed

Investigations into disease outbreaks generally incorporate an epidemiologic investigation, laboratory analysis, and an environmental health assessment. This last component is designed to discover connections between factors in the environment and the outbreak, but is often limited, either by time and resources, or the expertise of the personnel included in outbreak investigation teams. A waterborne Norovirus outbreak investigation in Sheridan County, Wyoming, in 2001 provides an excellent example of the importance of including an in-depth, systems-based environmental health assessment in outbreak investigations. The epidemiologic component of this investigation identified the water supply of a snowmobile lodge in the Bighorn Mountains as the source of the outbreak, a result that was confirmed by laboratory analysis. Including a systems-based environmental health assessment in this investigation also helped to uncover the underlying environmental factors that led to contamination of the water supply. Those factors included an onsite wastewater disposal system that was overloaded by increased use and not well suited to local soil and geologic conditions and a drinking water system with no treatment or disinfection. In addition, heavy precipitation and increased pumping of wells to satisfy higher demands probably facilitated the contamination of the drinking water wells by causing greater movement of wastewater through the soil and underlying bedrock. By focusing on these links between factors in the environment and adverse health outcomes, the systems-based environmental health assessment also helped to highlight prevention strategies for avoiding recurrences. PMID:15881980

Gelting, Richard; Sarisky, John; Selman, Carol; Otto, Charles; Higgins, Charles; Bohan, Patrick O; Buchanan, Sharunda B; Meehan, Patrick J

2005-01-01

285

Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) isolated from the ISA disease outbreaks in Chile diverged from ISAV isolates from Norway around 1996 and was disseminated around 2005, based on surface glycoprotein gene sequences  

PubMed Central

Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) is a pathogen of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar); a disease first diagnosed in Norway in 1984. For over 25 years ISAV has caused major disease outbreaks in the Northern hemisphere, and remains an emerging fish pathogen because of the asymptomatic infections in marine wild fish and the potential for emergence of new epidemic strains. ISAV belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae, together with influenza viruses but is sufficiently different to be assigned to its own genus, Isavirus. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; fusion (F) protein encoded on segment 5 and haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded on segment 6. However, comparision between different ISAV isolates is complicated because there is presently no universally accepted nomenclature system for designation of genetic relatedness between ISAV isolates. The first outbreak of ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in the Southern hemisphere occurred in Chile starting in June 2007. In order to describe the molecular characteristics of the virus so as to understand its origins, how ISAV isolates are maintained and spread, and their virulence characteristics, we conducted a study where the viral sequences were directly amplified, cloned and sequenced from tissue samples collected from several ISA-affected fish on the different fish farms with confirmed or suspected ISA outbreaks in Chile. This paper describes the genetic characterization of a large number of ISAV strains associated with extensive outbreaks in Chile starting in June 2007, and their phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates that are representative of the genetic diversity of ISAV. Results RT-PCR for ISAV F and HE glycoprotein genes was performed directly on tissue samples collected from ISA-affected fish on different farms among 14 fish companies in Chile during the ISA outbreaks that started in June 2007. The genes of the F and HE glycoproteins were cloned and sequenced for 51 and 78 new isolates, respectively. An extensive comparative analysis of ISAV F and HE sequence data, including reference isolates sampled from Norway, Faroe Islands, Scotland, USA, and Canada was performed. Based on phylogenetic analysis of concatenated ISAV F and HE genes of 103 individual isolates, the isolates from the ISA outbreaks in Chile grouped in their own cluster of 7 distinct strains within Genotype I (European genotype) of ISAV, with the closest relatedness to Norwegian ISAVs isolated in 1997. The phylogenetic software program, BACKTRACK, estimated the Chile isolates diverged from Norway isolates about 1996 and, therefore, had been present in Chile for some time before the recent outbreaks. Analysis of the deduced F protein sequence showed 43 of 51 Chile isolates with an 11-amino acid insert between 265N and 266Q, with 100% sequence identity with Genotype I ISAV RNA segment 2. Twenty four different HE-HPRs, including HPR0, were detected, with HPR7b making up 79.7%. This is considered a manifestation of ISAV quasispecies HE protein sequence diversity. Conclusion Taken together, these findings suggest that the ISA outbreaks were caused by virus that was already present in Chile that mutated to new strains. This is the first comprehensive report tracing ISAV from Europe to South America.

Kibenge, Frederick SB; Godoy, Marcos G; Wang, Yingwei; Kibenge, Molly JT; Gherardelli, Valentina; Mansilla, Soledad; Lisperger, Angelica; Jarpa, Miguel; Larroquete, Geraldine; Avendano, Fernando; Lara, Marcela; Gallardo, Alicia

2009-01-01

286

Antibodies to selected viral disease agents in wild boars from the Czech Republic.  

PubMed

Blood samples were collected from wild boar (Sus scrofa) shot during the hunting season from 1999 to 2005 in the Czech Republic. Sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the presence of antibodies against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Indirect fluorescence antibody test was used for detection of antibodies against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). Antibodies against ADV, BVDV, PCV-2, and TGEV were detected in 30% (101 of 338), 1% (2 of 352), 43% (57 of 134), and 1% (1 of 134) of wild boars, respectively. Sera of 6,471 and 362 tested wild boars were negative for the presence of antibodies against CSFV and SVDV, respectively. This is the first survey of TGEV antibodies in wild boars and the first serologic survey of viral diseases in wild boars in the Czech Republic. Wild boars in the Czech Republic may act as a potential reservoir of ADV and thus have a role in the epidemiology of this disease. PMID:18689671

Sedlak, Kamil; Bartova, Eva; Machova, Jirina

2008-07-01

287

Short Communication Differential Viral Protein Expression in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Infected Diseases Kaposi's Sarcoma, Primary Effusion Lymphoma, and Multicentric Castleman's Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked to KS, primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Transcript mapping studies using PEL cell lines have allowed preliminary classification of viral gene expression into constitutive (class I) and induc- ible (class II\\/III) categories. To determine whether viral gene expression differs in vivo, we examined tissue sections of

Carlo Parravicini; Bala Chandran; Mario Corbellino; Emilio Berti; Marco Paulli; Patrick S. Moore; Yuan Chang

2000-01-01

288

Dengue Viral RNA Levels in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Associated with Disease Severity and Preexisting Dengue Immune Status  

PubMed Central

Background Infection with dengue viruses (DENV) causes a wide range of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a febrile illness called dengue fever (DF), to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). The in vivo targets of DENV and the relation between the viral burden in these cells and disease severity are not known. Method The levels of positive and negative strand viral RNA in peripheral blood monocytes, T/NK cells, and B cells and in plasma of DF and DHF cases were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Results Positive strand viral RNA was detected in monocytes, T/NK cells and B cells with the highest amounts found in B cells. Viral RNA levels in CD14+ cells and plasma were significantly higher in DHF compared to DF, and in cases with a secondary infection compared to those undergoing a primary infection. The distribution of viral RNA among cell subpopulations was similar in DF and DHF cases. Small amounts of negative strand RNA were found in a few cases only. The severity of plasma leakage correlated with viral RNA levels in plasma and in CD14+ cells. Conclusions B cells were the principal cells containing DENV RNA in peripheral blood, but overall there was little active DENV RNA replication detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Secondary infection and DHF were associated with higher viral burden in PBMC populations, especially CD14+ monocytes, suggesting that viral infection of these cells may be involved in disease pathogenesis.

Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Gibbons, Robert V.; Green, Sharone; Libraty, Daniel H.; Endy, Timothy P.; Ennis, Francis A.; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Rothman, Alan L.

2012-01-01

289

Differences in Virulence among Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains Isolated from Humans during Disease Outbreaks and from Healthy Cattle?  

PubMed Central

Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes life-threatening outbreaks of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans and significant economic loss in agriculture and could be a potential agent of bioterrorism. Although the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in cattle and other species with which humans have frequent contact is high, human infections are relatively uncommon, despite a low infectious dose. A plausible explanation for the low disease incidence is the possibility that not all strains are virulent in humans. If there are substantial differences in virulence among strains in nature, then human disease may select for high virulence. We used a gnotobiotic piglet model to investigate the virulence of isolates from healthy cattle and from humans in disease outbreaks and to determine the correlation between production of Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Stx2 and virulence. Overall, E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from healthy cattle were less virulent in gnotobiotic piglets than strains isolated from humans during disease outbreaks. The amount of Stx2 produced by E. coli O157:H7 strains correlated with strain virulence as measured by a reduction in piglet survival and signs of central nervous system disease due to brain infarction. The amount of Stx1 produced in culture was not correlated with the length of time of piglet survival or with signs of central nervous system disease. We suggest that disease outbreaks select for producers of high levels of Stx2 among E. coli O157:H7 strains shed by animals and further suggest that Stx1 expression is unlikely to be significant in human outbreaks.

Baker, Diane R.; Moxley, Rodney A.; Steele, Mike B.; LeJeune, Jeffrey T.; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Chen, Ding-Geng; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Francis, David H.

2007-01-01

290

Foodborne disease outbreaks caused by Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, and Staphylococcus aureus--United States, 1998-2008.  

PubMed

From 1998 to 2008, 1229 foodborne outbreaks caused by Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, and Staphylococcus aureus were reported in the United States; 39% were reported with a confirmed etiology. Vomiting was commonly reported in B. cereus (median, 75% of cases) and S. aureus outbreaks (median, 87%), but rarely in C. perfringens outbreaks (median, 9%). Meat or poultry dishes were commonly implicated in C. perfringens (63%) and S. aureus (55%) outbreaks, and rice dishes were commonly implicated in B. cereus outbreaks (50%). Errors in food processing and preparation were commonly reported (93%), regardless of etiology; contamination by a food worker was only common in S. aureus outbreaks (55%). Public health interventions should focus on these commonly reported errors to reduce the occurrence of outbreaks caused by B. cereus, C. perfringens, and S. aureus in the United States. PMID:23592829

Bennett, Sarah D; Walsh, Kelly A; Gould, L Hannah

2013-08-01

291

Cooler Temperatures Destabilize RNA Interference and Increase Susceptibility of Disease Vector Mosquitoes to Viral Infection  

PubMed Central

Background The impact of global climate change on the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases is the subject of extensive debate. The transmission of mosquito-borne viral diseases is particularly complex, with climatic variables directly affecting many parameters associated with the prevalence of disease vectors. While evidence shows that warmer temperatures often decrease the extrinsic incubation period of an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus), exposure to cooler temperatures often predisposes disease vector mosquitoes to higher infection rates. RNA interference (RNAi) pathways are essential to antiviral immunity in the mosquito; however, few experiments have explored the effects of temperature on the RNAi machinery. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized transgenic “sensor” strains of Aedes aegypti to examine the role of temperature on RNA silencing. These “sensor” strains express EGFP only when RNAi is inhibited; for example, after knockdown of the effector proteins Dicer-2 (DCR-2) or Argonaute-2 (AGO-2). We observed an increase in EGFP expression in transgenic sensor mosquitoes reared at 18°C as compared with 28°C. Changes in expression were dependent on the presence of an inverted repeat with homology to a portion of the EGFP sequence, as transgenic strains lacking this sequence, the double stranded RNA (dsRNA) trigger for RNAi, showed no change in EGFP expression when reared at 18°C. Sequencing small RNAs in sensor mosquitoes reared at low temperature revealed normal processing of dsRNA substrates, suggesting the observed deficiency in RNAi occurs downstream of DCR-2. Rearing at cooler temperatures also predisposed mosquitoes to higher levels of infection with both chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Conclusions/Significance This data suggest that microclimates, such as those present in mosquito breeding sites, as well as more general climactic variables may influence the dynamics of mosquito-borne viral diseases by affecting the antiviral immunity of disease vectors.

Adelman, Zach N.; Anderson, Michelle A. E.; Wiley, Michael R.; Murreddu, Marta G.; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Morazzani, Elaine M.; Myles, Kevin M.

2013-01-01

292

Detection of Viral Proteins after Infection of Cultured Hepatocytes with Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus  

PubMed Central

The calicivirus rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), which replicates predominantly in the livers of infected rabbits, cannot be propagated in tissue culture. To enable the performance of in vitro studies, rabbit hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion and gradient centrifugation. After inoculation with purified RHDV, more than 50% of the cells proved to be infected. Protein analyses led to the detection of 13 RHDV-specific polypeptides within the infected cells. These proteins were assigned to defined regions of the viral genome, resulting in a refined model of RHDV genome organization.

Konig, Matthias; Thiel, Heinz-Jurgen; Meyers, Gregor

1998-01-01

293

Biosurveillance in outbreak investigations.  

PubMed

Following the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the anthrax attacks in 2001, public health entities implemented automated surveillance systems based on disease syndromes for early detection of bioterror events and to increase timeliness of responses. Despite widespread adoption, syndromic surveillance systems' ability to provide early notification of outbreaks is unproven, and there is little documentation on their role in outbreak response. We hypothesized that biosurveillance is used in practice to augment classical outbreak investigations, and we used case studies conducted in 2007-08 to determine (1) which steps in outbreak investigations were best served by biosurveillance, and (2) which steps presented the greatest opportunities for improvement. The systems used in the case studies varied in how they functioned, and there were examples in which syndromic systems had identified outbreaks before other methods. Biosurveillance was used successfully for all steps of outbreak investigations. Key advantages of syndromic systems were sensitivity, timeliness, and flexibility and as a source of data for situational awareness. Limitations of biosurveillance were a lack of specificity, reliance on chief complaint data, and a lack of formal training for users. Linking syndromic data to triage notes and medical chart data would substantially increase the value of biosurveillance in the conduct of outbreak investigations and reduce the burden on health department staff. PMID:23448272

Kaydos-Daniels, S Cornelia; Rojas Smith, Lucia; Farris, Tonya R

2013-03-01

294

Novel insights into the regulation of the viral polymerase complex of neurotropic Borna disease virus.  

PubMed

Borna disease virus (BDV) genetic information is encoded in a highly condensed non-segmented RNA genome of negative polarity. Replication and transcription of the genome occurs in the nucleus, enabling the virus to employ the cellular splicing machinery to process primary transcripts and to regulate expression of viral gene products. BDV establishes a non-cytolytic, persistent infection that in animals is mainly restricted to neurons of the central nervous system. Based on these unique properties, BDV represents the prototype member of the virus family Bornaviridae in the order Mononegavirales. Analysis of molecular aspects of BDV replication has long been hampered by the lack of a reverse genetics system. Only recently, artificial BDV minigenomes permitted the reconstitution of the viral polymerase complex, allowing finally the recovery of BDV from cDNA. As in other families of the Mononegavirales, the active polymerase complex of BDV is composed of the polymerase (L), the nucleoprotein (N) and the phosphoprotein (P). In addition, the viral X protein was identified as potent negative regulator of polymerase activity. Protein interaction studies combined with minireplicon assays suggested that P is a central regulatory element of BDV replication that directs the assembly of the polymerase complex. Most intriguingly, BDV obtained from cDNA with variable genomic termini suggests a novel strategy for viral replication-control. BDV seems to restrict its propagation efficacy by defined 5' terminal trimming of genomic and antigenomic RNA molecules. This review will summarize these novel findings and will discuss them in the context of BDV neurotropism and persistence. PMID:15992626

Schneider, Urs

2005-08-01

295

Use of plasmid profiles in epidemiologic surveillance of disease outbreaks and in tracing the transmission of antibiotic resistance.  

PubMed Central

Plasmids are circular deoxyribonucleic acid molecules that exist in bacteria, usually independent of the chromosome. The study of plasmids is important to medical microbiology because plasmids can encode genes for antibiotic resistance or virulence factors. Plasmids can also serve as markers of various bacterial strains when a typing system referred to as plasmid profiling, or plasmid fingerprinting is used. In these methods partially purified plasma deoxyribonucleic acid species are separated according to molecular size by agarose gel electrophoresis. In a second procedure, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid which has been cleaved by restriction endonucleases can be separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the resulting pattern of fragments can be used to verify the identity of bacterial isolates. Because many species of bacteria contain plasmids, plasmid profile typing has been used to investigate outbreaks of many bacterial diseases and to trace inter- and intra-species spread of antibiotic resistance. Images

Mayer, L W

1988-01-01

296

Analysis of naturally occurring avian bornavirus infection and transmission during an outbreak of proventricular dilatation disease among captive psittacine birds.  

PubMed

A proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) outbreak provided the opportunity to investigate the transmissibility of avian Bornavirus (ABV) and its linkage to PDD under natural conditions. Upon exposure to a bird with a fatal case of PDD, 10 birds became symptomatic and died. ABV2 RNA was recovered from available tissues. Further screening revealed that 12/46 exposed birds were ABV2(+). Three chicks boarded at this aviary developed PDD. They harbored the same ABV2 isolate and transmitted it to five of eight chicks in their home aviary. These findings demonstrate that ABV infection precedes the development of PDD. ABV-specific Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicate that ABV2 is not strictly neurotropic. PMID:19955301

Kistler, Amy L; Smith, Jeanne M; Greninger, Alexander L; Derisi, Joseph L; Ganem, Don

2010-02-01

297

Analysis of Naturally Occurring Avian Bornavirus Infection and Transmission during an Outbreak of Proventricular Dilatation Disease among Captive Psittacine Birds ? † ¶  

PubMed Central

A proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) outbreak provided the opportunity to investigate the transmissibility of avian Bornavirus (ABV) and its linkage to PDD under natural conditions. Upon exposure to a bird with a fatal case of PDD, 10 birds became symptomatic and died. ABV2 RNA was recovered from available tissues. Further screening revealed that 12/46 exposed birds were ABV2+. Three chicks boarded at this aviary developed PDD. They harbored the same ABV2 isolate and transmitted it to five of eight chicks in their home aviary. These findings demonstrate that ABV infection precedes the development of PDD. ABV-specific Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicate that ABV2 is not strictly neurotropic.

Kistler, Amy L.; Smith, Jeanne M.; Greninger, Alexander L.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Ganem, Don

2010-01-01

298

The challenge to know and control: disease outbreak surveillance and alerts in China and India.  

PubMed

Since the revisions to the International Health Regulations (IHR) in 2005, much attention has been turned to how states, particularly developing states, will address core capacity requirements. The question often examined is how states with poor health systems can strengthen their capacity to identify and verify public health emergencies of international concern. A core capacity requirement is that by 2012 states will have a surveillance and response network that operates from the local community to the national level. Much emphasis has turned to the health system capacity required for this task. In this article, I seek to understand the political capacity to perform this task. This article considers how the world's two most populous states, 1 China and India, have sought to communicate outbreak events in times of crisis and calm. I consider what this reporting performance tells us of their capacity to meet their IHR obligations given the two countries differing political institutions. PMID:22788710

Davies, Sara E

2012-01-01

299

Multi-pathogen waterborne disease outbreak associated with a dinner cruise on Lake Michigan.  

PubMed

We report an outbreak associated with a dinner cruise on Lake Michigan. This took place on the same day as heavy rainfall, which resulted in 42·4 billion liters of rainwater and storm runoff containing highly diluted sewage being released into the lake. Of 72 cruise participants, 41 (57%) reported gastroenteritis. Stool specimens were positive for Shigella sonnei (n=3), Giardia (n=3), and Cryptosporidium (n=2). Ice consumption was associated with illness (risk ratio 2·2, P=0·011). S. sonnei was isolated from a swab obtained from the one of the boat's ice bins. Environmental inspection revealed conditions and equipment that could have contributed to lake water contaminating the hose used to load potable water onto the boat. Knowledge of water holding and distribution systems on boats, and of potential risks associated with flooding and the release of diluted sewage into large bodies of water, is crucial for public health guidance regarding recreational cruises. PMID:21676362

Serdarevic, F; Jones, R C; Weaver, K N; Black, S R; Ritger, K A; Guichard, F; Dombroski, P; Emanuel, B P; Miller, L; Gerber, S I

2012-04-01

300

Viral gastroenteritis: the USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT experience.  

PubMed

Although the spread of disease on board Navy ships is not a novel concept, the medical department of the USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT recently experienced a significant outbreak of viral gastroenteritis while at sea. The impact on the crew and medical department is reviewed in this case report. The use of the Navy Disease Non-Battle Injury tracking system was validated. Furthermore, we proposed the placement of waterless, isopropyl alcohol-based, hand-cleaning systems in strategic locations throughout the ship, to help prevent and minimize the spread of future disease. Finally, more stringent recommendations regarding sick in quarters status and careful utilization of consumable resources are necessary components of an effective outbreak management strategy. PMID:15495733

Whittaker, David R; Campbell, Jerome T; McCarten, Michael D

2004-09-01

301

Surveillance for waterborne disease and outbreaks associated with recreational water use and other aquatic facility-associated health events-United States, 2005-2006  

EPA Science Inventory

PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaboratively maintained the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System for collecting and reporting data related to waterborne-d...

302

[Serological survey of antibodies against viral diseases of public health interest in llamas (Lama glama) from Jujuy province, Argentina].  

PubMed

Llama population from Argentina is mainly concentrated in the Andean Puna, Jujuy. Llamas represent an important economic resource for the Andean communities. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antibodies against viral antigens associated to viral diseases of economic impact (neonatal diarrhea, reproductive and respiratory syndromes). A total of 349 serum samples from adult llamas were analyzed. The obtained antibody prevalence was 100 % for Rotavirus A and 70 % for Bovine parainfluenza virus 3. In contrast, no reactors were detected to Bovine herpesvirus 1, Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, Human influenza A virus (H1N1) and Equine influenza virus (H3N8). These results confirm the wide circulation of rotavirus and parainfluenza virus in Argentinean llamas and suggest that susceptibility to infection with bovine herpesvirus, pestivirus and influenza A viruses is low. This serologic survey provides novel information regarding the epidemiology of viral diseases affecting llamas from the Argentinean Andean Puna. PMID:24721276

Barbieri, Elena S; Rodríguez, Daniela V; Marin, Raúl E; Setti, Walter; Romero, Sandra; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana

2014-01-01

303

Automated Detection of Infectious Disease Outbreaks in Hospitals: A Retrospective Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Background Detection of outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections is often based on simple rules, such as the occurrence of three new cases of a single pathogen in two weeks on the same ward. These rules typically focus on only a few pathogens, and they do not account for the pathogens' underlying prevalence, the normal random variation in rates, and clusters that may occur beyond a single ward, such as those associated with specialty services. Ideally, outbreak detection programs should evaluate many pathogens, using a wide array of data sources. Methods and Findings We applied a space-time permutation scan statistic to microbiology data from patients admitted to a 750-bed academic medical center in 2002–2006, using WHONET-SaTScan laboratory information software from the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance. We evaluated patients' first isolates for each potential pathogenic species. In order to evaluate hospital-associated infections, only pathogens first isolated >2 d after admission were included. Clusters were sought daily across the entire hospital, as well as in hospital wards, specialty services, and using similar antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. We assessed clusters that had a likelihood of occurring by chance less than once per year. For methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), WHONET-SaTScan–generated clusters were compared to those previously identified by the Infection Control program, which were based on a rule-based criterion of three occurrences in two weeks in the same ward. Two hospital epidemiologists independently classified each cluster's importance. From 2002 to 2006, WHONET-SaTScan found 59 clusters involving 2–27 patients (median 4). Clusters were identified by antimicrobial resistance profile (41%), wards (29%), service (13%), and hospital-wide assessments (17%). WHONET-SaTScan rapidly detected the two previously known gram-negative pathogen clusters. Compared to rule-based thresholds, WHONET-SaTScan considered only one of 73 previously designated MRSA clusters and 0 of 87 VRE clusters as episodes statistically unlikely to have occurred by chance. WHONET-SaTScan identified six MRSA and four VRE clusters that were previously unknown. Epidemiologists considered more than 95% of the 59 detected clusters to merit consideration, with 27% warranting active investigation or intervention. Conclusions Automated statistical software identified hospital clusters that had escaped routine detection. It also classified many previously identified clusters as events likely to occur because of normal random fluctuations. This automated method has the potential to provide valuable real-time guidance both by identifying otherwise unrecognized outbreaks and by preventing the unnecessary implementation of resource-intensive infection control measures that interfere with regular patient care. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Stelling, John; Placzek, Hilary; Kulldorff, Martin; Kleinman, Ken; O'Brien, Thomas F.; Calderwood, Michael S.; Vostok, Johanna; Dunn, Julie; Platt, Richard

2010-01-01

304

Surveillance of pneumococcal serotype 1 carriage during an outbreak of serotype 1 invasive pneumococcal disease in central Australia 2010-2012  

PubMed Central

Background An outbreak of serotype 1 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) occurred in Central Australia from October 2010 to the latter part of 2012. Surveillance of serotype 1 carriage was conducted to determine epidemiological features of asymptomatic carriage that could potentially be driving the outbreak. Methods 130 patients and accompanying persons presenting at Alice Springs Hospital Emergency Department consented to nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) collection. NPS were processed by standard methods, including culture, pneumococcal lytA quantitative real-time PCR, serotype 1-specific real-time PCR and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Results Pneumococcal carriage was detected in 16% of participants. Carriage was highest in the under 10 year olds from remote communities surrounding Alice Springs (75%). Four NPS were positive for serotype 1 DNA by PCR; 3 were also culture-positive for serotype 1 pneumococci. Serotype 1 isolates had atypical colony morphology on primary culture. All serotype 1 carriers were healthy children 5 to 8 years of age from remote communities. By MLST, serotype 1 isolates were ST306, as were IPD isolates associated with this outbreak. Conclusions During an outbreak of serotype 1 ST306 IPD, carriage of the outbreak strain was detected in 3% NPS collected. All carriers were healthy children 5 to 8 years of age.

2013-01-01

305

How Ambient Humidity May Affect the Transmission of Viral Infectious Diseases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viral infectious diseases such as influenza have been a great burden to public health. The airborne transmission route is an important venue for the spread of many respiratory viral diseases. Many airborne viruses have been shown to be sensitive to ambient humidity, yet the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain elusive. A thorough understanding of this phenomenon may provide insight into the temporal and spatial distribution of diseases. For instance, studies have repeatedly suggested ambient humidity as an important environmental determinant in the transmission of influenza in temperate regions. Further, knowing how to optimize humidity so as to minimize virus survival may have practical implications for disease prevention. In this talk, we will discuss multiple mechanisms that may account for the association between humidity and viability of viruses in aerosols, including water activity, surface inactivation, salt toxicity, and conformational changes to the virus in response to varying pH. As a case study, we will discuss our work on the effect of relative humidity (RH) on survival of influenza A virus (IAV) and how it may contribute to the transmission patterns of seasonal flu around the world. We measured the change in viability of IAV in droplets at various RHs. Results suggest three potential regimes defined by humidity: physiological (~100% RH) with high viability, concentrated (~50% to near 100% RH) with lower viability, and dry (<~50% RH) with high viability. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic basis for the dependence of IAV's transmission on humidity. In temperate regions, the increase in influenza activity in winter may be due to enhanced transmission via the aerosol route thanks to IAV's higher viability in droplets at low RH. In tropical regions, transmission could be enhanced due to high viability of IAV at extremely high RH (rainy season), as observed in our study, possibly through both the aerosol route and the contact route.

Yang, Wan; Marr, Linsey; Elankumaran, Subbiah

2013-04-01

306

Southeast Asian Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses in Eastern Asia  

PubMed Central

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks recently affected 2 countries (Japan and South Korea) in eastern Asia that were free of FMD without vaccination. Analysis of viral protein 1 nucleotide sequences indicated that FMD serotype A and O viruses that caused these outbreaks originated in mainland Southeast Asia to which these viruses are endemic.

Knowles, Nick J.; He, JiJun; Shang, Youjun; Wadsworth, Jemma; Valdazo-Gonzalez, Begona; Onosato, Hiroyuki; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Morioka, Kazuki; Yoshida, Kazuo; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Luk, Geraldine; Borisov, Vladimir; Scherbakov, Alexey; Timina, Anna; Bold, Dashzeveg; Nguyen, Tung; Paton, David J.; Hammond, Jef M.; Liu, Xiangtao

2012-01-01

307

Evaluation of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis in Epidemiological Investigations of Meningococcal Disease Outbreaks Caused by Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C  

PubMed Central

Since 1990, the frequency of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (NMSC) outbreaks in the United States has increased. Based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE), the current molecular subtyping standard, most of the NMSC outbreaks have been caused by isolates of several closely related electrophoretic types (ETs) within the ET-37 complex. We chose 66 isolates from four well-described NMSC outbreaks that occurred in the United States from 1993 to 1995 to evaluate the potential of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to identify outbreak-related isolates specific for each of the four outbreaks and to differentiate between them and 50 sporadic isolates collected during the outbreak investigations or through active laboratory-based surveillance from 1989 to 1996. We tested all isolates collected during the outbreak investigations by four other molecular subtyping methods: MEE, ribotyping (ClaI), random amplified polymorphic DNA assay (two primers), and serotyping and serosubtyping. Among the 116 isolates, we observed 11 clusters of 39 NheI PFGE patterns. Excellent correlation between the PFGE and the epidemiological data was observed, with an overall sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 71% at the 95% pattern relatedness breakpoint using either 1.5 or 1.0% tolerance. For all four analyzed outbreaks, PFGE would have given public health officials additional support in declaring an outbreak and making appropriate public health decisions.

Popovic, Tanja; Schmink, Susanna; Rosenstein, Nancy A.; Ajello, Gloria W.; Reeves, Michael W.; Plikaytis, Brian; Hunter, Susan B.; Ribot, Efrain M.; Boxrud, David; Tondella, Maria L.; Kim, Chung; Noble, Corie; Mothershed, Elizabeth; Besser, John; Perkins, Bradley A.

2001-01-01

308

Viral respiratory diseases (ILT, aMPV infections, IB): are they ever under control?  

PubMed

1. The use of vaccines is the main approach to control of the economically important poultry viral respiratory diseases infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infections and infectious bronchitis (IB). This paper appraises the current methods of vaccine control in the light of the nature of each virus and epidemiological factors associated with each disease. 2. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) exists as a single type with a wide range of disease severity. It is a serious disease in certain regions of the world. Recent work has distinguished molecular differences between vaccine and field strains and vaccine virus can be a cause of disease. Vaccines have remained unaltered for many years but new ones are being developed to counter vaccine side effects and reversion and reactivation of latent virus. 3. Avian metapneumoviruses, the cause of turkey rhinotracheitis and respiratory disease in chickens exists as 4 subtypes, A, B, C and D. A and B are widespread and vaccines work well provided that accurate doses are given. Newer vaccine developments are designed to eliminate reversion and possibly counter the appearance of newer field strains which may break through established vaccine coverage. 4. IB presents the biggest problem of the three. Being an unstable RNA virus, part of the viral genome that codes for the S1 spike gene can undergo mutation and recombination so that important antigenic variants can appear irregularly which may evade existing vaccine protection. While conventional vaccines work well against homologous types, new strategies are needed to counter this instability. Molecular approaches involving tailoring viruses to suit field challenges are in progress. However, the simple use of two genetically different vaccines to protect against a wide range of heterologous types is now a widespread practice that is very effective. 5. None of the three diseases described can claim to be satisfactorily controlled and it remains to be seen whether the newer generations of vaccines will be more efficacious and cost effective. The importance of constant surveillance is emphasised and the testing of novel vaccines cannot be achieved without the use of vaccine-challenge experiments in poultry. PMID:20390564

Jones, Richard C

2010-02-01

309

Neurodegenerative disease and the neuroimmune axis (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, and viral infections)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The appearance of activated immune cells and the accumulation of inflammation-associated proteins are common phenomena associated with neurodegenerative diseases. These inflammatory components of central nervous system (CNS) diseases have most often been described in the context of an immune response to damage and cell loss already occurring in the affected brain area. There has, however, been a renewed interest in

Garth E. Ringheim; Katherine Conant

2004-01-01

310

The Role of Research in Viral Disease Eradication and Elimination Programs: Lessons for Malaria Eradication  

PubMed Central

By examining the role research has played in eradication or regional elimination initiatives for three viral diseases—smallpox, poliomyelitis, and measles—we derive nine cross-cutting lessons applicable to malaria eradication. In these initiatives, some types of research commenced as the programs began and proceeded in parallel. Basic laboratory, clinical, and field research all contributed notably to progress made in the viral programs. For each program, vaccine was the lynchpin intervention, but as the programs progressed, research was required to improve vaccine formulations, delivery methods, and immunization schedules. Surveillance was fundamental to all three programs, whilst polio eradication also required improved diagnostic methods to identify asymptomatic infections. Molecular characterization of pathogen isolates strengthened surveillance and allowed insights into the geographic source of infections and their spread. Anthropologic, sociologic, and behavioural research were needed to address cultural and religious beliefs to expand community acceptance. The last phases of elimination and eradication became increasingly difficult, as a nil incidence was approached. Any eradication initiative for malaria must incorporate flexible research agendas that can adapt to changing epidemiologic contingencies and allow planning for posteradication scenarios.

Breman, Joel G.; de Quadros, Ciro A.; Dowdle, Walter R.; Foege, William H.; Henderson, Donald A.; John, T. Jacob; Levine, Myron M.

2011-01-01

311

Animal viral diseases and global change: bluetongue and West Nile fever as paradigms  

PubMed Central

Environmental changes have an undoubted influence on the appearance, distribution, and evolution of infectious diseases, and notably on those transmitted by vectors. Global change refers to environmental changes arising from human activities affecting the fundamental mechanisms operating in the biosphere. This paper discusses the changes observed in recent times with regard to some important arboviral (arthropod-borne viral) diseases of animals, and the role global change could have played in these variations. Two of the most important arboviral diseases of animals, bluetongue (BT) and West Nile fever/encephalitis (WNF), have been selected as models. In both cases, in the last 15 years an important leap forward has been observed, which has lead to considering them emerging diseases in different parts of the world. BT, affecting domestic ruminants, has recently afflicted livestock in Europe in an unprecedented epizootic, causing enormous economic losses. WNF affects wildlife (birds), domestic animals (equines), and humans, thus, beyond the economic consequences of its occurrence, as a zoonotic disease, it poses an important public health threat. West Nile virus (WNV) has expanded in the last 12 years worldwide, and particularly in the Americas, where it first occurred in 1999, extending throughout the Americas relentlessly since then, causing a severe epidemic of disastrous consequences for public health, wildlife, and livestock. In Europe, WNV is known long time ago, but it is since the last years of the twentieth century that its incidence has risen substantially. Circumstances such as global warming, changes in land use and water management, increase in travel, trade of animals, and others, can have an important influence in the observed changes in both diseases. The following question is raised: What is the contribution of global changes to the current increase of these diseases in the world?

Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A

2012-01-01

312

Low numbers of repeat units in variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) regions of white spot syndrome virus are correlated with disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important pathogen in shrimp farming systems worldwide including the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. The genome of WSSV is characterized by the presence of two major 'indel regions' found at ORF14/15 and ORF23/24 (WSSV-Thailand) and three regions with variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) located in ORF75, ORF94 and ORF125. In the current study, we investigated whether or not the number of repeat units in the VNTRs correlates with virus outbreak status and/or shrimp farming practice. We analysed 662 WSSV samples from individual WSSV-infected Penaeus monodon shrimp from 104 ponds collected from two important shrimp farming regions of the Mekong Delta: Ca Mau and Bac Lieu. Using this large data set and statistical analysis, we found that for ORF94 and ORF125, the mean number of repeat units (RUs) in VNTRs was significantly lower in disease outbreak ponds than in non-outbreak ponds. Although a higher mean RU number was observed in the improved-extensive system than in the rice-shrimp or semi-intensive systems, these differences were not significant. VNTR sequences are thus not only useful markers for studying WSSV genotypes and populations, but specific VNTR variants also correlate with disease outbreaks in shrimp farming systems. PMID:22913744

Hoa, T T T; Zwart, M P; Phuong, N T; de Jong, M C M; Vlak, J M

2012-11-01

313

Cyanotoxins are not implicated in the etiology of coral black band disease outbreaks on Pelorus Island, Great Barrier Reef.  

PubMed

Cyanobacterial toxins (i.e. microcystins) produced within the microbial mat of coral black band disease (BBD) have been implicated in disease pathogenicity. This study investigated the presence of toxins within BBD lesions and other cyanobacterial patch (CP) lesions, which, in some instances ( approximately 19%), facilitated the onset of BBD, from an outbreak site at Pelorus Island on the inshore, central Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Cyanobacterial species that dominated the biomass of CP and BBD lesions were cultivated and identified, based on morphology and 16S rRNA gene sequences, as Blennothrix- and Oscillatoria-affiliated species, respectively, and identical to cyanobacterial sequences retrieved from previous molecular studies from this site. The presence of the cyanotoxins microcystin, cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, nodularin and anatoxin and their respective gene operons in field samples of CP and BBD lesions and their respective culture isolations was tested using genetic (PCR-based screenings), chemical (HPLC-UV, FTICR-MS and LC/MS(n)) and biochemical (PP2A) methods. Cyanotoxins and cyanotoxin synthetase genes were not detected in any of the samples. Cyanobacterial species dominant within CP and BBD lesions were phylogenetically distinct from species previously shown to produce cyanotoxins and isolated from BBD lesions. The results from this study demonstrate that cyanobacterial toxins appear to play no role in the pathogenicity of CP and BBD at this site on the GBR. PMID:20455937

Glas, Martin S; Motti, Cherie A; Negri, Andrew P; Sato, Yui; Froscio, Suzanne; Humpage, Andrew R; Krock, Bernd; Cembella, Allan; Bourne, David G

2010-07-01

314

Genetic Characterization of Infectious Bursal Disease Viruses Associated with Gumboro Outbreaks in Commercial Broilers from Asyut Province, Egypt  

PubMed Central

Ten infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) field strains were isolated from 15 broiler flocks located in various parts of Asyut, Egypt. Seven strains were subjected to comparative sequencing and phylogenetic analyses to help provide optimal control program for protection against IBDV infection. Sequence analysis of a 530?bp hypervariable region in the VP2 gene revealed that the rate of identity and homology was around 95.6~99.1%. Sequence characterization revealed the 7 strains identified as vvIBDV with the four amino acids residues typical of vvIBDV (242I, 256I, 294I, 299S). The BURSA-VAC vaccine was the nearest vaccine in sequence similarity to the local examined IBDV strains followed by CEVACIBDL then Bursine plus and Nobilis Gumboro indicating its probable success in the face of incoming outbreaks when using these vaccines. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the presence of three clusters for the examined strains and are grouped with reference very virulent IBDVs of European and Asian origin (Japanese and Hong Kong) strains suggesting the different ancestors of our isolates. The antigenic index showed a number of changes on the major and minor hydrophilic antigenic peaks of the virus surface structures indicating a new genetic evolution of the surface structure epitopes that may lead to vaccination failure and reemergence of the disease.

Mohamed, Moemen A.; Elzanaty, Kamal E. S.; Bakhit, Bakhit M.; Safwat, Marwa M.

2014-01-01

315

Thermal Stress and Coral Cover as Drivers of Coral Disease Outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very little is known about how environmental changes such as increasing temperature affect disease dynamics in the ocean, especially at large spatial scales. We asked whether the frequency of warm temperature anomalies is positively related to the frequency of coral disease across 1,500 km of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. We used a new high-resolution satellite dataset of ocean temperature and

John F. Bruno; Elizabeth R. Selig; Kenneth S. Casey; Cathie A. Page; Bette L. Willis; C. Drew Harvell; Hugh Sweatman; Amy M. Melendy

2007-01-01

316

Outbreaks of infectious diseases in stem cell transplant units: a silent cause of death for patients and transplant programmes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the closure of the National Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit in Dublin, because of an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infection, a survey was carried out by the EBMT to investigate the occurrence of outbreaks of infection in SCT units and the impact on patient morbidity, mortality and the administration of the transplant programme over a 10-year period from

S McCann; J L Byrne; M Rovira; P Shaw; P Ribaud; S Sica; L Volin; E Olavarria; S Mackinnon; P Trabasso; M T VanLint; P Ljungman; K Ward; P Browne; A Gratwohl; A F Widmer; C Cordonnier

2004-01-01

317

Animal-induced injuries and disease, neonatal jaundice, immunizations, and viral infections.  

PubMed

Highlights from the past years' literature on the topics of animal-induced injuries and diseases, neonatal jaundice, immunizations, and viral infections are discussed from the perspective of the general pediatrician. An effort is made to place recent advances in care or understanding of clinical problems into the context of the pediatric office practice. The current reality of health care-be it managed care, care for the underserved, or the recent pressures on academic and hospital-based medicine-does not alter the importance of the delivery of quality care at the office level. Although it is now popular to define quality of health care in cute advertising copy, as if we are selling durable goods, excellence in pediatric office-based practice continues to require broad strokes of medical knowledge coupled with a unswerving commitment to and advocacy for the needs and well-being of infants, children, and young adults. PMID:8954278

Gerson, W T

1996-08-01

318

Ozonization of blood for the therapy of viral diseases and immunodeficiencies. A hypothesis.  

PubMed

In the last 3 decades major autohemotherapy after exposure to ozone has been used in Europe in uncontrolled trials carried out in patients with many illnesses, particularly chronic viral diseases and neoplasms. It appears that the treatment may activate the host's immune system by inducing the production of immunoactive cytokines and it may now be possible to rationalize the procedure, improve the regimen and assess the outcome. It is apparent, however, that such a therapeutic approach, in order to be acceptable, requires an investigative effort of biologists and clinicians. Once this is done, owing to the large range of medical applications and the simplicity of the procedure, autohemotherapy could become very valuable particularly in underdeveloped countries. PMID:1435389

Bocci, V

1992-09-01

319

Dynamics of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, viral erythrocytic necrosis and ichthyophoniasis in confined juvenile Pacific herring Clupea pallasii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Capture of wild, juvenile herring Clupea pallasii from Puget Sound (Washington, USA) and confinement in laboratory tanks resulted in outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) and ichthyophoniasis; however, the timing and progression of the 3 diseases differed. The VHS epidemic occurred first, characterized by an initially low infection prevalence that increased quickly with confinement time, peaking at 93 to 98% after confinement for 6 d, then decreasing to negligible levels after 20 d. The VHS outbreak was followed by a VEN epidemic that, within 12 d of confinement, progressed from undetectable levels to 100% infection prevalence with >90% of erythrocytes demonstrating inclusions. The VEN epidemic persisted for 54 d, after which the study was terminated, and was characterized by severe blood dyscrasias including reduction of mean hematocrit from 42 to 6% and replacement of mature erythrocytes with circulating erythroblasts and ghost cells. All fish with ichthyophoniasis at capture died within the first 3 wk of confinement, probably as a result of the multiple stressors associated with capture, transport, confinement, and progression of concomitant viral diseases. The results illustrate the differences in disease ecology and possible synergistic effects of pathogens affecting marine fish and highlight the difficulty in ascribing a single causation to outbreaks of disease among populations of wild fishes. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

Hershberger, P.; Hart, A.; Gregg, J.; Elder, N.; Winton, J.

2006-01-01

320

Outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Yunnan, People's Republic of China, 2007.  

PubMed

An outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) occurred in Yunnan Province, China between August and September in 2007. A total of 3,597 cases were officially reported and the incidence rate reached 1390.94/100,000. Descriptive epidemiological analysis of the outbreak was conducted using the data from National Disease Supervision Information Management System (NDSIMS). To determine the causative agent for this outbreak and to analyze their genetic features, 30 conjunctival swabs and 19 paired serum specimens of acute and convalescent phase were collected from 30 patients with AHC, and viral isolation, molecular typing, antibody assay and phylogenetic analysis were performed. 11 virus strains were isolated from 30 conjunctival swabs. Amplification and sequencing of the VP4 region of these strains identified that coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v) could be the causative agent of the AHC outbreak and this was further confirmed by subsequent virus neutralizing antibody test on 19 paired serum specimens. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 3C regions showed that the Yunnan CA24v strains belonged to Group 3 and clustered with the strains isolated from worldwide AHC outbreaks after 2002. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial VP1 revealed that the Yunnan strains differed from the strains isolated from AHC outbreak in Guangdong of China in 2007 with 2.8 - 3.0% nucleotide divergence, suggesting that two different lineages of CA24v caused the independent AHC outbreaks in Yunnan and Guangdong, respectively. PMID:20579343

Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Shuangli; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yongming; Xu, Wenbo

2010-01-01

321

Outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Yunnan, People's Republic of China, 2007  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) occurred in Yunnan Province, China between August and September in 2007. A total of 3,597 cases were officially reported and the incidence rate reached 1390.94/100,000. Descriptive epidemiological analysis of the outbreak was conducted using the data from National Disease Supervision Information Management System (NDSIMS). To determine the causative agent for this outbreak and to analyze their genetic features, 30 conjunctival swabs and 19 paired serum specimens of acute and convalescent phase were collected from 30 patients with AHC, and viral isolation, molecular typing, antibody assay and phylogenetic analysis were performed. 11 virus strains were isolated from 30 conjunctival swabs. Amplification and sequencing of the VP4 region of these strains identified that coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v) could be the causative agent of the AHC outbreak and this was further confirmed by subsequent virus neutralizing antibody test on 19 paired serum specimens. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 3C regions showed that the Yunnan CA24v strains belonged to Group 3 and clustered with the strains isolated from worldwide AHC outbreaks after 2002. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial VP1 revealed that the Yunnan strains differed from the strains isolated from AHC outbreak in Guangdong of China in 2007 with 2.8 - 3.0% nucleotide divergence, suggesting that two different lineages of CA24v caused the independent AHC outbreaks in Yunnan and Guangdong, respectively.

2010-01-01

322

Waterborne Disease Outbreaks: Selected Reprints of Articles on Epidemiology, Surveillance, Investigation, and Laboratory Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication is Volume II of a series of articles based on selected presentations made at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Association of State Drinking Water Administrators Workshop on Methods for Investigation of Waterborne Disease ...

G. F. Craun

1990-01-01

323

SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE DISEASE AND OUTBREAK ASSOCIATED WITH RECREATIONAL WATER - UNITED STATES 2003-2004  

EPA Science Inventory

Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting da...

324

METHODS USED TO ANALYZE A NOROVIRUS OUTBREAK  

EPA Science Inventory

Project Goals and Objectives: To isolate and identify the viral agents in well water samples associated with two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis reported to the Wyoming Department of Health in February 2001 and October 2001. To isolate and identify the viral agents in pati...

325

Biochemical prevention and treatment of viral infections - A new paradigm in medicine for infectious diseases  

PubMed Central

For two centuries, vaccination has been the dominating approach to develop prophylaxis against viral infections through immunological prevention. However, vaccines are not always possible to make, are ineffective for many viral infections, and also carry certain risk for a small, yet significant portion of the population. In the recent years, FDA's approval and subsequent market acceptance of Synagis, a monoclonal antibody indicated for prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has heralded a new era for viral infection prevention and treatment. This emerging paradigm, herein designated "Biochemical Prevention and Treatment", currently involves two aspects: (1) preventing viral entry via passive transfer of specific protein-based anti-viral molecules or host cell receptor blockers; (2) inhibiting viral amplification by targeting the viral mRNA with anti-sense DNA, ribozyme, or RNA interference (RNAi). This article summarizes the current status of this field.

Le Calvez, Herve; Yu, Mang; Fang, Fang

2004-01-01

326

Human viral gastroenteritis.  

PubMed Central

During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images

Christensen, M L

1989-01-01

327

Observations on the incidence and seasonality of uterine torsion and left displaced abomasum following the 2001 outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the UK.  

PubMed

Time-series impact analysis was used to compare differences in the rate of reporting of left displaced abomasum (LDA) and uterine torsion by veterinarians in the UK before and after an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in 2001. There were 150% and 35% increases in the reported incidences of LDA and uterine torsion, respectively, following the outbreak. Changes to feeding practices are likely to have been a major contributor to the increased incidence of LDA, but this factor is unlikely to have influenced the changed incidence in uterine torsion. Given that abdominal size and shape of dairy cows are recognised risk factors for both disease processes, the findings of this study suggest changes in these parameters may have a role in the altered incidences. Additional research is required to further elucidate the risk factors contributing to the increased incidence of LDA and uterine torsion in dairy cows under UK conditions. PMID:23228514

Lawrence, K; Tulley, W; Laven, R

2013-06-01

328

Trypanosoma cruzi genotyping supports a common source of infection in a school-related oral outbreak of acute Chagas disease in Venezuela.  

PubMed

Trypanosoma cruzi I, a discrete typing unit (DTU) found in human infections in Venezuela and other countries of the northern region of South America and in Central America, has been recently classified into five intra-DTU genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id, Ie) based on sequence polymorphisms found in the spliced leader intergenic region. In this paper we report the genotype identification of T. cruzi human isolates from one outbreak of acute orally acquired Chagas disease that occurred in a non-endemic region of Venezuela and from T. cruzi triatomine and rat isolates captured at a guava juice preparation site which was identified as the presumptive source of infection. The genotyping of all these isolates as TcId supports the view of a common source of infection in this oral Chagas disease outbreak through the ingestion of guava juice. Implications for clinical manifestations and dynamics of transmission cycles are discussed. PMID:23544849

Díaz-Bello, Z; Thomas, M C; López, M C; Zavala-Jaspe, R; Noya, O; DE Noya, B Alarcón; Abate, T

2014-01-01

329

Outbreak of legionnaire s disease in two groups of tourists staying at camp sites in France.  

PubMed

On 11 June 1996, three suspected cases of legionnaires disease in a group of 42 Dutch tourists were reported to the local public health authority by Millau hospital in south west France. The group (group 1) had been touring with caravans and staying at d PMID:12631812

Infuso, A; Hubert, B; Dumas, D; Reyrolle, M; De Mateo, S; Pelaz, C; Hemery, C; Perez, I

1997-06-01

330

WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION'S RESPONSE TO WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS  

EPA Science Inventory

The WSWRD in NRMRL/ORD has had a successful collaborative relationship with the Cetners for Disease Control & Prevention (CDCP) for over twenty years. When invited, EPA has supplied technical assistance and advice on traking causative events, evaluation of drinking water problems...

331

Surveillance for Viral Respiratory Disease in Huntington, West Virginia. Annual Report March 31, 1982 through March 30, 1983.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Surveillance for viral respiratory disease in Huntington, West Virginia; Number of vaccinees; Titration of influenza A/California/H1N1 vaccine in children; Challenge of vaccinees with CR37; Evaluation of CR48, influenza A/Washington/H3N2 vaccine...

R. B. Belshe

1983-01-01

332

Effect of Stress on Viral-Bacterial Synergy in Bovine Respiratory Disease: Novel Mechanisms to Regulate Inflammation  

PubMed Central

The severity of bovine respiratory infections has been linked to a variety of factors, including environmental and nutritional changes, transportation, and social reorganization of weaned calves. Fatal respiratory infections, however, usually occur when a primary viral infection compromises host defences and enhances the severity of a secondary bacterial infection. This viral–bacterial synergy can occur by a number of different mechanisms and disease challenge models have been developed to analyse host responses during these respiratory infections. A primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection followed by a secondary challenge with Mannheimia haemolytica results in fatal bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and host responses to these two pathogens have been studied extensively. We used this disease model to demonstrate that stress significantly altered the viral–bacterial synergy resulting in fatal BRD. Functional genomic analysis revealed that BHV-1 infection enhanced toll-like receptors (TLR) expression and increased pro-inflammatory responses which contribute to the severity of a Mannheimia haemolytica infection. TLRs play a critical role in detecting bacterial infections and inducing pro-inflammatory responses. It is difficult to understand, however, how stress-induced corticosteroids could enhance this form of viral–bacterial synergy. Nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor activates cell signalling pathways which inhibit both TLR signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. The apparent conundrum between stress-induced corticosteroids and enhanced BRD susceptibility is discussed in terms of present data and previous investigations of stress and respiratory disease.

Hodgson, P. D.; Aich, P.; Manuja, A.; Hokamp, K.; Roche, F. M.; Brinkman, F. S. L.; Potter, A.; Babiuk, L. A.

2005-01-01

333

Population response to the risk of vector-borne diseases: lessons learned from socio-behavioural research during large-scale outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Vector-borne infectious diseases, such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and West Nile fevers are increasingly identified as major global human health threats in developing and developed countries. The success or failure of vector control rests mainly on the nature and scale of the behavioural response of exposed populations. Large-scale adoption of recommended protective behaviour represents a critical challenge that cannot be addressed without a better understanding of how individuals perceive and react to the risk of infection. Recently, French overseas territories faced large-scale outbreaks: an epidemic of chikungunya fever in La Re? union and Mayotte (2005–2006) and four successive outbreaks of dengue fever in one Caribbean island, Martinique (1995–2007). To assess how these populations perceived and responded to the risk, and how the nature and scale of protection affected their clinical status, socio-epidemiological surveys were conducted on each island during the outbreaks. These surveys address three crucial and interconnected questions relevant to the period after persons infected by the virus were identified: which factors shape the risk of acquiring disease? Which socio- demographic characteristics and living conditions induce a higher likelihood of infection? What is the impact of risk perception on protective behaviours adopted against mosquito bites? Grounded on the results of these surveys, a general framework is proposed to help draw out the knowledge needed to reveal the factors associated with higher probability of infection as an outbreak emerges. The lessons learnt can inform health authorities’ efforts to improve risk communication programmes, both in terms of the target and content of messages, so as to explore new strategies for ensuring sustainable protective behaviour. The authors compare three epidemics of vector-borne diseases to elucidate psychosocial factors that determine how populations perceive and respond to the risk of infectious disease.

Setbon, M; Raude, J

2009-01-01

334

Age-related disease in recurrent outbreaks of phocid herpesvirus type-I infections in a seal rehabilitation centre: evaluation of diagnostic methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence and clinical signs of phocid herpesvirus type-1 (PhHV-1) infections among harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in a seal rehabilitation centre in the Netherlands were monitored between June and September 1993 and 1994 when 34 and 36 seals, respectively, were rehabilitated. In both years PhHV-1-related disease outbreaks occurred in the pupping season. PhHV-1 infections were diagnosed by the demonstration of

T. C. Harder; H. Vos; R. L. de Swart; A. D. M. E. Osterhaus

1997-01-01

335

Do marketing margins change with food scares?: Examining the effects of food recalls and disease outbreaks in the us red meat industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the impact of food scares on marketing margins in the US beef and pork industry. We analyze how market stresses induced by different food recalls and disease outbreaks affect price margins and the extent of price transmission at the slaughter-to-wholesale and wholesale-to-retail levels. We use monthly data for the period 1986–2008. The results indicate that marketing margins

Manuel Hernandez; Sergio Colin-Castillo; Oral Capps Jr.

2011-01-01

336

Comparative effects of host and viral factors on early pathogenesis of Marek's disease.  

PubMed

A series of experiments on the early pathogenesis of Marek's disease was conducted according to a uniform scheme. In each experiment, there was a single variable-age, genetic strain, or virus strain. Virus assays from spleen, buffy coat, and bone marrow, and fluorescent antibody tests on spleen, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus were conducted on five birds per group daily from the 3rd through the 10th day postinoculation. From these data, it was apparent that the response could be divided into two periods: 4 to 6 days = early; 8 to 10 days = late. Serological tests showed all groups except the 1-day-old group to have neutralizing antibody by the end of the 10-day period. With few exceptions, none of the variables tested exerted any appreciable influence on the level of virus growth in spleen, bursa, or thymus during the early period. High levels of infection occurred in all birds during that period. Changes in infection pattern which occurred during the late period were significant and could be correlated with occurrence of Marek's disease in test samples of birds held until 7 weeks after infection. Infectivity levels dropped appreciably in the case of resistant N-line birds given JM virus, and, during the late period, infection levels were significantly higher in GA-infected birds than in those given viruses of lower virulence. Whereas the virus titers during the 8- to 10-day period usually reflected the eventual clinical pattern of Marek's disease, the levels of viral antigen (fluorescent antibody tests) were much less consistent. One further experiment conducted by the same uniform scheme demonstrated no significant effects on early pathogenesis or course of Marek's disease in birds given continuous oral medication with amino-ureido-sulfone. PMID:194836

Fabricant, J; Ianconescu, M; Calnek, B W

1977-04-01

337

Climate change promotes the emergence of serious disease outbreaks of filarioid nematodes.  

PubMed

Filarioid parasites represent major health hazards with important medical, veterinary, and economic implications, and considerable potential to affect the everyday lives of tens of millions of people globally (World Health Organization, 2007). Scenarios for climate change vary latitudinally and regionally and involve direct and indirect linkages for increasing temperature and the dissemination, amplification, and invasiveness of vector-borne parasites. High latitude regions are especially influenced by global climate change and thus may be prone to altered associations and dynamics for complex host-pathogen assemblages and emergence of disease with cascading effects on ecosystem structure. Although the potential for substantial ecological perturbation has been identified, few empirical observations have emanated from systems across the Holarctic. Coincidental with decades of warming, and anomalies of high temperature and humidity in the sub-Arctic region of Fennoscandia, the mosquito-borne filarioid nematode Setaria tundra is now associated with emerging epidemic disease resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality for reindeer and moose. We describe a host-parasite system that involves reindeer, arthropods, and nematodes, which may contribute as a factor to ongoing declines documented for this ungulate species across northern ecosystems. We demonstrate that mean summer temperatures exceeding 14 degrees C drive the emergence of disease due to S. tundra. An association between climate and emergence of filarioid parasites is a challenge to ecosystem services with direct effects on public health, sustainability of free-ranging and domestic ungulates, and ultimately food security for subsistence cultures at high latitudes. PMID:20422252

Laaksonen, Sauli; Pusenius, Jyrki; Kumpula, Jouko; Venäläinen, Ari; Kortet, Raine; Oksanen, Antti; Hoberg, Eric

2010-08-01

338

Molecular Epidemiology of Outbreak-Associated and Wild-Waterfowl-Derived Newcastle Disease Virus Strains in Finland, Including a Novel Class I Genotype  

PubMed Central

Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly contagious, severe disease of poultry caused by pathogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV; or avian paramyxovirus-1). NDV is endemic in wild birds worldwide and one of the economically most important poultry pathogens. Most of the published strains are outbreak-associated strains, while the apathogenic NDV strains that occur in wild birds, posing a constant threat to poultry with their capability to convert into more virulent forms, have remained less studied. We screened for NDV RNA in cloacal and oropharyngeal samples from wild waterfowl in Finland during the years 2006 to 2010: 39 of 715 birds were positive (prevalence, 5.5%). The partial or full-length F genes of 37 strains were sequenced for phylogenetic purposes. We also characterized viruses derived from three NDV outbreaks in Finland and discuss the relationships between these outbreak-associated and the wild-bird-associated strains. We found that all waterfowl NDV isolates were lentogenic strains of class I or class II genotype I. We also isolated a genetically distinct class I strain (teal/Finland/13111/2008) grouping phylogenetically together with only strain HIECK87191, isolated in Northern Ireland in 1987. Together they seem to form a novel class I genotype genetically differing from other known NDVs by at least 12%.

Ek-Kommonen, Christine; Vaananen, Veli-Matti; Alasaari, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

2012-01-01

339

Analysis of Equid Herpesvirus 1 Strain Variation Reveals a Point Mutation of the DNA Polymerase Strongly Associated with Neuropathogenic versus Nonneuropathogenic Disease Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Equid herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) can cause a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from inapparent respiratory infection to the induction of abortion and, in extreme cases, neurological disease resulting in paralysis and ultimately death. It has been suggested that distinct strains of EHV-1 that differ in pathogenic capacity circulate in the field. In order to investigate this hypothesis, it was necessary to identify genetic markers that allow subgroups of related strains to be identified. We have determined all of the genetic differences between a neuropathogenic strain (Ab4) and a nonneuropathogenic strain (V592) of EHV-1 and developed PCR/sequencing procedures enabling differentiation of EHV-1 strains circulating in the field. The results indicate the occurrence of several major genetic subgroups of EHV-1 among isolates recovered from outbreaks over the course of 30 years, consistent with the proposal that distinct strains of EHV-1 circulate in the field. Moreover, there is evidence that certain strain groups are geographically restricted, being recovered predominantly from outbreaks occurring in either North America or Europe. Significantly, variation of a single amino acid of the DNA polymerase is strongly associated with neurological versus nonneurological disease outbreaks. Strikingly, this variant amino acid occurs at a highly conserved position for herpesvirus DNA polymerases, suggesting an important functional role.

Nugent, J.; Birch-Machin, I.; Smith, K. C.; Mumford, J. A.; Swann, Z.; Newton, J. R.; Bowden, R. J.; Allen, G. P.; Davis-Poynter, N.

2006-01-01

340

vLIP, a Viral Lipase Homologue, Is a Virulence Factor of Marek's Disease Virus  

PubMed Central

The genome of Marek's disease virus (MDV) has been predicted to encode a secreted glycoprotein, vLIP, which bears significant homology to the ?/? hydrolase fold of pancreatic lipases. Here it is demonstrated that MDV vLIP mRNA is produced via splicing and that vLIP is a late gene, due to its sensitivity to inhibition of DNA replication. While vLIP was found to conserve several residues essential to hydrolase activity, an unfavorable asparagine substitution is present at the lipase catalytic triad acid position. Consistent with structural predictions, purified recombinant vLIP did not show detectable activity on traditional phospholipid or triacylglyceride substrates. Two different vLIP mutant viruses, one bearing a 173-amino-acid deletion in the lipase homologous domain, the other having an alanine point mutant at the serine nucleophile position, caused a significantly lower incidence of Marek's disease in chickens and resulted in enhanced survival relative to two independently produced vLIP revertants or parental virus. These data provide the first evidence that vLIP enhances the replication and pathogenic potential of MDV. Furthermore, while vLIP may not serve as a traditional lipase enzyme, the data indicate that the serine nucleophile position is nonetheless essential in vivo for the viral functions of vLIP. Therefore, it is suggested that this particular example of lipase homology may represent the repurposing of an ?/? hydrolase fold toward a nonenzymatic role, possibly in lipid bonding.

Kamil, Jeremy P.; Tischer, B. Karsten; Trapp, Sascha; Nair, Venugopal K.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Kung, Hsing-Jien

2005-01-01

341

Development of a live attenuated vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral disease.  

PubMed

Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus that is causing massive economic loss in the Chinese duck industry. To obtain a live vaccine candidate against the disease, the DTMUV isolate FX2010 was passaged serially in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Characterization of FX2010-180P revealed that it was unable to replicate efficiently in chicken embryonated eggs, nor intranasally infect mice or shelducks at high doses of 5.5log10 tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50). FX2010-180P did not induce clinical symptoms, or pathological lesions in ducks at a dose of 5.5log10TCID50. The attenuation of FX2010-180P was due to 19 amino acid changes and 15 synonymous mutations. Importantly, FX2010-180P elicited good immune responses in ducks inoculated at low doses (3.5log10TCID50) and provided complete protection against challenge with a virulent strain. These results indicate that FX2010-180P is a promising candidate live vaccine for prevention of duck Tembusu viral disease. PMID:24503086

Li, Guoxin; Gao, Xuyuan; Xiao, Yali; Liu, Shaoqiong; Peng, Shan; Li, Xuesong; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Wu, Xiaogang; Yan, Pixi; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Tong, Guangzhi; Li, Zejun

2014-02-01

342

Updated Norovirus Outbreak Management and Disease Prevention Guidelines. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 60, No. 3, March 4, 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Noroviruses are the most common cause of epidemic gastroenteritis, responsible for at least 50% of all gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide, and a major cause of foodborne illness. In the United States, approximately 21 million illnesses attributable to no...

A. J. Hall B. Lopman C. Yen G. W. Park J. Vinje N. Gregoricus U. Parashar

2011-01-01

343

Viral Infection of Transgenic Mice Expressing a Viral Protein in Oligodendrocytes Leads to Chronic Central Nervous System Autoimmune Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary One hypothesis for the etiology of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease is that infection by a virus sharing antigenic epitopes with CNS antigens (molecular mimicry) elicits a virus-specific immune response that also recognizes self-epitopes. To address this hypothesis, transgenic mice were generated that express the nucleoprotein or glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as self in oligodendrocytes. Intraperitoneal

Claire F. Evans; Marc S. Horwitz; Monte V. Hobbs; Michael B. A. Oldstone

2010-01-01

344

Economic Impact of Hard Clam Associated Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis in New York State.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper estimates the economic impacts of a series of gastroenteritis outbreaks, of presumed viral etiology, that occurred between May and September of 1982 in upstate New York. The outbreaks were associated with eating hard clams, Mercenaria mercenari...

J. W. Brown W. D. Folsom

1983-01-01

345

Detection and analysis of a small round-structured virus strain in oysters implicated in an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis.  

PubMed Central

Outbreaks of shellfish-transmitted viral disease occur periodically, but frequently the causative agent is not identified. In November 1993, during investigation of a multistate outbreak of acute gastroenteritis, incriminated lots of oysters were collected. Oyster tissues (stomachs and digestive diverticula) were processed for virus extraction and nucleic acid purification. Human calicivirus sequences were sought by reverse transcriptase PCR using different primer sets. Amplicons were obtained from 9 of 10 shellfish samples from four different lots when primers specific for the outbreak virus strain were used. The specificity of the amplification was confirmed by hybridization. The amplicons from the nine positive oysters were cloned and sequenced. The sequence of each of the clones was identical to the others but showed some variation (7 of 81 bp) from the sequences obtained from the stools of three persons made III by the outbreak.

Le Guyader, F; Neill, F H; Estes, M K; Monroe, S S; Ando, T; Atmar, R L

1996-01-01

346

Seroprevalence of anti-HAV among patients with chronic viral liver disease  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the current seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients with chronic viral liver disease in Korea. We also tried to identify the factors affecting the prevalence of HAV antibodies. METHODS: We performed an analysis of the clinical records of 986 patients (mean age: 49 ± 9 years, 714 males/272 females) with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who had undergone HAV antibody testing between January 2008 and December 2009. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of IgG anti-HAV was 86.61% (854/986) in patients with chronic liver disease and was 88.13% (869/986) in age- and gender-matched patients from the Center for Health Promotion. The anti-HAV prevalence was 80.04% (405/506) in patients with chronic hepatitis B, 86.96% (20/23) in patients with chronic hepatitis C, 93.78% (422/450) in patients with HBV related liver cirrhosis, and 100% (7/7) in patients with HCV related liver cirrhosis. The anti-HAV prevalence according to the decade of age was as follows: 20s (6.67%), 30s (50.86%), 40s (92.29%), 50s (97.77%), and 60s (100%). The anti-HAV prevalence was significantly higher in patients older than 40 years compared with that in patients younger than 40 years of age. Multivariable analysis showed that age ? 40 years, female gender and metropolitan cities as the place of residence were independent risk factors for IgG anti-HAV seropositivity. CONCLUSION: Most Korean patients with chronic liver disease and who are above 40 years of age have already been exposed to hepatitis A virus.

Cho, Hyun Chin; Paik, Seung Woon; Kim, Yu Jin; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Yoo, Byung Chul; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Seon Woo

2011-01-01

347

Viral exanthems.  

PubMed

Viral exanthems are mostly associated with self-limited diseases. However, in some cases diagnosis of an exanthem may be crucial to patients and their contacts. Certain exanthems have fairly characteristic morphology, but in many cases an accurate diagnosis cannot be made on the basis of morphology alone. Historical factors may be helpful when evaluating these patients, specifically their disease contacts, immunization record, previous exanthematous illnesses, and associated prodromal symptoms. Some illnesses are seasonal and this knowledge may be useful. This manuscript reviews a number of common childhood exanthems. We included the most common viral exanthems encountered by primary-care physicians and dermatologists. PMID:12952751

Scott, Lycia A; Stone, Mary Seabury

2003-08-01

348

Transmission of seasonal outbreak of childhood enteroviral aseptic meningitis and hand-foot-mouth disease.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to evaluate the modes of transmission of aseptic meningitis (AM) and hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) using a case-control and a case-crossover design. We recruited 205 childhood AM and 116 HFMD cases and 170 non-enteroviral disease controls from three general hospitals in Gyeongju, Pohang, and Seoul between May and August in both 2002 and 2003. For the case-crossover design, we established the hazard and non-hazard periods as week one and week four before admission, respectively. In the case-control design, drinking water that had not been boiled, not using a water purifier, changes in water quality, and contact with AM patients were significantly associated with the risk of AM (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, 2.9, 4.6, and 10.9, respectively), while drinking water that had not been boiled, having a non-water closet toilet, changes in water quality, and contact with HFMD patients were associated with risk of HFMD (OR=3.3, 2.8, 6.9, and 5.0, respectively). In the case-crossover design, many life-style variables such as contact with AM or HFMD patients, visiting a hospital, changes in water quality, presence of a skin wound, eating out, and going shopping were significantly associated with the risk of AM (OR=18.0, 7.0, 8.0, 2.2, 22.3, and 3.0, respectively) and HFMD (OR=9.0, 37.0, 11.0, 12.0, 37.0, and 5.0, respectively). Our findings suggest that person-to-person contact and contaminated water could be the principal modes of transmission of AM and HFMD. PMID:20436701

Park, Sue K; Park, Boyoung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Ho; Lee, Kwan; Jung, Cheoll; Sohn, Young Mo; Choi, Sung-Min; Kim, Doo-Kwun; Lee, Dong Seok; Ko, Joon Tae; Kim, Moon Kyu; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

2010-05-01

349

Viral information.  

PubMed

Viruses are major drivers of global biogeochemistry and the etiological agents of many diseases. They are also the winners in the game of life: there are more viruses on the planet than cellular organisms and they encode most of the genetic diversity on the planet. In fact, it is reasonable to view life as a viral incubator. Nevertheless, most ecological and evolutionary theories were developed, and continue to be developed, without considering the virosphere. This means these theories need to be to reinterpreted in light of viral knowledge or we need to develop new theory from the viral point-of-view. Here we briefly introduce our viral planet and then address a major outstanding question in biology: why is most of life viral? A key insight is that during an infection cycle the original virus is completely broken down and only the associated information is passed on to the next generation. This is different for cellular organisms, which must pass on some physical part of themselves from generation to generation. Based on this premise, it is proposed that the thermodynamic consequences of physical information (e.g., Landauer's principle) are observed in natural viral populations. This link between physical and genetic information is then used to develop the Viral Information Hypothesis, which states that genetic information replicates itself to the detriment of system energy efficiency (i.e., is viral in nature). Finally, we show how viral information can be tested, and illustrate how this novel view can explain existing ecological and evolutionary theories from more fundamental principles. PMID:23482918

Rohwer, Forest; Barott, Katie

2013-03-01

350

Isolating Fungal Pathogens from a Dynamic Disease Outbreak in a Native Plant Population to Establish Plant-Pathogen Bioassays for the Ecological Model Plant Nicotiana attenuata  

PubMed Central

The wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata has been intensively used as a model plant to study its interaction with insect herbivores and pollinators in nature, however very little is known about its native pathogen community. We describe a fungal disease outbreak in a native N. attenuata population comprising 873 plants growing in an area of about 1500 m2. The population was divided into 14 subpopulations and disease symptom development in the subpopulations was monitored for 16 days, revealing a waxing and waning of visible disease symptoms with some diseased plants recovering fully. Native fungal N. attenuata pathogens were isolated from diseased plants, characterized genetically, chemotaxonomically and morphologically, revealing several isolates of the ascomycete genera Fusarium and Alternaria, that differed in the type and strength of the disease symptoms they caused in bioassays on either detached leaves or intact soil-grown plants. These isolates and the bioassays will empower the study of N. attenuata-pathogen interactions in a realistic ecological context.

Schuck, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T.

2014-01-01

351

Foodborne outbreaks in Canada linked to produce: 2001 through 2009.  

PubMed

Foodborne disease outbreaks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables have been increasing in occurrence worldwide. Canada has one of the highest per capita consumption rates of fresh fruits and vegetables in the world. In this article, we review the foodborne disease outbreaks linked to produce consumption in Canada from 2001 through 2009. The 27 produce-related outbreaks included an estimated 1,549 cases of illness. Bacterial infection outbreaks represented 66% of the total. Among these, Salmonella was the most frequent agent (50% of outbreaks) followed by Escherichia coli (33%) and Shigella (17%). Cyclospora cayetanensis was the only parasite detected and was associated with seven outbreaks. Among the foodborne viruses, only hepatitis A was implicated in two outbreaks. The food vehicles most commonly implicated in outbreaks were leafy greens and herbs (26% of outbreaks), followed by seed sprouts (11%). Contamination sources and issues related to the future control of fresh produce-related foodborne disease outbreaks also are discussed. PMID:23317873

Kozak, G K; MacDonald, D; Landry, L; Farber, J M

2013-01-01

352

Clinicopathological findings of a natural outbreak of Theileria annulata in cattle: an emerging disease in southern Iran.  

PubMed

Theileriosis is an economically important hemoprotozoal disease with high morbidity and mortality in cattle. The present study reported the pathological features of a natural outbreak of tropical bovine theileriosis due to Theileria annulata in Fars Province, southern Iran. T. annulata was confirmed by the presence of T. annulata piroplasms in the blood smears and also by polymerase chain reaction test. On necropsy, pale mucous membranes and petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages in the mucosal and serosal surfaces together with lymphadenopathy were observed. The liver was friable, yellowish, and larger than normal. Hemorrhages and punched-out ulcers were observed in the abomasal mucous membrane. Severe petechial hemorrhages were seen in the skin particularly in the hairless areas. Pulmonary edema and emphysema with petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhagic foci in the lungs were evident. The main histological changes were proliferation of lymphocytes in the lymph nodes and proliferation of macrophages, lymphocytes, and plasma cells in the spleen, Peyer's patches, portal tracts of the liver, and interstitial tissue of the kidneys. The mucous membrane of the abomasum showed numerous multifocal areas of necrosis and ulceration, and the submucosal area and lamina propria adjacent to these lesions showed hyperemia and hemorrhages, with mononuclear cell infiltration. The skin showed multifocal necrotic changes, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and chronic dermatitis. The schizonts of Theileria were evident in the cytoplasm of the lymphocytes and macrophages of the lymph nodes, spleen, and skin. Molecular examination revealed that these animals were infected with T. annulata. The present study describes the clinicopathological findings of bovine tropical theileriosis in an unpredictable weather condition. PMID:22968949

Oryan, Ahmad; Namazi, Fatemeh; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Razavi, Mostafa; Shahriari, Reza

2013-01-01

353

Molecular analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in viral diseases of the central nervous system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of nucleic acid (NA) amplification techniques has transformed the diagnosis of viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Because of their enhanced sensitivity, these methods enable detection of even low amounts of viral genomes in cerebrospinal fluid. Following more than 10 years of experience, the polymerase chain reaction or other NA-based amplification techniques are nowadays performed in

Paola Cinque; Simona Bossolasco; Åke Lundkvist

2003-01-01

354

Primary immunodeficiency diseases associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections and malignancies.  

PubMed

Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are commonly characterized by an increased susceptibility to specific infections and, in certain instances, a higher than usual incidence of malignancies. Although improved diagnosis and early treatment of PIDs have reduced early morbidity and mortality from infection, the development of cancer remains a significant cause of premature death. The emergence of cancer in patients with PIDs often results from impairments in the immune response that lead to weakened surveillance against oncogenic viruses, premalignant or malignant cells, or both. Here we review the clinical and biologic features of several PIDs associated with enhanced susceptibility to viral infections and cancer, including X-linked lymphoproliferative disease; IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase deficiency; epidermodysplasia verruciformis; warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis syndrome; autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome; X-linked agammaglobulinemia; and common variable immunodeficiency. It is of importance that we gain in-depth insights into the fundamental molecular nature of these unique PIDs to better understand the pathogenesis of virus-associated malignancies and to develop innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:21514636

Rezaei, Nima; Hedayat, Mona; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Nichols, Kim E

2011-06-01

355

Human Papillomavirus 16, 18, 31 and 45 viral load, integration and methylation status stratified by cervical disease stage  

PubMed Central

Background Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with the development of cervical cancer with each genotype differing in their relative contribution to the prevalence of cervical disease. HPV DNA testing offers improved sensitivity over cytology testing alone but is accompanied by a generally low specificity. Potential molecular markers of cervical disease include type-specific viral load (VL), integration of HPV DNA into the host genome and methylation of the HPV genome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HPV type-specific viral load, integration and methylation status and cervical disease stage in samples harboring HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 or HPV45. Methods Samples singly infected with HPV16 (n?=?226), HPV18 (n?=?32), HPV31 (n?=?75) or HPV45 (n?=?29) were selected from a cohort of 4,719 women attending cervical screening in England. Viral load and integration status were determined by real-time PCR while 3’L1-URR methylation status was determined by pyrosequencing or sequencing of multiple clones derived from each sample. Results Viral load could differentiate between normal and abnormal cytology with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 80% (odds ratio [OR] 12.4, 95% CI 6.2–26.1; p?Viral integration was poorly associated with cervical disease. Few samples had fully integrated genomes and these could be found throughout the course of disease. Overall, integration status could distinguish between normal and abnormal cytology with a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 50% (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.0–6.8; p?=?0.054). Methylation levels were able to differentiate normal and low grade cytology from high grade cytology with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 82% (OR 8.2, 95% CI 3.8–18.0; p?viral load and CpG methylation status, but not integration status, to be considered as potential biomarkers of cervical disease.

2014-01-01

356

Differential viral protein expression in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected diseases: Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease.  

PubMed

Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked to KS, primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Transcript mapping studies using PEL cell lines have allowed preliminary classification of viral gene expression into constitutive (class I) and inducible (class II/III) categories. To determine whether viral gene expression differs in vivo, we examined tissue sections of KSHV-infected disorders, using specific antibodies against proteins that are representative of the different expression classes of KSHV genes. ORF73/LANA appears to be a surrogate marker for KSHV infection because it is constitutively expressed in vitro and in vivo in all KSHV-infected cells. Expression of vIRF1, vIL6, and PF-8 proteins in the infected B cells of MCD lymph nodes reproduces the expression pattern observed in TPA-stimulated KSHV-infected B-cell lines. In contrast, the protein expression of the inducible viral genes that we tested in KS and PEL biopsies is restricted to PF-8 and vIL6, respectively. The tightly restricted expression of KSHV proteins in vivo differs from the dysregulated expression of inducible KSHV genes in vitro and suggests that viral gene expression in KSHV-infected cell lines does not accurately reflect what occurs in diseased tissues. These differences may be related to either cell-specific or immune restriction of viral replication. PMID:10702388

Parravicini, C; Chandran, B; Corbellino, M; Berti, E; Paulli, M; Moore, P S; Chang, Y

2000-03-01

357

An orphan viral TNF receptor superfamily member identified in lymphocystis disease virus  

PubMed Central

Background Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) is a large icosahedral dsDNA-containing virus of the Lymphocystivirus genus within the Iridoviridae family that can cause disease in more than 140 marine and freshwater fish species. While several isolates have been charcaterized and classified into distinct genotypes the complete genomic sequence is currently only available from two species, the LCDV-1, isolated from flounder (Platichtys flesus) in Europe and the LCDV-C, isolated from Japanese cultured flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in China. Analysis of the genome of LCDV-C showed it to encode a protein named LDVICp016 with similarities to the Tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily with immunomodulatory potential. Findings We have expressed and purified the recombinant protein LDVICp016 and screened for potential interaction partners using surface plasmon resonance. Commercially available human and mouse members of the TNF superfamily (TNFSF), along with a representative set of fish-derived TNFSF were tested. We have found the LDVICp016 protein to be secreted and we have identified a second viral TNFR encoded by ORF 095 of the same virus. None of the 42 tested proteins were found to interact with LDVICp016. Conclusions We show that LDVICp016 is a secreted protein belonging to the TNF receptor family that may be part of a larger gene family in Lymphocystiviruses. While the ligand of this protein remains unknown, possibly due to the species specific nature of this interaction, further investigations into the potential role of this protein in the blockade of immune responses in its fish host are required.

2013-01-01

358

Potential strategies for control of bluetongue, a globally emerging, Culicoides-transmitted viral disease of ruminant livestock and wildlife.  

PubMed

Bluetongue (BT) is a non-zoonotic arboviral disease of certain wild and domestic species of cloven-hoofed ungulates. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV), is spread through temperate and tropical regions of the world by biting Culicoides midges. Control of BTV infection is complicated by the plurality of virus serotypes and the ubiquity and opportunistic feeding behavior of its midge vector. The global distribution of BTV infection has recently altered, perhaps driven in part by climatic influences on midge species resident in different regions. The goal of this review is to evaluate realistic strategies that might be utilized to control or prevent future outbreaks of BT and other Culicoides-transmitted diseases. Importantly, optimal control of emerging, rapidly evolving arbovirus diseases such as BT will require integrated countermeasures that mitigate all aspects of the virus's transmission cycle. This will best be accomplished using preventative, rather than purely reactive strategies. PMID:23664958

Maclachlan, N James; Mayo, Christie E

2013-08-01

359

Norovirus outbreak associated with a hotel in the west of Ireland, 2006.  

PubMed

An outbreak of gastrointestinal disease (nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea) occurred among a party of wedding guests, staff and other guests in a hotel in the west of Ireland, in October 2006. Upon notification, a multi-disciplinary outbreak control team was convened to investigate and control the outbreak. In all, 98 people were ascertained ill. The median duration of illness was 48 hours. The attack rate ranged between 48 and 85%. The hotel voluntarily notified health authorities and co-operated fully with investigation and control measures. Strict prevention and control measures were instituted promptly, including air ventilation, enhanced hand hygiene, isolation of cases, temporary "cooked food only", temporary alternative accommodation and specialised cleaning. Three cases of norovirus infection were laboratory-confirmed. There was no evidence of food- or water-borne transmission. Clinical and epidemiological findings indicated person-to-person transmission of norovirus. This report highlights the potential for large social gatherings to facilitate the spread of viral gastroenteritis by person-to-person transmission and via contaminated environment. Effective community management of this outbreak appears to have prevented its having an impact on local acute hospital services. The authors conclude that in addition to the existing national guidelines on the management of outbreaks of norovirus in healthcare settings, agreed guidelines for the management of norovirus outbreaks in the hotel and tourism industry are needed in Ireland. PMID:17991406

Michel, A; Fitzgerald, R; Whyte, D; Fitzgerald, A; Beggan, E; O'Connell, N; Greally, T

2007-07-01

360

Informing the Front Line about Common Respiratory Viral Epidemics  

PubMed Central

The nature of clinical medicine is to focus on individuals rather than the populations from which they originate. This orientation can be problematic in the context of acute healthcare delivery during routine winter outbreaks of viral respiratory disease where an individual’s likelihood of viral infection depends on knowledge of local disease incidence. The level of interest in and perceived utility of community and regional infection data for front line clinicians providing acute care is unclear. Based on input from clinicians, we developed an automated analysis and reporting system that delivers pathogen-specific epidemic curves derived from a viral panel that tests for influenza, RSV, adenovirus, parainfluenza and human metapneumovirus. Surveillance summaries were actively e-mailed to clinicians practicing in emergency, urgent and primary care settings and posted on a web site for passive consumption. We demonstrated the feasibility and sustainability of a system that provides both timely and clinically useful surveillance information.

Gesteland, Per H; Samore, Matthew H; Pavia, Andrew T; Srivastava, Rajendu; Korgenski, Kent; Gerber, Kristine; Daly, Judy A; Mundorff, Michael B; Rolfs, Robert T; James, Brent C.; Byington, Carrie L.

2007-01-01

361

THE KEY VIRAL PLAYERS  

EPA Science Inventory

A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Members of the enterovirus group cause numerous diseases, including gastroenteritis, encephalitis, meningitis, myocard...

362

Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers' Experiences and Preferences  

PubMed Central

Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.

Buhler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

2014-01-01

363

Clinical documentation and data transfer from Ebola and Marburg virus disease wards in outbreak settings: health care workers' experiences and preferences.  

PubMed

Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions. PMID:24556792

Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

2014-02-01

364

Intracerebral Borna Disease Virus Infection of Bank Voles Leading to Peripheral Spread and Reverse Transcription of Viral RNA  

PubMed Central

Bornaviruses, which chronically infect many species, can cause severe neurological diseases in some animal species; their association with human neuropsychiatric disorders is, however, debatable. The epidemiology of Borna disease virus (BDV), as for other members of the family Bornaviridae, is largely unknown, although evidence exists for a reservoir in small mammals, for example bank voles (Myodes glareolus). In addition to the current exogenous infections and despite the fact that bornaviruses have an RNA genome, bornavirus sequences integrated into the genomes of several vertebrates millions of years ago. Our hypothesis is that the bank vole, a common wild rodent species in traditional BDV-endemic areas, can serve as a viral host; we therefore explored whether this species can be infected with BDV, and if so, how the virus spreads and whether viral RNA is transcribed into DNA in vivo. We infected neonate bank voles intracerebrally with BDV and euthanized them 2 to 8 weeks post-infection. Specific Ig antibodies were detectable in 41%. Histological evaluation revealed no significant pathological alterations, but BDV RNA and antigen were detectable in all infected brains. Immunohistology demonstrated centrifugal spread throughout the nervous tissue, because viral antigen was widespread in peripheral nerves and ganglia, including the mediastinum, esophagus, and urinary bladder. This was associated with viral shedding in feces, of which 54% were BDV RNA-positive, and urine at 17%. BDV nucleocapsid gene DNA occurred in 66% of the infected voles, and, surprisingly, occasionally also phosphoprotein DNA. Thus, intracerebral BDV infection of bank vole led to systemic infection of the nervous tissue and viral excretion, as well as frequent reverse transcription of the BDV genome, enabling genomic integration. This first experimental bornavirus infection in wild mammals confirms the recent findings regarding bornavirus DNA, and suggests that bank voles are capable of bornavirus transmission.

Kinnunen, Paula Maria; Inkeroinen, Hanna; Ilander, Mette; Kallio, Eva Riikka; Heikkila, Henna Pauliina; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio; Palva, Airi; Vaheri, Antti; Kipar, Anja; Vapalahti, Olli

2011-01-01

365

Legionnaires' disease from a cooling tower in a community outbreak in Lidk?ping, Sweden- epidemiological, environmental and microbiological investigation supported by meteorological modelling  

PubMed Central

Background An outbreak of Legionnaires’ Disease took place in the Swedish town Lidköping on Lake Vänern in August 2004 and the number of pneumonia cases at the local hospital increased markedly. As soon as the first patients were diagnosed, health care providers were informed and an outbreak investigation was launched. Methods Classical epidemiological investigation, diagnostic tests, environmental analyses, epidemiological typing and meteorological methods. Results Thirty-two cases were found. The median age was 62 years (range 36 – 88) and 22 (69%) were males. No common indoor exposure was found. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was found at two industries, each with two cooling towers. In one cooling tower exceptionally high concentrations, 1.2 × 109 cfu/L, were found. Smaller amounts were also found in the other tower of the first industry and in one tower of the second plant. Sero- and genotyping of isolated L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from three patients and epidemiologically suspected environmental strains supported the cooling tower with the high concentration as the source. In all, two L. pneumophila strains were isolated from three culture confirmed cases and both these strains were detected in the cooling tower, but one strain in another cooling tower as well. Meteorological modelling demonstrated probable spread from the most suspected cooling tower towards the town centre and the precise location of four cases that were stray visitors to Lidköping. Conclusions Classical epidemiological, environmental and microbiological investigation of an LD outbreak can be supported by meteorological modelling methods. The broad competence and cooperation capabilities in the investigation team from different authorities were of paramount importance in stopping this outbreak.

2012-01-01

366

Humoral Response in Toscana Virus Acute Neurologic Disease Investigated by Viral-Protein-Specific Immunoassays  

PubMed Central

The Toscana virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is the only sandfly-transmitted virus that demonstrates neurotropic activity. Clinical cases ranging from aseptic meningitis to meningoencephalitis caused by Toscana virus are yearly observed in central Italy during the summer, and several cases have been reported among tourists returning from zones of endemicity (Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Cyprus). In Toscana virus patients, immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, usually present at the onset of symptoms, can reveal elevated titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and can persist for at least 1 year. IgG antibodies can be absent at the onset of symptoms: titers rise in convalescent sera and persist for many years. At least five proteins have been identified in Toscana virus-infected cells: nucleoprotein N, glycoproteins G1 and G2, a large protein (L) assumed to be a component of the polymerase, and two nonstructural proteins, NSm and NSs. We report results of a study on the antibody response to individual viral proteins in patients with Toscana virus-associated acute neurologic disease. Immunoblotting and semiquantitative radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) allow identification of nucleoprotein N as the major antigen responsible for both IgM and IgG responses. Antibodies to proteins other than nucleoprotein N are detected only by RIPA. Antibodies to glycoproteins are detected in about one-third of patients, and whereas their presence always predicts neutralization, some serum samples with neutralizing activity have undetectable levels of antibodies to G1-G2. Antibodies to nonstructural proteins NSm and NSs are also identified. The results obtained raise some questions about antigenic variability and relevant neutralization epitopes of Toscana virus.

Magurano, Fabio; Nicoletti, Loredana

1999-01-01

367

Fungal Diseases Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

... April 2012. MMWR 2012;61:310. Mikosz CA, Smith RM, Kim M, Tyson C, Lee EH, Adams E, et al. Fungal endophthalmitis associated with compounded products . Emerg Infect Dis 2014; 20:248-256. Fungal Endophthalmitis: ... 2012 CDC expert Dr. Rachel Smith discusses diagnosis and treatment of fungal endophthalmitis, an ...

368

Foodborne viral illness--status in Australia.  

PubMed

Norwalk-like virus contamination of oysters and orange juice, and hepatitis A virus contamination of oysters have been responsible for large outbreaks of foodborne viral disease in Australia. Rotavirus, adenovirus, astrovirus, parvovirus and other enteroviruses also contribute to the incidence of gastroenteritis in this country but the role of foods and waters in transmitting these viruses is unclear. Protocols for the investigation, surveillance and reporting of foodborne viral illness require further development to enable a more accurate description of the problem. Few laboratories have the capability to analyse foods for viruses and specific training in this technology is needed. Management of food safety in Australia largely relies on the implementation of HACCP principles, but these need to be adapted to address the specific risks from viruses. PMID:10946844

Fleet, G H; Heiskanen, P; Reid, I; Buckle, K A

2000-07-25

369

Waterborne outbreak control: which disinfectant?  

PubMed Central

Drinking water disinfection was shown to be an important public health measure around the turn of the century. In the United States, it was perhaps the single most important factor in controlling typhoid fever, a waterborne disease that was rampant throughout the world during the last century. It may also be assumed that disinfection was important in limiting the number of cases of other diseases known to be capable of waterborne transmission, i.e., cholera, amebiasis, shigellosis, salmonellosis, and hepatitis A. Even though modern treatment has eliminated water as a major vehicle of infectious disease transmission, outbreaks still occur. In fact, the annual number has been increasing since 1966. Interruption in chlorination or failure to achieve adequate levels of chlorine residual is the most often identified deficiency of the involved water supplies. This finding indicates that waterborne microbial pathogens remain as a potential health threat and underscores the importance of disinfection. From the outset, chlorination has been the drinking water disinfectant of choice in the country. Numerous studies have demonstrated its ability to inactivate bacterial, viral, and protozoal pathogens when applied under proper conditions. However, the finding that chlorinated organics that are potentially carcinogenic are formed has prompted an evaluation of alternative disinfectants. The viable alternatives to chlorine currently under consideration for widespread use are ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramines. In terms of biocidal efficiency, ozone is the most potent of the three. Chlorine dioxide is about the equivalent of free chlorine in the hypochlorous acid form but much more efficient than the hypochlorite form of free chlorine. The chloramines are weaker biocides than hypochlorite. Although this general order of ranking of efficiency holds for diverse types of microorganisms, quantitative comparisons vary with different microorganisms and experimental conditions.

Akin, E W; Hoff, J C; Lippy, E C

1982-01-01

370

Adaptation of Borna Disease Virus to New Host Species Attributed to Altered Regulation of Viral Polymerase Activity?  

PubMed Central

Borna disease virus (BDV) can persistently infect the central nervous system of a broad range of mammalian species. Mice are resistant to infections with primary BDV isolates, but certain laboratory strains can be adapted to replicate in mice. We determined the molecular basis of adaptation by studying mutations acquired by a cDNA-derived BDV strain during one brain passage in rats and three passages in mice. The adapted virus propagated efficiently in mouse brains and induced neurological disease. Its genome contained seven point mutations, three of which caused amino acid changes in the L polymerase (L1116R and N1398D) and in the polymerase cofactor P (R66K). Recombinant BDV carrying these mutations either alone or in combination all showed enhanced multiplication speed in Vero cells, indicating improved intrinsic viral polymerase activity rather than adaptation to a mouse-specific factor. Mutations R66K and L1116R, but not N1398D, conferred replication competence of recombinant BDV in mice if introduced individually. Virus propagation in mouse brains was substantially enhanced if both L mutations were present simultaneously, but infection remained mostly nonsymptomatic. Only if all three amino acid substitutions were combined did BDV replicate vigorously and induce early disease in mice. Interestingly, the virulence-enhancing effect of the R66K mutation in P could be attributed to reduced negative regulation of polymerase activity by the viral X protein. Our data demonstrate that BDV replication competence in mice is mediated by the polymerase complex rather than the viral envelope and suggest that altered regulation of viral gene expression can favor adaptation to new host species.

Ackermann, Andreas; Staeheli, Peter; Schneider, Urs

2007-01-01

371

Simian hemorrhagic fever virus infection of rhesus macaques as a model of viral hemorrhagic fever: Clinical characterization and risk factors for severe disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (SHFV) has caused sporadic outbreaks of hemorrhagic fevers in macaques at primate research facilities. SHFV is a BSL-2 pathogen that has not been linked to human disease; as such, investigation of SHFV pathogenesis in non-human primates (NHPs) could serve as a model for hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. Here we describe

Reed F. Johnson; Lori E. Dodd; Srikanth Yellayi; Wenjuan Gu; Jennifer A. Cann; Catherine Jett; John G. Bernbaum; Dan R. Ragland; Marisa St. Claire; Russell Byrum; Jason Paragas; Joseph E. Blaney; Peter B. Jahrling

2011-01-01

372

Anti-viral mechanism of barramundi Mx against betanodavirus involves the inhibition of viral RNA synthesis through the interference of RdRp  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) belongs to the betanodavirus of the Nodaviridae family. It is the causative agent of viral nervous necrosis (VNN) disease, and has inflicted devastating damage on the world-wide aquaculture industry. The fish that survived after the outbreak of VNN become persistently NNV-infected carriers. NNV-persistent infection has been demonstrated in a barramundi brain (BB) cell line, and it

Yu-Chi Wu; Yi-Fan Lu; Shau-Chi Chi

2010-01-01

373

Influence of clinorotation on the resistance to the viral disease of wheat plants of different geographical origin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the development of controlled ecological systems of life supply for spacecrafts of great importance are the living plants particularly wheat. There exits a high probability of the appearance of viral disease during the space flight, whereas the virus may remain latent under terrestrial conditions. We investigated the varieties of wheat of different ecologo-geographic origin: Chaika and Sarativska-29 (steppe zone of Ukraine), Colectivna-3 (forest - steppe zone of Ukraine) and Apogee (bred in the USA for the needs of space research activities). The growth reactions of different varieties of plants were connected with variety specificities, presence and concentration of viral infection and clinostating. Spring wheat Sarativska-29 stored by 32 % more above - ground biomass and by 45% more of the roots in virus infected horizontally clinostated plants compared with stationary ones, both infected and healthy. In clinostated WSMV-infected wheat plants of Chaika variety there were increases in the concentrations of chlorophylls a and b and carotenoids compared with stationary plants. The clinostated Apogee variety plants proved the most responsive to viral infection. Indirect IFA detected the reduction of viral reproduction of the WSMV with prolonged clinostating. The reduction of viral reproduction in various varieties causes variety - specific physiologo-biochemical processes in ontogenesis. Photosynthetic pigment content in clinostated Apogee wheat increased on the 15th day after inoculation by 50 % and the content of carotenoids nearly twice compared with non infected clinostated plants. Clinostating of healthy plants decreased their concentrations of carotenoids and the sum of chlorophylls. The interaction of two factors: viral infection and clinostating alleviates the negative impact of each of them on the photosynthetic apparatus of wheat. WSMV - infected Apogee wheat plants displayed a specific response a reaction opposite to that of noninfected ones towards the stress caused by the interaction of two factors: viral infection and clinostating. We also detected a reduction of electric conductivity in young leaves of virus-infected plants compared with noninfected by 42%, while in clinostated plants compared with stationary ones this reduction was within 12 - 33%. The reduction of electric conductivity in leaves with clinostating is evidently connected with the changes in cell walls, which become thinner losing calcium. Electric conductivity of infected Apogee wheat leaves decreased with clinostating compared with noninfected stationary plants but increased compared with noninfected clinostated ones. Thus our research data give an evidence of the improvement of infected plants' condition with clinostating.

Mishchenko, L. T.; Chetirkin, P. V.; Mishchenko, I. A.

374

An Outbreak of Norovirus Gastroenteritis on an Israeli Military Base  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Noroviruses (NVs) are a predominant cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks, but they are difficult to identify because they cannot be cultivated in cell culture. Therefore, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are widely used in the testing of clinical stool specimens for NV. However, testing of perianal swabs in the context of an outbreak is considered to be an

I. Grotto; M. Huerta; R. D. Balicer; T. Halperin; D. Cohen; N. Orr; M. Gdalevich

2004-01-01

375

High Human Bocavirus Viral Load Is Associated with Disease Severity in Children under Five Years of Age  

PubMed Central

Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus and detected worldwide in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), but its pathogenic role in respiratory illness is still debatable due to high incidence of co-infection with other respiratory viruses. To determine the prevalence of HBoV infection in patients with LRTI in Shanghai and its correlation with disease severity, we performed a 3-year prospective study of HBoV in healthy controls, outpatients and inpatients under five years of age with X-ray diagnosed LRTIs. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested by PCR for common respiratory viruses and by real time PCR for HBoV subtypes 1–4. Nasopharyngeal swabs from healthy controls and serum samples and stools from inpatients were also tested for HBoV1-4 by real time PCR. Viral loads were determined by quantitative real time PCR in all HBoV positive samples. HBoV1 was detected in 7.0% of inpatients, with annual rates of 5.1%, 8.0% and 4.8% in 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subtype A was the most frequent co-infection detected; HBoV1 and RSVA appeared to co-circulate with similar seasonal variations. High HBoV viral loads (>106 copies/ml) were significantly more frequent in inpatients and outpatients than in healthy controls. There was a direct correlation of high viral load with increasing disease severity in patients co-infected with HBoV1 and at least one other respiratory virus. In summary, our data suggest that HBoV1 can cause LRTIs, but symptomatic HBoV infection is only observed in the context of high viral load.

Wang, Chuanxian; Teng, Zheng; Wang, Chun; Shen, Jiaren; Gao, Ye; Zhu, Zhaokui; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

2013-01-01

376

Clinical relapses and disease activity on magnetic resonance imaging associated with viral upper respiratory tract infections in multiple sclerosis  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND—Although the risk of clinical attacks of multiple sclerosis seems to be significantly increased with viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), serological evidence for the reported association remains controversial. In addition, although MRI is six to 10 times more sensitive than clinical exacerbations in indexing disease activity, any possible association between URTI and MRI activity has yet to be investigated.?OBJECTIVES—To examine the relation between URTI and disease activity, in multiple sclerosis patients participating in a placebo controlled trial of interferon ?-1a, as indexed both by clinical exacerbation rate and by the number and volume of gadolinium - diethylenetriaminepenta acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancing lesions on MRI. "At risk" periods were defined around symptomatic URTI, with or without serological confirmation.?RESULTS—The relative risk of clinical relapse for serologically unconfirmed symptomatic URTI was 2.1 (p=0.004). Raised antiviral antibody titres conferred a relative risk of multiple sclerosis exacerbations that was 3.4 times higher than the "not at risk" periods (annual attack rates of 5.7 v 1.6, respectively, p=0.006). There was no definite relation between the number or the volume of active lesions on MRI and either symptomatic or serologically defined at risk periods.?CONCLUSIONS—These results confirm the previously reported association between viral infections and multiple sclerosis exacerbations and indicate that the relative risk may be even higher when viral infection is serologically confirmed. However, the results, perhaps because of the confounding effects of interferon ?-1a, do not provide convincing evidence of increased blood-brain barrier breakdown or inflammation during periods of virally induced immune stimulation.??

Edwards, S; Zvartau, M; Clarke, H; Irving, W; Blumhardt, L

1998-01-01

377

Foodborne norovirus outbreak: the role of an asymptomatic food handler  

PubMed Central

Background In July 2005 an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred on a residential summer camp in the province of Barcelona (northeast of Spain). Forty-four people were affected among residents and employees. All of them had in common a meal at lunch time on 13 July (paella, round of beef and fruit). The aim of this study was to investigate a foodborne norovirus outbreak that occurred in the residential summer camp and in which the implication of a food handler was demonstrated by laboratory tests. Methods A retrospective cohort study was designed. Personal or telephone interview was carried out to collect demographic, clinical and microbiological data of the exposed people, as well as food consumption in the suspected lunch. Food handlers of the mentioned summer camp were interviewed. Ten stool samples were requested from symptomatic exposed residents and the three food handlers that prepared the suspected food. Stools were tested for bacteries and noroviruses. Norovirus was detected using RT-PCR and sequence analysis. Attack rate, relative risks (RR) and its 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association between food consumption and disease. Results The global attack rate of the outbreak was 55%. The main symptoms were abdominal pain (90%), nausea (85%), vomiting (70%) and diarrhoea (42.5%). The disease remitted in 24-48 hours. Norovirus was detected in seven faecal samples, one of them was from an asymptomatic food handler who had not eaten the suspected food (round of beef), but cooked and served the lunch. Analysis of the two suspected foods isolated no pathogenic bacteria and detected no viruses. Molecular analysis showed that the viral strain was the same in ill patients and in the asymptomatic food handler (genotype GII.2 Melksham-like). Conclusions In outbreaks of foodborne disease, the search for viruses in affected patients and all food handlers, even in those that are asymptomatic, is essential. Health education of food handlers with respect to hand washing should be promoted.

2010-01-01

378

Surveillance of Viral Respiratory Diseases and Vaccine Evaluation in a Pediatric Population.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Field studies to determine the prevalent respiratory viruses in the pediatric population at Fort Ord were continued. Viral etiologic studies on all children admitted to the post hospital for an acute respiratory illness and a sample of children seen in th...

E. H. Lennette

1965-01-01

379

Application of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing To Discriminate Ralstonia solanacearum Strains Associated with English Watercourses and Disease Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was used for high-resolution discrimination among Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype IIB sequevar 1 (PIIB-1) isolates and further evaluated for use in source tracing. Five tandem-repeat-containing loci (comprising six tandem repeats) discriminated 17 different VNTR profiles among 75 isolates from potato, geranium, bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), tomato, and the environment. R. solanacearum isolates from crops at three unrelated outbreak sites where river water had been used for irrigation had distinct VNTR profiles that were shared with PIIB-1 isolates from infected bittersweet growing upriver of each site. The VNTR profiling results supported the implication that the source of R. solanacearum at each outbreak was contaminated river water. Analysis of 51 isolates from bittersweet growing in river water at different locations provided a means to evaluate the technique for studying the epidemiology of the pathogen in the environment. Ten different VNTR profiles were identified among bittersweet PIIB-1 isolates from the River Thames. Repeated findings of contiguous river stretches that produced isolates that shared single VNTR profiles supported the hypothesis that the pathogen had disseminated from infected bittersweet plants located upriver. VNTR profiles shared between bittersweet isolates from two widely separated Thames tributaries (River Ray and River Colne) suggested they were independently contaminated with the same clonal type. Some bittersweet isolates had VNTR profiles that were shared with potato isolates collected outside the United Kingdom. It was concluded that VNTR profiling could contribute to further understanding of R. solanacearum epidemiology and assist in control of future disease outbreaks.

Bryant, Ruth; Bew, Janice; Conyers, Christine; Stones, Robert; Alcock, Michael; Elphinstone, John

2013-01-01

380

Outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease/herpangina associated with coxsackievirus A6 and A10 infections in 2010, France: a large citywide, prospective observational study.  

PubMed

Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina (HA) are frequently caused by several distinct serotypes belonging to the human enterovirus A species (HEVA). Enterovirus 71 is considered as a significant public health threat because of rare but fatal neurological complications. A sentinel surveillance system involving paediatricians from Clermont-Ferrand (France) was set up to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of HFMD/HA associated with enterovirus infections. A standardized report form was used to collect demographic and clinical data. Throat or buccal specimens were obtained prospectively and tested for the presence of enteroviruses. The frequency of HEVA serotypes was determined by genotyping. Phylogenetic relationships were analysed to identify potential new virus variants. From 1 April to 31 December 2010, a total of 222 children were enrolled. The predominant clinical presentation was HA (63.8%) and this was frequently associated with clinical signs of HFMD (48%). An enterovirus infection was diagnosed in 143 (64.4%) patients and serotype identification was achieved in 141/143 (98.6%). The predominant serotypes were coxsackievirus A10 (39.9%) and A6 (28%), followed by coxsackievirus A16 (17.5%) and enterovirus 71 (6.3%). Fever was observed in 115 (80.4%) children. No patient had neurological complications. Coxsackievirus A10 and A6 strains involved in the outbreak were consistently genetically related with those detected earlier in Finland and constituted distinct European lineages. Although several enterovirus serotypes have been involved in HFMD/HA cases, the outbreak described in this population survey was caused by coxsackievirus A6 and coxsackievirus A10, the third dual outbreak in Europe in the last 3 years. PMID:22404077

Mirand, A; Henquell, C; Archimbaud, C; Ughetto, S; Antona, D; Bailly, J-L; Peigue-Lafeuille, H

2012-05-01

381

A review of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, shipping fever pneumonia and viral-bacterial synergism in respiratory disease of cattle.  

PubMed Central

Unanswered questions on the etiology and prevention of shipping fever pneumonia have allowed this disease to remain one of the most costly to the North American cattle industry. Research in this area has indirected that while Pasteurella haemolytica and, to a lesser extent, P. multocida are involved in most cases, they seem to require additional factors to help initiate the disease process. Bovine herpes virus 1 has been shown experimentally to be one such factor. This review examines in some detail the topics of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, shipping fever, and viral-bacterial interactions in the production of respiratory disease in various species. It deals with history, definitions, etiologies, clinical signs and lesions, and considers exposure levels, transmission and various pathogenetic mechanisms that are postulated or known to occur.

Yates, W D

1982-01-01

382

Analysis of 5? Nontranslated Region of Hepatitis A Viral RNA Genotype I from South Korea: Comparison with Disease Severities  

PubMed Central

The aim of the study was to analyze genotype I hepatitis A virus (HAV) 5? nontranslated region (NTR) sequences from a recent outbreak in South Korea and compare them with reported sequences from Japan. We collected a total of 54 acute hepatitis A patients' sera from HAV genotype I [27 severe disease (prothrombin time INR?1.50) and 27 mild hepatitis (prothrombin time INR <1.00)], performed nested RT-PCR of 5? NTR of HAV directly sequenced from PCR products (?300 bp), and compared them with each other. We could detect HAV 5?NTR sequences in 19 of the 54 (35.1%) cases [12 of 27 severe cases (44.4%) and 7 of 27 self-limited cases (25.9%)], all of which were subgenotype IA. Sequence analysis revealed that sequences of severe disease had 93.6%–99.0% homology and of self-limited disease 94.3%–98.6% homology, compared to subgenotype IA HAV GBM wild-type IA sequence. In this study, confirmation of the 5?NTR sequence differences between severe disease and mild disease was not carried out. Comparison with Japanese HAV A10 revealed 222C to G or T substitution in 8/12 cases of severe disease and 222C to G or T and 392G to A substitutions in 5/7 and 4/7 cases of mild disease, respectively, although the nucleotide sequences in this study showed high homology (93.6%–100%). In conclusion, HAV 5?NTR subgenotype IA from Korea had relatively high homology to Japanese sequences previously reported from Japan, and this region would be considered one of the antiviral targets. Further studies will be needed.

Imazeki, Fumio; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Yokosuka, Osamu

2010-01-01

383

Etiology and Viral Genotype in Patients with End-Stage Liver Diseases admitted to a Hepatology Unit in Colombia  

PubMed Central

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are the principal risk factor associated to end-stage liver diseases in the world. A study was carried out on end-stage liver disease cases admitted to an important hepatology unit in Medellin, the second largest city in Colombia. From 131 patients recruited in this prospective study, 71% of cases were diagnosed as cirrhosis, 12.2% as HCC, and 16.8% as cirrhosis and HCC. Regarding the risk factors of these patients, alcohol consumption was the most frequent (37.4%), followed by viral etiology (17.6%). Blood and/or hepatic tissue samples from patients with serological markers for HCV or HBV infection were characterized; on the basis of the phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5? UTR and HBV S gene, isolates belonged to HCV/1 and HBV/F3, respectively. These results confirm the presence of strains associated with poor clinical outcome, in patients with liver disease in Colombia; additionally, HBV basal core promoter double mutant was identified in HCC cases. Here we show the first study of cirrhosis and/or HCC in Colombian and HBV and HCV molecular characterization of these patients. Viral aetiology was not the main risk factor in this cohort but alcohol consumption.

Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan-Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Jaramillo, Sergio; Norder, Helene; Pujol, Flor Helene; Navas, Maria-Cristina

2011-01-01

384

HHV-8-encoded viral IL-6 collaborates with mouse IL-6 in the development of multicentric Castleman disease in mice  

PubMed Central

Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) or Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus is the etiologic agent of Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and plasma cell-type multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). HHV-8 encodes a viral homolog of human IL-6, called viral IL-6 (vIL-6), which does not require the cellular IL-6 receptor for binding to the ubiquitously expressed gp130 receptor subunit and subsequent JAK-STAT signaling. Thus, in contrast to IL-6, vIL-6 can stimulate virtually all cells in the body. To elucidate the mechanism by which vIL-6 drives human diseases, we generated transgenic mice that constitutively express vIL-6 under control of the MHC class I promoter. The mice were found to exhibit vIL-6 serum levels comparable with those observed in HHV-8–infected patients, to contain elevated amounts of phosphorylated STAT3 in spleen and lymph nodes, where vIL-6 was produced, and to spontaneously develop key features of human plasma cell-type MCD, including splenomegaly, multifocal lymphadenopathy, hypergammaglobulin-emia, and plasmacytosis. Transfer of the vIL-6 transgene onto an IL-6–deficient genetic background abrogated MCD-like phenotypes, indicating that endogenous mouse IL-6 is a crucial cofactor in the natural history of the disease. Our results in mice suggest that human IL-6 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HHV-8–associated MCD.

Suthaus, Jan; Stuhlmann-Laeisz, Christiane; Tompkins, Van S.; Rosean, Timothy R.; Klapper, Wolfram; Tosato, Giovanna; Janz, Siegfried

2012-01-01

385

New Concepts in the Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Control of Diseases Caused by the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus  

PubMed Central

The new information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of mucosal disease of cattle is reviewed. It is now known that clinical mucosal disease occurs only in cattle which were infected with a pestivirus in early gestation and were born with persistent viral infection and specific immunotolerance. These animals may be clinically normal at birth but may develop fatal mucosal disease, perhaps following superinfection with another pestivirus, usually between 6 and 24 months of age. They may also remain clinically normal indefinitely and breed successfully. The progeny from persistently infected females will similarly be persistently viremic, and maternal families of such animals may be established. Congenital defects may occur when infection of the fetus occurs in mid-gestation. Although fetuses may be infected in utero in late gestation, the infections do not persist, the fetuses develop antibodies, and they appear to suffer no ill-effects. Postnatal infection can result in subclinical disease (bovine viral diarrhea) with a normal immune response; the virus may also be responsible for enhanced susceptibility to other infections, diarrhea in newborn calves, and reproductive failure. Prevention of the economically important diseases caused by the virus is dependent upon the identification and elimination of persistently viremic animals, which are reservoirs of infection, and the vaccination of immunocompetent females at least three weeks before breeding. However, because of serotypic differences between strains, there is some doubt whether vaccination will reliably provide protection against the transplacental fetal infections that are important in the pathogenesis of this disease. There is no substantial evidence to warrant the vaccination of feedlot cattle.

Radostits, Otto M.; Littlejohns, Ian R.

1988-01-01

386

Mutations in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Newcastle Disease Virus Fusion Protein Confer Hyperfusogenic Phenotypes Modulating Viral Replication and Pathogenicity  

PubMed Central

The Newcastle disease virus (NDV) fusion protein (F) mediates fusion of viral and host cell membranes and is a major determinant of NDV pathogenicity. In the present study, we demonstrate the effects of functional properties of F cytoplasmic tail (CT) amino acids on virus replication and pathogenesis. Out of a series of C-terminal deletions in the CT, we were able to rescue mutant viruses lacking two or four residues (r?2 and r?4). We further rescued viral mutants with individual amino acid substitutions at each of these four terminal residues (rM553A, rK552A, rT551A, and rT550A). In addition, the NDV F CT has two conserved tyrosine residues (Y524 and Y527) and a dileucine motif (LL536-537). In other paramyxoviruses, these residues were shown to affect fusion activity and are central elements in basolateral targeting. The deletion of 2 and 4 CT amino acids and single tyrosine substitution resulted in hyperfusogenic phenotypes and increased viral replication and pathogenesis. We further found that in rY524A and rY527A viruses, disruption of the targeting signals did not reduce the expression on the apical or basolateral surface in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, whereas in double tyrosine mutant, it was reduced on both the apical and basolateral surfaces. Interestingly, in rL536A and rL537A mutants, the F protein expression was more on the apical